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THE COMPLETE RESOURCE FOR LIVING, WORKING, PLAYING AND GETTING INVOLVED

Reston Association Publication | 2011 Winter Edition | www.reston.org

Reston Station Giving Hope

William J. Conklin RA Programs and Events

INSIDE LIVE

How you can help our homeless neighbors.

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WORK

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Advance your career at Marymount in Reston.

PLAY

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Join Robert Hershorn on his search for the "finer things."

GET INVOLVED

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What happens to those coins you toss in the Mercury Fountain at Town Center?


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CONTENT 2011 WINTER EDITION | VOLUME 2 | NUMBER 4

PERSPECTIVES

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Giving Hope BY JANET REMS Three Reston moms launched a foundation that helps needy families, kids and local non-profits. What began as an idea to "have fun with a purpose" provides major assistance to other non-profits.

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Reston Station

Get a bird's eye view of the construction site.

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William J. Conklin BY SHELLEY S. MASTRAN AND CHERYL TERIO-SIMON

You may never have heard of him, but when you visit Reston or the U.S. Navy Memorial in Washington, D.C., you are encountering the design work of William Conklin.

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The Reston Timeline Women of the Senate History Lessons of Freedom in Our Backyard Help End Homelessness Thank You and Farewell But I’m Not Going Anywhere Sustainable Reston

ON THE STREET

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Story Can Change the World... Legal Tender Care Bow Tie Cinemas

AROUND RESTON

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The Finer Things Marymount University’s Reston Center Tree Pruning vs. Tree Topping When Snow Falls in Reston... A Taste of the German Tradition

On The Cover: The former park-n-ride lot at Wiehle Avenue is transformed into an active construction site as work on the parking garage for the new Reston Station takes shape behind the construction fence. Take a tour with photographer David Madison, www.davidmadisonphotography.com. He serves private and commercial clients,m including Volkswagen and the DNC.

Follow Reston Association on

WWW.RESTON.ORG | WINTER EDITION 2011

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COME PLAY IN RESTON

®

The Complete Resource for Living, Working, Playing and Getting Involved

Volume 2 | Number 4 VISION: Leading the model community where all can Live, Work, Play and Get Involved™. MISSION: To preserve and enhance the Reston community through

outstanding leadership, service and stewardship of our resources.

The AtoZ Guide: Follow the Colors to Your Section 60 Member Services 62 Aquatics 66 Tennis 70 Camps 72 Nature 82 Special Events

n n n n n n

GET INVOLVED

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Volunteer Opportunities

LIVING IN RESTON

90 Understanding

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93 93

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Party/Shared Elements Frequently Asked Questions Party/Shared Elements Helpful Guide for Single Family Homeowners Did You Know… Please Be Prepared, Winter Is Here Winter Word Find

BOARD & GOVERNANCE

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Board of Directors Actions Board of Directiors

DIRECTORY & FACILITIES 96 Directory & Facilities 97 Map

Reston is published quarterly by the Reston Association. Send correspondence or address changes to Reston Association at 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston, VA 20191-3404, 703-435-6530. All articles © Reston Association 2011. All rights reserved.

Advertising rates are available upon request to chris@bluehouse.us or by phone to 202-337-1892. Articles and letters to the editor may be submitted via mail to Amelia Townsend, Reston Association at 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston, VA 20191-3404, 703-435-6530. E-mail submissions may be made to Amelia@reston.org. Anonymous or incomplete information will not be published. Reston Association reserves the right to edit for length, style and clarity. Articles may be printed upon verification of authorship and availability of space.

Printed on 10% post-consumer recycled paper, using vegetablebased ink. Please recycle.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

PUBLISHER: Reston Association, Kathleen Driscoll McKee, President Board of Directors EDITORIAL: Amelia Townsend, amelia@reston.org COPY EDITORS: Jennifer O’ Connor, Kathy Bush DESIGN & PRODUCTION: Long Nguyen, long@reston.org PHOTOGRAPHER: Sean Bahrami, sean@reston.org CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS: Jim Kirby, David Madison, Charles A. Veatch, Pete Staples, Nathaniel Dickert ADVERTISING: Chris Schriever, chris@bluehouse.us Lindsay Sutton, lindsay@bluehouse.us RA CONTRIBUTORS: Arlene Whittick, Ashleigh Soloff, Barbara Beaver, Claudia Thompson-Deahl, Ha Brock, Katie Shaw, Laura Kowalski, Mary Conway, Nicki Bellezza, Patricia Greenberg, Sue Sims, Willa Whitacre, Liz Badley, Mohamed Ali COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTORS: Senator Janet Howell (D-Va.32), Delegate Ken Plum (D-Va.36), Supervisor Catherine Hudgins ( Fairfax County Board of Supervisors), Kathleen Driscoll McKee, Leila Gordon (Reston Community Center), Stu Gibson, Carol Nahorniak, Robert Hershorn, Janet Rems, Shelley S. Mastran, Cheryl Terio-Simon, Laurie Callahan, Maggie Parker

MAIN OFFICE (Member Services) 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Reston, Virginia 20191-3404 Office Hours: Monday–Friday, 8:30 a.m.–5 p.m. Extended Summer Hours: Saturdays, April 21–July 28, 9 a.m.–Noon. Phone: 703-435-6530 Fax: 703-435-6516 E-mail: member_services@reston.org ƒƒ Board & Management Services ƒƒ Administration ƒƒ Financial Services ƒƒ Human Resources ƒƒ Assessment Questions ƒƒ Parks and Recreation ƒƒ Program information, reservations and registration for all camps, aquatics, tennis, special events and facility rentals ƒƒ Pool & Tennis Pass sales HOTLINES Tennis: 703-435-6502 Ball fields: 703-435-6530 COVENANTS ADMINISTRATION Phone: 703-435-6530 Fax: 703-673-2040 E-mail: member_services@reston.org ƒƒ Design Review Board applications and design guidelines for Reston properties ƒƒ Use and maintenance of property, covenants information and complaints ƒƒ Information resource for neighborhood association operations ƒƒ Disclosure documents PARKS & RECREATION (Central Services Facility) Phone: 703-437-7658 Fax: 703-435-6555 E-mail: mikemc@reston.org ƒƒ Maintenance and facilities such as wildlife, ball fields, tot-lots, pavilions, pathways and open space (including lakes, natural areas and trees) ƒƒ Recreational Vehicle Central Park (RVCP) ƒƒ Garden Plot Program VOLUNTEERING Phone: 703-435-7986 Fax: 703-435-9481 E-mail: habrock@reston.org ƒƒ To volunteer for events and programs ƒƒ Volunteer to serve on RA’s advisory committees, which are organized to provide advice and assistance to the Board


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The Reston

Timeline

BY KATHLEEN DRISCOLL MCKEE

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f you were to draw a timeline for the major events in Reston’s history, where would you place the center of the line that marks the point at which Reston “arrived?’ How would you divide the time between our beginning as a “new town in the pastures and woodlands of Northern Virginia” and the second largest office and business area in Fairfax County? Many who moved to Reston in its first two decades mark the center of that timeline with the opening of the Dulles Toll Road in 1984. Until that time, residents had a difficult time getting most anywhere else. Although it was illegal, many people followed the Dulles Access Road through the terminal just to get places. Then the Dulles Toll Road opened. I vividly recall a day when I had to deliver something to my child’s school in Washington, D.C. You may not believe this now with our crush of traffic, but that trip on the new toll road took less than half an hour each way. Reston was finally connected to Washington D.C. But some would argue that not all the changes in Reston have been positive. More traffic and people stretch the resources and the ability of the Reston Association Board of Directors to meet the needs of the community. Some would say that Reston’s changes have forced the community into a “crisis mode.” Yes, there are challenges to change — new traffic patterns, more people competing for the same space and the same resources. To respond to

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these challenges, members of the community are working through the Reston Master Plan Special Study Task Force as well as the advisory committees of the Reston Association to anticipate and plan responses that retain the essential qualities of Reston. This is where you can become involved.

One of the unexpected gifts of living in a community that is not a town or city is the opportunity to have an active voice.

There are many, many ways to get involved in the Reston of today and tomorrow. Robert Simon’s vision and the adherence to his seven goals by successions of leaders have made this one of the most successful communities ever. We would all agree that Reston has matured and changed since the toll road marked the middle of our timeline. The Dulles Toll Road opened the world to Reston residents and we will continue to see new horizons as our community grows. Robert Simon’s vision of a densely packed community of 75-80,000 people is still to be realized and he often talks of how the energy and diversity of so many people would make Reston even more vibrant than it is today.

For example, The Design Review Board and the Covenants Committee volunteers work to make sure the quality of our structures is maintained. This ensures that our properties retain their values.

All of this translates into change.

Volunteers on the Reston Association’s Pedestrian and Bicycling Advisory Committee work to find ways to help people commute without cars, whether it be via the 55 miles of trails or pathways that connect Reston or on a bike. To that end, the work of the committee earned Reston Association a 2011 honorable mention in the national list of bike friendly communities from the League of American Bicyclists. This, by the way, was no small feat and quite an achievement to be chosen from among the more than 400 applicant communities.

Kathleen Driscoll McKee is the president of Reston Association.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

There will be a day when the toll road will no longer mark the middle of our timeline, when perhaps, Temporary Road will have a permanent name.


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WOMEN

IN THE HOUSE…AND SENATE BY SENATOR JANET HOWELL

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n the fall of 1991, I was doing a lot of door knocking for my very first race for elected office. Women kept asking the same question: “How many women are in the Virginia Senate? “ “Three,” I would say. “I’m voting for you — even though I am a Republican,” would be the frequent response. Women were very angry that fall because of the bitter Clarence Thomas/Anita Hill hearing before an all-male US Senate Judiciary Committee. Women thought Anita Hill was being badgered by a gang of insensitive men. Gender politics was truly beginning. I won, against all odds, and have always thought the disgust of women over being under-represented was part of the reason. Four women were sworn into the Senate in January 1992: Yvonne Miller, Jane Woods, Louise Lucas, and me. Only Senator Miller had been there previously. Our first term was tough. Freshmen of both genders were advised to speak rarely. As a result, we had to ration our floor speeches. One of us would make a statement on something of extreme importance to women and frequently no one would stand to back her up. It could be lonely and frustrating. “How is it dealing with the Good Old Boys?” women asked. Frankly, that was never a problem for me. Some older legislators were not used to working with women as equals. But they were earnest in trying. Twenty years later it is a total non-issue.

Left to Right: Senator Mamie Locke, Senator Janet Howell, Senator Jill Vogel, Senator Mary  Margaret Whipple, Senator Yvonne Miller, Senator Louise Lucas, Senator Linda (Toddy) Puller and Senator Patsy Ticer

Now we were in better shape. We could speak up and support each other on the floor. And, since all of us are workaholics who take our responsibilities seriously, we were gaining respect in the whole General Assembly. Each of us has developed areas of expertise and we back each other’s efforts. One vivid memory I have from the 1990s concerned my bill to make stalking a serious offense. We were able to get the bill through the Senate without much problem. The House Courts Committee was a different matter. Some of the delegates actually believed a stalker was harmless and was showing love for the victim. The stalking bill was in serious jeopardy.

As a group we started to break glass ceilings. I was selected the first woman and second non-lawyer on the Courts of Justice Committee. Soon thereafter I was the first woman to preside over the Senate. And, then, the big prize: selection as the first woman on the Finance Committee.

So we did something that has not happened before or since. Every female legislator in the House and the Senate stood behind me when I presented the bill in committee. Most glared at the committee members. Suddenly the bill was reported and soon passed!

In 1996, two more women, Patsy Ticer and Mary Margaret Whipple, were elected. In 2000, Toddy Puller joined us. Mamie Locke was elected in 2004 and Jill Vogel (the only Republican woman currently in the Senate) was elected in 2007.

With the Democrats taking control of the Senate four years ago, the women really gained power. Listening to the advice of Senator Yvonne Miller and following the caucus custom that the senior member of that committee is

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selected chair, all seven Democratic women became chairs of major committees. In addition, Mary Margaret Whipple was elected the Senate Democratic Caucus Chair and I was selected the first female Senate budget negotiator. More recently, Mamie Locke was elected chair of the Black Caucus. Clearly, women have never before had such clout in Virginia’s Senate. We have made huge progress over the past two decades. Lamentably, there are still very few women in our legislature. Our band of eight in the Senate is only 20 percent of the total. Virginia has among the fewest female legislators in the nation. We still have a long way to go. Senator Janet Howell has been a Reston leader for 35 years. She has represented us in Richmond since 1992. Currently, she is chair of the powerful Privileges and Elections Committee and a Senate budget conferee.


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PERSPECTIVES

History Lessons of

Freedom in Our Backyard BY DELEGATE KEN PLUM | PHOTOS PROVIDED BY JIM KIRBY, HUNTER MILL DEFENSE LEAGUE AND CERPHOTO.COM

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Hunter’s Mill

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e are fortunate to live in one of the safest and most peaceful communities in the country. Any crime is too much, and fortunately our crime rate is one of the lowest in the nation. Factors that contribute to making our community a safe and peaceful place include the wide range of recreational opportunities and activities available for all ages, our low unemployment, an excellent police force, and the educated populace living in Reston. Two historic events that are being recognized over the next several years remind us that our region was not always as peaceful as we know it today. The American Civil War was fought just 150 years ago, and the Sesquicentennial Celebration that is underway shows us how close the war was to our homes. The opening battle of the Civil War on July 21, 1861, was fought not far down the road at Manassas. The Commonwealth of Virginia was the scene of many of the major battles over the four years of the war. The area we now call Reston was not the location of any major battles, but our location near a train line that is the presentday W&OD Trail and our proximity to Leesburg Pike or Route 7, along with the relatively short distance to Washington, DC, made it inevitable that there would be troops moving through the area with some skirmishes.

Historic Markers

The story of the people who lived in the Hunter Mill Road area in 1861-1865 is told in a documentary DVD, Danger Between the Lines, and an accompanying Hunter Mill Road Civil War Self-Guided Tour booklet compiled by James G. Lewis, Jr. and distributed by the Hunter Mill Defense League (www.hmdl.org). The tour includes an area in Reston where Civil War trenches can be seen. There will be numerous opportunities over the next several years to participate in events that can enlighten us further on the causes and the actual conduct of the horrid war that was the Civil War. Visit www.virginiacivilwar.org for a calendar of activities. I serve on the Virginia Commission on the bicentennial of the War of 1812, sometimes referred to as America’s second war of independence or our forgotten war. Our immediate community did not feel the effects of that war, although President James Madison and his wife, Dolley, did flee to Salona in McLean to escape when the British burned the White House. To follow the schedule of events for the Bicentennial of the War of 1812, go to http://va1812bicentennial.dls.virginia.gov. I also serve on the Jamestown Yorktown Foundation Board that is underway in constructing a new visitor center at Yorktown where Cornwallis surrendered in America’s first war of independence (www.historyisfun.org/YorktownVictory-Center.htm).

I think it is important to have a sense of history for good citizenship. We can be smarter in the future if we learn from the past. While it is very easy to over-generalize the lessons of history we can certainly see the need to protect freedom at every turn. We can also see the devastation that can occur when we do not take a positive action to right a wrong such as slavery was at the time of the Civil War. What does history say to the people of Reston today? We can all be participants in extending and protecting in the simple but all-important action of freedom: we can vote. Election Day is November 8 this year. Make your own choices, but do vote.

To order the DVD or tour the trenches log onto www.hmdl.org Ken Plum represents the 36th District in the Virginia House of Delegates. He lives in Reston.

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Help End Homelessness BY CATHY HUDGINS

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n August, the Connection Newspapers developed a comprehensive special edition on homelessness in Fairfax County that ran throughout the county and on their website. This was truly worth the read. The story featured insight from many members of the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors, county staff, our non-profit and corporate partners, and from some of our homeless population. This feature was so on target that an author from the largest newspaper in our region and our nation, the Washington Post, commented on the quality of the story. If you have not read any of this feature I highly encourage you to do so. Why do I mention this story that ran more than three months ago? I do so because as we near our cold winter months, Fairfax County is gearing up once again to open hypothermia shelters for the eighth consecutive year. Coordinated by the county’s Office to Prevent and End Homelessness, the hypothermia program is a collaborative effort by government agencies, faith-based communities, and non-profit and corporate partners to provide shelter and warm meals during the coldest winter months for those who live outdoors in our community. In Reston alone, over 250 volunteers and 17 faith houses served 3,025 meals to 298 individuals during the hypothermia season. While I take this opportunity to acknowledge the many volunteers, faith communities, and other partners, I must also say that I am alarmed at the rising numbers of men, women, and children needing homeless assistance. Unfortunately, the stark reality is that homelessness does exist in our community, and in the cold months those unsheltered are at much greater risk of succumbing to the elements.

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The Fairfax County Board of Supervisors has made ending homelessness a priority and I make it no secret about my support for the Board of Supervisors’ February 2007 plan: Blueprint for Success: Strategic Directions for the Plan to Prevent and End Homelessness in the Fairfax-Falls Church Community. The fact that Fairfax County has joined other regional jurisdictions in establishing such an effort is not good enough. We must continue supporting the efforts of the Board of Supervisors, and all of its actively engaged partners in this endeavor. Reston has done a very good job at recognizing that the homeless are not outcasts in our community that we’d rather sweep under the rug. In fact, before the Embry Rucker Community Shelter was erected in Reston in 1986, many Restonians joined together in attempts to assist with shelter, food, employment supports, and whatever else it took to help those in need to get back on the road to self-sufficiency. When questioned whether the Fairfax zoning ordinance allowed the homeless to sleep in faith houses, then Supervisor Martha Pennino opened her Board office to shelter the homeless until resolution of the matter. Since that time, the population and demographics of those homeless in Reston has changed, as is the case for the county. Supervisor Pennino believed we fail as a community if we ignore the needs of those who live among us. I am proud to say the Reston community still lives by her belief. As the number of volunteers continues to grow with the need for service, many faces of those helping have changed, but there are some that remain. With so many Restonians volunteering, it is undeniable that Reston Interfaith is one of the most active and effective organizations

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

TO HELP

If you would like to volunteer at the Embry Rucker Community Shelter or with the hypothermia program, please contact 703-437-1975.

engaged in this effort, managing the shelter and the North County Hypothermia program at the county’s Human Services Building. Moreover, Reston Interfaith joins the county in providing homeless supports and policy discussions on homeless prevention and how to eradicate homelessness. Additionally, they operate a food pantry and child care center. While they have very able staff working diligently to address the increasing needs in our community, I assert that they, and the county, could not possibly achieve many of the successes if not for the volunteer participation. However, the effort still needs volunteers. I am proud of Reston for its early recognition that dealing with homelessness is a community effort. Together our community has demonstrated leadership that has reverberated around the county. Together we will prevent and end homelessness in our community. Cathy Hudgins has represented the Hunter Mill District on the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors since 2000. As a long time Restonian, she has been involved with local, county and state politics for over 30 years.


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Thank You and Farewell But I’m Not Going Anywhere BY STUART GIBSON

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his is my final column as your school board member. As such, and after 16 years of service, my most important task is to thank those people in our community who serve our children, those who advocate for the needs of our children, and — most importantly — those who teach and care for our children every day.

It is often said that “children are our future.” I believe that saying has it backwards. We adults are their future. If we neglect them and saddle them with poor schools, they will have only the bleakest of futures.

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And so I thank all of those in our Reston community who work diligently to make sure all of our children have the chance to shape their own bright, hopeful future. This includes our dedicated teachers, administrators and support staff. But it also includes those thousands of Restonians who give the gift of time and support by volunteering in our schools and community to better the lives of children. It also includes the people and businesses who donate time and money so that our neediest children have access to resources that we cannot afford to provide with tax dollars. And of course, I want to thank those parents who demonstrate every day that the education of each generation of young people is not something that can be delegated to the public schools. Education is most effective when children live in a loving, supportive environment. Thank you to parents who provide that environment. Finally, I want to publicly thank my 29 current and former colleagues on the Fairfax County School Board — and 16 student representatives — for their service and support during the past 16 years. Regardless of political party or philosophy, each one of these individuals served with dedication and a commitment to children. Thank you also to the small, but dedicated, staff in the School Board office who help us do our jobs.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

I like to tell people that I am a Reston newcomer — I’ve lived here for only 27 years. Our family moved here in 1984, and for our first 11 years we put down roots in the community. Our children attended Lake Anne Elementary School, Langston Hughes Middle School and South Lakes High School. For our last 16 years in Reston, I have been privileged to serve as your School Board Member. And on January 1, 2012, I will return to living and playing in Reston – still working in DC, though. This is a roundabout way of saying that there was life in Reston for me before the School Board, and there will be life after it as well. So although I say farewell to life as a public official, I am not saying farewell to caring about issues that impact our schools. I am not saying farewell to fiercely advocating for what is best for our children. And I am not saying farewell to fully participating in the life of our Reston community. So when you see me in 2012 and ask if I am still involved in the schools, my answer will still be “yes.” You see, I am leaving the School Board, but I am not going anywhere. Stu and his family moved to Reston in 1984, and his children are graduates of South Lakes High School. Stu works as Senior Litigation Counsel at the U.S. Department of Justice where he litigates large tax shelter cases. Mr. Gibson represents the Hunter Mill District on the Fairfax County School Board.


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p u o S t e b a h lp A e h Stirring t BY LEILA GORDON

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eston kicked off a new era of community support for its founding values on Oct. 22 with the Looking Back, Moving Forward to a Sustainable Reston Forum. The event featured awardwinning champions of sustainability and speakers who inspired the large and enthusiastic crowd to pursue the Sustainable Reston Vision: Building on our traditions, values and leadership, Reston of the 21st century continues to be a diverse and healthy community that fosters stewardship of natural beauty and has a vibrant, resilient economy. The first year’s goal, signing up 12 percent of Reston households to the Sustainable Reston Pledge by Founders Day in April 2012, is well on its way to being met. Beyond the steps outlined at the Forum and in the materials circulating with the pledge, there is a deeper meaning and value being realized. As the forum demonstrated, Reston’s “alphabet soup” has committed itself to meaningful collaboration and mutuality. Whatever our respective visions, missions and values, we are all very aware of how much more effective we are when we are working together. Reston Community Center and Reston Association are so intertwined in the minds of our community as to be almost interchangeable; our Greater Reston Chamber of Commerce is joined in partnership with our community’s helping hearts of Reston Interfaith to raise funds and provide people power to its many volunteer efforts to help others. Reston Historic Trust is shepherding the community-wide endeavor to create the documentary of Reston’s fifty-year history, which will be celebrated in 2014. Reston’s glorious complement of arts organizations sing together, act together, paint, sculpt, dance, make music and dream out loud in joint efforts to give visible evidence to the creative spirit in everyone. This kind of mutuality of purpose and action is at the heart of how a community can and must sustain itself. While we pursue the individual actions that are suggested by the Sustainable Reston Pledge, we need to continue as well to support the invisible infrastructure that connects us and makes these efforts

MAKE THE PLEDGE Sustainable Reston Pledge Cards Available at Reston Association 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive

Reston Community Center Hunters Woods 2310 Colts Neck Road

Reston Community Center Lake Anne

1609-A Washington Plaza

www.sustainablerestonforum.org succeed beyond our homes and businesses. Reston needs its volunteer civic and cultural and recreational and humanistic organizations to be as evergreen as our streams, lakes, woodlands, and skies. Along with environmental stewardship, sound lifestyle choices, and local buying to support our local economy, we can reach out to one another to do things together that make Reston thrive. For those of us engaged with the organizations that are our Reston alphabet soup, the flow of people through our activities and efforts is the lifeblood of our existence. In addition to whatever your household undertakes to support your Sustainable Reston Pledge, we hope you will also make time to reach out to our organizations by getting involved in this or any of a hundred different efforts to support the Reston way of living. Sustaining community begins with individual action, but it is through working together that we can create a lasting and immutable legacy for those who follow our footprints. Leila Gordon has been the RCC Executive Director since 2008.

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ON THE STREET

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Story Can Change the World...

A conversation with Executive Director Brad Russell PHOTOS BY DAVID MADISON What will people likely experience at the Washington West Film Festival? Your question is key to the uniqueness of this particular film festival. At the center of everything audiences will experience at Washington West is our belief in the underestimated power of story. So, two distinct experiences await ticket holders who attend Washington West. First, they will be introduced to some of the new, extremely talented, rising filmmakers of our generation — the future Spielbergs and Hitchcocks - whose new films have not been distributed and are very hard for audiences to see, if not impossible. We will celebrate these remarkable stories and storytellers. Second, our film festival, and those who attend, will actually be writing a story. Everyone attending Washington West, including filmmakers, industry and press, will feel a part of making a real, substantive difference in a world in dire need, as we give 100 percent of our regular screening box office proceeds away. This is estimated to be as much as one third of our potential overall revenue. But we’re committed to giving it away because we genuinely want Washington West to go well beyond just showing stories on the screen. We’re going to make significant differences for people suffering from disease, hunger, and poor education. I believe film lovers are going to appreciate this aspect as well.

Why did you choose Reston? I’m always drawn to spaces, to environments where stories can be told — comfortably and naturally. When you think about it, the whole Washington region is one giant environment for deal-making and selling and persuading, and our area is often devoid of real sharing. Probably a lame sounding theme, I realize, especially for the most powerful city in the world. But at the core of sharing is telling stories, and all of us innately crave to share life and heartache and dreams and our ideas. Reston is such an ideal space for storytelling. My family loves Reston. Maybe for me it’s tied to both of my daughters being born in Reston Hospital. But truly everyone loves Reston. It’s probably that it’s elegant and comfortable all at once. There is a class and aura about the community and the Reston Town Center that captivates the imagination, and invites conversation. I believe Reston is the perfect place for our festival to be centered.

Left: Mark Maxey (Washington West)  Right: Brad Russell (Executive Director, Washington West)

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Left: Opening movie at the festival in Reston Town Center  Right: 5 Minutes Each Screening at the Center for Innovative Technology

The Loving Story

6:30 p.m., Thursday, November 3, 2011 Bow Tie Cinemas at Reston Town Center

5 Minutes Each — As part of Shorts Program One 4 p.m., Friday, November 4, 2011 Center for Innovative Technology

For more info, visit www.washingtonwestfilmfestival.com

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Why not call it the Reston Film Festival?

How will your festival make a profit?

Our name was determined before we received such a warm welcome from both Bow Tie Cinema at Reston Town Center and the Reston Association. More specifically though, Reston will be our home base. It will be home to our visiting filmmakers and events in nearby venues such as the Center for Innovative Technology.

We will be funded entirely by corporate sponsors, as well as by individual contributing members of our festival. For information on both, anyone can e-mail our office at sponsorship@wwfilmfest.com.

What is your background? I’m a native to Virginia, was born west of Middleburg, in Winchester, and have lived my entire adult life in eastern Loudoun County. In graduate school I was asked to be in three short films, where film students were studying motion picture directing and film production. That’s when I caught the film bug. After graduate school I moved to Loudoun County, where I’ve lived for fifteen years. Our goal for the Washington West Film Festival is to make sure the projects we invest in are well vetted, extremely organized, and that every dollar is used to tangibly help the people in need.

What kinds of films will you showcase? Our festival will screen independent films from around the world, but as we mature in the coming years we plan to introduce Hollywood studio prerelease screenings (DC, US, and we’d like to think even world premieres) to our programming. Our festival will screen both feature length films and short films, which will include dramatic narrative stories, as well as documentaries. Washington West will select and screen a large variety of film genres, including drama, comedy, suspense, romance, and action, not to mention the amazing influx of true-stories/documentaries that have captured the film industry’s heart in recent years.


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ON THE STREET

GIVING HOPE Giving Circle of Hope Keeps It Local BY JANET REMS | PHOTOS PROVIDED BY GIVING CIRCLE OF HOPE

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Giving Circle of Hope Goals ƒƒ

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To make a difference in the community by offering time, talents and monetary resources To encourage community among ourselves and those we serve To increase public awareness of local needs. To encourage self-sufficiency and well-being among those in need To promote volunteerism and effective philanthropy To build a network that is a catalyst for positive change

“Our grantees do miracles with so little money. … It’s really gratifying.” – Diana Katz Founding member of Giving Circle of Hope

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hen the philanthropic group Giving Circle of Hope was officially launched in the winter of 2004, its founders — Linda Strup, Joan Kasprowicz, Diana Katz and Mary Narayan — made the important decision to invest locally. Focusing on community nonprofits and projects in Northern Virginia that help people in need would have tangible and significant impacts, they correctly believed. Seven years later, with the decline in the economy and the drying up of grant money and charitable giving, especially corporate, Giving Circle’s community-based philanthropy has taken on even more importance. Giving Circle’s four founders, who initially met almost 25 years ago while PTSA moms at Sunrise Valley Elementary School in Reston, have attracted a group of more than 100 women like themselves — women who, as their motto says, are motivated by “fun with a purpose.” By pooling their energy and resources, the Giving Circle has been able to have the kind of real impact none could have had individually.

“In this economy, we like to give strategically," Strup said at a recent quarterly meeting of the group. Organized like an investment club, Giving Circle’s voting members contribute money ($1 a day or $365 a year, all going toward grants) as well as their time and talents. Together they decide how to use the Giving Circle’s resources. There also are service members who do not vote nor contribute money regularly but participate in programs and attend the group’s social and other events. The group’s Guiding Circle (its four founders, who all live in or near Reston, along with Jane Williams, also of Reston, and Peggy Cressy of Fairfax) and other voting members will formally vote on its dozen 2012 grantees in November. The group’s vetting process has been going on since mid-August. So far, Giving Circle, a 2006 Best of Reston honoree, has given grants, totaling $375,000, to 36 different area nonprofits, which have budgets of $2 million or less. The top amount given is $5,000.

Grant money, Katz explained, must go toward a specific project that is usually completed within the year, and a group must wait to apply again after applying for three consecutive years. In addition to individual grants, Giving Circle has established two annual events that specifically focus on helping and raising awareness about the needy. The Gifts That Give Hope Fair is held annually the Saturday after Thanksgiving at Truro Church in Fairfax City, it does not compete with similar Reston events, it is intentionally not held here. “Shoppers” meet and learn about participating nonprofits and are encouraged to make donations as “alternative gifts.” The 2010 fair raised about $14,000 for 25 nonprofits. Its annual Empty Bowls fundraiser in April at St. John Neumann Catholic Church in Reston raised more than $19,500 for Food for Others, the area’s largest provider of free food for Northern Virginia’s needy. During the year, Giving Circle members also have the opportunity to participate in five ongoing direct service programs.

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Helping Hungry Kids provides weekend meals to school-age children who receive free or reduced lunch. During the 2009-2010 school year, the program provided more than 2,510 weekend food packages to students in need. A 2011 Best of Reston honoree, Sandy Amato, started the program in conjunction with the Giving Circle. Caring Friends’ volunteers visit with nursing home residents. Flashes of Hope organizes photo shoots for families coping with children with cancer. The Crafting Hope/Creating Futures program teaches homeless and lowincome women arts and crafts they can sell, and Kids’ Club provides literary and educational enrichment for the young homeless residents of Reston’s Embry Rucker Shelter.

Not an entirely new idea, there are hundreds of Giving Circles across the country. But the Reston-based group has shaped its own programs. “All of our programs came to fruition because one of our members had an idea,” Kasprowicz said.

P.O. Box 8832, Reston, VA 20195

VISIT

www.givingcircleofhope.org Janet Rems is the former managing editor of The Reston Times. She currently freelances for The Fairfax County Times and Northern Virginia Magazine.

To keep thoroughly informed, Williams leads a Book Circle, which meets at least six times a year to discuss topics that relate to the populations Giving Circle serves. Guest speakers on key topics also are invited to speak to members.

“We say it doesn’t take a village, it takes a Giving Circle … all of us with different skills and talents.” – Linda Strup Founding member of Giving Circle of Hope

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Giving Circle of Hope

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

LEARN MORE

info@givingcircleofhope.org


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ON THE STREET

LEGAL TENDER CARE BY SUSAN SIMS

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ne box of gloves, one turkey roasting pan, one four-wheeled dolly and seven 50-pound buckets filled with coins are the basic ingredients for a successful year for Reston’s Character Counts Coalition. The Character Counts Coalition hosts various events throughout the community, engaging youth in the development of positive character traits. The Coalition hosts poster competitions, character building workshops and partners with community organizations to support South Lakes High School’s Ethics Day each year. The Coalition relies upon donations to host these events, including money collected from the fountain in the Reston Town Center. All of the “wishes” from the fountain are collected and transported to the Reston Association by Specialty Pool and Fountain, to be cleaned, organized and deposited. This year, to speed up the process, RA’s volunteer specialist, Ha Brock, enlisted the assistance of two determined and resilient volunteers, Randeep and Jaivir Baweja. They were responsible for not only guiding 50 pounds of coins in and out of the hallways of the Association, but also for sifting through all of the coins to find any foreign, damaged or Chuck E. Cheese coins. They also removed screws, paper clips and other sharp debris.

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A time-consuming and messy task, the volunteers still plowed through the work with smiles. Once the coins were properly organized, they bagged and double bagged them for easy transport to the bank and once again navigated the treacherous turns of the Association to move them back to storage. The member services department prepared for prospective shotput competitions by hauling the bagged coins to the automatic counting machine at the bank, where they were calculated, receipted and deposited. Chuck E. Cheese coins aside, over $700 worth of change was deposited into the Character Counts fund in just one month. Due to the determination and teamwork of volunteers and the Association, Character Counts will

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

have the resources to provide quality programs to students in Reston. With every waterskipping coin, the collection and contribution of donations continues. We give many thanks to our volunteers, to our Association staff, to the Reston Town Center Association, and to everyone who still believes in wishes. Susan Sims is a graduate of George Washington University and a current student of the Emerging Leaders Institute of Leadership Fairfax. She is the member services supervisor at the Reston Association and well known for her high heel selections. Left to Right: Jaivir and Randeep Baweja 


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ON THE STREET

. BOW TIE Now Showing in Reston

CINEMAS Continuing Its Illustrious History in Entertainment

BY CAROL NAHORNIAK | PHOTOS BY DAVID MADISON AND CAROL NAHORNIAK

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estonians who have been curious about the status of their prime movie theater location take heart: Bow Tie Cinemas

is here. Reston Town Center’s multi-screen cinema, with its art-deco façade that has served as a community icon for two decades, and has drawn film audiences from miles around, is now under new, historically-significant management. Since Bow Tie Cinemas officially leased the popular 13-screen theater space at Reston Town Center in June of this year, the company has embarked on a renovation of all theaters, starting with Theaters 1 to 4, transforming these small houses back into their original configuration of two large auditoriums, and upgrading to digital projection. Theaters 5 through 13 were converted to 100 percent digital projection in June, when Bow Tie Cinemas also introduced new programs, including $6 Super Tuesday for Criterion Club members (a free points program), and the Free Summer Kids Film Series. Senior Movie Day, a Reston institution, continues in partnership with Reston Association. For those 55 and over, Bow Tie Cinemas hosts Meet Me at the Movies, presenting a free feature film on the last Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m.

Bow Tie has plans to roll out more options to the entertainment venue, along with a greater selection of films, in addition to the latest screen gems. In November, Bow Tie Cinemas will introduce Cine Classics, bringing classic and cult films “back on the big screen” for Reston audiences, who are encouraged to suggest their favorites on the Bow Tie website, www.bowtiecinemas. com [specifically: http://www.bowtiecinemas. com/classic-cult-favorites.html#movies_ mimosas] Film buffs can also follow progress and new film releases via Facebook: Bow Tie Cinemas Reston Town Center. Continuing the tradition of its founder, Bow Tie Cinemas is dedicated to the return of style and elegance to the movie-going experience, which has been established in their expansion to 18 locations and 150 screens in New York, Connecticut, Maryland, Colorado, and now Virginia, with their 19th location at Reston Town Center. The history of Bow Tie Cinemas is extensive, with a family foundation from more than 100 years ago. B.S. Moss began his career in the entertainment industry in the Nickelodeon era, which gave way to Vaudeville theaters until the 1930s when Moss dedicated himself to

building and operating motion picture theaters. His Colony Theater on Broadway was home to premieres and exclusive engagements of early Walt Disney films, including “Steamboat Willie, which launched Mickey Mouse to the world, and the classic “Fantasia.” Throughout the 20th Century, B.S. Moss Theaters became the largest independently-owned theater circuit in New York, including the landmark Criterion Theater in Times Square, which opened in 1936 exclusively for the exhibition of talking motion pictures. The third generation of this family-owned business is operated by partners Charles B. Moss, Jr. (Charley), and his son, Ben Moss. The Moss family business expanded in 1998 when Charley and Ben formed Bow Tie Cinemas to continue the traditions established by Ben’s great-grandfather. The cinema business is named for Moss family’s flagship property, their headquarters building that forms the “Bow Tie” of the crossing of Broadway and Seventh Avenue in Manhattan. That, plus a nod to Ben’s grandfather, Charles Sr., who always wore bow ties. Carol Nahorniak, creative director at Myers PR, and secretary of Reston Historic Trust, lives, works and plays in Reston.

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ON THE STREET

Reston Station PHOTOS BY DAVID MADISON

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The former park and ride lot as it looks from 200 feet above and six months since the beginning of the construction project. There are still plenty of vehicles on the site but they are all engaged in building the parking deck.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


CLIMB?

Recently some brave amateurs climbed the 200 foot tower crane working at Reston Station to get a better look at the project and see what was happening around Reston.

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MICROCHIP?

This might look like a microchip from 200 feet, but up close it is a footing for one of the pillar supports in the garage. This form with rebar supports holds 300 yards of concrete.

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8 TONS?

This view is of the counter-jib walkway to the rear of the crane — the photographer's perch for about three hours. On the other side of the operator's cabin is the main jib which is working about 12 -14 hours per day moving rebar, concrete and other construction materials around the site. This crane can haul about eight tons at a time.

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It’s not just a saying: smiling really is contagious, scientists say. In a study conducted in Sweden, people had difficulty frowning when they looked at other subjects who were smiling, and their muscles twitched into smiles all on their own.

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Almost 70% of people in the United States need some sort of orthodontic treatment.

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To have your business included in an upcoming Hmmm?, please contact Lindsay Sutton at 202-499-2131 or by e-mail at lindsay@bluehouse.us

Local community arts organizations also present performances at the CenterStage, and Bob Simon recently named it one of his top 10 places to show visitors in this year’s Reston Connection Newcomers & Community Guide. RCC also hosts community events like the annual Reston Multicultural Festival and Martin Luther King, Jr. Day celebration, and offers classes and activities throughout the year ranging from fitness to fine arts to cooking and travel and more. Learn more at www. restoncommunitycenter.com.

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REPLACING THE ROOF $18,042 67% REPLACING THE SIDING $9,910 83% TURNING THE ATTIC INTO A BEDROOM $46,691 77% EXTRA CLOSET SPACE $1,250 50% REMODELING THE BATHROOM* $15,789 78% MINOR KITCHEN UPGRADES $21,185 83% INSTALLING AN ENERGY-EFFICIENT WINDOW $325 50% MINOR LANDSCAPING up to $1,000 100% * For a complete bathroom remodel. A partial bathroom remodel will cost less. Source: Remodeling Magazine's Cost vs. Value Report 2007 & R. Randy Lee

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Home Solutions has been serving the area since 2001. More than 70% of our business is repeat clients and referrals. Full service from repairs to Custom Kitchens and additions. Seasonal gutter cleaning program. Call 703-906-6525 or e-mail solutionsofva@gmail.com


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AROUND RESTON

The Finer Things BY ROBERT HERSHORN | PHOTOS BY NATHANIEL DICKERT

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stroll through Reston Town Center on a Saturday evening can’t really be described as a “bar hop” or “pub crawl” or any other entertaining-yet-dubioussounding night on the town. The place is just too family and community-oriented to encourage anything truly seedy to occur. This is in fact a blessing. Just as one has loaded up on beer or cocktails and feels the sudden need to escape for fresh air, it is easy to find any number of wholesome options to cool down the passions and take stock of things: the pavilion, the fountain, the wide expanse of Market Street, plenty of places to stop in

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and have a bite to eat. Nor is the bar scene limited to a twenty-something cohort: there’s something here for every age and price range, and if you’re staying home because you’re wary of encountering a crowd made up exclusively of youngsters or of incurring a big hole in your wallet, you’ll end up being pleasantly surprised. This is particularly the case at Jackson’s Mighty Fine Food and Lucky Lounge. Jackson’s is an expansive, multi-tiered bar-and-restaurant experience that looks (depending on which room you find yourself in) like a cross between a 1950’s-era soda jerk stand and a much nicer version of Friendly’s. The vintage flourishes are

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

tastefully executed, with salvaged (or salvagedlooking) bathroom mirrors and 60’s-era tile work on the walls. Distracting light fixtures abound! Jackson’s boasts a wide array of drink options, from classic cocktail mixes to more sublimely ridiculous concoctions: I spied one incandescent red drink that seemed to be bubbling and steaming of its own accord, as if plucked from an overzealous suburban dad’s Halloween display. If for some reason you’d rather stick with the ales, draughts, and lagers (a.k.a. beer), they’ve got plenty on tap. A Guinness only costs fifty cents more than a Bud Lite!


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While Jackson’s caters to a slightly more seasoned caste of professionals, most of Reston’s bright young things eschew its charms for the homier spots across the street: American Tap Room and Uncle Julio’s Rio Grande Café. Uncle Julio’s has changed its moniker and some of its menu items from its days as simply the Rio Grande Café, but retains the studied charm of its south-of-the-border décor and the deeply satisfying succulence of its dinner fare. The beer is mostly Mexican, the margaritas are plentiful, and the grilled fish tacos are gone before you know it. Finding a happy middle between the more modern milieu of Jackson’s and Uncle Julio’s Tex Mex ambiance is American Tap Room, the most traditional tavern of the Town Center triumvirate. The cozy interior reminds one of a 21st Century version of Cheers. In fact, this is a place where everybody knows your name, though that’s probably because you went to high school with them and they’re now back home for Thanksgiving or Christmas. American Tap Room is the spot to run into former high school classmates returning from conquering

the world. ATR offers a vast array of beers on tap (they’ve got a name to live up to after all) and their bar and dining areas offer ample space for friends with catching up to do. Those looking for a mellower but no less satisfying evening out should head over to Lake Anne, which is lately having a bit of a night life renaissance. Kalypso’s is a favored spot, with its mix of down-home neighborhood sports bar and chic lounge, though “mix” is perhaps too strong a word: one side is entirely devoted to beer n’ wings, the other given over to glass-fronted, frosty, (sub)urban cool. The fascinatingly asymmetrical space is neatly bisected by a stage that can be viewed from either side of the bar/lounge/all-purpose functional unit. Kalypso’s bartenders are exceedingly friendly and welcoming and are on a first-name basis with a large segment of the clientele. Whether you’re hunched over the bar or sprawled out on a huge white divan, they make sure you feel as though you’re right at home.

At Lake Anne you’ll also find the Jasmine Café, a departure from all the bars listed above and perhaps my personal favorite. Not for the Jasmine’s proprietors the byzantine atmosphere and intensely wrought cocktails of Jackson’s, the madding crowds of American Tap Room, or even the Tejano trappings of Uncle Julio’s. Tucked into the far end of the Lake Anne plaza, the Jasmine Café is simply what it advertises, that is, a tranquil, no-frills spot to have a quiet drink after a long day. Lunch and dinner menus are available if you so choose, but the place stays open late enough to qualify as a night spot. Even after peak meal hours, though, things are kept at a generally low pitch. Long-time Reston dwellers nurse beers under soft light, Lou Reed and Big Star play over the stereo, and life is allowed to run at its own pace.

Robert Hershorn grew up in Reston and has returned after an extended stay in Richmond, Va. He is currently working as a producer and wire service writer for a D.C.-area broadcasting service.

Left : Kalypso  Top: Jasmine Café

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AROUND RESTON

William J. Conklin

Designer and Planner of Early Reston BY SHELLEY S. MASTRAN AND CHERYL TERIO-SIMON PHOTOS PROVIDED BY JIM KIRBY, MICHAEL COSTANTIN AND DAVID WASSERMAN

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“Textiles and art [both] impart meaning and significance.”

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- Bill Conklin

s we all know, Reston is the inspiration of Robert E. Simon, Jr., who in 1961 was invited from New York to purchase 6,750 acres of rolling northern Virginia countryside. Influenced by his European travels, his knowledge of the planned community of Radburn, NJ, and his frustration with typical suburban community design of the 1950s, Simon sought a firm that could bring his goals for Reston to reality. What many do not know is the role of William J. (Bill) Conklin and that of the firm of Whittlesey and Conklin (later Conklin Rossant) that Simon selected. One reason Simon chose Conklin’s firm is that the firm’s founders, Julian Whittlesey and Clarence Stein, had planned the garden community of Radburn, on whose board Simon’s father had served. Conklin’s firm produced the award-winning Master Plan for Reston, and upon Whittlesey’s retirement, the successor firm Conklin Rossant designed and oversaw the construction of Lake Anne Village Center. Conklin has distinguished credentials. He is a product of the Harvard University Graduate School of Design. There he studied under Walter Gropius, founder of the renowned Bauhaus. With James Rossant, Conklin designed the Butterfield House in New York City, which is considered one of the most strikingly beautiful post-World War II apartment buildings there. Conklin and Rossant also designed the award-winning Myriad Gardens in Oklahoma City, a pioneering urban renewal project. Beyond architecture, Conklin is an expert on pre-Columbian textiles. Both his grandmothers were textile experts and his family inherited a textile collection — so he was exposed to textile art at a very young age. In New York, after the development of Reston, Conklin became seriously interested in Indian textiles.

Top: Butterfield House exterior, New York  Middle: Butterfield House interior, New York Bottom: Myriad Gardens exterior Myriad Gardens interior 

He became a research associate at the Institute on Andean Studies and the Textile Museum and with Jeffrey Quilter edited Chavin: Art, Architecture and Culture on ancient Peru.

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Lake Anne urban plan 

While implementing Simon’s ideals in Reston, Conklin Rossant put its own stamp on the community. Conklin considers the architecture of Lake Anne Village Center structures original — he calls them “cubistic.” Their simple, unornamented use of natural materials places them in the mid-20th century modernist movement, with its emphasis on horizontal and vertical lines. Heron House is characteristic of Brutalism (from Le Corbusier’s beton brut or “raw concrete”). Conklin likens the brown brick, concrete trim, and steel frame windows of the Lake Anne storefronts and condos to the materials used for Butterfield House. The brown brick warms the concrete but is a far cry from Virginia’s colonial red brick. Conklin continues to advise on architecture, planning, and design with his firm, Conklin Constantin Architects in Washington, DC What does Conklin think of Lake Anne today? He recently said, “As I look back on our creation of Reston’s Lake Anne Village Center, it seems to mark an important turning point in American housing history — no more repetitive housing projects, no more single-use or single-age group developments and no more developments without art! “ Shelley S. Mastran is a professor in practice in Urban Affairs & Planning and at the Natural Resources Program at Virginia Tech in Alexandria. She has worked on numerous community planning projects involving visioning, heritage areas and scenic byways.

Top: Heron House on Lake Anne  Bottom: Lake Anne perspective architectural drawing William Conklin taken at the U.S. Navy Memorial on Pennsylvania Avenue for which  he did the preliminary design

Cheryl Terio-Simon is Vice Chair of the Reston Historic Trust. She is a retired lawyer, having been counsel for The American Institute of Architects, the Associated General Contractors of America, as well as in private practice. She has lived in Reston since 1969 and is the wife of Robert Simon.

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AROUND RESTON

Marymount University’s Reston Center A Community Partner for Higher Education BY LAURIE CALLAHAN  Preschool Workshop — Aidan Huchler

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eston’s blend of homes, businesses, and social gathering spaces provides an environment rich in activity and opportunity. Like other thriving communities in northern Virginia, Reston boasts a highly educated population, with nearly half of its residents having at least a bachelor’s degree. For many in the area, additional higher education and professional credentials are the keys to career advancement. Marymount University’s Reston Center, established in 2007, helps address this need. This June, Larry Hoffman was appointed to serve as the Reston Center’s executive director. He came to Marymount from McDaniel College in Westminster, Maryland, where he was the director of graduate marketing and admissions for four years. Previously, Hoffman held a variety of positions in public broadcasting, serving as director of communications for Maryland Public Television and, earlier, for New Hampshire Public Television. Speak with him for just a couple of minutes, and you quickly realize how enthusiastic Hoffman is about his new job. He says, “I’m excited about the diversity of programs that we are able to offer at the Reston Center. From business administration to human resources, health information management, education, and interior design, we have courses and programs that can help individuals achieve their personal and professional goals.” He adds, “The Reston Center’s location, on Wiehle Avenue right off the Dulles Toll Road, is a tremendous asset in terms of convenience, and we design our class schedules with working adults in mind. People in this area are busy; they have very full lives. So we focus on doing whatever we can to help them achieve their educational and career goals in as stress-free a way as possible.”

Since arriving at Marymount, Hoffman has been making the rounds of the Reston business community. He explains, “I think that an area where we can make a significant contribution is on-site education and professionaldevelopment programs that address the specific needs of employers. My objective right now is to learn as much as possible about the needs and goals of the organizations and individuals we serve.” He adds, “Marymount has a history of working with businesses, health care facilities, schools, and other organizations to provide programs that meet emerging needs and help them achieve their goals. We look forward to expanding that effort.” For an example of an “emerging need,” Hoffman points to the transition to digital patient records in the health care field. With medical offices and hospitals facing new requirements for computerized record-keeping, education and training to help ease the transition are in high demand. He notes, “Marymount’s programs in Health Information Technology and Health Information Management provide broad knowledge of health care delivery and information systems, quality management, and computer technology and security. We have both certificate and degree programs available, and we will work with employers to determine what options best meet their specific needs.” He concludes, “Reston is a fantastic community, and there is so much opportunity here! I think that Marymount has something important to contribute; we are committed to helping the individuals and organizations in this region continue to flourish.”

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makes a tree picture with assistance from Zach Porter, who is pursuing a Master of Education in Elementary Education.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Laurie Callahan, a Reston resident, is director of Public Relations at Marymount University.

Marymount University Reston Center

LOCATION

1861 Wiehle Avenue, just off exit 13 of the Dulles Toll Road

MISSION To provide undergraduate and graduate programs that help adult learners further their education and achieve their personal and professional goals.

CONTACT For more information, contact 703-284-5770.

ADMISSIONS Undergraduate Admissions: 703-284-1500 or admissions@marymount.edu Graduate Admissions: 703-284-5901 or grad.admissions@marymount.edu

LARRY HOFFMAN Executive Director lhoffman@marymount.edu

www.marymount.edu/reston


 ID Class1 — Dr. Doug Seidler, assistant professor of Interior Design, reviews a student project.

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AROUND RESTON

Tree Pruning vs. Tree Topping BY CLAUDIA THOMPSON-DEAHL | PHOTO PROVIDED BY USDA FOREST SERVICE - NORTHEASTERN AREA, BUGWOOD.ORG

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s a homeowner you want to protect your property and your home. The trees on your property provide many benefits, including environmental improvements such as improving air quality and conserving energy by protecting surroundings from sun and wind. Trees add to the aesthetics and beauty of your home and provide valuable wildlife habitat. Trees also require maintenance and may require pruning. How you prune will certainly affect the health of your tree. One inappropriate pruning technique is called topping. Topping your tree is the most harmful practice known and if the Arborist you are planning on hiring suggests topping your tree seek another bid. Topping is cutting back the tree to a predetermined crown limit. Tree branches are cut to stubs that are not large enough to support the remaining branch.

Proper way to prune a tree. 

ƒƒ The International Society of Arboriculture (ISA) has several good reasons why a tree should not be topped. These include: ƒƒ

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ƒƒ

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Good pruning practices rarely remove more than one-fourth of the crown of the tree. In fact, if it was properly pruned it should be hard to tell that your tree was pruned. If more is removed it will affect the tree's ability to manufacture food. A topped tree is a disfigured and ugly tree that loses its grace and the character of the species. Topping removes the ends of the branches and leaves stubs so the natural form of the tree is destroyed. The large stubs of a topped tree will not be able to form a callus roll, which is the tree's defense system. The stubs are highly vulnerable to insect invasion and spores of decay fungi.

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The goal of topping would be to reduce the height of the tree, but the ultimate effect is just the opposite. The water sprouts that grow after this type of pruning will produce elongated branches that will quickly return to the original height. In addition, the wood of the new sprouts has very weak attachment and creates weak limbs. They will become a hazard in a storm or heavy winds. The heavy pruning of topping can also create sunscald. The bark tissue that was used to being protected from the sun by the shade of thousands of leaves is now exposed to the direct rays of the sun. This can lead to cankers, bark splitting and/or death of the tree.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

ƒƒ

The cost of topping would be less than applying the skill and judgment needed to properly prune a tree. However, this is absolutely a case where you get what you pay for. Adding the cost of more frequent pruning of shoots, removal and replanting costs and reduced property value and you can see why proper pruning also makes financial sense.

If you are planting trees consider the ultimate height and width of the tree to reduce the need for drastic pruning in the future. Claudia Thompson-Deahl applauds those who create habitats for wildlife because they contribute to a healthy ecosystem. Claudia has received numerous awards and accolades for her preservation and beautification efforts throughout her career.


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AROUND RESTON

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When Snow Falls in Reston... BY LIZ BADLEY | PHOTOS BY SEAN BAHRAMI AND MOHAMED ALI

WWW.RESTON.ORG | WINTER EDITION 2011

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Top: CSF worker clears the street  to keep Reston residents safe. Bottom: The Bobcat used for heavy snow removal.

T

he lines between what the Reston Association does and doesn’t do can get blurred sometimes. As a community interest association, RA performs many of the duties that a town government might perform. So you may wonder what happens behind the scenes when it snows. The work for the team at Central Services begins with the forecast of snow. Reston Association Director of Maintenance, Brian Murphy, puts the four plow drivers, mechanics and hand shoveling crews on alert. He stays up to monitor the snow’s progress and calls in the plow drivers and mechanics when then snow reaches two inches.

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That’s when the teams and equipment get to work. Small plows called “the bombs” roll out to make sure that the 55 miles of pathway are accessible to the residents. Most of the time, it means these bombs are out in the middle of the night or the wee hours of the morning. Mechanics plow the parking lots of Reston Association facilities and a section of North Village road owned by the association. Then crews working with hand tools get to work during regular business hours (even if the Association has decided to close for the day) to assure that RA facilities are accessible and that the entry ways to the paths that may have been plowed in by the street plows are clear. What

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

that means for you, is that there are certain situations where you may be able to walk Reston, via the pathway system, before you can move your car out of your driveway. However, the Reston Association only clears the Reston pathway system. The Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) clears the state roads and clusters are responsible for clearing cluster roads. If you have a problem with snow or tree removal from a state road, please contact VDOT at 703- 383-8368 or www.virginiadot.org.


Sidewalks, however, fall into a different category. They are owned either by the county or the state, but it is asked, as part of your civic duty, that you clear the sidewalk in front of your home and that residents pitch in to make sure that sidewalks leading to schools are safe for children to walk on. The Reston Association does lend a hand when we can, but this responsibility does mainly fall on the residents near the schools and school support staff.

So when the snow falls in Reston, rest assured that the Reston Association is working hard to make sure that our properties are accessible to the residents. When it snows, if you ever have a question about who does what, the friendly staff at the Central Services Facility is always available to help. Feel free to call 703-437-7658 or e-mail CSFstaff@reston.org.

Liz Badley is a Reston Association employee at CSF. In her free time, she writes several blogs, including contributing to Reston Patch. She also coaches diving at South Lakes High School, swimming for the Herndon Commanders and enjoys running road races and participating in adrenaline sports.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | WINTER EDITION 2011

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AROUND RESTON

A Taste of the

German Tradition BY ROBERT HERSHORN | PHOTOS BY SEAN BAHRAMI

F

or the past four years, Reston has hosted a unique holiday festival, one that has flown quietly under the community's radar but that has nonetheless drawn a loyal following throughout its history. The Christkindl Market is a German holiday festival and bazaar curated by the families of the men and women serving at the German Armed Forces Command in Reston. Part of a tradition that dates back to the 13th century, the holiday market features crafts, baked goods, and traditional German fare. In the six years of its existence, the Christkindl Market has drawn attendees largely through word of mouth. Barring the lone sign that is posted on Sunrise Valley Drive on the day of the market itself, there has been essentially no advance publicity for the market in years past. Nevertheless, crowds numbering in the hundreds arrive, and most of the featured items sell out completely. Much of the planning and work that goes into the Christkindl Market takes place at the German Armed Forces Command’s facility near Dulles Airport, where the German Armed Forces families meet at least twice a month in the run-up to the event. Featuring a spacious warehouse and a number of conference rooms and meeting areas, it is an ideal staging spot for the months-long effort required to plan and organize the market. Most of the crafts being sold at the market will be created here as well. Planning sessions for the Christkindl market have been underway since May, and the families of the German Armed Forces Command have now begun crafting in earnest. The families have an easy familiarity with each other. During the final September meeting of the festival’s planning committee, as they sit down to their brunch spread and their raw materials of felt, wood, Krylon, and hot glue, their excitement and enthusiasm is palpable. Michaela Joergens is coordinating the operations of the Christkindl Market, a duty that has afforded her the title “Head of the Elves.” She notes that an ongoing event like this is important in a community of expats.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


Left: The artistic families creating the beautiful ornaments. 

Right: Michaela Joergens (left) and Sandra Mueller (right) display crafts they made.

“[The families] need something they can count on,” she says. “Nobody has to be an artist here, so everyone feels comfortable.” The crafting tasks are split into three tables. One work station is reserved for felt ornaments, one for wooden elk carvings, and one for pasta angels. The pasta angel table is certainly the quietest of the three; all hands are fully occupied in the creation of the angels and the avoidance of gobs of hot glue. Angels are formed with the greatest of care, as dried pasta ingredients are deftly arranged into miniaturized versions of God’s messengers. Farfalle becomes a set of wings, orzo and couscous provide hair, and rigatoni makes a natural torso. The pasta angels are, by all accounts, the bread and butter of the Christkindl Market, and the first item to sell out every year. Of course, the Christkindl Market does feature food products that do not contain glue and that are actually edible; delicious, in fact. German Christmas markets the world over traditionally feature warm baked goods to take the edge off of the chill December air, and this Kristkindl Market will be no exception. Those in attendance can expect to partake in delicacies from across the Rhineland and beyond. “We’re not all from the same region, so we can each bring specialties from our specific place,” Joergens says. “We’ll be bringing items from Bavaria, northern Germany, all over.” This will

include cookies, pastries, and a German holiday specialty known as Stollen, a form of bread similar to fruitcake and so popular in Germany that some major cities devote entire festivals to the hearty loaves during the holiday season. The food and Christmas crafts will all be available to take home at the Christkindl Market. Participants will be able to make a onetime donation at the market for any amount, which will provide them access to all of the market’s goods. Proceeds from the event will be donated to Reston Interfaith.

German Christkindl Market Thursday, Dec. 1, 2011 at 4-9 p.m. German Armed Forces Command Center 11150 Sunrise Valley Drive

Get there early if you have your heart set on a pasta angel.

"These kinds of donations help support our programs so we can help people get back to self sufficiency and into homes."

- Abby Kimble, Director of communications for Reston Interfaith

Robert Hershorn grew up in Reston and has returned after an extended stay in Richmond, Va. He is currently working as a producer and wire service writer for a D.C.-area broadcasting service.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | WINTER EDITION 2011

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MEMBER SERVICES

2012

Memberships will be available for purchase on January 30, 2012. VISIT THE PARKS, RECREATION & EVENT SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

n n n n n

AQUATICS 62 TENNIS 66 CAMPS 70 NATURE 72 SPECIAL EVENTS

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Living in Reston is like living in a park. Thirteen hundred acres of open space are maintained throughout the community and a wide variety of facilities and programs offer year-round opportunities for fitness, fun and exploration. Fifty-five miles of paved pathways and natural surface trails connect our facilities, neighborhoods, schools and shopping, and are perfect for walkers, joggers and bicyclists. More than 700 acres of forest, 50 meadows and four wetlands provide beautiful vistas and important habitat for local wildlife. Aquatic habitats include four lakes, three ponds and 20 miles of streams, enjoyed by boaters and anglers.

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In Reston’s 15 community pools, patrons swim laps in the Olympic-sized pool, splash in the children’s interactive area, speed down a giant slide and relax in heated spas. Reston’s vibrant tennis community plays on 48 community courts, eight of which are clay and 26 of which are lighted. Friends and teams practice and compete on ballfields and multipurpose courts. Playgrounds, garden plots, picnic facilities and community buildings are popular places to gather and enjoy. Parks & Recreation staff conduct an exciting line-up of top notch programs and special events for all ages. From nature programs and summer camps to dive-in movies and festivals, there is something fun for everyone. Many activities are free while others require reservations and have fees. Let us help you get the most out of Reston’s parklands and facilities.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

MEMBERSHIPS

A current Reston Association Pool and Tennis Pass is required for every member (age 1 or older) visiting the pool and tennis courts. To protect your member privileges, adults may also need to present a current photo ID proving Reston residency. You must present your pass for entry to the pool or tennis courts. Sorry, we cannot accept an online receipt. RA Members may purchase Pool and Tennis Passes online or in person at 12001 Sunrise Valley

RA MEMBER SERVICES 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Reston, VA 20191-3404.

Drive, Reston, VA 20191-3404. HOURS OF OPERATION

Monday–Friday from 8:30 a.m.–5 p.m. Extended summer hours are Saturdays, April 21–July 28 from 9 a.m.–Noon.


COME PLAY IN RESTON

RESTON ASSOCIATION

Conference Center HOLD YOUR NEXT MEETING CLOSE TO HOME CONFERENCE CENTER AVAILABLE FOR RENT Attractive Rental Rates Ideal for ƒƒ Corporate events ƒƒ Community meetings ƒƒ Workshops Can Accommodate ƒƒ Small groups of 35 or less ƒƒ Large groups up to 100 Features ƒƒ Flexible floor space ƒƒ Open Monday–Friday 8 a.m.–10 p.m. Saturdays April–August Extras (for an additional fee) ƒƒ Pantry with microwave, coffee maker and refrigerator ƒƒ Audio visual equipment Attractive Rates: $30-$90 an hour. Please contact Member Services to make your reservation at reservations@reston.org or 703-435-6530.

12001 Sunrise Valley Drive | Reston | Virginia | 20191-3404 | www.reston.org WWW.RESTON.ORG | WINTER EDITION 2011

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AQUATICS

The mission of the Aquatics department is to provide Reston residents with an array of aquatic facilities and programs. Members can participate at all levels – including learn-to-swim programs, safety training and exercise classes or relaxing by the pool – and do so at wellmaintained, clean facilities under local health department standards and managed by a trained, highly qualified staff. VISIT THE PARKS, RECREATION & EVENT SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

WHAT HAPPENS IN AQUATICS IN THE WINTER?

People often ask what goes on with aquatics in the winter months since the pools are closed. The answer is that we winterize the facilities and plan for the coming season.

WHAT IS “WINTERIZING?”

Winterizing is preparing the pool for the winter months. When water freezes, it expands. This can cause great damage to the pool, pool plumbing, and the filter system. When we close the pools for the winter, we take precautions to protect from freeze damage by: ƒƒ Lowering the water below the lights. This eliminates damage to the tile line and skimmers which can be easily damaged if water were to freeze there. ƒƒ Next, we blow out the water from the plumbing lines. Each pool has all of the water blown out of the plumbing that leads to the toilets, sinks, showers and pool pipes. The pipes are all disassembled. Once the winter months have passed, we put them all back together again.

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PROJECTS

Our Capital and Aquatics Department are working together to improve our existing and aging facilities. Just a few of the projects that will be completed in the fall and winter include: ƒƒ Lake Audubon Pool bath house will receive new siding ƒƒ Polo Club will be repaired ƒƒ Upgraded cabinets at Lake Newport Pool ƒƒ Ridge Heights will receive new deck lighting

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

DID YOU KNOW?

Statistics are maintained each year for our programs and open swim usage. We use these statistics to see usage trends, future programming needs and planning. Just a few statistics from this summer are listed below. The pools saw approximately: ƒƒ 1,100 Swim Lesson participants ƒƒ 250 Lifeguard & Safety Training participants ƒƒ 28,000 pool and tennis passes

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180,000 visits during open swim 31 Organizations rented pool time 250 maintenance projects were completed through August by just 3 Aquatics Maintenance Team members 20 capital projects Many smiling faces

DOGWOOD POOL RENOVATION

Dogwood Pool is on schedule for renovation, having been recently approved by the Design Review Board. The new pool will include a 25-meter, 3-lap lane pool with diving well and a zero-depth-entry splash area with spray features. The surrounding areas will also be renovated to include a newer, more energy efficient bathhouse, an underground cistern for irrigation, and an interactive splash and play area outside the pool enclosure. The aquatics and capital project departments are working with several contractors for the Dogwood Pool renovation and anticipate a Grand Reopening in 2012.


COME PLAY IN RESTON

CPR AND FIRST AID CERTIFICATION CLASSES

Register now, registration closes nine days before each class to allow time to obtain necessary materials. Minimum six students required for each class. All classes are held at the Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive. NOTE: These class are NOT for individuals wanting to become a lifeguard.

ADULT CPR/AED WITH STANDARD FIRST AID DATE: Oct. 22, 2011, Nov. 26, 2011 TIME: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. FEE: $50/RA Member or employee

$60/Non-member

ADULT, CHILD AND INFANT CPR/AED WITH STANDARD FIRST AID DATE: Nov. 6, 2011, Dec. 4, 2011 TIME: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FEE: $65/RA Member or employee

$75/Non-member For questions please contact Willa at aquaticsinfo@reston.org

ONLINE UPDATE

Do you want to make sure you get all the most current information from Reston Association about our programs and events? Please take a moment to update your online profile so that we can contact you about upcoming classes, registration dates, and notify you directly if there’s a change to a program that you are registered for. To edit your account please follow these simple steps: 1. Go to www.reston.org; 2. Click on ‘login’ in the top right corner of the screen; 3. Enter your username and password (If you have forgotten your password you can click a link below the login area to have it sent to you); 4. Once logged in, click on ‘My Account’ in the orange bar across the top of the screen and select ‘Profile’ from the drop down menu;

5.

Within your profile you can add household members, edit phone numbers and edit e-mail addresses. In order to edit a birth date you must contact our Member Services department at Member_Services@reston.org or 703-435-6530. Many of our programs and classes are only available to individuals within a certain age bracket so this must be filled in correctly in order to register.

If you have questions about your account or need assistance, please don’t hesitate to contact Member Services using the e-mail address or phone number listed above.

WANT TO BECOME A LIFEGUARD? The American Red Cross is in the process of updating their Lifeguard Training program with an expected release during the fall of 2011. Reston Association will be teaching the updated program beginning in 2012. Classes will be scheduled through the summer months and registration for those classes will begin April 2, 2012. After being certified by the American Red Cross applicants are encouraged to apply at http://careers.reston.org. Interviews and hiring will begin in May. Applicants must be fully certified before their interview but can apply as soon as applications open in mid to late January.

HAVE A QUESTION, CONCERN, OR SUGGESTION?

Fill out a comment card located at each pool facility, e-mail us directly at aquaticsinfo@reston.org, or give us a call at 703-435-6530. We appreciate your feedback!

 FOR MORE INFO ON AQUATIC PROGRAMS, CONTACT AQUATICSINFO@RESTON.ORG OR CALL 703-435-6530.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | WINTER EDITION 2011

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AQUATICS

Don’t wait in long lines this spring. Purchase your 2012 Pool & Tennis Pass beginning January 30th. Visit www.reston.org and click on Shop RA. VISIT THE PARKS, RECREATION & EVENT SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

YEAR-ROUND PROGRAM TEACHES WATER SAFETY

Nationwide, drowning remains the second leading cause of injury-related death among children ages 1 to 14. For each child who drowns, four more receive medical treatment for submersion-related injuries. This year, Reston Association and Reston Community Center joined to launch the Drowning Education Awareness Program, or D.E.A.P, designed to teach parents and children life-saving water safety techniques. You can sign up for a community presentation through either RA or RCC or call the aquatics directors at either organization to learn more. For more information contact: Reston Community Center (RCC) Phone: 703-476-4500 Reston Association (RA) Phone: 703-435-6528

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GENERAL WATER SAFETY ƒƒ 18 years and older ƒƒ One 90-minute session ƒƒ Free ƒƒ Registration required

WHALE TALES ƒƒ 5-12 years old ƒƒ One 60-minute session ƒƒ Free ƒƒ Registration required Longfellow’s WHALE Tales is a FREE 1-hour interactive presentation that provides easyto-follow information to help children learn safe behavior in, on, and around the water. Taught in a classroom environment, WHALE Tales makes water safety fun and easy to learn. Each lesson is reinforced with color posters, worksheets, activities, and a video that features Longfellow, the animated whale. This program is offered to Cub Scouts and Webelos, Daisy, Brownie and Junior Girl Scouts, and day care centers.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

PARENT ORIENTATION TO SWIM LESSONS ƒƒ 18 years and older ƒƒ One 60-minute session ƒƒ Free ƒƒ Registration required This FREE 1-hour presentation (30-minute presentation, 30 minutes of Q&A) will provide parents with an orientation to the American Red Cross swimming lessons offered at the RCC. It is designed to teach parents of Level 1, Level 2, Rookies, and Skippers how to provide guidance, care, supervision, motivation, and support as their children participate in our swim lessons program.

This FREE 90-minute presentation (60-minute lecture and 30 minutes of Q&A) focuses on the importance of water safety training and provides general information for keeping family members safe in, on, and around the water. The presentation is designed for rotary clubs, PTAs, home school networks, church groups, and other civic organizations and can be scheduled at their facility.


FIRST ANNUAL

COME PLAY IN RESTON

RESTON KIDS’ TRIATHLON

Celebrating the first partnership event for Reston Association and YMCA Fairfax County Reston.

200 Kids. Swam. Biked. Ran. Had Fun. They TRIed. They Finished. 100 + volunteers. Organized. Helped. Cheered. Generous Sponsors. Made the event possible — especially children who never had a chance to compete until now.

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Amazing Race Timing Bike Lane Bonzai Sports Dr. Thomas Fleeter, Town Center Orthopaedic Associates, P.C.

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FootSteps Home Aid Jones & Rostant, PC Matrix Consulting PNC Bank

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Reston Character Counts Coalition Rocky Mountain Sunscreen Sweetgreen

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Urban Ltd. Virginia Housing Development Authority Whole Foods Clean Fairfax Council

The Celebration Continues and You Are Invited

WWW.RESTON.ORG | WINTER EDITION 2011

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TENNIS

Look for us in the January edition of Reston for our spring tennis programs. VISIT THE PARKS, RECREATION & EVENT SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

GENERAL INFO

With 48 outdoor tennis courts, 26 lighted for night play, Reston Association offers one of the most extensive tennis programs in the Washington metropolitan area. See map on page 97 for court location. RA offers spring, summer and fall tournaments ranging from USTA-sanctioned to friendly local round robins. The tennis program also features men’s, women’s and junior leagues, as well as adult and junior individual and group lessons. Register for leagues, lessons and tournaments at Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, or online at www.reston.org. General tennis information can be found on our website, as well as on the tennis court bulletin boards at each of the tennis complexes. All registrations must be made online or at Reston Association.

FINDING TENNIS PARTNERS

Dial-a-Match list. This will give you the names, level and availability of players, along with their phone numbers. The list is updated once a month, so if you would like to add your name to the list, e-mail tennis@reston. org.

TENNIS COMMITTEE

The RA Tennis Advisory Committee meets on the second Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at Reston Association. All comments and suggestions are welcome. Send an e-mail to tennis@reston.org. To call or e-mail a committee member with suggestions, look them up on our website, www.reston.org.

TENNIS KEY TAGS

Great for easy identification and your convenience. Key tags are available for $2. Come to RA to purchase one.

Reston Tennis News on Facebook

COMMUNITY COURT WATCH

We have some of the best community courts in the Northern Virginia area. We are calling on you to help keep our courts in tiptop condition. If you see a broken net strap or a light out, please e-mail tennis@ reston.org or call the tennis office at 703-435-6502.

RA TENNIS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

RA Tennis provides scholarships to Reston youth whose families have demonstrated financial need. For example, if the family resides in subsidized housing or participates in the school meal program. To learn more about the scholarship program, call 703-435-6502.

HEART RESTON TENNIS STICKERS: $1 All proceeds go to the Reston Children’s Tennis Scholarship Fund

www.facebook.com/RestonTennisNews  FOR MORE INFORMATION ON TENNIS PROGRAMS, CONTACT TENNIS@RESTON.ORG OR CALL 703-435-6502.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

TENNIS ONLINE Find the following up-todate information in the tennis section on the Reston Association website. www.reston.org RTT Score Board www.restontennis.org Tennis Ladder www.tennisengine.com USTA Tournament and Entry Forms www.usta.com


COME PLAY IN RESTON

Tennis lesson gifT cerTificaTes

Buy One Today!

TENNIS COURTS

Looking for the Perfect Gift? Purchase a Reston Association Tennis Lesson Gift Certificate. Available in any amount. AvAilAble At the Pro ShoP At reSton ASSociAtion: 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Reston, VA 20191

For more inFormAtion: 703-435-6502 • Tennis@reston.org • www.reston.org

MEN & WOMAN SINGLES & DOUBLES LADDER

If you sign up for the doubles ladder with a partner, you can automatically enter the singles ladder at no additional cost. Upon completion of registering, you will receive a password to the online ladder. You must have a partner to join doubles ladder. Available at Shop RA under Adult Tennis Leagues. FEE: $10 per person.

Challenge Ladder Rules

the match. A withdrawn or canceled challenge is a default loss for the challenger. The standard rules of the United States Tennis Association (USTA) apply to ladder matches. The usual method of scoring is based on winning two of three sets, with a tiebreak at the end of any set that reaches a score of six games each. In the tiebreak, the first to win seven points wins the set, but must win by at least two points.

RESTON ASSOCIATION TENNIS COURT RULES Usage ƒƒ

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The initial ranking of players on a ladder is random. New players are added to the bottom of the ladder. The challenger must contact the player challenged.

The winner of the match is responsible for recording the results online at tennisengine. com within 24 hours of the match.

The challenged player may select the time and location of the match; however, the time and location should be mutually agreeable to both players. The challenger is responsible for providing new tennis balls and reserving the court according to Reston Association Tennis Court Rules.

The ladder listing is updated each time a new challenge match score has been entered. A player inactive for a period of four weeks is moved down in the rankings at that time, with additional penalties for each succeeding period of inactivity. The rules will be interpreted and disputes between members will be settled at the sole discretion of the ladder coordinator, Rob Tucker, at 703-435-6502.

TENNIS PRACTICE WALLS ƒƒ Colts Neck ƒƒ Hook Road ƒƒ Lake Anne Park ƒƒ

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Players must place their membership card and a racquet (or racquet cover) on the numbered hooks on the courtside bulletin boards. Failure to display the racquet/ cover and the membership card or key tag means the court is not reserved. Players reserving courts must remain courtside while waiting to play. One member may reserve a court to use a ball machine or ball hopper. Players may not reserve a court while playing.

RA may reserve courts for lessons, tournaments, league play and court rentals.

Priority of Play ƒƒ

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Court changes are made on the hour. Please show your pass when entering the court. Play is limited to one hour for singles and two hours for doubles when other people are waiting. Players who have used the court for a fraction of the hour must vacate on the hour when others are waiting to play.

Enforcement of the Rules ƒƒ

Reserving a Court ƒƒ

A match should be completed within seven days of the challenge. A person challenged who cannot play within seven days for any reason shall forfeit

RA Members with their membership cards. (Guests must have a guest pass and be accompanied by the host member.) Players must show membership cards and guest passes on the changeover. RA instructors are the ONLY persons permitted to give lessons on a fee-paying basis. Only tennis shoes with nonmarking soles allowed. No jogging or running shoes permitted.

LIGHTED COURTS The following 26 RA courts are lighted until 11 p.m. for night play. ƒƒ Autumnwood Courts ƒƒ Glade Clay Courts ƒƒ Hook Road Courts ƒƒ Lake Newport Courts ƒƒ North Hills Clay Courts ƒƒ Shadowood Courts

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RA court monitors and staff will enforce the rules of court play. Failure to adhere to these rules will result in loss of court privileges.

Membership cards and guest passes are available at the RA tennis office, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston, VA 201913404. Guest passes are also available from a court monitor.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | WINTER EDITION 2011

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TENNIS

RA TENNIS PRO SHOP Call 703-435-6502 for more info on racket demos and shoes. ®

K-SWISS BigShot (Black)

NEW Biomimetic 400 $169.99

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NEW Biomimetic 400 Tour $179.99

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

K-SWISS Tennis Tube (Womens)

NEW Biomimetic 400 Lite $159.99


COME PLAY IN RESTON

WWW.RESTON.ORG | WINTER EDITION 2011

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RA CAMPS

RA CAMPS… Friendship and Fun for over 35 years! Where real friendships are forged, youthful energy abounds, and memories last a lifetime. VISIT THE PARKS, RECREATION & EVENT SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

CAMP INFORMATION

Check the January issue of Reston for complete camp details and a registration form. More information will be posted online in January at www.reston.org.

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Age requirements must be met by September 30, 2012. Safety and supervision exceeds the minimum standards for child day centers as required by the Virginia Department of Social Services. Scholarships are available for Reston youth whose families have a demonstrated financial need.

REGISTRATION

ƒƒ ƒƒ Our family of camps includes: ƒƒ Nature Tots (ages 3-5) ƒƒ Walker’s Rangers (ages 6-8) ƒƒ Hug-A-Tree (ages 5-7) ƒƒ Sportsters (ages 6-8) ƒƒ Mini Camp (ages 5-10) ƒƒ Skate Camp (ages 6-13) ƒƒ Day Camp (ages 7-11) ƒƒ Science Camp (ages 8-12) ƒƒ Teen Camp (ages 11-14) ƒƒ Guard Start (ages 13-15) ƒƒ Counselor-In-Training (ages 14-16) ƒƒ Our staff-to-camper ratio is at least one staff member for every seven campers.

RA Member registration begins January 30, 2012. Non-resident registration begins February 6, 2012.

Payment & Refunds ƒƒ

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Members can register online, beginning at 8:30 a.m. on January 30. Non-member registration begins February 6.

Additional Services

Transportation ƒƒ For an additional fee, van transportation is available within RA boundaries. Pick Up/Drop Off locations must be a home, place of employment or day care provider. Extended Care ƒƒ For an additional fee, extended care is provided from 7:30-9 a.m. and 4-5:30 p.m.

A $75 non-refundable deposit per camper per session is required for all camps at registration time. Exception: Nature Tots and Walker’s Rangers deposit is $40. Full payment for all sessions and services is required by May 1. Refunds, minus applicable deposits, may be recovered until June 1.

 FOR MORE INFORMATION ON RA CAMPS, PLEASE CALL 703-435-6567 OR E-MAIL CAMPADMIN@RESTON.ORG.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

RA CAMPS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM Each year, donations from organizations, businesses and individuals make it possible for economically disadvantaged children of Reston to attend our valuable camp programs. SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR 2011 CAMP SCHOLARSHIP DONORS -- Fairfax County Department of Family Services -- Friends of Reston for Community Projects, Inc. -- Reston Garden Club -- Long & Foster North Hills -- Long & Foster Reston -- Bonnie Haukness -- Pam Tobey If you would like to make a donation to the scholarship fund, please contact CampAdmin@reston.org or call 703-435-6567.


COME PLAY IN RESTON

WWW.RESTON.ORG | WINTER EDITION 2011

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NATURE

NATURE HOUSE

Free parking, restroom and trail access dawn to dusk, 365 days a year.

HOURS OF OPERATION Monday, Wednesday–Friday: 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Tuesdays: Closed Saturday: 10 a.m.–1 p.m. Sunday: 1–4 p.m.

PHOTO BY CHARLES A. VEATCH.

Check holiday schedule for

GENERAL INFORMATION

Reston is a community founded on the preservation and appreciation of natural areas. To this day, a strong environmental stewardship ethic is nurtured in the community. Over 1,300 acres of open space are maintained by Reston Association, including more than 800 acres of woodlands, four lakes, three ponds, four wetlands, 50 meadows, and 20 miles of streams. Environmental education programs are provided by the Walker Nature Education Center, and ample opportunities exist for volunteers to help care for our local environment. Explore, protect and enjoy the nature of Reston.

NATURE ONLINE Join the Walker Nature Education Center’s electronic mailing list. Receive the quarterly newsletter, Branching Out, as well as announcements of upcoming special events. To subscribe, e-mail naturecenter@reston.org.

WALKER NATURE EDUCATION CENTER

Reston Association’s Walker Nature Education Center, located at 11450 Glade Drive, provides a variety of educational and recreational resources, programs and facilities. The mission of the center is to foster an environmental stewardship ethic in the community. The center enhances people’s awareness, knowledge, appreciation, and enjoyment of the environment.

ALL AGES

All ages welcome. Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult.

FALL FOR GEOCACHING The 72-acre wooded site features: ƒƒ Two miles of trails, including an ADA Native Plant Trail ƒƒ Nature House Interpretive Building ƒƒ Picnic pavilion ƒƒ Picnic tables and trailside benches ƒƒ Campfire ring ƒƒ Outdoor displays and interpretive signs ƒƒ Demonstration gardens and meadows ƒƒ Pond ƒƒ Glade Stream Valley ƒƒ Snakeden Branch stream’s entrance to 44-acre Lake Audubon

You can also e-mail nature questions to this address.

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NATURE PROGRAMS

Programs may be cancelled in the event of severe weather, severe weather warnings, or low enrollment. Advance reservations are required for all fee-based programs. Call 703-476-9689 and press 5 or e-mail naturecenter@reston.org.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

DATE: Saturday, Nov. 12 TIME: 11 a.m.-Noon LOCATION: Walker Nature Education

Center,11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Nov. 9 FEE: $4/RA Members $6/Non-members For one day only — come out and try our special nature geocaching trail. We will have several new caches set up with clues to the final cache. What’s inside? Come find out! Please bring your own GPS unit. If you do not have one, let us know when you make your reservation. We will try to have some units available on loan.

additional closings. VISIT THE PARKS, RECREATION & EVENT SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

THANKSGIVING CRAFTERS DATE: Friday, Nov. 18 TIME: 7-8:30 p.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education

Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Nov. 15 FEE: $15/centerpiece, RA Members $20/centerpiece, Non-members Start your holiday season with this festive workshop. Make a beautiful centerpiece with native plant materials and some simple napkin rings for your Thanksgiving table. We’ll enjoy music, mulled cider and seasonal treats as we work. All supplies provided. (When making reservations, please include the number of people in your party and the number of centerpieces.)

WINTER WREATHS DATE: Saturday, Dec. 3 TIME: 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education

Center,11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Nov. 30 FEE: $15/wreath, RA Members $20/wreath, Non-members Get started on your holiday decorating by making festive wreaths for your home. Listen to seasonal music and enjoy mulled cider and cookies. All supplies provided. Fee charged per wreath, not per person. (When making reservations, include number of persons in your party and how many wreaths you would like to make.)


COME PLAY IN RESTON

RENT SPACE AT THE NATURE CENTER Looking for the perfect spot for a community meeting, family gathering or business retreat? Affordable and attractive rentals are available at the Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive.

Nature House Multipurpose Room

664 square feet of space in new Nature House, capacity 94 people, seats 44 people with tables and chairs. Parking and restroom access. RA Member or Reston not-for-profit fee $30/hr. Non-member or Non-Reston not-for-profit fee $50/hr. For profit/corporate fee $75/hr.

Nature Center Pavilion 576 sq. ft. pavilion with picnic tables and bench seating in a beautiful woodland setting. Parking and restroom access. RA Member fee $20/hr. Non-member fee $30/hr. For profit/corporate fee $50/hr.

Campfire Ring Campfire pit with bench seating, small pavilion and picnic tables. Roadside parking. No restroom. RA Member fee $10/hr. Non-member fee $15/hr. For profit/corporate fee $25/hr. Renters must supply their own wood and water to extinguish the fire.

For details and reservations, call 703-476-9689 and press 3 or e-mail naturecenter@reston.org. WWW.RESTON.ORG| |SUMMER WINTER EDITION 2011 WWW.RESTON.ORG

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ATTENTION SCOUT LEADERS The Walker Nature Education Center can help your organization to earn patches & badges.

Make a Date with a Naturalist to...

ALL AGES

Continued from 72.

HOME HUNTING IS FOR THE BIRDS

DIGITAL CAMERA SCAVENGER HUNT

DATE: Saturday, Jan. 28 TIME: 11 a.m.-Noon LOCATION: Walker Nature Education

DATE: Wednesday, Dec. 28 TIME: 2-3 p.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education

Center,11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Dec. 22 FEE: $4/RA Members $6/Non-members Calling all shutter bugs! Bring your digital camera and search the trails for a list of interesting things and creative pictures to compose. Gather back at Nature House where we will warm up with refreshments, enjoy your photos and award prizes in kids and adult categories.

Center,11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Jan. 25 FEE: $4/RA Members $6/Non-members The best time to spot bird nests is in the winter when the leaves are gone. Learn how birds select a location and make their nests. Examine some real nests up close, then go on a short hike to see if we can find some along the trail.

BABES IN THE WOODS

18 months through 35 months. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

HOT STARS ON A COOL NIGHT

LEAF MAGIC

DATE: Friday, Jan. 13 TIME: 7-8:30 p.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education

DATE: Monday, Nov. 14 TIME: 10-11 a.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education

Center,11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Jan. 10 FEE: $4/RA Members $6/Non-members Winter is a great time to explore the galaxy. Learn about celestial objects that are now in view. Then head to the boat ramp at Lake Audubon Pool to check out the stars over the water. Hot cocoa will be provided.

Center,11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Nov. 10 FEE: $5/RA Members $8/Non-members The woods look very different in the fall. Discover which trees have lost their leaves and which are still holding onto them. Search for fall colors and make a craft from fallen leaves. Listen to the crunch of leaves as you walk along the trails.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

WHOO’S THERE? DATE: Monday, Dec. 5 TIME: 10-11 a.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education

Center,11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Dec. 1 FEE: $5/RA Members $8/Non-members While many birds fly south for the winter, owls stay and face the cold weather. Learn how owls stay warm and read Owl Moon. Hoot like an owl and make a feathery craft.

CRAFTY COYOTES DATE: Monday, Jan. 9 TIME: 10-11 a.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education

Lead a fun and educational program in an achievement area such as: Forester, Naturalist, Wildlife, Eco-action, Earth Connections, Earth is Our Home, Earth and Sky, Water Everywhere, Senses, Animals and more. FEE: $4 per participant (minimum charge $40), RA Members $6 per participant (minimum charge $60), Non-members Lead a Campfire Fun or Campfire Cookery program. FEE: $5 per participant (minimum charge $50), RA Members $8 per participant (minimum charge $80), Non-members Campfire Ring Rental FEE: $10/hr. for RA Members $15/hr. for Non-members You bring the wood and the water. Lead a Community Service Project with your group. FREE. Activity kits are also available on loan for Birds, Trees and Watershed requirements.

Center,11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Jan. 6 FEE: $5/RA Members $8/Non-members Who is the noisiest wild dog? The coyote, of course. Learn about coyotes, howl in a coyote chorus, feel some coyote fur and make a neat craft to take home.

Call 703-476-9689 and press 3 or e-mail naturecenter@reston.org for details and reservations.


COME PLAY IN RESTON

PLANNING A BIRTHDAY PARTY? Bring the kids and the cake to a fun-filled, creative party at the nature center. Thematic parties include a two hour pavilion or room rental, 45 minutes of activities, party favors, table setting and all paper products.

FEE: $175/RA Members, $200/Non-members

Choose from the following themes: NATURE DETECTIVES (AGES 3-7)

NATURE CRAFTS (AGES 3-12)

Learn to be a good nature detective by using your eyes, ears, nose and hands. Play sensory guessing games, find what doesn’t belong on our “unnature” trail, and follow clues to solve a mystery animal’s trail. Favors include a magnifying hand lens, a mini-notebook and a nature center pencil. The birthday child receives an Earl the Squirrel stuffed toy.

Learn new skills and nature facts as you make a variety of crafts to take home. Younger crafters will make bug boxes, rock insects, nature picture frames, and wildlife masks or puppets. Older crafters will try their hands at leather craft, building a bird feeder and making beaded accessories.

HOW TO BOOK • • • • •

Parties may be booked up to three months in advance. Weekend dates are limited and fill quickly. Consider a weekday afternoon or evening party. Call 703-476-9689 and press 3 or e-mail naturecenter@reston.org. MAXIMUM: 15 children per party.

PRESCHOOL HAPPENINGS

3 to 5 years. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

ANTLERS AND ACORNS DATE: Monday, Nov. 21 TIME: 10-11 a.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education

Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Nov. 18 FEE: $5/RA Members $8/Non-members Learn why November is an important time of year for deer. Make a craft, touch real antlers and go on a short hike to see what is left in the forest for the deer to eat.

WINTER WOODPECKERS DATE: Monday, Dec. 12 TIME: 10-11 a.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education

Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Dec. 9 FEE: $5/RA Members $8/Non-members Woodpeckers love to search the trees for food, even during winter. Learn about woodpeckers and other birds who peck on trees. Take a short hike to look for their homes and make a fun craft.

DINOSAURS (AGES 3-9)

CAMPFIRE FUN (AGES 7-12)

Share what you know about these amazing animals. Uncover bones and shells like a paleontologist, and make your own fossil imprints in clay. Go on a dinosaur egg hunt that will lead you to a nest full of eggs. Favors include a dinosaur egg, a dinosaur sticker and a fossil imprint. The birthday child gets a Myrtle the Turtle key chain.

Parties are held at the campfire ring off of Soapstone Drive. Program includes nature jokes, stories, songs, and games around the campfire. S’mores provided. Favors include a glow stick and red hot candies. The birthday child gets a nature center flashlight.

STINKY SKUNKS

CANDLE MAKING

DATE: Monday, Jan. 23 TIME: 10-11 a.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education

DATE: Friday, Dec. 16 TIME: 7-8 p.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education

Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Jan. 20 FEE: $5/RA Members $8/Non-members Despite their smelly reputation, skunks are very neat. Find out what skunks like to eat, why they are black and white, and if they are active during the cold winter months. Make a cute craft and sing a silly, smelly song!

Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Dec. 13 FEE: $5/RA Members $8/Non-members Before light bulbs, candles were an important item in every home. Learn where wax comes from and discover how candles are made. Dip a pair of candles and decorate a pillar candle with natural materials. Keep your candles for yourself or give them away as gifts. There will be colonial music and refreshments while we work. All supplies provided.

CHILDREN’S PROGRAMS

5 to 12 years. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

TURKEY TIME DATE: Sunday, Nov. 20 TIME: 2-3 p.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education

Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Nov. 17 FEE: $5/RA Members $8/Non-members Come celebrate turkeys in a whole new way. Compete in turkey races and do your best turkey call. Make turkey decorations for your Thanksgiving table. Gobble up the fun at this seasonal program!

OWL PELLET INVESTIGATION DATE: Thursday, Jan. 19 TIME: 7-8 p.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education

Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Jan. 16 FEE: $5/RA Members $8/Non-members Owls eat a variety of small animals. Learn how owls catch their prey, which owls live in Reston, and what they like to eat. Become a nature detective and dissect a real owl pellet!

ADULT PROGRAMS

16 years to adult

WINE TASTING AT NATURE HOUSE DATE: Friday, Nov. 4 TIME: 4-6 p.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education

Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Nov. 1 FEE: $7/RA Members $10/Non-members See details on page 83.

ECO-FRIENDLY CLEANING DATES & TIME: Saturday, Nov. 5,

10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. or Wednesday, Nov. 9, 6:30-8:30 p.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Nov. 2 FEE: $5/person RA or RCC Members $8/person Non-members This workshop will teach about why it is a good idea to reduce the use of harsh, sometimes toxic, cleansers in the home. Learn how to make safe and environmentallyfriendly household cleansers, which is quick and easy to do and very economical. Participants are encouraged to purchase Clean House, Clean Planet by Karen Logan and bring it to the workshop. Brought to you in partnership with the Reston Community Center.

 FOR NATURE PROGRAM RESERVATIONS, CALL 703-476-9689 AND PRESS 5 OR E-MAIL NATURECENTER@RESTON.ORG.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | WINTER EDITION 2011

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Environmental Volunteers Needed Details in the Get Involved section. Adopt-A-Spot — help keep your favorite trail or recreation area in tip top shape, see page 87. Storm Drain Marking — help mark storm drains that flow to local streams and the Chesapeake Bay, see page 88. Stream Monitors — help monitor local stream health by inventorying macroinvertebrates, see page 88. Weed Warriors — help protect the trees and other native plants in our natural areas, see page 87.

ADULT PROGRAMS

Continued from 75.

ENVIRONMENTAL FILM NIGHT: DIRT! THE MOVIE DATE: Friday, Nov. 11 TIME: 7-9 p.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education

Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Nov. 8 FEE: $5 suggested donation Dirt! The Movie is an insightful and timely film that tells the story of the glorious and unappreciated material beneath our feet. Inspired by William Bryant Logan’s acclaimed book, Dirt: The Ecstatic Skin of the Earth, this awardwinning film takes a humorous and substantial look into the history and current state of the living organic matter that we come from and will later return to. After the film, participate in a discussion about the lessons of the film and its call to action. Special guests include Dan Schwartz (Soil Scientist, Northern Virginia Soil and Water Conservation District) and Judy Zatsick (Fairfax County Master Gardeners, Green Spring Garden Park). Brought to you in partnership with Sustainable Reston, and made possible through the generosity of the Fairfax County Restoration Project.

MENU FOR THE FUTURE

BIRD WALKS

DATE: Mondays, Jan. 23-Feb. 27 TIME: 7-8:30 p.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education

16 years to adult FREE. No reservations required.

Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Jan. 2 FEE: $25/RA or RCC Members $30/Non-members Join this facilitated discussion course about modern food systems and our role as consumers in a global food marketplace. Participants will receive a book of readings that form the basis of each of the six discussions. The readings consider food from cultural, economic, ecological, health and social perspectives. Coordinator: Diane Blust, Sustainable Reston Local Foods Working Group. Brought to you in partnership with Reston Community Center. (Pay your fee when you pick up course materials approximately two weeks before the first session.)

Beginning and expert birders are invited to search for birds in some of Reston’s most beautiful natural areas. We will visit a variety of sites. Our collaborative efforts usually produce a good variety of local birds, and we always have a great time. These walks are jointly sponsored by Reston Association and its Environmental Advisory Committee, the Audubon Society of Northern Virginia and The Bird Feeder store. There are no fees and registration is not required. There is no bird walk in December or January. We encourage you to participate in one of the area’s bird counts.

NOVEMBER BIRD WALK: BUTTERMILK CREEK AND LAKE FAIRFAX DATE: Sunday, Nov. 20 TIME: 7:30-10:30 a.m. LOCATION: Park at Uplands Pool,

11032 Ring Road. FEE: Free LEADER: Kevin Munroe, Fairfax County Park Authority

 FOR NATURE PROGRAM RESERVATIONS, CALL 703-476-9689 AND PRESS 5 OR E-MAIL NATURECENTER@RESTON.ORG.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

WINTER BIRD COUNT DATE: Saturday, Jan. 7 TIME: 7 a.m.-Noon LOCATION: Walker Nature Education

Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Jan. 4 FEE: Free Join us for a half-day annual bird count throughout Reston’s natural areas. Meet local bird experts, learn tips on identification and have fun while helping obtain important information about our feathered friends. Enjoy lunch, tally results and swap stories back at Nature House following the count.


COME PLAY IN RESTON

STREAM RESTORATION STORM REPORT

The nearly eight miles of restored streams were inspected and fared very well despite the extreme weather, with less than 1percent of the project needing repairs. Snakeden Branch faired the best with well established vegetation and an open floodplain. Less woody debris from Snakeden Branch was found floating in Lake Audubon compared to the two thirty-yard dumpsters of debris that were removed after Tropical Storm Hannah hit in 2008 before stream restoration was completed.

Extreme weather hit Reston in early September. Ten inches of rain fell Sept. 5-8 with two-thirds (6.4 inches) falling on Thursday. RA staff monitored lake water levels when five inches of rain fell in three hours on Thursday afternoon flooding many stream valleys and lakes.

The Glade experienced a few areas where the trails approaching the bridges washed away and a few specific problem spots that require small equipment to repair.

installed plants washed away and some bedding material was displaced. The newly installed bridge connecting Reston to Lake Fairfax Park is still standing, but the trail approaches washed away on both sides. It is evident that without restoration, much more sediment and debris would have washed downstream, clogging road culverts and filling in Reston’s lakes. Next steps for the project include getting funding to start construction on the Hickory Cluster stream that drains into Lake Anne near North Shore Drive. Construction is expected, if all permissions are granted, beginning in fall/ winter 2012. For more information, visit Reston.wetlandstudies.com or contact Nicki Bellezza at nicki@reston.org or 703-435-6560.

The Forest Edge stream in the Colvin Run watershed was completed less than three months before the storm. Many of the newly

EIGHT PROHIBITED PLANTS IN RESTON

Banned Invasive Exotics

Invasive exotic plants are nonnative to North America. They spread quickly and out-compete our native vegetation. Often, invasive exotic plants get their start in yards and gardens where they can become a serious problem for the property owner and adversely affect neighboring private property, as well as RA natural areas. The proliferation of these plants decreases plant diversity and harms the wildlife that depends on native plants for food and shelter. Many invasive exotics overtake native shrubs and trees that are a signature of the Reston community. Efforts to control these species on RA property are ongoing and costly. We are grateful for the many volunteers who have worked diligently to remove invasive exotic plants and educate our members about their harmful effects. By resolution of Reston Association’s Board of Directors, the Use and Maintenance Standards for all properties that fall under the Reston deed were amended in May of 2008 to prohibit the planting of eight invasive exotics.

ƒƒ Flowering Pears (Pyrus calleryana cultivars) ƒƒ Winged Burning Bush (Euonymus alata) ƒƒ Japanese Barberry (Berberis thunbergii) ƒƒ Exotic Bush Honeysuckles (Lonicera spp.) ƒƒ Exotic Bamboos (Bambusa spp.) ƒƒ Chinese Wisteria (Wisteria sinensis) The Oriental Bittersweet vine winds its way up trees and may girdle or even kill a tree.

If you would like to learn more about invasive exotic plants, visit “Plants” on the “Natural Resources” page in the “Nature” section of our website, www.reston.org.

Please direct questions to our environmental resource staff at 703-437-7658. Thank you for your cooperation in not planting any of these species in Reston.

ƒƒ Japanese Wisteria (Wisteria floribunda) ƒƒ English Ivy (Hedera helix) ƒƒ Oriental Bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus)

If you would like to volunteer to help control invasive plants in Reston, contact Ha Brock via e-mail at habrock@reston.org. WWW.RESTON.ORG | WINTER EDITION 2011

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PHOTO BY CHARLES A. VEATCH.

NATURE

RULES FOR THE USE OF RESTON ASSOCIATION COMMON AREA 1.

2.

Owners, including owners of property adjacent to the Common Area, shall not attempt to nor improve, alter, landscape or mow Reston Association (RA) Common Area. Owners, including owners of property adjacent to the Common Area, shall confine all fencing (including invisible fencing), sheds, or any other development to their own property.

3.

RA meadows in the Common Area shall be mowed annually by RA staff only.

4.

Smoking is prohibited within all RA Community Buildings, and is also prohibited in all Pool facilities; on and within all Tennis Court facilities and Picnic Pavilions; on all Ball fields, Multipurpose Courts, Garden Plots or Garden Plot Areas; and on or within Tot-Lots or Tot-Lot Areas. This smoking ban is also in effect for up to a 25-foot perimeter around these buildings or facilities, to the extent that the 25 feet, or any portion thereof, comprises RA Common Area.

5.

Horseback riding shall be confined to designated bridle paths.

6.

Dogs are to be walked on a leash in accordance with Fairfax County regulations. Cats, while on Common Area, must also be walked on a leash. Except for service dogs, no pets are permitted on active recreation areas, including but not limited to, such areas as playgrounds, picnic and multi-purpose courts, and play fields.

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7.

Dumping of any refuse, including but not limited to grass clippings, leaves, Christmas trees, appliances, old sofas, crank case oil, etc. is prohibited. [Also see Amended Deed Section VI.2(b)]

8.

No invasive exotic plants or animals (especially invasive plants such as bamboo and English ivy), shall be introduced to the RA Common Area.

9.

Unless specifically authorized by the Association, the use of any motor vehicles or other motorized vehicle, other than governmental police, fire and rescue vehicles, on walkways or other Common Area is prohibited. [Also see Amended Deed Section VI.2(db)(10)]

10. Loitering, as defined by Fairfax County Code Article 1 Section 5-1-2, is prohibited. Specifically, it shall be unacceptable for any person to loiter at, on or in RA Common Area in the following manner: a. To interfere, impede or hinder the free passage of pedestrian or authorized vehicular traffic; b. To threaten or do physical harm to another member or members of the public; c. To threaten or do physical damage to the Common Area; or d. To breach the peace or engage in disorderly conduct by the use of words, or acts or other conduct that clearly threaten, intimidate or present a danger to others. Except where 10 a-d apply, before contacting local law enforcement, Reston Association, in its sole discretion, may contact an appropriate organization(s) to assist in the intervention with or removal of individuals from the Common Area.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

11. Unless specifically authorized by the RA Board of Directors, the following actions are prohibited in the RA Common Area: a. Carrying or discharging of firearms, air guns, archery equipment, including but not limited to bow and arrow, and B-B guns; b. Hunting, trapping, harvesting or collecting of any wildlife, including but not limited to mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians; c. Feeding of non-domesticated wild animals (except songbirds); d. Practices that attract nondomesticated wild animals or those that may be vectors for infectious diseases, including, but not limited to, leaving pet food out of doors overnight in a location accessible to non-domesticated wild animals; e. Fires or burning; f. Overnight camping; g. Harvesting or collecting plant life, except as authorized by the Association. 12. Fishing in the Association’s Lakes and Ponds is permitted as per Section 8(i) of Common Area Rules & Regulations Resolution 2 on Lake Use & Access. 13. Geocaching (use of Geographic Positioning Systems (GPS) to locate a cache of materials is permitted only by Members under the following rules: a. Members interested in performing geocaching must notify the Association of all cache sites. b. Cache sites located on the Common Area must be completely hidden from view. c. Cache sites are not permitted near wildflowers, a wildlife nest or den. d. Cache sites located in the Association’s Common Area, known as the Walker Nature Education Center, must be no more than ten feet from a pathway or trail edge. e. The Association shall not be held liable for any injuries or personal property damage incurred by those participating in geocaching on the Common Area. The Board of Directors may, for specific management purposes on certain properties, amend these rules or implement additional rules to meet land and resource management objectives.


COME PLAY IN RESTON Boating in Reston Reston’s four lakes are also available for boating. We suggest taking your favorite book out, having a floating picnic or fishing for large mouth bass. ƒƒ ƒƒ

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FISHING & BOATING GUIDELINES

Species of fish that may be caught include:

Other general access points for hand-carried boats include:

Reston’s four man-made lakes — Anne, Thoreau, Audubon, and Newport — along with Reston’s two ponds, Bright and Butler, cover 125 acres and provide recreation and stormwater management for the community. While swimming and ice skating are not permitted, fishing, boating, wildlife watching, and lakeside picnicking are available to RA members and their guests.

Large mouth bass, channel catfish, crappie, blue gill and sunfish. Please release grass carp. To support the large mouth bass population, please fish out large mouth bass four to twelve inches from Lake Aududon, Thoreau and Newport. Catch and release all species at Lake Anne.

Fishing in Reston

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Fishing is allowed on all of Reston’s lakes and ponds from designated areas. ƒƒ Lake Newport: Along dam (park at Brown’s Chapel). Lake Anne: Along Lake Anne Plaza steps and dock, along south shore of the canal and along dam.

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Electric motors only A free permit for general access to the four lakes is available at the RA main office,12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, during regular office hours. Proof of boat size is required. The concrete boat ramp at Lake Audubon, off of Twin Branches Road, is available to launch boats from trailers. Access points are monitored between April and October.

Anglers 16 years and older must have a VA fishing license. Residents may fish from RA-owned property, which includes the dams on each lake. Much of the shoreline around each lake is private. Please respect the “No Trespassing” and “Private Property” areas indicated by signs. Please do not litter. Please do not feed ducks, geese or other waterfowl.

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Boat Reminders ƒƒ

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ƒƒ Lake Thoreau: Along 80 feet of shoreline and dock near Thoreau pool, along dam, along bridge near golf course, and along timber wall at Purple Beach.

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Lake Audubon: Along dam behind Brenton Point Drive, at boat ramp and dam at Twin Branches Road and along shoreline for 150 feet near Nature Center. Docks are private.

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Help protect our wildlife.

On Lake Thoreau, the grassy area by the underpasses at the intersection of South Lakes Drive and Ridge Heights Road. On Lake Anne, the area at the north end of the dam at the intersection of Wiehle Ave. and Inlet Court. On Lake Newport, at the east end of the dam at the wooden dock.

Boats (jon boats, canoes, deck boats, sailboats, etc.) may be up to 18 feet long, and no more than ten feet wide. One electric motor (no gas motors) up to three horsepower may be used. Inflatables must have three separate compartments and sidewalls. All boats are required to have a wearable flotation device for each passenger on board. All boats left in the water between November 1 and March 31 require a permanent mooring permit. If you see an abandoned boat floating around or have lost your boat on our lakes, call Watershed Specialist Brian Petty at 703-435-6535 to help track it down. Only lakefront owners may permanently moor a boat on Reston's lakes. Cluster or condo associations who own lakefront property have specific rules regarding boat mooring, consistent with RA rules and regulations. For more information, see Resolution 2: Lake Use Access in Governing Documents.

Lines, lures and hooks can be harmful to people and animals. Please take them with you when you leave.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | WINTER EDITION 2011

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FRIENDS OF RESTON FR EE

Brush Chipping Dispose of Brush

RA’s brush chipping program offers you a place to bring your brush for chipping at no cost. RA Guidelines state that no brush may be dumped on RA property. Just drop off your brush at the locations listed below and RA crews will chip it for use on RA open space.

ADOPT-A-BENCH PROGRAM

Adopt-A-Bench is a program of Friends of Reston, which seeks to increase seating along Reston’s pathways and at recreational areas. Donations are appreciated in any amount and are tax-deductible. Sponsor a bench in someone’s honor for the donation amounts below.

Tennis Benches

CHIPPING DATES & SITES November 19-20

Lake Audubon Pool 2070 Twin Branches Road

December 17-18

Central Services Facility 12250 Sunset Hills Road

Donation Amount $235

Pathway/Recreation Facility Benches

January 21-22

Lake Audubon Pool 2070 Twin Branches Road PLEASE: Brush only (Branches should be less than 4 inches in diameter). No grass clippings, dirt, trash, paper, vines, thorns or other debris. Brush may be dropped off at any time during the days listed. No contractors. Donation Amount: $750

THE NATURE OF RESTON

Select the court location (based on availability on a first-come, first serve basis). Cost includes an engraved plaque if desired. For more details about tennis benches, contact tennis@reston. org or call 703-435-6534.

Locations based upon need and your preference. Benches are made of recycled plastic with heavy duty steel supports. Cost includes an engraved plaque if desired. For more information about pathway/recreation facility benches, contact CSFstaff@reston.org or call 703-437-7658.

Please make checks payable to the “Friends of Reston” and write “Adopt-ABench” in the memo section. Mail to: Friends of Reston, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston VA 20191.

ADOPT A RECYCLING BIN

Photos by: Charles A. Veatch Text By: Claudia Thompson-Deahl An art photography, nature and informational book and guide to Reston’s habitats all in one beautiful hard-bound volume. ON SALE FOR $30 at Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive All proceeds from the book sales go to the Walker Nature Education Center.

Donation Amount: $475

Help Reston increase recycling in the community. Attractive recycling bins are needed at Reston’s tennis courts. Select the court of your choice. Reston Association will manage the recyclables. The bins are made of 100% recycled plastic lumber, fastened to a sturdy, recycled, cast-aluminum frame. The cost includes an engraved plaque if desired.

Make checks payable to “Friends of Reston” and write “Adopt-A-Recycling Bin” in the memo section. Mail to: Friends of Reston, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston VA 20191. For more information, contact CSFstaff@reston.org or call 703-437-7658.


COMMUNITY BUILDING RENTAL

COME PLAY IN RESTON

MEETING FACILITIES

RA’s Glade Room and Brown’s Chapel are frequently used for group functions, including cluster meetings, scout meetings, wedding ceremonies and a variety of classes. RENTAL FEES: $12.50–$70 per hour (security deposit required) Contact Member Services to reserve a community room by calling 703-435-6530 or emailing member_services@reston.org.

BROWN’S CHAPEL, 11300 Baron Cameron Avenue Size: 914 square feet Its tall ceilings provide excellent acoustics and its parklike grounds offer a lovely setting. The facility has chairs to seat 65 people, three tables, restroom facilities, heating, air conditioning and ample parking. It is perfect for church services, small meetings or classes. GLADE ROOM, 11550 Glade Drive Size: 881 square feet Located above the pool bathhouse at the intersection of Glade and Soapstone Drive. This facility is equipped with chairs to seat 65 people, four tables, restroom facilities, heating and air conditioning. It is an ideal facility for preschool groups, dance classes, small meetings and club functions.

PICNIC PAVILIONS

Available for rent 7 days a week April through October, a perfect place for private parties and group gatherings. RENTAL FEES APPLY: $150/RA Members, $300/Corporate & Non-members HUNTERS WOODS PICNIC PAVILION (James “Jimmy” Wright Memorial Pavilion), at the corner of Steeplechase Drive and Reston Parkway. Size: 842 square feet The pavilion offers four picnic tables, one grill and ample parking (shared parking at Hunters Woods Pool or Hunters Woods Park).

NORTH HILLS PICNIC PAVILION Center Harbor Road and North Village Road Size: 1,024 square feet North Hills Picnic Pavilion offers electricity, water, lights, three large brick barbecue grills, two portable restrooms, six picnic tables (under cover of pavilion), tot-lot and ample parking.

BROWN’S CHAPEL PICNIC PAVILION Located next to Brown’s Chapel, 11300 Baron Cameron Avenue

PONY BARN Corner of Steeplechase Drive and Triple Crown Road Size: 2,006 square feet

This pavilion is equipped with four picnic tables, two grills, and restrooms. The pavilion is near a basketball court, ball fields, an exercise trail and a tot-lot. Lake Newport is close by for fishing off the dock/ dam. Brown’s Chapel Picnic Pavilion is available on a firstcome, first-serve basis at no charge.

A wood-chipped tot-lot, equipped with swings and a jungle gym, is an inviting place for youngsters to romp and play. The Pony Barn contains seven picnic tables, two grills and two portable restrooms. Water available.

LAKE ANNE PICNIC PAVILION 11301 North Shore Drive Size: 900 square feet Lake Anne Park includes a tot-lot, two large grills and a restroom facility. Six picnic tables are situated under cover. Basketball court, tennis court, sand volleyball court, water, electricity, and ample parking also are available. Recreational courts are not included in private reservation.

TEMPORARY ROAD PICNIC PAVILION Corner of North Shore Drive and Temporary Road Size: 892 square feet The pavilion is equipped with ten picnic tables (Eight of which are under cover), one large grill, two portable restrooms, swing set and four benches situated throughout the park. Parking is available in 16 marked spaces or at curbside. Water fountain available.

WALKER NATURE EDUCATION CENTER: See page 73 for more information on rental space.


SPECIAL EVENTS

Reston Association has something for everyone, including trips to local places of interest, monthly movies for seniors and a fun Halloween event, just to name a few. Join us at one of Reston Association’s many facilities and see what’s in it for you. VISIT THE PARKS, RECREATION & EVENT SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

CHILDREN’S EVENTS

For ages three through five years. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

HALLOWEEN FUN DATE: Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2011 TIME: 10–11 a.m. LOCATION: Reston Association, 12001

Sunrise Valley Drive FEE: $3/RA Members $6/Non-members Dress up in your favorite costume and join the fun with hands-on activities, crafts and go trick-ortreating around the Association office. Registration is required. Payment due at the event. Contact Ashleigh@reston.org or call 703435-6530 to register

KIDS PLAY DATE: Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2012 TIME: 10–11 a.m. LOCATION: Reston Association, 12001

Sunrise Valley Drive FEE: $4 RA Members $6/Non-members Great Kids Village staff will cosponsor a morning of fun with the Reston Association. We will have a variety of activities, crafts and games. Great event for a mom’s group, play dates and stay-at-home parents. Registration required. Payment due at the event. Contact Ashleigh@reston.

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org or call 703-435-6530 to register.

ALL AGES

All ages welcome. Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult.

RESTON PRESENTS SERIES Reston Presents is a bi-monthly lecture and presentation series that highlights the multifaceted talents of local residents. Topics include anything from cooking demonstrations to stories from war veterans and book signings with local authors. Reston Present is sponsored by the Reston Association and the Reston Community Center.

insightful program, hear personal and professional development coach, Joanne Aaronson, PMP, provide some key signs along the journey of life to stay on course. She’ll address: ƒƒ Recognizing the signs and patterns meant to guide us ƒƒ Using these markers to make key decisions ƒƒ Knowing when you’re on the right path ƒƒ How we know that death is not the end ƒƒ Registration is requested. ƒƒ For more information, contact Ashleigh@reston.org or 703435-6577.

LIFE IS A JOURNEY….

MEDICARE AND MEDICAID

DATE: Monday, Nov. 14, 2011 TIME: 7–9 p.m. LOCATION: Reston Community Center

DATE: Monday, Feb. 13, 2012 TIME: 7–9 p.m. LOCATION: Reston Community

at Lake Anne, 1609 Washington Plaza FEE: FREE This month features, “Life is a Journey….Death is not the End” Do patterns repeat in your life, but you don’t know what they mean? Do you make the same mistakes with your relationships, job situations or finances over and over? It is possible to learn how to recognize the signs that can guide us to our best life path. In this

Center at Lake Anne, 1609 Washington Plaza FEE: FREE This month features Buckley Fricker, an attorney dedicated to aging issues, who will educate and encourage attendees to plan ahead to make informed decisions regarding care options for the ederly. Registration required. For more information or to register to attend, contact Ashleigh@reston. org or 703-435-6577.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

SENIOR EVENTS

Ages 55 years and older

SENIOR MOVIE DAY WEDNESDAYS:

Oct. 26, 2011, Featuring, “Morning Glory” Nov. 23, 2011, “TBD” *Dec. 21, 2011, “TBD” Jan. 25, 2012, “TBD” (*one week early due to the holiday) TIME: Doors open at 9:15 a.m. Showtime is at 10 a.m. LOCATION: Reston Town Center Bow Tie Cinemas FEE: FREE The Reston Association, in cooperation with Reston Town Center Bow Tie Cinemas, presents, “Meet Me at the Movies.” Join us on the fourth Wednesday of each month. Refreshments are provided and door prizes are distributed prior to the movie. Movie titles are posted at www.reston.org.


COME PLAY IN RESTON

Seniors Advisory Committee This committee, established by the Reston Association, is charged with developing and implementing programs to benefit Reston’s senior adults. If you have visited Reston Town Center’s Bow Tie Cinemas recently to see a movie and enjoy coffee and pastries with friends, then you have seen the work of the Seniors Advisory Committee firsthand. We are looking for NEW ideas and FRESH perspectives. Give something back to your community by sharing your talents and ideas.

Place: Reston Association 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Time: 2–3:30 p.m. Date: 2nd Tuesday of each month

SENIOR EVENTS

Continued from page 82

HOLIDAY WREATH DECORATION

SENIOR SOCIAL DATE: Wednesday, March 15, 2012 TIME: Noon–2 p.m. LOCATION: Reston Community Center

DATE: Thursday, Dec. 1, 2011 TIME: 1:30–3:30 p.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education

WINE TASTING AT THE NATURE HOUSE DATE: Friday, Nov. 4, 2011 TIME: 4–6 p.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education

Center, 11450 Glade Drive FEE: $7/RA Members $10/Non-members Enjoy an evening of wine tasting in the beautiful setting of the Walker Nature Education Center. Sample red and white wines along with a variety of cheese and crackers. The evening includes a tour of the nature center’s gardens and ADA accessible trail. Watch for birds doing their own “tasting” at feeders. Look at wild grape vines and late blooming flowers. Registration is required as space is limited. Payment due at the event.

Center, 11450 Glade Drive FEE: $8/RA Members $12/Non-members Join us to create a beautiful seasonal decoration. We will have many options for you to choose from to make your floral decoration unique and an instructor to guide you along the way. Registration is required as space is limited. Payment due at the event.

SENIOR SOCIAL DATE: Thursday, Jan. 19, 2012 TIME: 1:30–3 p.m. LOCATION: Reston Community Center

at Hunters Woods, 2310 Colts Neck Road FEE: FREE Plan your fall calendar while you learn about upcoming senior adult trips, classes, and events that are facilitated by Reston Community Center and Reston Association. Enjoy a sampling of treats while meeting new people and catching up with friends. Door prizes will be awarded during the event. This event is co-sponsored by RCC and Reston Association.

CPR CLASS FOR SENIORS DATE: Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2012 TIME: 1–3 p.m. LOCATION: Tall Oaks Assisted Living

Facility, 12055 North Shore Drive FEE: $10/RA Members $14/Non-members Consider taking advantage of the newly revised training programs and materials now being implemented by the American Red Cross for CPR emergencies. It could save the life of your spouse, your best friend or your neighbor. Registration is required as space is limited. Payment due at the event. Contact Ashleigh@reston.org or 703-435-6530 to register.

at Hunters Woods, 2310 Colts Neck Road FEE: FREE It's never too early to celebrate the luck o' the Irish. The quarterly Reston Community Center and Reston Association social event is switching gears in March to celebrate St. Patrick's Day. Spend the afternoon with friends while enjoying traditional Irish fare and beautiful Irish music and entertainment. Plan your social calendar while you learn about upcoming senior adult trips, classes, and events. This event is cosponsored by Reston Community Center and Reston Association. Registration required. Contact Ashleigh@reston.org or call 703-435-6577 to register.

 TO REGISTER OR GET INFORMATION ON UPCOMING EVENTS, CONTACT ASHLEIGH@RESTON.ORG OR CALL 703-435-6577.

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SPECIAL EVENTS

Join Reston Association, as we take a variety of trips this year to locations such as Museums, a Dinner Theatre and local places of interest. Join us as we have fun visiting the area’s hot spots. For upcoming trip dates, details and to get on our trip mailing list, contact Ashleigh@reston.org or call 703-435-6577. VISIT THE PARKS, RECREATION & EVENT SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

SENIOR TRIPS AND TOURS

Ages 55 years and older

TRIP TO WESTERN MARYLAND SCENIC RAILROAD TRAIN RIDE DATE: Thursday, Oct. 27, 2011 TIME: 8:30 a.m.–6:30 p.m. BUS PICK-UP TIMES & LOCATIONS:

8:30 a.m. Hunters Woods Shopping Center (Ledo’s Pizza) 8:45 a.m. Thoreau Place, 1951 Sagewood Lane 9 a.m. Lake Anne Fellowship House, 11450 North Shore Drive FEE: $55/RA Members $63/Non-members Join us for a chartered bus trip up to Cumberland, MD, for a roundtrip excursion on the Western Maryland Scenic Railroad. Experience a mixture of mountain scenery, with the fall leaves changing. Participants are given the opportunity for not only an entertaining, but educational experience. Pack a lunch to enjoy during your lovely train ride. Registration is required. Registration form can be found on our website at www.reston.org.

NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA REHEARSAL TRIP

BILLY ELLIOT THE MUSICAL AT THE KENNEDY CENTER DATE: Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2012 TIME: 12 – 5:30 p.m. BUS PICK-UP TIMES & LOCATIONS:

DATE: Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011 TIME: 8 a.m.–2 p.m. (The concert is

from 10 a.m.–12:30 p.m.) PICK UP TIMES AND LOCATIONS:

8:00 a.m. Hunters Woods Shopping Center (Ledo’s Pizza) 8:15 a.m. Thoreau Place, 1951 Sagewood Lane 8:30 a.m. Lake Anne Fellowship House, 11450 North Shore Drive FEE: $26/RA Members $31/Non-members Attend an open rehearsal of the National Symphony Orchestra at the Kennedy Center Concert Hall conducted by Leonard Slatkin. E-mail Ashleigh@reston.org or call 703-435-6577 for more information. Payment is required to hold reservations. You must cancel 72 hours in advance to receive a refund.

TRIP TO FORD’S THEATRE TO SEE ‘A CHRISTMAS CAROL’ DATE: Thursday, Dec. 15, 2011 TIME: 10:15 a.m.–3 p.m. BUS PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS:

10:15 a.m. Hunters Wood Shopping Center (Ledo’s Pizza) 10:30 a.m. Thoreau Place, 1951 Sagewood Lane 10:45 a.m. Lake Anne Fellowship House, 11450 North Shore Drive FEE: $53/RA Members $61/Non-members Help us ring in the holidays with Charles Dickens’ timeless tale of redemption and charity brought to colorful life for the Yuletide season. Registration required. All sales are final. Registration form can be found on our website at www.reston.org.

 TO REGISTER OR GET INFORMATION ON UPCOMING EVENTS, CONTACT ASHLEIGH@RESTON.ORG OR CALL 703-435-6577.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Noon Hunters Woods Shopping Center (Ledo’s Pizza) 12:15 p.m. Thoreau Place, 1951 Sagewood Lane 12:30 p.m. Lake Anne Fellowship House, 11450 North Shore Drive FEE: $67/RA Members $75/Non-members (Seats are in the first tier of the Opera House) Join us for a charter bus trip to the Kennedy Center to see Billy Elliot. This musical has heart, humor, and passion and has been called “the most inspiring show I’ve seen in years” by the New York Times. The show was honored with ten 2009 Tony Awards, including Best Musical. Set in a small English town, the story follows Billy as he stumbles out of the boxing ring and into a ballet class, discovering a surprising talent for dance that inspires his family and his whole community, and changes his life forever. It’s your turn to experience this joyous celebration of one boy’s journey against the odds to make his dreams come true. Registration is required. All sales are final.


COME PLAY IN RESTON

Want a great

Reston summer job? Festival 2012 Special Events Assistant Position Mid-May to Mid-August Assist in the planning, implementing and evaluating of a variety of events and programs throughout the Reston community, including day trips outside the area. Applicants must be at least 18 years old with a good driving record.

The Festival committee is looking for energetic volunteers to help plan Reston Festival 2012. The festival celebrates Reston’s birthday and hosts a variety of games, crafts, kids’ activities, musical entertainment and great festival food. To volunteer to be part of this great team, call the Festival Information Line at 703-435-7989 or contact info@restonfestival.com. Check out our website at www.restonfestival.com.

This job will be open for applicants to apply online in February under Careers at www.reston.org. Contact Ashleigh@reston.org or call 703-435-6577 to find out details on this great summer job.

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VOLUNTEERS

For more information about RA’s Volunteer Program, please contact Ha Brock, RA’s community outreach specialist II, at 703435-7986 or e-mail habrock@reston.org. VISIT THE GET INVOLVED SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

GETTING INVOLVED AND SUITING YOUR OWN STYLE

You could say the ways to get involved in Reston are as unique as you.

For example, if you have a special knack for gardening and like to beautify natural spaces, then the Weed Warriors program might be for you. This group is out and about in Reston, removing invasive exotic plants from our forested areas, which can grow rapidly, eventually taking over the native ferns, wildflowers and tree seedlings. Or, maybe you like to slosh around in a streambed, checking water quality, identifying insects and collecting data on your findings. As a stream monitor, you can actively help to assess the health of our local watersheds. There are several monitoring sessions per year, with training given by the watershed staff. A two-year commitment is encouraged for this programs. There are also shorter-term endeavors that will allow even the busiest person the opportunity to make a difference in the community where they live.

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These include festivals or events such as Reston Festival or Potomac River Watershed Cleanup Day.

VOLUNTEER FOR YOUR PASSION

Our advisory committees are where you can really immerse yourself in a cause or area that suits you. These include: ƒƒ The Reston Neighborhood Advisory Committee ƒƒ The Environmental Advisory Committee ƒƒ The Parks and Planning Advisory Committee ƒƒ The Pedestrian and Bicycling Advisory Committee ƒƒ The Seniors Advisory Committee ƒƒ The Tennis Advisory Committee ƒƒ The Transportation Advisory Committee ƒƒ The Communications Advisory Committee Each committee is comprised of up to 15 members and includes a Board and at least one staff liaison and generally meets once per month. More information on the committees and an online committee application can be found at www.reston.org under Inside RA/Governance.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

MANY OPPORTUNITIES, ONE GOAL

At Reston’s volunteer appreciation party, at every regular Board meeting of the Association, at our annual meeting and at other events throughout the year, we take the opportunity to recognize and thank our amazing volunteers — from those who have served on committees, on a special project or even just a one-time event. From scout groups, business leaders to active retirees, all share one common goal. They want to give back to the community with their time, talent and unwavering energy.

OUR VOLUNTEERS REALLY DIG US

Some say it’s the tree planting they like the best. Some like the fact that they can cultivate an idea and watch it flourish. In some cases, RA volunteers actually do “dig” into the dirt to plant a few seedlings. You can make a difference in your community, be involved in something you like, meet some interesting people and learn some new skills in the process. Planting trees may not be what you’re into, but there are plenty of other areas in which to “grow.”

RA is seeking volunteers to help enhance the community in a variety of areas. There are many opportunities available in such areas as environment and ecology, the Walker Nature Education Center, recreational programs and facilities, special events and many more.

DO YOU NEED SERVICE HOURS FOR SCHOOL?

Often times we find that individuals (such as middle and high school students) are required to perform a specified number of community service hours. If this is the case, then you may be able to complete up to eight hours of community service by working one of our department’s special events, such as festivals, Weed Warriors, or watershed cleanups.


GET INVOLVED

WHAT’S THE PROGRAM ABOUT?

The RA volunteer program consists of about 500 active volunteers, working in a variety of capacities and settings. Ha Brock, RA’s community outreach specialist II, takes special care to make sure that there is a good match with the volunteer and the job. To volunteer or learn more about how you can get involved in Reston, you can call Ha Brock at 703-435-7986, or via e-mail to habrock@reston.org and she can help to provide ideas and options that are well suited for your talents. You can also visit the RA website at www.reston.org and click on “Get Involved” tab for more information or to complete the online volunteer application.

GIVE BACK TO YOUR COMMUNITY

Reston Association (RA) is a not-for-profit corporation that is initially empowered by the developer, further authorized by the state and responsible to its members. Reston’s attractiveness and the amenities provided by the Association play an important role in attracting and retaining environmentally friendly commercial enterprises. The Association maintains and nurtures over 1,350 acres of open space, including four manmade lakes, 55 miles of paved and natural surface pathways, 800 acres of parkland in woods, meadows and wetlands, as well as a 72-acre Walker Nature Education Center and Nature House. Perhaps the best metaphor for RA is that of a “steward” responsible for maintaining the quality of life in Reston by caring for and administering the use of one of the community’s most precious assets – its real property. There’s no better way to raise your profile in the community and make employees feel proud than by giving back to the community where they Live, Work, Play and Get Involved. Perhaps dedicate a

day of service. Close your office for a day (or a half day) and let your employees use that time to give back. Research shows that the most successful companyrun volunteer programs allow employees to select the causes they support, so you pick the day and let your people pick their cause. Get involved with the Reston Association and give back to the community. ƒƒ Join the Adopt-a-Spot Program – Adopt an area around your business and call it your own by keeping your site litter free. A sign with your business name will be posted at your adopted location. ƒƒ Sponsor a Reston Association project or event. ƒƒ Work with our environmental resource staff on an environmental project. ƒƒ Staff a booth at the Reston or Multicultural Festival. ƒƒ Donate your company’s products. ƒƒ Post our volunteer opportunities in your lunch room or post it on your internal website. ƒƒ Encourage employees to volunteer during business hours (if applicable) or during their personal time. Be recognized in your support. ƒƒ An article and photos of your “give back” project will be printed in RA’s Reston Magazine, which is mailed to 22,000 households and has a long shelf life. ƒƒ Your company’s name will be listed on the flyers that are distributed throughout Reston prior to the event if time permits. For more information about RA’s Volunteer Program, please contact Ha Brock, RA’s community outreach specialist II, at 703-435-7986 or e-mail habrock@reston.org.

Weed Warriors Project

Our native trees, ferns and wildflowers are under attack by invasive exotic plants like English Ivy, Japanese Honeysuckle and Bamboo. That is why we need warriors like you to join us in rescuing Reston’s beautiful parkland from these aggressive plants. These fast growing, invasive plants escape from people’s yards and seriously threaten local ecosystems, taking away vital food and habitat from already stressed wildlife populations. The strategy of Weed Warriors is to familiarize people with invasive exotic plants through hosting a hands-on weedpulling project in Reston’s natural areas. The result is education, outdoor exercise, as well as protecting habitat for wildlife. Please spend a couple hours in our parkland protecting the woods every fourth Saturday of each month from March through November. With new RA guidelines stating that certain invasive exotic plants may not be installed on Reston Association member property, we have more support than ever in this rigorous battle. Please join us.

Please wear long sleeves and long pants. RA will provide tools, gloves, snacks and water. There is poison ivy at most locations.

Support Biodiversity Saturday, Nov. 19 Restoring Wainwright Natural Area Help protect the trees at Wainwright natural area by removing the English Ivy that is crowding native plants for a place to grow. We have had immense success in the past and invite you to join us in protecting these woods. English Ivy is a threat to the health of trees by crowding the roots and suffocating the bark. It can even break branches and kill a tree. Meet near the corner of Wainwright and North Shore Drive. Look for the RA truck. There is poison ivy at this site. To volunteer, contact Ha Brock, RA community outreach specialist II, at habrock@reston.org or 703-435-7986.

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VOLUNTEERS

For more information about RA’s Volunteer Program, please contact Ha Brock, RA’s community outreach specialist II, at 703435-7986 or e-mail habrock@reston.org. VISIT THE GET INVOLVED SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

STREAM MONITORING PROGRAM FALL MONITORING SESSION:

Oct.1–Nov. 30 Become a volunteer stream monitor and help RA assess the health of our streams. RA is in need of volunteers to assist with stream monitoring at several locations throughout Reston during all seasons. If you are willing to learn, can work with a partner, enjoy data collection, insect identification, and are interested in the health of Reston’s streams, this is the job for you. Volunteering consists of four monitoring sessions of 3-4 hours each for a total of 12-16 hours per year. Training and practice are required and a two-year commitment is encouraged. Join the volunteer monitor’s e-mail notification list by sending an e-mail to Brian Petty, RA Watershed Specialist, at bpetty@reston. org with “add me to the stream monitors list” in the message and you will begin receiving e-mails.

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STORM DRAIN MARKING PROJECT

What can you do to protect our local streams, lakes and the Chesapeake Bay?

One way is to participate in the Storm Drain Marking Project. Our storm drains prevent flooding of roads and neighborhoods by carrying rain and snowmelt away from streets and sidewalks. Unlike water from our taps and tub, water flowing into our storm drains is not treated. Storm drains connect directly to our streams and empty into our lakes. Trash, pet waste, motor oil, paint and other materials dumped or washed into storm drains pollute our watersheds and ultimately, the Chesapeake Bay. Markers on each storm drain remind all of us to keep storm drains and our streams clean. By contacting Nicki Bellezza, Reston Association’s watershed supervisor, you can be a part of the Storm Drain Marking Project. Since there are over 4,000 storm drains in Reston, many volunteers are needed to mark the storm drains and to help educate the community about the connection between the storm drains and our streams and lakes. Everybody is encouraged to participate.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Many storm drains in Reston are on private roads. In order for volunteers to mark the drains, clusters need to grant permission first. Contact your local cluster board member and get your neighborhood involved today. To get your project started or for more information, contact Nicki Bellezza at 703-435-6560, Nicki@ reston.org or visit the county’s Storm Drain Marking website at http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/ nvswcd/stormdrained.htm. The Storm Drain Marking Project in Reston is sponsored by the Fairfax County Department of Public Works and Environmental Services, the Northern VA Soil and Water Conservation District, the Virginia Department of Transportation-Northern VA District, and Reston Association.

HALLOWEEN HOUSE AND TRICK OR TREAT TRAIL

Friday & Saturday, Oct. 28 – 29 Walker Nature Education Center 11450 Glade Drive, Reston, VA

Rain or shine event Volunteer Hours: 4:30 – 9:30 p.m. There will be a mandatory volunteer orientation at the Nature Center on Friday, Oct. 21 from 6-7 p.m.

Requirements: Must be willing to have fun! Costumes encouraged, but not required. Volunteers MUST be at least 15. Volunteers between the ages of 13-14 must be accompanied by an adult. We’re looking for fun-loving, energetic volunteers to help at our Halloween event for children of all ages. Volunteers ages 15 through adult are needed to play character roles and run carnival games, admissions, face painting, concessions and more. All volunteers will receive free pizza and drinks. For more information or to volunteer, contact Ha Brock, RA community outreach specialist II, at habrock@reston.org or 703-4357986. Volunteers must be preregistered to help with this event.


GET INVOLVED

Thank You 2010 Multicultural Festival Volunteers On Saturday, Sept. 24 over 100 volunteers participated in the Reston Multicultural Festival at Lake Anne Plaza. Volunteers are a critical part of the festival. We simply can't do the festival year after year without them. Our volunteers support all areas of Festival operations, be it in the kid's area, information booth, concessions, surveys, Master of Ceremonies, set-up, breakdown and much more. Volunteers tirelessly work the Festival insuring pleasurable and welcoming experiences for the many visitors and Festival participants. Thank you for making this year's festival a success.

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COVENANTS

Understanding

Party/Shared Elements PHOTO BY SEAN BAHRAMI

I

t is not unusual for adjoining townhomes to share housing components known as party elements (walls, fences, including integral components, such as rakeboards, siding, and trim). Maintenance of these party/shared elements can create issues between usually good neighbors. To mitigate tension that can rise when neighbors receive notice from RA about violations on party elements that are not visible on their side, homeowners should understand their rights and responsibilities concerning party/shared elements.

Citations are issued for the following: “c) Damage and Destruction. In the event that any party wall or fence is damaged or destroyed (including deterioration from ordinary wear and tear or lapse of time), it shall be the obligation of all Owners whose Lots adjoin such wall or fence to restore it promptly at their equal expense and they shall be liable to the Association jointly and severally for the costs of restoration if the Association makes the repairs.”

Section VII.4. of the Reston Association Governing Documents states: “Each wall or fence that is built on the dividing line between two or more Lots shall constitute a party wall…b) Rights of Owners. Owners of contiguous Lots who have a party wall or party fence shall equally have the right to use such wall or fence, provided that such use by one Owner does not interfere with the use and enjoyment of same by the other Owners. Each Owner shall have an easement of ingress (the act of entering) and egress (the action or right of going or coming out) over that portion of the Property necessary for the repair and maintenance of the party wall or fence. There shall be no impairment of the structural integrity of any party wall or fence without the prior consent of all affected Owners.”

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

In layman’s terms you and your neighbor share joint responsibility for maintenance and repair of party elements no matter which side shows the deterioration. Either owner has the right to make repairs, but both owners will be held responsible for compliance with RA covenants. Disputes and/or negotiations about the expenses of maintaining party elements are strictly between neighboring owners. RA cannot get involved in these disputes/negotiations. Ideally, both neighbors will act on a mutual desire to preserve their property and neighborhood’s appearance and value. If you have other related questions, please contact your Cluster Advisor or see the Frequently Asked Questions article.


LIVING IN RESTON

Frequently Asked Questions

Party/Shared Elements Q: What is a party element? A: When you draw an imaginary line from the ground to the sky on a shared property line, anything on that imaginary line is a party, or shared, element. This can include fences and walls and it can also include housing elements such as siding and trim, even if those elements are on a wall that encloses your neighbor’s house.

Q: How much of the party element is my responsibility? A: According to the Reston Deed (Sect. VII.4)both owners are jointly and severally responsible for the party element. This means both owners are responsible for maintenance of both sides of a fence or wall that sits on a shared property line, and both owners are responsible for maintenance of housing elements on a shared property line even if that housing element encloses just one neighbor’s house, extending beyond the front and/or rear of your house.

Q: Should I talk to my neighbor about this? A: Since a shared element is the legal responsibility of both property owners, it’s a good idea to speak to your neighbor about cooperating together on the repair/maintenance. Most owners will proceed on their own with repairs for violations existing on their side of a shared element only. If the violation exists on both sides of a shared piece of a shared fence or wall, such as a cap board, it’s beneficial for both owners to work together. If the violation exists only on your neighbor’s side, or exists on a housing element which encloses their house, you should speak to your neighbor about initiating the repairs or working together, since both owners remain legally responsible for compliance with RA covenants.

Q: What if I need to go on my neighbor’s property to make repairs to a shared element? A: The Reston Deed grants an ingress and egress easement (the legal right to come and go) on adjacent properties for the purpose of maintaining or repairing party elements.

Q: What if I want to work with my neighbor and they will not cooperate or the owner of that property does not live there? A: If your neighbor refuses to work with you, you may complete the repairs and fix the violation. You may be able to recover some of the costs from your neighbor through private legal action. Reston Association is not involved in these disputes but encourages neighbors to resolve their differences.

If the owner does not live there, you may wish to contact the cluster association to see if they have contact information for the owner. If the property is occupied, you may also wish to speak to the occupants to see if you can obtain contact information for the owner. Sometimes Fairfax County will have an alternative address for the owner. This is something your RA cluster advisor can assist with, however Reston Association cannot act as a go-between and you must contact your neighbor directly.

Q: What happens if I do not fix a party element? A: If a party element is not repaired, even if the violating condition is on the neighbor’s side or encloses their house only, both property owners are responsible. Reston Association will proceed with enforcement, which could result in legal action, against both you and your neighbor.

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COVENANTS

HELPFUL GUIDE

FOR SINGLE FAMILY HOMEOWNERS

If you reside in a single-family detached home that is not part of a cluster, there is a Covenants Advisor assigned to you who will address your specific design needs.

MEET YOUR ADVISOR… Kim Dobbin

Covenants Manager 703-435-6576 kimd@reston.org

Autumnwood Drive Barton Hill Road Bassett Lane Beaver Circle Briar Mill Lane Bugle Lane Burgee Court Cedar Hollow Way Citation Court Compass Point Lane Cranberry Lane Cross School Road Dark Star Court Dayflower Court Dosinia Court Fowlers Lane Gallant Fox Court Gold Cup Lane Greenbriar Circle Greenwich Point Road Grey Squirrel Lane Halyard Lane Harpers Cove Lane Hounds Lane Inlet Court Jackstay Terrace Lirio Court Midsummer Drive Moss Point Lane Nashua Court Newport Cove Lane Old Eaton Lane Old Trace Lane Oldfield Drive Paddock Lane Pepperidge Lane Post Mills Lane Post Oak Trl Putter Lane Quail Ridge Court Quail Ridge Drive Quartermaster Lane Quimby Point Lane

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Quorn Lane Ramstead Lane Red Oak Cir Reston Ave Round Pebble Lane Shagbark Cir Silver Fox Lane South Lakes Drive South Shore Road Spinnaker Court Spyglass Cove Lane Stirrup Road Stockbridge Lane Stowe Road Swaps Court Taffrail Court Thomas View Road Towering Oak Way Trails Edge Lane Turtle Rock Lane Upper Lake Drive Venetian Court Walnut Branch Road Water Pointe Cir Water Pointe Lane Wedge Drive Westhills Lane Weybridge Lane Whip Road Whitetail Court Wiehle Road Wild Bramble Way Wild Pine Way Wilder Point Lane Winstead Lane Wintercorn Lane Wintergreen Court Woodbrook Lane York Mills Lane Water Pointe Circle

Margo Collins

703-435-7994 margo@reston.org

Aintree Lane Appaloosa Court Bayard Drive Blue Smoke Trail

Bramblebush Court Bridoon Lane Buckthorn Lane Canter Lane Cavesson Court Charlestown Lane Checkerberry Court Clipstone Lane Club Pond Lane Colts Brook Drive Cross Country Lane Cutwater Court Darius Lane Deerdell Lane Drop Forge Lane Farrier Lane Fauquier Lane Fieldstone Lane Fox Clove Road Fox Mill Road Foxcroft Way Foxfire Court Guildmore Road Halter Lane Handlebar Road Hitchcock Court Hitchcock Drive Howland Drive Hurlingham Lane Jester Court Leatherwood Drive Marginella Drive Milburn Lane Myrtle Lane Noble Victory Court Noble Victory Lane November Lane Old Club Lane Old Wick Court Pegasus Lane Penny Royal Lane Pinoak Lane Players Pond Lane Pony Lane Red Clover Court Roark Court Roark Drive Running Cedar Road Staley Road

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Steeplechase Drive Stirrup Iron Lane Tack Lane Thunder Chase Drive Tournament Drive Trophy Lane Trotter Lane Turf Lane Virgate Lane Woodcutter Court Woodfern Court

Eddie McEver

703-435-6563 Eddie@reston.org

Acton Drive Aldenham Lane Amberjack Court Andorra Place Angel Wing Court Auburn Grove Court Auburn Grove Lane Bennington Hollow Lane Bennington Woods Road Bingham Court Bingham Terrace Black Cap Lane Bradbury Lane Bright Pond Lane Brussels Court Buttermilk Lane Catalpa Court Center Harbor Place Center Harbor Road Concord Point Lane Copenhagen Court Creekbend Drive Crows Nest Lane Deep Run Lane Deer Forest Road Durand Drive Eakins Court Earnshaw Court Elk Point Drive Embers Court Fairway Court Fairway Drive Fawn Ridge Lane

Field View Drive Freetown Drive French Horn Lane Glade Drive Golden Eagle Drive Golden Sands Lane Great Meadow Drive Homer Terrace Hook Road Hunt Club Road Hunting Horn Lane Lake Newport Road Lima Lane Longwood Grove Drive Marchmont Court Mock Orange Court Newbedford Lane North Village Road Nutmeg Lane Old Quincy Lane Old Trail Drive Owls Cove Lane Panama Road Peppermint Court Purple Beech Drive Red Leaf Court Red Maple Lane Ring Road San Jose Drive Sanibel Drive Sawbridge Way Shadbush Court Short Ridge Road Soapstone Drive Sourwood Lane Stamford Way Stones Throw Drive Stuart Road Sugarberry Court Summer Meadow Lane Sweet Bay Lane Tanbark Drive Thanlet Lane Timberhead Lane Triple Crown Road Tumbletree Way Wakerobin Lane


LIVING IN RESTON

Did you know… When a snow storm has been predicted, snow plows will be working during the early morning hours. The best way to ensure that plowing crews can clear the streets is to park in your designated areas, e.g. garages, driveways and marked parking spaces. In neighborhoods that are on private streets, follow your Cluster or Condo snow removal policies. Doing so will help make snow plowing easier and faster.

Please Be Prepared, Winter Is Here Virginia County Codes require that occupants — whether owners or tenants — remove all snow and ice from any walkways adjoining any part of their property within six hours after the snowfall has ceased. If the snow or ice fell during the night, it must be removed by noon the following day. Should the storm occur on Sunday, the accumulation must be removed by noon on Monday. Failure to comply with the Code can result in a fine of $250.00 imposed by the county. Be a good neighbor and clear your walkways. If you know someone who may be physically unable to keep their walkway clear, please consider giving them a helping hand.

WINTER WORD FIND D S K P P V Z R E I W W U C A L N M B E

V O A R L O B Y O Y B T L U H N O Y X M

F G O O E O Y S L O Z H Z F S V I G Z E

B I I H E O W X A W U K U R F I T H N T

R M R V R L S R N R W T I K E Q A M J U

I E E E J O D B M T U S E I A Z I J Q K

J G T X P M B Y P S M V C H O S C A Y K

S X Y N E L A H S W U U S N N V O X O G

E Q L M I D A F G B T P V O D N S B V Z

I Z B X I W Z C Y I W B W X I W S T S X

T E L L W T N Y E T E G A I Z V A X O A

R G O O D C F H W D D N O C M Q N T H J

A H W S N O I T A R O C E D H E O I K W

P O S E H V Y X S I J N P W N A T P G Y

H C T A W E F A X W Q A W Y P N S P M B

W N S G N N D X D E Q L F E H P E X D Y

F V A X I A T Q G V Y R H W W O R G V H

H E L P K N S T W X W U S L E D D I N G

K O T O Z T I E Q I O T V Y W D T U B H

A N P H H S B M O E P R H R U M Z J Z L

BOARDMEMBER COVENANTS DECORATIONS FIREPLACE HELP HOLIDAY NEIGHBORHOOD PARTIES PLOW RESTON ASSOCIATION SALT SLEDDING SNOW WATCH WINTER

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BOARD & GOVERNANCE

Board of Directors Actions June - July 2011

JUNE 2011

JULY 2011 MEETING I

Approved the appointment of Sridhar Ganesan to the Tennis Advisory Committee whereby he shall serve for a term of three years, ending June 2014.

Approved the request of Camp Sunshine, in coordination with the Lake Anne Merchants Association (LARKA), to hold its annual winter fundraiser, the “Polar Dip”, in Lake Anne on February 4, 2012, subject to an agreement approved by Reston Association’s Legal Counsel which will include, but are not limited to, set conditions. (Full motion can be viewed on www.reston.org under the Board Minutes section of the site.)

Approved the report of the Legal Committee and authorized action to be taken on the cases reviewed during its meeting of June 1, 2011. Authorized staff to expend Association funds not to exceed $34,000 to perform necessary maintenance, as permitted by court order, on five Member properties. Adopted Use & Maintenance Resolution 14; Common Area Pesticide & Fertilizer Use Policy; which governs the manner in which pesticides and fertilizers are handled by the Association and used on the Association’s Common Area, as amended. Adopted Board & Association Operations Resolution 11; Association Spokespersons; which designates the official spokespersons of the Reston Association, as amended. Approved the request of the 2011 Lake Thoreau Boat Party Committee to play amplified music on Lake Thoreau during its annual lake neighborhood event to be held on Saturday, August 27, 2011, 7:00 pm – 11:00 pm (with a rain date of Sunday, August 28, 2011, from 6:00 pm to 10:00 pm) with restrictions on amplified music, swimming, and timing of the event; and to obey Fairfax County Noise Ordinances. Approved the Secretary’s Certificate as presented which sets forth that: ƒƒ

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The Board of Directors’ President, Vice President in the absences of the President, and Chief Executive Officer each being an officer of the Corporation (collectively, the “Officers”) are authorized and empowered to execute and deliver performance agreements, bonds, escrow agreements, permit applications, deeds, record plats and other related documents which may be required by various governmental municipalities and agencies.

Approved the request of the Reston Triathlon Association (RTA) to use Lake Audubon and Lake Audubon Pool Facilities for the swim portion of the annual Triathlon to be held on Sunday, September 11, 2011. (Full motion can be viewed on www.reston.org under the Board Minutes section of the site.) Denied move to hear the appeal of the decision of the Covenants Committee made during its meeting of June 15, 2011 concerning the property located at 11318 South Shore Road. Approved the proposed letter to Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority to offer Reston Association’s continuing support for Rail to Dulles, specifically, Phase 2, as amended. Appointed: Carolyn Badila, Carol Ivory, and Diane Blust as co-chairs of the Environmental Advisory Committee for a term of one year, ending July 2012. Sue Beffel and Mike Sanio to the Environmental Advisory Committee for a term of three years each, ending July 2014. Adopted Design Review & Covenants Administration Resolution 9; DRB Conflict of Interests Policy & Procedure which shall govern any matter to which the interests of the Reston Association may conflict with the material, personal or economic interest, direct or indirect, of any member of the DRB, as amended. Adopted Committees Resolution 4; Board Committees which consolidates the Board Administration Committee and the Planning & Evaluation Committee into one new body, the Board Planning Committee, as amended.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Approved amendment of the January 31, 2011 motion of the Board of Directors on the Proposed Indoor Tennis Study by removing the “due date” requirements, as presented in the revised document, to address staff and committee concerns with regard to the sequence with which the requested Board actions are being addressed. Directed the Communications and Tennis Advisory Committees to work together, in coordination with staff, to create a “Fact Sheet” about Tennis in Reston for the Board’s review by September 22, 2011. (Full motion can be viewed on www.reston.org under the Board Minutes section of the site.)

JULY 2011 MEETING II Directed the Fiscal Committee to present to the Board of Directors, during its September 22, 2011 regular meeting, at least three viable options for financing the proposed indoor tennis facility currently under study by the Association. Appointed Michael Werner to the Board Fiscal Committee whereby he shall serve a term of two years, ending July 2013. Approved the extension of the 2010 deer hunting application request of Mr. Dan Grove, owner of the property located at 1916 Buckthorn Lane; thereby, granting him permission to hunt through the 2013 deer hunting season. (Full motion can be viewed on www.reston.org under the Board Minutes section of the site.) Approved the proposed letter to Supervisor Hudgins requesting that the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors adopt a motion to include in the Reston Master Plan the requirement that all future residential developments, outside of the Reston Town Center Association boundaries, be made a part of the Reston Association, as amended.


BOARD OF DIRECTORS Kathleen Driscoll McKee, President South Lakes District Representatives Kathleen.driscoll.mckee@gmail.com

Paul Thomas, Vice President At-Large Representative pabloreston@gmail.com

Joe Leighton, Secretary At-Large Representative Joe_Leighton@comcast.net

John Higgins, Treasurer Reston Association Member john.higgins@fairfaxcounty.gov Amanda Andere Apartment Owners’ Representative amanda.andere@gmail.com Cheryl Beamer, Board Director Hunters Woods/Dogwood District Representative cherylbeamer@verizon.net

Andrew “Andy” Sigle, Board Director At-Large Representative awsigle@gmail.com Tom Vis, Board Director At-Large Representative tvisrasoc@hotmail.com

Ken Knueven, Board Director Lake Anne/Tall Oaks District Representative kknueven@hotmail.com Mike Collins, Board Director North Point District Representative mike4ra@gmail.com

Milton Matthews, Chief Executive Officer matthews@reston.org

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DIRECTORY & FACILITIES

FREQUENTLY CALLED NUMBERS (outside Reston Association) TRANSPORTATION Fairfax Connector/ RIBS Bus 703-339-7200 LINK-Transportation 703-435-5465 METRO 202-637-7000

COMMUNITY

Reston Association Member Services 703-435-6530 Reston Community Center 703-476-4500 Reston Historic Trust 703-709-7700 Reston Regional Library 703-689-2700 Reston Town Center 703-689-4699 Reston Visitors Center/ Chamber of Commerce 703-707-9045 YMCA 703-742-8800

PARKS

Fairfax County Parks 703-324-8702 Fairfax County Ball Fields 703-324-5533 Lake Fairfax Park 703-471-5415 Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority 703-352-5900

SPORTS

Reston Soccer Association 703-859-6268 Reston Swim Team Association 703-326-0526 www.rsta.org Reston Youth Baseball 703-860-4400 Reston Youth Basketball 703-391-8533 Reston Youth Football 703-620-2019 SkateQuest 703-709-1010

RESTON ASSOCIATION FACILITIES

RESTON ASSOCIATION HEADQUARTERS (14) 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, 703-435-6530 NORTH HILLS POOL (1)  1325 NORTH VILLAGE ROAD 703-707-9367 Depth: 2–5 ft Length: 25 meters ƒƒ Wading pool with fountain ƒƒ Spa ƒƒ ADA access and hydrolift chair to main pool ƒƒ Grass area and picnic tables ƒƒ Tennis within walking distance

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AUTUMNWOOD POOL (2)  11950 WALNUT BRANCH ROAD 703-437-3847 Depth: 3.5–5.5 ft Length: 25 meters ƒƒ Wading pool with fountain ƒƒ Covered picnic area ƒƒ Grass area ƒƒ Tennis and playground within walking distance DOGWOOD POOL (24) Dogwood Pool will be closed for renovation. Please visit www.reston.org for up-to-date information. Additional amenities will include a zero-depth entry, outside water play area and picnic pavilion. We will host a Grand Re-opening in May 2012. GLADE POOL (29) 11550 GLADE DRIVE, 703-860-9765 Depth: 3.5–12.5 ft Length: 25 meters ƒƒ 1-meter diving board ƒƒ Spa ƒƒ Zero-depth wading pool with fountains ƒƒ Picnic tables ƒƒ Tennis and playground within walking distance ƒƒ 20-foot slide GOLF COURSE ISLAND POOL (12) 11301 LINKS DRIVE, 703-437-9792 Depth: 3–12 ft Length: 25 meters ƒƒ 1-meter diving board ƒƒ Two Grass areas ƒƒ Wading pool ƒƒ Picnic tables ƒƒ Playground and pavilion within walking distance HUNTERS WOODS POOL (26)  2501 RESTON PARKWAY, 703-860-9763 Depth: 3.5–8.5 ft Length: 25 meters ƒƒ In-water basketball and volleyball ƒƒ Diving board ƒƒ Children’s splash area ƒƒ Large spa ƒƒ ADA ramp into main pool ƒƒ Picnic tables ƒƒ Playground, tennis and pavilion within walking distance LAKE AUDUBON POOL (22) 2070 TWIN BRANCHES ROAD 703-620-9801 Depth: 3–5 ft Length: 25 meters ƒƒ Diving board ƒƒ Grass area ƒƒ Picnic tables ƒƒ Wading pool ƒƒ Boat ramp to Lake Audubon within walking distance LAKE NEWPORT POOL (3) 11601 LAKE NEWPORT ROAD 703-689-9862 Depth: 3.5–5.5 ft Length: 50 meters ƒƒ Two 1-meter diving boards ƒƒ Wading pool ƒƒ Covered picnic area with grills ƒƒ Sand volleyball area ƒƒ Playground ƒƒ Softball and basketball within walking distance

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

LAKE THOREAU POOL (19) 2040 UPPER LAKES DRIVE 703-860-9843 Depth: 3–5 ft Length: 25 meters ƒƒ Diving board ƒƒ Spa ƒƒ Wading pool ƒƒ Grass area and picnic tables ƒƒ Lake overlook NEWBRIDGE POOL (17) 11718 GOLF COURSE SQUARE 703-860-9713 Depth: 3.5–12 ft Length: 25 meters ƒƒ 1-meter diving board ƒƒ Wading pool ƒƒ Picnic tables ƒƒ Tennis and playground within walking distance TALL OAKS POOL (13) 12025 NORTH SHORE DRIVE 703-437-9854 Depth: 3–12 ft Length: 25 meters ƒƒ 1-meter diving board ƒƒ Wading pool ƒƒ Picnic tables ƒƒ Tall Oaks Shopping Center within walking distance UPLANDS POOL (7)  11032 RING ROAD, 703-437-9784 Depth: 3.5–8.5 ft Length: 25 meters ƒƒ Separate zero-depth (0-3 ft) children’s pool with interactive fountains ƒƒ Interactive sand pit ƒƒ ADA ramp into main pool ƒƒ Picnic tables NORTH SHORE POOL (8) 11515 NORTH SHORE DRIVE 703-437-9888 Depth: 3–11 ft Length: 25 meters ƒƒ Parking only on North Shore Drive ƒƒ Spa ƒƒ Main pool heated ƒƒ Shaded upper deck with picnic tables ƒƒ Lake Anne Plaza and tennis within walking distance ƒƒ Wading pool ƒƒ Diving board RIDGE HEIGHTS POOL (21) 11400 RIDGE HEIGHTS ROAD 703-860-9767 Depth: 3–5 ft Length: 25 meters ƒƒ Main pool heated ƒƒ Diving board ƒƒ Wading pool ƒƒ Grass areas with picnic tables SHADOWOOD POOL (23) 2201 SPRINGWOOD DRIVE 703-860-9708 Depth: 3–5 ft Length: 20 meters ƒƒ Small slide ƒƒ Wading pool ƒƒ Grass area and picnic tables

LAKE NEWPORT TENNIS COURTS (5) 11452 Baron Cameron Avenue NEWBRIDGE TENNIS COURTS (17) 11718 Golf Course Square SHADOWOOD TENNIS COURTS (23) 2201 Springwood Drive NORTH HILLS TENNIS COURTS (1) 1325 North Village Road HOOK ROAD TENNIS COURTS (9) Fairway Drive/Hook Road AUTUMNWOOD TENNIS COURTS (2) 11950 Walnut Branch Road BARTON HILL TENNIS COURTS (20) Sunrise Valley Drive/Barton Hill Road COLTS NECK TENNIS COURTS (27) Colts Neck Road GLADE TENNIS COURTS (29) 11550 Glade Drive LAKE ANNE TENNIS COURTS (6) 11301 North Shore Drive NORTH SHORE TENNIS COURTS (8) 11515 North Shore Drive UPPER LAKES TENNIS COURTS (18) Upper Lakes Drive/Sunrise Valley Drive UPLANDS TENNIS COURTS (7) 11032 Ring Road BROWN’S CHAPEL PARK (4) Baron Cameron Avenue HUNTERS WOODS PICNIC PAVILION (25) Steeplechase Drive LAKE ANNE PICNIC PAVILION (6) 11301 North Shore Drive NORTH HILLS PICNIC PAVILION (1) 1325 North Village Road PONY BARN PICNIC PAVILION (28) Triple Crown/Steeplechase Drive POLO FIELDS RECREATION AREA (15) Thunder Chase Drive RESTON ASSOCIATION CENTRAL SERVICES FACILITY (10) 12250 Sunset Hills Road, 703-437-7658 TEMPORARY ROAD PICNIC PAVILION (11) Temporary Road/Northshore Drive WALKER NATURE EDUCATION CENTER (30) 11450 Glade Drive, 703-476-9689 WALKER NATURE EDUCATION CENTER CAMPFIRE RING (31) Soapstone Drive & Lawyers Road


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Reston Farmers’ Market

Lake Anne Plaza Saturdays May – October Farmers & Vendors

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


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12001 Sunrise Valley Drive | Reston | Virginia | 20191-3404

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Reston Winter 2011  

Reston Magazine Winter 2011 Edition