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RESTON RESTON ASSOCIATION QUARTERLY PUBLICATION

OCTOBER 2018

WWW.RESTON.ORG

TOGETHER WE MAKE RESTON GREAT

WEBTRAC REGISTRATION PAGE 52

PROGRAMS & EVENTS PAGES 54-67


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CONTENTS

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Digital version available online@www.reston.org

INSIDE

What’s Coming to Reston?

BY JESSICA BIGGER Get an update on Reston redevelopment projects that have been approved or in the process of receiving approval.

MEMBER SERVICES 50

Welcome to Reston and FAQ

WEBTRAC 52

Registration Info

POOL & TENNIS PASSES 53

RA members

PROGRAMS & EVENTS

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54 55 56 62 66

Development in Reston

BY RICHARD NEWLON RA’s Design Review Board works to balance the developer’s desire for a profitable project while respecting and preserving the community and neighborhoods.

Aquatics & Safety Camps Nature Special Events Tennis

FACILITY RENTALS 68 70 71 72 73

RA Picnic Pavilions Conference Center The Lake House RA Community Buildings Walker Nature Center

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White circles denote 1/4 and 1/2 mile distances from center of station platform within Reston Corridor area.

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Reston PRC & non-PRC Zoned Land Fairfax County, Virginia

INFO AND RESOURCES

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BY JESSICA BIGGER AND KELSEY STEFFEN Learn why RA is actively engaged in discussions with Fairfax County about the County’s proposed increase in Reston’s population density.

PRC Zoned Land

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Fairfax County Looks to Increase Reston’s Population Density

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74 Volunteer Opportunity 75 VOLGISTICS & VICNET 76 Environmental Opportunity 80 Corporate Team Building With a Difference

Legend

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Map prepared September 2017 by DPZ Flight date March 2013

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Fairfax County GIS & Mapping

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RA Common Area Fishing and Boating Facilities and Map

On the Cover: Reston Station Promenade — Artist Rendering of Full Service Hotel, courtesy of Nunzio Marc Desantis Architects and Comstock

PERSPECTIVES 08 10 12 14 16

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Letter From RA Board President Did You Know? Happiest Place in the World Reston: A Success Story Communitywide Housing Plan

ON THE STREET

AROUND RESTON

18 Winter Wonderland Comes to Town 26 NoVA PRISM – A New Partnership 28 New Residential Developments Join the Reston Association Members 32 Newly Renovated Central Services Facility

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Building a Portfolio of Public Art A Day in the Life of Member Services at RA

HISTORIC RESTON 48

Heron House: Reston’s First High-Rise


WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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RESTON VOLUME 9 | NUMBER 4

PUBLISHER

DESIGN & PRODUCTION

Andy Sigle RA President Board of Directors

Long Nguyen long@reston.org

EDITORIAL

PHOTOGRAPHER

Mike Leone mike@reston.org

Sean Bahrami sean@reston.org

COPY EDITOR Leslie Siegmund

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Colena Turner, David Madison, Jim Kirby, LeRoy Wallin, Neil Totten

RA CONTRIBUTORS

RESTON ASSOCIATION’S NEWS SOURCE Receive the RA News email in your inbox each Friday to stay informed on important information about Reston Association and our growing community. The newsletter features short articles on meetings, policy decisions, development, homeowner tips, operations notices, facility information and other news that impacts association members. Links to sign up for RA programs, activities and events are also provided in each email. RA News is mobile friendly, meaning it is as easy to navigate on your phone as it is on a desktop computer. The newsletter also provides space for paid advertisements, which is a great way for local businesses to promote their services directly to the RA members and other subscribers. To sign up for RA News, go to www.reston.org and scroll down to the bottom of the page. Type your email address in the box below the “Join Our Mailing List” title and then click the join button. That’s all it takes to receive the free weekly newsletter.

Abby Stocking, Andy Sigle, Ashleigh Soloff, Chalise JohnsonKidd, Claudia Thompson-Deahl, Dan Merenick, Ha Brock, Jackie Reed, Katherine Caffrey, Katie Shaw, Kelsey Steffen, Larry Butler, Laura Cutrona, Laura Kowalski, Lisa Singer, Nicki Bellezza, Patricia Greenberg, Rob Tucker, Willa Suter, William Peterson

COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTORS Alex Sanders, Cathy Hudgins, Carol Nahorniak, Cheryl T. Simon, Gerry Connolly, Janet Rems, Jessica Bigger, Ken Knueven, Ken Plum, Richard Newlon, Shelley S. Mastran

ADVERTISING SALES Mike Leone Email: mike@reston.org Direct: 703-435-6579

Reston is published quarterly by the Reston Association. Send correspondence or address changes to Reston Association at 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston, VA 20191-3404, 703-435-6530. All articles © Reston Association 2018. All rights reserved. Articles and letters to the editor may be submitted via mail to Mike Leone, Reston Association, at 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston, VA 20191-3404. 703-435-6530. Email submissions may be made to mike@reston.org. Anonymous or incomplete information will not be published. Reston Association reserves the right to edit for length, style, clarity and content. Articles may be printed upon verification of authorship and availability of space. Content submitted by guest columnists reflects their own viewpoints and is not endorsed by Reston Association.

RESTON ASSOCIATION 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Reston, Virginia 20191-3404 Member Services Hours: Mon-Fri, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Phone: 703-435-6530 Fax: 703-435-6516 Email: member_services@reston.org

facebook.com/restonassociation youtube.com/restonassociation twitter.com/restononline Printed on 10% post-consumer recycled paper, using vegetable-based ink. Please recycle.

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PERSPECTIVES | IDEAS | COMMUNITY LEADERS | VIEWS

Letter From RA Board President

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n behalf of the Reston Association Board of Directors, I want to take this opportunity to update association members on several matters related to land use and development in Reston. Although Fairfax County ultimately makes decisions about land use and development in our community, RA is in a position to influence the county to continue providing a good quality of life for members, especially through focusing on our community’s founding principles and Reston’s Essential Elements: Environmental Stewardship, Commitment to the Arts, Accessibility, Planning and Design Excellence, Recreational Amenities and Diverse Housing Opportunities. As you may know, earlier this year, the county proposed that our current Planned Residential Community (PRC) density cap of 13 persons per acre be increased to 16. The county’s position is that the change is necessary to implement the comprehensive plan guidance in the Reston Master Plan that was updated over a several year period and ratified in 2015. RA, as an entity, generally supports the Reston Master Plan’s high-level strategy of urbanizing the new Metro transit station areas while leaving the balance of Reston’s existing, stable neighborhoods (aka the PRC portion of Reston) “as is.” However, our position is that we need to see the details behind the need for this PRC density increase before we can support the proposed change. In July, we at RA and the Coalition for a Planned Reston (CPR) engaged county officials in four focused work sessions. The discussions at each of the meetings covered issues of vital importance to RA and the rest of the community: Transportation, Parks/ Open Space, Schools and Planning/Zoning. I am glad to report that participants were able to find many areas of common ground and commit to maintaining the unique character of Reston into the future. That said, there are still many unresolved issues and follow-up items that came out of the meetings. RA looks forward to continuing these discussions with the county into the future. Several items important to highlight here come from the nine points in a November 2017 letter to the county from the RA Board of Directors: ƒƒ Population Cap: The RA stance is that an overall population cap should be inserted into the Reston Master Plan text and shown on the Land Use Map. This overall population cap should include all dwelling units, including planned Affordable Dwelling Units (ADUs) and Work Force housing (WFHs), which had previously been left out of the county’s calculations, since the Comprehensive Plan must provide for the physical and social infrastructure needs of all Restonians. Several numbers have been suggested for what the cap should be, 120K being the most often quoted, and RA would like to participate in finalizing the appropriate number with the county. ƒƒ Village Centers: At the July 30 session, RA pushed for and is now satisfied with the county’s agreement to remove all stable neighborhood areas from the designated “Village Center areas,” thus reducing the maximum density prescribed to the Village Centers as calculated for the proposed increase in the PRC Ordinance Amendment. In fact, at that session, the county distributed a handout that showed a PRC density cap of 15, down from their original proposal of 16 persons per acre; although no final decision was quoted at that time. Further, RA would like to continue this discussion with the county by confirming our position that the Village Centers (except Lake Anne and Tall Oaks, which have previously undergone replanning efforts) are envisioned to remain as currently developed until such a time when replanning efforts are undertaken. Our stance remains that when redevelopment of the Village Centers is anticipated, Plan amendments would be required to initiate such redevelopment. ƒƒ Development vs. Infrastructure Balance Monitoring: RA would like to see a formal monitoring system to ensure that planned infrastructure is being provided commensurate with the level of residential and nonresidential development and that development may have to be reduced as necessary to maintain the balance between land use and infrastructure. In other words, we would like to see definition and monitoring of the tipping point at which there must be a slowing of development application approvals to ensure balance with Reston Master Plan’s prescribed infrastructure enhancements. This would apply especially in the area of transportation improvements, so that we have “just in time” infrastructure improvements, rather than those that are “way too late.” Should you have further interest in this topic, please review the full detail of our letter to Fairfax County Supervisor Hudgins dated August 20, 2018, which is available on the RA website. It contains more related topics that we feel are important to continued dialogue. We at RA will plan to stay engaged with the county on these matters as they move forward, and we encourage you to stay informed on progress and to make your voices heard. As always, thank you for your interest and input. I look forward to seeing you around our wonderful community! Andy Sigle, President – RA Board of Directors

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PERSPECTIVES | IDEAS | COMMUNITY LEADERS | VIEWS

Did You Know? H BY LARRY BUTLER

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JIM KIRBY

ave you ever wandered through Reston on one of our pathways, marveling at the number of trees, and wondered how many trees there are in Reston? Perhaps not, but given the fact that Reston prides itself on being a Tree City USA for many years running, and that a tree graces Reston Association’s (RA) logo, it could be a dinner conversation topic that might really start a conversation. While the exact number is not known, a pretty reliable estimate, based on a comprehensive Fairfax County study in 2017, puts that number at over 1.2 million trees! On RA property alone, which exceeds 1,300 acres, we likely have at least 200,000 trees. Each year our arborists work on more than 1,500 trees, an average of almost six a day. These may be trees felled in windstorms, damaged by heavy snow or affected by disease. Many trees are pruned annually for health reasons, too, by removing branches or thinning to make them less susceptible to wind damage. While we are on the pathways … No one wants to think about snow right now; however, RA takes snow in stride, or rather, allows others to stride when snow is falling or on the ground due to our crack team of Bombardier snowcat operators. As one of the only community associations to plow its pathways, you may have seen Maverick, Iceman, Goose or Wolfman at any time of day or night getting the snow cleared. Our staff takes great pride in both their machines and the work they do, and our pathways are typically passable well before the roads are. Speaking of interesting

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EACH YEAR OUR ARBORISTS WORK ON MORE THAN 1,500 TREES, AN AVERAGE OF ALMOST SIX A DAY. names, many interesting ones can be heard and learned at the Walker Nature Center’s annual Halloween House and Trick-orTreat Trail event. With a robust team of character actors and actresses, both kids and parents alike can learn about the woods and its inhabitants in Reston by meeting the likes of the Lorax, the Troll at the troll bridge, Spiderella and Professor Herp. You maybe did not know you had so many “neighbors” in the open space near your home! While on the subject of neighbors, yours are part of the 21,000 residential units in Reston, with approximately 80 percent of those being

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

single-family detached homes, townhomes or condominiums. With that many homes, and a robust real estate market, it is not surprising to see real estate signs at almost every corner. With these real estate transactions comes a host of activities for RA’s covenants department. Each transaction requires a thorough review of the home’s history for such things as Design Review Board approvals, use and maintenance violations and the owners’ history of addressing each of these. The Virginia Property Owners Association Act, or POAA, requires this documentation and inspection, and the disclosure of such, for those purchasing into a common interest (or planned) community such as Reston. There are over 1,050 of these transactions each year, and many of these result in the

over 1,850 DRB applications, or roughly 36 to review each week! Approximately 50 percent of the DRB applications result from the required inspections. As we head into 2019, your Reston magazine will feature different RA functions in next year’s issues. It will be an opportunity to learn what facilities and services your association provides and the staff you may speak with about those very things, whether making a reservation, cutting the grass, plowing the pathways, teaching us about the flora and fauna in Reston or conducting a property inspection. As always, there is more to come, and remember — please get out and enjoy Reston in the fall — the trees make it stunning! Larry Butler, Acting CEO & Senior Director, Land Use and Planning


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WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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PERSPECTIVES | IDEAS | COMMUNITY LEADERS | VIEWS

Happiest Place in the World F BY KEN PLUM

airfax County and neighboring Loudoun Counties are among the happiest places in America to live, according to the World Happiness Report published by the Sustainable Development Solutions Network for the U.N. By the criteria used, Loudoun is the third happiest place and Fairfax County is the fourth happiest place in the United States, and by the same criteria, the United States ranked as the 18th happiest country in the world. Fairfax County received its designation in part because it has “one of the highest incomes when compared to cost of living … the average household earns nearly 2.3 times the minimum recommended amount to live a comfortable life.” Life expectancy in Fairfax, which is 83.73 years, is among the highest anywhere, according to the report. Loudoun lost its top spot for happiness, which it had earned in previous years, because it now has the thirdworst bankruptcy rate in the top 10. Living in Reston makes you even more blessed. Money Magazine in January 2018 named Reston the Best Place to Live in Virginia “for its expanses of parks, lakes, golf courses, and bridle paths [?] as well as the numerous shopping and dining opportunities in Reston Town Center.” These rankings, as with any attempt to measure “happiest” or “best,” rely on criteria that are open

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BEING “THE BEST PLACE TO LIVE” MEANS WE HAVE EDUCATED AND TALENTED PEOPLE WHO CAN PUT THEIR MINDS TO ENHANCING OUR COMMUNITY EVEN AS WE GROW. for debate. Do income, employment rates, divorce rates or physical attributes of a community equate to the designated award? Within these communities there are those who may not enjoy the benefits of the majority. Given a choice, I think it is better to be in the ranking than not. As we work to make Reston and

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Fairfax County even better places in which to live, we have a solid base on which to build. Concerns about the evolving nature of our community as it grows are understandable. Welcoming others to a community known for being a happy place and one where there are opportunities for work and enjoyment need not take away from the desirability to live here. Issues related to land use and transportation can be resolved while maintaining the quality of life of the place where we live. The process is often slower than any would like because of the complexities of the issues and the number of stakeholders. Being “the best place to live” means we have educated and talented people who can put their minds to

enhancing our community even as we grow. And it means we can continue to work to ensure that the greatest number of our neighbors enjoy the benefits of living here. Added together, that’s what makes Reston the best place to live in Virginia for sure, and I think the best to live anywhere! Delegate Plum represents the 36th District, including all of Reston, in the Virginia House of Delegates.


Professional Touring Artist Series 2018-2019 the CenterStage at Reston Community Center

Tickets: $5-$25 for Reston Residents & Employees

Armistead Maupin October 21, 7:00 p.m. Dr. Robert Sapolsky November 7, 8:00 p.m. A Gospel Extravaganza with The Legendary Ingramettes November 25, 3:00 p.m. Happy Vaudeville Holidays with Mark Brutsché December 1, 11:00 a.m. Lúnasa – Christmas from Ireland December 15, 2:00 p.m. & 8:00 p.m. From Here to There with opera diva Elizabeth Bishop December 16, 7:00 p.m. MLK keynote DeRay Mckesson and Community Luncheon January 21, 12:00 p.m. Dabke – choreographed by Zvi Gotheiner February 7, 8:00 p.m. An Evening with Broadway Legend Baayork Lee February 9, 8:00 p.m. Yumi Kurosawa with guest Anubrata Chatterjee February 13, 8:00 p.m. Ranky Tanky March 3, 7:00 p.m. joyUS justUS – choreographed by Contra-Tiempo March 14, 8:00 p.m. RSC’s The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (abriged) {revised} March 27, 8:00 p.m. Jazzmeia Horn March 30, 8:00 p.m. Liner Notes – A Musical Journey Through Hip-Hop April 7, 3:00 p.m. Trout Fishing in America April 13, 3:00 p.m. Still Standing – Anita Hollander May 8, 8:00 p.m. ETHEL with Robert Mirabal presents The River May 26, 7:00 p.m. An Evening with Nancy Giles – The Accidental Pundette June 1, 8:00 p.m.

www.restoncommunitycenter.com/PTAS 2310 Colts Neck Road, Reston, VA 20191

WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

To request reasonable ADA accommodations, call 703-476-4500, TTY 711.

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PERSPECTIVES | IDEAS | COMMUNITY LEADERS | VIEWS

Reston: A Success Story E BY GERRY CONNOLLY

ach year, through a program we developed called Congress at Your Company, I am fortunate to visit hundreds of our area businesses. These events give me a chance to hear directly from constituents at companies of all sizes across our district about their concerns. Before those town halls begin, I often get a chance to sit down with company executives to hear their perspectives on issues facing our country and how my office can be of assistance. Throughout all of these meetings, one constant refrain has struck me. Time and again, I hear company executives mention that they chose to bring their business to Fairfax County because of the quality of life we offer. This point was driven home to me recently. Over a two-month period, Governor Ralph Northam visited Northern Virginia five times to make major economic development announcements. Of those five announcements, four were right here in the Dulles Corridor. One was an announcement about Arconic Industries, a Fortune 500 company, settling here. That announcement made Arconic the 10th Fortune 500 company to be located in Fairfax County. To put that in context, that is more than exist in 30 states and the District of Columbia. Quite an accomplishment for the former dairy capital of the Commonwealth. So why do all these companies keep coming to

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID MADISON

THE DULLES CORRIDOR, ANCHORED BY TYSONS AND RESTON, HOLDS THE KEYS TO THE FUTURE ECONOMIC SUCCESS OF FAIRFAX COUNTY AND, BY EXTENSION, THE COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA. Fairfax County? For starters, we have one of the most highly educated workforces in the country. As a community, we understand the importance of education and the benefits it brings to the entire region. Fairfax County has made the necessary investments to back up that understanding with concrete action, with a particular focus on STEM education. As a result, we have a world-class school system that is the envy of many communities. And that investment has allowed us to meet the workforce demands

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

required in the 21st century economy. We have also made investments in transportation improvements and smart growth development. The Silver Line, for example, and other transit-oriented development is encouraging the kind of communities that the future workforce demands. When people live closer to where they work, the whole community benefits. When they are able to get to work without using a car, the benefits are even greater, environmentally as well as economically. The increase in commercial development being spurred by the Silver Line will also lessen the property tax burden on residential homeowners over time. While it seems as though this project was a foregone conclusion, this is most certainly not the case. I would like to thank Reston’s representatives in the General Assembly, Delegate Ken Plum and Senator Janet Howell, for their tireless commitment, shared vision and ongoing support for the Silver Line.

This year’s agreement to finally provide dedicated funding to Metro, coupled with increased safety reforms, is a step forward in restoring our Metro system. The Dulles Corridor, anchored by Tysons and Reston, holds the keys to the future economic success of Fairfax County and, by extension, the Commonwealth of Virginia. One needs only look to neighboring Arlington County and the economic benefits brought by the Ballston-Rosslyn corridor to imagine the possibilities. What we are doing in the Dulles Corridor is on a significantly larger scale, and we can only hope that the benefits will be larger still. We are on the path toward realizing Bob Simon’s vision for our community, and Reston’s future is bright. Congressman Gerry Connolly represents Virginia’s 11th District, which includes Reston. A former chairman of the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors, he serves on both the Oversight and Government Reform and Foreign Affairs Committees.


WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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PERSPECTIVES | IDEAS | COMMUNITY LEADERS | VIEWS

Communitywide Housing Plan H BY CATHY HUDGINS

ousing has always been a major consideration in the development of Reston. In 1963, there was talk of “the fullest range of housing styles and prices”; today I rather imagine that we speak in terms of preserving, expanding and facilitating affordable housing opportunities. In both cases the goal is the same: to offer safe, financially accessible shelter as the cornerstone of a world class community and a thriving and diverse economy. Whereas Mr. Simon drafted his Goals for the New Town, Fairfax County adopted the Communitywide Housing Strategic Plan in June 2018. Yes, it is the right thing to do, but just how important is the housing stock issue economically? As an example, let’s examine Amazon’s search for its second headquarters and the candidate locality requirements. To begin, please remember should Amazon HQ2 settle in our area, it would mean 50,000 high-paying jobs for the region, bringing additional investment in the local economy, construction and ongoing operation. In short, hosting HQ2 would be quite a financial catalyst for development. According to the Amazon HQ2 RFP, requirements include the following: local and regional talent, a well-educated workforce, location near airports, major highways, and public transits; optimal fiber connectivity; diverse population, excellent

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RESEARCH SHOWS PRICE-APPROPRIATE HOUSING SUPPORTS THE REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND ATTRACTS TALENT. institutions of higher education, supportive elected officials; an overall high quality of life; recreational opportunities, diversity of housing options, availability of housing near potential sites for HQ2. Fairfax is an excellent candidate, satisfying so many of the Amazon needs. Clearly, Amazon cares about housing its employees locally. Housing options that allow the company to hire workers who are able to live close to the HQ2 site is a strong preference. Research shows price-appropriate housing supports the regional development and attracts talent. Plus, when employees live where they work, there is less congestion on the roads. Even better, these resident/

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

GOAL 2

That it be possible for anyone to remain in a single neighborhood throughout his life, uprooting being neither inevitable nor always desirable. By providing the fullest range of housing styles and prices — from high-rise efficiencies to 6-bedroom townhouses and detached houses — housing needs can be met at a variety of income levels and at different stages of family life. This kind of mixture permits residents to remain rooted in the community if they so choose — as their particular housing needs change. As a by-product, this also results in the heterogeneity that spells a lively and varied community. Bob Simon, Founder, The Reston Concept — Goals for the New Town employees bring richer community benefits! However, there is a current deficit of workforce and affordable housing options in Fairfax County. Given the 50 years of scrutiny and commitment, if we hope to remain competitive in the Amazon HQ2 horse race, how are we going to address this deficit? By creating and implementing the Communitywide Housing Strategic Plan (https://bit. ly/2QBOmLe) as the third leg of the stool, this approach complements and reinforces

the Strategic Plan to Facilitate the Economic Success of Fairfax County, an economic development strategy, and the One Fairfax Policy, an approach to ensure racial and social equity across all services the county offers. The inclusivity and shared prosperity of these combined actions will surely build a vibrant Fairfax County that benefits residents and will appeal to Amazon. Cathy Hudgins has represented the Hunter Mill District on the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors since 2000. As a long-time Restonian, she has been involved with local, county and state politics for over 30 years.


WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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ON THE STREET | STORIES | CURRENT EVENTS | HIGHLIGHTS

Winter Wonderland Comes to Town E very parade needs a Grand Marshal, and every year, Reston Holiday Parade has featured a Reston luminary to lead the way. This year, a national star will be the 2018 Grand Marshal for the 28th annual Reston Holiday Parade: 14-year-old stage and screen actress Sissy Sheridan of Reston. Sissy’s established career includes the popular children’s series “Chicken Girls,” Nickelodeon’s “DIY With Me” and a recurring role in Netflix’s “Maniac” starring Emma Stone and Jonah Hill. This fall and winter she’s appearing in “Billy Elliot” at Signature Theatre in Arlington. Her ongoing achievements can be followed on Instagram, @ItsSissySheridan, and on SissySheridan.com. Sissy will start the procession at 11:00 a.m. in a chauffeur-driven convertible, leading more than 1,400 performers and groups from around the region that will march, sing, dance and drive in the one-hour, half-mile parade along Market Street, announced by special guest emcees at two VIP grandstand locations. After the parade concludes around noon, Sissy will meet and greet fans at Fountain Square in Reston Town Center where many of the parade’s personalities linger for photos around the tree.

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF RESTON TOWN CENTER

© GARDNER TALENT MANAGEMENT

BY CAROL NAHORNIAK

USA TODAY “10 BEST”

On the day after Thanksgiving, every year since 1991, the Reston Holiday Parade has been a huge draw for the community to launch the season of celebrations. Traditions have been established, and the parade has grown along with Reston’s development over the years. The one-of-a-kind Reston Holiday Parade has gained national media attention, and it was voted one of the “10 Best“ holiday parades in 2016 and 2017 in USA Today Travel.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

HOLIDAY SPARKLE ARRIVES

This year’s parade is titled “Winter Wonderland” and will feature Macy’s-style balloons, antique cars, fire trucks, characters, entertainers, local dignitaries, groups from Reston Community Center and Reston Association and much more — all bringing the sparkle of the holidays. The parade ends with the arrival of Santa and Mrs. Claus in a horse-drawn carriage, but there’s more to enjoy. The Clauses will stay for the afternoon in their special


28TH ANNUAL

Reston Holiday Parade Friday, November 23

Parade • Tree Lighting • Sing Along Reston Town Center 11900 Market Street www.restontowncenter.com/holidays

2016 & 2017: “10 Best” in USA Today 2018 Grand Marshal: Sissy Sheridan

WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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ON THE STREET | STORIES | CURRENT EVENTS | HIGHLIGHTS

spot for visits and photos in the lobby next to the Skate Shop, and those who make a donation to South Lakes High School Chorus will receive their own portrait to take home. As dusk falls on parade day, the spotlight will turn on Fountain Square for the Conservatory Ballet’s performance of a dance from “The Nutcracker.” Shortly afterward, the Clauses return for the magical tree lighting at 6:00 p.m., followed by the annual Sing Along led by The Reston Chorale and a brass quintet. With Community Partner support from Reston Community Center and balloon sponsor Reston Town Center Association, the Reston Holiday Parade is presented by Reston Town Center, along

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

with help from 200 volunteers. Distribution of 10,000 commemorative jingle bells to children along the route, serving as parade marshals and costumed characters and wrangling the huge balloons are among the tasks accomplished by volunteers from Reston and beyond.

THROUGH THE SEASON

In another long-standing tradition on parade day, and on weekends prior to Christmas, Reston Town Center presents afternoon mini-train rides and evening horse-drawn carriage rides to benefit local charities. On designated days, all ride proceeds are received directly by local nonprofit organizations such as Cornerstones, Leadership Fairfax, Volunteer Fairfax, Kids R First, Reston Rotary and Friends of Reston.


The Reston Holiday Parade, Tree Lighting and Sing Along at Reston Town Center are traditions that have continued over 28 seasons, gathering the community, friends and families together for an entire day filled with activities for all ages to enjoy. Details about all the events on Friday, November 23, and more throughout the season are on the Holidays webpage at restontowncenter.com. Carol Nahorniak, Creative Director at Myers PR, lives, works, plays and gets involved in Reston.

Leading you the way home Lauren Budik, REALTORÂŽ

Your agent. Your advocate. NVAR Multi-Million Dollar Sales Club 703.738.9505 LaurenBudik.com I LBudik@McEnearney.com 1320 Old Chain Bridge Road I McLean, VA 22101

WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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ON THE STREET | STORIES | CURRENT EVENTS | HIGHLIGHTS

What’s Coming to Reston? S ince the WiehleReston Metro Station opened a couple of years ago, Reston has seen a major surge in redevelopment activity. Several buildings are already completed offering apartments, condos, office space, restaurants and retail. Fairfax County continues to consider and approve redevelopment applications for building projects surrounding or near both the Wiehle-Reston Station and the Reston Town Center Metro Station, which is expected to be up and running in 2020. Here is an update on projects that have been approved or are in the process of receiving approvals.

NEAR THE WIEHLERESTON METRO STATION Approved Development Projects: 1831 Michael Faraday Drive Developer Rooney Properties plans to develop 13 townhomes, 283 apartments and ground floor commercial uses (each between 500 and 10,000 square feet), totaling 293,000 square feet of space. The location is off Michael Faraday Drive, between Sunset Hills Road and the Dulles Toll Road. The approved project will also include a green rooftop with a pool

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COMSTOCK RESTON STATION PROMENADE

and additional green space incorporated throughout the development. Commerce Metro Center This project will convert the existing office building park into a mixed-use development by adding residential, hotel, retail and

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additional office uses across four new buildings. The two new residential buildings are approved for up to 500 units. The new office building is approved for up to 375,000 square feet, and the fourth building will be a 175-room hotel. Approximately 17,000 square feet of retail will also

ARCHITECTURAL RENDERING BY NUNZIO MARC DESANTIS ARCHITECTS, COURTESY OF COMSTOCK

BY JESSICA BIGGER

RESTON GATEWAY

be included across three of the four new buildings. The three existing office buildings, which total over 300,000 square feet, will remain. There will also be green space incorporated throughout the development that will include recreational open space, fountains, etc. Comstock Reston Station Promenade In April of this year, the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors approved Comstock’s proposal to develop approximately 1.24 million square feet across four new buildings at the southwest corner of Sunset Hills Road and Wiehle Avenue. The approved development will deliver a residential building, an office building and two other buildings


PHOTO COURTESY OF BOSTON PROPERTIES

will add approximately 1,000 new residential units across four new buildings, while retaining the two existing 117,686-squarefoot office buildings. Retail uses are also proposed to be incorporated into the residential buildings. TF Cornerstone has offered to include such amenities as a rooftop pool, lots of open space (parks), a residential garden, a recreational club and a community pool.

RESTON TOWN CENTER METRO STATION AREA Approved Development Projects:

that are a combination of residential/hotel and residential/office space, resulting in approximately 460 residential units, with an additional 80 residential/hotel units, and approximately 340,000 square feet of retail and office uses. Retail space will be available on the ground floor of each of the four buildings. The surrounding open space will have a parklike feel. To accommodate the increase in traffic, Comstock has contributed funds to add turn lane extensions to Sunset Hills Road and Wiehle Avenue. Reston Station Promenade is located directly north of the existing Reston Station development and is designed to tie into the existing and planned buildings.

11111 Sunset Hills The redevelopment applications for the property located at 11111 Sunset Hills Road, across from the Post Office, were approved by the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors in July of this year. The redevelopment project will include one new multifamily residential building with up to 175 units and 13 single-family townhomes while retaining an existing office building. Projects Awaiting Approval: Midline The joint redevelopment proposal between JBG, EYA and Chevy Chase Land Company for the Midline project is currently under review by Fairfax County. The approximately 1.6

million square feet of new development is planned to spread across the approximately 17-acre site, bounded on the north by Sunset Hills Road, on the west by Wiehle Avenue and on the south by the Dulles Toll Road. The developers plan to add several urban parks, public art and recreational amenities. If approved, this mixed-use project will deliver a mix of residential, retail, office and independent living uses. Campus Commons The applicant, TF Cornerstone, has submitted redevelopment applications for the properties located at the southeast corner of Wiehle Avenue and Sunrise Valley Drive, south of the Dulles Toll Road. The current development proposal

Reston Gateway Boston Properties’ Reston Gateway redevelopment project was approved by the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors in July. Located on the north side of Sunset Hills Road, between Town Center Parkway and Reston Parkway to the west and east, respectively, the approximately 30-acre site was approved to add over 4 million square feet of mixed-used development to Reston’s footprint (including two existing office buildings to be retained). The project site will eventually serve as the landing spot for the Reston Town Center Metro Station pedestrian bridge on the north side of the Dulles Toll Road. This site has also been identified as a potential location for the future Reston performing arts center, as identified as a need in the Comprehensive

WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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PHOTO COURTESY OF ONE RESTON CO. LLC AND TWO RESTON CO. LLC

ON THE STREET | STORIES | CURRENT EVENTS | HIGHLIGHTS

RESTON CRESCENT

Plan for the Reston Transit Station Areas. The applicants included a provision in their approved proffer statement to explore the possibility of allotting space for a performing arts center. Boston Properties has included plans to widen Sunset Hills Road to accommodate the increase in traffic. Reston Crescent The Reston Crescent development project, from applicants One Reston Co. LLC and Two Reston Co. LLC, was approved by the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors in late July 2018. This project will be located off the northwest corner of Reston Parkway and Sunrise Valley Drive. The approved project allows for up to 4.3 million square feet of

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total development and will house space for residential units, assisted living, retail, office and a hotel. The two existing office buildings will be retained. Developers have already secured Wegmans as one of their commercial tenants in the first phase of development. Projects Awaiting Approval: Reston Town Center, West Located on the northwest corner of Town Center Parkway and Sunset Hills Road, JBG Smith has already completed construction of the restaurant and retail space with current tenants like Cooper Hawk Winery, Starbucks, etc. This current redevelopment plan will retain four existing buildings and two parking

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structures, and it will add five additional buildings onsite. The new buildings will offer residential, office and retail uses for a total of approximately 1.36 million square feet. There will be 3.44 acres of open space, with 1.75 acres set aside for urban park space. The developer has added recreational space along the W&OD trail and plans to make improvements for increased access between the existing trail and the future site. Reston Crossing Located directly north of the approved Reston Crescent project, applications to redevelop the property off Edmond Halley Drive, just south of the Dulles Toll Road, have been submitted for review to Fairfax County.

The applicants currently propose up to 1.95 million square feet of mixed-use development.

RESTON TOWN CENTER NORTH

A joint development proposal between Fairfax County and INOVA looks to redevelop the approximately 47-acre Reston Town Center North site with mixed-use development through a public-private partnership. The current application under review by Fairfax County requires rezoning to establish a continuous zoning designation as Planned Residential Community (PRC) and establish the grid of streets and central green area. The vision for this property is a mix of uses that includes public facilities such as a new library and a location for the Embry Rucker


RESTON TOWN CENTER NORTH

PHOTO COURTESY OF FAIRFAX COUNTY, INOVA

Shelter. Another public amenity envisioned for this site is the indoor athletic and aquatic facility identified as a core recreational need in the Reston Comprehensive Plan. The development refers to the area bounded by Explorer Street, Bowman Towne Drive, New Dominion Parkway and Fountain Drive. The area includes the current Reston Library and Embry Rucker Shelter.

is currently developed with three office buildings and associated surface parking. The applicants plan to rezone just over 4 acres of the property to allow for residential development onsite. Jessica Bigger is a freelance writer who lives in Reston.

Reston Corner Located on the southeast corner of Sunrise Valley Drive and Reston Parkway, just south of the approved Reston Crescent project, a redevelopment application is currently under review for Reston Corner. The approximately 10-acre site

WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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ON THE STREET | STORIES | CURRENT EVENTS | HIGHLIGHTS

NoVA PRISM – A New Partnership H BY ALEX SANDERS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY HA BROCK

ave you been on the Washington and Old Dominion Trail lately? Or one of Reston’s wonderful parks? If you have, you’ve seen invasive plant species. Autumn olive, porcelain-berry and English ivy are just a few of the many invasive plants that reside in our public and private spaces. While they may look pretty, invasive plants are a major threat to wildlife and wildlife habitat, especially in our region where some habitats are increasingly rare and fragmented. Since they are not native to our area, few animals feed on them, and they can spread so easily that they harm native species. Invasives can shade out and strangle trees, change the soil chemistry and overwhelm natural areas. Japanese barberry, a popular landscaping shrub, even harbors deer ticks, which spread Lyme disease to humans. Many, including the Reston Association, have been working to control invasive species on their lands for years. But invasive species do not care if they grow on public or private land or whose jurisdiction they are in, and their spread has become regional. In a new effort funded by a grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, several partners, including Reston Association, Arlington County, NOVA Parks and Dominion Energy, are joining together to form a Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management in Northern Virginia (or

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IN A NEW EFFORT FUNDED BY A GRANT FROM THE NATIONAL FISH AND WILDLIFE FOUNDATION, SEVERAL PARTNERS, INCLUDING RESTON ASSOCIATION, ARLINGTON COUNTY, NOVA PARKS AND DOMINION ENERGY, ARE JOINING TOGETHER TO FORM A PARTNERSHIP FOR REGIONAL INVASIVE SPECIES MANAGEMENT IN NORTHERN VIRGINIA (OR NOVA PRISM). NoVA PRISM). PRISMs are partnerships of government agencies, conservation organizations, volunteers, landowners, businesses

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

and academic institutions that work cooperatively to coordinate invasive species management across political and ecological boundaries

within a defined geographic area. PRISMs and Cooperative Weed Management Areas (CWMAs, another cooperative framework) are being created around the country to help manage invasive species. The NoVA PRISM has an ambitious agenda to coordinate existing efforts to control invasives and restore habitat, share information to improve management techniques and engage in community outreach to educate landowners and land managers about invasives and native alternatives. Local cooperative efforts are already making a difference. For


example, last spring Dominion Energy mowed green space beneath the power line along the W&OD trail in Arlington County, and afterward staff and contractors continued to manage the area. By June, a mix of native species, including common milkweed (essential to the monarch butterfly),

dogbane and sensitive fern had returned. The PRISM is also supporting several pilot projects in Northern Virginia to restore meadow and riparian habitats on or near the W&OD trail. In Reston, Dominion Energy, NOVA Parks, Reston Association and volunteers

have combined efforts to protect trees and meadow habitat from encroaching vines and shrubs on the W&OD trail near Reston Parkway. Nearby, they have started a project to clear green space of invasives in order to encourage natives to return. In Falls Church, staff and volunteers will be

VA Sunrise Square

replanting a city park with native species this autumn after a multiyear campaign to clear the park of invasive plants. Want to join the effort and make a difference? Email NoVA PRISM at novaprism1@gmail.com for more information on invasives and native alternatives. To volunteer in Reston, join Habitat Heroes and contact Ha Brock, Volunteer Reston Manager, at habrock@reston. org or 703-435-7986. Alex Sanders is the coordinator for the NoVA PRISM and has worked as a consultant in environmental history and natural resource management for nearly two decades.

1975 Roland Clark place Reston, VA 20191

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703-963-7676 WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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ON THE STREET | STORIES | CURRENT EVENTS | HIGHLIGHTS

New Residential Developments Join the Reston Association Members F BY JESSICA BIGGER

PHOTOGRAPHY BY SEAN BAHRAMI

our new developments have recently joined the Reston Association (RA) or will soon become members and will add approximately 500 new families to Reston. The Lofts at Reston Station, Sunrise Square and Valley & Park are residential developments, and VY Reston Heights is designed for mixeduse. New renters and owners will enjoy all the amenities RA has to offer, including access to the pools and tennis courts, and numerous events and programs. These new residential communities will bring in additional assessment dollars to RA. The added fees will go toward maintaining the association’s parks and recreation facilities, paved pathways, streams, ponds, lakes, meadows, nature trails, playgrounds, pools, tennis courts and athletic fields. In addition, the funds will go toward reforestation and native plants projects, stream monitoring, invasive plant removal, upkeep of RA’s bridges and underpasses

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NEW RENTERS AND OWNERS WILL ENJOY ALL THE AMENITIES RA HAS TO OFFER, INCLUDING ACCESS TO THE POOLS AND TENNIS COURTS, AND NUMEROUS EVENTS AND PROGRAMS. and roads, as well as leaf and snow removal on RA’s paved pathways.

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LOFTS AT RESTON STATION

Pulte is building townhomes and condos for its new development called the Lofts at Reston Station, which is located off of Michael Faraday Drive and is east of Wiehle Avenue and south of Sunset Hills Road. There are 32 apartments and 12 one- to two-floor loft-style townhomes. Both townhome designs have an open floor plan with three bedrooms, two bathrooms and a onecar garage. The first is 2,393 square feet, and the second is

1,509 square feet. The Lofts are within a short walking distance to the W&OD trail and the Wiehle-Reston Metro Station.

SUNRISE SQUARE

Seka Homes just completed construction of its Sunrise Square development located at 11690 Sunrise Valley Drive, across from the Reston National Golf Course. The developer built 34 luxury townhomes and six luxury condominiums. There are two townhome designs. Both styles have four floors and include a patio off the ground floor and a rooftop terrace. Each


WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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PHOTO BYBTW IMAGES & SEKAS HOMES


ON THE STREET | STORIES | CURRENT EVENTS | HIGHLIGHTS

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVEDâ„¢


townhome can have up to five bedrooms. The luxury condos have three floor plan designs, each with two bedrooms and two bathrooms. Two of the designs are 1,033 square feet, and the third is 1,231 square feet. RA will own and manage the 1.9 acres of open space on the east of the property. The park will include a playground, picnic areas, meadows and pathways, and it will be open to all RA members.

VALLEY & PARK

Valley & Park, by Toll Brothers, is currently under construction at 11720 Sunrise Valley Drive, also across from the Reston National Golf Course. Once the project is completed, there will be 54 four-story residential townhomes ranging from 2,597 square feet to 3,015 square feet. Toll Brothers will be offering four different home designs, all with open floor plans. Each townhome will have three to four bedrooms, two full bathrooms, three half baths, and a two-car garage.

square feet. The apartment complex is located at 11830 Sunrise Valley Drive and is adjacent to the International Business Center and the Westin Hotel. This mixeduse development includes 385 residential units and 89,000 square feet that has been set aside for retail and restaurants. JBG has already secured three restaurant tenants: Reston Kebab, Signature Thai and Super Chicken. Residents will be able to enjoy the outdoor pavilion and rooftop sky lounge. There is also a recreational lounge with a shuffleboard table, foosball, a television and a catering kitchen. To accommodate residents’ busy schedules, the development also has a fitness center on site. Many services are also available, including dog walkers and pet sitters, a handyman, house cleaners and a carwash and detailing service. Jessica Bigger is a freelance writer who lives in Reston.

VY RESTON HEIGHTS

JBG’s VY Reston Heights offers one-, two- and three-bedroom luxury apartments ranging from 670 square feet to 1,684 WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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ON THE STREET | STORIES | CURRENT EVENTS | HIGHLIGHTS

Newly Renovated Central Services Facility WHAT IS CSF?

Central Services Facility (CSF), a division of Parks and Recreation, is responsible for the maintenance and care of Reston’s facilities, including pavilions, community buildings, garden plots and pathways. CSF is an integral part of the Reston Association, ensuring that our open space, such as our lakes, streams and natural areas, are kept pristine and beautiful for the enjoyment of our residents. CSF spearheads projects to preserve the native wildlife and vegetation of our area, while working to educate the public on invasive exotics, proper composting methods and available recycling programs, just to name a few.

CSF RENOVATION

The CSF building was originally built in the early 1980s. The entire structure is a Butler-type building typically used for warehouse purposes. The office and shops and other interior rooms were added as needed over the years; however, in recent years, there were many problems. For instance, there was only one bathroom with only one stall for over 50 male employees.

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The roof had many leaks, and the climate control system was outdated. The office areas were poorly lighted, and the air circulation was bad. There was asbestos in the building as well. There was only one entrance for both the employees and the members. Lighting, security and safety were either nonexistent or outdated, and there was no security in the working yard. The upper offices had no climate control or bathroom facility, and the entire building was not up to ADA standards. The skylights were completely weathered and a source of leaks. The outer shell of the building was peeling, faded and rusting away. The entire facility was just too old and outdated to house the function of the CSF, so a new work space was long overdue for our maintenance employees.

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IMPROVEMENTS

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More modern working space. New IT equipment and improved network connections to respond to residents quickly and more efficiently. New security system including cameras and new gate system for the RVCP (Recreational Vehicle Central Park). More ADA accessibility. Better and safer working conditions for the staff and public. New roof. More efficient fuel system that saves RA money and time. Better bathrooms for the public and staff. New modern conference room and AV equipment for meetings. Additional bathroom in the warehouse. New and improved lighting system. Additional garage door for truck and equipment storage/maintenance.


BEFORE RENO

AFTER RENO

WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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AROUND RESTON | HOT SPOTS | LOCAL INTEREST | TRENDING

Building a Portfolio of Public Art

Many Reston Developers Consider Public Art Integral to Their Projects BY JANET REMS

C

PHOTOS COURTESY OF PUBLIC ART RESTON

harles (Chuck) Veatch — who has “lived, worked, played and served in Reston for 54 years”— knows firsthand every aspect of the development business. Veatch, founder and president of the commercial real estate company Charles A. Veatch Co., started his development career in the early 1960s as a young man selling the then totally new, still unfinished and innovative community of Reston. After establishing his own company, Veatch, a Real Estate Fellow at the McIntire School of Commerce at the University of Virginia, invested in a number of commercial properties, developing and managing them. Under his company Environmental Concepts, Inc., he built homes until the 1980s. Most recently, he is working on various development projects under the umbrella Real Asset Management Associates, including a majority partnership with The Bozzuto Companies that built Aperture, luxury rental apartments in a new mixeduse development immediately across from the Reston-Wiehle Metro station. Also an accomplished nature photographer and a director of Nature’s Best

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photography magazine, Veatch — who provided the photographs for the book “The Nature of Reston”—has long appreciated the value of incorporating public art into development projects. While working for Reston’s late founder, Robert E. Simon Jr., selling Reston, Veatch watched famed Uruguayan sculptor Gonzalo Fonseca create Lake Anne Village Center’s noted concrete and wooden sculptures, occasionally chatting with the artist as he worked. Well before there were any residents, finished homes or roads but lots of mud all around, he directly observed how Simon integrated public art in his original plans for his “New Town.” A strong proponent of public art was born. Veatch was later one of the driving forces behind the Zachary Oxman bronze sculpture at Lake Anne Village Center, Untold Stories (affectionately known as Bronze Bob), which commemorated Simon’s 90th birthday in 2004. It was no surprise, therefore, that Veatch made public art an essential feature of Aperture. Sitting prominently outside the entrance to the Aperture

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From left, Charles (Chuck) Veatch, majority partner with The Bozzuto Companies that built the Aperture luxury apartments; Cathy Hudgins, Hunter Mill Supervisor; and artist Zachary Oxman, pose with Oxman’s 2017 stainless-steel and bronze sculpture, Convergence, which sits prominently outside the entrance of Aperture.

apartments is another Oxman sculpture, Convergence. A massive bronze and stainlesssteel sculpture, it aptly uses

the form of a camera and the act of taking a photograph as a metaphor for the convergence that happens when the


LIKE THE FREQUENTLY PHOTOGRAPHED BRONZE BOB, VEATCH ANTICIPATES THAT CONVERGENCE WILL BECOME ANOTHER PUBLIC ART ICON IN RESTON.

The massive 2017 stainless-steel and bronze sculpture, Convergence, was created by Zachary Oxman, a native of Reston. It sits prominently outside the entrance to the Aperture apartments, a new mixed-use development immediately across from the Reston-Wiehle Metro station. Convergence marks the second of Oxman’s artworks to take up residence in the community. The first, Untold Stories (2004), depicts Reston’s founder Robert E. Simon Jr. sitting on a bench and overlooking the lake at Lake Anne Village Center.

intangible becomes tangible. In addition, Aperture’s lobby features another Oxman sculpture, inspired by the parts of old cameras. There also is a wall-sized, photographic collage in the lobby, which tells the story of Reston and how it is different, especially for newcomers, as well as Nature’s Best photographs throughout the building and film strips in its elevators. Aperture’s public art was a “chance to go back to my roots and Reston’s roots,” Veatch said, sharing that because of his insistence on incorporating art, his Bozzuto partners have dubbed him the development project’s “director of soul.” He further observed, “I made sure Aperture had soul, and public art is one of my tools.” Like the frequently photographed Bronze Bob, Veatch anticipates that Convergence will become another public art icon in Reston. He noted how residents and passersby often stop, look and contemplate the sculpture and, more practically, “what a great marketing tool” it has become. “I believe to my core,” he said, “that living with art and having it be part of everyday life makes it a place where people want to live.” He added, “I am really, truly proud of this product and the way it turned out,” and, addressing fellow developers, he also hoped that Convergence might “set the tone for others to do something new and exciting for public art.” Comstock Companies, which is constructing

WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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AROUND RESTON | HOT SPOTS | LOCAL INTEREST | TRENDING Left: The 2018 cast bronze sculpture, The Force of Nature, by Lorenzo Quinn, is prominently situated on the Reston Station Neighborhood’s public plaza.

mixed-use developments above and around key Metro stations, including RestonWiehle, agrees. Comstock considers public art integral to all its development projects, according to Maggie Parker, Comstock’s vice president, communications, and chair of Public Art Reston’s board of directors. Parker explained that a bulk of Comstock’s current work in this region involves mixed-use environments and noted that “we’re trying to create neighborhoods.” Public artworks, she suggested, create “small respites for the eye and mind,” thereby contributing greatly to establishing a sense of place. At Comstock’s Reston Station Neighborhood, which

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is described as “the only fully integrated transit-oriented development in Northern Virginia,” public art “allows residents, commuters, office staff and general visitors to take a look, a breath, experience something other than asphalt and the mayhem [of ongoing construction].” Also, Parker said, each public artwork says something about who Comstock is as a company and “how we would like our neighborhoods to evolve.” In addition, they reflect Comstock CEO Christopher Clemente’s personal love of art of all types. The powerful figurative, cast bronze sculpture The Force of Nature, by Lorenzo Quinn (son of actor Anthony Quinn), is prominently

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and permanently situated on Reston Station’s plaza near the new Helmut Jahn building. The sculpture was found by Clemente while traveling abroad. Like Reston Town Center’s marble and bronze Mercury Fountain by sculptor Saint Clair Cemin, Parker suggested that The Force of Nature functions as a plaza focal point. Two other Quinn sculptures are being considered, she noted, for other phases of the Reston Station development. Reston Station’s plaza also is home to a group of whimsical temporary sculptures, Dancing Reeds, which appear randomly placed around the plaza. Designed by the landscape architecture

firm Oculus, the sprays of PVC pipes burst out of the ground like a bouquet of unadorned stems or a handful of lollipop sticks without the lollipops. The “reeds,” which vary in color based on the season, are “an artistic solution” to an interim problem, Parker said. They camouflage steel rebar pipes, which are the cornerstones for future buildings. Incorporating public art was made a key action item in the development plan during the zoning process for the Reston Station Neighborhood, Parker recalled. And when Hunter Mill Supervisor Cathy Hudgins asked Comstock to consider it as a proffer, “we stepped up right away.” “In all honesty, I must confess I am a big fan of public art,” said Hudgins, who has been an active supporter of Public Art Reston since its inception in 2008 and has a representative on its board of directors. Commenting in an emailed statement, she said, “It inspires the community and engages the mind and senses. In fact, it often reflects the character of the surrounding Reston Community. Public art makes its location a memorable place — an icon, a landmark.” She added, “In Reston, public art is a community value and commitment, one that was incorporated by Reston founder Bob Simon all those years ago. To support that commitment, Fairfax County encourages builders to incorporate public art in their construction. It is my hope that developers would identify potential opportunities for public art at a specific site prior to breaking ground and then enrich the project through proffering a work of art.” Anne Delaney, executive director of Public Art Reston — quoting in part from the “Public Art Master Plan for Reston adopted in 2008” — credits


Top: The welded, stainless-steel sculpture by Matthew Duffy, Mutual Understanding/Mutual Respect, sits outside the front entrance of Reston’s North County Government Center, where Hunter Mill Supervisor Cathy Hudgins has her offices. At the time of the sculpture’s 2016 installation, Hudgins said, “Incorporating artwork into our new facility is a demonstration of the county’s commitment to public art.” The sculpture, which represents two hands reaching toward each other but not touching, suggests peaceful greetings, respect and shared objectives. Bottom: The public art work, Basket of Flowers, owned by Boston Properties, sits at the entrance to The Avant apartments in Reston Town Center. The 2014 cast aluminum sculpture was created by Stephen Robin, whose sculptures often draw inspiration from architectural details from the Beaux-Arts and Art Deco periods. His works also are in the Smithsonian American Art Museum collection as well as several private collections around the country.

Hudgins’ ongoing support with helping the community “reinvigorate its tradition of commissioning significant public artworks that anchor key community places and serve as sources of community enjoyment and education.” Delaney said, “It is thanks to the support of Hunter Mill Supervisor Cathy Hudgins that so many developers are making a commitment to the voluntary

proffer to commission and integrate public art in their developments or to make a contribution toward a public art community project. Her critical support helps raise the expectations that public art will be an integral component of Reston’s long-term ethic of building a quality environment as Reston experiences tremendous growth.” Delaney further noted that the Fairfax

Town Center as a good example of a developer’s commitment. Commissioned by Boston Properties, the vertical, spiraling glass sculpture by Danny Lane, an Americanborn artist who lives and works in London, “enhances the experience of pedestrians and drivers along Reston Parkway,” she said. Starting with the iconic Mercury Fountain, Delaney added, visitors will notice a large number of other public artworks throughout Reston Town Center. Given the very positive response to its first guided Public Art Tour Series at Lake Anne, Public Art Reston is currently developing a new guide dedicated to the public artworks in Reston Town Center. In addition, the Public Art Tour Series at Lake Anne is available for purchase at the Reston Historic Trust and Museum and at Reston Association headquarters. “The objective of these guides,” she observed, “is to bring greater awareness and enjoyment about Reston’s public art collection. And as new public artworks are commissioned as a result of Reston’s growth, we plan to develop additional guides, notably along the Dulles Road corridor.” Janet Rems is chairman of Public Art-Reston’s Communications Committee. The former editor of The Reston Times, she regularly freelances for The Fairfax County Times, writing primarily about the arts.

County Comprehensive Plan, which specifically references the Public Art Master Plan for Reston, also encourages a commitment to public art in new development projects, both private and public, in Reston. Besides the public art at Aperture and Comstock’s Reston Station Neighborhood, Delaney cited the most recent public art addition at Reston WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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AROUND RESTON | HOT SPOTS | LOCAL INTEREST | TRENDING

Development in Reston D BY RICHARD NEWLON

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BALANCING THE DEVELOPER’S DESIRES FOR A PROFITABLE PROJECT WITH THE VERY REAL NEED TO RESPECT AND PRESERVE OUR COMMUNITY AND NEIGHBORHOODS IS OF PARAMOUNT IMPORTANCE.

consists of nine volunteer Reston Association members forming three, three-member panels that meet weekly, and once a month as the Full Design Review Board. Many levels of review are handled by the RA DRB, and primarily residential applications go to Covenants staff or a DRB panel. The Full DRB reviews the “Development” and most commercial applications. The size and complexity of some of the developments require many meetings and workshops to allow member input, applicant presentation(s) and DRB review and comments to direct the proposed design to satisfy contextual concerns, community impact, neighborhood concerns and general design implications. Some of these larger applications have involved the Fairways Development, Tall Oaks Village Center, the Harrison Apartments, St. Johns Woods, Terraset Elementary

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

PHOTO BY DAVID MADISON

evelopment is coming to Reston in a big way. Millions of square feet of new office space and thousands of new residences are already planned and coming soon. Keep in mind there are three distinct areas of Reston, each with a different review board. The Reston Association has the purview over the areas included in the original Planned Residential Community (PRC), while the Reston Town Center has its own Design Review Board. The “Industrial Corridor” (basically the area bounded on the north by Sunset Hills and on the South by Sunrise Valley) used to have its own Design Review Board, but the landowners decided (in 2011) to vacate all of their covenants and ordinances (to allow residential development) and, in so doing, removed any design review from the development process. There are a few properties in the Industrial Corridor that were part of the PRC: the Sheraton, Westin Hotel, Reston Heights and the Mercer Apartments. Reston Association has its Design Review Board (DRB), which has “… the power to interpret, administer, and render decisions involving the design covenants … in accordance with the … Design Guidelines.” The DRB is also charged “… to foster the attractiveness and functional utility of the community as a place to live, including a harmonious relationship among structures, vegetation, and topography.” The DRB

School and Sunrise Valley School. Additional possible future developments involve Reston’s two golf courses: Reston National Golf Course and Hidden Creek Golf Course. Reston’s DRB has purview only over Hidden Creek Golf Course, but a citizen coalition, Rescue Reston, has been successful in its effort to halt further development consideration of Reston National Golf Course. The introduction of Metro to Reston has had both positive and negative effects, with the impact continuing into the future. Some of the larger developments being proposed in the Industrial Corridor will include millions of square feet of office and commercial space

and thousands of dwelling units, primarily apartments. These are certain to affect the demographics of Reston as smaller units are not likely to bring families with children. The enormous impact on our existing infrastructure must be considered with any development approved by the county; however, to date, minimal changes have been proposed, and the pipeline for future changes remains mired in budgets and bureaucratic nonsense. The push for increased development will certainly reward Fairfax County with increased tax revenue, but it will be to the detriment of current Reston residents and their way of life. One concern with each


PHOTO BY SEAN BAHRAMI

development in the PRC area involves the “matter-ofright” that developers have with their properties. The Reston Master Plan and the regulations in the original PRC development dictate certain allowable zoning requirements for each site. Balancing the developer’s desires for a profitable project with the very real need to respect and preserve our community and neighborhoods is of paramount importance. Finding common ground between these sometimes conflicting issues is the subjective work of the DRB. Another issue is that the Reston Master Plan states “… a foundational characteristic of Reston has been a commitment to preserve natural areas

and integrate open space throughout the community.” Some of the new developments in the Industrial Corridor have sorely missed this desired design feature. Reston is growing rapidly. All RA members must be aware of the potential and proposed developments that are coming. There are limits to the density that must be considered to avoid losing the character of where we live. Town Center and the Industrial Corridor are out of our reach as a community since only Fairfax County can control the growth and design in those areas. Everyone that lives in Reston, or comes to visit, is immediately aware that Reston is different. We have around us

a wonderful, relaxed, natural landscape and a variety of housing types blended into forests and lakes. Careful, sensitive development is of utmost importance for us to continue to live in and love this wonderful place. Richard Newlon Chair, Reston Design Review Board

WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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AROUND RESTON | HOT SPOTS | LOCAL INTEREST | TRENDING

Fairfax County Looks to Increase Reston’s Population Density F BY JESSICA BIGGER AND KELSEY STEFFEN airfax County is looking to amend Reston’s PRC Zoning Ordinance. As it stands, any future development must limit the number of units to satisfy a population density of 13 persons per acre. The county wanted to increase the population density cap in the PRC Ordinance to 16 persons per acre, but during small group meetings over the summer indicated the number could be 15 persons per acre. This would allow for an increase to allow in the number of residential units within this Zoning District; specifically, in the Reston Town Center, Reston’s Village Centers and the Transit Service Areas (TSAs) surrounding the three Metro stations. According to Fairfax County staff and officials, the proposed increase is needed to fulfill the density described in the current Reston Master Plan (also referred to as the Comprehensive Plan). Many at RA and in the county throw around the term PRC, but what are they talking

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ACCORDING TO FAIRFAX COUNTY STAFF AND OFFICIALS, THE PROPOSED INCREASE IS NEEDED TO FULFILL THE DENSITY DESCRIBED IN THE CURRENT RESTON MASTER PLAN (ALSO REFERRED TO AS THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN).

about? PRC stands for Planned Residential Community, which, in Reston, includes many community services and a high number of recreational amenities and open space, including hiking and bike pathways, nature surface trails, parks, lakes and woodlands. Most of Reston falls under the current PRC Zoning Ordinance, which limits

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

the number of persons and dwelling units per acre. The idea was to ensure quality of life by providing a balance between the number of residential units and Reston’s infrastructure, which included recreational amenities and services provided by RA, as envisioned by Reston’s founder, Robert E. Simon. When Simon designed Reston, he envisioned a diverse community where residents of all backgrounds could “live, work and play.” Everywhere he looked, Simon saw suburban sprawl with little open space for recreation and leisure. People had to drive to get their groceries or go to the doctor or visit a park. He wanted to create a suburb with a small city feel that incorporated recreational amenities: open space with streams, meadows, ponds and lakes, a network of trails, basic services and a sense of connectedness. To preserve as much open space as possible, Simon incorporated townhome

clusters designed for lower density housing throughout Reston and a few highrise apartment buildings to accommodate high-density residential housing. The plan created a balance between developments on the one hand and nature and recreational amenities on the other. This well-planned community is what has attracted so many to Reston in the first place. The current PRC Zoning Ordinance limits the overall density in the PRC District to 13 persons per acre and has a limit of up to 50 dwellings per acre (50 du/ac) for individual areas that are designated as high-density residential. If the ordinance is changed based on the current proposal by the county, the overall PRC District would allow 15 persons per acre and would allow up to 70 du/ac for individual properties identified in the Comprehensive Plan to have additional density. At the time of this article’s development, the county has not specified


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per acre. In response, RA sent a letter in October 2017 to Fairfax County Supervisor Cathy Hudgins opposing the zoning amendment as it is written. RA’s Board of Directors sent a second letter in November of the same year that included a list of actions they wanted the county to consider before moving forward on its plans. “RA isn’t opposed to increasing the population density, but the question still remains; how much of an increase is necessary?” mentioned Kelsey Steffen, RA Land Use Planner. Simon was never opposed to future development, but the question still remains, how much is too much? Recently, Fairfax County adjusted its numbers from

Miles

Fairfax County GIS & Mapping

G:\projects\ocp\pd\Comp_Plan_Text_Graphics\-Area_III\Reston\Reston_Overall\Map_Projects\Reston_PRC_and_NonPRC_Land_Map.mxd

whether the final density number will be 15 or 16 persons per acre. So why is the county so adamant about changing the Zoning Ordinance? As mentioned above, the Comprehensive Plan added residential development along the Dulles Corridor, including a few PRC designated properties, and in a few targeted areas in other parts of Reston. County staff and officials have stated that for the Comprehensive Plan (or Reston Master Plan) to be implemented as written, the cap must be raised. Back in August 2017, Fairfax County sent RA a letter justifying why it needed to amend the Zoning Ordinance in the PRC District from 13 persons per acre to 16 persons

© WWW.FAIRFAXCOUNTY.GOV

LAW YERS RO AD

16 persons per acre to 15 persons per acre in a handout distributed during small group meetings this summer. Initially, some of the neighborhoods surrounding the Village Centers were included in the original estimate. But RA and the community still have concerns and are not convinced that increasing the number to even 15 persons per acre to accommodate a growing population is necessary. “Many feel it would negatively impact their quality of life in Reston,” said Steffen. There is also a belief that the county’s decision to change the PRC Zoning Ordinance goes against the spirit of Simon’s original vision and plan. RA and Restonians

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are concerned. One of the biggest issues is the balance of infrastructure to accommodate a larger population. As it stands, the existing infrastructure will be strained by an influx of new residents into the area. Many feel that the current residential and mixed-use developments being constructed have already added a strain on Reston’s infrastructure, especially its roads. Another communitywide question concerns timing. If the PRC Zoning Ordinance amendment is approved and the rate of other development along the Dulles Corridor continues, when will all the needed infrastructure to accommodate the growth be delivered? There has been a lot

WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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AROUND RESTON | HOT SPOTS | LOCAL INTEREST | TRENDING Reston PRC District New Residential Development Potential By Location

Other Areas 1269 Units, 9%

Village Centers 3365 Units, 24%

1 2 3

© WWW.FAIRFAXCOUNTY.GOV

Transit Station Areas, 9469 Units, 67%

of discussion about whether there is even enough space to accommodate the needs of an influx of new residents who move into Reston now and in the future. This includes land for parks and recreation and new schools, including additional funding to support each new student. Fairfax County has assured RA and its community that the population increase in Reston will occur gradually and not make a significant impact on Reston’s resources and infrastructure in the immediate future. But Restonians disagree, and many feel that Reston is already overbuilt. To change the PRC Zoning Ordinance would only aggravate the situation and slowly erode the original values that the community of Reston was founded on. As one resident put it, “We don’t want

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to trade Reston for the Metro.” The significant number of developments that have been built and the plan for many more to come will put a strain on the amenities RA provides to those who are part of the association. The fact remains that these amenities and the layout of the original community are what attracts people to Reston. So, it’s only natural that the concern remains that new residents who are not members of RA will use the recreational amenities (minus the pools and tennis courts) without paying the assessments required of other Reston residents. Fairfax County plans to move forward with an amendment to the PRC Zoning Ordinance; however, the details of when this amendment will occur and specifically what will

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

be proposed are still unknown. The RA Board of Directors and RA staff will continue to work with Fairfax County to ensure that Reston is prepared to accommodate the additional development and preserve the quality of life residents have come to expect: a Reston where everyone can “live, work and play.” Jessica Bigger is a freelance writer who lives in Reston, and Kelsey Steffen is the Reston Association's Land Use Planner.


Start Your Holiday Shopping Season At

RESTON GEAR & GIFTS SHOP Give unique RA and Reston gifts to your family and friends. We offer: ƒƒ Reston T-Shirts ƒƒ Travel Mugs ƒƒ Tote Bags ƒƒ Books ƒƒ Aquatics Gear – Goggles, Swim Caps and more ƒƒ Camps Gear – Water Bottles, T-Shirts, Caps and Lanyards ƒƒ Tennis Gear & Equipment – Rackets, Shirts, Shoes, etc. Purchase merchandise online at www.restonwebtrac.org and pick up at the shop within 2 business days.

VISIT THE SHOP Member Services

12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, Suite 101 Open Monday - Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. 703-435-6530 WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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AROUND RESTON | HOT SPOTS | LOCAL INTEREST | TRENDING

A Day in the Life of Member Services at RA BY JACKIE REED

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY SEAN BAHRAMI

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVEDâ„¢


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hen someone walks in to the Reston Association (RA) headquarters to obtain pool and tennis passes, pay assessment fees, ask about adding a deck to their home, request rental space or even look for good eats in Reston, they will be greeted by an RA Member Services (MS) representative. Member Services is a community space where members can connect with RA staffers to learn more about what RA offers. It is stocked with Reston merchandise, swim accessories, tennis gear, a children’s area and a welcoming front desk staff. Whoever the person and whatever the reason, the MS team is here to connect with members and help them make the most of living in Reston. Whether residents come in to hear about upcoming events, want to volunteer or are new to the area, the MS team is prepared to help as needed.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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AROUND RESTON | HOT SPOTS | LOCAL INTEREST | TRENDING

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVEDâ„¢


REGARDLESS OF MEMBERS’ NEEDS OR CONCERNS, MS ENSURES THAT MEMBERS ARE THE TOP PRIORITY. A day in the life of Member Services includes assisting walk-in members, answering phone calls and responding to emails. In July 2018, MS received an average 278 emails a day. Nearly one-third of those emails involved reserving an RA facility for a meeting or special event. In 2017, MS managed 2,349 reservations for the Conference Center (see page 70), three community buildings (the Lake House, Brown’s Chapel and the Glade Room (see pages 71, 72 and 68)) and seven picnic pavilions. Outside of staffing the office during regular business hours, the team is also onsite to assist with Conference Center and Lake House reservations. MS also actively markets and promotes these venues to both members and non-members through local postings and open houses. Member Services hosts open house events at the Lake House every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. (see page 72). Who is the Member Services team? The team is made up of three fulltime employees and parttime seasonal staff. Amanda Lowe, MS Supervisor, enjoys the team’s connection to its members. She said, “It feels like you’re getting to know the community and your neighbors. I enjoy talking with people who are trying to improve the look of their home or just want to get involved. It’s nice to be a part of that.” The MS team regularly communicates with other RA departments to stay informed, so they can point members in the right direction.

Regardless of members’ needs or concerns, MS ensures that members are the top priority. Saskia Gonzalez, a full-time representative, said, “working at Member Services is about being active, being proactive and taking care of our members.” With the varied tasks and amount of information the staff handles, Member Services cannot operate without teamwork and dedication. The representatives do exactly that. Lisa Singer, MS Manager, said, “I am privileged to work with a group of people who really care about Reston and its community.” The MS team reflects RA’s commitment to making Reston a great place to live, work, play and get involved. Jackie Reed is the Volunteer Reston Assistant for Reston Association.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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HISTORIC RESTON | 1964 | PLANNED COMMUNITY | ROBERT E. SIMON

Heron House: Reston’s First High-Rise A BY CHERYL T. SIMON AND SHELLEY S. MASTRAN s Reston sees more and more highrise buildings near Metro stations and Town Center, it is fitting to revisit the community’s first high-rise: Heron House at Lake Anne, built in 1964. This 16-story building is a beige brick, concrete and glass sculpture rising by the lake. Its skywardthrusting piers create a façade that moves in and out of multiple planes. It houses what are now condominium units plus an art gallery/studio at its base. All Heron House units have views of Lake Anne. Inspiration for the highrise at Lake Anne came from the new town of Tapiola, Finland, outside of Helsinki. Robert E. Simon Jr. wanted to make a strong statement with the first village center – not an office tower that could stand vacant for years, but a residential tower, confident that if rentals were low enough it would be fully occupied. And make a statement it did. As architecture critic John Anderson wrote of Heron House in Show magazine in 1965, “Unexpected and immensely dramatic, that tower is influencing the whole city in ways that run far beyond mere architecture.” The planning and architecture firm Conklin Rossant designed and

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INSPIRATION FOR THE HIGH-RISE AT LAKE ANNE CAME FROM THE NEW TOWN OF TAPIOLA, FINLAND, OUTSIDE OF HELSINKI oversaw the construction of the Lake Anne Village Center, including Heron House, which was built by a local construction company, Simpson. The location of the 16-story building (originally with apartments) was primarily based on existing soil conditions. The site had the most solid mixture of rock, rock fragments and soil suitable for supporting the tower. The building material is form-poured concrete, and the original glass windows, some of which are corner glazed, were steel framed. (In 2001 they were replaced with more energy-efficient glass with aluminum frames.) Heron House is characteristic

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID MADISON of the sometimes disparaged “Brutalism” style (from Le Corbusier’s “beton brut” or raw concrete) showing the wood grain from the concrete frame. But Conklin Rossant managed to make something elegant and slightly medieval out of Brutalism. Washington Post critic Wolf Von Eckhardt, writing for Arts in Virginia in 1967, described it as having “a touch of nostalgia for the medieval.” Simon liked to refer to it as “Modern Gothic.” The name Heron House came from Spencer Potter, son of one of Bob Simon’s friends. He related the story in a letter to Simon in 2004: “I was walking along the shore of Lake Anne when I saw a great blue heron standing where the first high-rise apartment was to be built. Tall and grayish – it seemed natural that the building be named Heron House (rather than Lakeside Towers or whatever). I suggested that name; it took and I hope it remains.” The 61 apartment units

1639 Washington Plaza, Reston, VA 20190 Phone: 703-709-7700 Email: info@restonmuseum.org www.restonmuseum.org www.facebook.com/RestonMuseum twitter.com/RestonMuseum

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

in Heron House were initially slow to lease, but today, as condos with lake views, they are highly desirable. Would that all Reston’s high-rise buildings follow the example of Heron House and make place-making statements on the land! Cheryl T. Simon, Vice Chair, and Shelley S. Mastran, Chair, Reston Historic Trust & Museum

RESTON MUSEUM HOURS Monday-Friday 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Sunday Closed


WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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MEMBER SERVICES WELCOME TO RESTON

New to Reston and have questions? The Reston Association is here to help you get the most out of your community and start enjoying all Reston has to offer. Contact Member Services for more information on programs and events. We look forward to serving you.

UPDATING YOUR WWW.RESTON.ORG ACCOUNT

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS I just moved to Reston. When will I receive the next assessment and how can I pay it?

The next assessment will be mailed to homes in midDecember. There are many convenient ways to pay, including check, credit card or you can pay online through your www.reston.org account.

When do the tennis courts close for the season? The tennis courts are open year-round, weather permitting.

I want to repaint my house. Can I use any colors I want?

This account is used for your Property transactions: ƒƒ Assessment payments ƒƒ Covenants payments ƒƒ Disclosure Document purchases Please take a moment to update your online profile so can conveniently make property payments online. If you forget your username or password, click the appropriate link to receive assistance. If you would like to change your billing address for assessment mailings, please contact Billing_ Collections@Reston. org or 703-435-7991.

RA’s Design Covenants specify homes to be repainted in the approved cluster or neighborhood colors. To contact your property’s Covenants Advisor, go to www.reston. org and navigate to Property Owner Resources> Covenants Team & Appointments. You can also call Member Services to be put in touch with your advisor. Advisors have specific information on all of Reston’s homes and will happy to assist you in obtaining the correct color guidelines.

Our newest facility, the Lake House, sponsored by Comstock (for more details see page 71) is a lovely setting for a wedding/ reception, engagement party, anniversary, birthday parties and more. The Walker Nature Center also has space available for rent. To search for availability and amenities for RA facilities, go to www. restonwebtrac.org and click on the Facility Rentals quick link.

Where is the Walker Nature Center and what’s there?

The Nature Center is located at 11450 Glade Drive. It provides a variety of educational and recreational programs and amenities. This beautiful, 72-acre wooded site features a one-mile loop trail, picnic tables and trailside benches, a picnic pavilion, a campfire ring, outdoor displays and interpretive signs, a pond, on-site naturalists, and much more. Parking is available year round. For more information, go to our website.

Does RA offer special events? RA offers over 100 events for all ages each year. Events include trips to local places of interest, monthly movies for seniors, a fun Halloween event, and wine tasting events. Email Ashleigh@ reston.org to be added to her email distribution list announcing upcoming events.

How do I get a job with RA?

All available positions are posted on RA’s career page at careers.reston.org. To apply for a position, visit our career page and complete an online application. Lifeguard positions open in late November.

Who maintains the pathways and sidewalks in Reston? RA maintains 55 miles of pathways throughout Reston. Sidewalks are maintained by clusters if they are alongside cluster roads or by VDOT if they are along main, state-controlled roads. A few sidewalks are part of the pathway system.

RESTON ASSOCIATION 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Reston, VA 20191 HOURS OF OPERATION

Monday-Friday

8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.

Email: member_services@reston.org Phone: 703-435-6530

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Does RA offer any wedding or special event venues?

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Facility Inquiries: reservations@reston.org


LET US HELP YOU

REACH OUR MEMBERS

Advertise today and be seen by 21,000+ households

Call and begin your successful marketing campaign today. Mike Leone Advertising Sales E-mail: mike@reston.org WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018 Direct: 703-435-657951


MEMBER SERVICES

WEBTRAC RA’s Online Registration System for:

§§ Aquatics, Camps, Health and Wellness, Nature and Tennis programs §§ Pool and Tennis Pass renewals and purchases §§ Event and trip registrations §§ Community building and picnic pavilion reservations If you created your account in 2017, you are all set to begin shopping. If you forgot your username or password, use the appropriate link for assistance.

STEP 1: CREATE YOUR ACCOUNT §§ §§ §§ §§ §§

Visit www.restonwebtrac.org Click on “Need an Account? Click Here.” Be sure to include all members of your household. Accounts may take up to 2 business days to verify. After you have created your account and received a confirmation email, you are able to begin shopping.

STEP 2: SHOP FOR ACTIVITIES

§§ Enter your username and password to log in. §§ Use the Quick Link “Browse Activities” or click on one of the shortcut photo buttons. §§ Here, you may search by any of the following methods: ˚˚ Type in the “Activity Number” (9 digits included in this magazine and indicated with this icon ) ˚˚ Type in a “Keyword” related to the activity ˚˚ Search broadly by selecting criteria such as age or category from the drop down menus. §§ Choose your activity by clicking the plus sign (+) in the “Add to Cart” column. §§ You can continue shopping or check out by clicking the “Add to Cart” button in the window at the bottom of your screen. §§ You will be asked to select the applicable family member(s) for each of the items in your cart. §§ Follow onscreen directions to complete your transaction by Visa or MasterCard. To pay by check or cash, please visit Reston Association. For any questions or assistance in creating your household account or with making a purchase, please contact Member Services at member_services@reston.org or 703-435-6530.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


POOL & TENNIS PASSES

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It’s not too early to save money on your Pool and Tennis Passes for next year! RENEW YOUR PASS

BEGINNING DECEMBER 15

Members Can Buy Early and Save 20%

Reminder: Passes are renewable online, so keep your current card.

Here’s how to renew your passes or purchase for the first time: ƒƒ Go to www.restonwebtrac.org, RA’s new online registration system, and log in to your account or create a new one if this is your first time purchasing RA passes. ƒƒ Renew or purchase your Pool & Tennis passes on or before March 1, 2019, and receive a 20% discount. (Discount applies to adult and child passes.) Free shipping or office pick-up for all online orders. Passes will be available within seven business days. Member Services 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Reston, VA 20191 Email: member_services@reston.org Phone: 703-435-6530

Hours of Operation Monday-Friday from 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. There’s still time to play tennis. The courts are open year-round, weather permitting. Passes are still available for the 2018 season. WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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AQUATICS & SAFETY AQUATICS OVERVIEW

SWIM TEAMS

Please feel free to contact us to share your experiences from this summer, make suggestions for future years and report any lost and not-yet-found items (by Nov. 1). You can email us directly at aquaticsinfo@reston. org or call our Member Services department at 703-435-6530. We appreciate your feedback!

AQUATIC FACILITY OPERATOR (AFO)

Earn premier facility operator certification from the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA). The AFO course is a two-day instructor-led training, with the exam administered on the second day. Candidates receive a copy of the AFO manual prior to arriving. Certification is valid for five years and can be renewed through CEUs or retesting. Potential AFOs are highly encouraged to review the manual content prior to arriving at the course. See www.reston.org for a fact sheet with additional details. Registration closes Nov. 30. 401010206 12/20-21 Sat & Sun 8:00 am - 6:00 pm RA Headquarters Adult $250 $275

Reston Swim Team Association (Rsta)

RSTA is an independent developmental league for swimmers 6-18 years old and offers multiple summer teams and a Winter Swim Program. For more info: www.rsta.org or email winterswimcomm@rsta.org

Reston Masters Swim Team (Rmst)

The RMST is an adult (18 and older) swim league for Reston area residents. We have something for everyone — a mixture of fitness swimmers, triathletes and highly competitive swimmers. RMST operates under the Potomac Valley Local Swimming Committee, which is part of United States Masters Swimming (USMS). General Information: www.restonmasters.com

TO REGISTER FOR ACTIVITIES, GO TO WWW.RESTONWEBTRAC.ORG OR CALL 703-435-6530 FOR MORE INFO.

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CAMPS

Winter Break Camp Kids can enjoy their school break with other kids their age in a fun and supervised environment at an affordable cost. The fee includes one or two field trips during the week. Campers participate in recreational activities, arts and crafts and sports along with other fun activities. Don’t have your kids sit around the house for the holidays; keep them active and engaged at camp! WebTrac Registration: Oct. 1 Registration Deadline: Dec. 13 402130202 12/26-12/28 Wed-Fri 9:00 am - 4:00 pm The Lake House Ages: 5-12 $135 $155 402130202 1/2-1/4/19 Wed-Fri 9:00 am - 4:00 pm The Lake House Ages: 5-12 $135 $155 Extended Care: $20 per child. Covers both before (7:30-9 a.m.) and after (4-6 p.m.) camp.

Reston Association and Friends of Reston would like to thank the following businesses and individuals for their generous support of RA’s Camp Scholarship Program in 2018. Paramount Condominiums Friends of Reston Bonnie & Robert Haukness Long & Foster – Reston Offices Red’s Table Reston Garden Club Reston Triathlon Sweet Frog

If you would like to help send more Reston kids to camp next summer, please consider making a year-end tax-deductible donation to Friends of Reston. A $200 contribution will send a child between the ages of 5 and 12 to camp for a week. Donations can be made online at www.friendsofreston.org or mail a check to Friends of Reston, 11450 Glade Drive, Reston, VA 20191.

TO FIND PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, USE THE INDICATED ACTIVITY NUMBER

. PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS

WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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NATURE WALKER NATURE ALL AGES All ages welcome. Children must be CENTER accompanied by a registered adult.

Located at 11450 Glade Drive, the Nature Center provides a variety of educational and recreational programs and amenities. There is free parking and restroom and trail access dawn to dusk, 365 days a year. The mission of the Center is to foster an environmental stewardship ethic in the community. The Center enhances people’s awareness, knowledge, appreciation and enjoyment of the environment. The 72-acre wooded site features: §§ 1 mile of loop trails §§ An education building known as Nature House §§ A picnic pavilion §§ Picnic tables and trailside benches §§ A fire ring §§ Outdoor displays and interpretive signs §§ Demonstration gardens and meadow §§ A pond §§ The Glade Stream Valley §§ Snakeden Branch stream’s entrance to 44-acre Lake Audubon

REGISTRATION

Advance registration and payment is required for all programs, unless otherwise noted. Visit www.restonwebtrac.org to register online, or contact naturecenter@reston.org or 703-476-9689, ext. 5, for assistance.

Cancellation Policy: Nature activities may be canceled due to severe weather, severe weather warnings or low enrollment. Refund Policy: Refunds are available with two weeks’ notice or if we cancel for any reason.

Fall Favorites

Caramel apples, corn husk crafts, smells of cinnamon and spices. What fall traditions does your family have? Celebrate the natural delights of the season with some Nature Center favorites. Register by October 11. 406011012 10/14 Sun 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm Walker Nature Center All ages $8 $10

Thanksgiving Centerpieces

Start your holiday season with this festive workshop. Make a beautiful centerpiece with native plant materials and four simple napkin rings for your Thanksgiving table ($1 per additional ring). Enjoy mulled cider and seasonal music as we work. All supplies provided. When registering, include the number of people in your party and how many centerpieces you wish to make. Register by November 14. 406011012 11/17 Sat 10:30 am - 12:00 pm or 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm Walker Nature Center All ages $20/centerpiece $25/centerpiece

Winter Wreath Workshop

Start your holiday decorating by making a festive wreath for your home. Listen to seasonal music and enjoy mulled cider and cookies. All supplies provided. When registering, please indicate the number of people in your party and how many wreaths you would like to make. Register by November 29.

406011012 12/1 Sat 10:30 am - 12:00 pm or 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm Walker Nature Center All ages $20/wreath $25/wreath

NATURE HOUSE

Free parking, restroom and trail access dawn to dusk, 365 days a year.

Visit Nature House to: ƒƒ ƒƒ

Turkey Trail

Let’s get moving after your big Thanksgiving meal. Sharpen your skills of logic as you follow clues from a “wild” turkey to see where they lead you. Discover more about these fascinating birds. Register by November 21. 406011008 11/24 Sat 11:00 am -12:00 pm Walker Nature Center All ages $5 $7

ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

Enjoy exhibits and displays. See some native animals up close. Talk with a naturalist. Use the nature resource library. Do a simple activity or read a nature story with a child. Learn about the green features of this LEED Gold building.

HOURS OF OPERATION MON, WED - FRI 9 AM-5 PM TUE

CLOSED

SAT

10 AM-1 PM

SUN

1-4 PM

Check holiday schedule for additional closings.

Want to rent space at the Walker Nature Center? See page 73 for details.

TO REGISTER FOR ACTIVITIES, GO TO WWW.RESTONWEBTRAC.ORG OR CALL 703-435-6530 FOR MORE INFO.

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Sunday, December 2 1:00 - 3:00 p.m. FREE Bring your family, bring a friend for … Refreshments Live holiday music Ornament making with natural materials On sale items in the Nature Center gift area Handmade, reusable shopping bags from the Virginia Green Baggers Photo opps with mascots Walker the Woodpecker and Myrtle the Turtle

There will be a special sing-along at 2:30 p.m. to share our holiday spirit.

TO FIND PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, USE THE INDICATED ACTIVITY NUMBER

. PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS

WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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NATURE BABES IN THE WOODS

Ages 18 months through 35 months. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Fees are applied per child.

Li’l Pumpkins Halloween Party

Join the Halloween bash that’s perfect for toddlers. Wear your costume on a walk along the trails. Meet a couple of fun characters and a real Corn Snake. Paint a pumpkin and collect a goody bag to take home. No frights at this fest! Register by October 12. 406111001 10/15 Mon 10:00 am - 11:00 am or 10/16 Tue 10:00 am - 11:00 am Walker Nature Center Ages 18-35 months $7 $9

Nature’s Thanksgiving

If animals were going to have a Thanksgiving feast, what would they serve? Discover what animals like to eat and how they prepare for the winter. Set the tables for different animal friends and make a fall wreath for your home. Register by November 16. 406111001 11/19 Mon 10:00 am - 11:00 am or 11/20 Tue 10:00 am - 11:00 am Walker Nature Center Ages 18-35 months $7 $9

Winter Sparkles

All sorts of icy things make winter sparkle and glitter: snow, ice, frost and more. Make some icy looking art and sing winter songs. If the weather is nice, we will take a walk in the woods and look for signs of winter. Register by December 7. 406111001 12/10 Mon 10:00 am - 11:00 am or 12/11 Tue 10:00 am - 11:00 am Walker Nature Center Ages 18-35 months $7 $9

Choose from the following themes: Ages 3-7

3 to 5 years. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Fees are applied per child.

Fur, Feathers and Fins

As people pull on their warm clothes, animals also need to stay warm as temperatures drop. Feel furs and feathers and discover what else keeps an animal from getting cold. Make a feathery craft and look for animals in the woods and around the pond. Register by November 7. 406121008 11/10 Sat 10:30 am - 11:30 am Walker Nature Center Ages 3-5 $6 $8

The Snow Tree

Gather around and listen to the story about the Snow Tree and all its animal friends. Decorate your own Snow Tree. Stroll along the trail and look for animals gathering around our winter trees. Register by December 3. 406121008 12/6 Thu 1:30 pm - 2:30 pm Walker Nature Center $6

Bring the kids and the cake to a fun-filled, creative party at the Nature Center. Thematic parties include a two-anda-half hour facility rental, with 45 minutes of staff-led activities and party favors.

Nature Detectives

PRESCHOOL HAPPENINGS

Ages 3-5

Planning a Birthday Party?

$8

Learn to be a good nature detective by using your eyes, ears, nose and hands. Play sensory guessing games, find what doesn’t belong on our “unnature” trail and follow clues to solve a mystery animal’s trail. Favors include a magnifying hand lens, a mini-notebook and a Nature Center pencil. The birthday child receives an Earl the Squirrel stuffed toy.

Dinosaurs Ages 3-9

Share what you know about these amazing animals. Uncover bones and shells like a paleontologist, and make your own fossil imprints in clay. Go on a dinosaur egg hunt that will lead you to a nest full of eggs. Favors include a dinosaur egg, a dinosaur sticker and a fossil imprint. The birthday child receives a dinosaur coloring book (ages 3-5) or sticker book (ages 6-9).

Nature Crafts Ages 3-12

Learn new skills and nature facts as you make a variety of crafts to take home. Younger crafters will make bug boxes, rock insects and wildlife masks or puppets. Older crafters will try their hands at leather crafts, bird feeders and beads.

How to Book • • • •

Parties may be booked up to three months in advance. Weekend dates are limited and fill quickly. Consider a weekday afternoon or evening party. Maximum 15 children per party.

$200/RA member $225/Non-member For more info, please call 703-476-9689 and press 3 or email naturecenter@ reston.org.

TO REGISTER FOR ACTIVITIES, GO TO WWW.RESTONWEBTRAC.ORG OR CALL 703-435-6530 FOR MORE INFO.

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CHILDREN’S PROGRAMS

Ages 5 to 12. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Fees are applied per child.

STEAM Workshop — Cornucopia of Science

Turn the Thanksgiving table into a science experiment — at least while you’re at the Nature Center! Discover which foods can create clothing dyes. Learn why some corn is colorful and meet a Corn Snake. Make stamps out of potatoes and use them to create a masterpiece. Register by November 2. 406131012 11/5 Mon 10:00 am - 11:30 am Walker Nature Center Ages 5-12 $6 $8

Kids’ Candle-Making Workshop

Bring a little glow to your winter. Learn where wax comes from and discover how candles are made. Dip a pair of candles and decorate a pillar candle with natural materials. Keep your candles for yourself or give them away as gifts. There will be music and refreshments while we work. All supplies provided. Register by December 11. 406131012 12/14 Fri 6:30 pm - 7:30 pm Walker Nature Center Ages 5-12 $12 $16

PUPPET SHOW — WILD WINTER BREAK Enjoy a creative puppet show about about how the animals at the Nature Center are enjoying their winter break. Sing songs, feel animal feathers and fur and enjoy one of your last days of winter break. Register by December 31. 106101011 Thu or Walker Nature Center Ages 3-8 $6

1/3 10:00 am - 10:45 am 11:15 am - 12:00 pm

$8

Attention Scout Leaders The Walker Nature Center can help your organization to earn patches and badges.

Education Programs

Fun and educational programs are available in achievement areas such as Forester, Naturalist, Wildlife, Eco-action, Earth Connections, Earth is Our Home, Earth and Sky, Water Everywhere, Senses, Animals and more.

$5/scout (min. charge $50) $7/scout (min. charge $70)

Campfire Programs

Service Projects

Campfire Fun and Campfire Cookery programs are available upon request.

Community service projects such as planting and trail maintenance days can be arranged for your group.

$6/scout (min. charge $60) $8/scout (min. charge $80)

FREE.

Note: Fire Ring can be rented for self-use. You bring the wood and the water.

$20/hour

$30/hour

Nature Trunks

Available on loan for Birds, Trees, Insects and Watershed requirements. FREE for Reston

groups. $25/non-Reston

Call 703-476-9689 and press 3 or email naturecenter@reston.org for details and reservations. TO FIND PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, USE THE INDICATED ACTIVITY NUMBER

. PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS

WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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NATURE ADULT PROGRAMS

BIRD WALKS

Beekeeping for Beginners

Certified Master Beekeeper Todd Harding will present the basics of keeping honeybees. This class provides information on honeybees as well as the rules and regulations for keeping them locally. Learning about the costs, equipment and time involved will help you to make an informed decision about pursuing this wonderful hobby. Register by October 17. 406201006 10/20 Sat 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm Walker Nature Center Adults $5 $7

Adults. No registration required. Free Beginning and expert birders are invited to help find birds in some of Reston’s most beautiful natural areas. Co-hosted by the Audubon Society of Northern Virginia and The Bird Feeder store. In December and January, we encourage you to participate in one of the area’s bird counts.

Bird Walk: Bright Pond

10/14 Sun 7:30 am - 10:30 am Bright Pond Lane, park at the end of the cul-de-sac. Adults Free, no registration required

Bird Walk: Lower Glade Stream Valley

11/18 Sun 7:30 am - 10:30 am Park on Glade Drive near Twin Branches Road Adults Free, no registration required

Holiday Creations With Mayflowers

Professional floral designer May Bernhardt of Reston Town Center’s Mayflowers will lead this hands-on workshop, using items such as pine cones and evergreens. Make a beautiful arrangement to decorate your home for the holidays. All materials will be provided. Register by December 8. 406201012 12/12 Wed 10:30 am - 12:00 pm Walker Nature Center Adults $50 $65

Garden Plots Do you have a Green Thumb?

Reston Association’s garden plots are available for members to rent on an annual basis. Reserve early. The plots rent quickly. Plant flowers and vegetables at one of five locations. Contact gardenplots@reston.org or 703-437-7658.

Reston’s Official Bird: The Pileated Woodpecker Prints by Dana Ann Scheurer Limited Edition Prints Available for $125 Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive The original watercolor, commissioned by Friends of Reston and created by the Reston artist Dana Ann Scheurer, is part of the permanent collection at the Walker Nature Center. Exclusive limited edition iris giclee prints are available. Scheurer’s works are highly recognizable. They include a mural of Reston’s founder, Robert E. Simon, located at the Reston Town Center. All proceeds from the sales of the prints benefit Friends of Reston, dedicated to helping Reston Association bring charitable, scientific and educational projects to the community. Visit its website at www.friendsofreston.org.

Free

BRUSH CHIPPING RA’s brush chipping program offers you a place to bring your brush for chipping at no cost. RA Guidelines state that no brush may be dumped on RA property. Just drop off your brush at the locations listed below, and RA crews will chip it for use on RA open space. PLEASE: Brush only (branches should be less than 4 inches in diameter). No grass clippings, dirt, trash, paper, vines, thorns or other debris. Brush may be dropped off at any time during the days listed. No contractors.

DATES & SITES: October 20-21 Central Services Facility November 17-18 Lake Audubon Pool December 15-16 Central Services Facility

THE NATURE OF RESTON

Photos by Charles A. Veatch Text by Claudia Thompson-Deahl An art photography, nature and informational book and guide to Reston’s habitats all in one beautiful hardbound volume. ON SALE for $20 at Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive All proceeds from the book sales go to the Walker Nature Center.

TO REGISTER FOR ACTIVITIES, GO TO WWW.RESTONWEBTRAC.ORG OR CALL 703-435-6530 FOR MORE INFO.

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PROHIBITED PLANTS IN RESTON

Reston Association’s Board of Directors has updated the invasive plant ban to include all plants on the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) Heritage Program’s invasive plant list. Although many of these plants can be purchased at nurseries and garden centers, they are detrimental to the local environment. They may not be planted by homeowners in RA member yards or by staff at RA facilities and natural areas. Invasive exotic plants are nonnative to North America. They spread quickly and outcompete native vegetation. Often, invasives get their start in yards where they can become a serious problem for the property owner and adversely affect neighboring properties

as well as RA natural areas. The proliferation of invasives decreases plant diversity and harms wildlife that depends on native plants for food and shelter. Many invasives overtake native shrubs and trees that are a signature of the Reston community. Efforts to control these species on RA property are ongoing and costly.

Banned Invasives

The banned invasive plant species include: ƒƒ Flowering Pears (Pyrus calleryana cultivars) ƒƒ Winged Burning Bush (Euonymus alata) ƒƒ Japanese Barberry (Berberis thunbergii) ƒƒ Exotic Bush Honeysuckles (Lonicera spp.) ƒƒ Exotic Bamboos (Bambusa spp.) ƒƒ Chinese Wisteria (Wisteria sinensis) ƒƒ Japanese Wisteria (Wisteria floribunda) ƒƒ English Ivy (Hedera helix)

ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

Oriental Bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus) Porcelain-berry (Ampelopsis brevipedunculata) Yellow Flag (Iris pseudacorus) Chinese Privet (Ligustrum sinense) Periwinkle and Greater Periwinkle (Vinca major and minor) Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria)

Additional banned plants can be found at www.dcr.virginia.gov/ natural-heritage/invsppdflist. If you would like to learn about alternative native plants, visit the RA website at http://bit.ly/2qwjRbH. If you would like to volunteer to help control invasive plants in Reston, contact Ha Brock at habrock@reston. org. Please direct questions to our environmental resource staff at 703-437-7658.

JOIN THE WALKER NATURE CENTER’S ELECTRONIC MAILING LIST!

Receive the quarterly newsletter, Branching Out, as well as announcements of upcoming special events. To subscribe, email naturecenter@reston.org. You can also email nature questions to this address. Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ walkernaturecenter Instagram at @walkernaturecenter Follow us on Twitter @ restonnature

A Unique Way to Recognize Someone or Something Make a lasting community enhancement. Donations are appreciated in any amount and are tax-deductible. Sponsoring a needed item for one of our park facilities is a great way to memorialize a loved one, promote your organization or commemorate a special occasion. Full donation amounts include an engraved plaque, if desired. Locations are based upon community need as well as your preference. After a location has been agreed upon with RA staff, donations are gratefully received by its 501(c)(3) supporting organization, Friends of Reston, 11450 Glade Drive, Reston VA 20191. Please make checks payable to Friends of Reston and write the item you are donating towards in the memo section of your check.

Pathway/ Recreation Area Bench: $1,000

Adopt-A-Bench

Help to increase seating along Reston’s pathways and at recreational areas such as tennis courts. Benches are recycled plastic with heavy duty steel support.

Tennis Bench: $600

Adopt-A-Recycling Bin

Help Reston increase recycling in the community. Bins are especially needed at picnic pavilions and tennis courts. The bins are made from recycled plastic lumber and fastened to a sturdy, recycled, cast-aluminum frame.

Recycling Bin: $1,000

Adopt-A-Bike Rack

Help promote bicycling as an alternative form of transportation by providing a convenient way for patrons to secure their bikes at our recreational facilities. The racks have a heavy duty frame and a 4-loop design.

Bike Rack: $750

Contact CSFstaff@reston.org or call 703-437-7658. TO FIND PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, USE THE INDICATED ACTIVITY NUMBER

. PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS

WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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SPECIAL EVENTS Reston Association has something for everyone, including trips to local places of interest, monthly movies for seniors and a community yard sale, just to name a few. Contact Ashleigh@reston. org to be added to the email distribution list for events.

CHILDREN’S EVENTS

Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Cookies With Santa

Be here when Santa makes his first stop in Reston! Join the holiday countdown with a cookie jar full of fun and see Santa Claus before he embarks on his annual journey around the world! With many personal photo opportunities, crafts, and activities to create a jumpstart to the holiday season, you can make sure you’re on the right list and that he checks it twice before it’s too late! 407011025 12/8 Sat 9:00 am - 12:00 pm The Lake House All ages $15 $20

ALL AGES

Children under 18 must be accompanied by an adult.

Trip to the Holiday Music Festival at Constitution Hall

Corn Maze in the Plains

Voted a top fall attraction in Northern Virginia, Corn Maze in the Plains boasts a 5-acre corn maze with a new, fun theme every year. Besides the incredible fun of the maze itself, Corn Maze in the Plains has entertaining outdoor activities like hayrides, pumpkin slingshot, animal petting zoos, obstacle courses, slides for the kids and more. Fees includes admission to the maze and transportation. 307011617 10/14 Sun 12:00 pm - 4:30 pm Bus pickup: RA Headquarters $18/Adult (ages 13+) $12/Child (ages 3-12) Free (ages 0-2)

Kick off your holiday with a chartered bus trip to Constitution Hall to enjoy sounds of the holiday season. This annual concert is performed by the talented musicians of The U.S. Army Band, “Pershing’s Own.” The halls will be decked, holiday musical favorites will abound, and you never know what characters might show up to help celebrate the season with The U.S. Army Orchestra, Herald Trumpets, and Army Band vocalists. All sales are final. Show is 90 minutes. 407011613 12/2 Sun 1:30 pm - 5:15 pm Bus pickup: RA Headquarters All ages $38 $46

Parks & Recreation Paid Internship (Spring 2019)

Provides administrative support and customer service to the Parks and Recreation Department. Assists the Community Events Supervisor in planning, implementing and evaluating a variety of trips, events and programs for all ages throughout the Reston community. Also assists with projects, research, planning activities and ordering supplies for both the Aquatics and Camp departments. January through April. Minimum Qualifications: ƒƒ Candidate must be working toward an undergraduate or graduate degree in Parks & Recreation or related field. ƒƒ Must be at least 18 years old with a good driving record and valid driver’s license. ƒƒ Must be able to lift 20+ pounds. ƒƒ Must be able to work 10-20 hours per week. ƒƒ Should be familiar with Microsoft Word, Excel and Outlook and enjoy working with the public. A $500 stipend is paid at completion. Applications are available at https://careers.reston.org.

© WWW.USARMYBAND.COM

Contact Ashleigh@reston.org or 703-435-6577 for more information.

TO REGISTER FOR ACTIVITIES, GO TO WWW.RESTONWEBTRAC.ORG OR CALL 703-435-6577 FOR MORE INFO.

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ADULT EVENTS

55+ EVENTS

Trip to See Capitol Steps Performance

Make a Connection

Ages 18 years and older.

Join us as we journey to the Ronald Reagan Building to see the Capitol Steps perform live! The Capitol Steps began as a group of Senate staffers who set out to satirize the very people and places that employed them. They poke fun at the headlines of the day and have created song parodies and skits that convey a special brand of satirical humor. All sales are final. 407201615 10/12 Fri 5:45 pm - 10:30 pm Bus pickup: RA Headquarters Ages: 18+ $52 $62

TAI CHI

Tai Chi, when practiced correctly and in a consistent, sustained way, yields numerous benefits. Some of these include improved coordination, agility, balance, and general body strength. Practiced by millions the world over as a gentle, weight-bearing callisthenic or “moving meditation,” Tai Chi is an ancient internal martial art and mind-body discipline rooted in Chinese tradition. This weekly six-week class is taught by Jeffery Edwards. 405200810 10/16-11/20 Tue 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm The Glade Room Ages: 30+ $70 $90

Ages 55 years and older. Find a new friend or meet your future companion. Make a Connection is a fun way to meet new and interesting people through a series of five-minute chats in a welcoming environment. Light refreshments will be served. This event is co-sponsored by Reston Community Center and Reston Association. Register early for this popular event. 407221015 10/19 Fri 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm The Lake House Ages: 55+ FREE

Senior Movie Day

The Reston Association, in cooperation with Reston Town Center Bow Tie Cinemas, and sponsored by Tall Oaks Assisted Living present ‘Meet Me at the Movies’ on the fourth Wednesday of each month. Refreshments are provided, and door prizes are distributed prior to the movie. Ocean 8 10/24 TBD 11/28 TBD 12/19* (*one week early due to the holiday) Doors open at 9:15 am Showtime is at 10:00 am Bow Tie Cinemas Ages: 55+ FREE

TO FIND PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, USE THE INDICATED ACTIVITY NUMBER

Appraisal Roadshow

The Appraisal Roadshow delivers a treasure hunt experience in a fun, educational and rewarding forum. Bring one personal valuables such as jewelry, coins, timepieces, porcelain, artwork or other heirlooms, and the appraisal experts will educate the audience with interesting facts and information on what it is, what it’s worth, and what you can do with your treasure. 407221002 11/7 Wed 11:00 am - 1:00 pm RA Headquarters Ages: 55+ $15 $18

. PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

Jigsaw Puzzle & Lunch

Do you like to put together jigsaw puzzles? If so, Reston Association’s Puzzle Day is an opportunity to challenge yourself with jigsaw puzzles made from beautiful, themed photos of Reston. Depending on your level of interest, there are two different sizes of puzzles, 500 and 750 pieces. You can work individually or as a member of a team to see if you can complete the puzzle in the time allotted. Enjoy coffee and conversation while doing one of America’s favorite pastimes. Lunch will be provided. 407221008 11/13 Tue 10:00 am - 4:00 pm RA Headquarters Ages: 55+ $15 $18

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS

WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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SPECIAL EVENTS

Ages 55 years and older.

We will take a variety of trips this year to locations such as museums, shows and local places of interest. Join us as we have fun visiting the area’s hot spots. For upcoming trip dates, details and to get on our trip mailing list, contact Ashleigh@ reston.org or call 703-435-6577.

Trip to See “Ain’t Misbehavin’”

Join us for a chartered bus trip to Toby’s Dinner Theatre in Columbia, Maryland, to enjoy a wonderful buffet lunch and see “Ain’t Misbehavin’”. ‘This joint will be jumpin’ with one of the most popular, well-crafted revues of all time and a Tony Award winner for Best Musical. The inimitable Thomas “Fats” Waller rose to international fame during the Golden Age of the Cotton Club with his infectious swing music. “Ain’t Misbehavin’” evokes the delightful humor and powerful energy of this American original with music made famous from uptown clubs to Tin Pan Alley to Hollywood! All sales are final. 407221620 10/21 Sun 9:45 am - 4:00 pm Bus pickup: RA Headquarters Ages: 55+ $75 $85

Trip to See “A Christmas Carol”

Join us for a chartered bus trip to Ford’s Theatre to enjoy a wonderful holiday classic. Watch the ghosts of Christmas Past, Present and Future as they lead the miserly Ebenezer Scrooge on a journey of transformation and redemption. Originally conceived by Michael Baron, this music-infused production captures the magic and joy of Dickens’s Yuletide classic. 407221619 12/12 Wed 12:45 pm - 5:00 pm Bus pickup: RA Headquarters Ages: 55+ $60 $70

© WWW.WIKIPEDIA.ORG

55+ TRIPS AND TOURS

55+ Advisory Committee Where: Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive When: 3rd Wednesday of each month, 6:30-8 p.m. This committee, established by the Reston Association, advises the board on how to enhance the general welfare and wellbeing of the association’s older adults (55 and over) through advocacy and initiative. We are looking for new members and fresh perspectives. Give something back to your community by volunteering your time and join this active RA committee.

Want a Great Summer Job? Community Events Assistant Position

Dates: mid-May to mid-August 2019

Assist the Community Events Supervisor in planning, implementing and evaluating a variety of programs throughout the Reston community. This is a great job for a college student who is comfortable working independently and available to work some evenings and weekends and July 4. Must be at least 18 years old with a valid driver’s license, good driving record and able to lift 20 pounds. Application available on website at https://careers.reston.org. Contact Ashleigh@reston.org or 703-435-6577 for more information. TO REGISTER FOR ACTIVITIES, GO TO WWW.RESTONWEBTRAC.ORG OR CALL 703-435-6577 FOR MORE INFO.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


Holiday Shopping Trips Please join us for a day of shopping, saving, and fun! Your $35 ticket includes transportation, light refreshments and a coupon book. Call Katherine at 703-435-6544 with questions.

Dates and Locations

Saturday, 11/10

Hagerstown, MD Premium Outlets

Sunday, 11/11

Leesburg, VA Premium Outlets

Saturday, 11/17

Clarksburg, MD Premium Outlets

Sunday, 11/18

Woodbridge, VA Potomac Mills

Saturday, 11/24

Tyson, VA Tysons Mall 1 (AM) 2 (PM)

Sunday, 11/25

Oxon Hill, MD Tanger Outlets (AM) National Harbor (PM)

Saturday, 12/1

Oxon Hill, MD National Harbor (AM) Tanger Outlets (PM)

Sunday, 12/2

Hagerstown, MD Premium Outlets

Saturday, 12/8

Woodbridge, VA Potomac Mills

Sunday, 12/9

Clarksburg, MD Premium Outlets

Saturday, 12/15

Leesburg, VA Premium Outlets

Sunday, 12/16

Tyson, VA Tysons Mall 1 (AM) 2 (PM)

FIND PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, USE THE INDICATED ACTIVITY NUMBER PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH RA MEMBERS AND NON-MEMBERS Bus TOdeparts Reston Association Headquarters .at 9 a.m. each trip and return approximately | OCTOBER 2018 WWW.RESTON.ORG 65 5 p.m. To reserve your seat on the bus, visit https:/ /restonwebtrac.org.


TENNIS household. Instructor and student passes must display matching addresses and Guest Passes shall not be valid for this exception.

Priority of Play ƒƒ

ROBERT TUCKER

Robert is the Reston Tennis Program Manager who lives in Reston. With two decades of experience in tennis sales, he is the “go-to” guy when you’re trying to find the right equipment for your game.

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COURT CHANGES ARE MADE ON THE HOUR. Please show your pass when entering the court. Play is limited to one hour for singles and two hours for doubles when other players are waiting. Players who use the court for a fraction of an hour must vacate on the hour when others are waiting to play.

Reserving a Court ƒƒ

ERIN KOENIG

Erin was a scholarship player at Oklahoma State University. After becoming a USPTA certified instructor, she coached at IMG/Bollettieri Tennis Academy. As Reston’s tennis lesson coordinator, she is happy to help find you the right lessons for your level.

RA TENNIS COURT RULES

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Who May Use the Courts ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

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Reston Association Members only with their membership cards. Guests must have a guest pass and be accompanied by the host member. Players must show membership cards and guest passes on the changeover. RA Courts may only be used by Association staff to conduct lessons/ coaching sessions or give instruction with the exception of parents, guardians, or immediate family members providing instruction to those persons residing within the same

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Players must place their membership card or key tag and racquet (or racquet cover) on a numbered hook on courtside gates. Failure to display either racquet or cover and membership card or key tag means court is not reserved. Players reserving courts must remain courtside while waiting to play. Players may not reserve courts while playing. One member may reserve a court to use a ball machine or ball hopper. Reston Association may reserve courts for lessons, tournaments, junior activity, league play and court rentals. Check our online calendar at www.reston.org

Rules for Court Use ƒƒ ƒƒ

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COURTS ARE TO BE USED FOR TENNIS ONLY. Players are required to use tennis shoes when using the courts. (No jogging or soccer shoes.) Bicycles, skates, skateboards, baby carriages, playpens, strollers, radios and pets are not allowed on the courts. Children who are not playing tennis are not allowed on the courts.

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Please dispose of trash in proper receptacles.

Rules Enforcement ƒƒ

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Reston Association and staff, court monitors and Reston Tennis Association officers will enforce the rules of court play. Failure to adhere to the rules will result in loss of court privileges. RA cards are available at Reston Association headquarters or online at www.reston.org. Guest passes can be purchased from court monitors. For further information, call 703-435-6530.

TENNIS KEY TAGS

Great for easy identification and your convenience. Key tags are available for $3 at Reston Association.

LIGHTED COURTS

The following 26 RA courts are lighted until 11 p.m. for night play: ƒƒ Autumnwood Courts ƒƒ Glade Clay Courts ƒƒ Hook Road Courts ƒƒ Lake Newport Courts ƒƒ North Hills Clay Courts ƒƒ Shadowood Courts

PRACTICE WALLS

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Colts Neck Hook Road Lake Anne Park

TENNIS INFO

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Info available on our Reston Tennis News Facebook page www.facebook. com/ RestonTennisNews Find the following upto-date information in the tennis section on the Reston Association website at www.reston.org. RTT Scoreboard is listed at www.restontennis.org. Tennis ladder is listed on www.tennisengine.com. USTA Tournament and entry forms are listed on www.usta.com.

TO REGISTER FOR ACTIVITIES, GO TO WWW.RESTONWEBTRAC.ORG OR CALL 703-435-6530 FOR MORE INFO.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


Racquets, Shoes, Strings, Grips, Great Prices and Customer Service

For details call 703-435-6534 or email tennis@reston.org. 67

TO FIND PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, USE THE INDICATED ACTIVITY NUMBER

. PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS

WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018


FACILITY RENTALS

Have Your Next Event at a Reston Picnic Pavilion

Plan outdoor private parties or weddings, group and corporate gatherings or family picnics at one of our seven affordable pavilions. Available for rent seven days a week from April through October. NEW To search for availability, go to www.restonwebtrac.org and click on the Facility Rentals quick link.

Contact Member Services: reservations@reston.org or 703-435-6530 Rental Fees: $165 $340

Dogwood

2460 Green Range Drive Size: 1,200 square feet ƒƒ Spray and play water feature available April through October ƒƒ Four picnic tables and a large built-in grill ƒƒ Features ADA-accessible parking lot and picnic pavilion area ƒƒ Parking shared with pool facility or at curbside ƒƒ Pool restrooms available during open pool hours (Pool access is not included in pavilion reservation.)

Now Taking Reservations Golf Course Island

North Shore Drive and Links Drive Size: 775 feet ƒƒ Four picnic tables and one grill ƒƒ Parklike setting with tot lot and a playground, both equipped with swings ƒƒ Near a basketball court, trail, and plenty of open space

Hunters Woods

Corner of Steeplechase Drive and Reston Parkway Size: 842 square feet ƒƒ Four picnic tables (two are ADA-accessible) and one grill ƒƒ Ample parking shared with pool facility or at Hunters Woods Park ƒƒ Pool restrooms available during open pool hours (Pool access is not included in pavilion reservation.) ƒƒ Nearby basketball court, tot lot, and trail

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


Lake Anne

11301 North Shore Drive Size: 900 square feet NEW

Available for Half-Day Rental: 7 a.m.-2 p.m. or 3-10 p.m. Fees: $100 $190

Featuring: ƒƒ Water spray fountain available April through October ƒƒ Seven picnic tables and two large grills ƒƒ Restroom facility ƒƒ Water and electricity ƒƒ Tot lot, benches, trail, and ample parking, including curbside ƒƒ Nearby basketball and volleyball courts not included in reservation

North Hills

Center Harbor Road and North Village Road Size: 1,024 square feet ƒƒ Eight picnic tables under cover and three large brick barbecue grills ƒƒ Two portable restrooms ƒƒ Electricity, water, lights, and a water fountain ƒƒ Tot lot, ample parking and green space

Pony Barn

Corner of Steeplechase Drive and Triple Crown Road Size: 2,006 square feet ƒƒ Eight picnic tables and one large grill ƒƒ Two portable restrooms ƒƒ Parking available in 11 spaces or at curbside ƒƒ Water fountain ƒƒ Wood-chipped tot lot equipped with swings

Temporary Road

Corner of North Shore Drive and Temporary Road Size: 892 square feet ƒƒ Seven picnic tables and one large grill ƒƒ Two portable restrooms ƒƒ Parking available in 16 spaces or at curbside ƒƒ Water fountain ƒƒ Four benches and a swing set situated throughout the park ƒƒ Large, level field excellent for group activities

WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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FACILITY RENTALS

Reston Association

Conference Center

12001 Sunrise Valley Drive | Reston | Virginia | 20191 | www.reston.org

HOLD YOUR NEXT MEETING CLOSE TO HOME Ideal for ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

Corporate events Community meetings Workshops and conferences Training programs

Features

Tech Info ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

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70” LCD TV with laptop projection capability Wireless connectivity in each room Ceiling-mounted projectors and projection screens Wireless microphone capability in tabletop, handheld, or clip-on/lavaliere-style Teleconferencing capability

Flexible room layouts ƒƒ Monday-Sunday, 8 a.m.-10 p.m. Presentation supplies, including flip charts, whiteboards, markers, ƒƒ podiums and easels ƒƒ Free parking Rates: $40-$120/hr. ƒƒ On-site support staff ƒƒ Buffet serving area in rooms Contact: To arrange a venue tour or to discuss your specific Accommodates meeting needs, contact Member ƒƒ Small groups of 35 or less Services at reservations@reston.org ƒƒ Large groups up to 170 or call 703-435-6530.

Extras (additional fee) ƒƒ

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Pantry with microwave, coffee and tea supplies, refrigerator and disposable serving supplies Audio-visual equipment Wireless microphones Outside catering

RA members in good standing are given priority in all facility rental requests. NEW

To search for Conference Center availability, go to www.restonwebtrac. org and click on the Facility Rentals quick link.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


The Lake House

SPONSORED BY COMSTOCK

Celebrate Your Special Day Lakeside! Host your wedding, reception or engagement party overlooking beautiful Lake Newport in Reston, Virginia. This airy and modern space is in a park-like setting and features two light-filled rooms both providing spectacular views of the lake. It’s not too early to book spring and summer 2019 wedding receptions on the lake. Ask us about our Wedding Package, including Brown’s Chapel. Attractive Rates: $100-$275/hour Available for members and non-members year round. RA members in good standing are given priority in all facility rental requests.

To search for availability, go to www.restonwebtrac.org and click on the Facility Rentals quick link. For monthly drop-in hours, see the Event Calendar. Contact Member Services: reservations@reston.org or 703-435-6530.

11450 BARON CAMERON AVENUE, RESTON, VA 20190

WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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FACILITY RENTALS

RA COMMUNITY BUILDINGS

Rent one of our indoor venues for your next event. Facilities are available to rent seven days a week. RA members in good standing are given priority in all facility rental requests. NEW To search for availability, go to www.restonwebtrac. org and click on the Facility Rentals quick link. Contact Member Services: reservations@reston.org 703-435-6530 Brown’s Chapel and the Glade Room are frequently used for: ƒƒ Group & business functions ƒƒ Classes, workshops & training programs ƒƒ Community and club meetings ƒƒ Birthday parties and wedding ceremonies & receptions ƒƒ Cluster meetings ƒƒ Faith group meetings

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Brown’s Chapel

1575 Brown’s Chapel Road Size: 914 square feet A very cozy and affordable facility close to home. Its tall ceilings provide excellent acoustics, and its parklike grounds offer a lovely setting. The facility has chairs to seat 50 people, three tables, restroom facilities, heating, air conditioning and ample parking.

Glade Room

11550 Glade Drive Size: 881 square feet This facility is equipped with chairs to seat 75 people, four tables, restroom facilities, heating and air conditioning. Enjoy nearby facilities such as tennis courts, tot lot, and the Glade Pool. Rental Fees: $25-$90 per hour (security deposit required). Available for members and non-members year round.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

The Lake House

11450 Baron Cameron Avenue Size: 1,490 square feet The Lake House, sponsored by Comstock, is Reston Association’s newest community building on Lake Newport and is frequently used for: ƒƒ Small to midsized weddings, engagement parties ƒƒ Milestone birthday and anniversary parties ƒƒ Family holiday gatherings ƒƒ Corporate retreats and holiday parties ƒƒ Private functions ƒƒ Workshops, classes and conferences

BROWN'S CHAPEL

GLADE ROOM

Ask us about our Wedding Package, including Brown’s Chapel. Attractive Rates: $100-$275/hour Available for members and non-members year round.

THE LAKE HOUSE


RENT SPACE AT THE WALKER NATURE CENTER WALKER NATURE CENTER 11450 GLADE DRIVE

Looking for the perfect spot for a community meeting, family gathering or business retreat? Affordable and attractive rentals are available at the Nature Center.

Nature House Multipurpose Room

664 square feet of space, capacity 60 people, seats 40 people with tables and chairs. Parking and restroom access. RA member or Reston not-for-profit fee $40/hour Non-member or non-Reston not-for-profit fee $60/hour For profit/corporate fee $80/hour

Nature Center Pavilion

576-square-foot pavilion with picnic tables and bench seating in a beautiful woodland setting. Parking and restroom access. RA member or Reston not-for-profit fee $30/hour Non-member or non-Reston not-for-profit fee $40/hour For profit/corporate fee $60/hour

Fire Ring

Fire pit in woodland setting with bench seating, small pavilion and picnic tables. Roadside parking. No restroom. Renters must supply their own wood and water to extinguish the fire. RA member or Reston not-for-profit fee $20/hour Non-member or non-Reston not-for-profit fee $30/hour For profit/corporate fee $40/hour Make a facility reservation request online using Reston Association’s WebTrac system at www.restonwebtrac.org. For assistance or further information, call 703-476-9689 and WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018 press 3 or email naturecenter@reston.org.

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VOLUNTEER RESTON | GET INVOLVED VOLUNTEER RESTON

Volunteer Reston is a network of community members who come together to complete various projects to improve our surroundings and bring the Reston community together. Our mission is to enhance Reston Association’s services and programs by matching the varied talents of individuals and groups of all ages, interests and skills to a variety of engaging projects and endeavors.

CONNECT WITH VOLUNTEER RESTON ON SOCIAL MEDIA!

WHY VOLUNTEER?

Volunteers play a critical role in helping Reston grow. Whether you are hoping to meet new people, spend time with friends, learn new skills, make a positive impact in your community or complete school service hours, Volunteer Reston has something for everyone. Regardless of the motive, Reston Association volunteers all have one thing in common — they are all helping to make Reston a better place to live, work and play. RA volunteers have a variety of ages, skill levels and personalities. Volunteers include senior citizens, corporate teams, faith-based groups, families, college students, retirees, scouts and youth. There are several ways to get involved. Some events happen frequently, whereas others happen on an annual or even one-time basis. Our recreational, environmental and administrative projects enable volunteers to meet other locals and learn more about Reston’s growing community.

MAKE A POSITIVE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

Following our accounts is a convenient way to stay up-to-date on volunteer opportunities in the Reston community. Get the latest updates about our events, share your experiences and photos with us, and see what all of our incredible volunteers are up to.

Facebook.com/VolunteerReston Instagram@Volunteer_Reston Twitter@VolunteerReston

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Reston is often praised for its trails, lakes and landscape. To preserve Reston’s natural beauty, regular maintenance is essential. Consider supporting habitat restoration, watershed cleanups and other workday projects by signing up for an upcoming opportunity. Opportunities include Habitat Heroes, stream monitoring, watershed cleanups, Walker Nature Center assistance and other workdays.

To get involved, complete a one-time Volunteer Application found online at www.reston.org, and contact Ha Brock, Volunteer Reston Manager, at habrock@ reston.org with your interest.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

JOIN THE COMMUNITY

Reston Association frequently hosts community events throughout the year. These events allow Reston locals to meet, network, share stories and work together with camaraderie and stewardship. Events include the Multicultural Festival, Halloween House & Trick-orTreat Trail, Community Yard Sale and Spring Festival. To learn more about upcoming opportunities, complete a onetime Volunteer Application found online at www.reston. org, and contact Ha Brock, Volunteer Reston Manager, at habrock@reston.org with your interest.

NEED SERVICE HOURS FOR SCHOOL?

Many students in Reston and the surrounding area are required to perform a specific number of community service hours for school. Volunteer Reston is a great way to fulfill these hours. Students may be able to finish their service hours by handling shifts at special events, monthly service projects and workday cleanups. We want all our volunteers to enjoy their time participating at such events. Not only will volunteers be prepped and trained for each opportunity, but they will also be able to grow individually and make a significant impact. We cannot guarantee that all service hours can be completed at one event, but we welcome student participation regardless. Each event has a limited number of spots available and can reach capacity. Please be mindful of upcoming dates/ times, and sign up in advance to secure a spot. To have your hours approved

by Volunteer Reston, you must have a volunteer record on file in Volgistics. (refer to “VOLUNTEER INFO PORTAL (VOL/VICNET)”, page 75) All opportunities are found in Volgistics/VicNet, x2VOL and the RA website at www.reston. org. We also frequently update our pages on VolunteerMatch, Volunteer Fairfax, Idealist and Mason Gives Back. Contact Ha Brock, Volunteer Reston Manager, at habrock@ reston.org, with any questions.

OCTOBER 27 Held every fourth Saturday of October, National Make A Difference Day unites communities all over the country through service and work projects. Celebrate this year by participating in one of Volunteer Reston’s opportunities! How to celebrate National Make A Difference Day: ƒƒ Habitat Heroes (refer to Habitat Heroes page) ƒƒ Halloween House & Trick-or-Treat Trail (refer to HH & Trick-or-Treat Trail page) All opportunities can be found on VicNet. To register, visit http://bit.ly/VRVicNet and click on the date. (refer to “VOLUNTEER INFO PORTAL (VOL/VICNET)”, page 75)


VOLUNTEER INFORMATION PORTAL

(VOLGISTICS/VICNET)

We invite you to become a vital member of the Volunteer Reston team. You can join our team by completing a one-time volunteer application in Volgistics and pre-register yourself for a shift in VicNet. If you are already registered as a volunteer, please go to Step 3 to sign up.

APPLICATIONS & INSTRUCTIONS

Full instructions can be found at www.reston.org. Locate the “About Reston Association” tab and click “Volunteer Opportunities” to learn more.

STEP 1: NEW VOLUNTEER — COMPLETE A ONE-TIME APPLICATION

ƒƒ Adult/Group Volunteer Application ƒƒ Volunteer Minor Application — Parent must consent with their email address After you submit your application, you will receive an email from Reston Association to go into VicNet to set up your volunteer account.

STEP 2: CREATE YOUR VICNET ACCOUNT

Go to http://bit.ly/VRVicNet, click on the “need a password” link. ƒƒ Enter your email address (the email you submitted on your volunteer application) and click the “Go” button. ƒƒ Follow the prompts on the screen to create your password. (Check junk/spam folder if you don’t receive an email.)

STEP 3: EXISTING OR RETURNING VOLUNTEERS — HOW TO SIGN UP FOR A VOLUNTEER SHIFT IN VICNET

Log in and schedule yourself in VicNet: http://bit.ly/VRVicNet ƒƒ Once you are logged in to VicNet, click on the “My Schedule” tab. ƒƒ In the blue box, use the dropdown menu to select any assignment(s) that you want to review or where you want to volunteer. ƒƒ Scroll down to see the calendar, which will display “Help Wanted” icons for opportunities where volunteers are needed. ƒƒ Click “Schedule Me” for the shift for which you would like to volunteer. ƒƒ Click “Yes” to confirm your shift. ƒƒ Click “Continue” to go back to the monthly calendar or click “Exit” to log off of your account. ƒƒ Bookmark or save VicNet on your desktop or mobile device. Visit often as we frequently update our assignments. For more information, please contact Ha Brock, Volunteer Reston Manager, at 703-435-7986 or habrock@reston.org

WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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VOLUNTEER RESTON | GET INVOLVED ENVIRONMENTAL WORK

Out of all the volunteer opportunities Volunteer Reston offers, environmental work is the most laborious. However, this makes it one of the most meaningful.

Work may include removing weeds, identifying invasive vegetation, planting seedlings, clearing trails, collecting trash and handling tools. Supplies are provided and are often used. With training, volunteers might be tasked with using wheelbarrows, brooms, trowels, shovels, rakes, pruning shears, gardening tools, hand picks, pitchforks, weed wrenches and hand saws. Workdays range from two to eight hours on any given day. Training is provided onsite by RA staff. Supplies, snacks and water are also available.

GUIDE TO FIELD SAFETY

Safety is our top priority, especially when volunteers are working in various parts of Reston’s woods. RA staff will provide volunteers with a safe work environment by identifying any potential hazards at any given work area.

POTENTIAL HAZARDS

Ticks: Ticks are common carriers of Lyme disease. Please check your clothes and body after working outdoors. Take a shower to wash away any bugs or ticks.

Poison Ivy: Poison ivy is typically onsite. The oil in poison ivy can cause a severe rash, especially for those who are allergic. RA staff will provide preventative and cleansing poison ivy wipes. Washing off with soap within three to four hours will help prevent a rash from forming. Tools/Back Safety: Some tools will require extra precaution to prevent any injury. Make sure you know the correct way to hold, use and transport them. Keep space around yourself and maintain space between you and other volunteers. Use your legs when lifting or pulling heavy weeds and other objects.

HOW TO STAY SAFE

Dress appropriately: Wear clothes that can get dirty. Long-sleeved shirt, long pants, closed-toed shoes and layers/ rain gear for changing weather are required for your safety. Hydrate: Bring a personal water bottle for hotter days. Drink plenty of water throughout the workday to prevent dehydration and overheating. Water will be supplied. Remain attentive: Natural hazards are frequent in this kind of work. RA staff are trained and will determine what procedures are necessary when handling tools and navigating through these areas. Report an injury: Notify an RA staffer if any injury occurs.

Yellow Jackets: Yellow jackets’ nests are commonly found in trees and on the ground in natural areas. They can be difficult to spot, but if you see one, try not to follow it back to its nest. Clear the area immediately and warn others. If you are allergic, please take extra precaution.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

HABITAT HEROES Our native trees, ferns and wildflowers are under attack by invasive plants like English ivy, Japanese honeysuckle and bamboo. These plants are fastgrowing and threaten the local habitat and wildlife. We need heroes like you to join us in preserving Reston’s ecosystem.

Stop the Choking, Save the Natives

Saturday, Oct. 27, 10 a.m.-Noon The native mayapple (Podophyllum peltatum) is in danger of being choked out by English ivy. We need your help to remove the English ivy vines and give the native wildflowers a chance to thrive. We will be along the asphalt path between Sanibel Drive and Dogwood Elementary School. Look for the RA truck.

Save the Trees, Stop the Choking

Saturday, Nov. 17, 10 a.m.-Noon English ivy is a threat to trees. Help RA restore healthy wildlife habitat. Volunteers will meet between 11239 and 11240 South Shore Road. Volunteers will help remove ivy with small tools and clear this section of the woods for native habitat. For your safety: Please wear long sleeves and long pants to protect you from biting insects, thorns, and poison ivy. There is poison ivy at almost all sites. Bring gardening gloves if you have them. RA will provide some tools, gloves, snacks and water. (refer to Guide to Field Safety) Key Responsibilities: ƒƒ Removing invasive plants from our community ƒƒ Protecting native vegetation from invasive plants ƒƒ Replanting natural areas with attractive and important native ferns, wildflowers, shrubs or trees Age Requirement: All ages are welcome. Children under 13 must be accompanied by an adult. Parents must complete a Volunteer Minor Application for each child participating. Registration: Visit http://bit.ly/VRVicNet and click on the date. (refer to “VOLUNTEER INFO PORTAL (VOL/ VICNET)”, page 75) Contact: Ha Brock, Volunteer Reston Manager at habrock@reston.org or 703-435-7986


(RAIN OR SHINE)

Saturday, Oct. 20, 10 a.m.-Noon There are three worksites. RA will be hosting cleanups at Hunters Woods Village Center, Soapstone Drive and the Southgate Community Center. Tons of trash ends up in the Potomac River and the Chesapeake Bay every year from our watersheds. Litter is harmful and an eyesore in our neighborhoods and open spaces. Let’s do our part. It is amazing what a group of people can accomplish in a few hours. Help keep Reston looking beautiful by joining RA for the Fall Stream Cleanup! By simply clearing out litter from our watersheds, your contributions will have a significant impact on restoring Reston’s streams. Age Requirement: All ages are welcome. Children under 13 must be accompanied by an adult. Parents must complete a Volunteer Minor Application for each child participating. Registration: Visit http://bit.ly/ VRVicNet and click on the date. (refer to “VOLUNTEER INFO PORTAL (VOL/VICNET)”, page 75) Contact: Ha Brock, Volunteer Reston Manager at habrock@ reston.org or 703-435-7986

STREAM MONITORING

Fall brings cooler weather and beautiful colors. What better way to enjoy fall than to get your feet wet in one of Reston’s streams? RA welcomes new volunteers to assist with stream monitoring at several locations. If you are interested in assisting with stream monitoring for more than one or two sessions, training and practice opportunities are offered by seasoned volunteers and RA staff. You can earn a Virginia Save Our Streams stream monitoring certification by successfully demonstrating your ability to identify macroinvertebrates. Each monitoring session lasts two to three hours. Any interest and commitment levels are appreciated. If interested, join our volunteer monitor email distribution list to receive notices of upcoming monitoring dates. Email Will Peterson, RA’s Watershed Specialist, at wpeterson@ reston.org with the message, “add me to the stream monitors list” to begin receiving emails. Upcoming Dates: Oct. 20, 1:30-4:30 p.m. Nov. 4, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Jan. 19, 1-4 p.m. Feb. 2, 1-4 p.m Age Requirement: All ages are welcome. Children under 13 must be accompanied by an adult. Parents must complete a Volunteer Minor Application for each child participating. Registration: Visit http://bit.ly/ VRVicNet and click on the date. (refer to “VOLUNTEER INFO PORTAL (VOL/VICNET)”, page 75) Contact: Ha Brock, Volunteer Reston Manager at habrock@ reston.org or 703-435-7986

MLK DAY OF SERVICE © EN.WIKIPEDIA.ORG/WIKI/MARTIN_LUTHER_KING_JR.

FALL STREAM CLEANUP

Join friends and neighbors in honoring Dr. King’s legacy by serving your community. As Dr. King said, “Everybody can be great…because anybody can serve.” 9 a.m. 1 p.m.

Southgate Community Center, 12125 Pinecrest Road, Reston, VA North County Government Center, 1801 Cameron Glen Dr., Reston, VA

All ages. Free. Registration required through Reston Association At 9 a.m. RCC is partnering with the Southgate Community Center, Reston Association, Cornerstones and The Closet on community service projects at Southgate Community Center. Indoor projects include making bag lunches for the Embry Rucker Community Shelter, sorting and organizing items from The Closet, and several other projects at Southgate Community Center. There will also be outdoor projects such as cleaning up the natural areas, pathways and hardscape surrounding the area, weather permitting. Volunteer hours conclude around noon, at which point volunteers will gather to share a lunch that will be provided. New this year is an additional project at the North County Government Center at 1:00 p.m. RCC is partnering with Cornerstones and the office of the Hunter Mill District Supervisor for a community service project in support of the Hunter Mill Winter Coat Closet. Volunteers are needed to sort and organize all the donated items. The project concludes at 3 p.m. To volunteer or for more information contact Ha Brock, Volunteer Reston Manager at 703-435-7986 or ha@reston.org.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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VOLUNTEER RESTON | GET INVOLVED COMMUNITY EVENTS

Reston Association hosts various community events throughout the year. These opportunities are great for families, students and individuals who want to contribute to citywide projects.

HALLOWEEN HOUSE & TRICKOR-TREAT TRAIL

Friday, Oct.26, 5-9:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 27, 5-9:30 p.m. Walker Nature Center

The Walker Nature Center’s Halloween event is one of our most exciting volunteer opportunities of the year. We’re looking for more than 50 funloving, energetic volunteers to bring this event to life. This is a great opportunity for adults, teens, civic organizations and college groups.

children’s faces or hands. Sample designs will be provided. Minimal artistic skill necessary. Supplies provided. Carnival Activities — Help children to play quick Halloween-themed carnival games. Distribute prizes and candy to children.

Volunteers: Must be preregistered to volunteer for this event. Please do not sign up until you are sure you can commit to the date and position. Please specify which day and shifts you would like to work. New volunteers must attend orientation. Returning volunteers have the option to attend orientation, but it is highly recommended. Volunteer Orientation: Wednesday, Oct. 17, 6-7 p.m. Age Requirement: Ages 13 and up are welcome. Volunteers between the ages of 13 and 15 must be accompanied by an adult who volunteer at the same station. Parents must complete a Volunteer Minor Application for each volunteer participating. Registration: Visit http://bit. ly/VRVicNet and click on the date. (refer to “VOLUNTEER INFO PORTAL (VOL/ VICNET)”, page 75)

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Hands-on Crafts – Help children to make Halloween themed take home crafts. All supplies provided.

JOBS:

Characters — Do you have a theatrical streak? Are you a Halloween enthusiast? You might have what it takes to be one of our Halloween characters that delight and educate visitors. All costumes, props and scripts will be provided. Costumed characters should be people who enjoy Halloween and will really “get into” their role. You do not have to memorize the script. Each station is based on a theme with key talking points and sample dialogue. You will ad-lib comments that fit with the mood of the station and have fun!

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Mascots — Kids love the Nature Center mascots, Walker the Woodpecker and Myrtle the Turtle. They love having their picture taken with them, too. We need volunteers to wear these adorable head-totoe, furry costumes. Mascots need excellent people skills and should be able to animate their character without talking. Mascot Escort — We need volunteers to help the mascots get into costume and escort them around the event. This job requires standing and walking. Face Painting —Paint simple animals and designs on

Trick-or-Treat Trail Assistant (Start) — Welcome patrons to the trail and check for hand stamps. Explain the rules of the trail and hand out trick-or-treat bags. Trick-or-Treat Trail Assistant (End) — Pass out candy and collect flashlights from patrons finishing the trail. Direct new patrons to the trail entrance. Breakdown — Help clean up the event at the end of the night. Many hands make for light work. Contact: Ha Brock, Volunteer Reston Manager at habrock@ reston.org or 703-435-7986


CALL FOR NOMINATIONS: 2019 VOLUNTEER RESTON SERVICE AWARDS

Every year, Volunteer Reston recognizes individuals, families, groups and community partners for their selfless contributions to the Reston Association and greater Reston community. It is their generosity that truly makes a difference in Reston and beyond. Community members are invited to nominate dedicated volunteer(s) for an award. See below for details.

HOW TO APPLY

Please complete the online 2019 Reston Association Volunteer Service Awards Nomination Form. This can be found at http://www.reston.org. Contact Ha Brock, Volunteer Reston Manager, at habrock@reston. org with any questions or concerns.

ELIGIBILITY 1.

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Nominees must have been engaged in volunteer activities for a minimum of one year in Reston (unless otherwise stated) and benefited the Reston community. Nominees do not have to live in Reston, but service performed outside Reston will not be considered. Nominees must have volunteered at least 30 hours for an individual and 50 hours for a group during the 2018 calendar year. Students receiving course credits (except for service learning hour credits) for their volunteer activities are ineligible unless the nomination is based on volunteer service that extends beyond the course requirements, in which case it must be clearly indicated in the nomination statement. Previous award recipients from within the past 10 years are ineligible.

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Nominees are ineligible if they receive compensation for their service. 6. Nomination cannot be based upon courtmandated community service. 7. Family members may not nominate another family member for an award. 8. Group/team and corporate volunteerism nominations must be made by those external to the group/team or corporation/business. 9. Nominees must be engaged in volunteer service or activities addressing community needs within the Reston community. 10. All nomination submission requirements listed below must be met.

SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS 1.

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All nominations must be submitted on the 2019 RA Volunteer Reston Service Awards nomination form. One nomination form per category will be accepted. Sections 1-6 must be completed. Incomplete nominations will not be considered for the award. While we regret any inconvenience it may cause, all nominations must be typed. Handwritten forms will not be accepted. At least one reference is required for each nomination. The nominator may not serve as one of the references. Judges will want to have a clear understanding of the nominee’s outstanding volunteer accomplishments that have made an impact in helping to meet critical needs in the community. Remember to provide specific details and examples in the appropriate section of the nomination form. Please save as a .pdf file and email to Ha Brock at habrock@reston.org. In the subject line, please include

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the words “RA Volunteer Nomination — Name of Nominee.” The deadline to submit your nomination packet is 5 p.m. on February 9, 2019.

Group Categories: ƒƒ

AWARD SELECTION 1.

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Award selections are based on the nominee’s volunteer efforts and commitment of time, accomplishments and community impact. Judges will select award recipients based on merit and eligibility. Recipients are selected without regard to race, religion, gender, national origin or physical/ mental disability. Decisions of judges are final.

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AWARD CATEGORIES & REQUIREMENTS Individual Categories: ƒƒ

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Volunteer of the Year — Must be 18 years or older and must have contributed to Volunteer Reston and surrounding Reston service projects in 2018. Youth Volunteer — Must be 18 years of age or younger and must have volunteered and contributed outstanding service to the Reston community and RA in 2018. 55+ Volunteer — Must be 55 years of age or older and have volunteered to help the Reston community and RA in 2018.

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Youth Group Volunteer — Must be a group of three or more, all members being age 17 or younger. Their combined volunteer efforts must have contributed outstanding service to the Reston community and RA in 2018. Family Volunteer — Nominee should be a family unit whose combined volunteer efforts demonstrated outstanding service to the Reston community and RA in 2018. Group Volunteer Service — Nominees should be a group of individuals or organizations that came together to make a difference in the Reston Community and RA in 2018. This may be a onetime service project or ongoing effort. Community Partner of the Year — This award will be based on the community partner (business, nonprofit, church, corporation, etc.) that has contributed most to Reston Association and the Reston community in 2018 (may include financial or in-kind support). Committee and/or Work Group Volunteer of the Year — Nominees should be individuals who have made a significant contribution to an RA advisory committee or work group and were involved with an RA project in 2018.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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VOLUNTEER RESTON | GET INVOLVED CORPORATE TEAM BUILDING WITH A DIFFERENCE

Volunteer Reston offers your company a flexible, efficient and professional means of mobilizing employees for a well-run volunteer experiences. We have 15+ years of experience producing custom service projects for groups of 25 to 100+ people in a single day.

Who Are We?

Reston Association is one the largest community associations in the U.S. We serve over 60,000 residents in Reston. Even though we’re not a “town” per se, we provide services and programs similar to a town or city government. We own and maintain over 1,300 acres of parkland, 15 outdoor pools, 48 tennis courts, a 72-acre Nature Center, 55 miles of pathways and four man-made lakes. Living in Reston is like living in a park. Your project will go through the Friends of Reston, a 501(c) (3) organization established in 1999 to support the Reston Association in bringing valuable projects to the community. The Friends group allows the association to tap into other resources to bring great community projects to fruition on our land, at our facilities and within our programs.

How It Works

Depending on your group size and other requirements, we will offer a range of opportunities that meet your specific needs. Projects can take place during the week or weekend, on a one-time basis or more frequently, and may include employees’ families and clients, if desired. Based on your input, our team will plan the day(s), order supplies, handle setup and logistics and prep any employees who wish to serve as volunteer team captains. On the day of service, we are onsite

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to support your volunteers and make sure your engagement runs smoothly. Some corporate service projects include: ƒƒ Landscaping, trail clearing, and other beautification efforts at Reston’s tot lots, facilities, picnic pavilions and lakes ƒƒ Clearing invasive species and increasing biodiversity in Reston’s natural areas ƒƒ Assisting with special projects and fundraising events in support of the Friends of Reston ƒƒ Assisting with programs that take place at the Nature House, including Nature House 5K, Spring Festival, Arbor Day, Earth Day and Halloween House & Trick-or-Treat Trail, which requires 50+ volunteers each year Partnerships start at $300 for the production and supplies of a custom day of service engaging up to 25 volunteers. Volunteer Reston is largely supported by volunteers, corporate partners and donations. We make it easy for your company to volunteer by managing the process

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

from A to Z. Donations and contributions go toward plants, tools and supplies that support the service projects. To get started on your Corporate Day of Service, please complete the Corporate Volunteer Application: bit.ly/ VRCorporateApplication For more information, please contact Ha Brock, Volunteer Reston Manager, at habrock@ reston.org or 703-435-7986.

Serve on Boards and Committees

Serve on our Board of Directors or on any of our Committees. Our Advisory Committees are where you can really immerse yourself in a cause or area that suits you. Advisory Committees are composed of RA members who provide advice on association matters and perform such duties as may be requested by the Board of Directors. Advisory Committees exist for a term of one year from the annual or initial meeting of the Board of Directors and may be renewed at the discretion of the Board of Directors. The Board currently has four such advisory committees: ƒƒ The Environmental

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Advisory Committee The Parks & Recreation Advisory Committee The Multimodal Transportation Advisory Committee The 55+ Advisory Committee

Each committee is composed of up to 15 members, includes a Board member and at least one staff liaison, and generally meets once per month. More information on the committees and an application can be found at www.reston.org.


CORPORATE SERVICE PROJECTS

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WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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BOARD & GOVERNANCE | ORGANIZATIONAL GOALS | DIRECTORS BOARD ACTIONS

The following actions were taken by the RA Board of Directors at meetings held in the months of May through July 2018. Please note that some of the motions below are abbreviated. To access the full motions, please see the board meeting minutes found in the Governance section of www. reston.org.

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May 24, 2018

ƒƒ Approved May 24, Regular Meeting Agenda ƒƒ Approved April 11, 2018 Meeting Minutes ƒƒ Approved April 19, 2018 Unanimous Consent Resolution ƒƒ Approved April 23, 2018 Unanimous Consent Resolution ƒƒ Approved calendar dates for 2018 Member Listening Tour ƒƒ Approved Amendments to Committees Resolution 5; Board Advisory Committees. ˚˚ Appointed John Norton to the Elections Committee ˚˚ Appointed Patti Lentz to the 55+ Advisory Committee ˚˚ Appointed Joanna Simon to the 55+ Advisory Committee ˚˚ Appointed Rick Stout to the Parks & Recreation Advisory Committee ˚˚ Appointed Brian Pittack to the Parks & Recreation Advisory Committee. ˚˚ Appointed John Pinkman to the Parks & Recreation Advisory Committee. ˚˚ Appointed Bonnie Elliot to the 55+ Advisory Committee ˚˚ Appointed Jeremey Novak and Don Gauger as representatives of the lakeshore property owners on Lake Thoreau for the Lakes, Docks & Boats Working Group ˚˚ Appointed Karen Fagelson and Mike Sneed as representatives of the lakeshore property owners on Lake Audubon for the Lakes,

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Docks & Boats Working Group Appointed Philip Maisel and Karen Noel as representatives of the lakeshore property owners on Lake Anne for the Lakes, Docks & Boats Working Group Appointed Joe O’Gorman and Alison Watts as representatives of the lakeshore property owners on Lake Newport for the Lakes, Docks & Boats Working Group Appointed Mike Aronoff, Elain Mattair, Lee Decola, Mike Norvel and Beth Rinker as at-large members for the Lakes, Docks & Boats Working Group. Appointed Doug Britt to the Environmental Advisory Committee on the Lakes, Docks & Boats Working Group Appointed Brian Pittack as a representative for the Parks & Recreation Advisory Committee on the Lakes, Docks & Boats Working Group

ƒƒ Directed Staff to issue a second call for candidates for non-lakefront property owners to serve on the Lakes, Docks & Boats Working Group ƒƒ Reconsidered and appointed Caron Anton as the Hunters Woods-Dogwood District Director until the next regular election in April 2019 ˚˚ Nominated Sridhar Ganesan and Andy Sigle for President ˚˚ Postponed the Election for President until June 28, 2018 ˚˚ Appointed Caron Anton as Board Liaison to the 55+ Advisory Committee ˚˚ Approved the Timeline for the Appointment of the Category B Director ƒƒ Appointed a CEO search Committee comprised of Director Sigle, Secretary Mooney and Director Herbert

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

June 5, 2018

ƒƒ Adopted June 5th Special Meeting Agenda

June 28, 2018

ƒƒ Approved May 24, 2018 Regular Meeting Minutes ƒƒ Approved May and June Legal Committee Reports ƒƒ Approved the Committee, Working Group & Board Appointments ƒƒ Approved the 2019 Budget Development Calendar ƒƒ Elected Andy Sigle President ƒƒ Approved hearing the Covenants Committee Appeal regarding 11901 Triple Crown Road during the next Regular Board Meeting. ƒƒ Approved Design Review and Covenants Committee Resolution 7; Design Review Board Meeting Requirements ƒƒ Approved Design Review and Covenants Committee Resolution 8; Design Review Application Procedures ƒƒ Approved Amended Fees Schedule for Design Review Applications (Non-Residential) ƒƒ Approved the Multimodal Transportation Advisory Committee’s 2018 Work Plan ƒƒ Awarded the Reston Association Conference Center AV Upgrade project to Acuity Audio Visual

July 26, 2018

ƒƒ Approved June 28, 2018 Regular Meeting Minutes ƒƒ Approved July 11, 2018 Legal Committee Report ƒƒ Approved Assessment and Finance Resolution 11: POAA Disclosure Document Fees ƒƒ Appointed Jason Beske to the Design Review Board as a professional member for a three-year term ending in July 2021 ƒƒ Approved the request by the Reston Triathlon Association for the 35th Annual Reston Triathlon on Sunday September 9, 2018 with the condition that an agreement, drafted by RA General Counsel, is executed that includes, at a minimum: ˚˚ The roles and

responsibilities of the sponsoring organization; ˚˚ Date and time limitations for the facilities used; ˚˚ Use of amplified publicaddress systems; ˚˚ Insurance requirement for the sponsoring organization; ˚˚ Clean-up provisions; ˚˚ Other provisions to protect the Association and its members ƒƒ Authorized President Sigle to send a letter to Fairfax County on behalf of Reston Association and its Environmental Advisory Committee encouraging Fairfax County to embrace Biophilic Principles in its decision-making and planning processes


MEET THE BOARD & OFFICERS / BOARDOFDIRECTORS@RESTON.ORG

Andy Sigle, President At-Large Director BODSigle@reston.org

Sridhar Ganesan, Vice-President At-Large Director BODganesan@reston.org

John Mooney, Secretary North Point District Director BODMooney@reston.org

Eric Carr, Treasurer At-Large Director BODCarr@reston.org

Sherri Hebert Lake Anne/Tall Oaks District Director BODHebert@reston.org

Caren Anton Hunters Woods/Dogwood District Director BODAnton@reston.org

Ven Iyer At-Large Director BODIyer@reston.org

Julie Bitzer South Lakes District Director BODBitzer@reston.org

Catherine A. Baum Apartment Owners' Representative BODBaum@reston.org

Larry Butler Acting Chief Executive Officer & Chief Financial Officer Larry@reston.org

WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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INFO & RESOURCES | GUIDELINES | FACILITIES | MAP

Reston Association Common Area 1.

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Owners, including Owners of property adjacent to the Common Area, shall not attempt to nor improve, alter, landscape or mow Reston Association (RA) Common Area. Owners, including Owners of property adjacent to the Common Area, shall confine all fencing (including invisible fencing), sheds, or any other development to their own property.

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RA meadows in the Common Area shall be mowed annually by RA staff only.

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Smoking is prohibited within all RA Community Buildings and is also prohibited in all Pool facilities; on and within all Tennis Court facilities and Picnic Pavilions; on all Ballfields, Multi-purpose Courts, Garden Plots or Garden Plot Areas; and on or within Tot-Lots or TotLot Areas. This smoking ban is also in effect within a fifty (50)-foot-wide perimeter around the exterior of any building or the boundary of any facility, to the extent that such fifty (50)-foot area, or any portion thereof, comprises RA Common Area. The utilization of electronic cigarettes is also prohibited on these RA common areas. On those Association Common Areas where smoking is not prohibited by this resolution, RA strongly discourages smoking and requests that all persons refrain from smoking.

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6.

Horseback riding shall be confined to designated bridle paths.

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Dogs are to be walked on a leash in accordance with Fairfax County regulations. Cats, while on Common Area, must also be walked on a leash. Except for service dogs, no pets are permitted on active recreation areas, including but not limited to, such areas as playgrounds, picnic and multi-purpose courts, and play fields. Dumping of any refuse, including but not limited to, grass clippings, leaves, Christmas trees, appliances, old sofas, crank case oil, etc., is prohibited. [Also see Amended Deed Section VI.2(b).]

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No invasive exotic plants or animals (especially invasive plants such as bamboo and English ivy) shall be introduced to the RA Common Area.

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Unless specifically authorized by the Association, the use of any motor vehicles or other motorized vehicle, other than governmental police, fire and rescue vehicles, on walkways or other Common Area, is prohibited. [Also see Amended Deed Section VI.2(db)(10).]

10. Loitering, as defined by Fairfax County Code Article 1 Section 5-1-2, is prohibited. Specifically, it shall be unacceptable for any person to loiter at, on, or in RA Common Area in the following manner: a. To interfere, impede or hinder the free passage of pedestrian or authorized vehicular traffic; b. To threaten or do physical harm to another member or members of the public; c. To threaten or do physical damage to the Common Area; or

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

d. To breach the peace or engage in disorderly conduct by the use of words or acts or other conduct that clearly threaten, intimidate or present a danger to others. Except where 10 a-d apply, before contacting local law enforcement, Reston Association, in its sole discretion, may contact an appropriate organization(s) to assist in the intervention with or removal of individuals from the Common Area. 11. Unless specifically authorized by the RA Board of Directors, the following actions are prohibited in the RA Common Area: a. Carrying or discharging of firearms, air guns, archery equipment, including but not limited to, bow and arrow, and B-B guns; b. Hunting, trapping, harvesting or collecting of any wildlife, including but not limited to, mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians; c. Feeding of nondomesticated wild animals (except songbirds); d. Practices that attract non-domesticated wild animals or those that may be vectors for infectious diseases, including but not limited to, leaving pet food out of doors overnight in a location accessible to nondomesticated wild animals; e. Fires or burning; f. Overnight camping; g. Harvesting or collecting plant life, except as authorized by the Association.

12. Fishing in the Association’s Lakes and Ponds is permitted as per Section 8(i) of Common Area Rules & Regulations Resolution 2 on Lake Use & Access. 13. Geocaching [use of Geographic Positioning Systems (GPS)] to locate a cache of materials is permitted only by Members under the following rules: a. Members interested in performing geocaching must notify the Association of all cache sites; b. Cache sites located on the Common Area must be completely hidden from view; c. Cache sites are not permitted near wildflowers, a wildlife nest or den; d. Cache sites located in the Association’s Common Area, known as the Walker Nature Education Center, must be no more than ten feet from a pathway or trail edge; e. The Association shall not be held liable for any injuries or personal property damage incurred by those participating in geocaching on the Common Area. 14. The Board of Directors may, for specific management purposes on certain properties, amend these rules or implement additional rules to meet land and resource management objectives.


Fishing and Boating Guidelines Reston’s four man-made lakes — Anne, Thoreau, Audubon, and Newport — along with Reston’s two ponds — Bright and Butler — cover 125 acres and provide recreation and stormwater management for the community. While swimming and ice skating are not permitted, fishing, boating, wildlife watching, and lakeside picnicking are available to RA members and their guests.

Fishing in Reston

Fishing is allowed on all of Reston’s lakes and ponds from designated areas. Species of fish that may be caught include: largemouth bass, channel catfish, crappie, blue gill and sunfish. ƒƒ ƒƒ

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Anglers 16 years and older must have a VA fishing license. Residents may fish from RA-owned property, which includes the dams on each lake. Much of the shoreline around each lake is private. Please respect the “No Trespassing” and“Private Property” areas indicated by signs. Please do not remove or damage shoreline vegetation. Please do not litter. Please do not feed ducks, geese or other waterfowl. Help protect people and wildlife. Please take all lines, lures and hooks with you when you leave.

Places to Fish

Lake Newport: Along the dam (park at Brown’s Chapel Park.) Lake Anne: Along the Lake Anne Plaza steps and public docks, along south shore of the canal and along the dam.

Lake Thoreau: Along 80 feet of shoreline and the public dock near Lake Thoreau pool, along dam by Lake Audubon, along bridge near golf course, and along timber wall at Purple Beach. Lake Audubon: Along dam by Lake Thoreau, at boat ramp by Lake Audubon Pool off Twin Branches Road, and along shoreline for 150 feet near the Nature Center (docks are private).

Boating in Reston

Reston’s four lakes are also available for boating. Whether you want to launch your own craft or rent a boat at Lake Anne (in-season only), ample opportunities exist to get on the water. We suggest taking your favorite book out, having a floating picnic or fishing for largemouth bass. ƒƒ

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A free general access permit for hand-carried boats to four lakes is available at RA headquarters, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, during regular office hours. Proof of boat size is required. The concrete boat ramp at Lake Audubon, off of Twin Branches Road, is available to launch boats from trailers. (Electric motors only) Access points are monitored between April and October.

Other general access points for hand-carried boats include: ƒƒ On Lake Thoreau, the grassy area by the underpass at the intersection of South Lakes Dr. and Ridge Heights Road; ƒƒ On Lake Anne, the area at the north end of the dam at the intersection of Wiehle Ave. and Inlet Court; ƒƒ On Lake Newport, at the east end of the dam at the wooden dock.

Boat Reminders ƒƒ

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Boats (jon boats, canoes, deck boats, sailboats, etc.) may be up to 18 feet long, and no more than 10 feet wide. One electric motor (no gas motors) up to three horsepower may be used. Inflatables must have three separate compartments and sidewalls. All boats are required to have a wearable flotation device for each passenger on board. All boats left in the water between November 1 and March 31 require a permanent mooring permit. Only lakefront owners may permanently moor a boat on Reston’s lakes. Individual clusters or condo associations which own lakefront property have specific rules regarding mooring boats consistent with RA rules and regulations. For more information, see Resolution 2: Lake Use Access in the Governing Documents download the Boat Guide at http://bit.ly/RABoatGuide.

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If you see an abandoned boat floating around or you have lost your boat on our lakes, call Watershed Specialist Will Peterson at 703-435-6535 to help track it down.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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INFO & RESOURCES | GUIDELINES | FACILITIES | MAP AUTUMNWOOD POOL (1)

LAKE NEWPORT POOL (13)

RESTON ASSOCIATION HEADQUARTERS (22)

11950 WALNUT BRANCH ROAD

11601 LAKE NEWPORT ROAD

12001 SUNRISE VALLEY DRIVE 703-435-6530

AUTUMNWOOD TENNIS COURTS (1) 11950 WALNUT BRANCH ROAD

BARTON HILL TENNIS COURTS (2) SUNRISE VALLEY DRIVE/ BARTON HILL ROAD

LAKE NEWPORT TENNIS COURTS (14)

COLTS NECK ROAD

BROWN’S CHAPEL PARK (4) 1575 BROWN’S CHAPEL ROAD

11032 RING ROAD

11452 BARON CAMERON AVENUE

11400 RIDGE HEIGHTS ROAD

UPLANDS TENNIS COURTS (28)

LAKE THOREAU POOL (15)

SHADOWOOD POOL (24)

11032 RING ROAD

2040 UPPER LAKES DRIVE

2201 SPRINGWOOD DRIVE

UPPER LAKES TENNIS COURTS (29)

NEWBRIDGE POOL (16)

SHADOWOOD TENNIS COURTS (24)

UPPER LAKES DRIVE/SUNRISE VALLEY DRIVE

11450 GLADE DRIVE 703-476-9689

WALKER NATURE CENTER CAMPFIRE RING (31) SOAPSTONE DRIVE/LAWYERS ROAD

2201 SPRINGWOOD DRIVE

NEWBRIDGE TENNIS COURTS (16)

TALL OAKS POOL (25)

11718 GOLF COURSE SQUARE

12025 NORTH SHORE DRIVE

NORTH HILLS PICNIC PAVILION (17)

TEMPORARY ROAD PICNIC PAVILION (26)

1325 NORTH VILLAGE ROAD

TEMPORARY ROAD/NORTH SHORE DRIVE

DOGWOOD POOL (5) 2460 GREEN RANGE ROAD

WALKER NATURE CENTER (30)

UPLANDS POOL (28) RIDGE HEIGHTS POOL (23)

11768 GOLF COURSE SQUARE

COLTS NECK TENNIS COURTS (3)

THE LAKE HOUSE (27) 11450 BARON CAMERON AVENUE

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NORTH HILLS POOL (17) 1325 NORTH VILLAGE ROAD

GLADE POOL (6) 11550 GLADE DRIVE

NORTH HILLS TENNIS COURTS (17)

GLADE TENNIS COURTS (6)

1325 NORTH VILLAGE ROAD

11550 GLADE DRIVE

NORTH SHORE POOL (18)

1

13 27

14

11515 NORTH SHORE DRIVE

GOLF COURSE ISLAND POOL (7) 11301 LINKS DRIVE

HOOK ROAD TENNIS COURTS (8)

28

11

18

NORTH SHORE QUICKSTART 36 FT TENNIS COURTS (18)

8 21

11515 NORTH SHORE DRIVE

7

26

25

FAIRWAY DRIVE/HOOK ROAD

HUNTERS WOODS PICNIC PAVILION (9)

19

STEEPLECHASE DRIVE

HUNTERS WOODS POOL (10)

POLO FIELDS RECREATION AREA (19)

2501 RESTON PARKWAY

THUNDER CHASE DRIVE

LAKE ANNE TENNIS COURTS (11)

PONY BARN PICNIC PAVILION (20)

11301 NORTH SHORE DRIVE

TRIPLE CROWN/ STEEPLECHASE DRIVE

LAKE ANNE PICNIC PAVILION (11) 11301 NORTH SHORE DRIVE

RESTON ASSOCIATION CENTRAL SERVICES FACILITY (21)

LAKE AUDUBON POOL (12)

12250 SUNSET HILLS ROAD 703-437-7658

2070 TWIN BRANCHES ROAD

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

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Management | Branding | Marketing | HR | Workplace Services

WWW.RESTON.ORG | OCTOBER 2018

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12001 Sunrise Valley Drive | Reston | Virginia | 20191

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE  PAID RESTON, VA PERMIT NO.21

Reston October 2018  

Reston magazine

Reston October 2018  

Reston magazine