Food Ireland Yearbook & Directory 2018/19

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Food www.foodirelanddirectory.com

IRELAND

Yearbook & Directory 2018/19

PERSPECTIVE +PERFORMANCE

Published in association with FDI – Food Drink Ireland

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contents

10 2 Minister’s FOREWORD

Food Wise 2025 provides a vital road map for the future growth of Ireland’s agri-food sector, writes Michael Creed TD, Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine.

4 Overview

Paul Kelly, Director, Food Drink Ireland, examines the potential impact of Brexit on Ireland’s agri-food sector, from currency fluctuations to market access, and stresses the policies needed to ensure the sector can meet the substantial challenges ahead.

8 The Big Interview

Brexit is just one of the big challenges facing Ireland’s agri-food and drink sector in the coming years, according to Bord Bia CEO, Tara McCarthy, but there are significant plans in place to help the sector grow, driven by market insight.

12 Prepared Consumer Foods

Since the outcome of the Brexit referendum, agri-food saw exports to the UK drop in 2016 by €570m at the cost of 5,700 jobs, writes Ailbhe Byrne, Food Drink Ireland.

14 Dairy

Dairy Sustainability Ireland is an initiative involving Government and the dairy industry to develop and implement new approaches to dairy farm sustainability at both economic and environmental levels, writes Conor Mulvihill, Director, Dairy Industry Ireland.

16 Packaging – The Future for Plastic

Demonised in the media, it is often forgotten that packaging, and plastic packaging in particular, prevents food waste, writes Colm Jordan, Director, Irish Beverage Council, while Rosemarie Downey, Head of Packaging Research at Euromonitor International, examines what needs to be done to integrate plastic into a circular economy.

22 Irish Whiskey

William Lavelle, Head of the Irish Whiskey Association, examines the explosive growth in Irish whiskey distilling, driven by ever-stronger consumer demand.

24 Food Safety

22

24

28 Workplace Wellbeing

Ireland’s fourth National Workplace Wellbeing Day was a tremendous success.

32 KeepWell Mark

The KeepWell Mark is an evidence-based accreditation and award from Ibec to recognise and celebrate organisations who look after the health and wellbeing of their staff, writes Sophie Moran, Food Drink Ireland.

51Conveyors

ENE is a leader in the manufacture and supply of FDA and HACCP compliant conveyors, machinery and belting.

52 Packaging

Connie Ryan, Managing Director, Limerick Packaging, explains the secrets behind the company’s phenomenal growth and continued success.

34 Learning & Development

54 Transport & Logistics

35 BREWING

57 Calibration

Access to skills continues to be a significant resource challenge for the sector, writes Mark Skinner, Food Drink Ireland Skillnet Manager. We have unprecedented consumer choice for beer drinkers but uncertain times lie ahead for Ireland’s brewing sector, argues Jonathan McDade, Head of the Irish Brewers Association.

36 Labelling Regulations

The EU has laid down new mandatory country of origin labelling regulations for the primary ingredient in food and drink products, due to come into force in April 2020, writes food lawyer, Raymond O’Rourke.

Endress+Hauser provides timely, traceable and cost-effective calibration services that allow their clients complete peace of mind.

59 Ingredients

Truly Grass Fed from Glanbia Ireland brings quality, natural ingredients to your brand.

60 Functional Ingredients

Brenntag Ireland is one of the country’s leading functional ingredients suppliers, actively supporting innovation across a wide number of areas.

64 University College Cork

40 Seafood

BIM recently unveiled its new Statement of Strategy Enabling Sustainable Growth for the 2018-2020 period, which aims to boost competitiveness amidst market uncertainties.

42 Packaging Recycling

Repak’s Prevent & Save Programme offers a host of benefits to companies, including reduced energy consumption and costs when packing your products.

46 Food Safety

safefood’s Knowledge Network is a networking community for food safety professionals on the island of Ireland.

48 Traceability

fTRACE is a modern, cloud-based traceability platform that provides businesses and consumers alike with information directly into the palm of their hand.

Dr Pamela Byrne, CEO of the Food Safety Authority of Ireland, discusses the evolving role of the FSAI, the potential impact of Brexit on the regulatory environment and the challenges facing the food industry in a world of ever more complex supply chains.

What will Brexit mean for your supply chain? Mark Boulton, Strategic Development Director, Cold Move, assesses the implications.

Food www.foodirelanddirectory.com

IRELAND

Yearbook & Directory 2018/19

PERSPECTIVE +PERFORMANCE

Food Ireland is published by: Tara Publishing Ltd 14 Upper Fitzwilliam Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01 6785165 Fax: 01 6785191 Email: kathleenbelton@tarapublications.ie Web: www.foodirelanddirectory.com

UCC is looking forward to another summer of food excellence with Blas na hÉireann, the Irish Food Awards

65 Robotics

Robots are increasingly being utilised in the food manufacturing and processing industry, and not just for packing and palletising.

66 Machinery & Equipment

If your business consists of ‘bagged products’ in any industry, Fischbein has a solution to fulfil your needs.

68 Pallets & Packaging

With Mid Cork Pallets, you can be assured that the pallets or packaging you buy are manufactured to the highest standard.

70 Capital Investment Programmes Factors to consider when considering capital investment programmes.

LISTINGS SECTION

Product & Service Index 71 74 Company Listings Relevant Organisations 86 Year Planner 88

Managing Director: Patrick Aylward Editorial and Marketing Director: Kathleen Belton Published in association with FDI – Food Drink Ireland

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Editor: John Walshe Sales: Brian Clark, Aaron Stewart Production: Ciara Conway Design: Tony Hunt Printed by: WG Baird

28.05.2018 13:58:00

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19 | 1


minister’s foreword

Food Wise 2025: A Coherent Vision for Agri-Food Now more than ever, Food Wise 2025 provides a vital road map for the future growth of Ireland’s agri-food sector, writes Michael Creed TD, Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine.

T

to be enhanced (outside of the traditional UK he agri-food sector is Ireland’s largest and EU markets), steadily increasing to a value indigenous industry, with a turnover of of around €4.2 billion in 2017. €26 billion, contributing 7.8% of Modified Gross National Income (GNI) and it accounted for 11.1% of all merchandise The Global Food Market of the Future exports in 2017. The agri-food sector has The global food market of the future will be performed strongly in recent years, with the marked by increasing population growth and value of food and drink exports reaching €13.6 prosperity in developing countries. billion in 2017, marking growth of over 70% Consumers increasingly demand assurances of since 2009. The agri-food sector also makes safety, nutritional value and sustainable a significant contribution to employment in production methods for the food they rural areas, accounting for 7.9% of total emconsume, as well as seeking greater choice and convenience in food products. ployment, or approximately 174,000 jobs. Through the national agri-food strategy, Food Ireland is a globally recognised trading Wise 2025, the Irish agri-food sector is well nation, consistently providing high quality placed to meet these demands, with a focus on food products worldwide. Irish food and sustainability, competitiveness and innovation drink is sold in 180 markets by a diverse and in order to grow existing markets and diversify ambitious network of around 1,300 food and Michael Creed TD, Minister for into new markets. drinks firms from across the country. In 2017, Agriculture, Food and the Marine. Food Wise 2025 sets out a 10-year plan for the the share of exports to the UK was 38% and 31% agri-food sector, underlines the sector’s unique and special position to other EU markets. Irish agri-food’s share of exports to international within the Irish economy, and it illustrates the potential which exists and emerging markets have also grown substantially to 31%. The for this sector to grow even further. It outlines the opportunities and profile of trade in food and drink exports to these markets continues

2 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19


minister’s foreword We are facing some uncertain times, but I think the need to have a coherent, shared vision for the sector has never been more important. We should, therefore, continue to work towards the vision of sustainable growth set out in Food Wise, while taking account of the new realities.

challenges facing the sector and provides an enabling strategy that will allow the sector to grow and prosper. Food Wise 2025 identifies ambitious and challenging growth projections for the industry over the next 10 years, including an 85% increase in exports to €19 billion; and the creation of 23,000 additional jobs all along the supply chain, from producer level to high end value added product development. These are ambitious projections, but in the sector, we have ample evidence of setting and achieving ambitious targets to date. We are facing some uncertain times, but I think the need to have a coherent, shared vision for the sector has never been more important. We should, therefore, continue to work towards the vision of sustainable growth set out in Food Wise, while taking account of the new realities. Of course, we must recognise the challenges, and take positive steps to deal with them.

High Level Implementation Committee The implementation of Food Wise is driven by a High Level Implementation Committee (HLIC), which I chair. It involves the CEOs of the State agencies and senior officials from relevant Departments, ensuring joined-up Government action and providing a platform for those bodies to meet collectively with industry representatives. The HLIC also ensures that Food Wise implementation is a live and dynamic process. Food Wise, like its predecessors, is a process as much as a product, responding to changing circumstances, while remaining loyal to the core vision and objectives of the plan itself. Progress on these ambitious projections is monitored and reviewed on a quarterly basis by the HLIC and at the beginning of

this month (July 3), the third progress report of Food Wise 2025, entitled ‘Steps to Success 2018’, was published. ‘Steps to Success 2018’ outlines what the Department and its agencies have achieved in year three and what they plan to achieve over the next 12 months. It covers four main areas: Brexit, Sustainability, Innovation & Growth and Protected Geographical Indications (PGI). Of the 375 actions that were due to start in 2015 to 2018 or are ongoing actions, there has been great progress to date, with all actions commenced. Of these, 74% of the actions have been achieved or substantial action has been undertaken, whilst 26% of the actions have commenced and are progressing.

New Market Development In April, I announced the opening of the Chinese beef market to exports from Ireland. The opening of this key market presents an excellent opportunity for the Irish beef sector, from farmers through to processors, in line with the market development theme of our Food Wise strategy. Opening and developing new markets is also a key part of our response to the uncertainties arising from Brexit. I believe that Ireland is well positioned to be the world leader in sustainable food production, provided that we take the necessary actions to support this objective. Ireland’s agri-food industry needs, now more than ever, to take steps to build and enhance its reputation for safe, sustainable and healthy food in order to move further up the value chain. Food Wise 2025 is the driver for this ambition to be achieved.

Michael Creed TD, Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19 | 3


overview Paul Kelly, Director, Food Drink Ireland, looks at the potential impact of Brexit on Ireland’s agri-food sector, from currency fluctuations to market access. He assesses the likely scenarios we will face and stresses the policies needed to ensure the sector is fit for purpose to meet the substantial challenges ahead.

The Challenge for Irish Agri-Food 4 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19


overview

T

he UK vote to leave the EU is the largest and most immediate challenge facing the Irish agri-food sector. The UK is our largest trading partner for food and drink. Irish exports to the UK were €4.5 billion (35% of total exports) in 2017 and UK exports to Ireland were £3.4 billion in 2016. The export exposure of the main sectors was as follows: • 51% of beef exports; • 56% of pigmeat exports; • 79% of poultry exports; • 24% of all dairy exports (but 50% of cheese exports); • 62% of prepared consumer foods exports; • 26% of beverage exports. Whilst the outcome of exit negotiations between the EU and UK will potentially have a huge impact on our trading relationship with the UK, the sector already faces one major challenge: a large and rapid weakening of Sterling over the last 18/24 months. The current change in currency value is structural not cyclical and there have also been many fundamental changes to the economic and business environment domestically and in the UK, which make this very different to previous Sterling weaknesses. These include: • Limited capacity for Irish exporters to drive further efficiencies in their businesses; • Impact on supply chain policies of UK retailers and food services sector on food and drinks companies; • Market renationalisation – domestic sourcing policies growing across Europe; • Much more competitive retail food sector in UK – hard discounters have doubled market share to over 10%; • Complication of operations and administration for all-island food and drinks businesses. A structural shift in exchange rate relationship, combined with Brexit related trade risks, means that UK buyers are planning significant supply chain restructuring - the real threat is a loss of confidence in Ireland as a competitive supply base, resulting in loss of markets and exports.

major implications for our trading relationship with the UK. The main objective must be to maintain full unfettered access to the UK market. In addition, UK access to the EU single market is much preferable to UK bi-lateral agreements with third countries. The retention of free access to, and maintenance of, the value of the UK market, is of critical importance. In practical terms, the reasons why are clear: • Food and drink products will face the threat of customs AND regulatory checks at borders; • Copenhagen Economics has estimated a 14% increase in trade costs in a Free Trade Agreement scenario due to customs impact and regulatory divergence. The European meat association UECBV have estimated the combined cost of veterinary checks / port clearance for exporters to the EU from third countries at over €625 per meat consignment; • 850,000 trucks travel by ferry between Ireland and Britain (45% are perishable food and drink); • Most of Ireland’s €4.1 billion food and drink exports to EU-26 use the UK land-bridge. In the case of Irish meat exports, the figure is 90%. For fresh food and drink produce, the shortest crossing is business critical. Ireland to Calais by land-bridge is a journey time of 10.5 hours. Ireland to Cherbourg by sea is a journey time of 20 hours.

A Competitive Disadvantage There are two areas in particular where Irish companies are at a significant competitive disadvantage to their UK counterparts – labour costs and capital costs. Past research has shown these are also the major costs items for manufacturing business. As a result, Ireland already has significant cost disadvantages from both an Opex and Capex point of view for food and drinks companies when compared with the UK. The market impact will be felt not just in the potential for reduced exports to the UK, but it will cause damage domestically where imports (and cross border trading) will displace indigenous products and in other export markets where UK food exports are competing with Irish exports - continental European and international markets. The exit negotiations between the EU and the UK will also have

In the short term, the Government’s objective must be to put in place mitigating measures to help companies manage their businesses through the on-going uncertainty caused by the currency shift and the exit negotiations. The focus must be on maintaining markets in the UK, developing other markets, as well as ensuring that in the domestic market, companies remain competitive against imports and the threat of cross-border shopping.

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19 | 5


overview

In the short term, however, the Government’s objective must be to put in place mitigating measures to help companies manage their businesses through the on-going uncertainty caused by the However, given the UK’s stated determination to leave the Single currency shift and the exit negotiations. The focus must be on Market and Customs Union, this will require a comprehensive Free maintaining markets in the UK, developing other markets, as well as Trade Agreement (FTA) between the EU and UK. avoiding tariffs, ensuring that in the domestic market, comTRQs and regulatory divergence. panies remain competitive against imports As a hugely important Key issues for the future trading and the threat of cross-border shopping. relationship are:

Key Issues for our Future Trading Relationship with the UK

measure to mitigate these

• Avoidance of a hard border risks, it is imperative to Mitigating the Risks with Northern Ireland; The longer-term opportunities largely • Minimise customs burdens implement policies within remain for the Irish food and drink sector. and regulatory checks (animal our power to control our cost However, the immediate response must products) as part of any future be to ensure the sector is fit for purpose base... The primary concerns trade agreement (mutual meet the substantial challenges ahead. recognition of standards to in this regard are labour costs, to Whilst agri-food is most at risk in the event expedite trade between poorly designed regulation of a hard Brexit, there is the ongoing impact approved consignors/ from Sterling depreciation. consignees, simplified and rising insurance costs. procedures consistent As a hugely important measure to with the Union Customs Code mitigate these risks, it is imperative to and maximum collaboration on SPS, veterinary and product implement policies within our power to control our cost base. This standards); must be done, whilst helping companies to innovate and improve productivity. The primary concerns in this regard are labour costs, • Special arrangements to facilitate transiting goods using the poorly designed regulation and rising insurance costs. It is also UK land-bridge; imperative that measures to improve utility and transport costs • Common legal recognition and technical application in both are taken to provide a hedge against possible future cost increases Ireland and Northern Ireland of the three All-island Spirits because of Brexit. Geographic Indications for Irish whiskey, Irish Cream and Poitin; Mitigating Brexit also requires the provision of exceptional state • Continuation of a seamless system, like the existing EMCS, to aid support for stabilisation, competitiveness and diversification manage and record movement of excisable produce in duty to remedy a serious disturbance in the Irish economy due to the suspension between Ireland and UK; • The UK should also remain part of the European Common Transit fracture of the Single Market. The will necessitate a multi-annual funding framework in the region of 5% of the value of current System to ensure smooth transit of goods to, from and through annual indigenous export sales to the UK (€650m over three years). the UK - to prevent border delays by suspending the payment With one in eight jobs in the economy linked to agri-food, failure of import duties and other charges (e.g. VAT) until the vehicle to do this will be damaging to the wider economy and not just the arrives at the final office of destination in the EU (or UK) in return food and drink industry. for a guarantee.

6 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19


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the big interview

Tara McCarthy, CEO, Bord Bia.

Brexit is just one of the big challenges facing Ireland’s agri-food and drink sector in the coming years, according to Bord Bia CEO, Tara McCarthy, but there are significant plans in place to help the sector grow, driven by market insight.

Y

ou could be forgiven for thinking that Brexit is the only show in town when it comes to the Irish agri-food industry, so serious could be its implications for those sectors and companies reliant on exporting to Britain. While Britain’s impending departure from the EU next March presents a massive problem, particularly given the continued uncertainty around negotiations, it is one of a number of issues facing the sector and those agencies charged to serve its interests, including Bord Bia. “Brexit is one very serious challenge, but it’s one of many we are facing in order to ensure that our industry gets what it needs to deliver on its potential,” explains Bord Bia CEO, Tara McCarthy. “As a country exporting to 180 different countries around the world, there are challenges in every single one of those. We’re now allocating resources to address the big challenges. When we’re looking at growth opportunities, we’re focusing on where the scaled opportunities to place business exist. We firmly believe that the UK has a huge part to play in that and we are very focused on the work we put into the UK, but we also believe that markets like China have a huge role to play. We’re not looking at China because of Brexit; we’re looking at China because China has a huge opportunity for our growth industry.” Bord Bia has collaborated with the agri-food industry to develop a more data-led, strategic approach to export

8 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

diversification and market prioritisation. “What we’re doing is looking at ourselves and our structure,” McCarthy explains. “We’re looking at the talent, the capabilities and the skills that we need to have in Bord Bia. We’re looking at identifying opportunity markets and prioritising those opportunity markets. We are restructuring our services to line up with those opportunities. We’re looking at trying to understand where does Brand Ireland have the best resonance and what are the messages that the world is looking for that Brand Ireland can deliver against. This is not about reacting to Brexit; this is about having an informed growth strategy. Even with the very difficult backdrop of last year, with Sterling volatility etc, our industry experienced double digit growth, up by 13% to reach €12.6 billion. We are in a growth industry and we want to ensure, Brexit or no Brexit, that we are doing the right things for our industry.” The UK remains Ireland’s key export market, at 35% of total exports in 2017 (down by 2% from the previous year), although sales to our neighbour increased for the year by 7% to over €4.5 billion. One would assume the UK will remain just as important post-Brexit – their appetite for Irish wagri-food and drink products is not going to suddenly disappear after March 19 next year.


the big interview “That’s our ambition,” she says. “And that’s logical. When you’re looking at trade, your neighbour is always the most logical person for you to trade with and when it comes to food, it’s even more logical; we have similar taste profiles; we speak the same language; presently, we have the same labelling, the same connotations for different use of products. All these things make it a very natural play for us to be working together.” Bord Bia have engaged heavily in “trying to disable as many barriers to trade as possible in our future relationship with the UK, by understanding that market better than we ever have before and having detailed market strategies for the UK.” Indeed, she argues that all Irish exporters should have market strategies for the UK: “For the last 10 years, companies have probably thought of the UK as an extension of the domestic market, rather than an export market. We’re repositioning it now as a market you have to invest in to get growth and putting in play the resources, the competencies and the skill-sets to enable companies to do that.”

Bord Bia’s Brexit Barometer More than half (54%) of Irish exporters have tailored marketing strategies specifically for the UK market, according to Bord Bia’s 2018 Brexit Barometer, a comprehensive survey of 117 Irish food, drink and horticulture companies, representing 48% of the sector’s exporters to the UK. 74% of respondents believe they have made progress in preparing for Brexit outcomes; 85% are actively seeking to expand their business into new markets, while 80% believe that they will continue to have opportunities to increase sales in the UK market. 62% of respondents have mapped their supply chain to identify possible delays, costs and customs challenges arising from Brexit, while 40% have taken steps to reduce their supply chain costs as a result of Brexit. “We firmly believe that the food industry is working very hard to ensure that they’re prepared for Brexit,” McCarthy insists. “That means understanding your supply chain, because that’s where complexities are going to arise. Where do you source your goods? Are they going to come in through the UK, whether it be your packaging or ingredients? If they do come through the UK, what happens if there’s going to be a delay? It’s not clear if tariffs are going to be levied on goods coming through the UK, so how bulletproof are you on that? It’s the exact same thing if you’re

exporting goods to the UK or through the UK: how ready are you for delays, be they discussions at the port or new paperwork? Have you costed scenarios for that? So understanding your supply chain is core, as is getting in front of your buyers in the UK, showing your commitment to the market.” Irish food and drink companies are also attempting to “de-risk and look at other markets, increasing their efforts at market prioritisation and diversification, as well as looking at innovation as a route to price recovery in the market”, McCarthy maintains.

Exposure to Currency Fluctuations Exposure to currency fluctuations has been a concern for many exporting companies since Britain voted to leave the EU. Things are improving, however, as companies get better at “hedging” against currency changes. According to the findings of the 2018 Brexit Barometer, only 7% of businesses surveyed would begin to experience severe difficulty in the £0.85 - £0.89 exchange rate range. This represents a significant drop from 28% in 2017. “Companies have become more sophisticated in their currency management,” McCarthy stresses, “but that only buys you time.” Even in the worst case scenario of a hard Brexit, the UK will still be an important market for us. “We export 250,000 tonnes of beef to the UK, which is 50% of our exports, so even if there is a hard Brexit, the following morning, we will not stop selling beef to the UK,” she stresses. “You still have a British consumer who is very interested in the quality of their product, who is a world leader in terms of their expectations of animal welfare, expectations on traceability – they have driven the European agenda on so many of those things. So you cannot assume that overnight, the British consumer will throw those values out. But will they choose to eat more chicken than beef? Will they choose to move away from certain categories? Will they choose better quality, less often? This is all about scenario planning, working out what choices consumers will make, hence our Thinking House investment.” Bord Bia research shows that British consumers view buying Irish produce as shopping local. “They don’t see us as a foreign product,” McCarthy explains. “A number of retailers and foodservice operators position their products as ‘British & Irish’, and that is a very different brand proposition than buying for example, Brazilian beef.” Bord Bia have recently launched a new refreshed Brexit training

Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Michael Creed TD, and Tara McCarthy, Bord Bia CEO, pictured on a recent trade mission to China.

FOOD IRELAND YFOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19 | 9


the big interview

Pictured at the recent 2018 Bord Bia Brexit Barometer are Tara McCarthy, Bord Bia CEO, with Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Michael Creed TD.

programme, including workshops on Customs, Currency Risk and Supply Chain, while they have also opened a new insight centre, modelled on Bord Bia’s existing “Thinking House” centre in Dublin, in their office in London.

Recruiting for the Future The Department of Agriculture, Food & the Marine have provided €6.7m of extra funding to Bord Bia, in addition to sanctioning the organisation to recruit an extra 30 staff in its largest ever recruitment drive, with the new positions in branding, marketing, insights, PR, digital marketing, events and business development – as well as more specialist meat, dairy, seafood, beverages, retail and sustainability roles, both in Dublin and abroad. “This shows the confidence of the Department in Bord Bia going forward,” McCarthy avows, “and as part of our market prioritisation/ diversification agenda, we will now be opening an office in Tokyo, will be strengthening our presence in Singapore, China, USA, in the UK, in Poland, in markets where we believe there is more opportunity.” Bord Bia engaged in a detailed market prioritisation strategy to identify the top growth markets for Irish food internationally, across various sectors, including meat, dairy, prepared foods, alcohol, seafood etc, creating more than 75 different reports into all those markets. “We’re now working on how best to utilise that 10 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

data to target those markets,” McCarthy notes. “This market prioritisation will shape our structure, our resource allocation etc, going forward.”

Origin Green: A Unique Partnership Alignment with both the Department of Agriculture and other state agencies is also crucial for the future development of our industry, she believes, referring to the concept of Brand Ireland. Nowhere is this more visible than in the success of Origin Green, the national food and drink sustainability programme, which is the first time that an entire industry and Government has dovetailed perfectly to move in one direction “It’s the first time such a programme was ever created anywhere in the world and we’re very excited about that,” she enthuses, acknowledging the work done by her predecessor at the helm of Bord Bia, Aidan Cotter, in its development. “The fantastic part of it and what makes it so unique is the collaboration we have throughout the State, throughout the supply chain, from farmers through to retailers, from seafood through to alcohol; every part of the industry is working in an aligned fashion. We believe that there are huge opportunities to align it even further. But all of our competitor nations, those countries who may enjoy some of our credentials,


the big interview

For the last 10 years, companies have probably thought of the UK as an extension of the domestic market, rather than an export market. We’re repositioning it now as a market you have to invest in to get growth and putting in play the resources, the competencies and the skill-sets to enable companies to do that.

would be very envious of the opportunity that Ireland has created for itself through Origin Green. The idea that 50,000 farmers would volunteer to do this in our beef industry; that 95% of our dairy farmers are now signed up, with the ambition for it to be 100%; that 90% of our exporters are volunteering to put in stretch targets that they are reporting against; the concept of an industry working together at that kind of scale, they find it bordering on impossible to understand. It is creating a huge opportunity, when dealing with global customers of scale, to put Ireland on the map.” Rather than rest on its laurels and congratulate itself on a job well done, however, Origin Green is moving forward, identifying “the next generation of sustainability because we know this programme has to evolve to stay relevant”. She cites the different agendas driving sustainability, depending on what part of the world you are in. In the western world, she reveals, sustainability is very much driven by corporations, while in the rest of the world, consumers are driving sustainability. “We’re a small agency of 110 people, looking to create a brand that’s global, so we need to choose our partners carefully and this type of insight will shape the partners we work with in different parts of the world.”

Market Diversification Obviously, market diversification is a key strategy, with Bord Bia investing huge resources in identifying key export markets for Irish produce, providing data-driven insights to allow Irish companies to grow their presence worldwide. Once, again, time is of the essence. “The Department of Agriculture was hugely focused on opening the Chinese market for Irish beef but it still took seven years just to open the market politically,” she explains. Trade missions are a “fundamental” part of opening up new markets, she stresses, “allowing us to put ourselves on the map, politically and commercially”, with potential locations chosen primarily via Bord Bia’s market prioritisation exercise. “The role of Government is absolutely huge, particularly in Asia, so for us, having our Minister of Agriculture having peer meetings and trade meetings there is a fantastic asset for Ireland. It also gives a commercial focus, as we create an opportunity of access to buyers at a senior level, so that we can create meet-and-greet opportunities, building the Brand of Ireland.” Bord Bia have also been hugely successful in bringing buyers and government officials from abroad to our shores at events like Marketplace International in April, where Bord Bia targeted €40m of new business generated over the next 18 months, and even Bloom, which saw a delegation of chefs from Hong Kong visiting the festival.

Trade Wars: No Winners Given the volatility of the global marketplace and the threat of trade wars, primarily driven by the US President’s protectionist manoeuvring, what are the dangers for Ireland? “Nobody wins in trade wars,” she says simply. “We would be very

concerned at any moves towards that and we’re concerned about the changing mindset around globalisation and international trade. Whatever the short term gains, there are no winners from a trade war. Brexit, trade barriers, trade wars are huge concerns for an open economy like Ireland. The language that we use is very much going back to the principle of sustainability. When Ireland is looking to trade, we’re not looking to trade as a low cost provider; we’re looking to trade as a sustainable provider, not just from an environmental perspective but from an economic and social perspective as well, so we are positioning ourselves as longer-term trade partners.”

New Bord Bia Strategy Bord Bia are currently producing a new strategy document to guide the association through from 2019-2021. Their current strategy (20162018) has five key pillars: consumer insight; enabled by valued people, talent and infrastructure; underpinned by Origin Green; realised by effective routes to market and business conversion; supported by strong brand communications in the digital age. “We took a very deep look at our strategy late last year, with Brexit, to ensure that we were on the right track and we heard that those five pillars were the right ones, but current thinking is less about five separate workstreams and more about the enablers that help us to create the reputation for Ireland. Each of the areas that we focus on will help the other. When we look at consumer and market insight, for example, that is a fantastic tool to enable us to make the right decisions for route to market. When we are looking at our talent and the skills we want to develop in our industry, that’s also a key enabler to the insight we are gathering and the markets we want to convert. So all these areas are merging into one to make sure we have a menu and a focus within that menu, rather than separate pillars.” Bord Bia are also currently working on a diversity project, linking in with ‘The 30% Club’, with the goal of achieving better gender balance in the food industry. McCarthy stresses that the food industry’s ranking in terms of gender balance is actually positive, primarily due to the amount of SMEs led by female entrepreneurs. “We want to position our industry as one that is welcoming,” McCarthy notes. “We are creating toolkits to attract more women to our industry and to offer them pathways to be serious players in our industry. We are now looking to create support programmes for HR divisions within food companies to make sure there is no unconscious bias or barriers existing in the industry.” If she was giving advice to an Irish agri-food business for the road ahead, it would be two-fold. Firstly, “listen to the market. We believe that market insight is the key differentiator in helping us to make the right decisions,” she stresses. “It’s a very complex world we live in but real data and market insight can help you to make informed decisions. We believe that within Ireland, we have a fundamental differentiator in Origin Green and we want to make sure that it is a value of the food industry, not just a project. As we increase our sustainability credentials, that ethos permeating through the industry will be core for us.” FOOD IRELAND YFOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19 | 11


prepared consumer foods

PCF Sector Preparing for Brexit

Ireland’s food sector is facing an unprecedented challenge following the UK vote to leave the EU in June 2016. Since the outcome of the referendum, agri-food saw exports to the UK drop in 2016 by €570m at the cost of 5,700 jobs, writes Ailbhe Byrne, Food Drink Ireland.

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iscussions on the impact of Brexit on Irish agri-food have focused largely on the primary sectors but considered attention must also be given to value-added products. The Prepared Consumer Foods (PCF) sector faces additional challenges, given factors such as its reliance on imports and exports with the UK, complex and interwoven supply chain arrangements, the threat of regulatory divergence and potential changes to workforce availability. The phase one joint agreement includes important commitments on how to avoid a hard border on the island of Ireland. These now need to be fully captured in robust legal form, which must inform the talks on a transition deal and, crucially, on the future EU-UK relationship. Avoiding a hard border will involve not only a comprehensive deal on customs, but also on wider regulatory alignment. Northern Ireland will need to stay close to the single market if we are to avoid checks at the border.

The Importance of the UK In 2016, exports to the UK fell by 9% to €1.6 billion. The decrease was due to weaker Sterling creating additional competitive pressures. This resulted in a decline in value for most categories of food and drink. Exports recovered in 2017 and experienced significant growth. However, this progress could be derailed if the Brexit negotiations break down. 2017 food and drink exports to the UK saw total exports of €4.4 billion from Ireland to the UK, including: • PCF exports valued at €1.8 billion • Beef exports valued at €1.25 billion • Dairy exports valued at €904,363m The future value of food exports from Ireland to the UK, and that of 12 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

the PCF sector will be determined not just by the changed relationship between our two currencies, but most particularly by the new trading relationship that will exist between the UK and the EU. We must consider how that new relationship will impact on such issues such as the supply chain, contracts, finance and funding, workforces, technology, regulation, tax, access to markets, and operating structures.

Decisive Action Needed No food company in Ireland is unaffected by Brexit. Government must take decisive action now to assist a sector which is of vital strategic importance to the Irish economy and society. While pursuing clear domestic policy objectives to back Irish food businesses, it should also continue to engage with the European Commission to seek specific flexibility in State aid rules due to Brexit constituting a serious disturbance to the Irish economy. The €5m capital investment to fund research and innovation in the PCF sector announced in Budget 2018 is welcome but a mere foundation. Secure, multiannual funding is essential to allow project planning and create confidence. Food Drink Ireland and its PCF Council will continue to engage with Government and beyond to ensure the sector’s voice is heard and concerns addressed. About Prepared Consumer Foods The Prepared Consumer Food sector produces value-added food and beverages which sell domestically or internationally to grocery or convenience retail, foodservice or other food companies. The sector includes prepared consumer foods, ingredients, value-added seafood, value-added horticulture and non-alcoholic beverages.


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dairy Dairy Sustainability Ireland is a pro-active industry led, whole of sector and whole of Government partnership.

Dairy Industry

Tackles Sustainability & Climate Change Dairy Sustainability Ireland is an initiative involving Government and the dairy industry to develop and implement new approaches to dairy farm sustainability at both economic and environmental levels, writes Conor Mulvihill, Director, Dairy Industry Ireland.

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he Irish dairy processing industry is a key component of the economy on the island, providing much needed employment, much of it spread across rural areas. Our industry processes over 7.5 billion litres of milk, across 30 sites and is supplied by 18,000 family farms, many of whom are owners of the primary businesses. Many of these businesses have an all island presence Since the abolition of quotas, we are driving to be a global leader in the development of a high value environmentally sustainable dairy industry based on our extensive grass based dairy system. Dairy Industry Ireland established Dairy Sustainability Ireland at the end of 2016 to provide industry leadership on the issue of sustainable dairy practices that would help the climate change agenda in a positive manner.

A Rationale for Positive Climate Change Measures It is clear that the discourse on climate change and sustainability had caused a disconnect between stakeholders. Negative 14 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

messaging and forced environmental and climate change actions have increasingly become seen as pejorative by the majority of farmers and many key companies. This project set about providing real solutions to show that positive environmental outcomes for all, along

with improved farmer incomes and overall company sustainability, are not mutually exclusive of each other and can indeed work with each other to create a win-win scenario. Dairy Sustainability Ireland is a pro-active industry led, whole of sector and whole of Government partnership, which is working


dairy to develop and implement new approaches to dairy farm sustainability at both economic and environmental levels. A Dairy Sustainability Ireland Forum was established, containing all 14 members of Ireland’s dairy processing industry, including the specialised nutrition companies. These were joined by all the main farm organisations, and augmented by the key relevant state agencies, including; the Department of Agriculture, Food & the Marine, the Department of Housing (Responsibility for Water), the EPA, Bord Bia, Teagasc and the Local Authorities.

Dairy Sustainability Ireland Aims & Launch With detailed technical work along with stakeholder building and consultation having occurred over a year, the initiative was publicly launched in October 2017 with Minister Creed and DII Chair Jim Woulfe (CEO of Dairygold). This first phase of the project, focusing on soil fertility, water quality improvement and farmyard management, is currently being rolled out nationwide through the dairy industry’s farm advice service and with the support of Teagasc. These actions are fundamental foundation stones to addressing climate change issues at farm and factory level.

Early Evolution of Initiative With Ireland needing to react to challenges from the Water Directives and the possible loss of the nitrates derogation coming from the EU, it was decided at the end of 2017 that the components of Dairy Sustainability Ireland would fully support the Government’s set-up of the Agricultural Sustainability Support and Advisory Programme (ASSAP) in tandem with the Departments of Housing & Agriculture. DII Chair Jim Woulfe launched the initiative with Minister for Agriculture, Food & the Marine, Michael Creed TD, and Minister for Housing, Eoghan Murphy TD in government buildings in December 2017. Currently a governance and action plan is being rolled out, where the dairy industry is to commit advisors to work with dedicated government personnel in Teagasc and the Local Authorities around the country to achieve on-the-ground solutions.

• This work will be supported up the supply chain by the specialised nutrition Dairy Industry Ireland members; • DII members will provide and fund 10 sustainability advisors to work within a shared partnership strategy and governance in the new ASSAP programme; • The sustainability advisors will work cohesively and in an integrated way with the Teagasc team; • All of the sustainability advisors will be trained with the Teagasc team by Teagasc to the same standard; • The sustainability advisors will support an internal change program within the companies as part of this new programme; • All dairy industry personnel in direct contact with farmers will be trained in this new approach; • Work within the partnership, to develop a new communications strategy to support on-farm sustainability and climate change best practice; • Co-op communication channels with their suppliers and supplier network structures will be utilised to drive the new strategy.

Outcomes The agreed outcomes include: • The current company farm pilots for Nutrient Management Programme best practice will be expanded to all processing dairy companies in 2018; • Two new pilots will be established with the Department of Agriculture, Food & the Marine, Teagasc, and the EPA, to understand and devise best practice in critical source areas– to break nutrient pathways; • The processing companies will actively promote the implementation of the New Nitrates Action Programme to all farmer suppliers; • The co-ops will seek that all dairy farms implement best practice in NMP by 2021; • The co-ops will support the development of new approaches and best practice re the broader sustainability and climate change agenda.

Commitments by Members Dairy Industry Ireland Members have committed to: • All of the processing dairy companies at all levels will fully support this new sustainability drive to achieve improved on farm sustainability outcomes;

Pictured at the launch of Dairy Sustainability Ireland are (l-r): Minister for Housing, Eoghan Murphy TD; DII Chair Jim Woulfe, CEO of Dairygold; and Minister for Agriculture, Food & the Marine, Michael Creed TD. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19 | 15


packaging

The Case for Plastic Packaging P ackaging, and plastic packaging in particular, has come under serious scrutiny recently. Small percentages of our overall packaging waste are garnering huge focus, while Ireland’s progress on segregation, collection and recycling are often ignored. It can quickly be forgotten how important packaging is in our daily lives and how it has helped to reduce our carbon footprint. Packaging is essential to bring many food and beverages to our tables. It helps reduce food waste and protects quality and freshness. Food packaging also lets consumers see the nutritional information on the label to help make informed choices. Food and beverage packaging plays a key role in protecting, containing and preserving the produce contained within.

The Role of Modern Packaging Modern packaging is a central element in the efficient manufacturing, handling and distribution of food from the factory to the consumer’s kitchen. Consumer safety is the overriding objective of food and beverage producers and packaging ensures effective communication to consumers and its safe use and handling. Because of effective packaging processes, food wastage rates (pre-consumption) are 2-4% in industrialised countries. This compares with 50% in developing countries. Moreover, the environmental impact of avoidable household food waste is eight times greater than the impact of total packaging waste going to landfill. Packaging ensures that people can buy and use products when they want them, in good condition and with little wastage. Inadequate packaging is bad for our environment, since 10-15 times more energy and materials are locked up in the food it contains, compared to the packaging around it.

A Circular Economy Approach Food and drink companies have a strong focus on sustainable sourcing, resource efficiency and sustainable consumption and are now working to integrate a circular economy approach to their

Demonised in the media, it is often forgotten that packaging, and plastic packaging in particular, prevents food waste, writes Colm Jordan, Director, Irish Beverage Council.

business operations. Packaging is a very important pillar within this approach and includes measures such as efficient use of natural resources, reduced packaging weight, refills, less packaging, awareness and education programmes on packing use and recycling and research & development. Proposal for a deposit/return scheme for sealed beverage containers must be considered in the context of our existing and successful waste packaging collection and recycling scheme in Ireland, Repak. The substantial financial commitment by food and drink companies as funders of Repak has seen Ireland exceed major EU packaging recycling and recovery targets. Before industry began funding Repak, 94% of all packaging went to landfill. Now 93% of all packaging is recycled and recovered, according to the EPA. Simply put, we capture 88% of our plastic packaging waste: c ompare that to 48% in the UK and 70% across the EU. Collection isn’t a problem. Placing a deposit/return scheme directly on top of our existing scheme would put this progress at risk. Removing easily recycled and valuable materials like aluminum and glass from our current system would dramatically increase processing costs and impact the cross-subsidy of less recyclable materials. Additionally, beverage packaging makes up just 4.5% of litter, according to the Department of the Environment. Tackling litter louts requires awareness programmes and enforcement of the Litter Act. Providing recycling bins in public, which so few local authorities do, would dramatically reduce on-the-go littering.

Ireland’s Collection/Recycling Scheme Ireland’s waste packaging collection and recycling scheme is built on the principle of shared responsibility. This ‘shared cost’ approach is one where business, waste collectors and householders share the cost of segregated packaging waste collections. This recognises the obligation on collectors to collect waste from households, with householders contributing towards the provision of a service (under the principle of polluter pays) and business contributing to the additional costs of collecting packaging waste for recycling separately from other waste. FDI believes that this should continue to be the case to build on our recycling rates. Food and beverage packaging plays a key role in protecting, containing and preserving the produce contained within. 16 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19


Our food industry is leading us to a better future As populations grow, so too does the need for food. Through Origin Green, the Irish food industry is responding to this need by producing food in a way that is kinder to our environment and its people. Created by Bord Bia, Origin Green is Ireland’s food and drink sustainability programme. It brings together the entire food industry with a common goal: sustainable food production. That means producing safe, nutritious food within a viable industry that protects and enhances the natural environment and the local community. With Origin Green, we are harnessing the power beneath our feet.

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Ireland’s food and drink sustainability programme

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28/05/2018 15:16


the future for plastic

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Plastic Lose It or Re-Use It?

uromonitor International’s team of economic, consumer, and industry trend experts has identified 20 megatrends shaping consumer markets and Ethical Living is one of our eight focus megatrends. Plastic, an influential part of modern society, is under scrutiny for its polluting presence in the global environment. There are visible and invisible pollutants. Greater awareness and growing ethical concerns about plastic waste are evident, with circular thinking initiatives to design out surplus plastics, improve recovery and re-use apparent. Current pressures represent an opportunity to tackle plastic waste and advance towards zero-litter.

Plastic’s influence in shaping modern society The global plastics industry has expanded at a phenomenal rate since its commercial inception in 1940s, bringing rapid innovation to modernise society and public health, from uses in medicine (from prosthetics to IV bags to syringes and much more), construction, transportation, to consumer goods, including provision of safe drinking water to the developing world. More than 300m metric tonnes of plastics were produced in the world in 2015, with China the largest producer (accounting for over a quarter of global production). Aligned with its leading place in the production of plastic, Asia Pacific is also the world-leading regional consumer of plastic.

Rosemarie Downey, Head of Packaging Research at Euromonitor International, assesses the importance of plastic as a packaging material, including its role in preventing food waste, and examines what needs to be done to integrate plastic into a circular economy. 18 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19


the future for plastic

Asia Pacific’s demand for products packed in plastic surpassed one billion packs in 2017. The largest onward gains for plastics are set to be derived from consumers’ purchases in Asia Pacific, the Middle East and Africa, supported by a growing, organised retail infrastructure enabling consumers to buy packaged goods. This is alongside a broader global trend of consumers opting to buy smaller packs for health (for example, chocolate portioning), on-the-go (soft drinks) and affordability (staples like noodles, bread, rice) needs.

Plastic protects and saves resources The importance of plastic to packaging and closures is vast with its myriad of

problem of food waste by providing product protection and shelf life. Furthermore, lightweighting has long been and remains a tool of efficiency used in the packaging industry, such as in neck, bottle and closure re-designs. New designing-out innovations push the bar on what can be achieved. Lighter weight packaging proffers an additional benefit when it comes to ageing populations. Japan, for example, is witnessing growing demand for lighter packaging types, such as refill plastic pouches. Shiseido, the second largest beauty and personal care company in Japan and within the top 10 players globally, changed the packaging of its well-established Auslese brand of men’s grooming

and closures to food wrappers, grocery bags and straws to coffee cups/lids and take-away containers. There are also invisible plastic pollutants including microbeads and microfibres. The issue of plastic waste, particularly single-use plastic, is being addressed in a number of ways, including via 2018-launched strategies, as governments look to re-think design to avoid waste at the outset and maximise recovery for re-use, to minimise its environmental and economic impact. In January 2018, the European Commission, in the release of its Plastic Strategy, indicated that the potential annual energy savings that could be achieved by recycling all global plastic waste equates to 3.5 billion barrels of oil per year - that would be surely no small gain for society. The UK government’s environment strategy similarly aims to reduce waste, with a 2042 target for plastic packaging. Its strategy seeks to reduce the number of types of plastics in circulation. It will be important in the review of alternatives for difficult-to-recycle plastics to consider the whole lifecycle for sustainability and so ensure that neither product safety nor environmental impact is compromised.

Plastics’ recovery and recycling rates are improving but more to do

applications across the consumer goods marketplace. From food to soft drinks to beauty and home care products, the rise of plastics over competing pack types is largely thanks to its resource-efficiency. Within the global packaging industry, flexible plastics, PET bottles and thin wall plastic containers rank among the top five most common pack types for retail grocery purchases. Packaging holds a valuable and sustainable role in guarding against waste, especially important for the food industry where plastic holds the strongest presence. The United Nations estimates that food waste represents about a third of all food produced for human consumption (1.3 billion tonnes) and amounts to 8% of global greenhouse gas emissions, which is of wide concern, a problem notable in developing countries where, for example, there is inadequate processing/packaging of seasonal produce. The rise in use of packaging, including plastic, is widely recognised as a remedy to tackle the

products in 2017 from a 200ml glass bottle to 220ml PET bottle, taking this opportunity to also slightly change the bottle’s shape for better grip, keeping its older customers in mind.

European policymakers launch strategies to target plastic waste Despite the widespread success of plastic, evident in the scales of plastic production and growth across industries, the recovery of said material for re-use has not progressed at the same rate. Concerns about plastic’s sustainability credentials have shot into sharp public focus since the end of 2017, elevated by learnings and concern that more than eight million tonnes of plastics end up as marine waste and the detrimental impact of such pollution. Visible, commonly single-use, plastic waste polluting the global environment ranges from plastic beverage bottles

Globally, plastic recycling is increasing but tends to lag behind other materials. In part, the ability to produce virgin plastic so economically has thwarted the development of recycled plastics. However, with a growing sense of environmental stewardship, creating capacity of recycled plastics and brands’ uses of them looks set to rise. Currently, around 30% of plastics in Europe, 25% in China and 9% in the US are recycled. Recycling varies considerably by polymer and country. Germany, Japan and South Korea are among the best recyclers in the world. PlasticsEurope announced that, in 2016, plastic waste recycled surpassed volumes sent to landfill for the first time in Europe, further indication of the positive moves that are taking place. In October 2017, a consortium of packaging associations petitioned the European Commission and Council of the EU for separate collection of all used packaging, showing there is will on behalf of the packaging industry to further improve on collection and recycling across materials. IRISH PACKAGING & PRINT FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19 | 19


the future for plastic Waste concern lends gravitas to the circular economy model There are signs of a shift in the plastics industry from a linear model to one that is more circular. Innovation in plastics, following circular economy principles, is one that reduces reliance on the finite supply of petroleum-based plastics by optimising plastics through responsible design and sourcing to ensure complete recovery and zero litter and re-use or through alternative renewable materials to minimise environmental footprint. This design optimisation helps address material scarcity and environmental impact, can deliver cost savings for manufacturers and taps into consumer demand for ethically-sourced products and services. Innovative, ethical re-thinking of design is in practice within the plastics industry and will continue to rise in importance across all materials and industries as the importance of sustainability grows. Altering consumer behaviour with regard to littering to one of waste recovery via recycling or return post-use, such as via a deposit system, will aid plastics recovery and reduce waste. The voluminous sources of plastic pollution in developing countries further require a globally-supported recovery action plan.

20 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

Mindful consumption is a global duty of all; consumers have their part to play to help realise a zero-litter society, as do corporate players in their use and handling and governments in providing the necessary infrastructure. For more information on our packaging research visit http://www.euromonitor.com/ packaging

About the Author Rosemarie Downey heads up the global packaging research at Euromonitor International. Rosemarie holds more than 20 years of experience in research of the international consumer packaging industry and of retail consumer goods.


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28.05.2018 10:58:05


irish whiskey

Tullamore Distillery

Irish Whiskey:

From Local Renaissance to Global Growth!

William Lavelle, Head of the Irish Whiskey Association, examines the explosive growth in Irish whiskey distilling driven by everstronger consumer demand.

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he Irish Whiskey Renaissance is a topic that has been well aired in recent years. In 2014, Ireland had four operational whiskey distilleries. There are now currently 18 working whiskey distilleries in Ireland and we will likely have 23 by the end of this year. Right across Ireland, north and south, from Dublin’s Liberties to rural communities in all four provinces, new distilleries are creating jobs, attracting tourists and supporting local barley famers. According to the CSO, the value of Irish whiskey exports (ROI only) increased by 14.2% to €580m in 2017. This sustained double-digit export growth and the consolidation of Irish whiskey’s position as the world’s fastest growing spirits category are all accomplishments which our industry can be proud of.

Realising Our Vision The 2014 ‘Vision for Irish Whiskey” strategy set a target of doubling the global sales of Irish whiskey from 6m nine-litre cases to 12m by 2020 and to double them again to 24m by 2030. With sales of nearly 10m cases in 2017, we are ahead of the curve in terms of achieving these goals. We are an ambitious industry and our ambitions are increasingly global. But future growth won’t necessarily come easy. While Irish whiskey is sold to over 135 countries, nearly 90% of Irish whiskey exports go to the EU and the US. There undoubtedly remains more growth potential in these markets. However, if we wish to meet our future growth targets, then there is a need to diversify Irish whiskey sales globally and our goal is to target more growth in more markets. We want to grow from our current 135 markets to at least the 170 markets where Scotch whisky is sold. More critically, in the many markets where we currently have a low 22 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

sales base, we want to grow sales by double digits in coming years. Recently, we have seen increased sales in emerging markets such as Canada, Mexico, and Africa. Going forward Asia and the Far East are going to be a key focus for Irish whiskey export growth.

EU Free Trade Agreements As a small island in the Atlantic, with a globalised economy, Ireland has benefited greatly from our membership of the EU. More specifically, EU Free Trade Agreements have been mightilyimportant in supporting global growth of Irish whiskey. The EU’s recent CETA Agreement with Canada has helped to make that country one of Irish whiskey’s fastest growing markets. In particular, CETA has led to the reform of the cost-of-service differential fee imposed by provincial liquor boards on imported spirits and this has greatly benefited premium Irish whiskey brands. Recently-concluded EU agreements with Japan, Singapore and Mexico and future prospective agreements with Australia, China, Thailand, South America and hopefully even India offer even further exciting growth opportunities. While Brexit poses threats, it also offers significant opportunities. Irish whiskey will be the EU’s largest whiskey category once Scotland leaves the EU, giving us a comparative advantage from continuing access to EU free trade agreements. Given our current growth trajectory, we could even in a few years overtake Cognac to become the EU’s largest spirit export. The Irish Whiskey Renaissance has restored Ireland’s position as an international whiskey powerhouse and in targeting more growth in more markets, the Irish whiskey industry is intent on realising a bright future.


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food safety Dr Pamela Byrne, CEO, Food Safety Authority of Ireland.

FSAI in Safe Hands Dr Pamela Byrne, CEO of the Food Safety Authority of Ireland, discusses the evolving role of the FSAI, the potential impact of Brexit on the regulatory environment and the challenges facing the food industry in a world of ever more complex supply chains.

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r Pamela Byrne has been CEO of the Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI) for just over three years, which has “absolutely flown”, she admits, sitting in the board room of the Authority’s new office in the Irish Financial Services Centre. Byrne and the rest of the FSAI are currently working on their new strategy, set to launch next year and covering a five-year period “to allow us to evolve in line with the expansion of industry”. As such, the FSAI are reviewing the current strategy, which covers 2016-18, and are currently involved in a public consultation on the strategy, and

received 47 individual responses from interested parties, from individuals to companies and other stakeholders. “Reviewing our strategy gives the organisation the opportunity to pause and assess what we have achieved, the difference we’ve made, and to look at how the next five years is going to be so different from what went before,” she explains. “When you look at the systems we have, the number of inspectors, the number of food businesses operating and the ambitions of our agri-food industry, the sector has changed dramatically. Government and the public sector have changed dramatically too and will continue to evolve and change. So we’ve a very busy, exciting and dynamic few years ahead.”

FSAI Advice Line The whole notion of food safety has come sharply into focus in recent years, as consumers display a huge upsurge in interest in food ingredients, food provenance and food safety. The latter is evident by the amount 24 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

of calls coming through from consumers to the FSAI’s free advice line, which has seen a 10-12% increase in consumer complaints. “If a product doesn’t look, smell or taste right or a premises doesn’t look clean, consumers are voting with their fingertips by ringing us, and we ask our inspectors to go out and inspect that food business to ensure consumer complaints are followed up. We don’t have enough inspectors to go out to every food business every day of the week and, therefore, we rely on consumers to tell us when they see things they’re not happy with.” In the event that a food business is forced to close its doors or a food product is prohibited from sale, consumers can view a copy of the Closure Order or Prohibition Order on the FSAI’s website, www.fsai.ie. “That level of openness and transparency is in line with Government policy, but it also, we believe, is a formal way of building compliance within the industry, because businesses don’t want to be named and shamed. We’re trying to drive a better food safety culture into businesses and this is one way of doing that,” Byrne insists. There has been an argument that the amount of legislation a food business must comply with is too much, particularly for smaller entrepreneurial food businesses. Is there too much red tape? “There is a lot of legislation, but there’s a


food safety

We like to think that we won’t have a crisis, but we will: there is no doubt about that.

lot of support as well,” Byrne stresses. “There is much information available for people who want to set up a food business, and a lot of state supports available, including innovation vouchers from Enterprise Ireland, supports from Bord Bia through consumer insight etc. But when somebody wants to make a food product, they have to make it in compliance with legislation.” In order to make it easier for entrepreneurs and food business owners to comply with legislation, the FSAI run a number of different events throughout the year, including webinars, co-events with safefood, and the hugely popular ‘Food Business Start-Up’ event, which invites people to come in and hear about all the legislation they need to comply with if they are setting up their own food business. The FSAI website also includes plenty of advice for business owners, including information on legislation, guidance documents and e-learning modules that companies can register for and use online, “so they get a better understanding of the legislation”. They’ve recently published a document to help food businesses to ensure they’re compliant when they’re trading online, for example, while a guidance document for the artisan sector explains some marketing terms producers are permitted to use, and when they can’t use them.

Byrne stresses that FSAI inspectors are working closely with entrepreneurs and food innovators, “helping them to understand what legislation they have to comply with and guiding them along the way until the point where the business starts”. After that, the inspector will establish an inspection regime to ensure the business is compliant with the law. “We want to make it as easy as possible for businesses to comply with the law,” Byrne insists, “providing them with the tools, the information, the guidance, the help and support to do that, but there comes a point when the responsibility to put safe food on the market is the industry’s. We have to assess compliance, which we do through inspections and audits, and if a business is posing a grave and immediate danger to public health or not complying with the law, we will close them down.”

Strong Food Safety Credentials The Irish agri-food sector is very highly regarded internationally for the quality and safety of our food. “We’re recognised as having very strong food safety credentials, strong sustainability credentials,” Byrne agrees. “We’re known for our grass-based production systems, our very resilient and robust industry. We trade into 180 markets across the world, which just wouldn’t happen without being

able to demonstrate that you have a great food safety system in place. “That said, we know that you can’t be complacent. We’re seeing huge expansion in dairy, in meat, in prepared consumer foods, and really ambitious targets set by industry to grow exports by 85% to €19 billion by 2025. We have to keep that scaling up of industry in mind when we’re thinking about the official food control system that underpins the industry and allows us, as the central competent authority, to provide assurances across Europe and the world that we have a strong food safety system in place.”

Crisis Management Simulation While Ireland enjoys a great reputation for the quality, provenance and safety of its food, Byrne acknowledges that when it comes to safety, “you’re only as good as how you responded to the last crisis”. “We like to think that we won’t have a crisis, but we will: there is no doubt about that,” she maintains. This is primarily down to the increased risks caused by “the globalisation of the food industry, longer and more complex supply chains, constant innovation with huge product diversity and a growing amount of different ingredients coming into Ireland from all over the world.” To prepare for such an eventuality, Ireland has put in place an inter-agency protocol on how to manage a serious food safety incident, and plans are in place to run a crisis simulation exercise this year, both nationally and at European level. “We’re trying to enhance and improve how we would all work together in managing a food safety crisis,” Byrne explains. “We’re bringing in other stakeholders, such as the Department of Agriculture, Bord Bia, the HSE, and industry itself, to help ensure that we can deal with a crisis, that nobody’s life is put at risk and that people’s quality of life doesn’t diminish if they get sick from a food-borne illness “It’s about protecting consumers, first of all, but it also goes back to our reputation internationally. Everyone accepts that these crises can happen: it’s all about how you FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19 | 25


food safety

deal with them. You can have a system in place on paper, but I think you need to test the system to see if it works in practice and if it doesn’t, find out what you need to change. You then need to practice again. Sometimes there’s resistance to that practice. It can take time and money, but I think it’s important to give that level of confidence to those involved in managing that crisis when it becomes a reality, for them to be able to deal with it effectively and efficiently.” Byrne maintains that the speed at which we can pull a product off the market is testament to how we deal with food safety crises. Last year saw 640 food safety incidents in Ireland, such as allergens not being declared on labels, pathogens or chemical contaminants found in food, which then has to be withdrawn from the market. These are “routine incidents”, according to the CEO, and Ireland has a proven track record in dealing with them. “We need to make sure we can deal with a food safety crisis which involves more complex systems,” she argues. “For example, when we had three days of snow, the country effectively went into lockdown. Food supply chains became affected and there was a lack of availability of bread, milk and other fresh produce. It took about five or six days for those supply chains to come back to normal levels. What if we 26 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

had a food safety issue in the midst of that?”

Impressive Food Safety Culture Byrne is adamant that Ireland has a good culture of food safety within the industry. She cites the stats: out of approximately 50,000 food businesses in Ireland, around 400 enforcement orders are issued each year. “But we want to get food businesses to think more critically about the culture of food safety within their organisation, because we had seen a drop-off in that during the recession,” she warns. “Businesses were trying to maintain viability and keep the key in the door and perhaps it slipped down their list of priorities, but we are talking to food businesses to ensure that food safety is high on the agenda, not just of their food safety people, but throughout the organisation.” The FSAI is eagerly awaiting a new document from the Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI) on the culture of food safety in business, which it will utilise to help drive a better culture of food safety within businesses in Ireland.

Food Fraud Since the horsemeat scandal of 2013, there have been some high profile instances of international food fraud. Is it becoming more

prevalent or are we getting better at spotting it? “A little of both,” she admits. “It goes back to the whole idea of globalisation and these long supply chains, but industry has done a huge amount over the last few years to understand their supply chains. It has put in place very strict audits and has removed elements of the supply chain where they believe there are vulnerabilities.” The European Commission has taken food fraud particularly seriously, with the establishment of the EU Food Fraud Network, while in terms of legislation, the end of 2019 sees the new Official Controls Regulation coming into force, with enhanced focus on fraudulent and deceptive practices in businesses. Of course, some people will intentionally set out to defraud the consumer or their suppliers, and the FSAI have regular communications on this at European and international level through Europol and Interpol.

Supply Chain Integrity Given the global nature of business today, it can be difficult to ensure the integrity of ever longer and more complex supply chains, but Byrne is adamant that this is the key to ensuring safe food: “We would advise companies to understand every point in their supply chain, from the source right through


food safety to the consumer, and if there are vulnerabilities, deal with them.” The FSAI are currently working on a large scale food chain vulnerability analysis of the dairy supply chain on the island of Ireland, involving Government, industry and other stakeholders in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. Utilising blockchain technology could be one solution to supply chain integrity, Byrne muses, but so far the uptake of blockchain has been slow in Ireland, yet there is definite potential to “learn and understand what this technology is capable of and how it might be applied in the food system”. The FSAI set up, in collaboration with industry, an emerging risks and threats forum, which meets regularly to learn more about potential risks in supply chains and whether there is something the FSAI can do to help remove that risk.

Brexit: the Challenge for Regulators Brexit is probably the biggest issue facing the Irish food industry in the immediate future, as detailed elsewhere in the publication, but it could also make life very difficult for the FSAI in terms of regulation. “As the only European country with a land border with the UK, Ireland is going to have to provide assurances to our 26 EU counterparts into the future that we have a very robust official control system, a strong inspection and sampling regime, the ability to analyse those samples and take the

appropriate enforcement action, to ensure the food coming through Ireland or exported from Ireland complies with rules and has no vulnerabilities,” Byrne stresses. The potential for regulatory divergence could bring another massive challenge. “If the UK change their rules around food safety, what will it mean for us? For example, if they change their labelling regulations, what will that mean for a product being imported from the UK? It can only come into Ireland if it complies with EU law. Similarly, if companies are exporting to the UK and regulations change, they will have to adhere to the new regulations or they won’t be allowed to trade there. That will be challenging for business,” she admits. There’s also a question mark around whether the UK will be able to remain part of the Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed (RASFF), and if not, how will each jurisdiction communicate with the other in the event of a food safety issue. “We have a good working relationship with Food Standards Agency Northern Ireland and we will continue to strengthen that relationship so we remove any risk to consumers from products on the market,” Byrne stresses. Brexit is one of the issues which will be covered in the FSAI’s new strategy document, which will cover one of the most potentially turbulent but dynamic periods for Irish agri-food and for the FSAI. “The challenges for us as an organisation into the future are manifold,” Byrne reveals. “They are political, as we begin to operate in a new political environment both globally

and within Europe; we’ll have emerging risks – pathogens keep evolving and there are new chemicals coming into the food system all the time, so we need to ensure we are on top of emerging risks; we need to make sure we have the best data to help us to make the best decisions we can.” Resources are a challenge for the FSAI going forward. Inspector numbers are down from almost 1,300 in 2012 to just over 1,100 today. “Within an industry that is expanding, innovating and diversifying, that is going to be a real challenge for us,” Byrne maintains. “We’re looking at how we can best use the resources we have, and where we do need more resources, we need to make sure any new resources add value and that we can demonstrate what value they add to the systems we have in place. We have to have an organisation with the capacity, competency and capability to assess risks, prioritise risks and take appropriate actions to remove risk to consumers. Asked if she has any advice for industry, Byrne is unequivocal: “Our message to the industry is to assess your supply chains. Make sure you have really strong traceability systems in place that are tested rigorously, going back as far as you can and forward as far as you can, either side of your business, to make sure that they are robust. Be compliant with the law. Talk to us and understand that we are there for advice, and be audit ready 24-7, because they will come to your business, whether they are supplier audits or unannounced visits from food inspectors.”

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19 | 27


fTRACE

workplace wellbeing

Food Industry Takes Steps for

Worker Wellbeing

Dermot Doherty, Project Manager, FDI Health Initiative

Ireland’s fourth National Workplace Wellbeing Day took place in April and was heralded as a tremendous success, as the agri-food industry takes steps to ensure the wellbeing of its workforce.

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housands of employees left their desks and workstations and took to the roads and streets around their workplaces on Friday, April 13 last, to walk the ‘Lunchtime Mile’ with their colleagues, one of many initiatives taking place around the country to mark Ireland’s National Workplace Wellbeing Day. Created by Food Drink Ireland and supported by Ibec, the initiative is a key part of the food and drink industry trade association’s Health Strategy Programme to help promote healthier living. From small beginnings just four years ago, National Workplace Wellbeing Day, the first of its kind in Europe, has grown into a substantial nationwide campaign. Hundreds of employers of all sizes across all sectors, public and private, took part this year, along with tens of thousands of their employees. The food industry itself was very well represented with Glanbia, Largo Foods, Lucozade Ribena Suntory Ireland, Mars Ireland and Nestlé Ireland a few of

28 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

the many companies that supported the day. For most, the day involved some form of physical exercise, from the ever-popular Lunchtime Mile walk to exercise classes and fun runs. For others, the day was a chance to learn a little more about what a healthier lifestyle really looks like, as employers organised talks on a wide range of topics, from nutrition and exercise to mental health and financial wellbeing. Some employers also offered complementary health checks to their staff so individual employees could get some one-toone advice on the practical steps they needed to make to improve their own wellbeing.

More Exercise Needed Ireland still has some way to go to become a healthy nation. Despite anecdotal evidence that exercise is on the rise here, research

commissioned by FDI for National Workplace Wellbeing Day highlighted that most workers continue to take very little exercise at all. Only one in four employees exercise at the recommended levels of over 150 minutes every week, while two out of five admitted to being either totally or extremely inactive during their workday. Just over half believe that they have the right work-life balance. The majority of workers, according to the research, recognise that they need to make personal changes, with most pointing to their current level of physical activity and the need to eat more healthily, while a significant number (44%) felt that they needed to take more care of their mental health. According to Dermot Doherty, Project Manager, FDI Health Initiative, there is no better place to start with health awareness than in the workplace and that was the catalyst for the campaign. “According to the World Health


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workplace wellbeing

The workplace is the ideal setting to promote health to a large proportion of the population, and as many workers are also parents, initiatives undertaken in the workplace can positively affect the health of families and reach further out into the wider community and society Organisation, the workplace is the ideal setting to promote health to a large proportion of the population, and as many workers are also parents, initiatives undertaken in the workplace can positively affect the health of families and reach further out into the wider community and society,” he said. “It’s a win-win for all involved,” he added. FDI’s research, which was conducted by Behaviour and Attitudes, also showed that the majority of workers are more likely to stay longer with employers who show an interest in their health and wellbeing, while half would consider leaving employers who do not. According to Doherty, “planned and co-ordinated workplace wellbeing initiatives provide clear, demonstrable evidence of an organisation’s values and its workplace culture, and how it lives those values on a daily basis.”

A Key Differentiator in a Competitive Marketplace With recruitment already proving challenging for employers in some sectors, an organisation’s commitment to the wellbeing of its employees can be a key differentiator in a competitive marketplace. “It’s something that may become increasingly important as we edge closer to full employment. Not only can it help set an organisation apart from other employers in a sector, it can also help employees to become an employer’s greatest advocates,” he said. Moreover, the benefits do not stop there. Approximately 11m days are lost through absenteeism every year at a cost of €1.5 billion to the Irish economy. Presenteeism, where employees still turn-up for work despite being ill or having ongoing health problems, is estimated to result in a loss of productivity that is, on average, 7.5 times greater than

30 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

absenteeism. “That is a staggering health bill. In contrast, healthy, engaged employees are, on average, up to 30 days more productive. So, whichever way we look at it, it’s in everyone’s interests, both employers and employees, to do something about employee wellbeing,” said Doherty.

Successfully Implementing Wellbeing Programmes For their part, Food Drink Ireland and Ibec hosted a free breakfast seminar for employers and HR executives in their Dublin Head Office that kick-started the day with ideas, insights and tips on how workplace wellbeing can help organisations. Wellbeing expert, Dr Mark Rowe, Workplace Wellbeing Day Ambassador and former Munster, Ireland and Lions rugby star, David Wallace, as well as consultant dietician, Sarah Keogh joined Ibec CEO Danny McCoy to discuss their insights on wellbeing. Guests also heard from Sky Ireland’s Head of HR, Aoife Ni Mhurchu, and Sinead Doherty, CEO of personal tax consultants, Fenero, who shared their experience on how companies can successfully implement wellbeing programmes into the workplace. Planning has begun already for National Workplace Wellbeing Day 2019. “We see from the increasing number of employers participating in National Workplace Wellbeing Day that there is a real and genuine appetite for an initiative that puts a focus on wellbeing in a fun and engaging way that can help to kick-start changes for individuals as well as for employers,” said Doherty. The date for next year’s event will be announced later this year. In the meantime, anyone wishing to find out more about the campaign can visit www.fooddrinkireland.ie/wellbeing.

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19 | 00


Why innovation in food needs to be healthy, natural and convenient The food market has changed significantly in the last few years, driven by consumer demand and an increasingly regulated environment. The health implications of what we eat today have never been so important and one of the key factors in the decision making process when it comes to purchasing. Functionality combined with a clean label are now priorities for both the consumer and producer leading to an ever increasing demand for natural ingredients. Freshness, health, convenience as well as provenance are high on the agenda forcing the industry to rethink and innovate. Consumers want to enjoy their favourite food products yet at the same time feel that they are benefitting their overall health. This is a challenge for the industry and is leading to many innovative products and technologies. Huge steps are being taken in the drive to reduce or replace sugar, salt and fat.

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About NCC Founded in 1969, NCC is an established leading raw material and sourcing specialist. We supply a comprehensive range of materials and ingredients to the life science, polymers, food and industrial sectors in Ireland and the UK. If you are looking for a reliable and trusted source for a commodity, functional ingredient or a bespoke solution then contact NCC Food Ingredients. Sugar replacement, salt reduction, fat replacement, and fibre as well as protein enrichment are just some of the exciting concepts we specialise in. For more information on how NCC Food Ingredients can assist you, contact: Fintan McConnell, Ireland T: +353 1 613 1408 M: +353 86 174 0289 E: fmcconnell@ncc.ie James Bliss, UK T: +353 1 613 1400 M: +44 791 775 5022 E: jbliss@ncc.ie

Solving your sugar replacement needs with second generation stevia With such a strong consumer trend towards reducing sugar intake, now is the right time for food producers to be innovative and adjust their product formulations with natural alternatives. Our exclusive partnership with Daepyung enables us to offer second generation stevia that is one of the most advanced types of natural sugar replacement. Specially designed for use in food and beverages, it does not have the bitter aftertaste that traditional stevia has and instead has a mouthfeel that is closer to sugar, as a result of glucose that is added to stevia extracts. Our second generation stevia is the perfect natural sugar replacement for all your food products.

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keepwell mark

Minister for Health, Simon Harris TD, is pictured at the launch of The KeepWell Mark with Ibec’s KeepWell Team: Sophie Moran, FDI Executive; Kevin McPartlan, Director of Prepared Consumer Foods; and Dermot Doherty, Project Manager for the FDI Health Initiative.

Employee Wellbeing a Top Priority

The KeepWell Mark is an evidence-based accreditation and award from Ibec to recognise and celebrate organisations who look after the health and wellbeing of their staff, writes Sophie Moran, Executive, Food Drink Ireland.

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esearch conducted by Ibec recently among 1,000 employees found that six out of 10 employees are more likely to stay long term with an employer who shows an interest in their health and wellbeing. It also found that nearly half of those surveyed would leave a job where they perceive an employer doesn’t care about their wellbeing. This data further cements what we already know about the importance of investment in, and a strategic approach to employee wellbeing.

Evidence Based Accreditation The KeepWell Mark is an evidence-based accreditation and award from Ibec, designed to recognise and celebrate the fantastic work that organisations all over Ireland are doing to look after the health and wellbeing of their people. It offers a structured, allencompassing approach to corporate wellbeing and is the first national set of standards and formal accreditation focusing solely on the health and wellness of staff, and it’s backed by business. Aoife Ní Mhurchú, Head of HR for Sky Ireland, one of the first KeepWell accredited companies in Ireland, commented, “Workplace wellness is a key foundation of our people engagement strategy and The KeepWell Mark will help Sky Ireland maintain the focus on wellbeing going forward, which is good for our people and good for our business.”

are missing out on the chance to identify key trends and areas of weakness which will inform more meaningful engagement with staff.

A Core Workplace Value Speaking at the launch of the KeepWell Mark, Minister for Health, Simon Harris TD, said, “A healthy workforce is vital for us to create a healthy Ireland, so it’s great to see a business representative organisation like Ibec making a significant commitment to promoting wellbeing in the workplace. We look forward to working in partnership with all stakeholders to make health and wellbeing a core value of workplaces in Ireland.” Speaking about The KeepWell Mark, Ibec CEO, Danny McCoy said, “It is really positive to see that workplace wellbeing is high on the agenda of Irish employers and that future increased investment in this area is in the pipeline for a large majority of organisations.” With talent attraction and retention so key to the continued success of Irish employers, it’s crucial that employers remain competitive and maintain an employer of choice status. Ibec is encouraging companies of all sizes in all sectors to participate in this initiative. For those wishing to get involved, visit www.thekeepwellmark.ie or contact info@thekeepwellmark.ie.

A Key HR Tool The accreditation is designed to act as a key tool for your HR and management team, identifying the strengths and weaknesses in your existing approach, and mapping out the way forward, all in line with a national set of standards for best practice. In Ibec’s Autumn 2017 HR update survey, three in five respondents rated employee wellbeing as ‘very important’ in their organisation, with 55% noting investment in employee wellbeing as a key initiate for retention of staff. While this is indeed positive, the approach in many cases lacks clear direction, as indicated by the fact that only 27% of respondents confirmed that they have a formal strategy in place that relates specifically to employee wellbeing. Without having a formalised, consistent approach across the organisation, businesses 32 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

Cathriona Hallahan, Managing Director, Microsoft Ireland; Minister for Health Simon Harris TD; Danny McCoy, CEO of Ibec; and Olympian athlete Jessie Barr at the launch of The KeepWell Mark.


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learning & development

Food Drink Ireland Skillnet: Addressing the Skills Shortage Access to skills continues to be a significant resource challenge for the sector, writes Mark Skinner, Food Drink Ireland Skillnet Manager.

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ccess to skills remains one of the biggest resource challenges of the food and drink sector. This is being driven by a labour market that is edging towards full employment and in a context where maintaining competitiveness is critical, particularly in light of the challenges of Brexit. In addressing these challenges, collaboration across the sector is critical, and a key enabler to this is the Skillnet model. With direction from a highly involved steering group of Learning & Development experts from across the sector, this allows Food Drink Ireland Skillnet to develop training programmes that are strategically essential to the sector, delivered to the highest standards and offering excellent value for money.

8,000 Training Days Food Drink Ireland Skillnet last year delivered almost 8,000 days of training to 600 employees from 100 companies in the sector. Funding for these programmes came from member companies and Skillnet Ireland, which is funded by the National Training Fund (NTF) through the Department of Education and Skills (DES). For 2018, demand levels for current programmes remains very high, particularly in the areas of leadership development, people management, food regulatory affairs and graduate development, as well as commercial, financial and lean skills. In addition, new programmes are being developed to address future skills needs in areas including International Selling, Managing Price Volatility as well as Coaching skills.

Benefits of Membership Membership of the network is free, and is open to companies from the Meat, Dairy, Consumer Foods and Beverages sector. The benefits

34 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

of membership include: • Industry specific training that’s relevant to your business; • Up to 60% saving on the cost of training due to net work purchasing power plus part-government funding; • Flexible training that is delivered at times that suit your company; • Saving time on procurement, as all courses procured by the network are done so as to ensure all trainers meet the quality standards of the sector and that value for money is achieved; • Opportunity to collaborate and learn from colleagues across the industry. More information can be found on www.fooddrinkireland.ie or if you would like to join the network for free, please contact Mark Skinner, Food Drink Ireland Skillnet Manager on (01) 6051615 or mark.skinner@ibec.ie.


brewing

Brewing Up a Storm?

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he Irish brewing sector is going through an interesting time. The craft beer movement seems to be continuing to grow, albeit with some evidence that market saturation is being reached. Overall beer consumption has declined marginally in 2017 and a recent report by the Drinks Industry Group of Ireland stated that beer’s alcohol market share in 2017 was 45%, a 2% decline from the previous year. The marginal decline in beer consumption is part of the overall fall in per capita alcohol consumption, which is down by 25% since 2005, according to the World Health Organisation. While domestic beer consumption has been relatively static in recent years, beer exports have performed remarkably well, with a 22% increase in the value of beer exports from 2013 to 2017.

Legislative Threats The sector continues to face some serious legislative threats, most worryingly in the form of the Public Health (Alcohol) Bill. In December, the Seanad passed amendments to the bill which state that all pre-packaged beer products (cans and bottles) must display a health warning citing the link between alcohol consumption and fatal cancers. In addition, the proposed health warnings must make up ‘one-third’ of the dedicated printed space on a label. This disturbing development was vigorously debated in during the Second Stage debate in the Dáil. The amendments have also drawn fierce criticism from other

We have unprecedented consumer choice for beer drinkers but uncertain times lie ahead for Ireland’s brewing sector, writes Jonathan McDade, Head of the Irish Brewers Association. EU Member States and the European Commission because the labels may constitute a barrier to trade. In June, the Oireachtas Select Health Committee agreed to remove the ‘one-third’ amendment. Unfortunately, Ireland is still on course to be the first country in the world to have mandatory cancer warnings on all prepackaged alcohol products. As always, the threat of an excise increase is ever present as we near the Budget. Last year, the Minister for Finance did not raise excise on any alcohol category, following a very successful Support your Local campaign, now in its fourth year. It is hoped that the success of last year’s campaign will be replicated this year. The success of the Support Your Local campaign was recently outlined in a presentation by Kathryn D’Arcy from Heineken Ireland at the inaugural

Brewers of Europe - Brewers Forum in Brussels in June. Another positive development is the expected passage of the Craft Drinks Bill this year as it has enormous support across the political spectrum. The bill, when passed, will enable Ireland’s craft brewers to sell their products on-site to brewery visitors, without requiring a full pub license.

Emerging Trends While craft beers continue to provide more variety for Ireland’s beer drinkers, some interesting trends that are beginning to emerge in the beer market include the increased availability of lighter strength lagers, lower calorie beers and non-alcoholic beers. Both large and small breweries appear to be responding to the growing consumer movement towards healthier living by offering lower calorie beers as an option. In terms of the beer variants breakdown, 61% of beer consumed in Ireland is lager, 33% is stout and 6% is ale. The overall trend has seen a marginal decline of lager’s market share over the past four years, with ale and stout taking advantage. In terms of sales channels, 66% of our beer is consumed in bars and restaurants. No other country in Europe has a higher on-trade versus off-trade sales channel ratio, which is testament to the continuing popularity of Ireland’s hospitality sector. The emergence of the various trends in the craft beer sector, coupled with the wider range of beer products from the larger breweries, show that Ireland’s beer drinkers have never had so much choice, and that is something to celebrate. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19 | 35


labelling regulations

New Mandatory Country of Origin Labelling Regulations on the Way The European Union has laid down new mandatory country of origin labelling regulations for the primary ingredient in food and drink products, due to come into force in April 2020. Food lawyer, Raymond O’Rourke explains what they mean for Irish food and drink suppliers.

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n the wake of the horsemeat scandal, many commentators argued that the scandal could have been averted if producers and manufacturers had to mandatorily label the origin of meats used as an ingredient in processed foods such as meat pies, lasagne etc. Compulsory origin labelling would not be a complete panacea, but it certainly would have made it more difficult for meat traders to pass off horsemeat as beef. The issue of origin labelling was, therefore, highlighted in EP & Council Regulation 1169/2011 on Food Information, where the Commission was mandated to follow-up with various external reports on origin labelling for various food products. In particular, Article 26(3) of the Food Information Regulation, stated that where the country of origin or the place of provenance of a food is given and where it is not the same as that of the primary ingredient, the country of origin or place of provenance of the primary ingredient in question shall also be given or indicated as being different to that of the food. It further states that application of these requirements shall be subject to the adoption of an implementing act.

Long Awaited Regulation On May 28, the European Commission adopted the long-awaited Implementing Regulation 2018/775, laying down the rules for the application of Article 26(3) of the Food Information Regulation 36 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

on the provision of information to consumers as regards the rules for indicating the country of origin or place of provenance of the primary ingredient. A ‘primary ingredient’ is defined in the Food Information Regulation (Article 2(q)) as “an ingredient or ingredients that represent more than 50% of that food and which are usually associated with the name of the food by the consumer and for which in most cases a quantitative indication is required”. Unfortunately, the Implementing Regulation 2018/775, whilst mentioning ‘primary ingredient’ throughout the legal text, does not actually make any cross-reference to this definition in Article 2(q) which covers an ingredient and ingredients – this issue is a major oversight by the Commission and needs to clarified as soon as possible.

Understanding the Rules: A Typical Case It is always easier to understand food information rules by giving examples – a typical case that would exist in many Member States is chocolate. The chocolate could be made in Italy, Spain, Ireland or Sweden and labelled as Italian, Spanish, Irish or Swedish chocolate, but the primary ingredient, cocoa, might come from the Ivory Coast. Under the rules detailed in this new Implementing Regulation 2018/775, the primary ingredient could be indicated as follows:


labelling regulations “Non-EU cocoa” “Cocoa – Ivory Coast” Or by means of a statement as follows: “cocoa does not originate from Ireland” or similar wording likely to have the same meaning for the consumer The origin of the primary ingredient (“Non-EU cocoa”) also must appear in the same field of vision as the indication of the origin of the food (“Irish Chocolate”) and be in the font-size specified in the Implementing Regulation 2018/775. Customary and generic names, which include geographic terms that literally indicate origin but whose understanding is not an indication of origin or place of provenance of the food, such as Bolognese sauce, are exempt from the Implementing Regulation rules, as are protected geographical indications (PGIs) such as Parma Ham and registered trademarks such as Kerrygold butter. This change to the EU’s food information rules will provide clear, detailed information to consumers, indicating that the primary ingredient has a different origin from that of the finished product, thereby assisting them in their purchasing decisions.

connected to their overall trust and confidence in the food industry and the food supply chain. The new rules are to apply as of April 2020 and will, therefore, supersede national measures already introduced in some Member States (Italy, France, Romania & Spain). Foods placed on the market or labelled prior to April 2020 may be marketed until stocks are exhausted. The European Commission has promised in the coming months to provide further information on the application of these new origin labelling rules in order to facilitate their uniform application throughout the European Union. During a public hearing on Origin Labelling in the European Parliament on June 4, many representatives of the food industry called for the Commission to publish a Guidance Note on correct application of these new rules.

The Likely Effect on Irish Products

Consumer interest in origin information was confirmed in two consumer surveys which formed the basis to these new rules: the Commission funded FCEC 2014 survey and the European Consumers Association BEUC 2013 survey. These surveys found that quality and food safety issues are key to consumer demands for origin labelling. The available evidence, therefore, suggests that consumer attitudes to origin labelling are more generally

Here in Ireland, the Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI) should immediately analyse these new EU food information rules to ascertain what Irish food products are likely to need to align the food labels on their products. In addition, they should seek clarification from the European Commission as to whether the rules for indicating the country of origin or place of provenance of the primary ingredient of a food is as defined as in the Food Information Regulation to be “an ingredient or ingredients that represent more than 50% of that food”. Many food companies are worried about issues related to Brexit at the moment and it would be unfortunate to overlook or miss this small labelling issue, which will come into force in less than two years’ time.

About the Author Raymond O’ Rourke is a qualified Barrister and a specialist food regulatory and consumer affairs lawyer. He worked for many years in legal firms both in Brussels and Dublin and now has his

own law practice. He is a member of the management board of both Bord Bia and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and was previously a Board Member of the FSAI. He is the current Chairman of the Consumers Association of Ireland (CAI).

Consumer Interest in Origin Information

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19 | 37


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Festo made-to- measure control cabinets provide protection for all pneumatic, electric and electronic system components. The control cabinets are individually designed and built for the application, taking into account specific industry requirements such as those in the Food or Pharmaceutical industries. The design is also influenced by local conditions such as weather and climate. Along with Festo components, third party components are integrated into the control cabinets as required.

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The operationally tested systems are delivered, fully tested with full documentation and ready-toinstall.


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Food Safety and Efficiency

Festo provide expert advice and help you to find the best possible solution for your needs. We offer a specific automation portfolio as well as selected services. Talk to us about your production requirements no matter where your are in the world. Food safety made easy You want hygienic and efficient automation? As your partner throughout the entire production process, Festo can help you to optimally implement food safety with clean design products and solutions. This ensures that both the consumer and your brand are protected.

Maximum productivity can be planned How do you make the operation of your system more economical? And ensure energy-efficient use of resources? With our complete portfolio of products, systems and selected services your production process will be equipped for maximum performance. It will have built-in reliability and a high level of quality. All this can be achieved with the right mix of electric and pneumatic automation technology.

Intelligent production of the future Traceability in production processes right down to individual batches is a crucial prerequisite for improved safety in the food industry. Flexibility is also a top priority as demand for handling different sizes, formats and shapes is constantly increasing. Get ready for Industry 4.0. With our intelligent automation solutions you can have highly flexible, reliable production today. And you can also make use of our training and consulting services to provide you and your employees with the knowledge you need for the future. We will be happy to work with you directly on site, in your company. For further details, please contact: Derick Tansey Head of Food an Beverage. Tel: +353 (0)87 9424057 Email: derick.tansey@festo.com Website: www.festo.ie

You ensure food safety. You rely on highly efficient packaging processes. We supply flexible automation solutions – worldwide. We are the engineers of productivity


seafood

Pictured at the launch of BIM’s report, The Business of Seafood 2017, are Minister for Agriculture Food and the Marine, Michael Creed TD, and Jim O’Toole, CEO of BIM.

Bord Iascaigh Mhara recently unveiled its new Statement of Strategy Enabling Sustainable Growth for the 2018-2020 period, which aims to boost competitiveness amidst market uncertainties.

BIM

Unveils New Seafood Strategy B Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM), the agency responsible for leading the development of the Irish seafood sector, recently unveiled its new Statement of Strategy Enabling Sustainable Growth for the 2018-2020 period, which is intended to deliver on the development objectives of Food Wise 2025 and the sustainability objectives of the Common Fisheries Policy. The new strategy is aimed at enhancing the competitiveness of the Irish seafood sector to capitalise on the growing demand for seafood, both domestically and internationally. BIM’s approach reflects the challenge of growing market uncertainty and places greater emphasis on product differentiation, value creation and profitability.

Delivering Growth to the €1.15 Billion Industry Launching the strategy, the Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Michael 40 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

Creed TD welcomed the publication of the new strategy document and its focus on delivering growth in Ireland’s seafood sector which currently contributes €1.15 billion to Ireland’s GDP and supports more than 14,000 jobs, mainly across Ireland’s coastal communities.

implementation of the new Common Fisheries Policy and to achieve the objectives of Food Wise for the seafood industry. I am confident BIM’s new strategy contains the right actions to deliver on this important agenda.”

“I am pleased to say the seafood sector is strongly supported by my Department and the European Union, with a funding programme of €240m from the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund,” Minister Creed noted. “Food Wise 2025, the Government’s 10-year strategy for the Irish food sector, outlines ambitious growth targets for Irish seafood. The Food Wise development strategy and the sustainability initiatives embedded in the reformed Common Fisheries Policy provide the framework within which our seafood industry can look forward to a more prosperous and stable future. BIM has been well resourced to assist the

Key Strategic Areas Outlining the focus of the strategy, BIM’s CEO, Jim O’Toole, said; “It is both an exciting and uncertain time for the Irish seafood industry. As the sector continues to face significant challenges, BIM’s strategy is designed to focus on enabling Ireland’s seafood industry to benefit from services in key strategic areas that will drive future growth. The strategy will ensure Ireland’s diverse sector is best placed to take advantage of the domestic and export growth potential by creating value across the supply chain, from catch to consumer. In BIM, we have a dedicated workforce with a high level of technical


seafood expertise that will work closely with this valuable industry to implement and achieve our strategic objectives by 2020.” BIM’s new strategy identifies five key strategic priorities that will underpin the delivery of BIM services - Sustainability, Skills, Innovation, Competitiveness and Leadership - which will all operate within the framework objective of the Common Fisheries Policy and Food Wise 2025 (See panel).

Sustainability: The Key Driver Sustainability is a key driver of all business and the Irish seafood sector adheres to the highest standards of responsible and sustainable sourcing, creating opportunities to differentiate Ireland’s offering especially in more sophisticated and higher value markets. Providing Ireland’s catching, farming and processing sectors with internationally recognised standards which embrace the country’s successful Origin Green initiative will benefit the performance of Irish seafood. The strategy aims to enhance the attractiveness and viability of careers in the sector by helping to establish fully accredited pathways for lifelong learning and career progression, featuring portable modular qualifications and recognition of prior learning. This will enhance the attractiveness of careers in the seafood sector, developing the talent pool and allowing the sector to better compete. The benefit of moving Irish seafood further up the value chain is also highlighted in the strategy, with a greater emphasis on innovation. BIM is supporting the industry to develop smarter ways of

Strategic Priorities & Actions BIM has defined a clear set of five strategies and related initiatives.

1. Sustainability There is a growing demand within the seafood marketplace globally to be able to demonstrate responsible and sustainable practices. As the focus shifts to concentrate on higher value market segments, more sophisticated consumer expectations will have to be met. These initiatives create an opportunity to differentiate Irish seafood in highmargin international markets. BIM will establish and drive a range of effective approaches to differentiate Irish seafood products, based on demonstrating their environmental credentials and provenance, enabling them to achieve access to higher margin segments in international markets.

Pictured at the launch of BIM’s new corporate strategy for 2018-2020 are BIM Chairman, Kieran Calnan; Michael Creed TD, Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine; and BIM CEO, Jim O’Toole.

doing business. The seafood sector has unique attributes and requires specialist guidance and support. BIM is expanding its existing core technical and analytical research capabilities to deliver relevant, insight-driven support services to drive the competitiveness of the sector. “With seafood trade reaching €1 billion for the first time, the potential of Ireland’s seafood sector is beginning to be realised,” noted BIM Chairman, Kieran Calnan. “I am confident that the actions outlined in our new strategy will help BIM to work effectively with Government to achieve the ambitions set out for seafood in Food Wise 2025 and with the seafood industry to drive growth for our fishermen, seafood producers and processors around the coast.”

2. Skills

4. Competitiveness

The long-term viability of the Irish seafood sector relies on attracting and retaining a highly-trained and educated workforce. The sector needs to increase its attractiveness to new entrants. A structured lifelong career path will attract and retain talent. BIM will deliver a structured career path through the provision of life long, accredited learning to create a professional, educated talent pool for the sector.

The seafood sector has unique issues and attributes that require specialist guidance and support in responding to local, national and global trends. BIM will help to guide for the sector through data-driven insights. Shifting focus from commodity to maximising profitability requires expert support. The broader environment in which the sector operates requires a global economic perspective and understanding.

3. Innovation

BIM will become recognised experts on national, regional and global seafood economic trends and share them with the sector.

Fleets, farms and factories are developing new and smarter ways of doing business. BIM will help industry to create the capacity to innovate and adopt new ways of operating to enhance the global competitiveness of the Irish seafood sector. They will encourage and enable Irish seafood companies to act more strategically in their ways of doing business and strive to create extra value at every stage of the supply chain. The aim is to increase profitability by shifting focus away from being price takers in a commodity market.

5. Leadership The aim is to heighten the awareness of the specific needs of the seafood sector so that the sector can deliver an ambitious growth agenda. As the seafood development agency, BIM are best placed to lead improvements in the level of coordination and the provision of services and support to the seafood sector. In collaboration with other agencies, BIM will ambitiously champion the seafood sector’s development. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19 | 41


packaging recycling

Prevent & Save:

The Benefits to Your Business

Repak CEO, Séamus Clancy.

Repak’s Prevent & Save Programme offers a host of benefits to companies, including reduced energy consumption and costs when packing your products. It’s also free to Repak members.

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Prevent & Save is the packaging waste prevention service provided to members by Repak under the Packaging Waste Prevention Programme. The programme is dedicated to assisting Irish businesses to optimise their packaging. By optimising packaging, you can prevent or minimise the use of unnecessary packaging during the manufacture, transport and sale of your products. The benefits of packaging optimisation to your business are numerous. By optimising packaging, you could: • Avoid the costs associated with purchasing certain packaging materials; • Reduce the cost and time associated with packaging waste management at your premises; • Reduce energy consumption and costs when packing your products; • Find an opportunity to innovate by using more environmentally friendly or lighter weight packaging materials. There are already economic By analysing all types of packaging, both into and out of a compaincentives to reduce excess ny, Repak’s packaging team can find ways of optimising packaging systems as a whole, so that your business can achieve the best use of packaging. Businesses are available resources. constantly looking to reduce

epak, Ireland’s only Government-approved packaging recycling compliance scheme, celebrated 20 years of recycling success in 2017, with over 10m tonnes of packaging waste diverted from landfill in that time. In fact, before Repak’s establishment, there were 126 landfills in Ireland. Today there are just three. Repak has over 2,400 member companies; these include restaurants, hotels, shops and many other businesses who produce and place packaging on the Irish market. These companies are committed to meeting their obligations to recycle their packaging and help fund the recycling industry in Ireland. Since 1997, Repak members have invested over €425m through Repak in supporting packaging recycling in Ireland. Repak members’ fees are used to subsidise the collection and recovery of waste packaging through registered recovery operators across Ireland, and over the last two decades, they have helped to grow packaging recycling and recovery rates from under 15% in 1997 to an estimated 90% in 2017.

Prevent & Save Programme However, Repak doesn’t just offer compliance; they also help their members to optimise packaging and reduce costs through their free Prevent & Save Programme.

42 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19



packaging recycling their product costs, while Repak’s “pay by weight” fee structure is designed to discourage companies from producing excess packaging.

Quantifying the Savings In 2017, Repak commisioned Dr Pat McCloughan of PMCA Economic Consulting to produce a report entitled ‘Packaging Waste Prevention and Minimisation – The Quantity and Value of Savings by Repak Members’. The report demonstrates that Repak’s members are responsible for significant monetary savings arising from their packaging waste prevention activities. Member activities have been supported by Repak, through the Prevent & Save Programme, which is dedicated to working with Repak members in optimising the volume of packaging placed in Ireland. Since 2006, Prevent & Save has saved Repak members: Tonnes prevented – over 857,000 tonnes; Procurement savings – more than €365m; Supply chain savings – €187.5m cumulatively; Total savings – €553m cumulatively.

Recognising the Role of Packaging Repak recognises that packaging plays an essential role in containing, preserving and protecting the food products we buy on a daily basis. Along with these critical functions, packaging also provides the consumer with information about the food they buy and is the primary tool used to enhance its sales appeal. Due to the critical role that packaging plays in the supply chain, less packaging is not necessarily more environmentally friendly. If poor packaging results in a product becoming unusable, the overall impact on the environment through increased food waste can be much more negative. The challenge facing business is to achieve a balance between reducing the volume of packaging used, while still serving customers’ needs with a quality product and packaging that drives sales through shelf appeal. Repak’s dedicated packaging technology team can assist your business on any aspect of sustainable packaging design and look at ways to optimise existing packaging systems. This can save on both material and money for your business. This is also free of charge to Repak members. Waste prevention methods help create less packaging waste in the first place. These methods include prevention (removal or avoidance of certain packaging) and minimisation (light weighting of packaging). This “stop waste before it happens” strategy is an integral part of how the food industry now approaches

Repak have helped to grow packaging recycling and recovery rates from under 15% in 1997 to an estimated 90% in 2017. 44 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

Repak members’ fees are used to subsidise the collection and recovery of waste packaging through registered recovery operators across Ireland.

packaging decisions, avoiding over-packaged, disposable, and non-reusable or non-recyclable products where possible.

Optimising Packaging Systems By analysing all types of packaging, both into and out of a company, and by examining product (primary), grouped (secondary) and transport (tertiary) packaging, Repak’s packaging team can find ways of optimising packaging systems as a whole, so that your business can achieve the best use of available resources. This in turn helps to reduce the overall amount of packaging you place on the Irish market. This short on-site survey usually leads to: • Reduced materials procurement bill, through less packaging being required; • Savings in producer responsibility fees, by reducing the amount of packaging being placed on the market. Whether you manufacture packaged food products or sell them, Repak can also evaluate your existing waste management practices and make suggestions, if applicable, that could save money on your waste bills. After completing the on-site survey, Repak will provide you with a detailed confidential report. This report guides your company through the steps required to realise a reduction in your packaging costs and packaging waste. Repak will follow up with you where you need any assistance. To enquire about Repak membership, please visit www.repak.ie or call (01) 4619251.


Teagasc Food Research The leading provider of Research & Technology for Irelands Food Industry Ashtown Centre (Dublin 15) Expertise Support in: • Food Training and Consultancy • Innovation/NPD Management • Meat Processing and Cereals Technologies • Marine Bioactives and Seafood Technologies • Food Analysis

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food safety

Advancing Food Safety Knowledge and Skills safefood’s Knowledge Network (KN) is a networking community for food safety professionals on the island of Ireland.

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s part of its all-island legislative remit, safefood promotes awareness of food safety issues among consumers and across all stages of the food supply chain. Food safety is central to public health protection, as well as to the reputation and sustainability of our agri-food sector.

The safefood Knowledge Network To advance food safety along the food chain, safefood established the Knowledge Network programme, which connects those working or having responsibility for food safety on the island of Ireland. The Knowledge Network has the flexibility to address a wide variety of food safety concerns, which are prioritised based on their impact on public health and the wider food

chain. These include chemical and microbiological food safety, food production and processing issues, food fraud/ crime and new food safety innovations, as well as broader topics which may impact on food safety, including trade and economic issues, climate change and sustainability. The activities of the Knowledge Network are directed by safefood with the assistance of an Expert Facilitator Group, drawn from industry, research and public health, who strategically lead their Network, guiding activities and advising on required training and supports, new services for members, and providing insights around both existing food safety risks and emerging issues. Through the Network, participants share new research best practice and all island networking through conferences and training. The Network takes a strategic approach to applying science-based knowledge to current and emerging issues across the food chain. Using a variety of partnerships and joined-up Government working, the safefood Knowledge Network has attracted more than 2,800 members, who have benefited from the various services provided.

Membership is Free

Pictured are Expert Group Members Professor Chris Elliott (Chair), Pro Vice Chancellor, Queen’s University Belfast; Stephane Durand, Agri Food QUEST Manager; Micheál Cosgrove, Glanbia Milk; Michael Bell, Northern Ireland Food and Drink Association; Jenny Morris, CIEH, London; Dr. Kieran Jordan, Moorepark, Teagasc; Professor David McDowell, Ulster University; Robin Irvine, Northern Ireland Grain Trade Association; and Dr. Declan Bolton, Ashtown, Teagasc. Also present are Dr. Gary Kearney (safefood), Dr. Linda Gordon (safefood) Dr. Sarah Norberg (safefood) and Michael Hills (safefood).

Membership of this all-island Knowledge Network is free and members include vets, environmental health officers, lab personnel, national food regulatory agency, public health and agriculture personnel; food safety researchers and trade representative bodies, as well as a variety of personnel in the food supply chain across primary production, processing, distribution, retail and catering. The Network helps these professionals to meet new and emerging challenges, with the overall aim of ensuring that consumers can continue to have confidence in the food they eat. Membership is also open to anyone with an interest in food safety working in the wider public sector. In 2018 and beyond, the Network will continue to keep members up-to-date on food safety issues, innovations and trends. With the support of the Expert Group, this all-island initiative will ensure members have access to the very latest developments in food safety as they emerge. To join the safefood Knowledge Network, visit www.safefoodkn.eu.

KN activities

• 434 new members; • 34 events with 1,395 participants; • More than 9,000 views of KN videos; • 1,072 uploads to the website & more than 14,000 visits; The safefood Knowledge Network has attracted more than 2,800 members, who have benefited from the various services provided.

46 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

• •

23 Network News bulletins; 6 editions of “The Food Chain “ magazine, each distributed to almost 2,000 people.



traceability fTRACE ad 210x275:Layout 1

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Adopting a in Modern A new era cloud-based traceability Approach to Traceability fTRACEcomplex is an innovative traceability supply chains combined with With increasingly and globalised platform that provides businesses andingredient tracking system has mounting regulation, a robust product and consumers alike with information directly never been more important. is a modern, cloud-based traceability into the palm of theirfTRACE hand. Manufacturers can have full visibility of their value chains alike with information platform that provides businesses and consumers the touch of a button. directly intoatthe palm of their hand.

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also enablesthe brand owners toPitfalls of Traditional Traceability Systems s recent foodfTRACE safety scandals demonstrate, The keyrisks marketing information such as commercial share and financial associated with a product The legal minimum requirement for traceability is a ‘one up, recipes origin thus contamination or supplyand chain the mishap can be of high.a product, one down’ system. As a product is being tracked, product Long-term damage to brand reputation, consumer confidence, strengthening the value of Irish brands at from one stakeholder to the next. This can be data is passed and revenue can be quick to follow the wake of an incident. home andininternationally. achieved through EDI (electronic data interchange) but for A quick and comprehensive tracking and recall process some businesses, it is still a paper-based process. This can cause is a vital part of any business’ response to a problems where companies seek to make accurate traceability crisis of this nature. A swift Contact GS1 Ireland today to finddata outavailable moretoabout using regulatory authorities and the end consumer. reaction helps reduce fTRACE in partnership with your suppliers The system is and reliant customers. on everyone in the supply chain playing the ongoing impact their part. There is also a significant amount of redundant and of an incident, as duplicate data because everyone is storing each other’s data. well as building a Paper based traceability systems create a considerable positive reputation amount of unnecessary administrative workusand Connect with GS1 Ireland taking immediateE: info@gs1ie.org significantly slows down the process of an urgent recall. T:for +353 1 2080660 and decisive action to www.gs1ie.org/ftrace There are substantial gains to be made to cost, efficiency, safeguard customers. and effectiveness through adopting a digital system. However, many Irish organisations operate How Does Cloud-Based Traceability Work? traceability systems that A cloud-based traceability platform enables suppliers, distributors are rudimentary, and and retailers, and other key parties along the supply chain, will struggle to provide a to upload specific information about a product to a shared rapid and thorough recall database. Their role in the supply chain, for example as a raw in the event of a crisis.

48 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19


ra in cloud-based lity

traceability

ingredient supplier or a finished product manufacturer, will determine the kind of information that they contribute to the centralised information pool. The traceability story of a product throughout its journey along the supply chain is strengthened by having a diverse and varied set of contributors, building a richer, more accurate profile of a product. Traceability is a shared responsibility. With all parties along the supply chain contributing, the integrity and reliability of the traceability information is not dependent on any one player.

ative traceability des businesses and h information directly eir hand. Manufacturers Introducing fTRACE - a Multi-Party, ty of their value chains Cloud-Based Approach to Traceability utton.

fTRACE is an example of a modern, cloud-based traceability platform that provides businesses and consumers alike with information directly into the palm of their hand. Manufacturers can have full visibility of their value chains at the touch of a button. Based on the GS1 EPCIS (& ISO) standard, fTRACE offers an innovative approach to traceability at every stage of the supply chain. Head of Industry Engagement and Solutions at GS1 Ireland, Alan Gormley, explains, “fTRACE creates a simple, fast and effective means for traceability. What makes fTRACE different from traditional forms of traceability is how it stores data in a central repository. This data is based on “events” that are distributed throughout the supply chain. In simple terms, it works when each stakeholder in the supply chain creates an event about a product, when they handle or transform it, and that information is then stored in the centralised traceability system. This allows fTRACE to offer far more efficiency in traceability and recalls. “fTRACE is based on GS1 standards, which allows it to be a federated platform,” Gormley continues. “Using standards enables systems to communicate seamlessly with each other, so information can be captured and queried in a standardised manner.”

es brand owners to g information such as gin of a product, thus alue of Irish brands at onally.

standardised data management, without interfering with existing IT systems. This means that business owners can achieve constant data quality throughout their enterprise, improving their process control while streamlining costs.

Streamlining the Recall Process Should problems arise with a food product, fTRACE makes it easy for retailers, suppliers and the consumer to identify the affected product and act accordingly. Seamless traceability means that the source of the issue or problem can be quickly determined and the associated risks mitigated. “Critically, as fTRACE is capturing dynamic data,” says Gormley “the big thing, in terms of brand protection, is that you can prevent the sale of a faulty product happening in the first place. Imagine Batch 1234 has a problem. You can immediately tell your retailer, they can put a freeze on that product and batch at the point-of-sale, and a sale can be prevented.”

d today to find out more about using Cost of Adopting a CloudBased Traceability Systemsuppliers and customers. hip withThe your It is fair to say that the reliable fulfilment of legalrequirements is more demanding than ever, and fTRACE offers the right management tool for this.

Gormley notes, “Because most companies are already in compliance with regulation, the cost for adoption is relatively lower than developing an entirely new solution, or maintaining an outdated ‘one-up, one-down’ system. It can be a challenge to consistently maintain system links and update impacted traceability artefacts over time. “With fTRACE, all companies have to do is publish the traceability data they already have, in a standardised GS1- compliant format, so all stakeholders can access the data when necessary and applicable.” fTRACE also offers a greater level of efficiency, enabling higher-level

reland 53 1 2080660 E: info@gs1ie.org .gs1ie.org/ftrace

Find out more about fTRACE To find out more about the benefits that fTRACE can bring to your business. Log on to www.gs1ie.org/ftrace/ or contact alan.gormley@gs1ie.org for more information.

Connect with us

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018 /19 | 49


conveyors

ENE:

Keeping Industry Moving Since 1996 ENE is a leader in the manufacture and supply of FDA and HACCP compliant conveyors, machinery and belting.

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NE Limited is a family run business, established in 1996, that has evolved to meet the ever-changing demands of the food industry. Their team has grown from four employees in 1996 to 50+ today. ENE’s specialised team is highly experienced, enabling them to deliver high quality products with a reliable service. “We strive to meet the ever-changing needs of our customers,” explains a company spokesperson. “Therefore, if you give us your requirements, we will design from concept to purpose.” ENE’s special purpose machines include Spiral Conveyors, Convergers, Divergers, Packing Conveyors, Lazy Susan’s and Bone Pullers. They supply all conveyor belt types to suit the specific application.

Standard and Bespoke Systems Working closely with the food sector, ENE offer practical efficient solutions. By understanding customer demands and their production lines, ENE have created a catalogue of standard and bespoke systems. With their fully equipped facility and a team of expert technicians, they manufacture all parts in-house. Their range covers the meat processing, poultry, seafood, fruit & veg, dairy, baking, confectionery and pharmaceutical industries. As the Forbo agent in Ireland, their belts guarantee the consistent support of your HACCP concept and production. “From conveying and processing to packaging, we have belt types to suit all processes; such as mixing, cooling, weighing, metal detecting and packaging,” the spokesperson explains. “There you can exploit your quality productivity potential to the full.”

• • • • • • • •

Smooth surface allows cleaning to microbiological level and clean-in-place process; Sealed edges and tension members prevent ingress of microbes; Kevlar tension members provide high strength, low stretch; Tough polyurethane construction is - Water and chemical resistant - Meets FDA material requirements for wet food contact; Stainless steel lacing - PosiLace™ - Plastic rivets Meat and poultry and dairy certifications Runs on most plastic modular pulleys; Optional sidewalls and flights available.

50 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

Production of Conveyors and Complete Systems ENE Limited specialise in the production of conveyors and complete systems for use across Ireland, the UK and Europe, with a dedicated team and one of the best stainless-steel manufacturing facilities in Ireland. They are perfectly placed to provide expert design, manufacture and installation services, with the ability to fabricate all types of machine components, laser cut parts in stainless steel and aluminium.

The Forbo systems can offer: Durability • Top resistance to hydrolysis; • Good resistance to fruit acids; • Hard-wearing belts for use in abrasive environments; • Fray-free edges; • Belt edge sealing. Variety of Applications and Versatility • Homogeneous belt bodies; • Elastic belts with homogeneous belt bodies; • Different patterns for inclined conveying; • Belts for deep freezing sections (cooling towers); • Special troughable belts for coagulation; • HACCP belts with excellent release characteristics; • Belts suitable for knife edges and ones with patterns; • Belts with profiles and side walls. Ease of Use and Maintenance • Incision-proof belts that are easy to clean; • Belts with large open areas for washing and drying; • Blue belts for fast checking processes that don’t strain eyes. A Wide Range of Belts • Check-Weigher belts of equal thicknesses and exceptionally precise splices that make endless belts superfluous; • Elastic belts for use in packaging machinery with homogeneous structures and easy to clean surfaces; • Light-permeable belts for vision-supported robot systems (pick & place); • Temperature-resistant belts for use in shrinking tunnels and round belts.


Sovereign Labelling Machines Limited C10, Plough Road Business Centre, Great Bentley, Essex,C07 8LG T: 01206 304182 sales@sovereign-labelling.co.uk www.sovereign-labelling.co.uk


packaging

Limerick Packaging: 16 Years and growing

Connie Ryan, Managing Director, Limerick Packaging, explains the secrets behind the company’s phenomenal growth and continued success.

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hen Limerick Packaging first opened their doors in 2002, there were a grand total of three employees. Today, there are more than 30. The company, started by Connie Ryan, Managing Director, and Mike Boland, Sales Director, initially hoped to have a client list of 60 customers, who they would “look after like we had kid gloves on”, as the MD recalls. Today, Limerick Packaging have 400 customers, which Ryan attributes to steadfastly standing by their company motto and delivering ‘on time, everytime’.

Ryan is extremely proud of the fact that Limerick Packaging have held onto most of the clients who they began dealing with at the company’s formation. He’s equally delighted that once Limerick Packaging start to work with a customer, they usually end up not only keeping the customer on their client list, but increasing the amount of business they do with them. “This is simply down to the fact that we deliver ‘on time, everytime’. If you wanted to know why our business has grown, that is exactly why. Mike Boland, our Sales Director, says to customers, new and old, ‘We’ll work hard, so you don’t have to’. This means that our customers’ buying teams can concentrate on other aspects of their business because they don’t have to worry about chasing packaging,” Ryan insists. “We put the customer first,” he continues, “but to be fair, if our customers hadn’t put us first initially, we’d never be in this position. We have customers today that we had in 2002, so the loyalty of our customers is hugely important for us and a big factor in our success.”

Understanding Their Customers’ Business Many food industry and pharma/medical companies throughout Ireland are able to concentrate on their business, safe in the knowledge that the packaging materials they need are but a phone-call away in Limerick Packaging. These companies no longer have stores full of boxes that they don’t need and a packing hall without the boxes they do need. They have zero capital tied up in packaging stocks, allowing that money 52 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19


packaging to be invested in turnover that perpetuates the business, and they have production and value-added activities where once they had stores. Once Limerick Packaging get to fully understand their customers’ business, they stock product to Purchase Order and deliver daily or weekly as required: if a customer phones by noon today with a call-off for product, Limerick Packaging will deliver tomorrow, anywhere in Ireland, via its own delivery fleet. The affable MD reveals that in its early years, Limerick Packaging was “heavily dependent” on the electronics industry, “but we realised in around 2005 that this market was going to shrink and we needed to get into markets that were expanding so we very deliberately targeted food and medical/ pharma.” “We didn’t have to change our business model because that’s based on one thing only: delivering on time,” Ryan explains, “but what has changed is that we have grown beyond what we believed we could achieve. Truth be told, I would say we underestimated the value and the benefit to our customers of us delivering on time consistently.”

Retail Ready Packaging The food/grocery arena has become hugely important to Limerick Packaging, who number a host of blue chip Irish food companies among their client base. The biggest change over the years, Ryan insists, has been the advent of Retail Ready Packaging. “It has opened us up to a lot more potential customers, given that we have a lot of expertise in that area, particularly on the printing side,” he insists. “Retail Ready Packaging continues to power ahead like a steam-train. Anyone who was resisting has had to jump on board. You can see it in retail outlets, where there is consistency of colour across packs and your eye is immediately drawn to the product you require based on the Retail Ready Packaging. “Psychologists have proven that a shopping decision is made in less than a second so if the pack on the shelf doesn’t draw the attention of the shopper immediately, their mind is gone to something else,” he continues. “That comes down to product quality, print finish and how it travels. It could start out as the most beautiful box you have ever seen, but by the time the transport channel is finished with it, it could be

unattractive on-shelf, so you have to ensure the box is strong enough for it to arrive in the condition it left the packaging company.”

Choosing the Right Supplier Pack strength is just one of the factors a customer should look out for when choosing the right packaging and the right packaging supplier, according to Ryan, who has some sound advice. “If we’re designing a pack for a customer, it has to make economic sense. We can’t make a box for a euro, if a box for 50 cent will do the job perfectly. It has to be able to package the product and to hold its contents safely; to inform both the retailer and end-user of what’s inside; it has to arrive in good condition; it has to look presentable on shelf; and we have to consider the environment at all stages during production. With our eye on the environment, we have to make sure that the box is fit for purpose but not over-fit for purpose.” Most of Limerick Packaging’s work is in corrugated cardboard containers, which dovetails nicely with the sustainability agenda, as their packaging is easily recyclable, an important concern for both industry and consumers. So what does the future hold for this one of a kind packaging supplier? “We will continue to work hard for our customers so they don’t have to, and we’re going to strive to continue growing, innovating and bringing to market what our customers want, both now and in the future.”

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19 | 53


transport & logistics

Brexit: A Logistician’s View

What will Brexit mean for your supply chain? Mark Boulton, Strategic Development Director, Cold Move, assesses the implications.

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s a logistics solutions provider, serving Ireland, the UK and mainland Europe, we at Cold Move are keenly following developments in Brexit negotiations and their implications for supply chain management. We have also listened to our clients’ concerns and are eager to allay any fears that may be unfounded at present. This article is not an attempt to scaremonger. However, it is suggesting that there are possible wide-reaching changes around the corner and we all need to be reviewing what we do and how we do it. If you have not considered what these potential changes could be, please read on...

What is Going to Happen? At the time of publication, we still do not know exactly what’s coming. One thing we can be sure of is that it will mean changes in the supply chain. If you are exporting your products or importing raw materials or goods, the departure of the UK from the EU will have an effect on your business. Even if the EU and the UK collectively decide to kick this can down the road, changes will occur as businesses will try to mitigate against any uncertainty.

The Implications The implications could be far-reaching: as supply chains are re-engineered to manage the change, vehicles that are available for return collections from the UK currently might not be available in the future or will be empty in a different geographical location. If companies from continental Europe stop using Britain as a land-bridge to Ireland, this could create a volume imbalance on vehicle movements across the Irish Sea. Too many 54 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

empty vehicles in either direction increases costs and lead times as hauliers are forced to wait for return loads. Companies who previously delivered product to the Irish market from the UK may now consider the option of holding stock in Ireland and servicing the market directly. Then there is the customs formalities, admin and paperwork!

Are You Ready for Change? Are you reviewing your current route to market, your strategic stockholding points and inventory levels? Do you know your options as regards the temperature conditioning of your products? The movement of foreign exchange between Sterling and the Euro has already caused changes within the supply chain and there are more to come. If there are significant changes to customs practices or established supply routes, then your current supply chain may no longer be optimal and should be reviewed.

Cold Move is Here to Help Cold Move has been actively researching the implications of Brexit over the last 12 months. We have been looking at how our

services may need to adapt to the coming changes. We have invested in changing warehouse configurations to meet changes in demand and dwell time. Our transport fleet is undergoing changes in terms of trailer types and deployment. Brexit should not be underestimated and we are now well-positioned to meet the challenges that will come. Cold Move is a 100% Irish-owned company that provides international and domestic transport, warehousing and many added value logistical services right across the island of Ireland and beyond. All of our services can handle products at chilled, frozen and ambient temperatures. Our warehousing and distribution services are all accredited to BRC standards and empowered by the latest technology to ensure the sure and seamless flow of information through IT integration with our customers and suppliers. Some of Ireland’s and the UK’s top brands trust Cold Move’s wide range of services. If you would like to discuss what Brexit means to you or would like a no-obligation discussion about your supply chain, please email info@coldmove.ie or visit www.coldmove.ie.

The implications of Brexit could be far-reaching, as supply chains are re-engineered to manage the change.


Every Retailer. Every County. Everyday!

Contact Jason Mallon today for more information:

M: + 353 (0) 86 809 1893 E: jasonmallon@coldmove.ie

www.coldmove.ie


UK & Ireland’s Ingredients Specialist Heterochem Dist. Ltd is the speciality raw materials supplier of choice to the Food and Beverage industries both in Ireland and the UK. ◊ Acidulants ◊ Antioxidants ◊ Emulsifiers ◊ Flavourings and Colorants

◊ Preservatives ◊ Starches ◊ Sweeteners

Benefits to your business: ◊ High quality, competitively priced products - ISO 9001 & GDP accredited ◊ Excellent customer service - before and after the sale ◊ A reliable and efficient sourcing partner, assisting our customers to develop new and existing products ◊ A highly qualified sales team of chemists available to assist with any technical queries ◊ Prime location in Baldoyle, Dublin - situated in close proximity to all distribution channels ◊ On site storage of all raw materials in our controlled warehousing ◊ Variety of UN approved pack sizes available: 25kg, 50kg, 200kg barrels & 1000kg IBCs Unit 49 Baldoyle Industrial Estate, Dublin D13 H2N2, Ireland T. +353 1 839 3127 F. +353 1 832 5746 E. info@heterochem.com W. www.heterochem.com


calibration

Endress+ Hauser: Your Calibration Partner Endress+Hauser provides timely, traceable, and cost-effective calibration services that allow their clients complete peace of mind. A smooth and safe-running plant is a top priority and compliant calibration is an integral part of its operation.

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egular calibration is essential to keep the instrumentation controlling your critical processes in spec. Endress+Hauser provides timely, traceable, and cost-effective services that are accompanied by clear and concise calibration certificates. From accurate on-site testing to fully accredited laboratory calibration, they carry out and advise on every aspect of instrument calibration to meet all your business requirements. Endress+Hauser continually strive for the best quality industry standards to provide their customers with cost-effective and sustainable solutions for each project. They offer a full range of calibration services for your instrumentation equipment. Therefore, their engineers and technicians handle all aspects of on-site instrument calibration services. Your individual needs and technical core processes are always their focus, including: • Traceable calibration of any measurement instrumentation; • Clear and comprehensive calibration certificate with conformity statement; • Providing centralised access to all your calibration documentation and calibration history (on demand).

Benefits Traceable and accredited instrument calibration: Full compliance and audit readiness with complete and traceable calibration performed according to ISO 17025. The high-level corporate standards of Endress+Hauser’s service capabilities and operating personnel’s technical expertise ensure a consistent calibration approach with secure results for all of your process instrumentation.

Highest accuracy with laboratory services Putting Endress+Hauser’s metrology expertise to work will provide secure, accurate and consistent results throughout the devices’ lifecycle. Their calibration laboratories are located worldwide, equipped with highly skilled personnel and state-of-the-art metrology. Their primary standards laboratory has the resources you need to meet the full traceability of your calibration.

High quality service from a global instrumentation partner Keep all your processes working reliably and your devices in spec. Be assured, the best quality and consistent performance of their instrument calibration services will be executed no matter the location. Their extensive services are available locally, with globally managed competences: • Proficiency testing to monitor local laboratories’ continuing performance; Endress+Hauser’s engineers and • Harmonised calibration technicians handle all aspects of standards; on-site instrument calibration • Technical training and a services. qualification management system to improve the skills of their service engineers.

Make Safe Measurement Your Priority Endress+Hauser’s compliant calibration ensures the safety of your processes and products to prevent harm to users, consumers and the environment. A smooth and safe-running plant is a top priority and compliant calibration is an integral part of its operation. Their broad range of instrument calibration services offers the best unique on-site experience.

Get Detailed Insights to Keep Compliance Keeping compliance and reducing cost without compromising risk might be a challenge. Very often, transparency about obsolete and critical assets is missing in plants, specifically after many years in operation. Endress+Hauser’s consultants can help you get full transparency of your installed base and deliver insights to improve process availability and minimise risks. Outcomes might be adequate calibration intervals and methods for your quality critical assets. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19 | 57


info@jmcpackaging.co.uk

Kevin Woods

Machinery Limited Suppliers of machinery and service to the processing and packaging sector

• Tong engineering, manufacturers of all types of grading and conveying equipment in stainless steel • Manter weighing and packaging equipment for processed fruit and vegetable pouch fillers • REV packaging machines for fruit and vegetables • Redpack flowrappers • Upmatic automatic paper bag filler and stitchers • Marcelissen food processing equipment • Large selection of used machines always in stock

Stockist and Distributors of Food Grade Plastic Buckets and Tubs (BRC Approved Manufacturers), Alcohol, Sauce and Food PET Bottles and Jars, IBCs, Plastic and Steel Drums, Plastic Jars and Pallets.

Over 30 years in Ireland Our experience makes the difference

The Inch, Balbriggan, Co. Dublin, Ireland. Tel: 086 859 5532 / 086 170 8791

www.kevinwoodsmachinery.ie

Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd, a family owned business, we have been supplying the Food, Beverage, Pharmaceutical and Fine Chemical Industries for over 30 years. We are an ISO 9001:2015 Certified Company.

PLEASE CONTACT

E

sales@quitmannoneill.com

Packaging Ltd

David O’Neill

M

086 699 2693

Michelle Lucas

T

090 974 1148 / 9

Shane McEnroy

M

085 802 2626

Gareth Reville

T

086 811 8154

St. Brendan’s Road | Portumna | Co. Galway | H53 HX51 | www.qonpack.com


ingredients

Natural Ingredients from Farm to Plate

Truly Grass Fed from Glanbia Ireland brings quality, natural ingredients to your brand.

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t rains a lot in Ireland and while most of us are not impressed by this fact, our cows are happy as this means that for the most part, they spend their days grazing on the lush green pastures, made possible only by our temperate climate. In December 2016, the Truly Grass Fed brand was launched by Glanbia Ireland. As Ireland’s leading dairy company, Glanbia Ireland has a global reputation for producing top quality dairy products from its Irish family farm suppliers for export to more than 60 countries, and this new range of branded ingredients is the result of extensive work to raise the bar even higher through the creation of a new standard in dairy. The company’s vision for Truly Grass Fed is the creation of a premium, grass fed ingredient brand for food and nutrition customers to support and endorse their natural brands in market. Their callouts are clear and strong:

The Best Natural Choice The Truly Grass Fed range is designed for customers and consumers who are looking for a natural choice for their brands and food products. Its mission is to prove its natural dairy credentials by leading the journey to third party grass-fed verification. A core element of the Truly Grass Fed offering is ‘non-GMO’, and last year

Glanbia Ireland announced that the products offered under its Truly Grass Fed range had been verified by the Non-GMO Project. The Non-GMO Project is a US-based, non-profit organisation committed to preserving and building sources of non-GMO products, educating consumers, and providing verified non-GMO choices. It is North America’s most trusted seal for GMO avoidance by consumers who are concerned about what is in their food.

The Truly Grass Fed Seal Customers who include Truly Grass Fed ingredients in their branded products can also use the Truly Grass Fed endorsement seal on their packaging, which informs their consumers about what Truly Grass Fed demonstrates to customers. In addition to these key attributes, Glanbia is in the process of establishing an independent Grass Fed standard. This code of practice will give dairy processors in Ireland the opportunity to qualify as verified Grass Fed producers. Currently, Truly Grass Fed whey can be found in Garden of Life’s SPORT Certified Grass Fed Whey product, which launched in the United States in early 2017. “Our partnership with Garden of Life cements our belief in the quality of our new natural, grass fed range. As a trusted vegan brand, they have told us that in order to launch an animal protein product, they needed a holistic approach that started at the farm and traced every metric straight through to the tub,” explained Nicola O’Connell, Head of Marketing and Project Manager for the Truly Grass Fed brand. “Truly Grass Fed continues to work with a range of valued partners in sports nutrition, bakery, butter, cheese, infant formula and more to extend the distribution and range of our offerings.” For more information, see www.trulygrassfed.com. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19 | 59


functional ingredients

Leading the way on

Ingredients

Brenntag Ireland is one of the country’s leading functional ingredients suppliers, actively supporting innovation across a wide number of areas such as sugar, fat and sodium reduction, as well as offering advanced clean label and ‘free from’ solutions. 60 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19


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functional ingredients

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collaboration will help us grow the business through local knowledge and the customer proximity of Brenntag’s network and provide an even more improved service to customers on technical, regulatory and commercial aspects.

renntag Ireland has been a supplier of choice to an impressive portfolio of leading food and beverage companies for many years. The strength of the Brenntag brand attracts some of the best-known names in the industry for functional ingredients that influence taste, texture and preservation, as well as solutions for market trends such as “free from” and clean label. FOOD IRELAND met with Russel Argo, President of Brenntag UK & Ireland, and Tony Smyth, Regional Manager, Brenntag UK & Ireland, to discuss.

Have there been advancements of your Irish food product portfolio?

Can you tell us about your heritage in Ireland?

TS: Our history in Ireland goes back 50 years, whilst Brenntag’s local offering was significantly enhanced in 2006 when the former Albion Chemicals came fully under the Brenntag group’s brand. We are proud to be a global leader with local sites and expert customer service teams. Today, Brenntag Ireland is a team of 50 direct employees, with the dedicated food team looking after the NI and ROI sector, further supported by the team of technical specialists, formulators, technical marketing, business development and account managers with many years of experience in the industry, based at our Brenntag satellite sites.

Brenntag actively supports innovation across key trends such as “free from” and clean label.

RA: There have been terrific developments within our ranges in the last few months, which make me even more excited about the opportunities for collaboration with Irish food manufacturers. Earlier this year, we have become the exclusive distribution partner for Kronos specialty Titanium Dioxide grades into life science applications. Our ability to offer solutions for gluten free, sugar, fat and sodium reduction gives our customers a further scope for innovation for healthier products. Bakery is another area where our technical expertise adds true value to a customer’s business: we are able to offer a range of high quality versatile cake mixes, from off-the-shelf options to bespoke cake mixes, tailor made to meet the needs of bakers with the highest technical capability to support.

Brenntag holds a strong foothold in the food industry in Ireland. What have been the keys to your success?

RA: The food and beverage industry has always been an area of focused growth for us. The strength of Brenntag as a global leader certainly brings additional benefits to local Brenntag entities, whether through being able to bring more products to the market, having a highly experienced industry focused team, or through the efficiencies in our supply chain. We are continuing to expand our already successful specialty chemicals business, creating innovative solutions within markets where the market share we command is already significant. We build long-standing relationships based on trust and long-term engagement, and we are delighted our business partners share the same ethos. For instance, following the successful partnership with PureCircle in the UK, Brenntag have now been appointed as their exclusive distributor in Ireland, enabling us to offer our customers access to PureCircle’s stevia sweeteners across the entire territory, which is particularly timely as the Sugar Tax came into force in May 2018. TS: The extension of Brenntag’s partnership with PureCircle has been a tremendous boost to our teams, as this is a great demonstration of PureCircle having confidence in Brenntag UK & Ireland’s ability to develop the market. This FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19 | 61


functional ingredients Last December we acquired Kluman & Balter, one of the largest independent bakery ingredient suppliers and specialty cake mix blenders in the UK & Ireland, who are renowned for providing value-added services, including new product development and technical competence, which perfectly complement Brenntag’s proposition to customers. Food processing is yet another area of expertise for our teams. Several applications such as processed meat, poultry and fish, smokehouses, vegetable processing, breweries and distilleries have all taken advantages of ‘CLORIOUS2’, which is a ready to use Chlorine Dioxide that provides a highly effective, safe method of disinfection and biofilm removal in water systems for food processing and washing, without increasing chlorate levels. Speaking of distilleries, we have recently completed the major upgrade of our Life Science Solvents facility, and offer the highest quality potable alcohol for breweries and alcohol drinks manufacturers. TS: I would also mention the area of water treatment for food processing. The Brenntag acquisition of the CCP Water Solutions business in December last year is a great complementary fit to our Water Treatment business in UK & Ireland, as this now means we can offer the full range of BASF polyelectrolyte flocculants across the entire territory. We are well placed to assist our customers by offering competitively priced products of the highest quality from recognised brands, and our strong local presence allows them to minimise their stockholding, in the knowledge that their next delivery is only a phone call away.

There are a large number of investments planned throughout 2018/2019. Can you share your plans with our readers?

RA: We have always been a company to invest highly into the development of our teams and infrastructure. For instance, our Brenntag Blending Solutions (BBS) Services are pivotal to our success in food and beverage industries, and we continue to focus on this area to create a step-change in the value added services that we are bringing to our customers. Our blending facilities are located throughout the UK & Ireland and receive a high level of focus from our development team, so that we can continue to provide the highest level of service to our customers. TS: In addition to our BRC accredited food solutions blending plant in Belfast, which offers bespoke blends and pack sizes, we have other blending facilities located throughout the UK and receive a high level of focus from our development team, so that we can continue to provide the highest level of service to our cus62 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

tomers. Our BRC AA Food Solutions Blending Plant in Belfast is designed to produce blends and solutions to the customer’s exact specification, HACCP and GMP standards. Safety and quality is an ethos that we follow throughout the business: all our distribution sites are ISO, BRC and FEMAS accredited, which is a testament to the expertise of our operational teams. RA: I’d like to mention the technical development expertise of our teams. We believe technical facilities such as QC testing, application kitchens and laboratories are a major source of added value service that we, as a supplier, are striving to provide. Last year, we opened a new food application kitchen in Widnes, in the north-west of the UK, where our technical teams undertake trials and create ideas under the “Formulating the Future Together” concept.

What else gives the company a competitive edge in the market?

RA: First and foremost, it is our people. We encourage a problem-solving attitude, with dynamism and their technical expertise, whether it be in the arena of product development, specific industry focus, logistics and supply chain excellence, or a can-do attitude to customer service. We have local account management

and key account management to look after the multi-sited customers in the UK & Ireland, and also the European key account management capability to service the requirements of those of our multi-nationally located customer base, of which many are in Ireland. In fact, we have the largest account management team in the chemical distribution industry, that provides extensive sales and customer support. A strong culture of local customer service, coupled with industry specific technical knowhow, ensures we provide consistently high levels of support locally, nationwide, pan-European and even on a global basis. TS: I’d also like to focus on our flexibility and can-do attitude. Our product range, storage capability, focus on safety and sustainability, legislative and regulative support services, are all geared to provide the best customer experience to our Irish customers. We are actively supporting innovation across a wide number of areas such as sugar, fat and sodium reduction, as well as offering advanced clean label and free from solutions. For further details please contact Brenntag Food Ingredients Ireland : James Dixon, (01) 4013500, james.dixon@brenntag.ie; Angela Mills, +44 (028) 9078 7450, angela.mills@ brenntag.co.uk.


Highly efficient businesses deserve highly efficient partners www.toyota-fortlifts.ie

Call Toyota for all your handling needs. www.toyota-forklifts.ie or Toyota Material Handling Ireland at Toyota Ireland, Killeen Road, Dublin 12. Tel 01 419 0200.

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MSc in Co-operatives, Agri-Food and Sustainable Development This exciting & unique new one-year masters explores contemporary socio-economic & environmental challenges related to agri-food & rural communities

TO APPLY Visit www.pac.ie/ucc Use course code CKL03 SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE FURTHER ENQUIRIES: Dr. Olive McCarthy & Noreen Byrne o.mccarthy@ucc.ie n.byrne@ucc.ie 021 4903354 021 4903356

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Graduates of this programme will be in high demand because there will be an upsurge in jobs within the food industry in the area of sustainability & sustainable food production.� MICHAEL CRONIN, CHAIR AGRIFOOD BUSINESS PARTNERS


University College Cork

education

Food For Thought UCC Celebrates Collaboration

Uwith Blas na hÉireann U

CC has solidified its reputation as the ‘Food University’ with the establishment of the UCC Food Institute, which will encompass the largest concentration of food-related education and research resources in Ireland. Food has niversity been a critical the UCC identity since the Collegeaspect Cork isoflooking foundation forward of the Dairy Science faculty in food 1929. Since then, UCC to another summer of has produced world-class in the areas excellence withgraduates Blas na hÉireann, the of food and dairy technology, industry leaders Irish Foodincluding Awards, as they begin theirsuch 11thas Dan MacSweeney (Carbery), John O’Brien (Nestlé) and Denis year ofDr collaboration. The Blas Awards is theBrosnan (Kerry). The university also evolved this period, with course developbiggesthas competition for over quality Irish produce ments theofwider spectrum of 2500 food, including Food Business on across the island Ireland, with over entered the 2017 competition, andproducts Marketing, Food into Microbiology and Nutritional Studies. across over 100 food and drink categories. The awards are the biggest blind tasting Collaborative Research Centre of produce in the country, and the criteria on Minister Michael Creed meets the new UCC President Professor UCC’s Foodthe Industry Unit which productTraining is judged, as(FITU), well asfirst the established in 1993, is Patrick O’Shea, along with Professor Paul Ross, UCC; Mary alsojudging widely recognised across the national food industry due to its system itself, was developed in McCarthy Buckley, UCC; and Professor Paul McSweeney, UCC, on excellence in the provision of skills training partnership with the School of Food and and professional devela courtesy visit to hear about Food Research and Business at UCC. Pictured are Artie Clifford, Blas na hÉireann, and Dr Joe Kerry, UCC. opment courses. Now, in as the European food market enters Nutritional Sciences in2017, UCC and is now intorecognised a challenging and dynamic period, UCC is ready more than as an international industry of foodthrough intake and logging, food handling, ognised as leaders by the Irishfood food and industry, 50 years, UCC has always been a world-leader regarding everstandard. to provide expertise and learning in the food sphere sampling and preparation, and the sensory and their scientific support has helped dairy science and the new Institute will strengthen this position to the establishment of the UCC Food Institute. training of judges with evaluation score on trans-disciplinarity, shape the Blas awards into a globaland brand. with a strongof emphasis sustainability The UCC Food Institute is aResults collaborative researchresults. centre,The comEvaluation of Score final judging of products, and the For further information on the School innovation. It will provide a united identity for food in the univer-of bining all disciplines across the food spectrum into announcement a single one- of winners takes place during Food & Nutritional Sciences, UCC, please visit The team in UCC, led by Dr Joe Kerry, sity and for our stakeholders.” The UCC Food Institute will officially stop-shop for stakeholders. This single Institute will the provide access Dingle Food Festival, which takes place www.ucc.ie/en/fns/, and for further informamanage, co-ordinate and implement the launch at the close of this year. to world experts and the most current research, whilst streamlining on October 5-7, 2018. tion on the Blas na hÉireann awards please scientific element of the awards on-site in For further contact Dr Karen McCarthy, Institute branding and alumni Prof. Paul Ross, Head the Packaging Colvisit http://www.irishfoodawards.com/. TheofFood Group, UCC,information, are recthe University. Thisengagement. includes the logistics Manager, at Karen_mccarthy@ucc.ie or at 021 4903810. lege of Science, Engineering and Food Science, says, “Over the past

Food Industry Training Unit Continuing Professional Development and Training for the Food Industry

Information on courses from: Mary McCarthy-Buckley Food Industry Training Unit College of Science, Engineering and Food Science University College Cork E-mail m.mccarthybuckley@ucc.ie www.ucc.ie/en/fitu 64 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 39


robotics

Robots in the Food Industry: A Recipe for Success Robots are increasingly being utilised in the food manufacturing and processing industry, and not just for packing and palletising.

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wider variety of food and beverage products, an increase in consumer demand and health & safety issues are just some of the challenges faced within the food production and processing industry that are forcing business owners to explore new ways of managing their supply chain. As such, the adoption of automation and robotic technologies has increased at an unprecedented rate. In a bid to retain market share in what has become an ever evolving, ever competitive market, manufacturers are striving to protect their profit margins and increase product throughput, whilst keeping production costs to a minimum, with a clear focus on quality output.

Robots Moving Upstream Robots have for some time been used extensively in the food industry, though mainly downstream within applications such as packing and palletising, complementing order cycle times and removing non-ergonomic tasks from their human counterparts. Today, however, robotics are making their way upstream in the production process and are being implemented within manual applications as a means to increase operational efficiency. Manual applications within food handling have a higher rate of error and risk of contamination. Such risks can have a catastrophic impact upon a supply chain. Material handling robots are being implemented more and more within production lines so that new standards can be met, regulations are adhered to and flexible packaging solutions can be managed efficiently. Using robots in food production also reduces waste. The accuracy and efficiency afforded through the adoption of automated robots’ processes delivers a consistency in tasks such as cutting. That precision can be the difference between a contaminated, sub-standard or a sellable product. Not only do robots support a more sterilised environment, they also make more precise counts during production; this leads to the ability to track a product that might be substandard back to its origins.

Environmental Factors Environmental factors also need to be considered in today’s food production and storage environments. Robots have been designed to withstand harsh environments, extreme heat or sub-zero temperatures that would be too severe for a human to operate within safely and efficiently. When we also consider the health and safety aspects applicable to the food processing and production industry, we should also consider the tools that are required to undertake a variety of tasks. Robots can utilise sharp, dangerous equipment that eliminates the need for workers to be involved, providing a safer working environment. The quality and safety of a product is paramount to the success of an operation. Positioning a business to offer a competitive and flexible service is a key driver for manufacturers and the adoption of automated robotics can only support that success. KUKA is a global automation corporation with sales of around €3.5 billion and roughly 14,200 employees. As one of the world’s leading suppliers of intelligent automation solutions, KUKA offers customers everything they need from a single source: from components and cells to fully automated systems for the automotive, electronics, consumer goods, metalworking, logistics/ e-commerce, healthcare and service robotics industries. For more information, email briancooney@kuka.ie or call (042) 9395134. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/2019 | 65


machinery & equipment

Fischbein Seals Bagged Market

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nvesting in machinery and equipment should be on top of every company’s priority list if it aims to boost productivity and production, and ultimately, positively contribute to the overall economy. The logic behind it is simple: by investing in the latest M&E, a company is able to save time and money as it doubles its manpower’s production efforts. If your business consists of ‘bagged products’, in any industry, Fischbein has a solution to fulfil your needs. From low-cost manual sealers, semi-automated industrial bag sealers and sewing systems and sewing consumables, to high-speed fully automated bagging and palletising solutions.

a challenge, we meet it. When there’s a problem, we solve it. Not just before the sale, but also for years after installation.” Should you wish to discuss the solutions available for your business, call 0044 (0) 8443722877 or email: sales@fischbein-Saxon.co.uk.

Finance Available With finance available at cost effective rates, companies can invest in technology now, enabling them to produce their products faster, neater and with lower labour costs, within minimal initial financial outlay. Manufactured in the UK, as well as Europe and the US, Fischbein is always here for you. “The most important thing Fischbein build is relationships,” notes a company spokesperson. “We do that by listening first. When you pick up the phone, we answer. When there’s

66 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

If your business consists of ‘bagged products’, in any industry, Fischbein has a solution to fulfil your needs.


For more details see page 68 & 69


pallets & packaging

Mid Cork Pallets

40 Years of Quality

With Mid Cork Pallets, you can be assured that the pallets or packaging you buy are manufactured to the highest standard.

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stablished in 1978, Mid Cork Pallets & Packaging is one of the leading manufacturers of pallets in Ireland. They also provide a flexible stock and serve service for their growing list of customers’ corrugated packaging needs. Operating from a 20,000 square metre facility near Macroom in Cork and a 7,000 square metre storage and distribution centre in Dunboyne, Co. Meath, MCP is strategically located to provide fast and

68 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

efficient delivery of your pallets and packaging, close to all major road networks. Their Clondrohid facility in Co. Cork is over 25 acres and consists of over 250,000 square feet of purpose built manufacturing and storage facilities. In Co. Meath, they have over 100,000 square feet of storage facilities in their seven-acre Dunboyne depot.


pallets & packaging With 40 years’ experience, Mid Cork Pallets and Packaging is the largest automated pallet manufacturer in Ireland. They boast one of the most modern facilities in Ireland and provide pallets and corrugated boxes to most of Ireland’s largest blue chip companies. “In operation since 1978, we know a bit about pallets and packaging, as well as the importance of a dependable, reliable, and efficient service,” explains Aidan Harty. “Although we don’t manufacture corrugated boxes, we offer a complete Design and Sampling Service to help you with box design and to source your packaging. We manage the manufacturing process for you and provide a stock management service so you always have a continuous supply of packaging.”

Customers First

Be assured the pallets or packaging that you buy are manufactured to the highest standard

Pallets Their product range includes: • All types of timber pallets including Euro pallets, kiln dried and heat treated (both new and second hand); • Plastic and Aluminum pallets, as well as timber pallets; • They also have a Specialised Pallet Design Service available.

Packaging Mid Cork Pallets are BRC accredited and supply all types of corrugated boxes including 0201, Die Cuts, 4 and 6 point glued trays. They also offer an extensive range of Shelf Ready packaging solutions. They offer a range of print finishes, from standard to HD Flexo to Litho Laminated boxes. MCP offer a full Design and Sampling Service.

Specialist Packaging When it comes to specialist packaging, MCP’s product range includes: • • • • •

Plywood Crates Shipping Crates Machine Pallet Wrap Hand Pallet Wrap Corner Pieces

“Our customers are looking for a supplier that will put their needs at the forefront of everything that we do,” explains Aidan Harty. “We achieve that here at MCP by engaging with our customers and their evolving needs and continuously aiming to improve the overall package that we deliver to our customers.” Many of MCP’s customers operate 24/7, so they strive to ensure that they plan accordingly so they receive the service that is required to satisfy the demands of their business. “We get to know the customer inside out so we have a great understanding of their needs and the demands of their business,” Aidan Harty explains. “We provide a quality, reliable product, at a competitive price, when our customer wants it.”

Certifications Mid Cork Pallets are certified to the following quality systems: • ISO9001:2008 • ISPM 15 Certified • BRC Certified • Sedex Certified • Members of TIMCON • Licenced EPAL Manufacturers • Registered member with Repak

Contact Details: For more details, please visit www.midcorkpallets.com or email sales@midcorkpallets.com or phone (026) 41311.

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19 | 69


capital investment programmes

Factors to Consider for Capital Investment Programmes

A

feature of food processing facilities is the constant capital investment in new equipment and/or existing building modifications to accommodate customer demands or increasing product throughput. Undertaking works within a live production facility requires detailed planning and co-ordination of all components and required contractors/suppliers, so as to ensure that there are no production interruptions. If carefully researched and planned well in advance, the works can be carried out in a seamless manner. New or replacement equipment installations will usually require additional services, such as electrical supplies, water services, data collection, compressed air, refrigeration and ventilation, to name a few. Pre-planning for all of these works in advance of the equipment arrival can be achieved with planned work schedules at weekends or undertaking works during non-production hours.

Experienced and Competent Advisors Some basic issues are very often overlooked, such as how a new piece of production equipment can physically fit into the building, as existing doors may be too small. In some cases, the external wall or roof has to be temporarily removed to gain access and this would need careful and detailed planning in advance. All works undertaken would have to be compliant with food hygiene regulations, along with statutory requirements, such as com-

70 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

pliance with Building Regulations and Health and Safety Welfare at Work Act regulations. In summary, food manufacturing companies should employ experienced and competent professional advisors when undertaking capital investment programmes. About The Author Fergus V. Carey, MRIAI, of Carey Associates Architects & Project Managers has over 30 years’ experience in the design, construction, commissioning of EU Licenced/Food Safety Authority procedures for all categories of food production and food related buildings.


Food

IRELAND 2 018 /19 Ye a r b o o k & D i re c to r y

Product & Service Index

ACCREDITATION

Air Products Ireland Ltd Codico Distributors Ltd GS1 Ireland

ARCHITECTS / FOOD RELATED BUILDINGS BSS (Ireland) Ltd Carey Associates

BARCODING / LABELLING ADC Barcode AIS Ltd ALS Labelling Solutions Avery Weigh-Tronix Codico Distributors Ltd Com-Plas Packaging DSG Packaging Ltd Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd GS1 Ireland Heavey Technology JMC Packaging Ltd Label One Ltd Obeeco Ltd SAI Global Tekpak Automation Ltd Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd Wrap It Packaging

BULK SPIRITS

Great Northern Distillery

EDUCATION /TRAINING / CERTIFICATE /CONSULTANCY

Festo Ltd GS1 Ireland Irish National Accreditation Board JMC Packaging Ltd Kuka Robotics Limerick Packaging National Standards Authority Of Ireland (NSAI) safefood SAI Global UCC - School of Food and Nutritional Science UCD School Of Agriculture and Food Science

ENERGY / UTILITIES MANAGEMENT Calor

FOOD SAFETY AUDITING GS1 Ireland SAI Global

CONSULTANTS Air Products Ireland Ltd Cross Refrigeration GS1 Ireland Q-Lab Ltd SAI Global Value Stream Machinery CONTAMINANT CONTROL QPM Ltd CONTROL /INSTRUMENTATION Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd P.J. Bonner & Co. Ltd Cross Refrigeration Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Kuka Robotics QPM Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd FOREIGN BODY REMOVAL QPM Ltd HYGIENE Cross Refrigeration Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Enviroclad Systems Ltd safefood Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Stone Food Machinery Value Stream Machinery TESTING/INSPECTION Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Cross Refrigeration DSG Packaging Ltd Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd P.J. Bonner & Co. Ltd Q-Lab Ltd QPM Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Teagasc Food Research Programme Moorepark and Ashtown Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd

TRACKING SYSTEMS ADC Barcode Codico Distributors Ltd GS1 Ireland Heavey Technology Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd WrenTech Ltd

FOOD LUBRICANTS Kevin Woods Machinery

GENERAL SERVICES /SUPPLY TO THE TRADE

Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd AIC Plastic Pallets Ltd All in All Ingredients Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix BIM/Irish Sea Fisheries Board Blenders Ltd Bord Bia - The Irish Food Board Codico Distributors Ltd Com-Plas Packaging Fisher Scientific Great Northern Distillery Healy Group Heavey Technology Innovate Food Technology Irish National Accreditation Board JMC Packaging Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery Kuka Robotics Limerick Packaging National Chemical Company National Standards Authority Of Ireland (NSAI) Pegler & Louden Pharmafoods Ltd Puratos Crest Foods Ltd Q-Lab Ltd QPM Ltd Saica Packaging Ireland Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland T.S. O’Connor & Son Ltd Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd

HEALTH & SAFETY

Enviroclad Systems Ltd SAI Global Value Stream Machinery WrenTech Ltd FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19 | 71


product & service index INDUSTRIAL WASHING EQUIPMENT Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery Stone Food Machinery

INGREDIENTS

AB Mauri UK & Ireland All in All Ingredients Ltd Andrew Ingredients Ltd Brenntag Camida Ltd Corcoran Chemicals Ltd Glanbia Ireland Healy Group Heterochem (Dist.) Ltd Kiernan’s Food Ingredients Ltd National Chemical Company Nutrition Supplies O’Brien Ingredients Ornua PK Chemicals Ltd Puratos Crest Foods Ltd Trilby Trading Ltd D.D. Williamson (Ireland) Ltd

IT SERVICES & OUTSOURCING ALS Labelling Solutions DSG Packaging Ltd Innovate Food Technology Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd

LEGAL SERVICES Matheson

MATERIALS HANDLING SERVICE

CONTROL / INSTRUMENTATION Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix BSS (Ireland) Ltd Irish Lift Trucks JMC Packaging Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery Kuka Robotics Manotherm Ltd P.J. Bonner & Co. Ltd QPM Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Tekpak Automation Ltd WrenTech Ltd MACHINERY / EQUIPMENT ABB Ltd Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd AIC Plastic Pallets Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix ENE Limited Fischbein-Saxon Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd Irish Lift Trucks JMC Packaging Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery 72 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

Kuka Robotics Obeeco Ltd QPM Ltd Schoeller Allibert Ltd Security Pak Ltd Stone Food Machinery Syspal Tekpak Automation Ltd Toyota Material Handling Ireland Wrap It Packaging WrenTech Ltd PALLETS, CRATES & CONTAINERS AIC Plastic Pallets Ltd Dollard Packaging Ltd Donoghue Packaging Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd Industrial Packaging Ltd Irish Lift Trucks JMC Packaging Ltd Kuka Robotics Limerick Packaging Mid Cork Pallets & Packaging Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Saica Packaging Ireland Schoeller Allibert Ltd Syspal WrenTech Ltd PUMPS & VALVES BSS (Ireland) Ltd Festo Ltd Irish Lift Trucks Kevin Woods Machinery Pegler & Louden Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd WrenTech Ltd REFRIGERATION / COLD STORAGE Air Products Ireland Ltd Cold Move Cross Refrigeration CRS Mobile Cold Storage Ltd DSG Packaging Ltd Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd Irish Lift Trucks Kuka Robotics Ornua Schoeller Allibert Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Syspal SERVICE & CALIBRATION QPM Ltd TRANSPORT & LOGISTICS Avery Weigh-Tronix DSG Packaging Ltd Irish Lift Trucks Johnston Logistics Ornua Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Schütz (Ireland) Ltd Storage Ltd Toyota Material Handling Ireland WrenTech Ltd

WASTE MANAGEMENT/RECYCLING Avery Weigh-Tronix Irish Lift Trucks Kevin Woods Machinery Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Repak Ltd

PACKAGING /DESIGN / LABELLING

ADC Barcode AiP Thermoform Packaging Air Products Ireland Ltd ALS Labelling Solutions Celtic Sales Company Ltd Com-Plas Packaging Corcoran Products (Irl) Ltd Diamond Corrugated Dollard Packaging Ltd Donoghue Packaging DSG Packaging Ltd Elopak ENE Limited GS1 Ireland Greiner Packaging Ltd Industrial Packaging Ltd Innovate Food Technology JMC Packaging Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery Kiernan’s Food Ingredients Ltd Label One Ltd Limerick Packaging Measom Freer & Co. Ltd NPP Group Ltd Obeeco Ltd Ornua T.S. O’Connor & Son Ltd Packex Industries Ltd P.C. Packaging Ltd Pharmafoods Ltd Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Schoeller Allibert Ltd Schütz (Ireland) Ltd Sealed Air Ltd (Cryovac) Security Pak Ltd Smurfit Kappa Ireland Syspal Tekpak Automation Ltd The Packaging Centre Ltd Versatile Packaging Ltd Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd Wrap It Packaging WrenTech Ltd

PEST CONTROL /FLY SCREENS Mitie Rentokil Pest Control

PLANT MAINTENANCE

Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd P.J. Bonner & Co. Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery National Chemical Company Obeeco Ltd Value Stream Machinery


product & service index PROCESSING EQUIPMENT

BAKERY Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix Cross Refrigeration DSG Packaging Ltd Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd ENE Limited Festo Ltd JMC Packaging Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery Kuka Robotics Obeeco Ltd Pharmafoods Ltd Puratos Crest Foods Ltd QPM Ltd Schoeller Allibert Ltd Syspal Value Stream Machinery Versatile Packaging Ltd Wrap It Packaging WrenTech Ltd DAIRY Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix BSS (Ireland) Ltd Cross Refrigeration David Kellett & Partners Ltd DSG Packaging Ltd Elopak Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd ENE Limited Festo Ltd JMC Packaging Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery Kuka Robotics Obeeco Ltd Pharmafoods Ltd QPM Ltd Schoeller Allibert Ltd Syspal Value Stream Machinery Versatile Packaging Ltd Wrap It Packaging WrenTech Ltd DRINK Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix BSS (Ireland) Ltd Cross Refrigeration DSG Packaging Ltd Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd ENE Limited Festo Ltd JMC Packaging Ltd Kuka Robotics Obeeco Ltd Pharmafoods Ltd QPM Ltd Schoeller Allibert Ltd Syspal

Value Stream Machinery Versatile Packaging Ltd Wrap It Packaging WrenTech Ltd

Kuka Robotics Value Stream Machinery

RECRUITMENT

FRESH FOOD Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix Cross Refrigeration DSG Packaging Ltd Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd ENE Limited Festo Ltd JMC Packaging Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery Kuka Robotics Obeeco Ltd Pharmafoods Ltd Puratos Crest Foods Ltd QPM Ltd Schoeller Allibert Ltd Syspal Value Stream Machinery Versatile Packaging Ltd Wrap It Packaging WrenTech Ltd MEAT, FISH & POULTRY Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix Cross Refrigeration DSG Packaging Ltd Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd ENE Limited Festo Ltd JMC Packaging Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery Kuka Robotics Obeeco Ltd Pharmafoods Ltd QPM Ltd Schoeller Allibert Ltd Stone Food Machinery Syspal Value Stream Machinery Versatile Packaging Ltd Wrap It Packaging WrenTech Ltd

ICDS Recruitment Consultants Innovate Food Technology

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT BIM/Irish Sea Fisheries Board

Bord TheofIrish Food Board A person overBia the- age 15 but under 18 may be in the Technology bar of Innovate a licensedFood premises unaccompanied until 9pm Packaging Ltd (10pm JMC in Summertime), but only after 9pm (10pm in Ornuain the event of a private function where a Summertime) Safefood substantial meal is served.

allowing peop in itself constit

(4) Provided n is implemente of not serving which exceeds Rules regardin not constitute

Teagasc Food Research

- School of Food Nutritional There isUCC a ?300 fine for a first and offence on the publican and upScience to ?300 for the parent. Licensees can use due Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd diligence as a defence. WrenTech Ltd

Production of Evidence of Age by 18 - 20 Year Olds STAINLESS STEEL

Jurisdictio of Prohibit Premises

Publicans cannot allow 18-20 year olds to be in the bar of FABRICATION a licensed premises without an appropriate age document Cross Refrigeration (passport, EULimited identity card, driving licence, Garda age card). ENE Publicans are liable to aMachinery ?1,500 fine for a first offence while Kevin Woods the person involved faces a fine not exceeding ?300. Syspal

This essential discrimination District Court. include compe action, and tem

Teknomek Industries Ltd

Amendments WrenTech of LtdSection 15 of the Equal Status Act 2000 - Publican’s Discretion

This is an o consult the In oireachtas.ie on 01 647 68

TRADE 3(a) Licensees canASSOCIATIONS allow people under 18 years of age GS1 to be on theIreland premises at their discretion, subject to time Repak Ltd above (i.e. not after 9.00 p.m.). Not limitations outlined

For all your Corporate and Contract Publishing Needs, Call the Experts

MACHINERY AUCTIONEERS Air Products Ireland Ltd Cross Refrigeration JMC Packaging Ltd

01-678 5165

WASTE WATER EQUIPMENT BSS (Ireland) Ltd Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Festo Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery Stone Food Machinery

kathleenbelton@tarapublications.ie www.tarapublications.ie

PRODUCTION OPTIMISATION Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd JMC Packaging Ltd

Untitled-1 1

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19 | 73 26/11/2013

quarter_ports.indd 1

50,51 Licensing Legislation.indd 2

10:46

13/12/2011 14

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ADC Barcode Ltd

A

Address:

Unit 8, Willow Business Park, Knockmitten Lane, Dublin 12. Telephone: (01) 465 6480 Fax: (01) 465 6487 Email: ciaranf@adcbarcode.com Web: www.adcbarcode.com Main Products/ Thermal transfer Advanced Packaging Services: printers, EU178 software, Machinery Ltdlabels, thermal foil, scanners. Address: 718 Northwest Business Park, Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Ballycoolin, Dublin 15. Address: 718 Northwest Tel: (01) 861 2141 Fax: (01) 861Business Park, 2142 Email: s.dallas@test.ie Ballycoolin, Dublin 15. Web: www.packagingmachinery.ie Telephone: (01) 861 2141 Main Products & (01) 861 2142 Services: Fax: Metal detectors, x-ray Email: s.dallas@test.ie inspection systems, Web: www.packagingmachinery.ie Products/ Metal detectors, x-ray check weighers & label Main applicators. Services: inspection systems, Contact: Technical Director: check weighers & label Stephenapplicators. Dallas Contact: Technical Director: Stephen Dallas

AiP Thermoform Packaging Address: Unit 1 A Ballymaley Business Park, Barefield, Ennis, Co. Clare. Telephone: (065) 686 4486 Fax: (065) 689 3479 Email: john@aip.ie Air Products Ireland Ltd Web: www.aip.ie Address: Unit 950, Western Main Products/ Design and manufacture Industrial Estate, Services of Thermoform Packaging Killeen Road, Dublin 12. Tel: 1800 99 50for the Irish market. 29 Email: ieinfo@airproducts.com Contact: John Mulleady Web: www.airproducts.ie Main Products & Services: Air Products brings you the latest, most innovative solutions in cryogenic freezing, chilling, cooling and Modified Atmosphere Packaging. Freshline Gases® include CO2, Nitrogen and Oxygen in liquidLtd or gaseous Air Products Ireland Address: form. Backed by over 40 years’ Unit 950, Western knowhow in food processing. Industrial Estate, To find out more please visit our website.Killeen Road, Contact: Air ProductsDublin 12. on 1800 99 50 29 Telephone: 1800 99 50 29 Email: ieinfo@airproducts.com Web: www.airproducts.ie AIS Ltd - Automatic Main Products/ Air Products brings Identification Systems Services: you the latest, most Address: Unit 48, Canal Walk, Park West Industrial Park, innovative solutions Nangor Road, Dublin 12. in cryogenic freezing, (01) 620 5742 Tel: chilling, cooling and Fax: (01) 620 5735 Modified Atmosphere Email: info@aisltd.ie Packaging. Freshline Web: www.aisltd.ie Gases® include CO2, Main Products & Services: RFID equipment,automatic Nitrogen and Oxygen labelling, print & apply systems, in liquid or gaseous industrial barcode scanning, form. Backed by over 40 2D barcode equipment, years’ knowhow in food hand held readers, mobile computers, processing. To find out fixed mount more please visit our scanning, label printers, mobile website. printers, desktop printers, Contact: Air Products on industrial printers, barcode printers, labels & ribbons. 1800 99 50 29 Supply, install & maintenance of auto ID products. Custom solution development for product traceability suitable for you.

company listings ABB Ltd Address: Auriga House, Precedent Drive, Rooksley, Milton Keynes, ABB Ltd MK13 8PQ. Address: Auriga House, Telephone: (0044) 1908 350 300 Precedent Drive, Rooksley, Fax: (0044) 1908 350 301 Milton Keynes, MK13 8PQ. Email: robotics@gb.abb.com Tel: (0044) 1908 350 300 Web: www.abb.com (0044) 1908 350 301 Fax: Email: robotics@gb.abb.com www.abb.com/robotics Contact: UK & Ireland - Robotics Web: www.abb.com www.abb.com/robotics Managing Director: & Services: Main Products Chris Withey ABB is Main Products/ ABB is a leading a leading supplier of industrial robots, Services: supplier of industrial modular manufacturing robots, modular systems and service. A manufacturing systems strong solutions focus helpsand service. A strong manufacturers solutions focus helps improve productivity, product quality and manufacturers improve safety. ABB has worker productivity, product more than installed quality and worker 200,000 robots world wide safety. ABB has installed more than 190,000 robots worldwide. Contact: Ireland - Robotics Group: Sales & Marketing Manager: Nigel Platt

a

AB Mauri UK & Ireland

Address: Barn Way, Lodge Farm, Northampton, NN5 7UW. AB Cheesemaking Tel: (0044) 1604 755 522 Address: 7 Daybell Close, Fax: (0044) 1604 752 470 Email: Damien.McDonald@abmauri.com Bottesford, Nottingham, Web: www.abmauriukandireland.com NG13 0DQ, Main ProductsEngland. & Services: Dough conditioners, Telephone: (0044) 1949 842 867 yeast, soya flours, sour Fax: (0044) 1949 842 867 doughs, cake & donut Email: chrisashby@ mixes, icings & fillings. abcheesemaking.co.uk Contact: Director of Sales (Ireland): Damien McDonald Web: www.abcheesemaking.co.uk

Main Products/ Cheesemaking training Services: and consultancy. Contact: Christine Ashby

ADC Barcode Ltd

Address: Unit 8, Willow Business Park, Knockmitten Lane, Dublin 12. Tel: (01) 465 6480 Fax: (01) 465 6487 37_48 company_listing.indd 1 Email: ciaranf@adcbarcode.com Web: www.adcbarcode.com Main Products & Services: Thermal transfer printers, EU178 software, labels, thermal foil, scanners. 74 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

AICPlastic PlasticPallets Pallets Ltd Ltd AIC

Address: The Woodlands, Address: The Woodlands, Carrigmore, Ballineen, Carrigmore, Ballineen, Co. Cork. Co. Cork. Tel: (023) 884 7333 Telephone: (023) 884 7333 Fax: (023) 884 7671 Fax: (023) 884 7671 Email: info@aicplasticpallets.com Email: info@aicplasticpallets.com Web: www.aicplasticpallets.com Web: www.aicplasticpallets.com Main Products & Services: Main Products/ Materials handling Plastic, timber and aluminium Services: platforms, pallets, pallets, pallet boxes, totes, storagecontainers, boxes, plastic boxes, stacking & wooden, ISPMI5 containers, slipsheets, linbins, bespokecompliance, trays, tote pallets and boxes boxes, plastic pallets, (aluminium and plastic). plastic tote boxes, Contact: Joe O’Flynn plastic pallet boxes, slipsheets, linbins, plastic buckets, bespoke pallets (aluminium and plastic). Contact: Joint Managing Director: AiP Thermoform Packaging Charles O’Donovan Address: Unit 1 AJoint Managing Director: Ballymaley Jerry O’Flynn Business Park, Barefield, Ennis, Co. Clare. 3 7 686 f o o4486 d ireland Tel: (065) Fax: (065) 689 3479 Email: john@aip.ie Web: www.aip.ie Main Products & Services: Design and manufacture Services of Thermoform Packaging for the Irish market.

Company Listin

Company listings

Andrew Ingredients Ltd

Address: 27 Ferguson Drive, Knockmore Hill Industrial Park, Lisburn, Co. Antrim, BT28 2EX. Tel: (048) 9267 2525 Fax: (048) 9263 3840 Email: johngraham@andrewingredients.co.uk Web: www.andrewingredients.ie Main Products & Services: 11/01/2012 Bakery ingredients, flour,bread, cake and confectionery mixes, gluten free mixes, icings, dried fruit, savoury and sweet sauces, colours and flavours, baking powders, raising agents, sugar etc.

17:09


whERE ALL ThE ELEmENTS

COmE TOgEThER company listings Avery Weigh-Tronix

Address: Dublin: Airton Park, Airton Road, LIFE SCIENCE Tallaght, Dublin 24. Tel: (01) 400 0720 Fax: (01) 400 0750 Address: Antrim: 1 Sentry Lane,Newtownabbey, Co. Antrim, BT36 4XX. Tel: (028) 9083 9092 Fax: (028) 9083 5393 Email: irelandinfo@awtxglobal.com Web: www.averyweigh-tronix.com /ireland

P.J. Bonner & Co. Ltd INDUSTRIAL

Calibration, Instrumentation & Weighing

Address: 35 Western Parkway Business Centre, Ballymount Drive, Ballymount, Dublin 12. (01) 450 5050 Tel: (01) 450 5183 Fax: Email: sales@pjbonner.com Web: www.pjbonner.com Main Products & Services: Supply, Service and Calibration of Instruments, Controls, Weighing. Contact: Managing Director: Patrick M Bonner Instantising Milk Powders with Lecithin has its challenges. Service Manager: hydration Roddy Jefferson Whether it is controlling the rate of of a high

Camida know LeCithin...

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protein powder or the rapid wetting of a high fat powder, the choice of Lecithin to improve the instantising properties of a powder is essential. As not one Lecithin resembles another, the importance of making the right decision cannot be overstated. BIM/Ireland’s Seafood Development Agency Camida wants understand the application Address: Crofton Rd,to Dun Laoghaire, Bord Bia - and customer Dublin. the Lecithin that suits needs toCo.choose youFood andBoard your product. The Irish Tel: (01) 214 4100 Address: Clanwilliam Court, GM Wetting and flavour, colour, viscosity, Fax: (01) 284flow-properties, 1123 Lower Mount Street, Dublin 2. status many other properties must be adapted to the Email: and info@bim.ie Tel: (01) 668 5155 Web: www.bim.ie needs of the finished product. We Email: analyse your needs. We info@bordbia.ie Main Products & Services: Web: www.bordbia.ie tailor each approach the processing plant and Bord Iascaigh Mhara to (BIM) individual Main Products & Services: with over 40 years combined experience of Dairy across helps to develop the Irish Seafood Marketing, promotion by providing technical Industry Europe, we manage the process and importantly add most and development of Irish expertise, business support, drink & horticulture. food, value tofunding, your training end product. and promoting

INgREDIENTS

BSS (Ireland) Ltd.

Address: White Heather Industrial Estate, 301 South Circular Road, Dublin DO8 C78P Tel: 00 353 (1) 416 5100 00 353 (1) 416 5165 Fax: Email: 1930-sales@bssgroup.com Web: www.bssireland.ie Main Products & Services: Pipeline and heating solutions Contact: Business Director: Jason Warnock

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Calor

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Address: Long Mile Road, Dublin 12. Tel: 1850 812 450 Email: info@calorgas.ie i s o v e r Web: www.calorgas.ie Main Products & Services: Supply of LPG in bulk tanks or cylinders. Contact: Sales Director: Oliver Kenny.

IrIsh PharmaChem 2012 CamidaCamida Ltd Ltd., Tower House,

o v e r

Address: New Quay, Clonmel, New Quay, Clonmel, Co. Tipperary. (052) 612 5455 Ireland. Tel: Building 1000, Co Tipperary, (052) 612 5466 Fax: Units 1201& 1202, Mobile: 086-2413223 Email: joe.guiney@camida.com City Gate, Mahon, LIFE SCIENCE INDUSTRIAL INgREDIENTS t: +353Cork. 52 6125455 Web: www.camida.com e: joe.guiney@camida.com Tel: Main Products & (021) 240 9099 Services: Newmarket, Dublin 8. Ingredients Beverage, Fax: m: (021) 240 9009 Address: Unit 405, Address: Unit 405, Greenogue Business +353 86(Food, 2413223 Tel: (01) 453 6960 Esters (Fatty Park, Rathcoole, Dublin 24 Email: Feed). Lecithin, mail@calleng.ie Greenogue Business w: www.camida.com Fax: (01) 453 7607 acids & MCT Oils), Emulsification PLEASE DIRECT YOUR ENQUIRIES TOPark, Rathcoole, gUINEY +353(0) 1jOE 4013500/ Web: systems,www.calleng.ie Tel: Sweeteners (Sucralose, Email: sales@blenders.ie +353 (0)Dublin 24. 86 2958750 Business: Stevia, NHDC), Multi-discipline Vitamin blends, Web: www.blenders.ie Email: dublin.sales@brenntag.ie/ Tel: (01) 401 3500 Flavourconsulting engineering systems, Meat Main Products & Services: james.dixon@brenntag.ie Functional blends (Texture & and project managment Fax: (01) 405 3501 Mayonnaises, dressings, Web: www.brenntag.ie Yield improvers). company. Email: dublin.sales@brenntag.ie bouillons, cooking sauces, Main Products & Services: Feed Sector – Vitamins (Dry and table sauces, carvery sauces, Web: www.brenntag.ie Food ingredients, cake mixes, 3 02/06/2015 liquid form), Glycinates (Copper, relishes in bulk catering, sachets Contact: cAmidA Iron, LtdManganese & Zinc), blends,Sales Desk NPD and retail jar formats.Branded Address: OrganicTower House, acids (buffered propionContact: Key Account Manager: and private label. ic acid & buffered formic acid). New Quay, James Dixon Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). Clonmel, Joe Guiney Contact: Sales Manager: Co. Tipperary.

This a dedicated and experienced team with in-depth technical and market knowledge and who deliver a customer focused approach to your business. So Blenders Ltd challenge Camida to find tailor-made solutions for you and Address: Unit 4, IDA Centre, bBrenntag renntAG ireLAnd your production.

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briGhtwAter Address: Tel: Fax:

36 Merrion Square, Dublin 2. (01) 662 1000 (01) 662 3900

Tel: (052) 612 5455 Fax: (052) 612 5466 FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19 | Email: info@camida.com Web: www.camida.com Contact: Company Secretary: Deirdre McGrath

75

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12:48 Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Business: Contact:


company listings

D

Corcoran Products (Irl.) Limited

Kingsbridge House 17-22 Parkgate Street Dublin 8 Ireland

Carey Associates

Architects for the Food Industry Address: Office 1, Second Floor, Building 3b, Killegland Street, Ashbourne Town Centre, Ashbourne, Co. Meath A84 NX77 Tel: (01) 835 1572 Email: info@careyassociates.ie Web: www.careyassociates.ie Main Products & Services: Architects and Project Managers Contact: Fergus Carey MRIAI

+353-1 63 30 400 +353-1 67 93 521 info@corcoranchemicals.com

Corcoran Products (Irl) Ltd

Address: 17 Parkgate Street, Dublin 8. Corcoran Chemicals Limited Daikin Europe Kingsbridge House Tel: (01) 633 0400 17-22 Parkgate Street Address: Unit 1, Orchard Business Centre, Dublin 8 (01) 679 3521 Fax: Ireland Orchard Avenue, Citywest, info@corcoranproducts.com Email: Dublin 24. www.corcoranproducts.com Web: (01) 642 3430 Tel: Main Products & Services: Email: chillers@daikin.ie Suppliers of packaging to Web: www.daikin.ie the food, pharmaceutical and Main Products & Services: chemical industry. HVAC manufacturer Contact: Derek Lennon Contact: Mark Smyth, Applied Product Responsible (tel) (fax) (email)

+353-1 63 30 400 +353-1 67 93 521 info@corcoranchemicals.com

Cross Refrigeration (Irl) Ltd

Celtic Sales Co (Cork) Ltd

Address: Unit 3b, Waterfront Business Park, Little Island, Cork. (021) 429 7984 Tel: Fax: (021) 429 7990 Email: mary@celticsales.com Main Products & Services: Packaging materials for fresh food. Contact: Mary O’Brien

Cold Move

Address: Glenasaul Industrial Park, Oranmore, Co. Galway. Tel: (091) 792 926 Mobile: 086 8091 893 Email: innovation@coldmove.ie Web: www.coldmove.ie Main Products & Services: Controlled Storage & Distribution.

(tel) (fax) (email)

Address: Nationwide with offices in Armagh, Cork, Dublin and Limerick. Armagh: (028) 3752 6090 Tel: Cork: (021) 430 2321 Dublin: (01) 451 1915 Limerick: (061) 417 415 Email: info@cross-group.org Web: www.cross-group.org Main Products & Services: Energy management & all major types of Refrigeration and Air Conditioning systems installed & commissioned. www.crossdirect.ie offers commercial refrigeration, best prices, delivered direct with in one week of order! Dedicated Refrigeration and Air Conditioning rental business check out: www.crosshire.ie

Diamond Corrugated

Address: 12-13 Pennyburn Industrial Estate, Londonderry, Northern Ireland, BT48 OLU. Tel: (048) 7126 2957 Fax: (048) 7126 7094 Email: mail@diamondcorr.com Web: www.diamondcorr.com Main Products & Services: Corrugated, multi-point glued, litho-laminated corrugated, folding cartons.

Dollard Packaging Ltd

Address: Units 6-11, Eklad Park, Malahide Road Industrial Park, Malahide Road, Dublin 17. Tel: (01) 847 0044 Email: sales@dollard-packaging.ie Web: www.dollard-packaging.ie Main Products & Services: Print and Packaging.

Corcoran Products (Irl.) Limited

Kingsbridge House 17-22 Parkgate Street Dublin 8 Ireland

CRS Mobile Cold Storage Ltd (tel) (fax) (email)

+353-1 63 30 400 +353-1 67 93 521 info@corcoranchemicals.com

(tel) (fax) (email)

+353-1 63 30 400 +353-1 67 93 521 info@corcoranchemicals.com

Address: Carnisle, Kildalkey, Co. Meath. Tel: (046) 943 5000 Fax: (046) 943 5068 Corcoran Chemicals Limited Email: enquiry@crs.ie Kingsbridge House 17-22 Parkgate Street Web: www.crs.ie Dublin 8 Ireland Main Products & Services: Corcoran Chemicals Ltd Increase your on-site cold Address: 17 Parkgate Street,Dublin 8. storage capacity: CRS offer a Tel: (01) 633 0400 wide range of temperature Fax: (01) 679 3521 controlled storage solutions both Email: info@corcoranchemicals.com new and professionally Web: www.corcoranchemicals.com refurbished for rent and purMain Products & Services: chase. Our products include 1-58 Distributors of raw materials pallet portable cold stores and for the food, pharmaceutical, 10-106kw portable blast polymer & chemical industry. freezers. Contact: Sales 76 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

Donoghue Packaging

Address: Donpack Business Park, Bandon, Co. Cork Tel: (023) 884 2111 Fax: (023) 884 1211 Email: donpack@donpack.ie Web: www.donpack.com Main Products & Services: Heavy duty packaging products. Contact: Managing Director: Ray Donoghue


company listings DSG Packaging Ltd

Address: L2 Toughers Industrial Park, Newhall, Naas, Co. Kildare. Tel: (045) 454 900 Email: rdoyle@dsgpack.ie Web: www.dsgpack.ie Main Products & Services: Specialists in Contract Packaging, Outsourcing and “End of Line” Filling and Packaging Services.

E Elopak

Address: 67 Broomhill Road, Tallaght, Dublin 24. Tel: (01) 452 1111 Web: www.elopak.com Main Products & Services: Liquid Packaging, Milk, Soup and Juice Cartons, Packaging Machines.

Endress+Hauser Ireland Ltd

Address: Exchequer House, Embassy Office Park, Kill, Co. Kildare. Tel: (045) 989 200 Email: info@ie.endress.com Web: www.ie.endress.com Main Products & Services: Endress+Hauser are a global leader in instrumentation solutions and services for the food and beverage industry.

Ene Limited

Address: Unit 24, Scarva Road Industrial Estate, Banbridge, Co. Down. BT32 3QD Tel: +44 28 4062 2215 Email: info@eneconveyors.com Web: www.eneconveyors.com Main Products & Services: Conveyor systems and replacement belts. Contact: Belting Manager: Darren Horner

Enviroclad Systems Ltd

Address: Unit 57B, Hebron Industrial Estate, Hebron Road, Co. Kilkenny. Tel: (056) 775 2866 (056) 777 0955 Fax: Email: info@enviroclad.com Web: www.enviroclad.com Main Products & Services: Supply and Fitting of Enviroclad Hygienic Wall and Ceiling Cladding in P.V.C. for the Food Industry.

F

Festo Ltd

Address: Head Office: Unit 5, Sandyford Park, Sandyford Industrial Estate, Dublin 18. Tel: (01) 295 4955 Fax: (01) 295 5680 Email: sales_ie@festo.com Web: www.festo.com/ie Main Products & Services: Automation Technology · Industrial Automation · Electrical Automation · Process Automation Training & Consulting Food, Beverage & Packaging Expertise

Fischbein-Saxon

Address: 274 Alma Road, Enfield, Middlesex, EN3 7BB, England. Tel: (0044) 844 372 2877 Fax: (0044) 844 372 2876 Email: sales@fischbein-saxon.co.uk Web: www.fischbein.com/eastern Main Products & Services: If your business consists of ‘bagged products’, in any industry, Fischbein has a solution to fulfil your needs. From low-cost Manual sealers, semi-automated Industrial bag sealers and sewing systems and sewing consumables, to high speed fully automated bagging and palletizing solutions. With finance available at cost effective rates, companies can invest in technology now, enabling them to produce their products faster, neater and with lower labour costs, within minimal initial financial outlay. Contact: Sales & Services Manager: Barry Cox

Fisher Scientific Address: Suite 6, Plaza 212, Blanchardstown, Corporate Park, Ballycoolin, Dublin 15, DI5VY66. Tel: (01) 885 5854 Fax: (01) 899 1855 Email: fsie.sales@thermofisher.com Web: www.ie.fishersci.com Business: Laboratory supplies, Chemicals, Consumables, Reagents, Equipment & Instruments. Contact: Commercial Product Manager: Gerry Fitzmaurice

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19 | 77


company listings

G

H Healy Group

Greiner Packaging Ltd

Glanbia Ireland

Address: Ballyragget, Co. Kilkenny. (056) 8836346 Tel: Email: jennygraham@glanbia.ie Web: www.glanbiaingredientsireland.com Main Products & Services: Dairy ingredients Contact: Marketing Communications Manager: Jenny Graham

Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd

Address: Well Road, Nenagh, Co. Tipperary. Tel: (067) 37893 Fax: (067) 34794 Email: info@goliath.ie Web: www.goliath.ie Main Products & Services: Supply & installation of End of Line Automation Systems, Materials Handling Equipment & Industrial Washing Machinery.

Great Northern Distillery

Address: Carrick Road, Dundalk, Co. Louth, Ireland. Tel: 042-9429005 Email: office@gndireland.com Web: www.gndireland.com Main Products & Services: Suppliers of bulk Irish Whiskey & Gin Contact: John Lynch

78 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

Address: Killyman Road Industrial Estate, Dungannon, County Tyrone, BT 71 6LN. Northern Ireland. Tel: (0044) 28 8772 3131 Fax: (0044) 28 8772 7318 Email: Sales.Dungannon@greiner-gpi.com Web: www.greiner-gpi.com Contact: Sales Director: Oliver Murphy Sales Manager: Philip Hogan

GS1 Ireland

Address: Second Floor, The Merrion Centre, Nutley Lane, Donnybrook, Dublin 4. Tel: (01) 208 0660 Fax: (01) 208 0670 Email: info@gs1ie.org Web: www.gs1ie.org Main Products & Services: Global Supply Chain Standards Body. Barcode Numbers, Barcode Manager Tool, Barcode Symbols, EDI Message Standards, Data Synchronisation Catalogue (GDSN), EPC/RFID, Traceability Standards, fTrace, Barcode and EDI Message Verification, Advisory and Training Services. Contact: Chairman: Thomas Shortall (Kerry Group) Vice Chairman: Pat Tracey (DCC Vital) Chief Executive Officer: Mike Byrne

Address: HCL House,Second Avenue, Cookstown Industrial Estate, Tallaght, Dublin 24. D24 XDR5 Tel: +353 (0)1404 9200 Fax: +353 (0)1404 9201 Email: info@healy-group.com Web: www.healy-group.com Main Products & Services: Healy Group are a solutions-driven agent and distributor, supplying high-quality food ingredients, chemicals, nutraceuticals and raw materials. We are committed to providing an excellent range of products and unrivalled technical support to all of our customers. From beverages to bakery, pharmaceuticals to cosmetics, our customers can depend on the collective experience and expertise of our dedicated team.

Heterochem (Dist.) Ltd

Address: Unit 49, Baldoyle Industrial Estate, Dublin D13 H2N2 Tel: (01) 839 3127 Fax: (01) 832 5746 Email: info@heterochem.com Web: www.heterochem.com Main Products & Services: Acidulants, Antifoams, Antioxidants, Emulsifiers, Flavours, Colorants, Preservatives, Starches, Sweeteners. Contact: Account Managers: Lara Fearon (lara@heterochem.com), Noelle Shannon (noelle@heterochem.com), Paul Byrne (paul@heterochem.com).


company listings HH SOLUTIONS

Address: 12 Ritaville, Old Cork Road, Limerick. Tel: (061) 603 742 Email: info@hhsolutions.ie Web: www.hhsolutions.ie Main Products & Services: Food Probes & Data Services: Loggers & Wireless Monitoring Systems. Irish agents for Eltex of Sweden & Comark Ltd. Contact: Sales Manager: Garry Tuite

I ICDS Recruitment Consultants

Address: 24 Upper Fitzwilliam Street, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 632 1200 (01) 676 2292 Fax: Email: info@icds.ie Web: www.icds.ie Main Products & Services: Recruitment Consultants Contact: Recruitment Director: Anthony McLoughlin

Industrial Packaging Ltd

Address: Killarney Road, Bray, Co.Wicklow. Tel: (01) 286 4010 Fax: (01) 286 4015 Email: sales@industrialpackaging.ie Web: www.industrialpackaging.ie

Innovate Food Technology

Address: 2nd Floor, 6 South William Street, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 707 9856 Fax: (01) 707 9661 Email: info@innovatesolutions.ie Web: www.innovatesolutions.ie Main Products & Services: Food recruitment, software, food consumer research.

Irish Exporters Association

Address: 28 Merrion Square, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 661 2182 Email: iea@irishexporters.ie Web: www.irishexporters.ie Main Products & Services: Food and Drink Export Ireland, a division of the IEA, provides assistance to Irish food and drink companies in the home market and to increase their sales abroad.

Irish Lift Trucks

Address: Clonlara Avenue, Baldonnell Business Park, Baldonnell, Dublin 22. (01) 403 4100 Tel: Fax: (01) 403 4183 Email: info@irishlifttrucks.ie Web: www.irishlifttrucks.ie Main Products & Services: Materials Handling Equipment/Forklifts. Contact: Conal McCourt / Wayne Uzell

Irish National Accreditation Board

Address: Wilton Park House, Wilton Place, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 607 3003 Email: inab@inab.ie Web: www.inab.ie

J

K David Kellett & Partners Ltd

Address: Maple Court, Wormbridge House, Wormbridge, Hereford, HR2 9DH. (0044) 1981 570 611 Tel: Email: davidkellett@davidkellett.co.uk Main Products & Services: Dairy Engineering, Filtration Systems/Membranes, RO, UO, UF & MF. Osmosis®, Ultra Filtration and Micro Filtration, Effluent Treatment, Spiral Wound and Plate & Frame, Cheese Maturing Vacuum Pouches. Contact: Managing Director: David Kellett

Kevin Woods Machinery Limited

JMC Packaging Ltd

Address: 37 Seagoe Industrial Estate, Craigavon, Co. Armagh, BT63 5QE. Tel: 028 3839 1723 Mobile: +353 86 0234177 Email: jgovender@jmcpackaging.co.uk Web: www.jmcpackaging.co.uk Main Products & Services: Specialists in packaging materials and equipment. Shrink wrap equipment, tray sealing equipment, automatic label applications, automatic stretch wrappers, checkweighing & metal detections, polyolefin shrink film, smoothwall foil trays, soft fruit punnets, food grade stretch film & lidding film and meat & poultry trays.

Johnston Logistics Ltd

Address: Blackchurch Business Park, Rathcoole, Co. Dublin. Tel: (01) 401 3333 Fax: (01) 458 8015 Email: info@jol.ie Web: www.johnstonlogistics.ie Main Products & Services: Warehousing & Logistics.

Address: The Inch, Balbriggan, Co. Dublin, Ireland. Tel: 086 859 5532 / 086 170 8791 Web: www.kevinwoodsmachinery.ie Main Products & Services: Suppliers of machinery and service to the processing and packaging sector.

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FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19 | 79


pany

Listings

company listings

Kiernan’s Food Ingredients Ltd

Address: Unit 8 Steadfast Industrial Estate, Carrickmacross, Co. Monaghan. Tel: (042) 966 2096 Fax: (042) 966 3954 Email: info@kiernans.ie Web: www.kiernans.ie Main Products & Services: Food ingredients Contact: James Kiernan/Martin Kiernan

Contact: Mike Boland

LINPAC Allibert

Manotherm Ltd Address: 17 Ridgeway,

Address: Great Western Street, Wednesbury, West Midlands, WS10 7LL United Kingdom. Tel: (0044) 121 505 9970 Email: katherinenowill@kuka-robotics.co.uk Web: www.kuka.com Main Products & Services: Robotics & Automation Contact: General Sales Manager - Ireland: Brian Cooney

Address: 4 Walkinstown Road, Quinton Business Park, Dublin D12 RP83 Bimingham, B32 1AF, Tel: (01) 452United Kingdom. 2355 Fax: (01) 451 6919 Telephone: (0044) 1606 56 1929 Email: Fax: info@manotherm.ie (0044) 1606 56 1998 Email: brendan.mcgarry@linpac.com Web: www.manotherm.ie Web: www.linpacallibert.com Main Products & Services: Distributor of Plastic Materials Handling Main Products/ process instrumentation Services: Products - Boxes, Bins, and controls. Trays, Pallets etc. Contact: Managing Director: Contact: Sales Manager, Ireland: Robert V. Gilbert & Project DirectorBrendan McGarry 087 676 7161 Sales Engineer: Robert C. Gilbert

L Label One Ltd

Address: 3 Advantage Way, Ballygomartin Industrial Estate, Ballygomartin Road, Belfast BT13 3LZ. Tel: (048) 9077 7444 Fax: (048) 9077 4067 Email: info@labelone.ie Web: www.labelone.ie Main Products & Services: Self-adhesive labels, extended content leaflet labels

80 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

Address: Enterprise House, George Cayley Drive, Clifton Moor, York, YO30 4XE. Telephone: (0044) 1904 692 333 Fax: (0044) 1904 690 728 Email: salesonweb@logopak.net Web: www.logopakprintandapply.co.uk Main Products/ Print & Apply Services: Labelling Systems, software solutions, Measom Freer & Co. Ltd labels & ribbons. Address: 37/41 Chartwell Drive, Wigston, Contact: General Manager: Leicester, LE18 2FL, Wilson Clark England.

Tel: (0044) 116 288 1588 (0044) 116 281 3000 Fax: MEmail: sales@measomfreer.co.uk Web: www.measomfreer.co.uk Manotherm Ltd& Services: Main Products Limerick Packaging Limerick Packaging Address: 4 Walkinstown Road, Measom Freer manufacture and Address: Park, Dublin 12. Address: Eastlink Business Eastlink Business Park, stock quality plastic bottles, Ballysimon Road, Limerick. custom moulded bottles, Telephone: (01) 452 2355 Ballysimon Road, Tel: (061) 400Co. Limerick. 035 dropper caps, scoops, measures, Fax: (01) 451 6919 (061) 400 036 Fax: boxes, jars, tubes, fasteners etc, Email: info@manotherm.ie Telephone: (061) 400 035 Email: use. Services include 3D for food Website: www.manotherm.ie Fax: info@lmkpkg.ie (061) 400 036 design, in-house tool making and Web: www.limerickpackaging.ie Main Products/ Distributors of Email: info@lmkpkg.ie screen printing. Main Products & Services: Services: controls & Web: www.limerickpackaging.ie Corrugated Main Products/ Boxes, Polythene instrumentation. Corrugated Boxes, Bags, Edgeguards, Palletwrap, Services: Polythene Bags, Contact: Managing Director: Strapping, Tapes. R.V. Gilbert Edgeguards, Palletwrap, Contact: Mike Boland Director & Project Strapping, Tapes.

M Kuka Robotics

LogoPak International Ltd

Estate, Ballygomartin Road, Belfast BT13 3LZ. Telephone: (048) 9077 7444 Fax: (048) 9077 4067 Email: info@labelone.ie Web: www.labelone.ie Main Products/ Self-adhesive labels, Services: extended content leaflet labels. Contact: Sales Manager, ROI: Chris Moore 087 252 3335

Matheson

37_48 company_listing.indd 8

Address: 70 Sir John Rogersons Quay, Dublin 2, Ireland. Tel: 00 353 1 232 2000 Email: louise.tolerton@matheson.com Web: www.matheson.com Main Products & Services: Legal Services Contact: Marketing Manager: Louise Tolerton

Sales Engineer: Robert C. Gilbert

Mid Cork Pallets & Packaging Ltd

Measom Freer & Co. Ltd Address: Clondrohid, Macroom,

Address: 37/41 Chartwell Drive, Co. Cork. Wigston, Leicester, Oranstown, Dunboyne, Co. LE18 2FL, Meath. Tel: England. (026) 41311 (01) 825 2059 Telephone: (0044) 116 288 1588 Email: sales@midcorkpallets.com Fax: (0044) 116 281 3000 Web: www.midcorkpallets.com Email: sales@measomfreer.co.uk Main Products & Services: Web: www.measomfreer.co.uk Established in 1978, Mid Cork Main Products/ Measom Freer Pallets & Packaging is one of Services: the manufacture and stock leading manufacturers of quality plastic bottles, pallets in Ireland. We custom moulded bottles, also provide a flexible stock and dropper caps, scoops, serve service for our growing measures, boxes, jars, list of customers corrugated tubes, fasteners etc, for packaging needs. food use. Services include Operating from a 20,000 3D design, in-house square meter facility near tool making and screen Macroom in Cork and a 7,000 printing. square meter storage and

distribution centre in 4 4 f o o d i r el and Dunboyne, Co. Meath, MCP is strategically located to service the Irish market, close to all major road networks. Contact: sales@midcorkpallets.com

N

National Chemical

Address: NCC 42 Lo Stree Telephone: (01) 6 Fax: (01) 6 Email: sales@ Web: www Main Products/ Food Services: Aceti Acid, Amin Acid, Calci Carra & Ca Powd Citric and L - Syn Natu Dehy Egg P Fibre Flavo Gelat Glyce Gum Inulin Acid, Swee Bean Acid, Nitra Pectin & Pho Potas Silica’ Diace Modi Clean - Nat Tarta Whe Prote Xanth Packa HDPE IBCs bulk c acces adapt


company listings NPP Group Ltd

N National Standards Authority of Ireland (NSAI)

Address: 1 Swift Square, Northwood, Santry, Dublin 9. Tel: (01) 807 3800 Fax: (061) 332 982 Email: info@nsai.ie Web: www.nsai.ie Main Products & Services: Certification and inspection services to national & interna- tional product & management system standards including ISO 22000, ISO 9001, OHSAS and BRC Global Food Standard.

Address: Unit 509, Mitchelstown Road, Northwest Business Park, Ballycoolin, Dublin 15. (00353) (0) 1 880 9299 Tel: (00353) (0) 1 880 9298 Fax: Email: sales@npp.ie Web: www.npp.ie Main Products & Services: Flexible plastic packaging distributors. Contact: Sales Director: Eoin McDonagh

O’Brien Ingredients

Address: 11 Magna Drive, Magna Business Park, Citywest, Dublin D24 T97Y Tel: 00353 [0]1 469 1400 Fax: 00353 [0]1 469 1360 Email: ingred@obrien-ingredients.ie Web: www.obrien-ingredients.ie Main Products & Services: Supplier of ambient, frozen and chilled ingredients to Bakery, Beverage, Confectionery, Dairy, Ice Cream, Feed, Pharmaceutical, Infant Formula and Savoury sectors in Ireland. Contact: Sales Account Manager: Christopher Doyle

T.S. O’Connor & Son Ltd

Food Ingredients

NCC Food Ingredients

Address: NCC House, 42 Lower Leeson Street, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 613 1400 Fax: (01) 661 6261 Email: sales@ncc.ie Web: www.ncc.ie Main Products & Services: Food Ingredients: Acidulants,Preservatives, Biocides, Enzymes, Texturants, Hydrocolloids, Stabilizers, Antioxidants, Carriers, Binders, Gelling agents, Fibres, Sweeteners (natural & high intensity), Amino Acids, Colours, Fats & Oils, Starches, Texturizers, Clean Label ingredients, Other general ingredients. Ingredients Sourcing: NCC Food Ingredients has many years of expertise in the sales, marketing and distribution of speciality ingredients and commodities from global producers. NCC’s award winning service assists clients to innovate and become more cost efficient, we do this by sharing our expertise in research based smart sourcing solutions and supply chain management. Contact: Product Manager: Fintan McConnell (fmcconnell@ncc.ie)

Nutrition Supplies

Address: Innishannon, Co. Cork. Tel: (021) 477 5522 Fax: (021) 477 5449 Email: ursula.lecane@nutritionsupplies.ie Web: www.nutritionsupplies.ie Main Products & Services: Vitamin & Nutrient Precision Premixes.

O

Obeeco Ltd

Address: Annaville Avenue, Blackrock, Co. Dublin. Tel: (01) 278 2323 Fax: (01) 278 2374 Email: sales@obeeco.ie Web: www.obeeco.ie Main Products & Services: Packaging Processing and Automation Machinery. Coding and Printing Solutions and Materials. Contact: Sales Director: Richard Burke Managing Director: Olive Walker

Address: Unit C, 67 Heather Road, Sandyford Industrial Estate, Dublin 18. Tel: (01) 295 5696 Fax: (01) 295 5741 Email: andrew@bags.ie Web: www.bags.ie Main Products & Services: Printed Carrier Bags, Tapes, Labels & Flexible Packaging. Contact: Sales Manager: Andrew Haughton

Ornua

Address: Grattan House, Mount Street Lower, Dublin 2. Tel: +353 1 661 9599 Fax: +353 1 661 2778 Email: communications@ornua.com Web: www.ornua.com Main Products & Services: Ireland’s largest exporter of dairy products

P Packex Industries Ltd

Address: Unit 1, Village Mills Business Park, Rathnew, Co. Wicklow. Tel: (0404) 69 851 Fax: (0404) 69 861 Email: sales@packex.ie Main Products & Services: High quality flexible packaging. Contact: Ivan Cruise FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19 | 81


company listings P.C. Packaging Ltd

Address: Derrynane House, Eadestown, Naas, Co. Kildare. Tel: (045) 883 510 Fax: (045) 880 934 Email: philip@pcpackaging.ie Web: www.pcpackaging.ie Main Products & Services: Packaging machinery/ shrink films, flexible packaging, Belca range of shrink wrappers, Ilapak flow wrapping, Sovereign labelling systems, Sick sensors.

Pharmafoods Ltd

Address: Lower Waterford Road, Carrickbeg, Carrick-on-Suir, Co. Tipperary. Tel: (051) 645 066/645 084 Fax: (051) 645 033 Email: info@pharmafoods.net Web: www.pharmafoods.net Main Products & Services: Bilwinco Multihead Weighers, Mondini Tray Sealers Vacuum and Gas, Limitech Liquid Processing Equipment, Rovema Vertical Form Fill Sealers, Cartoning, Bag In Box, Abtech Premade Pouch Production for Tuna in Foil.

Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd

Puratos Crest Foods Ltd

Address: 70 - 71 Dunboyne Business Park, Dunboyne, Co. Meath. Tel: (01) 825 5505 (01) 825 5506 Fax: Email: info_ireland@puratos.com Web: www.puratos.com Main Products & Services: Bakery, patisserie and chocolate ingredients. Belcolade Belgian chocolate, Puratos bakery & patisserie products, PatisFrance premium patisserie ingredients. Contact: General Manager: Sean McDaid www.linkedin.com/in/seanmcdaidgm Puratos’ Virtual Innovation Center www.poppr.be/virtualtour/puratos_innovationcenter/

Q Q-Lab Ltd

Address: PO Box 27, Kerlogue Industrial Estate, Drinagh, Co. Wexford. Tel: (053) 914 5600 Fax: (053) 918 4575 Email: info@qlab.ie Web: www.qlab.ie Main Products & Services: Microbiological & chemical analysis of food, water & environmental samples.

PK Chemicals Ltd

Address: Unit 23, Sandyford Office Park, Blackthorn Avenue, Sandyford Industrial Estate, Foxrock, Dublin 18. Tel: (01) 295 6977 Fax: (01) 295 8338 Email: graeme@pkchemicals.com Main Products & Services: Food Ingredients, Flavours and Colours. Contact: General Manager: Graeme Locke 82 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

QPM Ltd

Address: Unit 12, Robinhood Business Park, Robinhood Road, Dublin 22. Tel: (01) 450 2421 Email: anevin@qpm.ie Web: www.qpm.ie Main Products & Services: X-ray inspection, Metal detection, checkweighing, Scales, Temperature Probes, Data Loggers, pH Meters, Gas Analysis, Magnetic Separators, Service & Calibration. Contact: Andy Nevin

Address: St Brendan’s Road, Portumna, Co. Galway, H53 HX51 Tel: (090) 97 41148 (090) 97 41459 Fax: Email: sales@quitmannoneill.com Web: www.qonpack.com Main Products & Services: Stockist and Distributors of Packaging Contact: General Manager: David O’Neill

R Rentokil Pest Control

Nationwide Coverage Tel: 1890 869 869 Fax: (045) 852 890 Email: pestcontrolinfo@rentokil.ie Web: www.rentokil.ie Main Products & Services: Suppliers of Pest Control to ISO 9001:2008 specification. Contact: Pest Control: Michael O’Mahoney

Repak Ltd

Address: Red Cow Interchange Estate, 1 Ballymount Road, Clondalkin, Dublin 22. Tel: (01) 467 0190 Fax: (01) 403 0929 Email: info@repak.ie Web: www.repak.ie Main Products & Services: Repak is Ireland’s only government-approved packaging compliance scheme, licensed by the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment. Repak was set up in 1997 in accordance with EU Packaging Regulations. Repak is a not for profit organisation that has over 2,300 members. Repak members


company listings

subsidise the collection and recovery of waste packaging through registered recovery operators across Ireland. Since 1997, Repak’s members have contributed €425m to the recycling industry and diverted over 10m tonnes of packaging waste from landfill. There are many benefits to becoming a Repak member, including access to its Prevent & Save programme which can cut packaging waste at source and save your business money.

S safe food

Address: 7 Eastgate Avenue, Eastgate, Little Island, Co. Cork T45 RX01 Tel: 021 230 4100 Fax: 021 230 4111 Email: info@safefood.eu Web: www.safefood.eu Main Products & Services: safefood is the all island public agency promoting food safety and healthy eating to consumers through education and awareness campaigns. It also acts as an independent source of scientific advice, commissions and funds relevant research, co-ordinates scientific co-operation and facilitates knowledge exchange among those working in the food sector and other key stakeholders.

Sealed Air Ltd

SAI Global

Address: Block 3, Quayside Business Park, Mill St, Dundalk, Co. Louth. Tel: 042 932 0912 Email: information@saiglobal.com Web: www.saiglobal.com Main Products & Services: Food Safety certification, BRC Certification, GFSI Scheme Certification, Environmental Management, Quality Management Systems, Supply Chain Management, Aquaculture Services, Fishery Services, Compliance Solutions, Risk Management. Contact: Operations manager: Bill Patterson

Saica Pack Ireland

Address: Ashbourne Industrial Estate, Ashbourne, Co. Meath. Tel: (01) 801 0400 Fax: (01) 835 1249 Email: michael.shaw@saica.com Web: www.saica.com Contact: Regional Sales Director, Ireland: Michael Shaw

Schütz (Ireland) Ltd

Address: Townmore, Killala, Co. Mayo Tel: (096) 33044 Fax: (096) 33045 Email: info1ireland@schuetz.net Web: www.schuetz.net Main Products & Services: Manufacturer of IBCs and PE Drums.

Address: Clifton House, 1 Marston Road, St. Neots, Cambridgeshire PE19 2HN. Tel: (0044) 148 022 4000 (0044) 148 022 4063 Fax: Email: cryovac.ukmkt@sealedair.com Web: www.sealedair.com Main Products & Services: Cryovac® Packaging Solutions, including films, barrier bags, rigid trays, punnets and pots. Diversey Hygiene Solutions including detergents, disinfectants, dosing equipment and energy and water management solutions. Contact: Timothy O’Connell Mobile: 086 225 3172

Smurfit Kappa Ireland

Address: Ballymount Road, Walkinstown, Dublin 12. Tel: (01) 409 0000 (01) 456 4509 Fax: Email: info@smurfitkappa.ie Web: www.smurfitkappa.ie www.skpackaging.ie www.smurfitkappadirect.ie Main Products & Services: Ireland’s leading manufacturer of packaging and point of purchase displays, with a wide product range to suit the needs of the food industry. Standard packaging & promotional products can now be bought on-line via our webshop at www.smurfitkappadirect.ie

Stone Food Machinery Ltd

Address: 14 North Main Street, Wexford. Tel: (053) 914 7800 Fax: (053) 914 7799 Email: info@stonefoodmachinery.com Web: www.stonefoodmachinery.com Main Products & Services: MEVA Inlet Screens- Penstocks- Gunther Pickle Injectors & Tumblers- Industrial Cleaning Machines

Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland

Address: Wilton Park House, Wilton Place, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 808 2100 Fax: (01) 808 2002 Email: info@sei.ie Web: www.sei.ie Contact: Head, Energy Demand Management: Kevin O’Rourke Declan Healey FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19 | 83


company listings Syspal

Address: Cockshutt Lane, Broseley, Shropshire, TF12 5JA, England. (0044) 1952 883188 Tel: (0044) 1952 884 093 Fax: Email: sales@syspal.com Web: www.syspal.com Main Products & Services: Manufacturers of stainless steel and aluminium products, specifically designed for regulations within the food industry. Contact: Nicky Davies

Tekpak Automation Ltd

Address: Whitemill Industrial Estate, Wexford, Ireland. (053) 916 3033 Tel: Email: jkehoe@tekpak.ie The Packaging Centre Ltd Web: www.tekpak.ie For all your packaging needs Main Products & Services: Fox & Geese House, Naas Road, Dublin 22. guided TPC Vision Tel: 01 450 8759 pick ~ Fax: 01 450 7567 www.thepackagingcentre.ie and place robots, product Contact: John Kehoe

The Packaging Centre Ltd For all your packaging needs

T Teagasc Food Research Programme

Moorepark and Ashtown Address: Cork: Moorepark, Fermoy, Co. Cork. Dublin: Ashtown, Dublin 15. Tel: (025) 42 222 / (01) 805 9500 Email: mark.fenelon@teagasc.ie / declan.troy@teagasc.ie Web: www.teagasc.ie Main Products & Services: Research, development and innovation, food bioscience, food safety, food chemistry and technology, food industry development, pilot plant facilities, analytical services, training, consultancy. Contact: Mark Fenelon, Declan Troy.

TPC

Fox & Geese House, Naas Road, Dublin 22. Tel: 01 450 8759 ~ Fax: 01 450 7567 www.thepackagingcentre.ie

The Packaging Centre

Address: Fox & Geese House, Naas Road, Dublin 22. Tel: (01) 450 8759 Fax: (01) 450 7567 Email: sales@thepackagingcentre.ie Web: www.thepackagingcentre.ie Contact: Managing Director, Ivan Powell

Pantone 2935 UCC - Food Institute

Address: 3rd Floor, Food Science Building University College Cork, Cork. (021) 490 3810 Tel: Email: infofoodinstitute@ucc.ie Main Products & Services: Education, research, continuing Cyan: 100 education Magenta: 50 & training.

CMYK

UCC - School of Food and Nutritional Sciences

Address: Room 242, Food Science Building, University College Cork, Cork. Tel: (021) 490 3393 Email: foodandnutrition@ucc.ie Web: www.ucc.ie/en/fns/ Main Products & Services: Education, research, continuing education & training.

UCC - Department of Food Business and Development

Toyota Material Handling Ireland

Address: Killeen Road, Dublin 12. Tel: (01) 419 0200 Fax: (01) 419 0325 Email: materialhandling@toyota.ie Web: www.toyota-forklifts.ie Main Products & Services: Toyota forklifts and BT warehouse equipment. Diesel/LPG and electric forklifts, powerpallet trucks, stackers etc.

Trilby Trading Ltd

Address: Boyne House, Boyne Business Park, Greenhills, Drogheda, Co. Louth. Tel: (041) 983 2137 Fax: (041) 983 5463 Email: sales@trilbytrading.ie Main Products & Services: Food Grade Vegetable Oils. Contact: sales@trilbytrading.ie 84 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

U

Address: O’Rahilly Building, University College Cork, Cork. Tel: (021) 490 2570 Email: foodbusiness@ucc.ie Web: www.ucc.ie/en/foodbus/ Main Products & Services: Education, research, continuing education & training.

UCC - Food Industry Training Unit

Address: Food Science Building, University College Cork, Cork. Tel: (021) 490 3363 Email: m.mccarthybuckley@ucc.ie Web: www.ucc.ie/en/fitu Main Products & Services: Education, research, continuing education & training.

UCD - School Of Agriculture and Food Science Address: UCD Agriculture and Food Science Centre, UCD, Belfield, Dublin 4. Undergraduate Programmes:


company listings

V

Value Stream Machinery Ltd

Address: The Mount, 2 Woodstock Link, Belfast, BT6 8DD Tel: 0044 28 90730153 Email: info@valuestreammachinery.com Web: valuestreammachinery.com Main Products & Services: Machinery Supply & Installation, Condition Monitoring, Contractor Services. Contact: Director: Richard Stewart-Maunder

Versatile Packaging Ltd

Address: Silverstream Business Park, Silverstream, Co. Monaghan. Tel: (047) 85 177 Fax: (047) 85 199 Email: info@versatilepackaging.ie Web: www.versatilepackaging.ie Main Products & Services: Food Packaging Materials and Equipment - Tray Sealers, CPET, Barrier, Antifog Films, Aluminium Trays, Stand Up Pouches, Vacuum Pouches, Pouch Filling & Sealing Equipment.

W

Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd

Address: Kilcannon Industrial Estate, Old Dublin Road, Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford. Tel: (053) 923 3778 Fax: (053) 923 3284 Email: sales@weberireland.com Web: www.webermarking.ie Main Products & Services: Print & Apply Labelling Systems, Desktop Printers, Laser Coders. Manufacturers of Blank& Pre Printed Labels.

D.D. Williamson (Ireland) Ltd

Address: Little Island Industrial Estate, Little Island, Co. Cork. Tel: (021) 435 3821 Fax: (021) 435 4328 Email: info@ddwmson.com Web: www.ddwilliamson.com Main Products & Services: Caramel colours, natural colours, burnt sugars, natural colour blends, liquids & powders.

www.foodirelanddirectory.com

UCD Agricultural Science and Veterinary Medicine programme Office UCD Agriculture and Food Science Centre. Tel: (01) 716 7194 Email: agandfoodprogrammes@ucd.ie Web: www.ucd.ie/agfood Postgraduate Programmes: UCD School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine UCD Veterinary Sciences Centre. Tel: (01) 716 6100 Email: agfoodvet@ucd.ie Web: www.ucd.ie/agfoodvet

WrenTech Ltd

Address: Eversley, Church Bay Road, Crosshaven, Co. Cork. Tel: (021) 483 2644 Fax: (021) 483 1363 Email: smurray@wrentech.ie/ mwren@wrentech.ie Web: www.wrentech.ie Main Products & Services: Ytron & Matcon Mixing & Blending, Powder Dispersion / Incorporation, Dust free transfer batch sytems, Powder bins / Silo discharging, Auger filling, Dosing,Formulation,Batching, Flexibatch. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19 | 85


relevant organisations

relevant

Organisations AN BORD PLEANÁLA

64 Marlborough Street, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-858 8100 Lo-call: 1890 275 175 Email: bord@pleanala.ie Web: www.pleanala.ie

BORD BIA

Clanwilliam Court, Lower Mount Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-668 5155 Email: info@bordbia.ie Web: www.bordbia.ie

BORD GÁIS ENERGY

1 Warrington Place, Dublin 2. Tel: 1850 632 632 Emergency: 1850 205 050 Email: info@bordgais.ie Web: www.bordgaisenergy.ie

BORD IASCAIGH MHARA

(Irish Sea Fisheries Board) BIM Dun Laoghaire, Crofton Road, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. Tel: 01-214 4100 Email: info@bim.ie Web: www.bim.ie

COMPETITION AND CONSUMER PROTECTION COMMISSION Bloom House, PO. Box 12585, Dublin 1. Tel: 1890 432 432 Web: www.consumerhelp.ie

CONSUMERS’ASSOCIATION OF IRELAND 120/121 Baggot Street Lower, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-659 9430 Email: cai@thecai.ie Web: www.thecai.ie

86 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19

DRINKS INDUSTRY GROUP OF IRELAND (DIGI) 50 Upper Mount Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-637 1777 Web: www.drinksindustry.ie

ENTERPRISE IRELAND

The Plaza, Eastpoint Business Park, Dublin 3. Tel: 01-727 2000 Email: client.service@enterpriseireland.com Web: www.enterprise-ireland.com

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH ASSOC. OF IRELAND

Heraghty House, 4 Carlton Terrace, Novara Avenue, Bray, Co. Wicklow. Tel: 01-276 1211 Email: info@ehoa.ie Web: www.ehai.ie

EUROPEAN COMMISSION IN IRELAND

Europe House, 12-14 Lower Mount Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-634 1111 Email: eu-ie-info-request@ec.europa.eu Web: www.euireland.ie

EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT

EXPERIAN IRELAND LTD Newenham House, Northern Cross, Ground Floor, Malahide Road, Dublin 17. Tel: 01-846 9200 Email: info@experian.ie Web: www.experian.ie

FOOD DRINK IRELAND (FDI) Confederation House, 84-86 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-605 1500 Email: info@fooddrinkireland.ie Web: www.fooddrinkireland.ie

FOOD PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT CENTRE Dublin Institute of Technology, Cathal Brugha Street, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-814 6080 Email: fpdc@dit.ie Web: www.fpdc.dit.ie

FOOD SAFETY AUTHORITY OF IRELAND

The Exchange, George’s Dock, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-817 1300 Lo-call: 1890 336 677 Email: info@fsai.ie Web: www.fsai.ie

European House, 12-14 Lower Mount Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-605 7900 Email: epdublin@ep.europa.eu Web: www.europarl.ie

GUARANTEED IRISH LTD

EXCELLENCE IRELAND

The Metropolitan Building, James Joyce Street, Dublin 1. Lo-call: 1890 289 389 Email: wcu@hsa.ie Web: www.hsa.ie

68 Pembroke Road, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4. Tel: 01-660 4100 Email: info@eiqa.com Web: www.qmark.ie

1 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-661 2607 Email: info@guaranteedirish.ie Web: www.guaranteedirish.ie

HEALTH & SAFETY AUTHORITY


relevant organisations INVESTMENT DEVELOPMENT AGENCY (IDA) Wilton Park House, Wilton Place, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-603 4000 Email: idaireland@ida.ie Web: www.idaireland.com

IRISH BUSINESS & EMPLOYERS CONFEDERIATION (IBEC) Head Office, Confederation House, 84-86 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-605 1500 Email: info@ibec.ie Web: www.ibec.ie

IRISH SECURITY INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION Chase House, City Junction Business Park, Northern Cross, Malahide Road, Dublin 17. Tel: 01-484 7206 Email: info@isia.ie Web: www.isia.ie

IRISH SMALL AND MEDIUM ENTERPRISES ASSOCIATION (ISME) 17 Kildare Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-662 2755 Email: info@isme.ie Web: www.isme.ie

MANDATE

O’Lehane House, 9 Cavendish Row, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-874 6321 Email: news@mandate.ie Web: www.mandate.ie

NATIONAL DAIRY COUNCIL The Studio, 55C, Maple Avenue, Stillorgan, Co. Dublin. Tel: 01-290 2451 Email: info@ndc.ie Web: www.ndc.ie

THE PRIVATE SECURITY AUTHORITY Davis Street, Tipperary Town, Co. Tipperary. Tel: 062-32600 Email: info@psa.gov.ie Web: www.psa.gov.ie

REVENUE COMMISSIONERS Head Office, Dublin Castle, Dame Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-647 5000 Web: www.revenue.ie

RGDATA

Mentec House, Pottery Road, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. Tel: 01-288 7584 Email: rgdata@rgdata.ie Web: www.rgdata.ie

SMALL FIRMS ASSOCIATION (IBEC) 84-86 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-605 1500 Email: info@sfa.ie Web: www.sfa.ie

TEAGASC FOOD RESEARCH CENTRE Ashtown, Dublin 15. Tel: 01-805 9500 Email: info@teagasc.ie Web: www.teagasc.ie

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES, C/O NSAI 1 Swift Square, Northwood, Santry, Dublin 9. Tel: 01-807 3800 Email: info@nsai.ie Web: www.nsai.ie

WORKPLACE RELATIONS COMMISSION

O’Brien Road, Carlow, R93 W7W2 Tel: (059) 917 8990 Web: www.workplacerelations.ie

Government Departments: AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND THE MARINE

Agriculture House, Kildare Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-607 2000 Lo-call: 1890 200 510 Email: firstname.surname@agriculture.gov.ie Web: www.agriculture.gov.ie

BUSINESS, ENTERPRISE & INNOVATION 23 Kildare Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-631 2121 Lo-Call: 1890 220 222 Email: info@dbei.gov.ie Web: www.djei.ie

COLLECTOR GENERAL’S OFFICE VAT/PAYE/PRSI Sarsfield House, Francis Street, Limerick. Lo-call: 1890 203 070 Email: cgcustserv@revenue.ie Web: www.revenue.ie

COMPANIES REGISTRATION OFFICE

Bloom House, Gloucester Place Lower, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-804 5200 Lo-call: 1890 220 226 Email: info@cro.ie Web: www.cro.ie

CUSTOMS PROCEDURES BRANCH

St. Conlons Road, Nenagh, Co. Tipperary. Tel: 067 63370 Email: tarclass@revenue.ie Web: www.revenue.ie

EMPLOYMENT AFFAIRS AND SOCIAL PROTECTION Aras Mhic Dhiarmada, Store Street, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-704 3000 Email: info@welfare.ie Web: www.welfare.ie

FINANCE

Government Buildings, Upper Merrion Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-676 7571 Lo-call: 1890 661 010 Email: webmaster@finance.gov.ie Web: www.finance.gov.ie

HOUSING, PLANNING, AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT Custom House, Custom House Quay, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-888 2000 Lo-call: 1890 202 021 Email: qcsofficer@housing.gov.ie Web: www.housing.gov.ie

JUSTICE AND EQUALITY

51 St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-602 8202 Lo-call: 1890 221 227 Email: foi@justice.ie Web: www.justice.ie

VALUATION OFFICE

Block 2, Irish Life Centre, Lower Abbey Street, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-817 1000 Email: info@valoff.ie Web: www.valoff.ie FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2018/19 | 87


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