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Food

IRELAND 2015/16 Yearbook & Directory

In association with Food and Drink Industry Ireland

www.foodirelanddirectory.com

Well served.


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contents

2 8

2 The Big Interview

Simon Coveney TD, Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, explains how the ambitious targets set out in Food Wise 2025 are achievable, as well as discussing export growth, business costs in Ireland, grocery sector regulation and the importance of sustainability to the continued success of Ireland’s agri-food sector.

8 Prepared Consumer Foods

The Prepared Consumer Foods sector will shape the Irish food industry’s future, writes Shane Dempsey, Director of Prepared Consumer Foods, FDII.

10 Beef Sector

Ireland’s beef industry is in fine health and can look forward with confidence to the years ahead, but any future trade agreements providing for imports of nonEU beef could have a significant impact, explains Joe Ryan, Meat Industry Ireland.

12 Dairy

EU trade negotiations are vitally important to Irish dairy export growth, writes Cormac Healy, Director, Irish Dairy Industries Association.

14 Brewing

2014 saw a 4% rise in beer consumption, following a challenging decade, notes Jonathan McDade, Irish Brewers Association.

16 Training & Development

The Food and Drink Industry Ireland Skillnet provides tailored training and development across the food and drink sector, highlights Mark Skinner, Network Manager.

18 Crisis Management

Have you got a plan in place to manage a crisis or product recall in your business? Solicitor Maree Gallagher advises on the best way to prepare for the worst.

22 Branding

Professor Damien McLoughlin, Professor of Marketing, UCD Michael Smurfit Graduate Business School, explains five key things we have learned about brands this year.

24 Seafood

26 Food Safety News

Food allergen information for non prepacked foods; New guidance for use of food marketing terms; Food safety for caterers and retailers made easy.

28 FOOD Labelling

The EU is adopting a stricter new approach to food labelling and information law. Make sure your brand is compliant, warns food lawyer Raymond O’Rourke.

30 Legislation

Ita White, Food Industry Development, Teagasc, discusses the forthcoming update to the official feed and food control regulation.

33 Food Safety

Safefood is connecting food safety professionals through its Knowledge Networks.

34 Robotics

The LBR iiwa from KUKA Robotics heralds a new era of sensitive robots, making it possible to automate delicate and complex tasks.

36 Packaging Recycling

New EU packaging recycling targets may prove difficult for Ireland, particularly when it comes to plastics.

38 Packaging

Limerick Packaging has built up an enviable reputation for quality products and first class customer service.

41 Building Design

When it comes to food processing facilities, understanding risk assessment is a critical element of process flow and building design, writes architect Fergus Carey.

42 Barcoding

Barcode Manager is a new online tool from GS1 Ireland to help SMEs to generate and manage barcodes and product information.

There are a wealth of opportunities to grow the domestic seafood market, as BIM works closely with seafood retailers to develop their business. Food Ireland is published by: Tara Publishing Ltd 14 Upper Fitzwilliam Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 00 353 (0)1 678 5165 Fax: 00 353 (0)1 6477127 Email: kathleenbelton@tarapublications.ie Web: www.foodirelanddirectory.com

KUKA Food Mag advert.qxp_Layout 1 05/10/2015 17:06 Page 1

Food

IRELAND 2015/16 Yearbook & Directory

In association with Food and Drinks Industry Ireland

www.foodirelanddirectory.com

Well served.

44 Supply Chain

34

Innovation is key at Cold Move, market leaders in temperature controlled and ambient supply chain management within the food industry.

46 Material Handling

Toyota Material Handling offers a one stop shop for all your material handling needs, including the new Toyota Traigo series of electric forklifts.

48 Pest Control

Peter Trotman, Managing Director of Mitie’s pest control services, outlines the benefits of real-time, intelligent pest management.

50 Standards & Compliance

SAI Global provides information services and solutions for managing risk, achieving compliance and driving business improvement.

53 Intellectual Property

Solicitor Brendan Kelly advises on how you can nurture and protect your brand and your know-how.

54 Chemicals & Food Ingredients

NCC now distribute the Galactic range of natural solutions for application in the food, feed, cosmetic, personal & healthcare and industrial markets.

55 Instrumentation

Manotherm offer a range of instrumentation products at competitive prices.

56 Energy

Calor Gas provides cleaner, efficient energy solutions to the Irish food sector.

57 UCC

The vital role of UCC’s Food Industry Training Unit.

58 LISTINGS SECTION Product & Service Index 58 61 Company Listings Relevant Organisations 72 Year Planner 74 Three-year Diary 76 Managing Director: Patrick Aylward Editorial and Marketing Director: Kathleen Belton

Editor: John Walshe Advertising Sales: Brian Clark Design: Tony Hunt Production: Ciara Conway Printed by: WG Baird

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 1


the big interview

Simon

says...

Simon Coveney TD, Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, explains how the ambitious targets set out in Food Wise 2025 are achievable, as well as discussing export growth, business costs in Ireland, grocery sector regulation and the importance of sustainability to the continued success of Ireland’s agri-food sector.

S

imon Coveney TD has been Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine since March, 2011, with the Defence portfolio added to his brief in 2014. During his tenure, Minister Coveney has been at the coalface of Common Agriculture (CAP) and Common Fisheries (CFP) Policy reforms. Here he talks to Food Ireland about the bold targets set out in Food Wise 2025, the government’s blueprint for the future development of Ireland’s agri-food sector. In a wide-ranging interview, the Minster also discusses the issue of business costs in Ireland, access to finance for SMEs, grocery sector regulation and the area of sustainability and its vital place at the heart of Irish agri-food.

Food Wise 2025 sets out ambitious targets for Ireland’s agri-food sector over the coming decade, including the creation of 23,000 new jobs and almost doubling exports to €19 billion. How achievable are they? It’s true that Food Wise 2025 sets out ambitious growth projections for the sector, but I strongly believe that they are achievable. The growth of the middle class population in our key global markets will drive an increased demand for high quality, safe, sustainably 2 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16

produced and nutritious foods. Ireland’s agri-food sector is well placed to capitalise on those growth opportunities.

What will Ireland Inc. have to do to make this happen? Food Wise 2025 identifies a number of key focus areas that will allow the industry to capitalise on, deliver and maximise the growth opportunities which exist in particular: • Sustainability: environmental protection and economic competitiveness are equal and complementary: one will not be achieved at the expense of the other. • Human capital: attracting, retaining and developing the best people with the right skills at every stage of the supply chain. • Market development: utilising a deep understanding of consumer requirements and preferences in key markets to drive product development and specific targeting of market opportunities. • Competitiveness: productivity and value-added improvements which are driven by innovation and the adoption of the latest technologies. Food Wise 2025 recommends in excess of 350 actions, both crosscutting and sub-sectoral, to support the development of the sector up to 2025.


the big interview I would be in favour of any trade agreement with China that not only maintains our uniquely strong relationship but allows for easier access of Irish goods to the Chinese market, particularly as China is now our third biggest individual country market, with agri-food exports last year approaching €650m.

How does the Government plan to support this? Food Wise 2025 is a critical part of the Government’s recovery plan for Ireland. The Government is rebuilding an economy that is enterprise focused and that can support sustainable full employment by 2018. The Government is focused on creating a business and regulatory environment which will allow the agri food sector realise the growth opportunities and achieve the Food Wise growth projections.

How can Ireland really make the best of emerging global opportunities across the food sector? Food Wise has a clear focus on market development, including recommendations that relevant Government agencies collaborate more closely to develop the image and reputation of Ireland in emerging markets. Food Wise also recommends further enhancing Ireland’s strong credentials for food safety, animal health and sustainable production (for example Origin Green) to underline the excellence of our food and drinks offering. It envisages State agencies supporting market prioritisation and targeting through a strong focus on consumer insights.

Do we, to some extent, have our hands tied in terms of being dependent on the EU negotiating trade agreements with other countries and regions, with the result that Ireland’s best interests are not always top of the agenda? While the EU Commission does negotiate on behalf of Ireland and all Member States, all countries involved are given equal opportunity to have their voice heard and ultimately be part of all the stages during any Free Trade Agreement (FTA). It should also be noted that agriculture is always a cornerstone of any such negotiations, and given the vital importance of the agri-food sector to the Irish economy, we are able to play an influential role as the negotiations unfold. International trade agreements with new and emerging markets are crucial to the future success of Ireland’s agri-food market, if future export growth is to match predictions.

As Minister for Agriculture and Food, what can you do to ensure Ireland’s interests are served by these agreements? I and my Department officials are very proactive in ensuring Ireland’s voice and interests are brought to the forefront of

any international negotiations. We use every available mechanism in order to ensure that Ireland’s offensive and defensive interests are included in any negotiations. These interests are regularly communicated at the various meetings in Brussels that I or my Department officials attend. Prior to and during any such negotiations, I have regular meetings with all Irish stakeholders involved in order to facilitate all concerns. I am also in regular contact with my counterparts in other Member States and third countries to ensure Ireland’s interests are always to the fore.

It has been argued that the Chinese market is potentially the most important emerging market for Irish agri-food exports. Many commentators feel the EU needs to negotiate a trade agreement with China if we are not to fall behind other food producers, particularly dairy producers. Where do you stand on this? It goes without saying that China is of crucial importance to Ireland’s agriculture, fishing and food industry both as an export destination, particularly for our world-famous food and drinks industry, but also in terms of the synergies and partnerships which have developed between Irish and Asian businesses over recent years, to the benefit of everyone involved. I would be in favour of any trade agreement with China that not only maintains our uniquely strong relationship but allows for easier access of Irish goods to the Chinese market, particularly as China is now our third biggest individual country market, with agrifood exports last year approaching €650m. It is our second biggest market for dairy and for pigmeat, with significant growth also in seafood exports. Later this year, I intend to undertake a major trade mission to China which will afford the companies involved a unique opportunity to meet with and develop new business contacts, and more importantly, to identify and deliver new business opportunities.

Another area recognised in Food Wise 2025 is Prepared Consumer Foods, which is expected to deliver 7,500 jobs up to 2025. Why is this sector so important and how can we ensure its development? Food Wise 2025 identifies significant potential growth the prepared consumer foods (PCF) sector. While the PCF sector is emerging from a difficult period due to reduced consumer demand during the recent economic downturn, the recovery of the domestic FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 3


the big interview and international economy is creating opportunities for growth: exports estimated at over €2.1 billion have grown by 18% since 2009. There are opportunities for this sector to expand its customer base over the next 10 years through accessing new markets and continued innovative product development.

The dairy industry, in particular, is experiencing a global downturn at the minute. What can be done to address this? A number of factors, including the Russian ban, reduced demand and increased stocks and production in China have resulted in significant downward pressure on dairy prices. This is putting significant pressure on farmers in Ireland and across the EU. This is a global issue, an EU issue, as well as an Irish issue. From an Irish perspective, it is not possible to address this in isolation. At the very minimum, an EU policy response is required. There are market support tools, such as Aids to Private Storage (APS) and Intervention available at EU level to mitigate the worst impacts of volatility. While these can’t solve every problem, they can help to put a floor under prices. There is continuous engagement with our EU counterparts and the Commission to ensure that these tools are deployed to optimal effect. In this regard, Ireland warmly welcomes the announcement by the EU Commission that it is providing a €500m aid package for European farmers. Substantial EU budget funds will be used to provide a 70% rate of advance payment payable under the direct payment schemes, the introduction of APS for cheese, with better conditions for APS for other products and the introduction of additional promotional measures. The Commission have also agreed to allow advance 85% for rural development schemes before completion of controls. This will be of major benefit in easing the cash flow of farmers. The important issue now is to clarify as soon as possible how broader funds are going to be disbursed to Member States. Ireland is determined to ensure that these funds are used for measures that provide targeted and fair support for Irish farmers. The Commission has recently announced that that it will re-engage in discussions with the Russian authorities concerning the restrictions imposed on certain products. I have made continuous strong and unambiguous calls on the Commission to consider examination of the intervention price, indicating that there can be no doubt that softening of global dairy markets has had an impact on dairy farmers in Ireland and throughout the EU and the possibility remains for this to continue. It has been made clear that the full range of measures available should be under consideration in terms of any possible response. Ireland have also called on the Commission, along with a number of other Member States, to extend the timeframe for intervention beyond the September 30, 2015 deadline and this was agreed to. Price volatility will continue to be a feature of international markets. I will continue to work with industry, with other Member States and with the EU Institutions to consider how we can refine and improve mechanisms to help farmers to cope with downward price cycles when they arise (market support tools, flexible approach from banks, longer term fixed price contracts from co-ops, futures markets, etc).

In general terms, what more can be done to promote the agri-food sector as a career destination for talented individuals? Food Wise 2025 identifies that investment and development of people will drive growth in the sector. The report identifies a number of skills gaps, including lack of advanced financial and business development capabilities, foreign language skills, capacity 4 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16

to absorb new technologies and processes both at producer and processing levels. Investing in people and attracting, retaining and developing the best people is the best way for the sector to succeed and grow. Food Wise 2025 endorses this approach and the delivery on its actions recommended in this area will be a key driver and measure of the success of the sector over the next 10 years to 2025.

What can the Government do to ensure that long term financing facilities are available and that our indigenous entrepreneurs remain solvent and able to grow, so that the ambitious investment targets are realised? Financing Growth for SMEs is a key aspect of the Action Plan for Jobs 2015. It is the Government’s vision that all viable businesses operating in Ireland should have the opportunity to access sufficient finance to meet their enterprise needs in a manner that supports growth and employment in the economy. Last year, my colleague the Minister for Finance launched an SME online-tool, a website which makes it easier for small businesses to find information on over 80 Government business supports from over 30 different Government Departments, Agencies and Initiatives, totalling over €2 billion, potentially available for Irish small and medium enterprises (SMEs). On answering eight simple questions, it returns a list of all available Government business supports, with further information on each support and contact details for follow-up. You can access the Supporting SMEs online tool at https://www.localenterprise.ie/smeonlinetool. In February this year, the Government launched the Strategic Banking Corporation of Ireland (SBCI) as a means of ensuring that SMEs in Ireland are provided with sufficient finance for growth. Lending commenced on March 9, 2015, channelling money from KfW, the European Investment Bank and the Ireland Strategic Investment Fund to the first on-lenders of the loan products, AIB and Bank of Ireland. The loans have been taken up by Irish SMEs for a variety of purposes and across a range of sectors in the economy. Their products include ‘Agriculture Investment Loans’, available for investment by agricultural SMEs involved in primary agricultural production, the processing of agricultural products or the marketing of agricultural products. The features of these products compared with products currently on the market are lower interest rates, loan amounts up to €5m and increased repayment flexibility. To the end of June 2015, over €44m worth of loans have been approved and drawn down by SMEs and close to a third of loans were to the agriculture sector. The SBCI is seeking to support flexible loans and will develop and adapt its offerings over time to achieve this. SBCI products will also be adapted to address specific access to finance issues experienced by SMEs. The SBCI is complementary to other Government SME programmes such as the Credit Review Office, Microfinance Ireland, the Credit Guarantee Scheme, Enterprise Ireland schemes and the ISIF. New Initiatives in the SBCI pipeline will deliver new products, new market participants and support the growth of existing nonbank credit providers, all driving competition in the market. Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Simon Coveney TD.


the big interview

Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Simon Coveney TD, pictured with MEP Mairead McGuinness.

An on-going challenge for the overall agri-food industry is the maintenance of a viable production base. Profitability at farm level is not solely determined by market prices. Farmers need a high level of efficiency to be able to withstand periods of price fluctuation, especially when competing in a global market. What can be done to achieve this? In order for farmers to compete in a global market, they face many challenges including periods of price fluctuation, an ever increasing demand for food, increasing constraints on natural resources and emerging challenges of climate change. Food Wise 2025 includes specific recommendations aimed at improving competitiveness at farm level through a focus on sustainable productivity improvements, and at managing the impact of price and income volatility, as well as contributing to land mobility and farm restructuring.

Climate change too is a big concern. Is there a danger that the agri-food sector could become burdened with unfair emission targets? The EU has indicated to the UNFCCC that it will seek a 40% reduction in GHG across the EU compared with 1990 levels. While there are no sector specific targets, all sectors are going to have to contribute, including the agriculture sector. However, the specific issues that arise in the agriculture and land sector and their lower mitigation potential must be taken into account. This is something that Ireland has been very vocal on and we have had significant success in having this recognised at EU level. On the ground, we are taking a whole of government approach to the 2030 climate change negotiations. All of the key Departments work together to negotiate with the European Commission so as to ensure coherence between EU climate and food policies. In particular, we are very focused on seeking realistic targets for greenhouse gas reduction to 2030, and that there is not an unfair share of the burden placed on any one sector.

Here in Ireland, there is a perceived imbalance of power between larger retailers and suppliers, resulting from the former’s buying power. Will the imminent introduction of grocery sector regulations address this and protect Irish food and drink producers? The introduction of grocery sector regulations will provide specific protections for Irish food and drink producers from certain unfair practices.

How important is the Competition and Consumer Protection Act 2014 in regulating practices in the grocery sector between suppliers, retailers and consumers? The Competition and Consumer Protection Act, 2014 provides a step change in regulating practices in the grocery sector in a way that reduces the risk of surprises for suppliers, which could have serious adverse consequences, and gives consumers better prospects of a sustainable supply chain, which can provide the variety of products that they seek.

The argument from suppliers, particularly smaller suppliers, is that large multinational retailers can alter contracts unilaterally, can demand ‘hello money’ for stocking goods or that they can demand that suppliers bear the cost of promotions. Is enough being done to combat these practices? Have they been removed from the Irish market? The Competition and Consumer Protection Act, 2014 includes strong enabling provisions for regulations in this area. My colleague Minister Bruton, the Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Employment has undertaken a wide public consultation on draft implementing regulations and in my view, they will strengthen the food supply chain.

Does the newly established Competition and Consumer Protection Commission have enough power to investigate and punish breaches of the regulations? I think so. The provisions for enforcement in the draft regulations, on which there has been public consultation, go beyond the UK FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 5


the big interview

You are only as good as your next satisfied customer. So we need to be absolutely up to date on international markets and consumer trends and opportunities: that means being ahead of the curve on consumer insight… There are tasks in identifying ways of accessing finance for investment to improve competitiveness and access world class manufacturing technology.

system, which is well regarded. Nevertheless, an approach at EU level would be welcome and I think the European Commission is coming to that realisation.

Ireland has developed a great reputation internationally for quality, safe and sustainable food and Bord Bia’s Origin Green initiative should help to develop this. How important is this reputation to Ireland’s future growth as an agri-food exporter? Ireland’s reputation for quality, safe and sustainable food is integral to our reputation and plans for sustainable growth as set out in Food Wise 2025. Ireland’s agri-food industry is on a sustainable journey, one that is connecting local communities across the island to vast and diverse food markets around the globe. Food Wise 2025 sets out a vision for the industry to continue along this path of sustainable growth and recognises the strategic importance of specific market and consumer insights if emerging global opportunities are to be fully realised in the decade ahead. Origin Green is unique as an initiative launched at national level, which is based on evidence and independent accreditation. Standards of sustainable production at farm level are evidenced through inspections at 18-month intervals under the Bord Bia Quality Assurance Schemes. Carbon measurements at farm level have been pioneered in the Beef QA scheme and are being incorporated in Bord Bia QA schemes for other products. At food company level, by the end of this year, companies accounting for 85% of food and drink exports, both large and small, will have had their Origin Green plans and targets independently assessed. Many more have submitted expressions of interest and have commenced their journey. When I say food companies, I am including seafood and drinks companies. In addition, the new 2014-2020 Rural Development Programme contains a central focus on environmental and sustainability challenges across its schemes and supports. This continued investment in environmental sustainability in the agri-food sector has and will continue to complement initiatives such as Origin Green in enhancing Ireland’s green reputation as a producer of high quality produce.

seafood, whiskey and craft beer stories. However, you are only as good as your next satisfied customer. So we need to be absolutely up to date on international markets and consumer trends and opportunities, that means being ahead of the curve on consumer insight. The industry and development agencies – Bord Bia, Enterprise Ireland, Teagasc, Bord Iascaigh Mhara – need to maintain commitment to innovation and new product development. There are tasks in identifying ways of accessing finance for investment to improve competitiveness and access world class manufacturing technology. In parallel, it is necessary to strengthen investment in people and skills, from marketing right through to production. All this is just part of developing, at a time of volatility, a world class Irish food and drink eco-system - ‘ Local Roots, Global Reach’ as it is put so well in Food Wise 2025. Agri-food exports to non-EU markets grew to a record €3.1 billion in 2014, an increase of 15% over 2013, with particularly strong growth in exports to Asia (+36%) and the Gulf States (+39%). NonEU markets accounted for 28% of total Irish agri-food exports last year, with significant potential for further growth. Since my appointment as Minister, I have led several successful trade missions to facilitate trade promotion and market access to markets outside the EU, including to the United States, China, the Gulf States and Algeria. These visits provided the numerous Irish companies who accompanied me with an opportunity to increase their profile in new markets and build upon existing trade relationships. My visits to China and the US were also instrumental in helping to re-open these valuable markets to Irish beef. To date this year, I have: • led a successful trade mission to the US (Washington, New York and Boston), in February to launch beef access to this very valuable market; • led a successful dairy and beef promotion visit to the US (Chicago) in September; •

welcomed Chinese Premier Li Keqiang and Agriculture Minister Han Changfu on a farm visit in Mayo, which proved an invaluable opportunity to demonstrate the best of Irish farming to the Chinese Government and the Chinese media;

What more can be done to enhance Ireland’s international agri-food reputation?

• hosted meetings with Ministers and high level delegations from several non-EU countries.

Food Wise 2025 sets out an ambitious roadmap on how we can deepen and extend the efforts made to date. It is hugely encouraging to see the progress made in opening up access to markets, the continued commitment of producers to driving quality, safety and sustainability and the immensely positive response of our international trading partners to Origin Green and the Irish food,

I am presently finalising plans to lead trade missions to Asia, including China, in the last quarter of 2015. I will also lead a trade mission to West Africa. This mission will offer Irish food companies an opportunity to showcase their produce to a large and emerging market outside of our more traditional destinations and further enhance the growing reputation of Irish agri-food exports.

6 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16


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prepared consumer foods

Prepared for success

A key component in the Government’s Food Wise 2025 strategy, the Prepared Consumer Foods sector will shape the Irish food industry’s future, writes Shane Dempsey, Director of Prepared Consumer Foods, FDII.

T

he launch of the Government’s Food Wise 2025 strategy was the culmination of months of consultation between industry, State Agencies and farming groups. It also marked the official recognition of the Prepared Consumer Foods sector and its importance to the overall ambition and future of the Irish agri-food industry. The PCF sector, with the right policies, is expected to deliver 7,500 jobs up to 2025. This is about a third of the jobs anticipated in Food Wise 2025 across the entire agri-food industry. For those in the sector, this isn’t a surprise, as it currently supports around 20,600 jobs or over 50% of direct employment in agri-food. In 2014, the Minister for Agriculture brought together the PCF Strategy Group involving 15 prominent PCF company CEOs and FDII. Their report, ‘PCF: A 10 Year Strategy’ for the first time officially defined PCF companies and the category and measured its economic importance. This definition has established a baseline to measure the success of the sector and the effectiveness of Government policies on its growth over the next decade. This definition and report were incorporated into Food Wise 2025 and now provide a roadmap for the sector over the next decade.

Broad Geographical Spread This means the sector’s success is critical to the overall success and evolution of the Irish food industry. The unique characteristics of the sector mean it is deeply embedded in the Irish social and economic fabric. For example, the sector has over 500 manufacturing units, operating in communities dispersed across the island. In addition, it’s estimated that there are 8 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16

700 or so artisan and micro producers operating around the country. When PCF does well, rural communities do well. However, due to the sector’s dual focus on all important export markets and the domestic market, when PCF does well, so does the wider economy and Ireland’s balance of trade. Of the €4 billion output in the sector; €2.1 billion (53%) is exported to dozens of countries. However, €1.9 billion is sold on the home market in shops and supermarkets across the country. In PCF’s focus on the consumer, both domestic and international, lies the greatest opportunity for the Irish food industry. Food Wise 2025 foresees an increase in the value of agri-food exports by 85% to €19 billion in the next decade. The PCF sector can provide about €4 billion of these exports, it’s believed. To achieve this, PCF companies must develop strong innovative brands that resonate with consumers across the globe; particularly in the UK and EU but increasingly in the emerging middle class in the Far East. This is the only sustainable way that Ireland can drive long-term value growth in Irish exports.

Key Challenges The PCF strategy sets out the policies that can enable the sector to reach its growth potential. The key challenge for PCF sectors, like all those in the agri-food industry, is securing appropriate finance to enable growth. FDII has worked closely with the Department and the Irish Strategic Infrastructure Fund to put in place a funding mechanism where food companies can access finance; indeed, this was a recommendation


prepared consumer foods

€1.9 billion of Prepared Consumer Foods are sold on the home market in shops and supermarkets across the country.

in Food Wise 2025. I hope to be writing here next year about a number of large scale PCF projects that have secured significant funding and will be leading the charge for the sector. Due to the importance of the domestic sector to the emerging PCF companies with ambitions to export, FDII has strongly recommended that the Government introduce cost competitiveness improvement measures, such as a reduction in energy prices. Irish energy costs are too high and food production in general is energy intensive. Addressing this could give domestic PCF companies an edge in the highly competitive domestic grocery sector and export markets.

The Supplier/Retailer Relationship Other measures required in the domestic grocery sector focus on relations between retailers and suppliers and others in the supply chain. The imminent introduction of grocery sector regulations is a critical step in ensuring food producers and suppliers have a sustainable future. This levelling of the field should only be the first step in a more collaborative relationship with retailers where ‘supporting’ Irish food means innovating together to meet consumer demands, providing fair access to domestic and international shelves and addressing shared issues such as food safety, health and youth unemployment together. Finally, the PCF sector will in the coming months begin to promote itself as a career destination to talented individuals. There are many exciting and dynamic companies out there, producing highly innovative meaningful products that can utilise and support the highest level of talent available. Bord Bia, the Department of Agriculture, Food & the Marine, Enterprise Ireland and indeed these dynamic companies have done huge work in attracting talent but more can be done. About the Author If your organisation is interested in becoming involved in the work of the Prepared Consumer Foods Council in FDII, please contact me at any stage. Shane Dempsey Director of Prepared Consumer Foods, FDII. Telephone: (01) 6051599 Email: shane.dempsey@ibec.ie Web: www.fdii.ie

Due to Prepared Consumer Foods’ dual focus on all important export markets and the domestic market, when PCF does well, so does the wider economy and Ireland’s balance of trade. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 9


beef sector

B eefing up the meat market Ireland’s beef industry is in fine health and can look forward with confidence to the years ahead, but any future trade agreements providing for imports of non-EU beef could have a significant impact on Ireland, writes Joe Ryan, Meat Industry Ireland.

T

he beef sector in Ireland remains one of the most important and valuable industries in the national economy. With an output value of some €2.5 billion, with exports accounting for €2.1 billion, it supports 70,000 beef farmers and employs 10,000 jobs across processing, distribution and transport. The sector makes an invaluable contribution to the rural economy, where it provides much needed employment in parts of the country that seldom benefit from foreign direct investment. In the past five years, the beef sector has increased the value of exports by 40% and the potential again exists to further scale up output and to generate new revenues and jobs in the sector through added-value processing and higher export performance. This positive outlook for the Irish beef industry arises from increasing market access, coupled with the rising global population, which will help to drive an increased demand for all meat proteins, including beef. Coupled with existing EU channels, new international markets will provide good opportunity for marketing an increased output, resulting from the post-quota expansion in dairy cow numbers. Despite falling EU beef consumption in recent years as economic difficulties impacted on consumer spending, Irish beef has

10 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16

performed very well over this period and increased returns have been delivered to producers, with cattle prices having increased by 40% from 2009 to 2015.

Changing Market Dynamics The market for Irish beef has changed considerably over the past 15 years, moving from a frozen commodity market into a premium fresh food business to blue-chip retail companies. Livestock production needs to evolve to meet the needs of these new customers/markets and to be continuously aware of market requirements. It is essential that producers are focused on the requirements of the end customer. The industry, however, faces multiple challenges. Over the last number of years, there has been intense competition between UK retailers with marketing campaigns being built on ‘Red Tractor’ assured British beef. Indeed most UK retailers only stock British beef. This displaces Irish beef, as well as reducing the amount of Irish prime beef cuts accessing the UK retail sector.

Future Trade Agreements While the outlook for beef is positive, any future trade agreements providing for imports of non-EU beef could have a significant


beef sector

In the past five years, the beef sector has increased the value of exports by 40% and the potential again exists to further scale up output and to generate new revenues and jobs in the sector.

impact on Ireland, which has a 90% export dependency. It is important that agriculture does not become the bargaining chip for trade access for other sectors. Any access provided must be fair and balanced on the overall range of cuts, so that it is not biased in favour of high value cuts. An on-going challenge for the overall industry is the maintenance of a viable production base. Profitability at farm level is not solely determined by market prices. Farmers need a high level of efficiency to be able to withstand periods of price fluctuation, especially when competing in a global market.

The Challenge of Climate Change Climate change also poses a serious challenge. It is essential that policy makers at EU level do not unduly burden the agriculture sector with unfair emission reduction targets and an unworkable regulatory and policy regime. Agriculture must be seen as part of the solution and the issue of food security within Europe must be recognised when addressing the subject of climate change. In Ireland, we must capitalise on this area and ensure efficient production of lighter, younger animals to maximise the output of beef produced per hectare, while keeping emissions to a minimum. Ultimately, economic and environmental sustainability are interlinked. Surmounting challenges is the key to creating opportunities that exist in new markets. It is essential for success that there be full open access to the US and Chinese markets. These markets, when developed to their full potential in terms of access, volume and diversifying the market base for Irish beef, will create significant opportunities for the Irish beef industry and capitalise on its international reputation.

The increased output from the dairy herd and potential efficiency gains in the suckler herd provides another opportunity to produce and ultimately market an increased volume of beef. While the expected growth in the dairy herd provides opportunities for the beef industry, it is important to maximise the beef characteristics of the dairy off-spring by adopting innovative technologies, including genetics, use of breeding indices and sexed semen.

The Sustainability Issue The issue of sustainability has been high on the agenda of the Irish beef sector for some time. Customers are looking for a high quality, safe and fully traceable product, which is produced in an environmentally friendly manner, and Ireland’s track record is excellent in this area. Ireland performs very well globally, in terms of emissions per kilo of beef produced, albeit we have scope to improve this further. One of Ireland’s biggest strengths is the fact that the carbon footprint of beef farms is being measured independently - the only country globally to do so. Ireland has a modern processing sector which has undergone considerable investment to ensure we continue to meet the highest of standards globally. Significant investment has been made by processors in putting sales and marketing resources into key markets for Irish beef. This level of investment has not only contributed to efficiency but has enabled the sector to grow capacity in order to capitalise on future market opportunities. While there will always be challenges to face, there are significant opportunities coming our way to develop the industry further. Our strong reputation, green credentials and supply chain capability mean the sector can look forward ambitiously to the years ahead. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 11


dairy

The Dairy Best

EU trade negotiations are vitally important to Irish dairy export growth, writes Cormac Healy, Director, Irish Dairy Industries Association (IDIA).

T

he current downturn in dairy markets is a timely reminder of the critical importance of market access. While the fall in global dairy commodity prices and producer milk price is partly related to a period of strong supply from the world’s major milk producing regions, it is particularly attributable to downward pressure on the demand side. Weaker demand and reduced purchasing by Chinese importers has been a significant factor, but so too has the closure of the Russian market to dairy and other food imports. Russia accounted for approximately 30% of total exports of cheese and butter from the EU and was an important trading partner for many other dairy products. In August 2014, when the Russian embargo was introduced with little warning, EU exporters were left scrambling to secure alternative market outlets internationally. Maximising market access options is important now and for the future.

hance its contribution to Irish economic recovery. Irish dairy exports exceeded €3 billion in 2014 and the sector’s growth targets will see exports grow to over €4.5 billion by 2020. The industry is working to deliver sustainable export growth across a diverse and innovative range of dairy products, powders and high value ingredients destined for an increasing spread of market destinations and segments across the UK, Europe and internationally. Over 40% of Irish dairy exports in 2014 went to international markets

Developing New Export Markets

Developing new export outlets is at the core of our dairy sector growth plans. Traditional European markets will remain important but maximising international market access and improving trading terms will be critical to building new business. Irish dairy ingredients and products have an excellent quality and safety reputaLong Term Prospects Looking Good tion and strong sustainability credentials and these attributes will While the current market downturn looks remain critical to our success. However, the like being more protracted and possibly European Union’s ability to negotiate new deeper than first anticipated, the longer bilateral trade deals or free trade agreeterm market dynamics and global demand ments (FTAs) with international partners is growth remain positive. also important. In the wider scheme of things, the Irish Trade deals that the EU is currently negotiating, such as the FTA with Japan or the dairy sector is entering an exciting growth Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partphase, having been restricted by the EU milk nership (TTIP) with the USA, are important quota regime for three decades. Significant from two perspectives. Firstly, they have a investments have already been made at direct impact on significantly improving farm, processing and market development level to ensure that this expansion will be Irish dairy exports exceeded €3 billion in 2014 both tariff and non-tariff access condidelivered and will see the dairy sector, along and the sector’s growth targets will see exports tions for Irish dairy ingredient and product exports to these markets. Secondly, our with the wider food industry, further engrow to over €4.5 billion by 2020.

12 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16


dairy

The noticeable absentee in the list of countries with which the EU is currently negotiating a trade agreement is, of course, China. This needs to be addressed if we are to keep pace with our competitors

The EU dairy sector will not keep pace with competitive economies in countries like Australia and New Zealand if it fails to negotiate a trade agreement with the Chinese market.

global competitors in dairy are entering into important new preferential trade agreements with key partners that are improving their competitiveness in international markets. We cannot fall behind. New Zealand has a free trade agreement in place with China since 2008 which is progressively delivering beneficial trade terms for their dairy exports. In November last year, Australia concluded a similar trade agreement with China that will see the removal of all import tariffs on dairy products over the next 4-11 years. Even more significantly, the USA together with 11 other trading partners (including Japan, NZ, Singapore, Vietnam, Canada, Mexico and Australia) is about to conclude the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal that will see preferential trading terms between these economies that account for 40% of global GDP.

from the signing of the agreement. We await progress on current negotiations with Japan and the US. The noticeable absentee in the list of countries with which the EU is currently negotiating a trade agreement is, of course, China. This needs to be addressed if we are to keep pace with our competitors. From an Irish dairy industry perspective, we have a predominantly offensive interest in on-going EU trade negotiations. We acknowledge that such trade agreements have to be carefully crafted to ensure that other agri-food sectors, in particular the meat sector, achieves a balanced outcome. However, for Irish dairy, EU trade negotiations must deliver lower import tariffs or improved preferential import quota access, as well as ensuring that technical (non-tariff ) trade barriers are tackled. Better market access conditions are always relevant to an export-focused sector and all the more important, given the Irish dairy industry’s growth plans over the coming years. We need to ensure that we are in the best position to capitalise on growing global demand for dairy products.

European Commission Trade Agenda The European Commission’s trade agenda needs to deliver for the agri-food sector. The recently concluded EU-Canada bilateral trade agreement is somewhat disappointing, given the limited new access it has achieved for EU dairy exports. Progress has been made by the EU in concluding a trade agreement with Singapore and in August 2015, the Commission has announced agreement in principle on a trade deal with Vietnam, which should see duty free exports for EU dairy products within a maximum of five years FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 13


brewing

The Beer Necessities

2014 saw a 4% rise in beer consumption, following a challenging decade, writes Jonathan McDade, Irish Brewers Association.

F

or centuries, the brewing sector has been one of the leading lights in Ireland’s economy. From Arthur Guinness’ brew house at St. James Gate in 1759 to the fledgling microbreweries that have recently surfaced throughout the country, the sector offers a rich heritage, matched by an entrepreneurial spirit that Ireland can be proud of. Today, these businesses, both iconic and emerging, have fostered job growth and enabled investment into other industries from grain to glass. Beer has had a challenging decade, with declining consumption levels, falling production and increased competition from other alcoholic beverages, most notably wine. However, that decline ended in 2014, with a 4% rise in beer consumption according to receipts data from Revenue. Although the increase has come from a very low base, it is a welcome indicator of recovery for the sector. The industry expected the decline in consumption to eventually bottom out and the recent increase can be attributed to the Ireland’s booming hospitality and tourism sector.

Ireland’s Favourite Alcoholic Beverage Beer remains Ireland’s favourite alcoholic beverage, consistently enjoying 47% of market share over the past five years. According to the Irish Brewers Association’s recent Beer Market report, almost two thirds of beer consumed in Ireland is on-trade and there has been an increase in the consumption of stout and ale. Despite the recent increase in consumption and stabilised market share, domestic beer production continues to fall. This can be attributed to an increasing number of imported beers entering the Irish market and a slow-down in some external markets. Today, Irish consumers have unprecedented choice when it comes to beer, both in the off and on trade. The craft beer renaissance is continuing apace, with over 50 microbreweries in operation in Ireland by the end of 2014, with many more due to commence brewing this year. This upsurge in the craft beer market and product development 14 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16

by the major brewers has led to a growth in employment in the sector for the second consecutive year. In 2014, over 2,000 people are now directly employed in Ireland’s commercial brewing sector, up from 1,500 in 2012.

Changing Consumption Patterns The more diverse choice of beer for the Irish consumer is in line with the changing consumption patterns in other markets. Ireland’s microbreweries are capitalising on this international trend by exporting to other markets. In 2014, over 40% of Ireland’s craft beer producers brewed to export. When this is coupled with the continued export success of Ireland’s established beer brands, the total accounts for €228m worth of export value in 2014. Indeed, beer makes up 19% of Ireland’s total beverage exports. While the brewing sector has a responsibility to educate consumers and promote moderate consumption, it should remain proud of its heritage and contribution to society. In 2014, the exchequer receipts for beer alone were €425m.

Supporting Irish Jobs The total alcohol industry supports almost 92,000 jobs in sectors including agriculture, marketing, hospitality and transport. For tourists, the Guinness Storehouse remains the most popular attraction in Dublin, with record numbers visiting in the first six months of the year. The 2013 Fáilte Ireland visitors’ attitudes survey found that the Irish pub was the most desired experience for tourists before visiting the country. While the recovery of the brewing sector is still in its infancy, the potential for the industry to prosper and develop is large. Growth in exports of Ireland’s beers and stouts, excise reductions and sensible guidelines on advertising are the seeds that will enable the industry to grow, thus maintaining Ireland’s proud heritage of brewing world class beer.


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training & development

Pictured at the launch of the FDII Skillnet are Mark Skinner, FDII Skillnet Network Manager; Alan Nuzum, CEO Skillnet; Simon Coveney TD., Minister of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Colin Gordon, CEO, Glanbia Consumer Foods, and Chairperson for Food and Drink Industry Ireland.

Supporting Staff Development The Food and Drink Industry Ireland Skillnet provides tailored training and development across the food and drink sector, writes Mark Skinner, Network Manager.

A

s we work to achieve the ambitious targets set up by Food Wise 2025, having the appropriate skills base is a vital component to ensure the success of businesses individually and the sector as whole. In recognition of this, Food and Drink Industry Ireland set up the FDII Skillnet to provide industry relevant and government subsidised training to the sector. The network was launched in September 2013 by Minister for Agriculture, Food & the Marine, Simon Coveney, TD where at the launch he commented: “The launch of the FDII Skillnet marks another step towards reaching the targets in the industry-led Food Harvest 2020 report which highlighted skills, training and education as critical factors in ensuring growth and competitiveness in the food and drink industry. The FDII Skillnet offers companies an excellent, accessible and practical opportunity to address skills gaps. The FDII Skillnet will facilitate companies in achieving a step change on the skills front and securing future employment of a highly skilled food and drink workforce.”

Benefits of Membership To date, over 80 companies have become members of the FDII Skillnet. Each sector of the industry is represented, with companies from the meat, dairy, consumer foods and beverages sector being supported by the network. Membership of the network is free and benefits include: • Industry specific training that’s relevant to your business; • Up to 60% saving on the cost of training due to network purchasing power plus part-government funding; • Flexible training that is delivered at times that suit your company; • Saving time on procurement, as all courses procured by the network are done so to ensure all trainers meet the quality standards of the sector and value for money is achieved; 16 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16

• Opportunity to collaborate and learn from colleagues across the industry.

Subsidised Cost The training programmes delivered through the FDII Skillnet are developed specifically for the food and drink sector. They are available at a subsidised cost to member companies for staff at every level, from managers and food technicians to regulatory personnel. Free access to some of the training courses will also be available for eligible jobseekers. Relevance of the training courses is paramount to the network. As such, all training courses run are done so on the basis of training needs identified by the network’s Steering Group and company members. Training delivered by the network falls into the following categories: • Graduate training; • Lean & Lean Six Sigma; • People Management – Management and Supervisor Skills; • Soft Skills; • Quality; • IT; • Train the Trainer; • Innovation and Legislation . The network is funded by member companies and Skillnets, which itself is funded by the National Training Fund (NTF) through the Department of Education and Skills (DES). More information can be found on www.fdii.ie or by contacting Mark Skinner, FDII Skillnet Network Manager on (01) 6051615 or mark.skinner@ibec.ie.


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crisis management

Flirting with disaster

Have you got a plan in place to manage a crisis or product recall in your business? Solicitor Maree Gallagher advises on the best way to prepare for the worst. 18 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16


crisis management

I

t’s amazing how, in theory, everyone knows how to properly manage a food crisis, yet when the inevitable happens, those “in the know” usually fall disconcertingly silent, or, worse, they fall apart. A crisis of any sort in any business is a serious wake-up call for management and the board. It is also a time of great concern and stress for employees and indeed for consumers when the crisis in question might pose a risk to human health or indeed to life itself. There is often a belief that “it won’t happen to us” but several international studies show that the number of product recalls globally is on the increase and with higher standards being demanded by consumers and regulators alike, this increase is set to continue. In the food industry, as in any other business, mistakes happen and situations arise that are often nobody’s fault and outside the control of the best-run businesses. However, when you are dealing with products that people actually consume and put into their bodies, there has to be a zero tolerance approach to risk.

Time Is of the Essence One of the fundamental errors that food business operators (FBOs) make is taking too long assessing whether or not they have an issue. There is a reluctance to do anything or tell anyone outside the business, until the FBO has investigated the issue and has gathered the relevant information. All too often, by the time a business accepts it has a problem and needs help to manage it, days or weeks have passed when the problem has gradually escalated, testing has been done, meetings and calls have happened but everyone is still hoping that the problem will blow over and there will be no need for action. FBOs should understand that time is critical when it comes to successfully managing and controlling a potential issue; it is better to act fast and discover that the situation can be reasonably easily dealt with, rather than try to keep a lid on it and end up fire-fighting and on the back foot. The speed at which a decision is made to treat a situation as a potential crisis is usually what determines how successfully a business emerges unscathed from a crisis. There is also evidence to show that reacting quickly and decisively can minimise the cost of product recall or withdrawal in the long term. Delay in dealing with a problem can have catastrophic legal and financial implications for a business and these must be taken seriously.

ensure that consumer protection through food safety was at the core of policy and law. As a result of this, Europe has developed an effective and unique way of dealing with food safety crises and, for the most part, EU consumers have confidence in the food they eat and consume. They also, remarkably, have confidence in the regulators and those charged with ensuring that food safety standards are met, unlike consumers in other jurisdictions such as the US, China and New Zealand, where public suspicion of the authorities is much higher. That does not mean that managing a food crisis in Europe is easy - far from it. The fact that the laws and systems are relatively modern means that they anticipate many of the issues which food businesses can face in 2015. It also means that enforcement officials are very vigilant and can apply the letter of the law very strictly. This is further complicated by the fact that there are of course 28 different Member States in the EU and 24 official languages. Whilst in principle, the laws governing food crises are harmonised across Europe, the reality is that, culturally, very different approaches can be taken in different countries and even in different parts of countries. The crucial point for FBOs to understand is that the law throughout Europe requires immediate notification where there is or is suspected to be a food safety issue (noting that the EU law definition of unsafe food means food that is ‘injurious to health” but also, “food that may be unacceptable to consumers” – even though it might not be harmful). This can be challenging for food businesses but as stated previously, delay or any indication that a food business is not being fully transparent with the authorities can result in a business losing control over an issue and suffering irreparable damage as a result.

Knowledge (and Experience) is Power Knowing what the law requires and how a particular situation is likely to be dealt with is an essential part of effective crisis preparedness for selling products in Ireland and abroad. Building good relationships with lawmakers and regulators in peacetime is a risk

European Food Crises In Europe, we have experienced several continent shaking food scares over the last 20 years. The first and arguably the most significant of these was the BSE crisis, which emerged in the mid-1990s. That crisis led to a complete refocusing of priorities in the minds of European consumers, food businesses, policy makers and regulators. People were genuinely terrified to think that food they may have consumed many years previously could potentially result in them contracting a very debilitating and ultimately fatal disease. It had all the elements of a bad horror movie but in the case of BSE in Europe in 1996, it was far too real. The fallout from that crisis – aside from the fact that governments fell and it shook the institutions of the EU to its core – was that the consumer in Europe was firmly placed centre stage. Following the example of the Irish authorities, who have cemented a reputation of always being out front when it comes to dealing with food safety issues, food safety authorities sprung up throughout Europe in the late 1990s. Their raison d’etre was to protect consumers and to rebuild confidence in food safety in Europe. The European Commissioner for Health and Consumer Safety at the time was the eminent Irish lawyer, David Byrne, and he set about the very challenging process of reframing European food laws to

When you are dealing with products that people actually consume and put into their bodies, there has to be a zero tolerance approach to risk. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 19


crisis management management strategy that can pay off when things go wrong. It makes it much easier to have difficult conversations and work together when there is an existing relationship, and FBOs who have emerged from the other side of a product recall or crisis scenario will often prioritise such engagement after the event, in a way that they may not have done previously. Where a company is exporting product, it is equally important to understand (or have somebody available to the business who understands) the recall and crisis management processes in that country, as different markets have different requirements and obligations. With increased globalisation of the food industry and differing safety and legal requirements in different markets, knowing how to access the correct information is important. Not having access to local expertise can further add to delays in managing problems. Accurate and timely information gathering cannot be over-emnational product recall, a strong global network, good regulatory phasised. Get the facts and do not rely on estimates or conjecture. relationships and commercial awareness are key when retaining a If you don’t know the details or if you are waiting for confirmation crisis manager. (of test results, affected batches etc), then say that but do not PR and communication is very important in times of crisis but it make any categoric statements unless you can stand over them absolutely has to be aligned with the legal constraints imposed on 100%. businesses in crisis. A casual or unvetted PR statement or interview A badly managed product recall is one that is not dealt with (usually done in haste at the beginning of an incident) can have a quickly, that drags on longer than it should and one where effeccatastrophic effect on the management of a crisis and can also cause tive communication to the powers that be, consumers and shareholders, is compromised, resulting in untold damage to your brand litigation headaches further down the road, because one thing is certain in any crisis: someone pays. and to your bottom line. Product recall insurance should be conThis is particularly relevant today, given the prevalence of social sidered but it is equally important media and real-time communication. A to understand that access to the Delay in dealing with a very tight, streamlined approach is reright advice is a means of ensuring quired, which complies with the applicathat your business does not make problem can have ble law but which does not compromise costly mistakes. catastrophic legal and the business unnecessarily. Your crisis manager will input into this and What Should You Do? financial implications for will work with your PR advisers to So what is best practice? Putting toa business and these must ensure that a consistent message is gether and practising a crisis mancommunicated and that social media agement plan is the most common, be taken seriously. is monitored and used in an effective and basic, step for any business. Ask way. the question: what do we do when Ensuring that at least one key manager is media trained is a things go wrong? In my experience, though, such plans often lie good idea as it is sometimes appropriate for management to give buried in a filing cabinet or drawer somewhere and rarely see the interviews but care needs to be taken with this, as media interlight of day. When they are dusted off, often the contact details of views can backfire. An alternative, which also ties in with a good the crisis team have changed or the particular person is no longer social media strategy, is to prepare a professionally moderated in the business. Also, in times of real panic and crisis, who has the video interview with a senior manager that the business can then time to work through the well thought out series of questions and post online. protocols in a crisis management plan? To best protect your business and your brand, your retained criMy advice to FBOs is to keep a short but up-to-date contact list sis manager should be a high level advisor to the board. The right of the key people you may need to contact in the event of a poperson in this role will firstly work to properly understand your tential crisis. This should include the CEO, the production manager, business, which will then allow them to assist the business prepare the quality manager, the logistics manager, the marketing managfor issues that may arise and help devise strategies to avoid full er, the sales manager, the CFO. Mobile numbers, email addresses, home numbers and any other contact details should be on this list. blown crises. However, the real insurance policy for your business is that you It should also have details of the business’ legal, insurance and PR know if you ever have a problem that requires liaising with the advisers. If you do nothing else to prepare for a potential crisis in authorities or conducting a full recall, you have immediate access your business, do this, as getting in touch with the right people in to the relevant expertise and that, in times of crisis, could prove to good time can make all the difference. be of incalculable value. In addition to an up-to-date contact list, every FBO should have access to an experienced crisis manager who understands the global food industry and who can advise on the specific laws and Maree Gallagher is an Irish solicitor with over 20 years’ requirements that affect your product in the markets in which experience advising the food, retail and consumer product you are selling. This person should be familiar with the applicable sectors on product recall and crisis management. She has an laws regarding food safety, defective product and product safety. established global network and regularly manages domestic and international recalls and withdrawals for clients. But more than that, you must have confidence that the person advising you understands the bigger picture in terms of protecting For more information, call (01) 6787700 or email Maree@mga.ie. your brand and the integrity of your business. Experience in inter-

20 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16


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branding

Brands on the run

Professor Damien McLoughlin, Professor of Marketing, UCD Michael Smurfit Graduate Business School, explains five key things we have learned about brands this year.

1

Experience comes first, brand comes second

BFree, Ireland’s leading gluten and wheat free bread brand, fixes a serious problem for gluten and wheat intolerant consumers. Before BFree’s launch in 2011, gluten free breads crumbled easily and tasted of, well, not bread. BFree offers gluten and wheat intolerant consumers a freshly baked bread experience, with a range of breads, wraps, rolls and bagels. Over the past year or so, BFree has secured distribution in Asda, Tesco and Costa Coffee, and it has significantly expanded its distribution in the US, Sweden, Australia and New Zealand. How did they achieve this so quickly? One important part of the explanation was their recognition that the consumer must have a positive experience, with their needs met and exceeded, before that consumer will trust the brand to change their behaviour. An entrepreneur can invest as much as they wish in a brand, but the product must functionally deliver for the consumer before the brand can be thought to have power. Brands should ask about the job the BFree is one of Ireland’s most customer hires their product to pioneering, health conscious do and how they measure up bakery brands, via products like to completing that task as a first Quinoa and Chia Seed Wrap step in brand building. made with Teff and Flax seeds. 22 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16

2

Brands are valuable when they are important in consumer decision making It’s simple. Brands make life easy for consumers. They do that by making choices easier. Think of a treat after a weekend walk in Dun Laoghaire: kids in tow, Teddy’s ice cream. The same walk with no kids could involve lunch at Salt in Booterstown or a pint in The Purty Kitchen. It is the strength of these brands that allow us to solve the problem of how to relax after a bracing walk on the seafront. How do brands get to this position of being immediately considered a solution by consumers? One brand that made great strides to achieving this in 2015 was Improper Butter. They have done many important things, such as creating innovative flavours and engaging packaging. But the most important action was to position the brand as a cooking butter. How many brands of cooking butter can you name? Me? One: Improper Butter. This is a micro brand by any measure but they are associated clearly and uniquely with a customer problem, what butter to use in cooking. Shouldn’t every fridge have at least one pack of each flavour? The success of this positioning means that supermarket listings are following fast. Brands must focus on helping the consumer with their decisions, ensuring that when the customer has a problem, your brand is thought of first as a solution.


branding

The Improper Butter brand is associated successfully with a customer problem, what butter to use in cooking, which has led to huge growth for the brand.

3

Food brands are significant financial assets

Food brands sold for up to 25 times profits this year. Brazil’s 3G investment group supported by Warren Buffet, the world’s most successful investor, bought Kraft for 25 times earnings in 2015, having acquired Heinz for 20 times earnings in 2013. Ireland’s Valeo Foods acquired a number of brands, including Robert Roberts and Kelkin, for €60m in 2015. The financial value of brands comes from the (almost) guaranteed cashflow and margins they provide, secured through strong distribution, consumers who have learned to chose them regularly over the competition and pay a higher price for the privilege! Sounds easy? Not so much easy as possible and not just for big brands like Heinz, Kraft and Robert Roberts. Successful branding for every firm needs to recognise that brands have financial value and to regard marketing spending as investment, asking hard questions about return on investment and its measurement, but also ensuring that the there is consistent investment in building distribution and brand recognition.

4

Brands need to give customers something to talk about Do you think we really need a national potato day in Ireland, shamrock and sour cream flavoured crisps, a Spud Nav to see the field your crisps were grown in (seriously)? On the undoubtedly useful side, we have the first gluten free crisps in Ireland, a list of the best picnic spots in the country and, as the pack says, all grown with love in Ireland. In 2015, the architect of these innovations and many more, Keogh’s Tom Keogh, even had a picture in the papers with his mam! How could anyone resist a brand innovating with such warm and genuine credentials? Despite the advice of the health professionals, it seems like we can’t resist crisps and neither can anyone else. The result? Over the past year, Keogh’s sold 10,000 boxes of crisps in the United States, including a supply to the White House. A new contract with Tesco doubled Keogh’s sales in the UK. Export markets in France, Germany and Switzerland also have been opened. We know brands have to dialogue with customers these days: these brands remind us that fast growth goes to the ones that give customers something to talk about, creating a curiosity about exactly what will they do next.

5

Supermarkets need your brand’s help

Supermarkets don’t attract a lot of sympathy, particularly from their suppliers. The grocery industry faces challenges that are only partly explained by the great recession and the rise of the discounters. Put simply, grocery shopping is hard work and consumers have better things to do and so they are starting to shop in convenience stores and eating out or eating take-out more. The only way retailers can win back customers is to offer them unique value. They now realise this can only be done if they have closer relationships with suppliers. From my own research on the food industry, Tesco is at the forefront of this strategy. In the early part of 2015, they announced plans to work with a smaller group of suppliers than before, but on more clearly specified terms to secure unique value for their customers. My experience in the classroom with senior executives of supermarket suppliers in the United States and Europe is that this is a global phenomenon and will continue. A number of Ireland’s beef processors are working with UK and European supermarkets in this way, ensuring safe meat at a price that is sustainable for the industry and attractive to consumers. Successful branding in the food industry is increasingly focused on the ability to innovate, not just at a product level but also at a strategic level: that is, the alignment of supplier resources and capabilities more closely with those of their retail partners. About The Author Damien McLoughlin is Anthony C. Cunningham Professor of Marketing at UCD Michael Smurfit Graduate Business School.

Keogh’s crisps have enjoyed a tremendous performance, both domestically and internationally, with innovative marketing campaigns contributing to the growth.

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 23


seafood

Catching the tide

There are a wealth of opportunities to grow the domestic seafood market, as Bord Iascaigh Mhara work closely with seafood retailers to develop their business.

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alued at just over €200m per year, the domestic Irish retail market for seafood is experiencing growth after a number of slower years during the economic downturn. The sector is serviced by 129 independent seafood retailers and over 400 supermarket seafood counters around the country. The Business Development section of Bord Iascaigh Mhara, the Irish Sea Fisheries Board, works closely with seafood retailers of all sizes to support and help them develop their business. This includes a wide range of services focusing on the areas of up-skilling, building product knowledge and business mentoring.

Building Specialist Seafood Skills To build upon a seafood retailer’s product knowledge, BIM host a series of Seafood Masterclasses throughout the year. These are specialist ‘hands on’ practically based workshops, covering areas such as advanced seafood quality, creating shellfish platters and new product development. One such example is the two day introduction to Fish Handling and Filleting work24 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16

shop, which takes place about six times a year and attracts both new industry entrants and those already working with seafood who are keen to learn how to fillet fish and to build their practical skills.

Innovative Thinking Many of these courses are based in BIM’s Seafood Product Development Centre in Clonakilty, a state of the art facility that can help bring seafood companies’ innovative ideas to fruition. The SDC is integrated with BIM’s business planning services to ensure Irish seafood companies are provided with all the necessary business development and innovation services to help them grow. BIM’s team of experts will look at a company’s strategy and focus on projects that will make the biggest difference. This includes managing both large and small scale projects with companies from the very beginning of a concept or at any stage in the new product development process.

Building Quality Possibly the most important aspect of driving seafood sales is that of product quality.

It would be a false economy to operate a fish shop with well trained staff if the actual product offering is not of the very best quality. This year, BIM and Seafish UK are joining forces yet again to present a flagship course on Fish Quality Assessment. The programme will provide participants with the opportunity to assess the quality of key fish species, including white fish, flat fish, oil-rich fish and other products using both theory and practical assessments. The course is based on the Torry and Quality Index Methods (QIM) for assessing fish quality, which is recognised as the most effective means of objectively assessing fish quality and remaining shelf-life. They are used globally by fishmongers, supermarkets, processors, quality assessment inspectors and others working in the seafood industry. Frank Fleming of Community Supported Seafood Ltd, who is a previous course participant, said, “I found this course really interesting and informative. The skills we learned can be applied to all parts of the supply chain, from catching and processing right through to retail and foodservice. I


seafood think it would be very valuable to make this type of training available to the Irish seafood industry.”

Looking Further Afield Earlier this year, BIM led a retail study trip to Holland to view first-hand the wide range of value-added products which are on offer. Dutch fishmongers differ from many Irish seafood establishments as they offer a wider range of ready-to-eat and ready-to-cook products than those in Ireland, which tend to have a larger fresh fish offering. George Stevens, who owns and operates three seafood shops in Maynooth, Blanchardstown and Mullingar, said, “During the trip to Holland, I was really taken by the wide range of value-added seafood products which fishmongers sell and I thought there would be a demand for similar ranges here in Ireland. I chose a few of the best ones, and the minute I got home, I took the ideas and started experimenting with them. Now I have a range of value-added products that my customers love. I’ve also started selling freshly fried fish in my Blanchardstown store, and it has been really popular. All these new ideas help to drive my business forward and it’s important that fishmongers are constantly on the lookout for new ideas and products.”

Changing Customer Patterns BIM keep a close eye on changing customer tastes and how these affect seafood sales. With modern busy lifestyles and competition from other proteins, it is a challenging marketplace. However, there are many positives which seafood has to offer, not least the wide variety of species and tastes, how quick and easy seafood is to cook, as well as many health benefits. BIM Regional Business Development

Pictured are (l-r): Gerard Collier, BIM Young Fishmonger 2015, with celebrity chefs Martin Shanahan and Rory O’Connell at the SeaFest 2015 Maritime Festival in Ringaskiddy, Co. Cork.

Officer, John Hackett explains, “We have a wide range of information available to help seafood retailers. This includes bespoke market reports, as well as detailed Kantar Worldpanel information, which gives great insight into customer trends, species performance and shopping patterns. When this information is combined with the retailer’s own knowledge, it can provide a useful business planning tool.”

Attracting New Talent In recent years, as the economy begins to stabilise, there has been a number of new independent seafood shops opened across the country. This shows growing demand for seafood, sourced both from Ireland and further afield. It is heartening to see many of these shops opened by young entrepreneurs bringing new ideas to the sector. To recognise and reward younger people in the sector each year, BIM run the Young Fishmonger Competition to find the most competent, capable and knowledgeable seafood staff. Applicants are judged on a range of personal, business and technical skills. Recent winners include Gerard Collier,

who is the current 2015 winner, from Fisherman’s Catch in Clogherhead, Co. Louth, and James Kirwan, East Coast Seafood, Naas, Co. Kildare, the 2014 winner. Both Gerard and James found the Young Fishmonger competition has helped to highlight their seafood skills and knowledge to a wide customer base and drive their sales.

Looking to the Future While it is clear that margins may be tight and consumers have become increasingly product knowledgeable and money conscious, the seafood sector still holds strong potential. Irish seafood retailers now have highly skilled and knowledgeable staff, with a wide range of fresh quality products to suit an array of customer tastes and budgets. From scallop starters for a romantic meal, to Irish haddock goujons for a mid-week family dinner, seafood has something for everyone. With new ideas, new thinking and innovative new products to service customer needs, and grow a new generation of seafood consumers, it would appear that the domestic Irish seafood sector has an exciting future.

Participants in the Ostrea Academy workshop, The Seafood Platter, which was held at BIM, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin, in June 2015. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 25


food safety news

Food Allergen Information for Non Pre-Packed Foods

Since December 13, 2014, food businesses must provide written allergen information for all foods and beverages they provide. The 14 allergens specified under EU law include cereals containing gluten, crustaceans, eggs, fish, peanuts, soya beans, milk, nuts, celery, mustard, sesame seeds, sulphur dioxide and sulphites, lupin and molluscs. The purpose of providing this information is to fully equip consumers with sufficient information on the presence of allergens so they can choose food that is safe for them or people in their care. Until recently, allergen labelling was required only for prepacked foods. Evidence suggests, however, that most food allergy incidents can be traced back to non pre-packed or loose foods. EU Regulation 1169/2011 on the Provision of Food Information to Consumers (FIC) extends the requirement to provide allergen information for pre-packed food to non pre-packed foods. The Regulation permits EU Member States to introduce national legislation to determine how this legal requirement is put into effect within their jurisdictions. In Ireland, this has been achieved through S.I. No. 489 of 2014, which specifies that allergen information must be provided in written format for non pre-packed foods. The information must be at least in the English language, legible, must clearly identify the allergens contained in a food or beverage and must be easily located and accessible by the consumer. Furthermore, as a list of ingredients is not generally used for non pre-packed foods, the information provided must use the word ‘contains’ followed by the specific allergens, e.g. contains wheat, egg and milk. The mandatory labelling requirement applies to all food businesses using or handling food allergens and selling directly to the consumer, including restaurants, pubs, takeaways, caterers, food stalls and businesses offering delivery services. The requirement to declare food allergens also applies to the sale and supply of non pre-packed food through retail outlets such as shops and supermarkets, as well as food businesses engaged in direct selling to the consumer e.g. via a website or telephone. The particular way in which food businesses can declare food allergens will vary, depending on the non pre-packed food and the type of food business in question. It is envisaged that there will be a number of ways in which a food business can comply with this requirement and so each business must examine the options available and determine which is most suitable for their business. The FSAI has published a guidance note and information leaflet to assist food businesses with the implementation of the requirements of S.I. 489 of 2014 and these can be downloaded from the FSAI website here: http://bit.ly/1RS4ctR and http://bit.ly/12rybFS 26 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16

Breakfast Bites The FSAI runs a bi-monthly Breakfast Bites series of briefing meetings. These free, informal meetings are targeted at small food businesses to provide useful information on a variety of topics pertinent to a small food business. These events are very helpful if you own or work in a small food business and also for those of you who want to get your new food business off the ground. The Breakfast Bite series provide expert advice across a range of topics of interest to small food businesses, including: • Business start-up; • Food labelling requirements; • Food safety training for staff; • Traceability and best practices for food safety. Don’t miss out on this free valuable expert advice, subscribe to all upcoming FSAI events at: www.fsai.ie/subscriptions.

New Guidance For Use of Food Marketing Terms The Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI) has published new guidance aimed at ensuring consumers are not misled by the use of marketing terms on foods. The guidance will assist in the responsible use of marketing terms by food manufacturers, retailers and food service businesses when placing their products on the market, to ensure they convey clear meanings that are not misleading to consumers. The guidance follows a public consultation carried out by a working group including the FSAI, the FSAI’s Artisan Forum, Food & Drink Industry Ireland and the Consumers’ Association of Ireland. The guidance outlines the general legal requirements that food businesses must follow when using marketing terms on food and additionally, provides agreed guidance for the food industry concerning the use of the following specific marketing terms to describe foods placed on the Irish market: artisan/artisanal; farmhouse; traditional; and natural. Food businesses should aim to ensure marketing terms used on foods are compliant with relevant legislation and information contained in the guidance as soon as possible. However, as a minimum, the information in this guidance applies to the labels of foods placed on the market and/or presented and advertised after December 2016. The guide is available on the FSAI website at: http://bit.ly/1A26Dam


food safety news Food Safety for Caterers and Retailers Made Easy

Keep Up-to-date with the Latest Food Safety News

The FSAI has updated its ‘Safe Catering Pack for catering businesses and retailers who have a catering function within their business. The pack is designed to help food businesses sufficiently develop and implement a system themselves to manage food safety and comply with food hygiene law. It is ideal for new businesses that have not yet developed their own food safety management system and is also useful for businesses who wish to improve existing systems. The user-friendly pack consists of a DVD, workbook and record books, which provide options on how to control food safety in areas such as storage and display, preparation and handling, cooking, cooling, reheating, physical/ chemical contamination, transport and delivery – all of which are critical points in the implementation of a successful and effective food safety management system based on the principles of Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP). The pack is available to purchase from the FSAI and costs €70 (this includes €10 postage). It can be purchased online at www.fsai.ie/safecatering.

If you would like to keep up-to-date with the latest food safety news and information, you can follow us on www.facebook.com/FSAI or on Twitter @FSAIinfo. We can also be contacted through our Advice Line, Monday-Friday, 9am – 5pm at 1890 336677 or at info@fsai.ie.

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 27


food labelling

Beyond the food label The EU is adopting a stricter new approach to food labelling and information law. Is your brand compliant, asks food lawyer Raymond O’Rourke?

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ood companies may believe that everything is fine on the food labelling front if they did an inventory of their labels to ensure they were in line with the new rules contained in EU Regulation 1169/2011, the main provisions of which came into force on December 13, 2014. The EU rules covered the typical items on a food label: name of food, ingredients list, QUID, allergens, use-by/best before date etc. It is important to be aware that these new rules cover food information rather than food labelling. The definition of food information: “means information concerning a food and made available to the final consumer by means of a label, other accompanying material, or any other means including modern technology tools or verbal communication.” In that case, any information your company provides by means of social media will now fall within the ambit of these rules and therefore, you could be prosecuted for using information on a website that is not in line with the obligations contained in the EU Regulation: in that case, you should do an inventory of your social media communications to ensure they are in line with these new rules, despite anything you may have heard that the authorities are unlikely to be surveying numerous websites and Twitter accounts.

Mandatory Nutritional Declarations Another point to be aware of is that nutritional declarations (the nutrition box on a food label) will be mandatory on all food labels as of December 13, 2016. Whilst you may already provide such nutritional information, the format in which this information is to be provided to the consumer will change in 2016, so you should be aware of this fact. Your existing nutrition declaration will have to be changed. Declarations must now include: • energy value; • amounts of fat, saturates, carbohydrate, sugars, protein and 28 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16

• • • • •

salt: the order in which the amounts of each of these appears has changed, with fats now appearing first; the following items can be added to the declaration as a supplement: mono-unsaturates, polyunsaturates, polyols, starch, fibre, vitamins or minerals; trans fats: the European Commission is to publish a report by the end of 2015 to assess the need for a mandatory declaration for trans fats. It should be noted that the US Food & Drug Administration in June 2015 banned the use of trans fats in processed foods, so there may be a move to do likewise in the European Union; In addition to per 100g/100ml indications, the declaration must also include a per portion basis or per consumption unit; All nutrition particulars must be presented in the same field of vision, in a set font size; Additional nutritional information can be provided once it is based on sound and scientifically valid consumer research, is objective, non-discriminatory and does not create obstacles to the free movement of goods.

GDA Vs Traffic Lights Nutritional information in addition can be provided front-of-pack, whether in a Guideline Daily Allowance (GDA) or traffic lights format as suggested by Member States. During the discussion of this proposal, consumer groups and the UK Government wanted traffic lights to become mandatory, while industry wanted GDAs to be mandatory. The outcome was the ‘status quo’: Member States being permitted to recommend to food businesses whatever front-of-pack nutritional format they prefer. In that case, many Irish food products entering the UK market, if they want to put the nutritional information front-of-pack, will have to follow the ‘traffic lights’ format, whereas the GDA format is the preferred format in Ireland.


‘ The European Commission is to publish a report by the end of 2015 to assess the need for a mandatory declaration for trans fats.

Food companies should also be aware that new rules established after a public consultation by the Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI) on the use of the marketing terms ‘artisan/artisanal’, ‘farmhouse’, ‘traditional’ and ‘natural’ will come into force in December 2016. For example, the artisan definition demands that such products must be produced in limited quantities (1,000 Kg/litres per week) by skilled craftspeople, following a traditional method of production in an enterprise located at a single location and employing less than 10 persons. The idea behind these new rules is to avoid the consumer being misled by the use of marketing terms like ‘farmhouse’, which may imply the food product has been produced on a farm, when in actual fact it has been produced in a food manufacturing facility.

A New Legal Precedent The FSAI has highlighted that in enforcing food labelling rules, it will look at a food product’s packaging in its entirety to decide if it is misleading. This approach is reflected in a recent court judgement in Germany, which many food lawyers believe sets a new precedent for misleading food labelling and has been cited by the FSAI. The product in question, Felix Raspberry and Vanilla Adventure, contained the claim “fruit tea with natural flavourings” and pictures of vanilla orchids and raspber-

food labelling Any information your company provides by means of social media will now fall within the ambit of these rules and therefore, you could be prosecuted for using information on a website that is not in line with the obligations contained in the EU Regulation.

ries on the packaging. Neither raspberry nor vanilla were actually contained in the food product. Instead, the natural ingredients listed were hibiscus, apple, sweet blackberry leaves, orange peel and rosehip. The complainant told the Dusseldorf regional court that a consumer would reasonably expect the tea to contain vanilla and raspberry or at least natural vanilla or raspberry flavouring. Teekanne, the food manufacturer, has been ordered to stop marketing the product in its current form. The ruling is somewhat of a game changer for food companies. Previous case law of the European Court had allowed food manufacturers to understand that they were not guilty of misleading consumers whenever correct and complete information was provided on the ingredients list. This court case highlights what I said at the beginning about “food information”. In future, more than just the label can make your food product fall foul of the food labelling rules. You must ensure the overall image given to the consumer about your food product, by means of the packaging, food label and your social media sites, is clear and cannot be seen to be ‘misleading’. It is a new approach to enforcing food labelling law and you should be cognisant of it before it is too late. Nutritional declarations will be mandatory on all food labels as of December 13, 2016. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 29


legislation Ita White, Food Industry Development, Teagasc, discusses the forthcoming update to the official feed and food control regulation and what it could mean for packaging suppliers to the food industry.

New Food Laws to Impact on the Packaging Sector? T

he official feed and food control regulation (OFFCR) 1 deals with how official controls are performed to check for compliance with feed and food law, and animal health and welfare rules. The main aim is to: • Prevent, eliminate or reduce risks to animals and humans • Guarantee fair practices in feed and • Protect consumer interests. These checks are performed by regulatory officials such as environmental health officers (EHO) or veterinary officials from Local Authorities or the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (DAFM). While you will not find a reference to quality management systems (QMS) in the OFFCR, it does include many of the elements that you would expect in an effective QMS, such as: requirements for risk-based planning, defined and documented procedures on how to carry out official control checks; requirements for competent staff and methods for their supervision; internal audit, analysis and review amongst other requirements.

Why Update OFFCR? The OFFCR was published in 2004 and in light of experience and a number of high profile food fraud incidents, a review is probably appropriate at this time. Some of the aims of the update are to: modernise the system of official controls and create a single 30 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16

framework for all controls along the food chain; to simplify and clarify the system and create an integrated and uniform approach to official controls. The update put forward by the European Commission proposes to cover the whole agri-food chain and extends the scope of the regulation from feed, food, animal health and welfare to also include plant health, animal by-products and plant protection products and official control activities such as surveying, monitoring and disease control tasks. There has been much debate since the proposals were tabled, particularly in relation to the inclusion of plant products and the debate looks set to continue among member states. Some aspects relating to plant products such as plant reproductive material (e.g. seeds) and forestry may be excluded or regulated slightly differently. In the past, the focus on much of food law and animal health rules has been to ensure food safety but in light of more recent issues relating to food fraud, such as the “horsemeat scandal”, there has been an increased focus on protecting other consumer interests also.

What Will be Subject to Checks? Animals and goods at all stages of production, processing, marketing and distribution will be subject to checks by officials. As will


legislation substances, materials or other objects that may influence the characteristics or health of the above. Operators, their activities, premises, land, crops, processes, storage, transport, use of goods and keeping of animals and all related documentation will also be covered. This means that associated businesses supplying the feed and food sectors, such as the packaging industry, would also be included. Previously, some of these areas were not included under the OFFCR or were regulated separately. With the update, the idea is to integrate all official checks into one regulation to improve efficiency, transparency and consistency. Some of the key changes proposed relate to: • Financing of official controls; • Consolidation of sectoral import controls; • Improvements in transparency, efficiencies and flexibility; • Strengthened cross-border co-operation; • Integrated information management system. There are also some changes to the designation of laboratories and sampling proposed. Some changes to enforcement measures are also proposed, including penalties if a business fails to co-operate, and additional measures in cases of non-compliances e.g. closure of websites.

Financing of Official Controls Proposed changes to the way official controls are financed is perhaps one of the most controversial measures under debate. The idea being that there should be some means for rewarding compliant businesses and penalising those who are not compliant. Currently, fees are paid by businesses such as large meat, fisheries or dairy processors and for border controls; the proposal is to extend mandatory fees to all food businesses, with the exception of micro-enterprises. Adequate financial resources need to be available and the “user pays” principle should apply, while rewarding compliant businesses. This needs to be balanced against the aim of minimising the regulatory burden for SME’s, hence the proposed exemption for micro-enterprises. Equity, fairness and transparency are other important principles at play. The definition of an SME is one area of debate, issues such as turnover (<€2m/annum), employee numbers (<10) being typical criteria proposed. The challenge for businesses located in geographically remote areas is another aspect that has been put forward for discussion. It may be worth noting that related industries such as the packaging industry will also be subject to mandatory fees based on the criteria that will be finally agreed.

Improvements in Transparency, Efficiencies and Flexibility Member state competent authorities will be obliged to ensure a high level of transparency of control activities by, for example, publication of information, although flexibility will remain as to the extent of information a member state decides to publish. A high degree of transparency will also be required in relation to financing of controls and fees charged. It is foreseen that this should be a key driver of accountability and efficiency of the system. Consolidation of current rules, especially in relation to imports, should also contribute to increased transparency of the official control system.

On-Going Negotiations There have been discussions around the role of vets versus other qualified staff, which may have cost implications. Also around cross-border assistance, right of appeal, disclosure to the public and financial penalties. The latter relates to cases of intentional infringements (fraud), where the penalty should offset the economic advantage sought; while this principle seems reasonable, there may be difficulty in establishing the appropriate figure. Discussions will continue on the subject of plant reproductive material, plant protective products and fees for official controls. Negotiations are continuing amongst member state representatives and it is hoped to have an agreed text by the end of 2015, so there may still be some opportunity for representation by trade groups and other interested parties. Depending on having an agreed text, the update of the OFFCR may be in force in 2018.

Consolidation of Import Controls Current import controls are fragmented and it is proposed to have one common set of rules applicable to all imports, including actions to be taken in the event of non-compliance. There will be one common health entry document and alignment with modernised customs codes. This should prove to be more business-friendly, with common terminology and codes being used across customs and agri-food control. There will be additional specific rules for imports of animals, animal products and by-products, plants, plant and germinal products (seeds), and food and feed with specific associated risk. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 31


legislation Possible Implications for the Packaging Industry At present, the decision as to what controls to carry out and the frequency is based on risk and this will continue to be the case. The regulatory authorities will need to perform a risk assessment in relation to the packaging industry under their responsibility and decide if any changes are warranted. Things that may influence this risk assessment could include research on the types of food safety related incidents that have occurred and may have been caused by print/packaging materials, breaches of test limits for certain packaging materials, the scale and types of materials being imported, etc. Regulators may continue to focus on assessing packaging compliance at the point of use by the food industry and/or at import. The changes in the emphasis of the official control regulation may increase the focus on supply chain management, including traceability and authentication of materials used by the food industry. Documentation to demonstrate the authenticity and traceability of packaging material will be required by both customers and regulatory officials. Some regulatory requests may arrive indirectly via customers as officials will check packaging supplies as part of their audits of food businesses. Ultimately, regulators will want to know that the food industry is buying from reputable suppliers and that packaging materials are compliant with the relevant legislation and are fit for purpose. Remember, there are several legal documents applicable to the packaging industry. If you need to check you are up-to-date, the following links to the FSAI website will provide information on current legal requirements for packaging (a category of food contact material). www.fsai.ie/legislation/food_legislation/materials_articles/ introduction.html www.fsai.ie/legislation/food_legislation/materials_articles/ legislation_on_specific_materials.html The changes to import controls may require some change in terms of documentation and procedures but in the long term, this should benefit business as it becomes more transparent and ties in with customs better. There may possibly be more contact with regulatory officials, especially for importers initially. Anyone importing materials would need to ensure they have appropriate documentation to show compliance with the relevant legislation e.g. declarations of compliance or certificates of analysis. There may be changes to the way official controls (e.g. registration, audits/inspections, sampling, imports checks) are funded, including the possibility of charges depending on scale of business, but it is too early to speculate as to how these charges will be calculated at this stage. Reference: 1 Regulation (EC) No 882/2004on official controls performed to ensure the verification of compliance with feed and food law, animal health and animal welfare rules. Disclaimer The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and cannot be construed as reflecting Teagasc views. Reference to any commercial product or service is made with the understanding that no discrimination is intended and no endorsement by Teagasc is implied. 32 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16

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The update to the OFFCR put forward by the European Commission proposes to cover the whole agri-food chain.

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food safety

Safefood shares food safety expertise Safefood is connecting food safety professionals through its Knowledge Networks.

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afefood’s Knowledge Networks are professional networking platforms of research, best-practice, all-island networking through conferences and training, digital and e-newsletter communications, with a focus on developing a strategic approach to applying science-based knowledge. The principal aim of the networks is to bring together those involved in creating and applying knowledge at all parts of the food chain to support and enhance food safety and protect public health. “Our Knowledge Networks are going from strength to strength and show the value and importance of connecting food safety professionals from different disciplines and sectors in order to share expertise and find solutions to food safety issues,” explains Dr Gary Kearney, Director, Food Science, safefood.

2,700 Knowledge Network Members Dr Gary Kearney, Director, Food Science, safefood.

Of the 2,700 Knowledge Network members, more than 30% work in industry, while the others are professionals involved in research,

environmental health, public health and education. The events hosted by the Knowledge Networks range from regional training courses and workshops to seminars and one day conferences, featuring leading experts from the island of Ireland and around the world. Members can also avail of a training and mobility bursary and access up-to-date information and articles of interest via the Knowledge Network Ning Website (safefood.ning.com/) or through the magazine and e-newsletter, The Food Chain. Exciting developments will take place in 2016, with a new Knowledge Networks framework building on the solid base of the 2011-2015 programme, but with closer interaction with food industry groupings. The members will benefit from a programme of activities which will address the key food safety issues, both current and emerging, including food traceability; microbiological and chemical contaminants; climate change and food fraud. For more details on how to join safefood Knowledge Networks, visit www.safefood.eu/kn.

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 33


robotics

The LBR iiwa comes amazingly close to the motion sequences of the human arm.

A new generation of robots

The LBR iiwa from KUKA Robotics heralds a new era of sensitive robots, which makes it possible to automate delicate and complex tasks that were previously impossible.

The LBR iiwa is well on the way to opening up entirely new possibilities in the interaction of humans and robots. 34 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16


robotics

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resent day production in Europe often means full automation, with humans primarily involved in the planning and maintenance of flexible automation solutions but not in the actual production operations. In many cases, however, a variable degree of automation makes good sense. In this model, some of the tasks are performed by flexible industrial robots, others by humans. Robots and humans work hand in hand, optimally complementing each other with their respective skills.

Intelligent Industrial Work Assistant By introducing the new LBR iiwa (intelligent industrial work assistant), KUKA is delivering on its promise to the market to present a lightweight, collaborative robot for industrial applications. Sensitive and compliant, and equipped with mechanical and drive systems for industrial operation, the LBR iiwa heralds a new robot generation. The LBR iiwa makes it possible to automate delicate and complex automation tasks in which the use of robots was previously inconceivable. It enables high-performance and force-controlled processes to be automated and optimised. The LBR iiwa comes amazingly close to the motion sequences of the human arm. The integrated sensors and the impedance control endow the robot with a tactile sense. As a result, tasks are no longer solved on the basis of position accuracy but by means of compliance.

Responsive Collision Detection Its responsive collision detection function, provided by integrated joint torque sensors in all axes, makes the LBR iiwa an ideal solution for sensitive joining processes and allows the use of simple tools. Compliance can be

programmed individually for all joints and all Cartesian axes. As the compliance is provided by the robot rather than the tooling, the customer can save on cost-intensive technologies in the tools, as well as on complicated peripheral equipment. With the aid of its sensitive collision detection function, the lightweight robot can move quickly to the contact point, thus achieving short cycle times.

Human-Robot Interaction The LBR iiwa is well on the way to opening up entirely new possibilities in the interaction of humans and robots. Direct human-robot interaction makes future-oriented production concepts possible with the lightweight robot as the “third hand” of the human worker. The lightweight robot can sensitively feel objects and perform difficult work precisely. The robot can be positioned and adjusted to assist its human colleagues optimally in terms of ergonomics. As a result of its lightweight design, the LBR only has to move small masses. Combining this with high-performance servo control, it is able to follow contours quickly under force control. The LBR iiwa has seven axes, and is available in two variants: with payloads of 7Kg and 14Kg, and up to 820mm reach. Its lightweight construction is the key to the sensitivity and responsiveness of the LBR iiwa. Typical repeatability is ±0.1mm, making it suitable for complex assembly tasks.

Intuitive Programming The basis for the innovative LBR iiwa robotics consists of the specially developed KUKA Sunrise control technology, the KUKA Sunrise Cabinet control hardware and the KUKA Sunrise.OS control software. The LBR iiwa is suitable for operation in normal machine environments and meets the requirements of protection rating IP54. Teaching by demonstration, the most intuitive form of programming is now possible with the LBR iiwa. The operator guides the robot by hand to the desired positions, while the coordinates of points moved to on the path are saved in the robot programme. Teaching is quick and easy and requires no programming knowledge. Flexibility, mobility and human-robot collaboration are the cornerstones of future robot-based automation. With its latest developments in robotics, KUKA is a step ahead on the way to the future.

Ice-cold Stacking With the KR Quantec PA Arctic, KUKA presents a specialist robot for palletising at extremely low temperatures. The new KR Quantec PA Arctic needs no protective suit and can nevertheless work at temperatures way below zero. Its immunity to cold temperatures makes the robot ideal for the food sector – right down to -30°C. In addition, its energy supply system leading right up to the flange is adapted to the cold. There is no formation of ice on the frozen goods. The KR Quantec PA Arctic is designed to work uncompromisingly, reliably and extremely fast in deep-freeze environments. The KUKA KR Quantec PA Arctic is not a special solution from KUKA. Instead, it is a cold-resistant adaptation of the service-proven standard palletising robot from the KUKA KR Quantec series. With a reach of 3195mm, the palletising robot is characterised by short cycle times, high flexibility and extreme precision in stacking and setting down. The robot is available in three payload variants: 120Kg, 180Kg and 240Kg. Since it does not require a specially designed protective suit for cold environments, the user saves on costs compared with conventional shrouded solutions. Furthermore, no annual costs and downtime are required for exchange work. Cost-intensive heat emissions in the cold storage depot are avoided as no special heating is needed in the robot arm, and the large work envelope is not restricted by additional wrapping. The new energy-efficient KUKA KR Quantec range meets all the needs of future-oriented automation with minimised space requirements, shorter cycles, maximum availability, and reduced operating costs. See www.kuka-robotics.com for more information.

The LBR iiwa has seven axes, and is available in two variants: with payloads of 7Kg and 14Kg, and up to 820mm reach FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 35


packaging recycling

A lot done:

more to do

Irish companies continue to make an impressive contribution to the recovering and recycling of packaging, but new EU targets may prove difficult for Ireland, particularly when it comes to plastics.

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rish food companies are making a substantial contribution to the recovery and recycling of packaging in Ireland. Last year, Repak member companies, which includes all of the major food producers, supported the recovery of 812,046 tonnes of packing, up by 14% on the previous year. This included some 288,000 tonnes of paper and cardboard, 120,000 tonnes of glass and 79,000 tonnes of plastic – the major components of food packaging. This performance was well ahead of targets set by the Irish government and the EU, and helped maintain Ireland’s position as one of the top recycling performers in Europe. Major players from the FDT sector, such as Mars Ireland, Valeo, Mondelez and Glanbia, together with the major supermarket chains, form the financial bedrock of the Repak scheme. All told, Irish producers contributed €24.4m to Ireland’s recycling effort in 2014, rising to €25m in 2015. It’s not just the big players who are making the contribution. New additions to the Repak scheme in recent years have included some of Ireland’s emerging and innovative food companies, such as the Carbery Group, Hogans Farm, Meade

36 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16

Factors such as not over packaging the product, the use of recycled materials and the ability to fully recycle the final packaging can significantly affect consumer choice. This has been a major challenge to producers of products such as Easter eggs, pizzas, fruit and vegetables and other fresh produce, where the consumer is constantly assessing the sustainability of the packaging as well as the product itself.

Wide Range of Supports

Repak CEO Seamus Clancy.

Potato, Stillorgan Trading Post, Kohinoor, Gleeson Meats, Sheridans Cheesemongers and Glenilen Farm.

The Importance of Sustainability Producers of quality food products will know that the sustainability of their packaging is as essential as the product itself.

Repak’s Prevent and Save service offers a wide range of supports to member companies to assist in their packaging decisions. The team’s packaging technologists have assisted many companies with packaging solutions, working closely in areas such as transit packaging and final product packaging, to ensure that the total packaging mix is fully optimised. This has helped many companies, not just in delivering a better product offering but also in saving money in packaging costs. Please contact Colm Munnelly (colm.munnelly@repak.ie) or John Coleman (john.coleman@repak.ie) for more details. Repak is also working closely with the


packaging recycling Bord Bia Origin Green programme, the programme which enables food producers to reduce their environmental impact, while enhancing the green credentials of their products. Many smaller food companies are coming through this programme, particularly in niche and emerging product areas.

The Challenge Ahead Though Ireland’s packaging recycling performance has been impressive, tough new challenges lie ahead. Repak CEO Seamus Clancy says that new targets being set by the EU for recycling may prove very difficult for Ireland, particularly for plastics. “We have upped our recovery rate for plastic packaging quite substantially in recent years”, he says, “and our latest figures show that we are recycling about 40% of all plastic packaging placed on the market. But there is still a long way to go. The EU are set to increase the plastics recycling target to 45%, rising to 60% by 2025. Plastic is probably the toughest area for recycling and the most costly. While good quality plastics have value, dirty and difficult to break down materials are not as easily recyclable. At the end of the day, it comes down to cost.” Repak is committed to not raising fees for its members for the period of its licence. “So we need to find additional resources elsewhere,” Seamus notes. “A recent consultant’s report for The Department of the Environment Community and Local Government, the Review of the Producer Responsibility Initiative, noted that there are some 3,000 businesses in the country who are not compliant with the Packaging Regulations. We

Last year, Repak member companies, which includes all of the major food producers, supported the recovery of 812,046 tonnes of packing, up by 14% on the previous year.

estimate that there is a loss of about €5m to the system from these free riders.” That situation is now about to change.

Enforcing the Regulations Acting on the recommendation of the PRI Review, the Government has committed to stepping up its campaign to enforce the Packaging Regulations. Three new Regional Enforcement Teams are being set up, and their aim is to tackle the problem of evasion in a co-ordinated and concerted manner. Already, a county-by-county database has been drawn up, which identifies and lists all the businesses in each county which will be targeted. The campaign will also be given firm legal backing, so that those busi-

nesses who continue to dodge their legal obligations can be summoned and brought before the courts. Seamus Clancy has welcomed the Government’s commitment to action. “It is unacceptable that we have a member in Repak, paying its full contribution to national recycling, while their competitor across the street is dodging its obligations,” he said. “It is not just about competition: it is about fairness. We owe it to our members to ensure that there is equity in the system and that everybody is paying their fair share.” The message is clear. Packaging producers must fulfil their legal obligations – or face the consequences. Producers of quality food products understand that the sustainability of their packaging is as essential as the product itself.

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 37


packaging

Leaders of the pack

Limerick Packaging has built up an enviable reputation for quality products and first class customer service.

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hen a host of packaging consumers were asked to rank in order of importance the attributes that make a very good packaging supplier, unsurprisingly, quality came out on top, followed closely by on-time delivery, with price coming just third. What separates good packaging suppliers from truly excellent companies is how well they know and understand their customers’ business. Very few packaging companies are capable of this, but it is an area where Limerick Packaging really excels. At the heart of Limerick Packaging’s ethos is their commitment to deliver “On Time, Everytime”. They do this by taking the time and effort to understand your business and usage patterns, and subsequently stocking products to order, in advance of your needs, and delivering weekly or daily as necessary. Limerick Packaging have an extensive client list across the food and pharma/medical sectors in Ireland, and their customers can rest safe in the knowledge that the packaging materials they need are but a phone-call away. These companies no longer have stores full of boxes that they don’t need at that point in time and a packing hall without the boxes they do need. They have zero capital tied up in packaging stocks, allowing that money to be invested in turnover that perpetuates the business, with production and value-added activities where once they had stores.

Their extensive product range means that Limerick Packaging have something to suit most customers’ needs. “While 90% of our business is Corrugated Boxes in regular slotted case and die-cut formats, we now supply Litho printed outer boxes and inner cartons in very large quantities to a growing number of customers,” Mike notes. “We also supply industrial polythene bags, sheets and pallet hoods, pallet edgeguards, high quality post-printed boxes, pallet-wrap, strapping, strapping accessories, tapes and a full range of protective foams.” Walking through their facility on the Ballysimon Road in Limerick, one is immediately struck by the cleanliness, tidiness, efficiency and sheer size of the factory, within which there is a barcoded storage system that not only controls stocks but also results in a ‘first in, first out’ stock rotation system. Set up in June 2002, Limerick Packaging has grown to a formidable size and the staff are very proud to count among their many customers some of the biggest names in the food industry and medical/pharmaceutical sectors. Once they get to fully understand their customer’s business, they stock product to Purchase Order and deliver daily or weekly as required. “For customers within our famous ‘stock and serve’ model, this means that they can call product off today before noon and we will deliver tomorrow, anywhere in Ireland,” Mike Boland states proudly.

Crowning the Customer

Considerable Growth

Limerick Packaging has built up a reputation as the most reliable supplier of packaging materials in all of Ireland and this is a position they are not going to relinquish any time soon. “Our philosophy is simple: we are dedicated to supplying quality products, on time, everytime, and at Limerick Packaging, the customer really is king,” notes Mike Boland, Sales Director and Co-Owner. 38 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16

Limerick Packaging has experienced considerable growth in shelf ready/ retail ready packs and also in Litho-laminated corrugated packs, due to the company’s ability to respond and even pre-empt market trends, their ability to design effective solutions for their customers at very competitive prices and to assist their customers to get products innovatively packed to market in a timely fashion.


s

packaging Limerick Packaging offers innovative package design, very competitive pricing, quality to the very highest standards and all delivered, “on time, everytime”.

Walking through their factory, you cannot help but notice the purposeful approach each member of staff has in everything they do. Indeed, there is a steely determination to get everything right so that the company can succeed and prosper. Throughout the entire staff at Limerick Packaging, the one thing that stands out above all is the absolute focus on the customer’s needs, which is immediately evident in the ultra large screens throughout the factory, which track each order’s progress, outline the requirements for the next day’s deliveries and even break these down by county to optimise transport. The company also operates its own delivery fleet, as this provides the flexibility necessary to meet all customer needs on a daily basis. “We are certified to ISO9001:2008 and we operate to ISO14001 and BRC/IOP,” Mike Boland notes.

Improving Performance For a company with so many accolades and such a high profile client list, they could be forgiven for being content but Limerick Packaging are always looking to improve. “We are never happy,” laughs Mike, “and we are always striving to improve our performance and to create the ultimate customer experience. We are close but we are not there yet, and when we reach our goal, we will push on and once again set new standards for customer service.” Limerick Packaging has grown from humble beginnings in June 2002 to a very sizeable company today, and Connie Ryan, Managing Director and Co-Owner, attributes Limerick Packaging’s success to date “to the generosity of our many customers; in the first instance, for believing in us and placing their business with us; and for continuing to support us. Many of our customers who gave us business when we started have remained with us to this day. We have rewarded our customers with state of the art design and problem solving skills, trouble-free trading, competitive pricing and quality products delivered on time, everytime. We will continue to dedicate ourselves to our customers as we hope that many more fine customers will join in and be part of our success story.” For more information, see www.limerickpackaging.ie.

Impressive Product Range Limerick Packaging’s range of products is quite impressive, and includes: • Corrugated Boxes (RSC, Die-Cut, Sheets, Pads, Dies. etc.); • Foam/Corrugated Composite Packs; • Eco-Friendly Thermal Packaging (Replacement for Moulded EPS); • Protective Foams (EPE,EPU, EPS, EPP); • Solid Board Leak-Proof Bases and Lids; • Litho Printed Cartons and Litho-Laminated Outers; • Bubble-Wrap, Rolls and Bubble Bags; • Labels; • High Quality Post Printed Corrugated Boxes; • Pallet Wrap/Strapping/Strapping Accessories/ Tapes; • Shelf-Ready/Retail-Ready Packs; • Industrial Polyethylene Bags, Sleeves and Sheets; • Pallet Edgeguards; • POS/POP Stands,Bins and Signage; • Packaging Assembly Machinery. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 39


the forefront of design and developments in our industry,” he notes. “We will maintain our high standards of quality and overall customer service and hopefully we will continue to grow

who are thriving in this very difficult economic climate, and it seems that delivery ‘On Time, Every Time’ and the will to be the best are the major contributory factors in this success.

Limerick Packaging’s renowned design service includes sampling, artwork reproduction and approval, packaging auditing and problem solving, and developing effective designs with reduced carbon footprint.

2 2 f O O D i r El a n D

20,21,22 Limerick Packaging 2.5p.indd 3

Food Industry Training Unit Continuing Professional Development and Training for the Food Industry

Information on courses from: Mary McCarthy-Buckley Food Industry Training Unit College of Science, Engineering and Food Science University College Cork E-mail m.mccarthybuckley@ucc.ie www.ucc.ie/en/fitu

10/01/2012 16:50


building design

The Importance of Risk Assessment Each individual section of the food production process should be risk assessed to ensure that cross contamination cannot occur for the product being manufactured, as food safety is of critical importance.

When it comes to food processing facilities, understanding risk assessment is a critical element of process flow and building design, writes Fergus Carey MRIAI, of Carey Associates Architects and Project Managers.

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ssessing risk has become a priority feature in respect of designing new or reviewing existing food processing facilities. In order to achieve a high quality food processing facility, each part of the process needs to be assessed to determine the risk categories. To obtain EU, USDA and or BRC accreditation or to pass a customer audit, the building must meet standards which address production risks. The fabric of the building must meet the required hygiene standards for all internal surfaces. Most are aware of separation of raw and cooked products or the terms ‘low care’ and ‘high care’: this in a processing facility context will mean a division within the building envelope for food products, for equipment, for production operatives, for floor drainage, for waste products, for packaging and for environmental conditions. These two risk areas can have further divisions within each respective area, such as within a low care area, raw material storage and preparation prior to cooking could give rise to the provision of further building separations, which may also give rise to, for example, providing additional staff changing rooms.

customer audits being carried out in all categories of food production facilities.

The Value of High Standards High standards are critical in achieving food safety for the consumer. High food hygiene standards within the food production facility will transfer to consistent product quality and consequently high profits. In order to ensure a seamless and efficient food production facility, it is essential to carry out a thorough assessment of all associated risks along the production process flow, and this should be undertaken with a detailed knowledge of the product to be manufactured.

Cross Contamination Each individual section of the food production process should be risk assessed to ensure that cross contamination cannot occur for the product being manufactured, as food safety is of critical importance. Time expended in thoroughly assessing risk impact of the proposed or existing food production process will result in excellent product production, excellent product yields and will increase production capacity. Areas external to the hygienic production rooms but within or attached to the production building envelope, such as roof voids, plant rooms, storage rooms and administration offices, are equally important to risk assess, due to the ever increasing frequency of

In order to ensure a seamless and efficient food production facility, it is essential to carry out a thorough assessment of all associated risks along the production process flow.

Fergus V. Carey, MRIAI, of Carey Associates, Architects & Project Managers, has over 25 years’ experience in the design, construction, commissioning and EU licence/Food Safety Authority procedures for all categories of food production and food related buildings. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 41


barcoding Barcode Manager will reduce the information gathering burden for artisan producers and SMEs.

Barcode Manager is full of functionality; enabling the generation of barcode numbers for new products and the storing of barcode numbers for existing products.

Raising the Barcode Barcode Manager is a new online tool from GS1 Ireland to help SMEs to generate and manage barcodes and product information.

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unning a small business, especially at start-up stage, can be a big challenge, with so many demands to meet and with time, human and financial resources in short supply. Once you have created your product, bringing it to market and successfully getting it on the shelf in a store is a significant milestone. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the point at which it all comes together, product, branding, packaging and offer, and the point from which you hope it all takes off.

there are global standards about how product information should be formatted and stored, so that manufacturers, distributors and retailers can share the information easily between systems in a consistent and standardised way. Guidelines and frameworks for data quality exist to assist companies in preparing information in line with international best practices. This can prove vitally important down the line if you are successful in getting a listing with a major national or overseas retailer, for example.

Managing Barcodes

Benefits of Barcode Manager

One step on this journey is finalising your product packaging and completing a new line listing form for a retailer: this includes the barcode number for the product, its name, description and a selection of logistics information. For many businesses, managing barcodes means recording information in Excel spreadsheets or even hardback copybooks. These manual methods can lead to confusion, error, duplication and issues with storing and tracking information. With that in mind, GS1 Ireland has designed Barcode Manager, a free, user friendly web-based tool which will help SMEs collate product information and store it in a central repository. With Barcode Manager, GS1 hope to make life a little easier for SME owners getting their product to market. Listing a new product with a retailer is a bit like filling out a dating profile. It needs to be comprehensive, cover all the vital points and most importantly, the information needs to be accurate. Product information such as size is used to allocate space on shelves and in warehouses; weight information is used to configure transport and shipping loads; and description information is needed for shelf labels and to populate online shopping databases. The provision of much of this information is also governed by law, such as the Food Information for Consumers Regulation (1169/2011) that came into effect last December, with future provisions for ingredients, allergens and other data coming into effect this year and in 2016. To help businesses to prepare and share product information,

Gathering all this information, ensuring it is accurate and keeping it up-to-date can be an onerous task. Barcode Manager will reduce this burden for artisan producers and SMEs. Businesses using Barcode Manager will enjoy a higher degree of accuracy in their record keeping, making duplicated barcodes a thing of the past and reducing the likelihood of potentially costly mistakes. With its built-in check digit function, a whole stage of the barcode generation process is now automated, saving time and preventing errors. Barcode Manager stores your barcode information online, keeping it safe and secure. With its streamlined interface, Barcode Manager is easy to use, reducing the time it takes to train staff in the barcode allocation and management process. Barcode Manager is full of functionality; enabling the generation of barcode numbers for new products and the storing of barcode numbers for existing products. Brand owners can fill out a simple data profile for each product, including brand name, description, weight, size and contact information. The tool also enables SMEs to generate barcode symbol images in a variety of file formats. Barcode Manager also facilitates file uploads to import information that may currently be stored in spreadsheets or other systems and a full data set can be exported into Excel or CSV file as required. Any organisation that holds a barcode licence with GS1 Ireland and is interested in using Barcode Manager to control their barcode allocations can contact the GS1 Helpdesk on 01 2080660 or go to www.gs1ie.org/Barcode-Manager for further information.

42 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16


We have everything your business needs to succeed. Are you the owner or manager of a food manufacturing or retailing company? Are you looking to reduce costs & increase profits? Allocate your supply-chain, warehousing & logistics requirements to our turnkey facilities and watch your business grow and succeed.

Benefits Include: • Excellent storage locations with depots in Dublin Port, Galway & Kildare,over 40,000 pallet spaces • 32 county next day pallet & trolley distribution network • Daily European collection & delivery transport service • Web enabled stock control system, EDI functionality & on-line proof of delivery service • No capital requirement, pay as you go • Flexibility, various business models available • Clients supported by our experienced logistics team

Call: +353 (0)91 792926 Text: 086 8091893 Visit: www.coldmove.ie Email: innovation@coldmove.ie Glenasaul Industrial Park, Oranmore, Co. Galway.

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26/09/2012 16:12


supply chain

Revolutionising the supply chain

Innovation is key at Cold Move, who are market leaders in temperature controlled and ambient supply chain management within the food industry.

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mploying over 100 people in Galway, Kildare and Dublin and serving customers in Ireland, the UK and Europe, Cold Move is now one of Ireland’s leading supply chain management companies and has become a dominant player within the temperature controlled marketplace. Since its inception in 2005, Cold Move has provided temperature controlled and ambient supply chain management services to retailers, manufacturers, brand owners and food service operators. Cold Move services a wide portfolio of blue-chip clients involved in grocery brand ownership, frozen and chilled manufacturing, foodservice distributors and retail operators, with temperature-controlled storage and delivery services. With network hubs in Dublin, Cork and Galway supported by regional specialist distribution teams, Cold Move can deliver to every county on the island of Ireland, supplying to all major retail distribution centres and symbol groups every day. Indeed, Cold Move provides nationwide day one collection for day two delivery across ambient, chilled and frozen product lines on behalf of some of the best known brands in food retailing and manufacturing. Cold Move’s current network can accommodate pallet, combi, cage, tote or case deliveries throughout the country, North and South.

A Radical Shift Towards Traceability Chief Executive Officer, Jason Mallon set up Cold Move in 2005. He had been working in temperature controlled supply chains since 1992, but it was around 2004 when he saw that advances in Information Technology would change the supply chain process. 44 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16

“We could see there would be a radical shift from paper-based systems with very little focus on traceability to a very strong focus,” he explains. “We set up and designed systems in-house to capitalise on the change in the market. There were not many companies with the technology in situ in Ireland to provide such a service at that point in time: we aimed to deliver a unified solution across order management, warehousing and ancillary services and distribution.”

One Stop Shop for Logistics At that time, the logistics industry was made up of firms specialising in sectors of the supply chain. There were dedicated cold storage operators, large supply chain companies and transport providers, but very few providing the myriad of services under one banner using one accredited management process and system. “We created a one-stop shop for our customers, covering goods in and goods out, all of their logistics and supply chain with one point of control,” Jason reveals. In March of this year, Cold Move announced the completion of a management buyout, in a €4.5m deal structured by the management team and Donworth Capital. Jason Mallon, who joined the business at its inception in 2005, together with Operations Director, Stephen Gillen, partnered with John Casey, Managing Partner of Donworth, to structure the acquisition, which was part financed by Bank of Ireland. In 2014, Cold Move recorded turnover of €7.6m and with the acquisition is forecasting for continued growth. At the time of the transaction, Jason Mallon noted how “Cold Move is now well placed to continue its development as a leader in the supply


supply chain Right: Cold Move has an extensive warehousing network, both company owned and leased, and it provides efficient access to approved audited warehousing sites throughout Ireland, the UK and Europe.

In March of this year, Cold Move announced the completion of a management buyout, in a €4.5m deal.

chain sector. The re-structuring brings expertise and a well-financed balance sheet, enabling the future development of our business model.”

Improving Efficiency Back when Cold Move began operations, the big players in food and agri-business were beginning to embrace new technologies, and looked to squeeze more efficiency out of their supply chains. The main driver of innovation at that time was Tesco: with the introduction of Advanced Shipping Notification (ASN) in 2008, suppliers had to scan their goods out and upload a data file to Tesco in advance of delivery, giving Tesco the data it needed to automatically populate its distribution system. “It created a seamless supply chain, where the retailer knows what’s in stock and what’s on the way,” remembers Jason. “You could say that it revolutionised the goods-in process.”

Customised Solutions Using a combination of bespoke software development and off-theshelf products, Cold Move works closely with new customers, tailoring a solution to their specific needs. A consultant Information Technology expert conducts a site visit as part of the design process, mapping a traceability system to the client’s processes.

“Cold Move is well positioned to provide outsourced supply chain services to the many suppliers who don’t have the internal resources or volume of throughput to support the creation of in-house systems,” Jason notes. “They simply tap into our accredited process.” As part of the services it supplies, Cold Move has an in-house IT specialist on the management team, but also call in specialist consultants, depending on the client’s requirement and the complexity of start-up. According to Jason, the physical infrastructure is as much of a focus as the virtual tracking technology. Indeed, it’s the combination of both that sets Cold Move apart.

Developing Long Term Partnerships Cold Move has developed relationships with many Irish suppliers, who are now trusted partners of services under the Cold Move supply chain brand. Cold Move’s customer list includes some of the biggest and best companies in the food sector, including: Glanbia plc; Birds Eye Iglo Group; Iceland plc; Poundland plc; XPO Logistics; BWG; Supermac’s; Green Isle Foods and Kepak, to name just a small selection. Cold Move’s warehousing network is central to its ongoing success, growth and future viability. It is constantly working to develop long term partnerships with facility suppliers and to implement business development plans which will strengthen both its business and that of suppliers. Cold Move has an extensive warehousing network, both company owned and leased, and it provides efficient access to approved audited warehousing sites throughout Ireland, the UK and Europe. Furthermore, line managers from Cold Move carry out client supply chain risk analysis, conducting regional and national efficiency analysis on an ongoing basis. “We are constantly working with clients to implement development strategies, introduce new concepts, develop and roll-out Warehouse Management System (WMS) capability, physically support marketing plans and grow sales by delivering consistent supply chains for customers,” concludes Jason. For more information, contact: Jason Mallon. Tel: 086 8091893. Email: jasonmallon@coldmove.ie.

Cold Move is now one of Ireland’s leading supply chain management companies and has become a dominant player within the temperature controlled marketplace. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 45


material handling

Toyota reliability personified Toyota Material Handling offers a one stop shop for all your material handling needs, including the new Toyota Traigo series of electric forklifts, with load capacities of up to 8.5 tonnes.

Toyota Material Handling Ireland has recently completed the launch of the brand new Toyota Traigo series of electric forklifts, delivering more productivity and offering safer and more energy-efficient operation than ever before.

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uring the past 41 years, Toyota Ireland has firmly established the Toyota brand as a household name in Ireland and continues to be a market leader today. Toyota Material Handling Ireland now brings to the market the full range of Toyota and BT products, offering the customer a one stop shop for all material handling needs, from hand trucks, pallet trucks and reach trucks to stacker and gas, diesel and electric counterbalance trucks. All the benefits, peace of mind and value for money that Toyota provides to make it the number one seller of motor cars in Ireland are present, making Toyota Material Handling Ireland the ideal partner for your business, whatever it is. “What we pride ourselves on, first and foremost, is our wonderful products,” states Terry O’Reilly, MD, who has worked with Toyota Ireland for the past 34 years.

Toyota Traigo Range Toyota Material Handling Ireland has recently completed the launch of the brand new Toyota Traigo series of electric forklifts, a Toyota offers the customer a one stop shop for all material handling needs.

46 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16

truck designed to deliver more productivity and offering safer and more energy-efficient operation than ever before. With load capacities ranging from 1.0 tonnes up to 8.5 tonnes, the Traigo range is the result of an intense and continuous collaboration between Toyota and its customers, whose feedback contributed to the parameters of the new design. The Traigo features a range of qualities to optimise driver comfort and increase performance both indoors and outdoors. It also benefits from Toyota’s world-leading features and technologies to protect both driver and goods, including the company’s unique SAS safety feature, an exclusive technology designed to actively enhance forklift stability and safety. “During the course of the past couple of years we have successfully introduced a lot of new products to the market and they have all been very well received by dealers and customers alike,” notes Terry. “It’s the most up-to-date and complete range there has ever been in our history, renowned for their reliability, efficiency and durability.”


pest control

Intelligent pest management from Mitie Peter Trotman, Managing Director of Mitie’s pest control services outlines the benefits of real-time, intelligent pest management.

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nline systems are transforming pest control in the food and drink industry, providing real-time information, reducing risk, optimising hygiene and meeting and exceeding the standards expected by safety auditors, including HACCP, BRC, AIB and FEMAS. All food manufacturing, processing and supply companies in Ireland are required by law to uphold the highest hygiene standards and prevent pest contamination. Lack of due diligence in this area can lead to enforcement action, so maintaining good records of your pest management activities is not just good practice: it’s vital. Having evidence of an effective pest control strategy can also help in your defence in case of prosecution, which is why it’s important for your company to invest in the best appropriate technology for the job. The traditional approach of keeping records in paper files can render you unable to demonstrate due diligence. The problem with any paper-based system is that it tends to reside in a folder on a shelf, needing to be regularly updated by site staff and signed off by senior management. If records of preventative measures, pest

48 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16

Pest alert, a bespoke ITbased system which provides a dashboard showing the status of all monitoring points, a history of pest activity and easy to download reports and KPIs.

incidences and control actions are not kept up-to-date, your company could ultimately be exposed to legal proceedings or worse, experience an audit failure. It has been demonstrated that an online system changes behaviours, as the focus shifts from reactive pest control activity to pro-active prevention, leading to better risk management.

Innovative Pest Management This is where the latest technology comes into play, with reporting systems that monitor pest management activities, give recommendations, measure compliance with legislation, and importantly, act as evidence of compliance to third party auditors. Remote monitoring devices, which send a real time update every time a rodent is detected, mean that you can manage your pest risk across all your properties from a single PC or mobile device, giving you total control. For example, Mitie has developed Pest alert, a bespoke IT-based system which provides a dashboard showing the status of all monitoring points, a history of pest activity and easy to download reports and Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for 24/7 monitoring of pest control. Each time a pest control technician visits a client’s site, they record findings and recommendations, listing any actions to be taken. The technicians can also add photos which are automatically uploaded and locked within the report, supporting future actions. Pest alert also works seamlessly with remote monitoring systems like eMitter, a revolutionary system based on real-time remote monitoring and pesticide free live traps. eMitter comes with a series of innovative SWOPBOX, which can hold a large range of snap traps. The SWOPBOX can be mounted to walls to adapt to any food producing environment and are fitted with non-toxic allergen NARA BLOC baits, which outperformed regular toxic bait in a recent test. eMitter allows the user to get an instant alert, with the precise location of the trapped rodent – enabling a rapid response to reduce all health related issues. There is also no need for batteries:


pest control Case Study: Atkins & Potts

Food manufacturing requires best practice in pest control as well as the latest technology available such as Pest alert to satisfy hygiene and safety auditors.

the internal transmitters work on kinetic energy, making for a more resilient system, which is also maintenance free. Using eMitter technology, Mitie’s real-time intelligent pest management system can be fitted to any building configuration, with five types of highly efficient traps available for indoor or outdoor use.

Documentation Storage Online systems like Pest alert are also the best way to prepare for inspections and provide easy-to-access storage for all insurance certificates and supporting quality management documentation. Operating intelligently and seamlessly, such systems are able to provide evidence, at a moment’s notice, of all incidences, actions and preventative measures. Management can be reassured that they are in control of pest management across all sites, and a simple alert system means there are no surprises. The benefits of an intelligent approach to pest management don’t just stop at record keeping. By using an online portal, facilities managers can have direct online access to their pest control technicians, with a ‘chat’ function allowing managers to confirm specifications or request work when it is needed.

Hygiene Improvements With the technology available today, pest control can be much more effective and less time-consuming. Companies can protect themselves from potential prosecution by having a real-time record of pest management, and KPIs can be used to drive continual improvement. The data management capability also enables benchmarking across sites, so that problem areas can be identified and dealt with efficiently. Managers can be confident that they know the pest control status of each site and can direct investment or training where it is most needed. For more information about the latest pest control tools from Mitie. visit www.mitie.com/pest-control, call (01) 8839190 or email: sales.pest@mitie.com.

Family owned business, Atkins & Potts produces a variety of award-winning speciality foods, including gourmet sauces and chili and savoury jams for the Irish and the UK market. With UK Soil Association accreditation for its organic products, the business takes standards very seriously and was keen to find a pest control partner that could understand and match their very high hygiene standards. Following a review of their pest control process, Atkins and Potts sought to upgrade the provision of the service in 2015. Typically pest control is recorded using paper-based systems, which can easily be mislaid or left forgotten on a shelf. Atkins and Potts identified a new online system from Mitie pest control services which would enable information to be easily recorded and accessed, helping them to comply with strict food safety audits. They chose Mitie as their new pest control company, based on the scope of services available to aid compliance with food audits, and technological innovations. “Mitie’s proposal was head and shoulders above the competition,” said business owner Robert Young. “Their proactive approach is based on prevention rather than cure. Compared to the competition, this represented a refreshingly different philosophy to pest management.”

The solution Mitie designed a comprehensive ‘intelligent pest management’ solution to reduce the pest risk, based on the analysis of different pest factors and the layout of the business. The solution comprises a remote monitoring rodent unit, eMitter which is fitted inside the grounds. Maintaining compliance with the Soil Association’s requirements is easy with Mitie’s exclusive technology. The system registers when a rodent is trapped and sends an immediate alert with the precise location to a web-based system with real-time data. This enables a rapid response, crucial in food production sites. This technology was also combined with new low energy electronic fly trap units. Following the installation, Atkins and Potts staff were trained and the system was tested, with SMS alerts indicating if a trap had been activated.

Results “Mitie’s consultants carried out a thorough survey of the property, checking and fixing any weak spots,” explained Robert. “It was a unique service offering, and everything was carried out quickly and efficiently. They then installed the traps and infra-red technology to identify mouse tracks, and I can now say with absolute confidence that since the work was carried out we haven’t had any vermin on site. “Not only are we safe in the knowledge that Mitie has our pest prevention covered, but the service is also excellent value for money. Having Mitie on board has transformed how we think of pest management, giving us more control and accessibility to information. I am extremely happy to recommend their services to other food production businesses.”

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 49


standards & compliance

Fostering a Global Outlook

SAI Global provides legal, compliance and risk management professionals with a broad range of technology enabled programmes and consulting services.

SAI provides the training for business professionals to improve their individual performance and help their organisations to succeed.

SAI Global provides organisations around the world with information services and solutions for managing risk, achieving compliance and driving business improvement.

SAI

Global audit, certify and register your product, system or supply chain through independent assessment to reduce risk and enhance service and product quality. They provide legal, compliance and risk management professionals with a broad range of technology enabled programmes and consulting services that facilitate good governance and awareness of compliance, ethics and policy issues. Their aggregated access services are a portal to the standards, handbooks and legislative publications of hundreds of publishers, giving you the ability to reference and manage critical business information. SAI also provides the training that business professionals around the world need to improve their individual performance and help their organisations to succeed.

Substantive Product Portfolio Their product portfolios include:

• Risk Providing organisations with the ability to identify, assess, and prioritise matters that can have a negative or positive impact on their business. This is directly followed by a coordinated and proactive approach to 50 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16

monitor, and control opportunities for their business.

• Learning Providing integrated online, offline and face-to-face learning solutions to improve individual or organisational capability by increasing technical skills, knowledge and competencies.

• Assurance Providing, as a trusted partner, solutions which authenticate that their clients’ products, systems, supply chains and distribution channels meet a required standard. With a recognisable standards mark, they assure the integrity of their clients’ brands and their associated customer promises.

• Knowledge Providing solutions that blend content and technology to ensure their clients are provided with the knowledge and insight to make critical decisions, based on aggregated information and analysis. “We inspire our clients. We help them identify opportunities for business improvement, identify gaps and risks in their operations, benchmark against best practices, and establish goals and aspirations

appropriate for their organisation,” notes Stacey Goodridge, Marketing Manager, SAI Global.

Operational Improvement SAI improve their clients’ business operations and efficiency via operational improvement, communication about compliance management, risk mitigation and management, education and certification. “We inform our clients,” Stacey continues. “We provide access to knowledge, provide a means to assess status and analyse programme performance, and the enabling technology to report to internal and external stakeholders.” The end result is a stronger brand equity, enhanced brand reputation and customer confidence, reduced risk of fraud and corruption, better supply chain management, and improved productivity. “A decision to partner with SAI Global is a decision to inspire a high level of confidence in your brand, loyalty from your customers and partners, and the assurance that you have partnered with an astute service provider with highly skilled industry experts,” Stacey concludes. For more information, telephone (0044) (0) 42 9320912 or email ukmarketing@saiglobal.com.


SAI Global - The Food Safety Specialists SAI Global’s Agri-Food Services offer a comprehensive range of technical, training, audit and risk management solutions. No matter what your role along the farm- to-table journey is producer, processor, packager, packaging materials manufacturer, distributor, supplier or retailers - we ensure your food safety protocols and best practices are in compliance with the regulations of the markets you serve, or wish to serve.

SAI Global’s Services

SAI Global is proud to be an approved Certification Body for the leading Food Safety Management Standards and programs. • •

Food Safety GFSI Standards - BAP Standard, BRC, FSSC 22000, IFS, Global G.A.P. Social Accountability Audits - Responsible

SAI Global

Food Ireland Advert 2015.indd 1

• • • • •

Supply Chain Management MSC - Chain of custody HACCP Standards Traceability Allergen Management ISO 9001 / ISO 22000 / ISO 14001

Food Safety Training Solutions

SAI Global is one of the world’s leading providers of food safety training. Each year thousands of people partners with us to lean all the latest food safety information and best practices designed to enhance your systems while maximising your investment into your business .

SAI Global Creating Trust in a Complex World! CONTACT US Tel: Email: Web:

+ 44 (0) 2921 510 190 ukmarketing@saiglobal.com www.saiglobal.com

11/09/2015 14:12:41


‘UK & Ireland’s Raw Materials Specialists’ Heterochem (Dist.) Ltd is the speciality raw materials supplier of choice to the Food and Beverage industries both in Ireland and the UK

Acidulants Antioxidants Emulsifiers Food Colorants Preservatives Starches Sweeteners Benefits to your business: High quality, competitively priced products - ISO 9001 accredited Excellent customer service - before and after the sale A r, assisting our customers to develop new and existing products A any technical queries Prime location in Baldoyle, Dublin - situated in close proximity to all distribution channels On site storage of all raw materials in our controlled warehousing Variety of UN approved pack sizes available: 25kg, 50kg, 200kg barrels & 1000kg IBCs Unit 49 Baldoyle Industrial Estate, Baldoyle, Dublin 13, Ireland T. +353 1 839 3127 F. +353 1 832 5746 E. info@heterochem.com www.heterochem.com

Europe’s largest manufacturer of plastic crates and containers Trays & containers for safe food handling, distribution & retail display Plastic RTP (reusable Transit Packaging) is a zero-waste solution; its popularity is growing as the food industry seeks to reduce the cost and environmental impact of both packaging and transporting goods.

Legal Excellence in Food Supplier Contracts Distribution Agreements Crisis Management Litigation Rennick Solicitors Main St., Dunboyne ☎ 353-(0)1- 825 1030 www.rennickfoodlawyer.com

www.schoellerallibert.com Mobile: +353 (0)876 767161 brendan.mcgarry@schoellerallibert.com


intellectual property

Know How to Protect Your “Know-How” Brendan Kelly of Rennick Solicitors advises on how you can nurture and protect your brand and your know-how.

K

now-how and branding can be the difference between success and a failure for a food business. Protecting these intellectual assets is best considered even before the product is developed and continued until the merchandise is on the shelf. A company’s intellectual property can be secured by a range of legal measures, each measure designed to protect a different step in the company’s business process.

● Distribution Contracts, Agency Agreements and Franchise

Agreements will normally have contractual clauses inserted to protect each company’s intellectual property rights. Issues covered by such clauses may include limiting the geographic scope of the distribution agreement and the use and presentation of the company’s trademarks.

Protecting Your Reputation Protective Measures Protective measures include: ● A Non-Disclosure Agreement is advisable in the very early stages of product development. An effective Non-Disclosure Agreement can prevent potential suppliers and employees from stealing your company’s know-how and ideas. ● Database Rights may have a role in protecting a secret list of ingredients, formulae or suppliers. ● Patent Protection is available if the new food or process has a “novel” or “inventive step” that is not obvious to someone “skilled in the art”. ● Trade Mark registration is used to protect the company’s brand name and logo. ● Copyright can be effective in safeguarding distinctive packaging and advertisements. Copycat packaging can also be prevented by legal action under the tort of “passing-off”.

Arguably a company’s most prized intellectual asset is the good reputation associated with its name. In an age of mass social media where a reputation built up over decades can be destroyed in hours, it is important that food companies are aware that they may take legal action in cases of defamation. With some regulatory enforcements based on an alleged impurity level of less than one part per billion (the equivalent of one second every 32 years), a company may need to defend its good name from overzealous regulatory enforcements or sensationalist media through the courts. Ultimately, as with any other asset which is a source of competitive advantage, a company’s brand and know-how needs to be nurtured and protected.

Protecting your intellectual assets is best considered even before the product is developed.

A company’s intellectual property can be secured by a range of legal measures, each measure designed to protect a different step in the company’s business process.

About the Author Brendan Kelly is a food technologist and solicitor with over 20 years’ experience in the Irish, UK, and European food industry. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Food Science and Technology UK (FIFST) and a Chartered Scientist (CSci). FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 53


chemicals & food ingredients

NCC Announces New Distribution Partnership

N

ational Chemical Company (NCC) has been appointed by Galactic, the leading European manufacturer of lactic acid, lactates, enzymes, probiotics and powerful natural preservatives, to distribute their range in Ireland, since August 1, 2015. Galactic has acquired valuable expertise in biotechnology since its creation 20 years ago. Galactic develops natural solutions for application in the food, feed, cosmetic, personal & healthcare and industrial markets. Galactic offers health and environmentally friendly alternatives, including lactic acid, lactates, fermentates, proteins, esters and amides. The Galactic product range primarily serves the food industry, including meat, poultry, seafood, dairy and bakery, while the applications for the products include shelf life extension, fortification, preservation, acidification, dough improvement, flavour enhancement, texture improvement and colour stability.

Clean, Natural Solutions “Partnering with such an organisation as National Chemical Company gives us a market reach perfectly aligned with our customer-centric strategy dedicated to better understanding consumers’ needs and providing clean, efficient and natural solutions,” explains

NCC now distribute the Alan Looney, Managing Director of NCC. Galactic range of natural solutions for application in the food, feed, cosmetic, personal & healthcare and industrial markets. Jean-Christophe Bogaert, Sales, Marketing & Business Development Director, Galactic. From NCC’s perspective, the addition of the Galactic range is a further step in the strategic development of their growing product portfolio. “We look forward to developing together with Galactic their market in Ireland,” notes Alan Looney, Managing Director of NCC, “utilising our extensive market coverage, supported by NCC’s excellent sales and support organisation, offering our customers sound commercial solutions, combined with a high level of local technical support across industry sectors.” NCC was a winner of a Deloitte Best Managed Company Award in both 2014 and 2015 and is the leading sales channel partner in Ireland for chemicals and food ingredients. NCC offers solutions for a variety of sectors, including bakery, confectionery, dairy, meat, soups and sauces, ready meals, pet food and nutraceuticals.

NCC and Galactic, taking a fresh look at preservation and innovation.

sales@ncc.ie Contact: Fintan McConnell +353 1 6131400

54 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16

www.ncc.ie

fmcconnell@ncc.ie

www.ncc.ie


instrumentation

Manotherm Make Instruments Work for You

M

anotherm is Ireland’s leading supplier of pressure, temperature, flow, level and humidity instrumentation. They also offer a comprehensive range of high quality data loggers, calibrators, regulators, control valves, and butterfly, ball and knife valves. In addition, they offer calibration services, ensuring your thermometers and pressure gauges deliver accurate readings. And as for steam-trap surveys, they’re the reliable expert you can trust to provide amazing attention to detail. Thanks to their commitment to quality products and outstanding customer care, Manotherm are the first choice for clients across a wide range of industries. From food processing, pharmaceutical and HVAC companies to the water, power and IT sectors, they supply some of the most successful established businesses. Established in 1958 by Bob Gilbert, Manotherm have remained true to their founder’s original vision: to offer Irish industry the latest, most extensive range of instrumentation products at competitive prices.

Expanding Product Range They have recently introduced new ranges of products: Mankenberg sanitary regulators and Gemini electrical energy loggers. If you’re looking to reduce costs, consider VP compressed airflow

Manotherm offer a range of instrumentation products at competitive prices. meters, which monitor usage levels and leakage, so you can control how much you spend, or Domnik energy-efficient steam traps, which don’t use any live steam to operate. Manotherm works only with market-leading suppliers who deliver reliable products, such as Mankenberg, Dwyer, West, Drexelbrook, Land, Influx, Afriso, Gemini, Barksdale, Bindicator and Schubert & Salzer. Manotherm have an excellent understanding of the process requirements of the sectors they serve and are well positioned to provide an outstanding service, holding wide-ranging stock in Dublin and representing best-of-class products. To discover more about Manotherm and their product range, contact: Manotherm Ltd, The Control Centre, Walkinstown Road, Walkinstown, Dublin 12, D12 RP83. Tel: (01) 4522355. Email: info@manotherm.ie. Web: www.manotherm.ie.

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 55


0 Knowl

energy

Calor’s Clean Energy Promise Calor Gas provides cleaner, efficient energy solutions to the Irish food sector. ble. For businesses which are pro-actively aiming to reduce their carbon footprint, a switch from oil to LPG can have a huge impact. Companies can make the switch to Calor easily, and in many cases by a straightforward conversion of existing equipment. In the case of water heating, there are various highly efficient options, such as direct-fired and instantaneous water heaters, which ensure that an ample supply of hot water is available as needed.

Economical and Efficient

C

alor Gas has been delivering innovative energy solutions in Ireland for over 75 years and is part of SHV Energy, the largest distributor of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) worldwide, fuelling businesses, vehicles and homes in more than 27 countries. Calor Gas is a very versatile, portable and manageable fuel, which is easily stored in cylinders or in on-site storage tanks at customers’ premises, and can be delivered to any location in Ireland. As such, it can provide the energy to power a wide range of applications for the food sector, from small artisan producers to agriculture businesses to large manufacturing and production plants. As it produces far lower carbon emissions than oil, coal, peat and even electricity, it is one of the cleanest conventional fuels availa-

As the leading provider of LPG to the Irish market, Calor understands that businesses are looking for the most economical and efficient energy solution available. Calor LPG offers significant advantages for businesses in the food sector due to its cleaner burning and environmentally sustainable credentials. Calor’s energy advisors can tailor energy solutions for business to help reduce energy costs over the long term and positively impact on carbon footprint. In addition, Calor customers can enjoy excellent customer support, online account management and the peace of mind that they’ll never run out of gas as a Calor customer with their tank telemetry and automatic top-up service. For more information, telephone 1850 812450 (ROI) / 028 90455588 (NI) or visit www.calorgas.ie.

CREATING PRODUCE WORTH CELEBRATING TAKES THE RIGHT ENERGY. Whatever sector you’re in, Calor can work with your business to design smarter fuel solutions that make a real difference. Why switch to Calor? • • • •

Significantly reduce CO2 emissions Reduce maintenance costs Reliability of a secure fuel supply LPG offers businesses a cleaner, more efficient alternative

TO FIND OUT WHAT WE CAN DO FOR YOUR BUSINESS Call 1850 812 450 or visit www.calorgas.ie

56 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16


ucc

FITU for purpose UCC’s Food Industry Training Unit continues to play an important role in ensuring the food industry’s workforce possesses the new kinds of skills mix required to respond to a rapidly changing marketplace.

T

he Food Industry Training Unit (FITU) was established in 1993 by the Faculty of Food Science and Technology, UCC. This was in recognition of the importance of continuing professional development (CPD) in the food and related sectors. The FITU services the part-time continuing professional development and training needs of people working in, or associated with, the food and related industry sectors and is an example of UCC’s readiness to evolve and respond to the needs of industry. The student body which the Unit services is part of a growing market segment of non-traditional students which University College Cork has targeted in its strategy of providing education in selected professional areas. The expertise of academic and technical staff in the School of Food and Nutritional Sciences is critical to the successful development and delivery of CPD courses and programmes, which are highly complementary to the traditional education and research activities of the School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Inter-College Connections The Unit works on a day-to-day basis with staff in the School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, Department of Food Business and Development, School of Microbiology, College of Business and Law and the Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, Department of Process and Chemical Engineering, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, who provide academic directorship and lecture on the courses and programmes. These inter-College connections typify the collaborative and interdisciplinary nature of the Unit’s approach to food education and professional development initiatives. Since the FITU’s inception in 1993, the University’s Centre for Adult Continuing Education has provided accreditation services to the Unit. Externally, the Unit works closely in partnership with industry and with Government and state agencies.

National Industry Needs The activities of the FITU reflect national industry needs and are a response to meeting industry’s challenge to develop the quality and skills levels of its workforce. This is in line with national recommendations for an integrated human resources development strategy for the Irish food processing industry. The FITU is in the enviable position to respond to food science and technology, food biotechnology and food business continuing education and training industry challenges, as the critical mass of expertise in the University is uniquely positioned to satisfy this need. The success of the FITU is very much based on the confidence of the food and related sectors in its programmes, as evidenced by the levels of new and repeat business. The Unit is well positioned to continue ensuring that the food industry will be geared to meet the challenges facing it by having a well-trained workforce available, possessing the new kinds of skills mix required to respond to a rapidly changing marketplace and to make University College Cork the first choice university for these courses, regionally and nationally. Typically, those who undertake FITU courses work in the food and drinks manufacturing industries. It is noteworthy that the companies represented vary from very small one or two person operations right through to multinational food companies. A significant number of participants also come from Government departments, state agencies, retailing, services and supply industries. Since their inception, FITU programmes have been offered not only in Cork but also at national venues and over the years, the participants have been drawn from a wide geographical area throughout all four provinces. For further information please contact: Mary McCarthy-Buckley, Training Manager, Food Industry Training Unit, College of Science, Engineering and Food Science, UCC Email m.mccarthybuckley@ucc.ie Website www.ucc.ie/en/fitu FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 57


Food

IRE L A ND 2 015 /16 Ye a r b o o k & D i re c to r y

Product & Service Index

Accreditation

FOOD SAFETY

FOOD Lubricants

Air Products Ireland Ltd P.J. Bonner & Co. Ltd Codico Distributors Ltd Company GS1 Ireland

AUDITING

Topaz

SAI Global GS1 Ireland

GENERAL SERVICES /SUPPLY TO THE TRADE

CONSULTANTS

ARCHITECTS / FOOD RELATED BUILDINGS

Air Products Ireland Ltd Cross Refrigeration SAI Global GS1 Ireland Q-Lab Ltd

Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd AIC Plastic Pallets Ltd All in All Ingredients Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix BIM/Irish Sea Fisheries Board Blenders Ltd Bord Bia - The Irish Food Board Calor Gas Codico Distributors Ltd Com-Plas Packaging Festo Ltd Healy Group Heavey Technology Innovate Food Technology Irish National Accreditation Board JMC Packaging Ltd National Standards Authority Of Ireland (NSAI) Pegler & Louden Pharmafoods Ltd Puratos Crest Foods Ltd Q-Lab Ltd Rennick Solicitors Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland T.S. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor & Son Ltd Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd

Carey Associates

BARCODING / LABELLING ADC Barcode AIS Ltd ALS Labelling Solutions Avery Weigh-Tronix Codico Distributors Ltd Com-Plas Packaging DSG Packaging Ltd SAI Global GS1 Ireland Heavey Technology JMC Packaging Ltd Label One Ltd Limerick Packaging New Era Packaging Ltd Obeeco Ltd Tekpak Automation Ltd Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd Wrap It Packaging

EDUCATION /TRAINING / CERTIFICATE /CONSULTANCY SAI Global GS1 Ireland Irish National Accreditation Board National Standards Authority Of Ireland (NSAI) Safefood UCC - School of Food and Nutritional Science UCD School Of Agriculture and Food Science

ENERGY / UTILITIES MANAGEMENT Dalkia Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd 58 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16

CONTROL /INSTRUMENTATION Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd P.J. Bonner & Co. Ltd Cross Refrigeration Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Festo Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd

HYGIENE Cross Refrigeration Enviroclad Systems Ltd Safefood Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Stone Food Machinery

TESTING/INSPECTION Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Cross Refrigeration DSG Packaging Ltd P.J. Bonner & Co. Ltd Q-Lab Ltd QPM Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Teagasc Food Research Programme Moorepark and Ashtown Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd

HEALTH & SAFETY Enviroclad Systems Ltd SAI Global WrenTech Ltd

INDUSTRIAL WASHING EQUIPMENT

TRACKING SYSTEMS

Stone Food Machinery

ADC Barcode Codico Distributors Ltd GS1 Ireland Heavey Technology Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd WrenTech Ltd

INGREDIENTS AB Mauri UK & Ireland All in All Ingredients Ltd Andrew Ingredients Ltd Camida Ltd


product & service index Corcoran Chemicals Ltd Glanbia Plc Healy Group Heterochem (Dist.) Ltd Ornua Kiernan’s Food Ingredients Ltd National Chemical Company Nutrition Supplies O’Brien Ingredients PK Chemicals Ltd Puratos Crest Foods Ltd Trilby Trading Ltd D.D. Williamson (Ireland) Ltd

IT SERVICES & OUTSOURCING ALS Labelling Solutions Dalkia DSG Packaging Ltd Innovate Food Technology Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd

MATERIALS HANDLING SERVICE CONTROL / INSTRUMENTATION Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix Dalkia Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Irish Lift Trucks Manotherm Ltd Odenberg Engineering Ltd P.J. Bonner & Co. Ltd QPM Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Tekpak Automation Ltd WrenTech Ltd

MACHINERY / EQUIPMENT

ABB Ltd Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd AIC Plastic Pallets Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix Dalkia Fischbein-Saxon Irish Lift Trucks JMC Packaging Ltd Kuka Robotics Ireland Limerick Packaging Obeeco Ltd Odenberg Engineering Ltd QPM Ltd Security Pak Ltd Schoeller Allibert Ltd Stone Food Machinery Syspal Tekpak Automation Ltd Toyota Material Handling Ireland Wrap It Packaging WrenTech Ltd

PALLETS, CRATES & CONTAINERS Dollard Packaging Ltd Industrial Packaging Ltd

Irish Lift Trucks JMC Packaging Ltd Limerick Packaging Schoeller Allibert Ltd Syspal Odenberg Engineering Ltd WrenTech Ltd

PUMPS & VALVES

Festo Ltd Dalkia Irish Lift Trucks Pegler & Louden Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd WrenTech Ltd

REFRIGERATION / COLD STORAGE Air Products Ireland Ltd Cold Move Cross Refrigeration CRS Mobile Cold Storage Ltd Dalkia DSG Packaging Ltd Festo Ltd Irish Lift Trucks Schoeller Allibert Ltd Odenberg Engineering Ltd Ornua Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Syspal TransStock Warehousing & Cold Storage Ltd

TRANSPORT & LOGISTICS

Avery Weigh-Tronix DSG Packaging Ltd Irish Lift Trucks Johnston Logistics Ornua Toyota Material Handling Ireland TransStock Warehousing & Cold Schütz (Ireland) Ltd Storage Ltd WrenTech Ltd

WASTE MANAGEMENT/RECYCLING Avery Weigh-Tronix Irish Lift Trucks Repak Ltd

PACKAGING /DESIGN / LABELLING ADC Barcode AiP Thermoform Packaging Air Products Ireland Ltd ALS Labelling Solutions Celtic Sales Company Ltd Com-Plas Packaging Corcoran Products (Irl) Ltd Diamond Corrugated Dollard Packaging Ltd DSG Packaging Ltd Elopak GS1 Ireland Greiner Packaging Ltd Industrial Packaging Ltd

Innovate Food Technology JMC Packaging Ltd Kiernan’s Food Ingredients Ltd Label One Ltd Limerick Packaging Measom Freer & Co. Ltd New Era Packaging Ltd NPP Group Ltd Obeeco Ltd Ornua T.S. O’Connor & Son Ltd Packex Industries Ltd P.C. Packaging Ltd Pharmafoods Ltd QPM Ltd Schoeller Allibert Ltd Schütz (Ireland) Ltd Sealed Air Ltd (Cryovac) Security Pak Ltd Smurfit Kappa Ireland Syspal Tekpak Automation Ltd Versatile Packaging Ltd Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd Wrap It Packaging WrenTech Ltd

Pest Control /Fly screens Mitie Rentokil Pest Control

Plant Maintenance Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd P.J. Bonner & Co. Ltd Dalkia Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Obeeco Ltd

Processing Equipment Bakery

Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix Cross Refrigerawtion DSG Packaging Ltd Pharmafoods Ltd Puratos Crest Foods Ltd QPM Ltd Schoeller Allibert Ltd Syspal Versatile Packaging Ltd Wrap It Packaging WrenTech Ltd

Dairy

Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix Cross Refrigeration Elopak David Kellett & Partners Ltd DSG Packaging Ltd Schoeller Allibert Ltd Syspal Obeeco Ltd Odenberg Engineering Ltd FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 59


Food Ireland 2012

product & service index

alpackaging.ie , fibre drums, e bulk (fibre & plastic), DRINK Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd los & materials Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-TronixCross Refrigeration oducts.

ions

se, Millennium Co. Kildare. 00 038 nitial.ie .ie Solutions

ogy

William Street,

9856 9661 tesolutions.ie tesolutions.ie uitment, food research.

ouse, Mount er, Dublin 2. 599 778

gold.com marketing oducts.

Meat, Fish & Poultry

Recruitment ICDS Recruitment Consultants Innovate Food Technology

Research & Development Bord Bia - The Irish Food Board BIM/Irish Sea Fisheries Board Healy Group Innovate Food Technology OrnuaBlackchurch Business Safefood Park, Rathcoole, Teagasc Food Research UCC -Co. Dublin. School of Food and Nutritional Science (01) 401 3333 Teagasc Food Research Weber(01) 458 8015 Packaging Solutions Ltd WrenTech Ltd info@jol.ie

Johnston Logistics Ltd

Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Address: DSG Packaging Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix Schoeller Allibert Ltd Cross Refrigeration Syspal DSG Packaging Ltd Odenberg Engineering Ltd Schoeller Allibert Ltd Telephone: Pharmafoods Ltd Obeeco Ltd QPM Ltd Odenberg Engineering Ltd Fax: Clonlara Avenue, Versatile Address: Packaging Ltd Pharmafoods Ltd Email: Wrap It Packaging QPM Ltd Baldonnell Business WrenTech Ltd Stone Food Machinery Web: www.johnstonlogistics.ie Park, Baldonnell, Syspal Main Products/ Warehousing & Cross Refrigeration FRESH FOOD Dublin 22. Versatile Packaging Ltd QPM Ltd Wrap It Packaging Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Services: Logistics. Telephone: (01) 403 4100 Syspal WrenTech Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Contact: Business Development: Teknomek Industries Ltd Fax: (01) 403 4183 Avery Weigh-Tronix WrenTech Ltd Deirdre McGuirk Cross Refrigeration Machinery Auctioneers Email: info@irishlifttrucks.ie DSG Packaging Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Niall Hickey Obeeco Web: www.irishlifttrucks.ie Ltd Cross Refrigeration Odenberg Engineering Ltd Main Products/ Materials handling, GS1 Ireland Waste Water equipment Pharmafoods Ltd Repak Ltd Services: equipment / forklifts. Stone Food Machinery K Puratos Crest Foods Ltd

Irish Lift Trucks

Stainless Steel Fabrication

Company Listings

QPM Ltd Pharmafoods Ltd Schoeller Allibert Ltd QPM Ltd their sales abroad. Syspal Versatile Packaging Ltd Versatile Packaging Ltd Wrap ItContact: Godfrey Lydon Packaging Wrap It Packaging WrenTech Ltd WrenTech Ltd

Trade Associations

Contact:

General Manager: Conal McCourt

Irish National Accreditation Board Address: Wilton Park House, Wilton Place, Dublin 2. Telephone: (01) 607 3003 Email: inab@inab.ie Web: www.inab.ie

J

JMC Packaging Ltd Address:

116 Clonmore Road, Dungannon, Co. Tyrone, BT71 6HX. Telephone: 048 38 851 413 Email: jasongovenderjmc@aol.com Web: www.jmcpackaging.co.uk Main Products/ Specialists in packaging Services: materials and equipment. Shrink wrap equipment, tray sealing equipment,

Maple Court Wormbridge House MapleMaple Court House Court Wormbridge Wormbridge House Hereford HR2 9DH Wormbridge Maple Court Hereford Wormbridge Hereford HR2HR2 9DHHouse Wormbridge 9DH Wormbridge HR2Ltd 9DH Wormbridge David Kellett &Hereford Partners Tel: (0044) 1981 570611 www.davidkellett.co.uk

Tel: (0044) 1981 570611 www.davidkellett.co.uk Email: sales@davidkellett.co.uk Tel: (0044) 1981 570611 www.davidkellett.co.uk Address: Maple Court, Email: sales@davidkellett.co.uk Tel: (0044) 1981 570611 www.davidkellett.co.uk Email: sales@davidkellett.co.uk

Wormbridge House, Wormbridge, Hereford, HR2 9DH. Telephone: (0044) 1981 570 611 Fax: (0044) 1981 570 599 Email: davidkellett@davidkellett. REV ERSE OSMO SIS, co.uk U LTRA-O SMO SIS, Main Products/ U L T R A Dairy Engineering, F ILTRA TIO N & M I C R O FILTRA TION Services: Systems/Membranes, SYSTEM S A ND ASNSM EM SOOS SI SI ,S , RR EE V V EEMRRESSMEReverse Osmosis, EB ROO U L T R A -Ultra Osmosis®, Ultra O S M OOS SI SI S, , RU ELUTVLRETARRFSAIEL- TOORSSAM M O SNI S&, UUL LT TR RAAF -IFiltration and Micro LOTSRMATOTI O I OI SN, & M I C R O FFiltration, Effluent I L T R A T SI O N RFOI LF ITLRTAR TAI TOI N O N& U LMT IRSCA Y S T ETreatment, Spiral M S A ND TF EIBLM SA AETNSI D M I CSM RYOES M ON RTAR N Wound and Plate & M E M B R A N E S Advertisement S Y S T EFrame, Cheese Maturing M S for A NFood D Ireland — May 2014 M EBrian M Vacuum Pouches B RClarke A N E S Tel: 00 353 87 6434892 To: Contact: Managing Director: Email: brian@ tarapublications.ie David Kellett From: Debbie Kellett Tel: 01981 570611 Email: sales@davidkellett.co.uk


Food Ireland 2012

company listings

Companylistings listings Company

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ADCADC Barcode Ltd Ltd ADC Barcode Ltd Barcode

Company Listings

Food Ireland 2012

AiPAiP Thermoform Packaging Packaging Thermoform AiP Thermoform

Address: Unit 8, Willow Business Address: Unit 1 A Ballymaley Address: Unit 8, Willow Business Address: Unit 8, Willow Business Packaging Address: Unit 1 A Ballymaley Park, Knockmitten Lane, Park, Knockmitten Lane, Address: Unit 1Business Park, A Ballymaley Park, Knockmitten Lane, Business Park, Dublin 12. Business Park, Barefield, Ennis, Dublin 12. Barefield, Tel: (01) 465 6480 Clare. Co. Dublin 12. Barefield, Telephone: (01) 465 6480 Ennis, Fax: (01) 465 6487 Tel: (065) 686 4486 Fax: Telephone: (01) 465 6487 (01) 465 6480 (065) Co. Clare. Ennis, Email: ciaranf@adcbarcode.com Fax: 689 3479 Email: ciaranf@adcbarcode.com Telephone: (065) 686 4486 Web: www.adcbarcode.com Fax: (01) 465 6487 Co. Clare. Email: john@aip.ie Main Products & Services: Web: www.adcbarcode.com Fax: (065) 689 3479 ABB Ltd Web: www.aip.ie Email: ciaranf@adcbarcode.com Telephone: (065) 686 4486 ABB Ltd Thermal transfer printers, EU178 Email: john@aip.ie Main Products & Services: Main Products/ Thermal transfer Address: Auriga House, Address: Auriga House, Web: www.adcbarcode.com Fax: (065) 689 3479 ABB Ltd software,labels, thermal foil, Design and manufacture printers, EU178 software, Web: www.aip.ie Precedent Drive, Precedent Drive, Rooksley, Services: scanners. Services of Thermoform Email: john@aip.ie Address: Auriga House, Milton Keynes, MK13 8PQ. Main Products/ Thermal transfer labels, thermal foil, scanners. Main Products/ Design and manufacture Rooksley, Milton Keynes, Packaging for the Irish market. Services: printers, EU178 software, Web: www.aip.ie Tel: Precedent Drive, (0044) 1908 350 300 Services of Thermoform Packaging MK13 8PQ. Advanced Packaging Contact: John Mulleady Fax: Rooksley, Milton Keynes, (0044) 1908 350 301 Advanced Packaging Machinery labels, thermal foil, scanners. Main Products/ Design and manufacture for the Irish market. Telephone: (0044) 1908 350 300 Ltd Machinery Ltd Email: robotics@gb.abb.com Contact: John Mulleady Fax: (0044) 1908 350 301 Address: 718 Northwest Address: 718 Northwest Air Products Ireland Ltd Services of Thermoform Packaging MK13 8PQ. Web: www.abb.com Address: Unit 950, Western Business Park, Advanced Business Park, Email: robotics@gb.abb.com Packaging www.abb.com/robotics for the Irish market. Telephone: (0044) 1908 350 300 Machinery Ltd Industrial Estate, Dublin 15. Ballycoolin, Ballycoolin, Dublin 15. Main Products & Services: Web: www.abb.com Contact: John Mulleady Fax: (0044) 1908 350 301 Address: 718 Northwest Killeen Road, Dublin 12. Tel: (01) 861 214 1 (01) 861 2141 ABB is a leading supplier of Telephone: www.abb.com/robotics 1800 99 50 29 Tel: (01) Fax: 861 2142 Business Park, Email: robotics@gb.abb.com robots, industrial Fax: (01) 861 2142 Contact: UK & Ireland - Robotics ieinfo@airproducts.com Email: s.dallas@test.ie Email: Ballycoolin, Dublin 15. modular manufacturing Email: s.dallas@test.ie Web: www.abb.com Managing Director: www.airproducts.ie Web: www.packagingmachinery.ie Web: systems and service. A Web: www.packagingmachinery.ie Telephone: (01) 861 2141 www.abb.com/robotics Main Products & Services: Main Products & Services: Chris Withey strong solutions focus MainFax: Products/ Metal detectors, x-ray (01) 861 2142 Air Products brings Metal detectors, x-ray Contact: UK & Ireland - Robotics helps manufacturers Main Products/ Air Products Ireland Ltdyou ABB is a leading Services: inspection systems, the latest, most innovative inspection systems, Email: s.dallas@test.ie productivity, improve Address: Unit 950, Western supplier of industrial Services: Managing Director: check weighers & label solutions in cryogenic freezing, check weighers & label product quality and Web: www.packagingmachinery.ie Industrial Estate, robots, modular applicators. chilling, cooling and Modified applicators. Chris Withey worker safety. ABB has Killeen Road, Main Products/ Metal detectors, x-ray manufacturing systems Atmosphere Packaging. Freshline Contact: Technical Director: Contact: Technical Director: installed more than Main Products/ ABB is a leading Air Products Ireland Ltd Dublin 12. Services: inspection systems, Gases® include CO2, Nitrogen Stephen Dallas and service. A strong Stephen Dallas 200,000 robots world wide Address: Services: supplier of industrial and Oxygen in liquid orUnit 950, Western gaseous check weighers & label Telephone: 1800 99 50 29 Ireland - Robotics Group: Contact: solutions focus helps Email: ieinfo@airproducts.com form. Backed by over 40 years’ Industrial Estate, robots, modular Sales & Marketing applicators. manufacturers improve knowhow in food processing. To Web: www.airproducts.ie Killeen Road, Manager: Mike Wilson manufacturing systems Contact: Technical Director: Main productivity, product Products/ find outAir Products brings more please visit our UK & Ireland – Robotics Dublin 12. quality and worker and service. A strong Stephen Dallas website. Services: you the latest, most Managing Director: Telephone: 1800 99 50 29 on Contact: Air Products safety. ABB has installed Chris Withey innovative solutions solutions focus helps 1800 99 50 29 Email: ieinfo@airproducts.com more than 190,000 in cryogenic freezing, manufacturers improve AIC Plastic Pallets Web: www.airproducts.ie robots worldwide. chilling, cooling and AIC Plastic Pallets Ltd Ltd productivity, product Address: The Woodlands, AIS Ltd -Main Automatic Products/ Air Products brings Address: The Woodlands, Modified Atmosphere Contact: Ireland - Carrigmore, Ballineen, IdentificationPackaging. Freshline Systems quality and worker Carrigmore, Ballineen, Services: you the latest, most Robotics Group: Co. Cork. Address: Unit 48, Canal Walk, Co. Cork. Gases® include CO2, safety. ABB has installed innovative solutions (023) Tel: 884 7333 Sales & Marketing Park West Industrial Park, Telephone: (023) 884 7333 Fax: (023) 884 7671 more than 190,000 NangorNitrogen and Oxygen Road, Dublin 12. Manager: Nigel Platt in cryogenic freezing, Fax: (023) 884 7671 Email: info@aicplasticpallets.com (01) 620in liquid or gaseous Tel: 5742 robots worldwide. chilling, cooling and AIC Plastic Pallets Ltd Email: info@aicplasticpallets.com Web: www.aicplasticpallets.com Fax: (01) 620form. Backed by over 40 5735 AB Mauri UK & Ireland Address: The Woodlands, Modified Atmosphere Contact: Address:Ireland - Main Products & Services: years’ knowhow in food Email: info@aisltd.ie Barn Way, Lodge Farm, Web: www.aicplasticpallets.com Carrigmore, Ballineen, Main Products/ Materials handling Plastic, timber and aluminium Packaging. Freshline Web: www.aisltd.ie processing. To find out AB Cheesemaking Robotics Group: Northampton, NN5 7UW. pallets, pallet boxes, totes, Address: 7 Daybell Close, Services: platforms, pallets, Main Products &more please visit our Services: Gases® include CO2, Co. Cork. Tel: (0044) 1604 755 522 Sales & Marketing storage boxes, stacking RFID equipment,automatic containers, boxes, plastic Fax: Bottesford, Nottingham, (0044) 1604 752 470 website. Telephone: (023) 884 7333 Nitrogen and Oxygen containers, slipsheets, linbins, Manager: Nigel Platt labelling, print & apply systems, & wooden, ISPMI5 Damien.McDonald@abmauri.com Email: NG13 0DQ, Contact: Air Products on Fax: (023) 884 7671 in liquid or gaseous bespoke pallets and boxes industrial barcode scanning, compliance, trays, tote Web: England. www.abmauriukandireland.com 1800 99 50 29 Email: info@aicplasticpallets.com (aluminium and plastic). form. Backed by over 40 2D barcode equipment, hand Main Products & Services: boxes, plastic pallets, Telephone: (0044) 1949 842 867 Contact: Joe O’Flynn Web: www.aicplasticpallets.com held readers, mobile computers, Dough conditioners, years’ knowhow in food plastic tote boxes, (0044) 1949 842 867 fixed mount scanning, label ABFax: Cheesemaking yeast, soya flours, sour Main Products/ Materials handling plastic pallet boxes, processing. To find out printers, mobile printers, desktop Email: chrisashby@ doughs, cake & donut Address: 7 Daybell Close, slipsheets, linbins, plastic Services: platforms, pallets, more please visit our printers, industrial printers, mixes, icings & fillings. abcheesemaking.co.uk buckets, bespoke pallets containers, boxes, plastic Bottesford, Nottingham, barcode printers, labels & website. Contact: Director of Sales (Ireland): Web: www.abcheesemaking.co.uk (aluminium and plastic). & wooden, ISPMI5 ribbons. Supply, install & NG13 0DQ, Damien McDonald Contact: Air Products on Contact: Joint Managing Director: Main Products/ Cheesemaking training maintenance of auto ID products. compliance, trays, tote Custom solution development 1800 99 50 29 Services: and consultancy. England. Charles O’Donovan boxes, plastic pallets, Joint Managing Director: Telephone: (0044) 1949 842 867 for product traceability Contact: Christine Ashby plastic tote boxes, Jerry O’Flynn suitable for you. Fax: (0044) 1949 842 867

Email: chrisashby@ abcheesemaking.co.uk Web: www.abcheesemaking.co.uk 37_48 company_listing.indd 1 Main Products/ Cheesemaking training

plastic pallet boxes,

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 61 3 7 f o o d i rslipsheets, linbins, plastic eland

buckets, bespoke pallets (aluminium and plastic). Contact: Joint Managing Director:

11/01/2012 17:09


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COmE TOgEThER

company listings Andrew Ingredients Ltd

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Address: 27 Ferguson Drive, Knockmore Hill Industrial Park, Lisburn, Co. Antrim, BT28 2EX. Tel: (048) 9267 2525 Fax: (048) 9263 3840 Bord Bia Email: tim@andrewingredients.co.uk The Irish Food Board Web: SCIENCE www.andrewingredients.ie LIFE INDUSTRIAL INgREDIENTS Address: Clanwilliam Court, Main Products & Services: BIM/Irish Sea Fisheries Board Lower Mount Street, Dublin 2. Bakery ingredients, flour, Address: PO Box 12, Crofton Rd, Tel: (01) 668 5155 bread, cake and confectionery Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. Email: info@bordbia.ie mixes, gluten free mixes, icings, Tel: (01) 214 4100 Web: www.bordbia.ie dried fruit, savoury and sweet Fax: (01) 214 4132 Main Products & Services: sauces, colours and flavours, Email: info@bim.ie Marketing, promotion baking powders, raising agents, Web: www.bim.ie and development of Irish sugar etc. Main Products & Services: food, drink & horticulture. Contact: Managing Director: Tim Andrew Bord Iascaigh Mhara helps to develop the Irish Seafood Industry Avery Weigh-Tronix by providing technical expertise, Address: Dublin: business support, funding, training Airton Park, Airton Road, and promoting responsible Tallaght, Dublin 24. environmental practice. Tel: (01) 400 0720 (01) 400 Fax: Milk 0750 Ltd Instantising Powders with LecithinBlenders has its challenges. Antrim: Address: Unit 4, IDA Centre, Whether it is controlling the rate of hydration of a high Dublin 8. 1 Sentry Lane,Newtownabbey, Newmarket, Calor Gas 4XX. 453 6960 the (01)powder, protein powderCo.orAntrim, the BT36 rapid wetting of aTel: high fat Address: Long Mile Road, Tel: (028) 9083 9092 Fax: (01) 453 7607 choice of to improve the instantising properties of a Dublin 12. Fax: Lecithin (028) 9083 5393 Email: sales@blenders.ie 1850 812 450 Tel: powder Email: is essential. As not one Lecithin Main resembles irelandinfo@awtxglobal.com Products &another, Services: info@calorgas.ie Email: www.averyweigh-tronix.com/ireland Web: Mayonnaises, the importance of making the right decision cannot be dressings, yWeb: o u rwww.calorgas.ie Main Products & Services: bouillons, cooking sauces, overstated. Main Products & Services: Avery Weigh-Tronix / GSE table sauces, carvery sauces, Supplier of LPG (Liquefied indicators and weighing relishes in bulk catering, sachets Petroleum Gas) equipment; Labelling and retail jar formats.Branded and Camida wants equipment; to understand the application and customer energy solutions for Atex Systems for i s oTailored v e r private label. the food production sector. needs to choose the Lecithin that suits you and your product. Food & associated industries; Contact: Sales and Marketing Liquid and bag filling; Vessel Providing Quality Services, Director: Wetting and flow-properties, flavour, colour, viscosity, GM Products Kevin Donnelly, and hopper weighing; and Systems Since status and many properties must be adapted to the weighbridges Lorryother 1978. & Management systems;We analyse needs of the finished product. your needs. We P.J. Bonner & Co. Ltd instrumentation weighing Recipe and Q.C. software. Calibration, Instrumentation tailor each approach to the individual processing plant and & Weighing A full range of maintenance Address: 35CALIBRATION Western Parkway with over experience of Dairy across- Fixed,Ballymount 40 years contracts. Emergency supportcombined Calibration Business - Expert Service Centre, Full Time Schedules breakdown service; Legal ISO9001:2008 Certified - Flexible Schedules Europe, we manage the process and most importantly add Ballymount, Dublin 12. - Nationwide Drive, Service - On Demand / Emergency Metrology Verification, Full -Tel: Traceable Calibrations (01) 450 5050 - Fully Qualified Staff value to your end product. Camida Ltd - Legal Verification - Online Certificates & Reports range of calibration services Fax: (01) 450 5183 CamidaTower Ltd.,House, Tower House, Address: New Quay, including UKAS; High precision Email: sales@pjbonner.com MAINTENANCE New Quay, Clonmel, Co. Tipperary. balances, project management Clonmel, Web: experienced www.pjbonner.com This service is and provided by a dedicated and team (052) 612 5455 Tel: - I&C Maintenance project support; Main Products & Services:Technicians - Qualified Instrumentation Co Tipperary, Fax: (052) 612 Ireland. 5466 with in-depth technical who Provide serviceand for allmarket knowledge - Fully and Documented Support Reporting Supply, Service and Calibration - Emergency & Breakdown Resonse Times Email: joe.guiney@camida.com manufacturerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brands,not only deliver a customer focused approach to your business. SoControls, of Instruments, Web: INDUSTRIAL www.camida.comINgREDIENTS LIFE SCIENCE Avery Weigh-Tronix equipment; Weighing. t: +353 52 6125455 challenge Camida to find tailor-made solutions for you and Main Products & Services: COMMISSIONING software contract support; Contact: Managing Director: e: joe.guiney@camida.com Ingredients (Food, Beverage, Full range of equipment hire: your production. New Plant and Upgrade Commissioning Service Patrick M Bonner - Full Documentation provided Feed). Lecithin, Esters (Fatty Fullrange of consumable m: +353 86 2413223 - Loop Checking Service Manager: acids & MCT oils), - Bench & Loop Calibration products, Printheads,Thermal Roddy Jefferson w: www.camida.com Emulsification systems, PLEASE DIRECT YOUR TO jOE gUINEY transfer ribbons and ENQUIRIES labels. Sweeteners (Sucralose, Stevia, PRODUCTS NHDC), Vitamin blends, Flavour - Instrumentation Sales - Weighing Sales systems, Meat functional blends - Measurement & Control - Analytical/Precision Balances - Leading Manufacturers - Bench/Platform Scales (Texture & yield improvers), - Technical Support - Retail EC Approved - Calibration Prior to Dispatch - Platform, Check, Counting Gum Arabic. - Project Procurement - Loadcells Contact: Sales Manager: 3 02/06/2015 12:48 SYSTEMS Joe Guiney

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62 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16

- Wireless Temperature Monitoring Systems - Weighing Control Systems Including Batching - Alarm Monitoring - Calibration & Maintenance Management System

Pharmaceutical | Medical Device | Food & Dairy | Beverage Manufacturing | Healthcare | Water | Chemical | Retail


company listings Corcoran Chemicals Ltd Carey Associates

Architects for the Food Industry Address: Office 1, Second Floor, Building 3b, Killegland Street, Ashbourne Town Centre, Ashbourne, Co. Meath A84 NX77 (01) 835 1572 Tel: Email: info@careyassociates.ie www.careyassociates.ie Web: Main Products & Services: Architects and Project Managers Contact: Fergus Carey MRIAI

Celtic Sales Company Ltd

Address: Unit 3b, Waterfront Business Park, Little Island, Cork. (021) 429 7984 Tel: (021) 429 7990 Fax: Email: conor@celticsales.com Main Products & Services: Packaging materials for fresh food. Contact: Managing Director: Conor Ahern

Codico Distributors Ltd

Address: Cleaboy Business Park, Old Kilmeaden Road, Co. Waterford. Tel: (051) 379 933 Fax: (051) 372 352 Email: sales@codico-distributors.com Web: www.codico-distributors.com Main Products & Services: Domino: Inkjet, Laser, Outer Case, Thermal Transfer, Thermal Inkjet, Print and Apply Labelling, 2D, Data Matrix Systems, Electrox: Yag, Fibre, UV Lasers, Handling Stations.

Address: 17 Parkgate Street,Dublin 8. Tel: (01) 633 0400 Fax: (01) 679 3521 Email: info@corcoranchemicals.com www.corcoranchemicals.com Web: Main Products & Services: Distributors of raw materials for the food, pharmaceutical chemical industry. Contact: Sales

Corcoran Products (Irl) Ltd

Address: 17 Parkgate Street, Dublin 8. Tel: (01) 633 0400 Fax: (01) 679 3521 Email: info@corcoranproducts.com www.corcoranproducts.com Web: Main Products & Services: Suppliers of packaging to the food, pharmaceutical and chemical industry. Contact: Colin Acton

Cross Refrigeration (Irl) Ltd

Address: Nationwide with offices in Armagh, Cork, Dublin and Limerick. Tel: Armagh: (028) 3752 6090 Cork: (021) 430 2321 Dublin: (01) 451 1915 Limerick: (061) 417 415 Email: info@cross-group.org Web: www.cross-group.org Main Products & Services: Energy management & all major types of Refrigeration and Air Conditioning systems installed & commissioned. www.crossdirect.ie offers commercial refrigeration, best prices, delivered direct within one week of order! Dedicated Refrigeration and Air Conditioning rental business - check out: www.crosshire.ie

D Dalkia

Address: 145 Lakeview Drive, Airside Business Park, Swords, Co. Dublin. Tel: (01) 870 1200 Fax: (01) 870 1201 Email: info@dalkia.ie Web: www.dalkia.ie Main Products & Services: Energy Management Services, Utilities Management Services, Maintenance, Lighting & Technical Services. Contact: Business Delvelopment Manager, Energy & Utilities: Alan Keogh

Diamond Corrugated

Address: 12-13 Pennyburn Industrial Estate, Londonderry, Northern Ireland, BT48 OLU. Tel: (048) 7126 2957 Fax: (048) 7126 7094 Email: mail@diamondcorr.com Web: www.diamondcorr.com Main Products & Services: Corrugated, multi-point glued, litho-laminated corrugated, folding cartons. Contact: Sales & Marketing Manager: Joanne Beckett

Dollard Packaging Ltd

Address: Units 6-11, Eklad Park, Malahide Road Industrial Park, Malahide Road, Dublin 17. Tel: (01) 847 0044 Email: sales@dollard-packaging.ie Web: www.dollard-packaging.ie Main Products & Services: Print and Packaging.

CRS Mobile Cold Storage Ltd Cold Move

Address: Glenasaul Industrial Park, Oranmore, Co. Galway. Tel: (091) 792 926 Mobile: 086 8091 893 Email: innovation@coldmove.ie Web: www.coldmove.ie Main Products & Services: Controlled Storage & Distribution.

Address: Carnisle, Kildalkey, Co. Meath. Tel: (046) 943 5000 Fax: (046) 943 5068 Email: enquiry@crs.ie Web: www.crs.ie Main Products & Services: Increase your on site cold storage capacity: CRS offer a wide range of temperature controlled storage solutions both new and professionally refurbished for rent and purchase.

Donoghue Packaging

Address: Donpack Business Park, Bandon, Co. Cork Tel: (023) 884 2111 Fax: (023) 884 1211 Email: donpack@donpack.ie Web: www.donpack.com Main Products & Services: Heavy duty packaging products. Contact: Managing Director: Ray Donoghue


company listings Address: L2 Toughers Industrial Park, Newhall, Naas, Co. Kildare. Tel: (045) 454 900 Email: rdoyle@dsgpack.ie Web: www.dsgpack.ie Main Products & Services: Specialists in Contract Packaging, Outsourcing and “End of Line” Filling and Packaging Services. Contact: Robert Doyle

E Elopak

Address: 67 Broomhill Road, Enviroclad Systems Ltd Tallaght, Dublin 24. Address: Unit 57B, Tel: (01) 452 1111 Hebron Industrial Estate, Web: www.elopak.com Hebron Road, Main Products & Services: Co. Kilkenny. Liquid Packaging, Milk, (056) 775Cartons, 2866 Telephone: Soup and Juice (056) 777 0955 Fax: Packaging Machines. Email: Derek Nangle info@enviroclad.com Contact:

Web: www.enviroclad.com Main Products/ Supply and Fitting of Services: Enviroclad Hygienic Wall and Ceiling Cladding in P.V.C. for the Food Industry. Contact: Director: Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Liam Moylan Address: Exchequer House, Director: Embassy Office Park, Mary Moylan

Kill, Co. Kildare. Tel: (045) 989 200 ESB Independent Energy Email: info@ie.endress.com Dublin Office: Web: www.ie.endress.com Address: Woodford Business Park, Main Products & Services: Endress Santry, + Hauser Dublin 17.in leader is a global Tel: (01) 862 8300 instrumentation solutions Fax: (01) 862 and services for 8350 the food info@esbie.ie industry. Email: and beverage Web:

www.esbie.ie

F Festo Ltd

Address: Head Office: Unit 5, Sandyford Park, Sandyford Industrial Estate, Dublin 18. Tel: (01) 295 4955 Fax: (01) 295 5680 Email: sales_ie@festo.com Web: www.festo.com/ie Main Products & Services: Pneumatic, electrical & sensoric equipment. Industrial automation I r e lEngineering and 2012 F o o d training. service. Complete system solutions.

Address: Unit 57B, FoodIndustrial ScienceEstate, Faculty of Hebron - U.C.C. and Technology Hebron Road, University College, Address: Co. Kilkenny. Co.2866 Cork. Tel: (056) 775 Fax: (056) 777 0955 Telephone: (021) 490 3527 Email: Fax: info@enviroclad.com (021) 427 6398 Web: www.enviroclad.com Email: dean.food@ucc.ie Main Web:Products & Services: http://food.ucc.ie Supply and Main Products/ Fitting research, of Education, Services: Enviroclad Hygienic Wall continuing education & and Ceiling Cladding in training. P.V.C. for the Food Festo Ltd Industry. Contact: Director: LiamOffice: Moylan Address: Head Unit 5, Director:Sandyford Mary Moylan Park, Sandyford Industrial 64 | FOOD IRELAND Estate, YEARBOOK Dublin 2015/16 18. Telephone: (01) 295 4955 Fax: (01) 295 5680 Email: sales_ie@festo.com Web: www.festo.com/ie

Address: Killyman Road Industrial Estate, Dungannon, County Tyrone.Northern Ireland BT 71 6LN Tel: (0044) 28 8772 3131 Fax: (0044) 28 8772 7318 office.gb@greiner-gpi.com Email: Web: www.greiner-gpi.com Main Products & Services: Greiner Packaging is a leading supplier of plastic food packaging in the UK, Europe and North America, leading the way with innovation technology and decoration.

Fischbein-Saxon

Fischbein-Saxon Address: Alexandra Business Address: Centre,Alexandra 274 Alma Business Road, 274 Alma Road, Enfield,Centre, Middlesex, Enfield, Middlesex, EN3 7BB, England. England. (0044)EN3 Tel: 844 7BB, 372 2877 Telephone:(0044)(0044) 8442876 372 2877 Fax: 844 372 Email: sales@fischbein-saxon.co.uk Fax: (0044) 844 372 2876 Web: www.fischbein.com/ Email: sales@fischbein-saxon.co.uk Web: eastern/products.php www.fischbein.com/ Main Products & eastern/products.php Services: Main Products/ Saxon Bag sealers, Fischbein Sealing equipment, Services: sewingsewing machines, bag systems, handling and bagging conveyors, consumables. technology including: Bag Palletizers, automated placers,bagging bag top formers, systems. Contact: bespoke handling and Sales & Service palletising lines, sewing Manager: Barry Cox threads and consumables Sales Assistant: Contact: Sales & Service Sharon Browne Manager: Barry Cox Ireland Service Engineer: Donald Gibson

G

E.Flahavan & Sons Ltd Address:

Enviroclad Systems Ltd F

Greiner Packaging Ltd

Kilnagrange Mills, Kilmacthomas, Co. Waterford. Glanbia Plc (051) Telephone: 294 107 Address: Glanbia House, Fox: (051) 294 308 Co. Kilkenny. Email: oatmail@flahavans.com Tel: (056) 777 2200 Web: www.flahavans.com Email: corporatecomms@glanbia.ie Main Products/ Oat-based products Web: www.glanbia.com Services: including Flahavan’s Main Products & Services: Progress Oatlets, Cheese, nutritional Quick Oats, Organic, Muesli and soluions, dairy Flapjacks. ingredients, milk & fresh Contact: Dolores Whelan dairy products.

Global Trust Certification Ltd Address:

3rd Floor, Block 3, Quayside Business Park, Mill St, Dundalk, Co Louth, GS1 IrelandIreland. Telephone: 042 932 0912 Address: Second Fax: 042Floor,The 938 6864Merrion Centre, Nutleyinfo@gtcert.com Lane, Donnybrook, Dublin 4. Email: Tel: (01) 208 0660 Web: www.GTcert.com Fax: (01) 208 0670 www.brc-ireland.com info@gs1ie.org Email: Main Products/ Food Quality www.gs1ie.org Web: Services: Certification/ BRC Main Products Certification & Services: / Organic Global Supply Chain Certification / Standards Certification. Barcode Numbers, Body.Energy Contact: Business Development Barcode Symbols, EDI Manager: Phil Vernon Message Standards, Data

Synchronisation Catalogue, EPC/RFID, Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd Traceability Standards, Address: Beechwood, Barcode and EDI Message Nenagh, Advisory and Verification, Co. Tipperary. Training Services. Telephone: (067) 37893 Contact: Chairman: Fax: 34794 John(067) O’Callaghan Email: info@goliath.ie (Musgrave Group) Web: Vicewww.goliath.ie Chairman: Products/ TonyEnd Minogue Main of line packaging (Glanbia) Services: equipment & materials Chief Executive Officer: handling systems. MikeDirector: Byrne Contact: George O’Leary

Contact: Group Managing

Food Safety Interactive Training Director: John Moloney Address: Telephone:

Tievebane, Burnfoot, Co. Donegal. (086) 827 9352

Greiner Packaging Ltd Address:

G

Glanbia Plc Address: Telephone:

Glanbia House, Co. Kilkenny. (056) 777 2200

Company Listings

DSG Packaging Ltd

Telephone: Fax: Email:

Killyman Road Industrial Estate, Dungannon, County Tyrone. BT 71 6LN (0044) 28 8772 3131 (0044) 28 8772 7318 office.gb@greiner-gpi.com


company listings Irish Exporters Association

H

Address: 28 Merrion Square, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 661 2182 Healy Group Email: iea@irishexporters.ie F o o d I r e l a nd 2012 Address: HCL House,Second Avenue, www.irishexporters.ie Web: Cookstown Industrial Main Products & Services: Estate, Tallaght, Dublin 24. Heterochem (Dist.) Ltd Food and Drink Export Ireland, a Tel: (01) 404 9200 Address: Unit 49, Baldoyle Industrial division of the IEA, provides (01) 404 9201 Fax: Estate, Dublin 13. assistance to Irish food and drink Email: ghealy@healy-group.ie their sales abroad. Web: www.industrialpackaging.ie Tel: (01) 839 3127 companies in the home market Web: www.healy-group.com Contact: Godfrey Lydon Main Products/ Containers, fibre drums, (01) 832 5746 Fax: and to increase their sales abroad. Main Products & Services: info@heterochem.com Email: Services: intermediate bulk The Healy Group are the Web: www.heterochem.com containers (fibre & plastic), market leader in innovative Main Products & Services: food ingredient solutions for all-plastic silos & materials Johnston Log Acidulants, Antifoams, all sectors of the food industry. Antioxidants, Emulsifiers, handling products. Address: Our innovative solutions Food Colorants, include; Salt reduction, Fat Preservatives, Starches, replacement,Initial natural sugar Washroom Solutions Sweeteners. replacement, clean label Telephone: Address: Hazel House, Millennium Contact: Account Managers: Irish Lift Trucks replacement starches, cocoa Irish Lift Trucks Lara Fearon Address: Clonlara Avenue, Fax: Park, Naas, Co. Kildare. and many more innovative Address: Clonlara Avenue, (lara@heterochem.com), Baldonnell Business Park, Email: solutions.If you have a challenge, Telephone: 1890 300 500 Simon Brophy Baldonnell, Dublin 22. Baldonnell Business we have a solution… Web: Fax: (061) 309 038 (simon@heterochem.com), Tel: Park, Baldonnell, (01) 403 4100 Products offered: Paul Byrne Fax: (01) 403 4 183 Main Products/ Email: wssales@initial.ie Caramels -colours, aromatics, Dublin 22. (paul@heterochem.com). info@irishlifttrucks.ie Email: and pastes. Rice Starches Services: Web: www.initial.ie Telephone: (01) 403 4100 Web: www.irishlifttrucks.ie Syrups. Gelatin and Hydrolysed Main Products/ Washroom Solutions Main(01) 403 4183 Products & Services: Contact: Fax: Collagen. Aromild Plus, yeast Services: and mats. Materials Handling extract and flavourings, Email: info@irishlifttrucks.ie Equipment/Forklifts. for MSG. Potato replacement Contact: Aisling Brill Web: www.irishlifttrucks.ie Contact: Conal McCourt / Wayne Uzell and Pea Starches, potato flakes, Main Products/ Materials handling, granules. Starch, Glucose, Proteins. ICDS Recruitment Consultants Services: equipment / forklifts. Glucose powders and syrups, K Address: 24 Upper Fitzwilliam Street, Maltodextrins.Potassium Sorbate/ Contact: General Manager: Dublin 2. Sorbic Acid. Xanthan Gum, Conal McCourt Tel: (01) 632 1200 Guar Gum,Carrageenan, Fax: (01) 676 2292 emulsifiers & stabilisers. Naturally Email: info@icds.ie brewed Soy Sauce,Teriyaki Web: www.icds.ie Sauce, M&S approved, Innovate Food Technology Irish National Accreditation Board Main Products & Services: Apple fibre and Oat fibre. Brands: Address: 2nd Floor, Address: Wilton Park House, Recruitment Consultants Beneo, Stringer Emsland, Nigay, Contact: Recruitment Director: Flavour, Rousellot, Kohjin, 6 South William Street, Wilton Place, Dublin 2. David Kellett Meggle, Kikkoman, Forida Food McLoughlin Anthony Dublin 2. Telephone: (01) 607 3003 Address: Products. Telephone: (01) 707 9856 Email: inab@inab.ie Contact: CEO: Maurice Healy Industrial Packaging Ltd (01) 707 9661 Web: www.inab.ie Sales Director:Fax: Address: Killarney Road, Bray, Co.Wicklow. Gareth Healy Email: info@innovatesolutions.ie Tel: (01) 286 4010 Technical Director: Fax: (01) 286 4015 Telephone: J Pat McDonaghWeb: www.innovatesolutions.ie Email: sales@industrialpackaging.ie

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I WON’T BE IMPRESSED BY TECHNOLOGY

Main Products/ Food recruitment, Web: www.industrialpackaging.ie software, food Address: 12 Ritaville, Old Cork Road, Innovate Food Technology consumer research.

HH SOLUTIONS Services:

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FOOD!

Limerick. Address: 2nd Floor, 6 South William Street, Tel: (061) 603 742 Dublin 2. Email: info@hhsolutions.ie Tel: (01) 707 9856 Web: www.hhsolutions.ie Fax: (01) 707 9661 Irish Dairy Board Main Products & Services: JMC Packaging Ltd Email: info@innovatesolutions.ie Food ProbesAddress: Grattan House, Mount & Data Services: Web: www.innovatesolutions.ie Address: 116 Clonmore Road, Loggers & Wireless Street Lower, Dublin 2. Main Products & Services: Dungannon, Co. Tyrone, Monitoring Systems. Food recruitment, Telephone: (01) 661 9599 Irish agents for Eltex of BT71 6HX. software, food consumer Fax: Ltd. (01) 661 2778 Sweden & Comark Telephone: WWW.FOODIRELANDDIRECTORY.COM 048 38 851 413 research. Email: idb@idb.ie Contact: Sales Manager: Email: jasongovenderjmc@aol.com Garry Tuite Web: www.idb.ie

www.kerrygold.com Main Products/ Export & marketing Services: of dairy products.

Irish Exporters Association

Web: www.jmcpackaging.co.uk Main Products/ Specialists in packaging FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 Services: materials and equipment. Shrink wrap equipment, tray sealing equipment, automatic label

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ns um Irish Lift Trucks Millennium e. Irish Lift Trucks Clonlara Avenue, Co. Kildare. Address: Address: Clonlara Avenue, 0 Baldonnell Business Baldonnell Business 8 Park, Baldonnell, Park, Baldonnell, ial.ie Dublin 22. Dublin 22. Telephone: (01) 403 4100 Telephone: (01) 403 4100 olutions (01) 403 4183 Fax: Fax: (01) 403 4183 Email: info@irishlifttrucks.ie Email: info@irishlifttrucks.ie Web: www.irishlifttrucks.ie Web: www.irishlifttrucks.ie Main Products/ Materials handling, Main Products/ Materials handling, Services: equipment / forklifts. Irish National Accreditation Contact: General Manager: Services: Board equipment / forklifts. Conal McCourt Contact:Address: Wilton General Manager: Park House, Conal McCourt Wilton Place, 2. gy Irish NationalDublin Accreditation Board Tel: (01) 607 3003 Address: Wilton Park House, Email: Accreditation inab@inab.ie Board iam Street, Irish National Wilton Place, Dublin 2. Web: www.inab.ie Telephone: (01) 607 3003 Address: Wilton Park House, 56 Email: inab@inab.ie et, Wilton Place, Dublin 2. 61 Web: www.inab.ie Telephone: (01) 607 3003 solutions.ie inab@inab.ie solutions.ie Email: J Web: www.inab.ie tment, od .ie esearch. ie J

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Park, Rathcoole, Blackchurch Business Co. Dublin. Park, Rathcoole, Telephone: Co. Dublin. (01) 401 3333 Telephone: (01) 401 3333 Fax: (01) 458 8015 Fax: (01) 458 8015 Email: info@jol.ie Email: info@jol.ie Web: www.johnstonlogistics.ie Web: www.johnstonlogistics.ie Main Products/ Warehousing & Main Products/ Warehousing & Services: Logistics. Services: Logistics. Contact: Business Development: Contact: Business Development: Deirdre McGuirk Deirdre McGuirk Niall Hickey Niall Hickey Address:

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Label One Ltd

Address: 3 Advantage Way, Ballygomartin Industrial Estate, Ballygomartin LogoPak International Lt Road, Belfast BT13 3LZ. Address: Enterprise Ho Telephone: (048) 9077 7444 George Cayle Fax: (048) 9077 4067 Clifton Moor, Email: info@labelone.ie York, Web: www.labelone.ie YO30 4XE. Main Products/ Self-adhesive labels, Telephone: (0044) 1904 6 Services: Main Products extended content leaflet Fax: (0044) 1904 6 & Services: Self-adhesive labels, extended labels. Email: salesonweb@l content leaflet labels. Contact: Sales Manager, ROI: Web: www.logopakprintanda Contact: Sales Manager, ROI: Chris Moore Main Products/ Print & Apply Chris Moore 087 252 3335 Services: Labelling Syst 087 252 3335 software solu labels & ribbo Contact: General Mana Wilson Clark

Address: Maple Court, David Kellett & Partners Ltd Wormbridge House, Maple Court, Wormbridge DavidAddress: Kellett & Partners Ltd Wormbridge, House, Wormbridge, Address: Maple Court, M Hereford, HR2 9DH. Hereford, HR2 9DH. Wormbridge House, Telephone: (0044) 1981 570 611 Tel: (0044) 1981 570 611 Manotherm Ltd Wormbridge, Fax: Fax: (0044) 1981 570 599 (0044) 1981 570 599 LimerickLimerick PackagingPackaging Address: 4 Walkinstown Email: davidkellett@davidkellett. Hereford, HR2 9DH. Email: davidkellett@davidkellett.co.uk Address: Eastlink Business Park, Dublin 12. Address: Eastlink Business Park, co.uk Telephone: (0044) 1981 570 611 Main Products & Services: Ballysimon Road, Limerick. Telephone: (01) 452 2355 Ballysimon Road, Main Products/ Dairy Engineering, Dairy Engineering, Filtration Fax: (0044) 1981 570 599 Tel: (061) 400 035 Fax: (01) 451 6919 Co. Limerick. Services: Systems/Membranes, Systems/Membranes, RO, UO, Fax: (061) 400 036 Email: davidkellett@davidkellett. Email: info@manothe Telephone: (061) 400 035 Reverse Osmosis, UF & MF. Osmosis®, Ultra info@lmkpkg.ie Email: Packaging Ltd JMCJMC Packaging Ltd co.uk Ultra Osmosis®, Ultra Website: www.manothe Fax: (061) 400 036 Filtration and Micro Filtration, Web: www.limerickpackaging.ie Address: 37 116 Clonmore Road, Seagoe Industrial Address: Main Products/ Dairy Engineering, Filtration and Micro Main Products/ Distributors o Email: info@lmkpkg.ie Effluent Treatment, Spiral Wound Main Products & Services: Estate, Craigavon, Dungannon, Co. Tyrone, Filtration, Effluent Services: controls & www.limerickpackaging.ie Services: Systems/Membranes, and Plate & Frame, Cheese Web: Corrugated Boxes, Polythene Co.BT71 6HX. Armagh, Treatment, Spiral instrumentatio Corrugated Boxes, Maturing Vacuum Pouches. Main Products/ Reverse Osmosis, Bags, Edgeguards, Palletwrap, Telephone: 048 38 851 413 BT63 5QE. Wound and Plate & JMC Packaging Ltd Contact: Managing Dire Services: Polythene Bags, Contact: Managing Director: Email: jasongovenderjmc@aol.com Strapping, Tapes. Tel: 028 3839 1723 Ultra Osmosis®, Ultra Frame, Cheese Maturing Address: David Kellett R.V. Gilbert Edgeguards, Palletwrap, Web: www.jmcpackaging.co.uk Contact: Mike Boland +353 86 0234177 Mobile: 116 Clonmore Road, Filtration and Micro Vacuum Pouches Director & Pro Strapping, Tapes. Main Products/ Specialists in packaging Dungannon, Co. Tyrone, jgovender@jmcpackaging.co.uk Email: Filtration, Effluent Contact: Managing Director: Services: materials and equipment. Sales Engineer Contact: Mike Boland Kiernan’s Food Web: BT71 6HX. www.jmcpackaging.co.uk David Kellett Treatment, Spiral Shrink wrap equipment, Robert C. Gilb Main Products & Services: Ingredients Ltd Telephone: 048 38 851 413 tray sealing equipment, Wound and Plate & Specialists in packaging Address: Unit 8 Steadfast Industrial Estate, Email: jasongovenderjmc@aol.com Kiernan’s Food Ingredients Ltd automatic label Frame, Cheese Maturing LINPAC Allibert Measom Freer & Co. Ltd materials and equipment. Co. Monaghan. Carrickmacros, Web: www.jmcpackaging.co.uk Address: Unit 8 Steadfast Industrial applications, automatic Address: 17 Ridgeway, Address: 37/41 Chartwe Shrink wrap equipment, 966 2096 Tel: (042) Vacuum Pouches Estate, Carrickmacros, Main Products/ Specialists in packaging stretch wrappers, tray sealing equipment, Fax: (042) 966 3954 Quinton Business Park, Wigston, Leice Contact: Managing Director: Co. Monaghan. checkweighing & metal Services: materials and equipment. automatic label Email: info@kiernans.ie Bimingham, B32 1AF, LE18 2FL, Telephone: (042) 966 2096 detections, polyolefin David Kellett Shrink wrap equipment, applications, automatic Web: (042) 966 3954 www.kiernans.ie United Kingdom. England. shrink film, smoothwall Fax: tray sealing equipment, stretch wrappers, Main Products & Services: Telephone: (0044) 1606 56 1929 Telephone: (0044) 116 28 foil trays, soft fruit Email: info@kiernans.ie Kiernan’s Food Ingredients checkweighing & metal sauces, Ltd marinades, Seasoning, automatic label Fax: (0044) 1606 56 1998 Fax: (0044) 116 28 punnets, food grade Web: www.kiernans.ie detections, polyolefin & packaging. cures Address: Unit 8 Steadfast Industrial applications, automatic Email: brendan.mcgarry@linpac.com Email: sales@measomfr stretch film & lidding Main Products/ Seasoning, sauces, shrink film, smoothwall Manotherm Ltd Estate, Carrickmacros, film and meat & poultry Web: www.linpacallibert.com Web: www.measomfre stretch wrappers, Services: marinades, cures & foil trays. trays, soft fruit Address: 4 Walkinstown Road, Dublin D12 RP83 Main Products/ Plastic Materials Handling Main Products/ Measom Freer Co. Monaghan. packaging. checkweighing & metal punnets, food grade Contact: Jason Govender Tel: (01) 452 2355 Services: Products - Boxes, Bins, Services: manufacture a Telephone: (042) 966 2096 detections, polyolefin stretch film & lidding (086 0234177). Fax: Trays, Pallets etc. (01) 451 6919 quality plastic shrink film, smoothwall Fax: (042) 966 3954 film and meat & poultry Email: info@manotherm.ie Kuka Robotics Ireland Contact: Sales Manager, Ireland: custom mould foil trays, soft fruit Email: info@kiernans.ie 4 3trays. f oo d i r e l a n d Web: Brendan McGarry www.manotherm.ie Address: Great Western Street dropper caps, punnets, food grade Contact: Jason Govender Web: www.kiernans.ie Main Products & Services: Distributors of Wednesbury, West Midlands 087 676 7161 measures, box (086 0234177). stretch film & lidding controls & instrumentation. 7LL United Kingdom WS10 Main Products/ Seasoning, sauces, tubes, fastener 11/01/2012 17:09 Contact: Managing Director: film and meat & poultry Tel: (0044) 121 505 9970 Services: marinades, cures & food use. Serv Robert V. Gilbert Fax: (0044) 121 505 6589 trays. 3D design, inpackaging. Director & Project Email: mariewinmill@kuka-robotics.co.uk Contact: Jason Govender tool making an Johnston Logistics Ltd Sales Engineer: Robert C. Gilbert Web: www.kuka-robotics.co.uk (086 0234177). printing.

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Address: Blackchurch Business Park, Rathcoole, Co. Dublin. ireland Tel:4 3 f ood (01) 401 3333 Fax: (01) 458 8015 Email: info@jol.ie Web: www.johnstonlogistics.ie Main Products & Services: Warehousing & Logistics.

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Main Products & Services: Robotics, Service and Training. Contact: General Sales Manager: Brian Cooney

Measom Freer & Co. Ltd

Address: 37/41 Chartwell Drive, Wigston, Leicester, LE18 2FL, England. Tel:8 (0044) 116 288 1588 37_48 company_listing.indd Fax: (0044) 116 281 3000 11/01/2012 17:09 Email: sales@measomfreer.co.uk Web: www.measomfreer.co.uk Main Products & Services: Measom Freer manufacture and Label One Ltd stock quality plastic bottles, Address: 3 Advantage Way, Ballygomartin custom moulded bottles, Industrial Estate, Ballygomartin dropper caps, scoops, measures, Road, Belfast BT13 3LZ. boxes, jars, tubes, fasteners etc, Tel: (048) 9077 7444 for food use. Services include 3D Fax: (048) 9077 4067 design, in-house tool making and Email: info@labelone.ie screen printing. Web: www.labelone.ie

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company listings National Standards Authority of Ireland (NSAI)

Mitie

Address: 145 Lakeview Drive, Airside Business Park, Swords, Co. Dublin. Tel: 01 883 9190 Email: sales.pest@mitie.com Web: www.mitie.com/pest-control Main Products & Services: Pest control. Contact: Service Manager: Greg McLure

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National Chemical Company

Address: NCC House, 42 Lower Leeson Street, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 613 1400 Fax: (01) 634 0132 Email: sales@ncc.ie Web: www.ncc.ie Main Products & Services: Food Ingredients: Acidulants Preservatives Biocides Enzymes Texturants Hydrocolloids Stabilizers Antioxidants Carriers Binders Gelling agents Fibres Sweeteners (natural & high intensity) Ingredients Sourcing: NCC Ireland has a long standing experience and expertise in the sales, marketing & distribution of speciality ingredients and commodities from global producers which in turn improves the sourcing capabilities NCC can offer their customers. Contact: Product Manager: Fintan McConnell (fmcconnell@ncc.ie)

Address: 1 Swift Square, Northwood, Santry, Dublin 9. Tel: (01) 807 3800 (061) 332 982 Fax: Email: info@nsai.ie Web: www.nsai.ie Main Products & Services: Certification and inspection services to national & international product & management system standards including ISO 22000, ISO 9001, OHSAS and BRC Global Food Standard.

New Era Packaging Ltd

Address: Drogheda Industrial Estate, Donore Road, Drogheda, Co. Louth. Tel: (041) 987 5600 Fax: (041) 983 4481 Email: dnevin@newera.ie Web: www.newera.ie Main Products & Services: Self-adhesive labels for all end-users and manufacturers. Contact: Sales Director: David Nevin

NPP Group Ltd

Address: Unit 509, Mitchelstown Road, Northwest Business Park, Ballycoolin, Dublin 15. Tel: (00353) (0) 1 880 9299 Fax: (00353) (0) 1 880 9298 Email: sales@npp.ie Web: www.npp.ie Main Products & Services: Flexible plastic packaging distributors. Contact: Sales Director: Eoin McDonagh

Nutrition Supplies

Address: Innishannon, Co. Cork. Tel: (021) 477 5522 Fax: (021) 477 5449 ursula.lecane@nutritionsupplies.ie Email: Web: www.nutritionsupplies.ie Main Products & Services: Vitamin & Nutrient Precision Premixes. Contact: Managing Director: Dr. Frank Cremin Technical Director: Ursula Lecane

O Obeeco Ltd

Address: Annaville Avenue, Blackrock, Co. Dublin. Tel: (01) 278 2323 Fax: (01) 278 2374 Email: sales@obeeco.ie Web: www.obeeco.ie Main Products & Services: Packaging machinery, materials, thermal print solutions. Contact: Sales Director: Richard Burke Managing Director: Olive Walker

O’Brien Ingredients

Address: O’Brien House, Magna Drive, Magna Business Park, Citywest, Dublin 24. Tel: (01) 469 1400 Fax: (01) 469 1360 Email: ingred@obrien-ingredients.ie Web: www.obrien-ingredients.ie Main Products & Services: Supplier of ambient, frozen and chilled ingredients to Bakery, Beverage, Confectionery, Dairy, Ice Cream, Feed, Pharmaceutical, Infant Formula and Savoury sectors in Ireland. Contact: Sales Account Manager: Tom Pigott

T.S. O’Connor & Son Ltd

Address: Unit C, 67 Heather Road, Sandyford Industrial Estate, Dublin 18. Tel: (01) 295 5696 Fax: (01) 295 5741 Email: andrew@bags.ie Web: www.bags.ie Main Products & Services: Printed Carrier Bags, Tapes, Labels & Flexible Packaging. Contact: Sales Manager: Andrew Haughton

Odenberg Engineering Ltd

Address: 2004 Orchard Avenue, City West Business Campus, Naas Road, Dublin 24. Tel: (01) 413 6200 Fax: (01) 457 0219 Email: info@odenberg.ie Web: www.odenberg.ie Main Products & Services: Robotics, mechanical handling systems. Contact: Business Unit Manager: James J. Deane FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 67


company listings Pharmafoods Ltd Ornua

Address: Grattan House, Mount Street Lower, Dublin 2. Tel: +353 1 661 9599 Fax: +353 1 661 2778 Email: communications@ornua.com Web: www.ornua.com Main Products & Services: Ireland’s largest exporter of dairy products

P Packex Industries Ltd

Address: Unit 1, Village Mills Business Park, Rathnew, Co. Wicklow. Tel: (0404) 69 851 Fax: (0404) 69 861 Email: sales@packex.ie Main Products & Services: High quality flexible packaging. Contact: Ivan Cruise

P.C. Packaging Ltd

Address: Derrynane House, Eadestown, Naas, Co. Kildare. (045) 883 510 Tel: (045) 880 934 Fax: Email: philip@pcpackaging.ie Web: www.pcpackaging.ie Main Products & Services: Packaging machinery/ shrink films, flexible packaging, Belca range of shrink wrappers, Ilapak flow wrapping, Sovereign labelling systems, Sick sensors.

Address: Lower Waterford Road, Carrickbeg, Carrick-on-Suir, Co. Tipperary. Tel: (051) 645 066/645 084 Fax: (051) 645 033 Email: info@pharmafoods.net Web: www.pharmafoods.net Main Products & Services: Bilwinco Multihead Weighers, Mondini Tray Sealers Vacuum and Gas, Limitech Liquid Processing Equipment, Rovema Vertical Form Fill Sealers, Cartoning, Bag In Box, Abtech Premade Pouch Production for Tuna in Foil.

Q QPM Ltd

Address: Unit 12, Robinhood Business Park, Robinhood Road, Dublin 22. Tel: (01) 450 2421 Fax: (01) 450 2311 Email: enevin@qpm.ie Web: www.qpm.ie Main Products & Services: Metal detectors, x-ray, checkweighing, calibration, shrink wrapping machinery and materials, flow-wrapping, tray sealing. Contact: Eddie Nevin

Q-Lab Ltd PK Chemicals Ltd

Address: Unit 23, Sandyford Office Park, Blackthorn Avenue, Sandyford Industrial Estate, Foxrock, Dublin 18. Tel: (01) 295 6977 Fax: (01) 295 8338 Email: graeme@pkchemicals.com Main Products & Services: Food Ingredients, Flavours and Colours. Contact: Technical Sales Manager: Graeme Locke

Address: PO Box 27, Kerlogue Industrial Estate, Drinagh, Co. Wexford. (053) 914 5600 Tel: (053) 918 4575 Fax: Email: info@qlab.ie Web: www.qlab.ie Main Products & Services: Microbiological & chemical analysis of food, water & environmental samples. Contact: Managing Director: Anne-Marie Kelly Financial Controller: Aidan Byrne Chem. Lab. Manager: Peter O’Byrne Micro. Lab Manager Brian Healy Business Development Manager: Liz Morris

Pegler & Louden

Address: White Heather, Industrial Estate, 301 South Circular Road, Dublin 8. South Link Park, Ballycurreen Road, Grange, Co. Cork. Tel: (01) 416 5170 Fax: (01) 416 5175 (021) 497 7128 Main Products & Services: Industrial valves and actuators.

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Puratos Crest Foods Ltd

Address: 70 - 71 Dunboyne Business Park, Dunboyne, Co. Meath. Tel: (01) 825 5505 Fax: (01) 825 5506 Email: info_ireland@puratos.com Web: www.puratos.com Main Products & Services: Bakery, patisserie and chocolate ingredients. Belcolade Belgian chocolate, Puratos bakery & patisserie products, PatisFrance premium patisserie ingredients. Contact: General Manager: Sean McDaid

R Rentokil Pest Control

Nationwide Coverage Tel: 1890 869 869 Fax: (045) 852 890 Email: pestcontrolinfo@rentokil.ie Web: www.rentokil.ie Main Products & Services: Suppliers of Pest Control to ISO 9001:2008 specification. Contact: Pest Control: Michael O’Mahoney


Web: www.repak.ie Contact: CEO: Andrew Hetherington Membership Services Manager: Declan Martin

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Rennick Solicitors

Address: Main Street, Dunboyne, Co. Meath +353 1 825 1030 Tel: +353 1 825 1031 Fax: Email: info@rennickfoodlawyer.com www.rennickfoodlawyer.com Web: Main Products & Services: Legal & Business Advice Contact: Office Manager: Gemma McKenna

Repak Ltd

Address: Red Cow Interchange Estate, 1 Ballymount Road, Clondalkin, Dublin 22. (01) 467 0190 Tel: Fax: (01) 403 0929 Email: info@repak.ie Web: www.repak.ie Main Products & Services: Repak was established through a voluntary agreement between industry and the Department of the Environment, Community and Local Government as industry’s response to the producer responsibility obligations placed on Ireland by the EU Directive on Packaging Waste (94/62/EC). Operating on a not-for profit basis, Repak gives producers legal compliance with their obligation to fund the recovery and recycling of their used packaging. The fees our members pay us are used to fund the recovery and recycling of the packaging on the goods or services they provide to their customers. Repak is the only government approved packaging compliance scheme under the Waste Management Packaging Regulations 2007.

company listings

Tel: 00353 87 6767 161

Schütz (Ireland) Ltd Ltd Schütz (Ireland) Safefood

Address: Townmore,

Address: 7 Eastgate Avenue, Eastgate, Little Island, Co. Cork T45 RX01 Tel: 021 230 4100 Fax: 021 230 4111 Email: info@safefood.eu Web: www.safefood.eu Main Products & Services: safefood is the all island public agency promoting food safety and healthy eating to consumers through education and awareness campaigns. It also acts as an independent source of scientific advice, commissions and funds relevant research, co-ordinates scientific co-operation and facilitates knowledge exchange among those working in the food sector and other key stakeholders.

Killala, Co. Mayo Address: Townmore, Tel: (096) 33044 Killala, (096) 33045 Fax: Email: info1ireland@schuetz.net Co. Mayo Web: www.schuetz.net Telephone: (096) 33044 Main Products & Services: Manufacturer of IBCs and Fax: (096) 33045 PE Drums. Email: info1ireland@schuetz.net Web: www.schuetz.net Scientific & Chemical Contact: General Manager Supplies Ltd John Forkin Address: Greenhills Industrial

Estate, Walkinstown, Dublin 12. (01) 450 4077 Tel: (01) 450 4328 Fax: Email: frank.eardley@scichem.com www.scichem.com Web: Main Products & Services: Address: Greenhills Industrial Estate, Laboratory Equipment Walkinstown, Distributor. Contact: Sales: Frank Eardley Dublin 12. SAI Global (086 850 6778) Address: Block 3, Quayside Business Park,Telephone: (01) 450 4077 Mill St, Dundalk, Co. Louth. Fax: Sealed Air Ltd (01) 450 4328 Tel: 042 932 0912 Address: Clifton House, 1 Email: ukmarketing@saiglobal.com Email: frank.eardley@scichem.com Marston Road, Web: www.gtcert.com St. Neots, Cambridgeshire Web: www.scichem.com www.saiglobal.com PE19 2HN. Main Products & Services: Laboratory Equipment Tel: (0044) 148 022 4000 Food Safety certification, BRC Main Products/ Fax: (0044) 148 022 4063 certification, GFSI Scheme Services: Distributor. Email: cryovac.ukmkt@sealedair.com Certification, Environmental Sales: Web: www.sealedair.com Management, Quality ManagementContact: Main Products &Frank Eardley Services: Systems, Supply Chain Management, Aquaculture Services, Fishery Cryovac® Packaging (086 850 6778) Services, Compliance Solutions, including films, Solutions, Risk Management. barrier bags, rigid trays, Contact: Operations manager: Bill Patterson punnets and pots. Diversey Hygiene Solutions including detergents, disinfectants, dosing equipment and energy and water management solutions. Contact: Timothy O’Connell Schoeller Allibert Ltd Mobile: 086 225 3172 Address: 17 Ridgeway, Quinton Business Park,Birmingham, Smurfit Kappa Ireland B32 1AF, United Kingdom. Address: Ballymount Road, Tel: 0044 (0) 121 5060 100 Walkinstown, Dublin 12. 11 Fax: 0044 (0) 121 422 1771 37_48 company_listing.indd Tel: (01) 409 0000 Email: brendan.mcgarry@ Fax: (01) 456 4509 schoellerallibert.com Email: info@smurfitkappa.ie Web: www.schoellerallibert.com Web: www.smurfitkappa.ie Main Products & Services: Plastic Materials www.skpackaging.ie Handling Products - Boxes, Bins, Trays, Pallets etc. www.smurfitkappadirect.ie Contact: Country Sales Manager Main Products & Services: (Ireland): Brendan McGarry Ireland’s leading Tel: 00 353 87 6767161

Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd

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company listings manufacturer of packaging and point of purchase displays, with a wide product range to suit the needs of the food industry. Standard packaging & promotional products can now be bought on-line via our webshop at www.smurfitkappadirect.ie Contact: Marketing Manager: Mark Munnelly

Stone Food Machinery Ltd

Address: 14 North Main Street, Wexford. Tel: (053) 914 7800 Fax: (053) 914 7799 Email: info@stonefoodmachinery.com Web: www.stonefoodmachinery.com Main Products & Services: MEVA Inlet Screens- Penstocks-Gunther Pickle Injectors & Tumblers- Industrial Cleaning Machines Contact: Val W. Stone Mobile: 086 257 0492

Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland

Address: Wilton Park House, Wilton Place, Dublin 2. (01) 808 2100 Tel: Fax: (01) 808 2002 Email: info@sei.ie Web: www.sei.ie Contact: Head, Energy Demand Management: Kevin Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Rourke Declan Healey

Syspal

Address: Cockshutt Lane, Broseley, Shropshire, TF12 5JA, England. Tel: (0044) 1952 883188 Fax: (0044) 1952 884 093 Email: sales@syspal.com Web: www.syspal.com Main Products & Services: Manufacturers of stainless steel and aluminium products, specifically designed for regulations within the food industry. Contact: Nicky Davies

70 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16

T

Toyota Material Handling Ireland Teagasc Food Research Programme

Moorepark and Ashtown Address: Cork: Moorepark, Fermoy, Co. Cork. Dublin: Ashtown, Dublin 15. Tel: (025) 42 222 / (01) 805 9500 Email: mark.fenelon@teagasc.ie / declan.troy@teagasc.ie Web: www.teagasc.ie Main Products & Services: Research, development and innovation, food bioscience, food safety, food chemistry and technology, food industry development, pilot plant facilities, analytical services, training, consultancy. Contact: Mark Fenelon, Declan Troy, Pat Daly.

Tekpak Automation Ltd

Address: Whitemill Industrial Estate, Wexford, Ireland. Tel: (053) 916 3033 Email: jkehoe@tekpak.ie Web: www.tekpak.ie Main Products & Services: Vision guided pick and place robots, product Contact: John Kehoe

Topaz

Address: Topaz House, Beech Hill, Clonskeagh, Dublin 4. Tel: (01) 202 8888 Email: lubricants@topaz.ie Web: www.topaz.ie Main Products & Services: Lubricants: Food grade, Industrial, Marine, Vehicle and Plant. Contact: Lubricants / Technical Manager: Jack Condon

Address: Killeen Road, Dublin 12. (01) 419 0200 Tel: Fax: (01) 419 0325 Email: materialhandling@toyota.ie www.toyota-forklifts.ie Web: Main Products & Services: Toyota forklifts and warehouse equipment. diesel/LPG and electric forklifts, powerpallet trucks, stackers etc.

Transtock Warehousing & Cold Storage Ltd

Address: Christendom, Ferrybank, Co. Waterford. Tel: (051) 832 411 Fax: (051) 832 666 Email: info@trans-stock.com www.trans-stock.com Web: Main Products & Services: Warehousing and frozen and chilled cold storage, logistics. Contact: Managing Director: Colm Browne

Trilby Trading Ltd

Address: Boyne House, Boyne Business Park, Greenhills, Drogheda, Co. Louth. Tel: (041) 983 2137 (041) 983 5463 Fax: Email: sales@trilbytrading.ie Main Products & Services: Food Grade Vegetable Oils. Contact: sales@trilbytrading.ie


company listings

UCC - School of Food and Nutritional Sciences

Address: Room 242, Food Science Building, University College Cork, Cork. (021) 490 2384 Tel: Fax: (021) 427 0244 Email: foodandnutrition@ucc.ie Web: www.ucc.ie/en/fns/ Main Products & Services: Education, research, continuing education & training.

UCC - Department of Food Business and Development

Address: O’Rahilly Building, University College Cork, Cork. (021) 490 2570 Tel: Fax: (021) 490 3358 Email: foodbusiness@ucc.ie Web: www.ucc.ie/en/foodbus/ Main Products & Services: Education, research, continuing education & training.

UCC - Food Industry Training Unit

Address: Food Science Building, University College Cork, Cork. Tel: (021) 490 3363 Email: m.mccarthybuckley@ucc.ie Web: www.ucc.ie/fitu Main Products & Services: Education, research, continuing education & training.

UCD - School Of Agriculture and Food Science

Address: UCD Agriculture and Food Science Centre, UCD, Belfield, Dublin 4. Undergraduate Programmes: UCD Agricultural Science and Veterinary Medicine programme Office UCD Agriculture

Tel: Email: Web: Tel: Email: Web:

and Food Science Centre. (01) 716 7194 agandfoodprogrammes@ucd.ie www.ucd.ie/agfood Postgraduate Programmes: UCD School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine UCD Veterinary Sciences Centre. (01) 716 6100 agfoodvet@ucd.ie www.ucd.ie/agfoodvet

UCD - School of Biology & Environmental Sciences

Address: UCD Science Education and Research Centre West Tel: (01) 01 716 2243 Email: BiolandEnv@ucd.ie www.ucd.ie/bioenvsci/index.html Web Education/Training, Research & Development.

V Versatile Packaging Ltd

Address: Silverstream Business Park, Silverstream, Co. Monaghan. Tel: (047) 85 177 Fax: (047) 85 199 Email: info@versatilepackaging.ie Web: www.versatilepackaging.ie Main Products & Services: Food Packaging Materials and Equipment - Tray Sealers, CPET, Barrier, Antifog Films, Aluminium Trays, Stand Up Pouches, Vacuum Pouches, Pouch Filling & Sealing Equipment.

W Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd

Address: Kilcannon Industrial Estate, Old Dublin Road, Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford. Tel: (053) 923 3778 Fax: (053) 923 3284 Email: sales@weberireland.com Web: www.webermarking.ie Main Products & Services: Print & Apply Labelling Systems, Desktop Printers, Laser Coders. Manufacturers of Blank& Pre Printed Labels. Contact: Patrick Hughes Mobile: 087 279 8925

D.D. Williamson (Ireland) Ltd

Address: Little Island Industrial Estate, Little Island, Co. Cork. Tel: (021) 435 3821 Fax: (021) 435 4328 Email: info@ddwmson.com Web: www.ddwilliamson.com Main Products & Services: Caramel colours, natural colours, burnt sugars, natural colour blends, liquids & powders. Contact: Anne O’Dwyer

WrenTech Ltd

Address: Eversley, Church Bay Road, Crosshaven, Co. Cork. Tel: (021) 483 2644 Fax: (021) 483 1363 Email: smurray@wrentech.ie/ mwren@wrentech.ie Web: www.wrentech.ie Main Products & Services: Ytron & Matcon Mixing & Blending, Powder Dispersion / ncorporation, Dust free transfer batch sytems, Powder bins / Silo discharging, Auger filling, Dosing,Formulation,Batching, Flexibatch. Contact: Siobhan Murray / Michael Wren

www.foodirelanddirectory.com

U

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 71


relevant organisations

relevant

Organisations AN BORD PLEANÁLA

64 Marlborough Street, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-858 8100 Lo-call: 1890 275 175 Email: bord@pleanala.ie Web: www.pleanala.ie

BORD BIA

Clanwilliam Court, Lower Mount Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-668 5155 Email: info@bordbia.ie Web: www.bordbia.ie

BORD GÁIS ENERGY

1 Warrington Place, Dublin 2. Tel: 1850 632 632 Emergency: 1850 205 050 Email: info@bordgais.ie Web: www.bordgaisenergy.ie

BORD IASCAIGH MHARA (Irish Sea Fisheries Board) PO Box 12, Crofton Road, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. Tel: 01-214 4100 Email: info@bim.ie Web: www.bim.ie

COMPETITION AND CONSUMER PROTECTION COMMISSION PO. Box 12585, Dublin 1. Tel: 1890 432 432 Web: www.consumerhelp.ie

CONSUMERS’ ASSOCIATION OF IRELAND LTD 26 Upper Pembroke Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-637 3961 Email: cai@thecai.ie Web: www.thecai.ie

72 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16

DRINKS INDUSTRY GROUP OF IRELAND (DIGI)

EXPERIAN IRELAND LTD

Anglesea House, Anglesea Road, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4. Tel: 01-668 0215 Web: www.drinksindustry.ie

Newenham House, Northern Cross, Ground Floor, Malahide Road, Dublin 17. Tel: 01-846 9200 Email: info@experian.ie Web: www.experian.ie

ENTERPRISE IRELAND

FOOD & DRINK INDUSTRY IRELAND (FDII)

The Plaza, Eastpoint Business Park, Dublin 3. Tel: 01-727 2000 Email: client.service@enterprise-ireland.com Web: www.enterprise-ireland.com

Confederation House, 84-86 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-605 1500 Email: firstname.surname@ibec.ie Web: www.fdii.ie

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH ASSOC. OF IRELAND

FOOD PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT CENTRE

Heraghty House, 4 Carlton Terrace, Novara Avenue, Bray, Co. Wicklow Tel: 01-276 1211 Email: info@ehoa.ie Web: www.ehai.ie

Dublin Institute of Technology, Cathal Brugha Street, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-814 6080 Email: fpdc@dit.ie Web: www.fpdc.dit.ie

EUROPEAN COMMISSION IN IRELAND

FOOD SAFETY AUTHORITY OF IRELAND

European House, 18 Dawson Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-634 1111 Email: eu-ie-info-request@ec.europa.eu Web: www.euireland.ie

Abbey Court, Lower Abbey Street, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-817 1300 Lo-call: 1890 336 677 Email: info@fsai.ie Web: www.fsai.ie

EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT

GUARANTEED IRISH LTD

43 Molesworth Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-605 7900 Email: epdublin@ep.europa.eu Web: www.europarl.ie

EXCELLENCE IRELAND

68 Pembroke Road, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4. Tel: 01-660 4100 Email: info@eiqa.com Web: www.eiqa.com

1 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-661 2607 Email: info@guaranteedirish.ie Web: www.guaranteedirish.ie

HEALTH & SAFETY AUTHORITY The Metropolitan Building, James Joyce Street, Dublin 1. Lo-call: 1890 289 389 Email: wcu@hsa.ie Web: www.hsa.ie


relevant organisations INVESTMENT DEVELOPMENT AGENCY (IDA)

THE PRIVATE SECURITY AUTHORITY

COMPANIES REGISTRATION OFFICE

IRISH ASSOCIATION OF DISTRIBUTIVE TRADES (IADT)

REVENUE COMMISSIONERS

CUSTOMS & EXCISE, LICENSING SECTION

Wilton Park House, Wilton Place, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-603 4000 Email: idaireland@ida.ie Web: www.idaireland.com

Rock House, Main Street, Blackrock, Co. Dublin. Tel: 01-288 7584/288 8274 Email: rgdata@rgdata.ie Web: www.rgdata.ie

IRISH BUSINESS & EMPLOYERS CONFEDERIATION (IBEC) Head Office, Confederation House, 84-86 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-605 1500 Email: info@ibec.ie Web: www.ibec.ie

IRISH SECURITY INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION Chase House, City Junction Business Park, Northern Cross, Malahide Road, Dublin 17. Tel: 01-484 7206 Email: info@isia.ie Web: www.isia.ie

IRISH SMALL AND MEDIUM ENTERPRISES ASSOCIATION (ISME) 17 Kildare Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-662 2755 Email: iisme@isme.ie Web: www.isme.ie

MANDATE

O’Lehane House, 9 Cavendish Row, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-874 6321 Email: mandate@mandate.ie Web: www.mandate.ie

NATIONAL DAIRY COUNCIL Innovation House, 3 Arkle Road, Sandyford Industrial Estate, Dublin 18. Tel: 01-290 2451 Email: info@ndc.ie Web: www.ndc.ie

NATIONAL EMPLOYMENT RIGHTS AUTHORITY (NERA) Government Buildings, O’Brien Road, Carlow. Lo-call: 1890 808 090 Web: www.employmentrights.ie

Davis Street, Tipperary Town, Co. Tipperary. Tel: 062-31588 Email: info@psa.gov.ie Web: www.psa.gov.ie

Head Office, Dublin Castle, Dame Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-647 5000 Web: www.revenue.ie

SMALL FIRMS ASSOCIATION (IBEC) 84-86 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-605 1500 Email: info@sfa.ie Web: www.sfa.ie

TEAGASC FOOD RESEARCH CENTRE Dublin: Ashtown, Dublin 15 Tel: 01-805 9500 Email: info@teagasc.ie Web: www.teagasc.ie Cork: Moorepark,Fermoy, Co. Cork. Tel: 025 42222

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES, C/O NSAI, 1 Swift Square, Northwood, Santry, Dublin 9. Tel: 01-807 3800 Email: nsai@nsai.ie Web: www.nsai.ie

DEPARTMENTS OF STATE AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND THE MARINE

Agriculture House, Kildare Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-607 2000 Lo-call: 1890 200 510 Email: info@agriculture.gov.ie Web: www.agriculture.gov.ie

COLLECTOR GENERAL’S OFFICE VAT/PAYE/PRSI Sarsfield House, Francis Street, Limerick. Lo-call: 1890 203 070 Email: cgcustserv@revenue.ie Web: www.revenue.ie

Parnell House, 14 Parnell Square, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-804 5200 Lo-call: 1890 220 226 Email: info@cro.ie Web: www.cro.ie

St. Conlons Road, Nenagh, Co. Tipperary. Lo-call: 1890 666 333 Email: tarclass@revenue.ie Web: www.revenue.ie

ENVIRONMENT, COMMUNITY & LOCAL GOVERNMENT Custom House, Custom House Quay, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-888 2000 Lo-call: 1890 202 021 Email: qcsofficer@environ.ie Web: www.environ.ie

FINANCE

Government Buildings, Upper Merrion Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-676 7571 Lo-call: 1890 661 010 Email: webmaster@finance.irlgov.ie Web: www.finance.gov.ie

JOBS, ENTERPRISE & INNOVATION

23 Kildare Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-631 2121 Email: info@djei.ie Web: www.djei.ie

JUSTICE AND EQUALITY 94 St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-602 8202 Lo-call: 1890 221 227 Email: info@justice.ie Web: www.justice.ie

SOCIAL PROTECTION Aras Mhic Dhiarmada, Store Street, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-704 3000 Email: info@welfare.ie Web: www.welfare.ie

VALUATION OFFICE

Block 2, Irish Life Centre, Lower Abbey Street, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-817 1000 Email: info@valoff.ie Web: www.valoff.ie FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 73


year a rl aPnl2016 e0 r 1260 1 6 Y e aYplanner re P naenrn 2 SUN

J A N

J A N

F E B

F E B

M A R

M A R

A P R

A P R

M A Y

M A Y

J U N

J U N

J U L

J U L

A U G

A U G

S E P

S E P

O C T

O C T

N O V

N O V

D E C

D E C

WED

TH

109

1110

1211

1312

13

14

1413

1514

1615

1716

17

18

1312

1413

1514

1615

16

SUN TUE MON WED TUE THU WED FRI THU SATFRI SUN SAT MON SUN TUE MON WED TUE THU WED FRI THU SATFRI SUN SAT MON SUN TUE MON WED TUE MON

1

1

21

32

43

21

New Year’s Day

New Year’s Day

Public Holiday

Public Holiday

54

65

32

43

54

76

87

98

65

76

87

98

109

1110

1211

1312

1110

1211

Ash Wednesday

21

1

32

43

54

65 Mother’s Day

76

87

98

Ash Wednesday

109

St. Valentine’s Day

St. Valentine’s Day

17

St. Patric Day

Mother’s Day

Public Holida

1

SUN

21

32

1

21

32

43

54

65

76

87

98

109

1110

1211

1312

1413

1514

1615

1716

1817

19

43

54

65

76

87

98

109

1110

1211

1312

1

21

32

43

54

65

76

87

98

109

1110

1211

1312

1413

1514

15

16

Public Holiday

21

32

Public Holiday

1

21

32

43

54

65

76

87

98

109

1110

1211

1312

13

14

43

54

65

76

87

98

109

1110

1211

1312

1413

1514

1615

1716

17

18

1

21

32

43

54

65

76

87

98

109

1110

1211

1312

1413

14

15

1

21

32

43

54

65

76

87

98

109

1110

1211

12

13

Public Holiday

Public Holiday

1

SUN MON

18

14

Public Holiday

Public Holiday

1

13

21

32

43

54

65

76

87

98

109

1110

1211

1312

1413

1514

1615

16

17

1

21

32

43

54

65

76

87

98

109

1110

1211 1312

1413

14

15

WED

THU

MON WED TUE THU WED FRI THU SATFRI SUN SAT MON SUN TUE MON WED TUE THU WED FRI THU SAT FRI SUN SAT MON SUN TUE MON WED TUE TUE

74 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16


WED

year planner 2016 THU

SAT MON SUN TUE MON WED TUE THU WED FRITHU SATFRI SUN SAT MON SUN TUE MON WED TUE THU WED FRITHU SATFRI SUN SAT MON SUN FRITHU SATFRI SUN

3

14

1514

1615

1716

1817 1918 2019

2120

2221 2322 2423

7

18

1918

2019

2120

2221 2322 2423

2524

2625

17

1817

1918

2019

2120 2221 2322

2423

6

St. Patrick’s Day

St. Patrick’s Day

Public Holiday

Public Holiday

2524

2625

2726 2827 2928

29

2524 2625 2726

Good Friday

Good Friday

2827

Easter Sunday

Easter Easter Monday Sunday

Summer Time Begins

Summer Time Public Begins Holiday

2928

Easter Monday

2726

2827

2928

3029

3130

31

2827

2928

14

1514

1615

1716

1817 1918 2019

2120

2221 2322 2423

2524

2625

2726

18

19

2019

2120

2221

2322 2423 2524

2625

2726 2827 2928

3029

3130

31

5

16

1716

1817

1918

2019 2120 2221

2322

2423 2524 2625

2726

2827

2928

3029

30

2928

3029

31

30

Father’s Day

3

14

1514

1615

1716

1817 1918 2019

2120

2221 2322 2423

2524

2625

2726

2827

7

18

1918

2019

2120

2221 2322 2423

2524

2625 2726 2827

2928

3029

3130

31

4

15

1615

1716

1817

1918 2019 2120

2221

2322 2423 2524

2625

2726

2827

2928

3029

30

2

13

1413

1514

1615

1716 1817 1918

2019

2120 2221 2322

23 24

25 24 2625

2726

2827

2928

3029

3130

3029 Summer Time Ends

31

3130 Halloween Summer Time Ends

Public Holiday

6

17

1817

1918

2019

2120 2221 2322

2423

2524 2625 2726

4

15

1615

1716

1817

1918 2019 2120

2221

2322 2423 2524

WED

3130

Public Holiday

3

Father’s Day

3029

Christmas Day

2827

2928

3029

30

2625

2726

2827

2928

Christmas St.Stephen’s Day Day

Public Holiday

THU

3029

3130

31

St.Stephen’s Day

Public Bank Holiday Holiday

Bank Holiday

THU SAT FRI SUN SAT MON SUN TUE MON WED TUE THU WED FRI THU SAT FRI SUN SAT MON SUN TUE MON WED TUE THU WED FRI THU SAT FRI SUN SAT MON SUN FRI

MON

J A N

J A N

F E B

F E B

M A R

M A R

A P R

A P R

M A Y

M A Y

J U N

J U N

J U L

J U L

A U G

A U G

S E P

S E P 31

Public Holiday

O C T

N O V

N O V

D E C

D E C

O C T

Halloween

MON

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 | 75


3 year calendar

2 0 1 5

2 0 1 5

2 0 1 6

2 0 1 6

2 0 1 7

2 0 1 7

January

2015

February

Week 1

2

3

4

5

Week

M T W T F S S

5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18

19 20 21 22 23 24 25

26 27 28 29 30 31

M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4

May

2015

2015 5

6

1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

March

2015

7

8

9

Week 9

9 10 11 12 13 14 15

16 17 18 19 20 21 22

23 24 25 26 27 28

M T W T F S S

June

2015

10 11 12 13 14

1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

9 10 11 12 13 14 15

16 17 18 19 20 21 22

23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28 29

July

2015

April

2015

Week 14 15 16 17 18 M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4 5

6 7 8 9 10 11 12

13 14 15 16 17 18 19

20 21 22 23 24 25 26

August

27 28 29 30

2015

Week 18 19 20 21 22

Week 23 24 25 26 27

Week 27 28 29 30 31

Week 31 32 33 34 35 36

M T W T F S S

M T W T F S S

M T W T F S S

M T W T F S S

4 5 6 7 8 9 10

1 2 3

11 12 13 14 15 16 17

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26 27 28 29 30 31

September

2015

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

8 9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 29 23 30 24 25 26 27 28

October

2015

1 2 3 4 5

6 7 8 9 10 11 12

13 14 15 16 17 18 19

20 21 22 23 24 25 26

November

27 28 29 30 31

2015

1 2

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

December

24 31 25 26 27 28 29 30

2015

Week 36 37 38 39 40

Week 40 41 42 43 44

Week 44 45 46 47 48 49

Week

49 50 51 52

M T W T F S S

M T W T F S S

M T W T F S S

M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4 5 6

7 8 9 10 11 12 13

14 15 16 17 18 19 20

21 28 22 29 23 30 24 25 26 27

1

2

3

4

5

Week

1 2 3

4 5 6 7 8 9 10

11 12 13 14 15 16 17

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26 27 28 29 30 31

M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4 5 6

January Week M T W T F S S

2016

May

2016

5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18

19 20 21 22 23 24 25

26 27 28 29 30 31

6

7

8

9

10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

8 9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 29 23 24 25 26 27 28

1 2 3 4

February

2016

June

2016

1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

9 10 11 12 13 14 15

16 17 18 19 20 21 22

March

23 30 24 25 26 27 28 29

2016

7 8 9 10 11 12 13

14 15 16 17 18 19 20

April

21 22 23 24 25 26 27

28 29 30 31

2016

Week 10 11 12 13 14

Week 14 15 16 17 18

M T W T F S S

M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4 5 6

7 8 9 10 11 12 13

14 15 16 17 18 19 20

21 22 23 24 25 26 27

July

28 29 30 31

2016

1 2 3

4 5 6 7 8 9 10

11 12 13 14 15 16 17

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

August

25 26 27 28 29 30

2016

Week 18

19 20 21 22 23

Week 23 24 25 26 27

Week 27 28 29 30 31

Week 32 33 34 35 36

M T W T F S S

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

M T W T F S S

M T W T F S S

M T W T F S S

1

9 10 11 12 13 14 15

16 17 18 19 20 21 22

September

23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28 29

2016

1 2 3 4 5

6 7 8 9 10 11 12

13 14 15 16 17 18 19

20 21 22 23 24 25 26

October

27 28 29 30

2016

1 2 3

4 5 6 7 8 9 10

11 12 13 14 15 16 17

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

November

25 26 27 28 29 30 31

2016

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

8 9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 29 23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28

December

2016

Week 36 37 38 39 40

Week 40 41 42 43 44 45

Week 45 46 47 48 49

Week 49 50 51 52

M T W T F S S

M T W T F S S

M T W T F S S

M T W T F S S

5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18

19 20 21 22 23 24 25

26 27 28 29 30

1

2

3

4

5

1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

9 10 11 12 13 14 15

16 17 18 19 20 21 22

23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28 29

1 2 3 4

January Week M T W T F S S

2017

May

6

2017

1 2

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

February

24 31 25 26 27 28 29 30

2017

Week

6

7

8

9

M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4 5

6 7 8 9 10 11 12

13 14 15 16 17 18 19

20 27 21 28 22 23 24 25 26

June

10

2017

1 2 3 4 5 6

7 8 9 10 11 12 13

14 15 16 17 18 19 20

21 28 22 29 23 30 24 25 26 27

March

2017

1 2 3 4

5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18

19 20 21 22 23 24 25

April

26 27 28 29 30 31

2017

Week 10 11 12 13 14

Week 14 15 16 17 18

M T W T F S S

M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4 5

6 7 8 9 10 11 12

13 14 15 16 17 18 19

20 21 22 23 24 25 26

July

27 28 29 30 31

2017

1 2

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

August

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 2017

Week 19

20 21 21 23

Week 23 24 25 26 27

Week 27 28 29 30 31 32

Week 32 33 34 35 36

M T W T F S S

8 9 10 11 12 13 14

M T W T F S S

M T W T F S S

M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 29 23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28

September

2017

1 2 3 4

5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18

19 20 21 22 23 24 25

October

26 27 28 29 30

2017

1 2

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

November

24 31 25 26 27 28 29 30

2017

1 2 3 4 5 6

7 8 9 10 11 12 13

14 15 16 17 18 19 20

21 22 23 24 25 26 27

December

2017

Week 36 37 38 39 40

Week 41 42 43 44 45

Week 45 46 47 48 49

Week 49 50 51 52

M T W T F S S

M T W T F S S

M T W T F S S

M T W T F S S

1 2 3

4 5 6 7 8 9 10

11 12 13 14 15 16 17

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 31 26 27 28 29 30

= Public Holiday

76 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16

1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

9 10 11 12 13 14 15

16 17 18 19 20 21 22

23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28 29

1 2 3 4 5

6 7 8 9 10 11 12

13 14 15 16 17 18 19

20 21 22 23 24 25 26

27 28 29 30

1 2 3

28 29 30 31

4 5 6 7 8 9 10

11 12 13 14 15 16 17

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26 27 28 29 30 31


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Food Ireland Yearbook & Directory 2015/16  

Food Ireland Yearbook & Directory: An annual information guide & reference source of products and services for the food & drink manufacturin...

Food Ireland Yearbook & Directory 2015/16  

Food Ireland Yearbook & Directory: An annual information guide & reference source of products and services for the food & drink manufacturin...