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RESTON

INSIDE Check Out RA's Fall Programs and Events Guide Pages 52-91

RESTON ASSOCIATION PUBLICATION

FALL 2015

TOGETHER, WE MAKE RESTON GREAT | WWW.RESTON.ORG


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“Thanks for your advice on how to best get our home ready to sell and how to

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703-860-8025 www.boofie.com 2

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

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WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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CONTENTS

10 FEATURES One Reston

BY CATE FULKERSON

Learn how Reston Association is addressing the residential development boom in the fast growing area known as the Dulles Corridor ensuring “One Reston.” Cover: Dulles Corridor Developement Photographer: David Madison

PERSPECTIVES 08 12 14 16 18

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Tribal Traditions Campers

Deloitte Brings Native Plants to Autumnwood

The Non-Profit in Your Backyard

Read how RA provided children a unique cultural experience enabling them to learn about different tribes in Africa, America, Australia and New Zealand and their folk traditions.

Deloitte IMPACT Day volunteers continue their long history of volunteer service turning the Autumnwood pool area into a National Wildlife Federation certified wildlife habitat.

Since 1999, the not-for-profit Friends of Reston have been supporting RA’s charitable, educational and scientific projects.

BY JESSICA BIGGER

Tetra Transformation Underway We the People Offshore Drilling Investing in the Future Reston’s Signature Strength: Diversity

ON THE STREET 24 32 34

BY FREDA DE COLA

The Reston Home Tour Reston’s Kid’s Triathlon Rally for a Cause

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

BY JESSICA ROBINSON

AROUND RESTON 40

42 44 48

Transforming Reston to Back-to-the- Future The Access Road to Dulles Irresistible Art Wake & Roll


INSIDE FALL PROGRAMS & EVENTS 50 Member Services 52 Aquatics 58 Camps 60 Nature 72 Special Events 80 Tennis

GET INVOLVED

92 Scout Projects 93 Reston Multicultural Festival Volunteer 94 Restore Native Habitat & Trails in Reston 94 Habitat Heroes Projects 95 Pulling Invasives & Planting Natives 96 Stream Monitoring 96 Storm Drain Marking Project 96 Fall Stream Cleanup 97 Halloween House & Trick-or-Treat Trail 98 Team Building with a Difference 99 Corporate Teambuilding Service Projects

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BOARD AND GOVERNANCE 100 Board Actions 101 Board of Directors

INFO AND RESOURCES 102 Facility Rental 103 Reston Association Common Area 104 Fishing and Boating Guidelines 106 Facilities and Map

80 INSIDE

MEMBER SERVICES 42

AQUATICS 44

CAMPS 60

RESTON ASSOCIATION PUBLICATION

facebook.com/restonassociation youtube.com/restonassociation twitter.com/restononline

NATURE 72

SPECIAL EVENTS 86

TENNIS 96

VOLUNTEERS 110

SUMMER 2015

ONLINE @ WWW.RESTON.ORG

TOGETHER, WE MAKE RESTON GREAT WWW.RESTON.ORG

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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RESTON VOLUME 6 | NUMBER 3

where healthy food comes naturally

PUBLISHER Ellen Graves, RA President, Board of Directors

DESIGN & PRODUCTION Long Nguyen long@reston.org

EDITORIAL Mike Leone mike@reston.org

PHOTOGRAPHER Sean Bahrami sean@reston.org

COPY EDITORS Jennifer O’ Connor Kathy Bush CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Amanda Lowe, Bari-Sue Cohen, Bob Haukness, Carl Hutzler, Charles A. Veatch, Colena Turner, David Madison, George Burke, Jim Kirby, Jordan Majoros, Kristina Alcorn, Mark Majoros, Pete Staples, Shannon Kennedy, William O' Brien RA CONTRIBUTORS Abby Stocking, Ashleigh Soloff, Cate Fulkerson, Claudia Thompson-Deahl, Ha Brock, Katie Shaw, Laura Kowalski, Lisa Delgado, Nicki Bellezza, Rob Tucker, Sabrina Tadele, Willa Whitacre

Caring About Animal Nutrition Since 2005

We’re different than national chain stores. ALL of our foods and treats are natural and nutritious. We are locally owned and operated BB&T Center • 304 Elden Street (at Herndon Pkwy) Herndon, VA 20170 • 571.521.0399 Open M–F 10 – 8 PM • SAT 10 – 6 PM • SUN 11-6 PM OTHER LOCATIONS Ashburn Farm Market Center • 43330 Junction Plaza, Suite 176 Ashburn, VA 20147 • 703.724.4319 1306 E. Gude Drive • Rockville, MD 20850 • 301. 217. 0432

COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTORS Andy Sigle, Bonnie Haukness, Cathy Hudgins, Ellen Graves, Freya De Cola, Gerry Connolly, Janet Rems, Jessica Bigger, Jessica Robinson, Kelley Westenhoff, Ken Plum, Leila Gordon, Rachel McCarthy, Shelley S. Mastran ADVERTISING Shannon B. Duffy E-mail: shannonbduffy@gmail.com Mobile: 703-508-4815 Reston is published quarterly by the Reston Association. Send correspondence or address changes to Reston Association at 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston, VA 201913404, 703-435-6530. All articles © Reston Association 2015. All rights reserved. Articles and letters to the editor may be submitted via mail to Mike Leone, Reston Association, at 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston, VA 20191-3404. 703-435-6530. Email submissions may be made to mike@reston.org. Anonymous or incomplete information will not be published. Reston Association reserves the right to edit for length, style, clarity and content. Articles may be printed upon verification of authorship and availability of space. Content submitted by guest columnists reflect their own viewpoints and are not endorsed by Reston Association. RESTON ASSOCIATION 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Reston, Virginia 20191-3404 Member Services Hours: Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Phone: 703-435-6530 Fax: 703-435-6516 Email: member_services@reston.org

www.wholepetcentral.com Printed on 10% post-consumer recycled paper, using vegetable-based ink. Please recycle.


PERSPECTIVES | IDEAS | COMMUNITY LEADERS | VIEWS

Tetra Transformation Underway I BY ELLEN GRAVES  PHOTOGRAPHY BY SEAN BAHRAMI

In May 2015, the Reston Association Board of Directors announced that the majority of members had approved the referendum to purchase the Tetra property located on Baron Cameron Avenue in Reston. Since that time, the association officially acquired the 3.476-acre property in July at a cost of $2.65 million, and a number of activities are underway to transform the site for community use. Reston Association plans to create more open space at the Lake Newport site and renovate the Tetra building so it can be used for RA member events and programs. The RA Board purchased the property to protect against commercial overdevelopment to increase and enhance Reston greenspace, and to increase community and recreational use opportunities. To assist in developing a concept plan for the new site, the Board has appointed a special Working Group that will provide recommendations to the Board on the following: nn By December 2015, identify short-and long-term indoor community use programming opportunities for the building, including corporate and event rentals; and nn By February 2016, propose concept plans that increase outdoor community use opportunities with the goals of: ƒƒ Preserving and enhancing the existing greenspace; and

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ƒƒ Exploring the feasibility of reducing impervious surfaces (parking) that contribute stormwater runoff to Lake Anne.

To learn more about the activities of the Working Group, go to our website www.reston.org and click on the Development & Future of Reston page. In addition to the Working Group, between August 2015 and April 2016, Reston Association staff will be working with Cresa Partners, a full-service real estate firm that will be responsible for: nn Making necessary exterior design and maintenance repairs including HVAC system and roof replacement; nn Developing interior space reconfiguration plans to accommodate community meetings, recreational programs and corporate/ event rentals; nn Managing the engagement of designers, contractors, voice/data suppliers, furniture and all other providers; nn Assuming overall project management, including but not limited to: ƒƒ Soliciting and reviewing bids for work, ƒƒ Forecasting and cost control, ƒƒ Overseeing the entire project schedule, ƒƒ Keeping RA staff informed of key project dates,

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

THE RA BOARD PURCHASED THE PROPERTY TO PROTECT AGAINST COMMERCIAL OVER DEVELOPMENT TO INCREASE AND ENHANCE RESTON GREENSPACE AND TO INCREASE COMMUNITY AND RECREATIONAL USE OPPORTUNITIES.

ƒƒ Ensuring design, construction and vendor processes stay on schedule.

Based on the initial project timeline, the new site should be ready for community use in spring 2016. Ellen Graves is the president of Reston Association.


WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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PERSPECTIVES | IDEAS | COMMUNITY LEADERS | VIEWS

ONE RESTON I BY CATE FULKERSON  PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID MADISON

n June 2015, the RA Board of Directors unanimously passed two motions clearing the way for new properties to be added to the Association both now and in the future. The first motion approved the adding of the Comstock property known as BVLD Residential at Reston Station. The second motion focused on establishing a policy, before the end of 2015, to enable the Board to add properties, specifically those in the Dulles Corridor or non-Planned Residential Community (PRC) areas, to the Options Model presented to the Board in May of this year. This new model for adding properties to RA concerns the area known as the Dulles Corridor. Currently, new or existing properties along the Corridor do not fall within RA’s jurisdiction (RA covenanted land); therefore, assessments from those residences are not collected by RA. Those properties also do not fall under RA’s design guidelines and could potentially create an appearance of “two different Restons” if the properties are not properly maintained.

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Under the new model, developers will have the opportunity to join RA. The Association will receive an initiation fee and/or proffers from developers in exchange for RA providing certain services, such as overseeing the future administration and design review process of the properties. Because many of the new

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

properties currently outside of RA covenanted land, including BLVD Residential, already offer extensive on-site amenities such as swimming pools, RA has the flexibility to reduce the assessment fee paid by full members of the Association. New RA members in the Corridor area would not have the same access to RA amenities that full members

BECAUSE OF THE RECENT DEVELOPMENT BOOM, THE ASSOCIATION BELIEVES THIS IS AN APPROPRIATE TIME TO PUT IN PLACE A POLICY FOR ADDING NEW MEMBERS, WHILE ALSO BRINGING IN NEW REVENUE THAT WILL BENEFIT ALL MEMBERS AND RESTON AS A WHOLE.

possess, but would benefit from various RA services. The 2015 assessment fee for full members is $642. The key point has to do with services more than amenities. Of course, all residents, regardless of whether they are members or not, have access to RA's pathways, open


Alternate Model Provided Under RA Deed for Addition of Properties to RA (Including those Properties in the Corridor)

RA Membership

spaces, ball fields and other public amenities that don't require membership. The services RA would provide to new members are administrative in nature. Those administrative benefits would include things like design guideline oversight. Beyond the administrative tasks, RA might also provide services like snow removal. Members who receive the reduced assessment rates would not qualify for the lower rates that full members receive on things like tennis and pool passes. The Association feels this is fair to both our existing members and any potential new members. Because many residential projects under construction or in the planning phase outside of RA-covenanted land already have pools, gyms and other facilities on site, there is no need for RA to essentially duplicate those offerings. We also don't anticipate providing reduced camp or other programing rates for members who are receiving the lesser assessment rate. Providing an incentive for developers who have no legal

Project/Developer Options: 1. Project/development owner pays a lump sum (often pursuant to proffer) and/or other initiation fee. 2. Development may be subject to some or all of the provisions of the RA Deed through a Supplemental Declaration. 3. Owner may pay some portion of or all of the Annual Assessment per residential unit owned. 4. In the case of Rental Apartments, the Owner is considered a Category B Member — Multifamily Dwelling — with voting rights for Designated Director Election, Deed amendments, and Common Area Referenda; In the case of a Condominium, each Owner of a Unit is considered a Category A Member obligation to join RA is something with specified voting rights pursuant the Association has explored in the to the RA Deed. past. Because of the recent devel5. In the case of Rental Apartments opment boom, the Association bewhere Owner pays an Annual lieves this is an appropriate time Assessment per Apartment, to put in place a policy for adding Apartment Occupants could be new members, while also bringing considered Category C Members in new revenue that will benefit all (Occupants) with right to run for the members and Reston as a whole. Board of Directors and vote in Board As well, by adding new propElections. erties to RA, the Association will 6. Alternatively, if Owner does not have greater control over the depay an Annual Assessment per sign guidelines and upkeep of the unit owned, then, in accord with properties. The new assessments and the Supplemental Declaration, initiation fees will bring revenue to Occupants would not be Class C the Association and allow the cormembers and would only be eligible ridor area — which runs along the to purchase a RA Recreation package Dulles Toll Road — to become part for a specific annual fee for the same of “one Reston.” Several projects recreational services. are already underway or planned for 7. For an annual fee, RA administers the the corridor. developments Design Guidelines under a separate architectural board Cate Fulkerson is the CEO of of review. Reston Association, a 37-year 8. For an annual fee, RA could agree to resident of Reston and 24-year provide development owner with employee of RA committed to onsite common area maintenance/ making Reston the best it can be and giving landscaping/snowremoval services you the best value possible for your assessand/or recreational programming. ment dollars.

How land holdings and mix of uses are assembled impacts what options Corridor Developers will choose.

All other options are RA negotiation opportunities with Corridor Developers.

Options 1 and 7 are staples of each RA addition to Property Agreement made with Corridor Developers.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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PERSPECTIVES | IDEAS | COMMUNITY LEADERS | VIEWS

WE THE PEOPLE O BY KEN PLUM

ur forefathers made clear in the beginning of our government’s founding document, the Constitution, that our government was to be based on the wishes of the people. Our country’s history has seen a steady expansion of the election franchise. Every year is an election year in Reston and in Virginia. That does not make us any more democratic than other communities or states. In fact, some would argue that having elections every year tires out the public and certainly campaign workers. There is a weariness that sets in for many about this time of year as we face the prospects of another round of political campaigns. There aren’t more elective offices in Virginia than in other states. We just divide up our election calendar differently. Most states have their federal elections for the president and their congressional representatives along with their state and

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local officials in the same even-numbered years. Of course we vote for the president every four years in the even-numbered years along with everyone else, and we elect our members of the House of Representatives every two years and our members of the U.S. Senate when their sixyear terms end in the same years. What is different about Virginia is that in the odd-numbered years we have state and local elections. This November 2015 voters will elect all 100 members of the House of Delegates and all 40 members of the State Senate. There are no statewide elections in Virginia this year. Two years from now we will elect a new governor, for there is a one-term limit on the governor, and we will elect the lieutenant governor and attorney general and all members of the House of Delegates. Also, this year we will elect constitutional officers, called that because they are required by the state constitution, and they include

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

MANY OF THE CRITICAL DECISIONS THAT RELATE TO THE QUALITY OF LIFE FOR OUR COMMUNITY ARE MADE BY LOCAL AND STATE OFFICIALS.

for our locality the sheriff and clerk of the court. Judges in Virginia are elected by the legislature and not by popular vote. The challenge with the current system is that “we the people” can grow weary rather quickly with political campaigning going on every year. State and local candidates will compete this year for the attention of voters while the presidential election campaigns that are already underway for next year will command much of the attention of the media. Many of the critical decisions that relate to the quality of life for

our community are made by local and state officials. That makes elections this year of utmost importance. Amid all the static and buzz that seems always to come with political campaigns, it is essential that we focus on the candidates who are running and make an informed decision on who to support. Not all candidates are opposed for re-election; but even in these instances, it is important to give incumbents a vote of support for the work they have been doing. As is sometimes pointed out, if you do not vote you lose your right to complain. Mark Election Day, November 3, on your calendar. Whatever your position on issues or candidates, help make sure that we the people continue to be in charge of our government! Delegate Plum represents the 36th District, including all of Reston, in the Virginia House of Delegates.


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For more information, please contact Kevin Danaher, RCC Community Events Director, at 703-390-6166.

RESTON COMMUNITY CENTER

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2310 Colts Neck Road, Reston, VA 20191 WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015 To request reasonable ADA accommodations, call 703-476-4500 • 800-828-1120 (TTY)

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PERSPECTIVES | IDEAS | COMMUNITY LEADERS | VIEWS

Offshore Drilling Risky for Virginia’s Environment and Economy BY GERRY CONNOLLY  PHOTO PROVIDED BY GERRY CONNOLLY

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his summer, many Restonians will pack up their cars and head southeast to vacation on Virginia’s beaches and its Eastern Shore. It’s a pilgrimage many of us enjoy year after year. Unfortunately, the Obama Administration’s short-sighted decision to reverse the moratorium on offshore oil and gas drilling, imposed following the catastrophic BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill, poses a serious threat to our Commonwealth’s coastline and its economy. While the environmental concerns that have dominated the public conversation are certainly important and worthy of debate, there is also a very compelling economic case to be made on the impact oil and gas exploration will have on Virginia’s economy. There is no question that this decision asks Virginians to assume all the risk that comes with offshore drilling, but little reward. It’s estimated that Virginia’s Atlantic Coast Outer Continental Shelf would yield only a few days-worth of the nation’s oil supply and less than a month of the nation’s gas supply. Even worse, absent a royalty-sharing agreement, it remains to be seen how much, if any, revenue Virginia would receive from drilling. Offshore oil and gas exploration poses real economic risks for Virginia, an argument I made in a recent letter asking Interior Secretary Sally Jewell to reconsider the Administration’s decision to open our coastal waters to drilling. A May 2010 Department of Defense report showed that nearly 80 percent of the proposed leasing area off Virginia’s coast would interfere with U.S. Navy training and operations. Drilling could jeopardize the Defense Department’s presence in Hampton Roads, and that

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would have a devastating effect on our economy. According to a 2013 Hampton Roads Planning District Report, “Defense-related activities and spending account for 41.2% of the region’s economy, generating approximately $35.2 billion in gross regional product.” They go on to point out that Department of Defense spending on salaries, retirement, and procurement account for more than 393,000 jobs, or 40% of the employment in the region. Threatening that economy would have impacts felt here in Northern Virginia and throughout the Commonwealth. Virginia’s congressional delegation and state leaders have fought hard to keep the Navy in Hampton Roads. Making the waters off our coast inhospitable to critical naval operations is not helpful to that effort. We also cannot minimize the serious consequences a spill would have on our tourism, recreation, and the fishing industries. Last year, more than 2.17 million visitors frequented our shore. These industries support more than 91,000 jobs and generate nearly $5 billion in gross domestic product. By comparison, less than 1,000 people visit the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge annually. So it was ironic that only 48 hours after the Obama Administration took a historic and important step to protect more than 12 million acres of Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge from the risks of oil and gas drilling, it said it would change course and expose Virginia’s barrier islands, fragile ecosystem, wildlife and beaches to this very same threat. Since the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico, Congress has failed to pass any legislation to prevent oil well blowouts

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

TO VISUALIZE THE IMPACT, IF YOU SUPERIMPOSED THE BP OIL SPILL ON A MAP OF OUR REGION, IT WOULD STRETCH FROM DALE CITY IN PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY TO NEW YORK CITY. or strengthen regulations on offshore drilling. Why would we risk such an incident and the havoc it would wreak on Virginia’s coastal economy for only a few days' worth of our nation’s energy supply? To visualize the impact, if you superimposed the BP oil spill on a map of our region, it would stretch from Dale City in Prince William County to New York City. President Obama has forged a lasting legacy of conservation and environmental protection. That is why it is so hard to fathom why the Administration has chosen to ignore clear economic and environmental

justification to exclude the Atlantic OCS from offshore exploration. By contrast, wind energy development off Virginia’s coast would offer a far better and safer return on investment. It is estimated that a proposed 113,000-acre wind energy area in the Atlantic off Virginia would create hundreds of jobs and generate enough electricity to power 700,000 homes. On a broader scale, a 2010 Energy Department study estimated that about 4,100 gigawatts of wind energy could be harnessed along the U.S. coastline, providing more than four times the current generating capacity of the entire U.S. electric grid. With wind energy offering so much promise, why are we willing to gamble with our coastal economy and fragile ecosystem by placing a bad bet on offshore oil and gas drilling? Congressman Gerry Connolly represents Virginia’s 11th District, which includes Reston. A former chairman of the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors, he serves on both the Oversight and Government Reform and the Foreign Affairs committees.


WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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PERSPECTIVES | IDEAS | COMMUNITY LEADERS | VIEWS

Investing in the Future N BY CATHY HUDGINS  PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID MADISON

ot so long ago, I participated in an installation ceremony at Lake Anne Village Center of the Reston Historical Marker. The Reston Historic Trust applied for and was granted the commemorative plaque. Some folks may think it was just another ribbon-cutting event with little impact. Actually, nothing could be further from the truth. It was a very big deal. It memorialized the fruition of over fifty years' planning and work by countless individuals investing time, talent, and treasure in a trail-blazing experiment of “New Town” building. Within the Commonwealth of Virginia, there are more than 2,400 Historical Highway Markers, which honor people, places, or events of regional, statewide or national significance. Typically, the markers are erected to be visible from a highway. So it was an honor and a true distinction for Reston to be the first and only community with its own historical marker. The marker acknowledges the innovative and visionary significance of Reston and its precedent-setting definition of community. It is that investing in the future viewpoint that distinguishes Reston from other housing developments of the 60’s. Being a long-time Reston resident, that attitude is much the way I view paying it forward, particularly with regard to housing and transportation in Fairfax County. And in some cases, the benefits are tantalizingly near, like the Lake Anne Revitalization Plan. The project creates significantly more affordable housing than currently exists with the redevelopment of the Crescent Apartments into 185 new affordable apartments, plus

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732 market rate apartments. These new residential units are part of an overall revitalization of the village center. In addition, new mixed use development of residential, office and retail space will transform the 24-acre site into a dynamic and rapidly growing economic center, while guarding its extraordinary charm and its Historical Marker presence. This is a housing investment undertaking that I am proud to have been a part of from the beginning. Metro and the Silver Line Construction are transportation operations with which I also share a long history. Serving as both past Chair and Vice Chair, and currently continuing as a Principal Director of the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority Board, my involvement with the Silver Line transit service allowed me to witness the historic completion of one of the largest capital construction projects in the United States — the Silver Line and the Wiehle-Reston East Station. The temporary Silver Line terminus, until the six additional phase II stations to Dulles are completed, is a bustling place indeed. As I told the Washington Post, “Many people worked tirelessly for more than 20 years to bring quality rail transportation to the Dulles Corridor, and our residents will now benefit from more choices about where to work, live, and recreate. The Silver Line is a game changer for Fairfax County economically and it will improve the quality of life for many families in our community.” A boon to commuters and the economy, the Silver Line Metro Project will be benefitting the region for decades to come. How do we stay faithful to the 1962 creation of Reston

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

IT REQUIRES BOLD COMMITMENT TO INVESTMENTS THAT REAPS REWARDS AND SEEKS LEADERS WITH VISION TO PLAN FOR THE FUTURE TODAY.

and its goals? How do we endow future housing and transit? The answer is rather simple but it may not be easy. It requires people who understand that services carry a cost, and that the cost is not too great to bear. It requires bold commitment to investments that reaps rewards and seeks leaders with vision to plan for the future today. It takes individuals like those to call Reston home. Cathy Hudgins has represented the Hunter Mill District on the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors since 2000. As a long-time Restonian, she has been involved with local, county and state politics for over 30 years.


WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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PERSPECTIVES | IDEAS | COMMUNITY LEADERS | VIEWS

Reston’s Signature Strength: Diversity W BY LEILA GORDON  PHOTOS COURTESY OF INSIDE OUT

hat does your face stand for? How does your individuality contribute to the Reston community? In September 2015, We Make Reston, an INSIDE OUT Project, will be created by the people of Reston and coordinated by Reston Community Center and the Initiative for Public Art — Reston (IPAR). We Make Reston will feature large-scale photographic portraits representing the diverse faces of Reston. The exhibit will be unveiled at the Reston Multicultural Festival on Saturday, September 26 at Lake Anne Plaza. The photos will remain on display four weeks; they will be in the Jo Ann Rose Gallery at RCC Lake Anne and outdoors if feasible. This project will contribute to a diversity dialogue that began 50 years ago when Reston was founded with the first racially integrated housing policy in Virginia. September activities kick off community discussions occurring over the next several months. RCC and its partners hope these dialogs will help us reconnect to and sustain our founding values and how we live them. We will be exploring issues of diversity, disproportionality, how the justice system in our country functions and how we can achieve

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greater opportunity equity — not just equality. The We Make Reston exhibit will launch us beautifully by reminding us of our community’s greatest strength — the multitude of perspectives and histories our people bring to Reston. We Make Reston is part of the international INSIDE OUT project — a global initiative with 200,000 participants from more than 112 countries and territories that was conceived by the French artist “JR.” A screening of the documentary INSIDE OUT: The People’s Art Project will be presented by IPAR on September 22 at 7:30 p.m. at the CenterStage. Come find out how this work has galvanized communities with the simple premise that recognizing our common humanity can be transformative. INSIDE OUT exhibits are largescale participatory efforts that transform messages of personal identity into pieces of artistic work. Participants use black and white photographic portraits to discover, reveal and share the untold stories and images of people around the world. These digitally uploaded images are made into posters and sent back to the local project co-creators for exhibit in their own communities. Posters can be placed anywhere, from a solitary image in an office window, to a wall of an abandoned building, or in a full stadium.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

RCC and IPAR celebrate Reston’s diversity with a large-scale photo exhibit on September 26 at Lake Anne. These exhibitions are documented, archived and made available online at www.insideoutproject.net/. On September 26 at historic Lake Anne Plaza, Reston will add the stories and images of its community to the international INSIDE OUT movement when We Make Reston is unveiled at our Multicultural Festival. Everyone is welcome to come enjoy the diversity that is front and center at the celebration. Leila Gordon has been the RCC Executive Director since 2008.


THIS PROJECT WILL CONTRIBUTE TO A DIVERSITY DIALOGUE THAT BEGAN 50 YEARS AGO WHEN RESTON WAS FOUNDED WITH THE FIRST RACIALLY INTEGRATED HOUSING POLICY IN VIRGINIA.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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ON THE STREET | STORIES | CURRENT EVENTS | HIGHLIGHTS

Tribal Traditions Campers Learning about Different Cultures and Creating Relationships with Campers from Global Camps Africa BY JESSICA BIGGER  PHOTOS PROVIDED BY GLOBAL CAMPS AFRICA AND SEAN BAHRAMI

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an Merenick, Reston Association’s (RA) new Camp Program Manager, was busy brainstorming new ideas for future summer camps he could add to RA’s summer camp program. Tribal Traditions Camp was one of Merenick’s creations. Not only have Reston campers learned about different tribes in New Zealand, Australia, America, and Africa, but they also had the opportunity to build friendships with South African children from Global Camps Africa, through a pen pal program. “We are excited to explore the rich history of Africa and teach our campers that camps don’t exist just in Reston, and at the beginning of camp, we looked forward to sharing our traditions of RA Camps with people outside our RA boarders,” said Merenick. Tribal Traditions Camp was a two-week program where children, between the ages of 7 and 11 experienced what it was like to be in a tribe, as well as learn about other tribes. Campers created crafts and music, like rain sticks and masks, etc., as well as participated in folk traditions from each culture. Although this was Tribal Traditions Camp’s initial year, all four sessions filled up quickly. There were 96 children who participated in the camp program. Campers spent two days learning about each culture. A representative from each tribe delivered a presentation to campers, giving them a different perspective from their own life,

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and show them how other children live in different parts of the world. In addition to learning about each culture, Merenick teamed up with Global Camps Africa, creating a pen pal program where Reston campers were able to learn more about a few South African campers and share a little bit about themselves and their life in Reston. Global Camps Africa, founded by Phil Lilienthal in 2004, was created during a time when AIDS was a huge problem in Eastern South Africa. Even before Lilienthal came up with the idea of a camp based in Africa, he was searching for a program he could create that incorporated regular camp activities, like art, recreation and music, but included courses that could empower children so they could rise above their desolate environment. Lilienthal is not new to designing camp programs. He grew up helping his family run Camp Winnebago in Maine, which his son currently owns and runs. After law school, Lilienthal joined the Peace Corp. and helped establish Ethiopia’s first residential camps in 1967 and 1968 that focused on breaking down stereotypes between African tribes. “That [Ethiopian experience] is where I got the aha moment about camp being appropriate for kids in other areas where camp wasn’t known… I’m very comfortable about going into another country and saying ‘Hey would this be useful if you want to try it?’ [We can] build a camp and use the techniques of camp to give your child [and] youth

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

A REPRESENTATIVE FROM EACH TRIBE DELIVERED A PRESENTATION TO CAMPERS, GIVING THEM A DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVE FROM THEIR OWN LIFE, AND SHOW THEM HOW OTHER CHILDREN LIVE IN DIFFERENT PARTS OF THE WORLD. development people added tools,” said Lilienthal. In 2004, Lilienthal was looking for a new camp program to establish in Africa. “At the time I was doing this, the countries where

I was looking at in Eastern South Africa, Kenya, Botswana, and South Africa— had a big AIDS problem. I knew nothing about AIDS, but I thought it would be a good hook to hang camp on … I wanted something that I didn’t know to be added to the pot to make some gains to whatever was lacking to the prevention of the disease,” explained Lilienthal. It costs $500 to support each camper in the Global Camps Africa eight-day program. In addition to traditional camp activities, the kids attend life skills courses; HIV prevention through sexual education courses; as well as other life skills that arm them with the tools they need to handle many of the situations that are created through poverty. The funds also provided former campers an after-school program they can attend to seek additional support throughout the year.


WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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The after-school program is there to support former campers. Many of the same counselors they interacted with during their camp session are involved with the after-school program to provide support to the kids. Most of the camp counselors have been in similar situations as their campers. They are a wonderful resource for former campers who need advice or someone to talk to. The counselors are also there to encourage former campers to continue their education, reminding them they will have better opportunities than if they give up. Although it is still difficult to move up in the world, these children gain a sense of empowerment so that when they finish their education there are better

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opportunities on the horizon. When asked if the camp program has been successful, Lilienthal responded, “It has because we see it, because parents tell us, because the kids tell us, and because the teachers tell us. What they gain from it is an empowerment that they can be more than they are and an understanding of what’s killing people around them, and that they don’t have to be killed. An understanding, or at least a belief that staying with your education is going to get you out of poverty and some of the situations that poverty stimulates … abusive behaviors, sexual, psychological, social … But the empowerment, it gives them the tools to do these things. We teach them what

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

they need. If this is happening to you, this is what you should know so it doesn’t happen to you in the future,” replied Lilienthal. Lilienthal has reported that although they don’t have the data yet, and are in the process of creating a report, Global Camps Africa is making a difference for many children. One in particular moved away from Africa, went to university and now speaks to campers at Global Camps Africa to encourage them to stay on the right path and that it truly is possible to rise above the poverty and be where she is today. To learn more about Global Camps Africa, visit www.globalcampsafrica.org. As far as the RA’s Camp Program is concerned, Merenick

has only just begun to think of new ideas to expand the summer camp program. He would also like to see how Reston Association could create a few after-school programs to give Reston children a fun and creative place to go after school. To learn more about upcoming RA events and programs, visit www.reston.org.


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ON THE STREET | STORIES | CURRENT EVENTS | HIGHLIGHTS

The Reston Home Tour A BY BONNIE HAUKNESS  PHOTOGRAPHY BY BOB HAUKNESS

s Reston enters a new phase — one that promises to bring new and exciting ideas of urbanization to our community — the creative juices are flowing with possibilities. The owners of the homes on this year’s tour have ‘contracted the bug’ and altered their personal spaces to reflect the exciting changes happening around them. On our 14th annual home tour, you will have the opportunity to see the vision, and be inspired, by six of Reston's most creative homeowners. Besides these exciting private properties, there's an additional stop at Reston's newest apartment building — The Harrison — where you can savor a taste of fall surrounded by the luxury and striking spaces of this amazing apartment community. Tickets to this one-day, selfguided event sell out quickly. To avoid disappointment, make your plans now. All proceeds benefit the Reston Historic Trust and the Reston Museum. Always on the lookout for a special home to share with clients and tour attendees, Bonnie Haukness has been selling homes in Reston for forty years, and chairing the Reston Home Tour since 2007.

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Spaces Reimagined

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Saturday, October 17 10 AM – 5 PM TICKETS: $30 AVAILABLE AT: ƒƒ Reston Museum at Lake Anne Plaza ƒƒ The Wine Cabinet at North Point ƒƒ Appalachian Spring in Reston Town Center ƒƒ Greater Reston Arts Center in Reston Town Center Visit www.restonmuseum.org or call 703-709-7700 for more info.


LAKE NEWPORT ROAD – AYLESTOCK

After 33 years in an 1889 farmhouse in Great Falls, no move would be an easy task. The search encompassed Washington, D.C. to Waterford, VA. Then “we fell in love” with this setting, the open, relaxed floor plan and the natural light. Karen Aylestock, owner and founder of KPA Design Group, wanted a home that she could brand with her ideas — to naturalize and ground the house by adding more organic materials — the flagstone sunroom, the ledge stone in the great room, all overlooking the pool, overlooking the lake. Don’t miss it.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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THE HARRISON

This is apartment living at its best. The mixture of stone, steel and style in The Harrison truly elevates the concept of the modern apartment community. And, if you’re seeking lifestyle-centric amenities, they are all here — onsite pet spa, an outdoor and an indoor pool with a spa tub, a modern fitness center with a massage room, media lounge and gaming spaces, and a walk score of 79 out of 100. The commercial demo kitchen will offer a taste of the season for tour participants.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


MOORINGS DRIVE

The ink on the deed hadn’t dried when the new owners began deconstructing this condominium — from the popcorn ceilings to the floors and everything in between — to make it their own. An exposed brick wall, the price and the location were all reasons to buy, though now those “glorious concrete slabs” in the ceiling rank up there, too. The décor, a fabulous mix of DIY, Salvation Army, Ikea, Beastie Boys wallpaper and Lucketts Antiques with a little vintage 1960s from the family thrown in, is guaranteed to wow.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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LAKE NEWPORT ROAD – BEYER

PHOTO BY BARRY HARLEY

Purchasing “beautiful bones” is something you can only do when you have a vision of what the possibilities are. Interior designers have an easier time with that than most of us. Cindy Beyer, who specializes in kitchen design, saw the potential, and today’s home is quite different from the one they purchased. Many of the changes came about to take advantage of the water views over Lake Newport — enlarging windows, opening up rooms and altering land and hardscaping to frame those views.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


LINKS DRIVE

Thirty years and two renovations later, the owners of this home still call it “ongoing.” What began with a sledgehammer removal of a wall between living areas has evolved over the years to include a deck, a fireplace and a twice-renovated kitchen. Special pieces from a lifetime of travel and collecting share space with family heirlooms — Jesse’s parents’ first piece of furniture sits beside art from Havana, Cuba’s Castro revolutionary days. Painters’ drop cloths turned drapes mingle with Limoges plates and hand-painted Italian tiles. Everything has a story to tell.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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TURTLE POND

There’s a private movie theatre in Reston. It’s by invitation only, to a film chosen by the projectionist, prefaced by a talk and followed by a trivia game on the film, and, though it accommodates 30 people, it’s always a sellout! Often there’s a wait-list. Overlooking Lake Thoreau, this architecturally interesting home is filled with fun. Catch Marilyn Monroe as she enjoys a shower in her themed bathroom adjoining the theatre, complete with a blue glass basin-vanity and lots of Marilyn images.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


GOVERNOUR’S SQUARE

We’ve been assured by Reston’s Synergy Design and Construction, as well as by the owners, that things in this Governour’s Square townhouse will be back together by tour day and we’re counting on it. Walls removed, rooms reconfigured, baths and closets enlarged — all the things you can change — are part of the plan. Having lived in this home for 14 years, the owners wanted to stay in their “private, quiet, wooded setting” within a short walk of Reston’s Town Center, so altering their 1968 townhouse was the solution.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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ON THE STREET | STORIES | CURRENT EVENTS | HIGHLIGHTS

Reston’s Kid’s Triathlon Celebrates its Fifth Year W

BY JESSICA BIGGER  PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK MAJOROS, JORDAN MAJOROS AND SEAN BAHRAMI

hen you watch the video of the first kids' triathlon five years ago, the words that come to mind are “intensely emotional.” You see kids from all walks of life participate in a race that begins with swimming, moves to biking, and ends with running to the finish line. You can hear the crowd of parents and supporters cheering the kids on. Each child is elated every step of the way. Every single participant has a huge smile and their enthusiasm is contagious. They are having a fantastic time, and the feeling of accomplishment when they cross the finish line is amazing. Reston Association (RA) always hosted two adult triathlons per year, one where 15-year-olds could participate, but they never imagined putting on a kid’s triathlon until they started seeing children of the race participants get involved as they cheered their parents on with remarkable excitement. RA observed a growing movement where the kids were just as enthusiastic about the race as their parents. So it made sense to create a separate triathlon just for kids. With such enthusiasm growing, RA collaborated with the YMCA, Laurel Learning Center, and Amy’s Amigos to create the first kid’s triathlon five years ago. The race sold

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out in minutes and has continued to sell out every year since. One of the amazing things about this race is that it has inspired so many children from different economic backgrounds to participate every year. RA not only celebrated its 5th anniversary putting on this amazing race, but also recognized the children who have participated for all five years. When Laura Kowlaski, then RA’s Aquatics Manager, made the kid’s triathlon a reality and teamed up with the YMCA, Laurel Learning Center, and Amy’s Amigos, each organization had very different goals for how the proceeds should be used. Fifty scholarships from the race proceeds were created for a variety of different programs. Plus, several community members and businesses donated bikes and gear to give to less fortunate race participants. The Reston Association and the YMCA’s mission were more aligned with each other. RA wanted to use the proceeds to create scholarships for its summer camps, classes, and other programs it provided. The YMCA also wanted to provide scholarships for several of their programs. Laurel Learning Center would use the proceeds to create training clinics for less fortunate children. Amy’s Amigos, a group of three friends who created a nonprofit in order to honor their

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

friend Amy who died of a brain tumor, wanted to use the funds to provide after-school programs. The kid’s triathlon, which took place on August 2nd, was split into three age groups: 6-8, 9-11 and 12-14. Each group raced at different distances. The youngest group raced the shortest distance. The age groups stop at 14 because 15-yearolds can participate in the half triathlon along with adults. The day before the triathlon, all the participants picked up their T-shirts, swim caps, and race numbers. Most of the kids were very excited. Some were a little bit nervous ,and the volunteers focused on getting those kids excited and looking forward to the race the following morning by joking with them and making them feel more comfortable. “The goal is to have them smiling before they walk away, so that they are excited for the race day,” said Laura Kowalski, who is now RA Deputy Director for Recreation. During the clinics the day before, the staff and volunteers made a few jokes to get the kids laughing and looking forward to the next day. “All the kids are sitting in the front and all the parents are standing in the back…kids are the focus, so we joke with them and say, ‘Okay, make sure your parents get their coffee and make sure your parents set their alarm clock early, because you have

to be here early, and we don’t want them to make you late,’” explained Kowalski. The RA staff also talked about nutrition in a funny way, said Kowalski, using “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs” as an example, which the kids could relate to. They were asked, “If you lived in the land of Chew and Swallow, what would be a healthy breakfast before the race?” The morning of the race, the kids arrived at 8 a.m. at Ridge Heights pool, set their bikes on the rack, and said goodbye to their parents. There were an incredible number of volunteers to help support all the race participants. Parents, however, were not allowed to volunteer. They were encouraged to be on the sidelines to cheer their children on. There was some waiting initially, but the volunteers helped keep the kids occupied and focused on the race, and reminded them it’s about finishing the race, not about winning. That was the most important thing for the kids to remember. Prior to the race, the parents positioned themselves on the sidelines, ready to cheer their children on and encouraged them to finish. Right before the race began, all kids waited at the pool deck ready to start. The youngest group, 6- to 8year-olds, began the race swimming


ONE OF THE AMAZING THINGS ABOUT THIS RACE IS THAT IT HAS INSPIRED SO MANY CHILDREN, FROM DIFFERENT ECONOMIC BACKGROUNDS, THAT SEVERAL HAVE PARTICIPATED EVERY YEAR.

their laps, then the 9 to 11 year olds followed, and finally the 12 to 14 year olds jumped into the pool to begin the first leg of the race. Once each group was finished swimming, they ran in their wet swimsuits, threw off their caps and goggles, and ran to put on their shirts and shorts over their wet swim suits as quick as lightening. Then they ran to their bikes, quickly hopped on and took off. After the children completed the second leg of the race, they threw their bikes down and ran with all their might until reaching the finish line; hundreds of parents, volunteers, and spectators cheered them on till the end. Each child was a winner and received a medal for their amazing efforts. Not only did Reston Association, YMCA, Laurel Learning Center, and Amy’s Amigos benefit from the proceeds of the triathlon, but they continued to be amazed by the incredible participation and excitement of young racers, as well as the support the kids receive from the community year after year.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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ON THE STREET | STORIES | CURRENT EVENTS | HIGHLIGHTS

Rally for a Cause T BY RACHEL MCCARTHY  PHOTOGRAPHY BY SEAN BAHRAMI he 4th Annual Rally for a Cause tennis tournament dates are set for September 19-20, 2015, at Reston’s Lake Newport tennis courts. The charity event will feature brackets for 3.0, 3.5, 4.0 and 4.5 players, competing in men's and women's doubles and singles matches. The $30 entry fee guarantees each player two matches with awards, raffle prizes and participation T-shirts. It is the generosity of our four-time presenting sponsor, Dr. Hani Thariani, and donations from local businesses that make this tournament possible. Entry is open to all tennis players, regardless of USTA membership. All proceeds will go to the charity organization of each participant’s choice: USTA Foundation's Warrior Tennis Curriculum; developing curriculum for rehabilitation through tennis for wounded, ill

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LAST YEAR’S EVENT HOSTED 70 PLAYERS AND RAISED $3,750 FOR OUR CHARITY ORGANIZATIONS.

and injured military service members and veterans; or Cornerstones/ Laurel Learning Center, providing comprehensive family services and developmental childcare programs. Last year’s event hosted 70 players and raised $3,750 for our charity organizations. Registration opens August 1st. For more information, email rally4acause@restontennis.org or visit www.restontennis.org. Rachel McCarthy, member of Reston's Tennis Working Group.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


RA

NEWS

Performing at CENTERSTAGE The Reston Community Center 2310 Colts Neck Road, Reston, VA

The Easiest Way to Stay Informed Reston Association’s weekly newsletter, RA News, is free and informative. Whether you’re interested in keeping up with important local news that impacts all of Reston, or just want to know about what upcoming events and programs are being offered, reading RA News is a quick way to stay informed. Go to www.reston.org and scroll to the bottom of the page and type in your email address under “Join Our Mailing List,” then click the “Join” button. The newsletter will be emailed to you every Friday morning.

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WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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AROUND RESTON | HOT SPOTS | LOCAL INTEREST | TRENDING

Deloitte Brings Native Plants to Autumnwood E BY FREYA DE COLA  PHOTOGRAPHY BY SEAN BAHRAMI

arly Friday morning, June 5th, a small army of 65 volunteers, employees of Deloitte LLP, began showing up at Autumnwood pool to take part in the company's annual IMPACT Day. Singly and in small groups, they signed in at the pool's check-in desk, received their blue IMPACT Day T-shirts and helped themselves to RA's coffee, fruit and pastries. The RA environmental staff had arrived earlier, and an impressive array of pick-up trucks, dump trucks, bobcats, chippers, a dumpster and rows of potted plants could be seen in the pool's parking lot. The two groups came together to work on a project to turn the Autumnwood pool area into a National Wildlife Federation certified wildlife habitat, to mark Reston's 15-year anniversary as a Certified Wildlife Habitat Community. This was not the first time Reston's recreational and natural areas benefited from the IMPACT Day volunteers' hard work. Non-profit organizations that have projects they would like done have to apply, and RA has been fortunate to have been chosen several times. Outside the pool entrance were sandwich boards featuring photos of past IMPACT Day projects in Reston — at Brown's Chapel in 2008, Old Trail in 2009 and Cabots Point in 2012. An article in the Fall 2013 issue of this magazine featured that year's double project at Lake Newport soccer field and Cocquina Cluster. According to Deloitte project coordinator Jason Hovell, this is the 15th year of IMPACT Day volunteer

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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AROUND RESTON | HOT SPOTS | LOCAL INTEREST | TRENDING

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


AT THE ENTRANCE, WHERE THE INVASIVE SHRUBS HAD BEEN, NEW TREE SPROUTS RECEIVED PROTECTIVE TUBES TO KEEP THE DEER FROM NIBBLING. service, which includes over 950 projects around the country. "The main purpose of the day is to give back to the community," he said. But the day also builds camaraderie among Deloitte employees, who work in local offices in D.C., Rosslyn and Tysons. "It's not all people who know each other." It can be a welcome change of pace for employees whose typical work for the financial services and consulting firm has them staring at a computer screen for long hours. Once the volunteers arrived, they lined up for a group photo and received a welcome from RA CEO Cate Fulkerson and volunteer coordinator Ha Brock. Ha circulated with a box of poison ivy wipes and reasons why the volunteers should use them. Environmental resources staff, the project site coordinators, laid out the day's plan. Five worksites were identified around

the pool grounds where assigned groups would remove harmful invasive plants and replace them with native plants with high wildlife value. Each site was set up with a collection of tools and two RA site supervisors to instruct in their proper use and the best methods for removing the unwanted plants and siting the native replacements. The groups got to work, pulling out giant reeds and invasive grass. At the parking lot entrance, Senior Environmental Resource Manager Claudia Thompson-Deahl marked woody shrubs like Autumn Olive and Bush Honeysuckle with white spray so volunteers would know what to remove. As they worked, what had been a high-humidity atmosphere turned into a steady drizzle, but they continued undeterred. At noon, the volunteers took a well-deserved break, and helped themselves to box lunches. People who didn't know each other were now chatting and joking. One woman, a home gardener, said she was enjoying a day away from her desk. She found the project educational — "I hadn't given much thought to invasive plants," she said. She was surprised to learn that the invasive grass her group has been removing outside the pool fence is the same species that her landscaper planted in her yard. When lunch was over, the

volunteers returned to their sites and put in the new native plants. Poolside, giant reeds were replaced by irises. The plots overtaken by grass turned into a pollinator garden. At the entrance, where the invasive shrubs had been, new tree sprouts received protective tubes to keep the deer from nibbling. Volunteers unloaded wheelbarrows full of mulch at the various sites to protect the new plantings. By the end of the project, what would have taken RA staff alone a month of work had been completed in one day by their teamwork with the IMPACT Day participants. The pool area was beautified and made a healthier environment for people and wildlife. And there is now a new

sign announcing that this is a certified wildlife habitat. RA members and the local birds, butterflies and other creatures have the Deloitte volunteers to thank for that. Freya De Cola served for 10 years on RA's Environmental Advisory Committee and continues to do environmental volunteer work in Reston.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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AROUND RESTON | HOT SPOTS | LOCAL INTEREST | TRENDING

Transforming Reston to Backto-the-Future BY ANDY SIGLE  PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID MADISON

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


T

he team at Washington West kicks off its 5th annual international film festival, based in Reston’s Town Center, on October 21st. Back to the Future fans will recognize this as the exact date Marty and Doc first land in the future. So along with the regular plethora of world-class documentaries, feature films and shorts from independents and studios that Washington West annually brings to the area (last year, 28 different screenings, including films from 13 countries), this year’s festival will also include, among other highlights, a red-carpet screening of Back to the Future with writer Bob Gales confirmed for attendance. The team has even gone as far as petitioning the Fairfax County Board to change Reston’s name to “Hill Valley” for the week of the festival. For those new to Washington West, the organization’s core belief is that “story can change the world.” A key mission of the Washington West Film Festival is to celebrate the transformative power of film by not only showcasing the finest emerging and indie filmmakers from around the globe, but also by uniquely engaging its audiences in the process of story creation. Last year, seven of the fourteen full-length films were documentaries, three of which were intended specifically to launch social change; four of the twenty-four short films were documentaries created by students and emerging filmmakers. Over the years, Festival selections

AFTER EVERY YEAR’S FESTIVAL, 100% OF REGULARSCREENING NET BOX OFFICE PROCEEDS ARE DONATED TO A CHARITABLE PROJECT INTENDED TO RELIEVE HUNGER, DISEASE, DISPLACEMENT, AND/ OR EDUCATIONAL CHALLENGES. have documented the oppression of women, the cholera epidemic in Haiti, bullying among youth and adults, and other important social issues. A main goal of the organization is to capture and inspire audiences who can, in turn, contribute to lasting, tangible changes in the world and ultimately, create stories of their own. Washington West organizes the screenings and then uses ticket sales revenue to provide funding to high-impact charitable projects. After every year’s Festival, 100% of regular-screening net box office proceeds are donated to a charitable project intended to relieve hunger, disease, displacement, and/or educational challenges. The project is then served by volunteers from Washington West, including staff, Board leadership, and even inspired audience members. By filming

the charitable service project and presenting the short video before every screening at the following year’s Festival, Washington West is endeavoring to help grow a culture of philanthropy among its audiences and to inspire more giving every year. Last year’s Festival video can be seen at: https://vimeo. com/106460642. In the past several years, box office proceeds from the Washington West Film Festival have provided funds for the reconstruction of a school in Haiti, emergency assistance for families suffering from the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy in New Jersey, and operating support for two Shelter House homeless facilities here in Fairfax County. This year, Washington West is partnering with the Robert Duvall Children’s Fund on a project for Virginia’s underserved children and youth. The Festival audience base has grown 33% annually, primarily due to the attraction of this long-term charitable vision, coupled with the high quality of the film screenings and related events. Finally, by providing a true film festival structure and format, Washington West consistently brings many independent and emerging filmmakers and artists to our area for programming and Q&A sessions after film screenings. In recent years, Washington West has also brought some of Hollywood’s biggest names to Reston. Guests have included Julia Louise Dreyfus (Seinfield, Veep), Brad Hall (Saturday Night

More information on Washington West and this year’s Festival — including a full list of films/screenings and tickets — can be viewed at http://www.filmfest.com/. Live, Curb Your Enthusiasm), W.G. “Snuffy” Walden (The West Wing, Friday Night Lights), Tom Shadyac (Bruce Almighty, Patch Adams), and 7-time Emmy winning actor Ed Asner. Further, Washington West has introduced Reston to critically acclaimed new films – such as Buzkashi Boys, which received a 2013 Oscar nomination after its 2012 screening at Washington West, and a 2013 spotlight interview with Ashley Dyke, actress from 2014 Best Picture Academy Award winner and Golden Globe Best Picture winner, 12 Years A Slave. Hope to see you at the movies. Andy Sigle is a former board member and vice-president of Reston Association. He currently serves as vice-chair of the Southgate Community Center Advisory Board and is also on the Washington West Board of Directors.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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AROUND RESTON | HOT SPOTS | LOCAL INTEREST | TRENDING

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


The History of the Access Road to Dulles M BY SHELLEY S. MASTRAN  PHOTOGRAPHY BY JIM KIRBY

ost newcomers to Reston are unaware that originally the highway to Dulles Airport led only to the airport. Dulles, 26 miles west of Washington, opened in 1962 and at the time was surrounded by dairy farms and forest land. Driving west toward the airport one could not exit anywhere along the 13.5-mile stretch between the Capital Beltway and Dulles; however, one could exit at a few locations on the return trip east. Thus, in the early days, Reston was much less accessible than it is today — reached primarily via Route 7 and Baron Cameron Avenue. From the beginning, Robert E. Simon, Jr. tried to persuade the Federal Aviation Administration to open the road to local traffic, to no avail. In 1968, Virginia Senator Harry Byrd weighed in, noting that the light volume of air traffic at Dulles didn’t justify the auto restrictions. “The highway could easily accommodate three times as many vehicles as now use it,” he declared. Some motorists used the Dulles Access Road by driving to the airport, circling by it, and backtracking toward the Beltway; and by 1972, the FAA had given permission for the Reston commuter bus to use the Access Road. Eventually, the Virginia Department of Transportation determined that a limited access highway was indeed needed to serve adjacent areas without interfering with airport traffic. Shortly after Mobil took over

AS NAN NETHERTON WROTE, WITH THE TOLL LANES, “THERE WAS EASY ACCESS ALONG AN ATTRACTIVE CORRIDOR WITH NO USED CAR LOTS, NO STRIP RETAIL OUTLETS, AND NO CLUTTER. THE DREAM THAT BOB SIMON HAD IN 1961 WAS ACTUALLY COMING TRUE.”

Reston’s development in 1979 and began an aggressive campaign to attract business to Reston, the General Assembly approved a revenue bond to build the toll road, officially named for Virginia senators Omer L. Hirst and Adelard L. Brault who sponsored the bill. The parallel toll lanes (originally two in each direction) were completed in 1984. An ad in the September 24, 1984 Washington Post proclaimed, “Reston is moving 20 minutes closer to Washington.” By the end of 1984, Mobil had sold nearly 350 acres of industrial land near the Dulles lanes, and the hightech corridor began its boom. As Nan Netherton wrote, with the toll lanes, “there was easy access along

an attractive corridor with no used car lots, no strip retail outlets, and no clutter. The dream that Bob Simon had in 1961 was actually coming true.” A third lane in each direction was added to the toll road in 1992 to serve high-occupancy-vehicle (HOV) traffic. Opposed to the concept of HOV, drivers of single-passenger vehicles often avoided the tolls by backtracking to the airport and using the Access Road; some used the HOV lane, without paying, in protest. Under pressure, Congress passed legislation prohibiting the HOV restrictions. To resolve the situation, Virginia lifted HOV on the third lane and constructed a fourth lane in each direction to serve HOV traffic. In 2005, five companies submitted proposals to VDOT to privatize the toll road. In response, in 2006 the Metropolitan Washington

Airports Authority assumed operation of the toll road from VDOT, took on associated debts, and committed to building a rapid transit line in the median. Thus, since 1961, the Dulles Access corridor has evolved from a four-lane restricted highway through dairy farms to a 12-lane expressway with HOV lanes, Metrorail, and a booming high-tech industry. Mirabile dictu! Shelley S. Mastran is Chair of the Board of the Reston Historic Trust.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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AROUND RESTON | HOT SPOTS | LOCAL INTEREST | TRENDING

Irresistible Art

Patrick Dougherty’s Sculptural Installation in Reston Town Square Park Engages Public’s Minds and Hearts BY JANET REMS  PHOTOGRAPHY BY SEAN BAHRAMI

B

y now innumerable children have run and otherwise romped exuberantly through the winding interior of the sculptural installation created last April, along with a team of volunteers, by internationally renowned North Carolina artist Patrick Dougherty at Reston Town Center’s Reston Town Square Park. The towering installation, intricately woven primarily from local saplings, seems to be a powerful visual magnet for adults, too, who are equally drawn to photographing its unique, cylindrical exterior as well as exploring its forms and materials from inside its passageways. Titled “A Bird in the Hand,” the installation, immediately across St. Francis Street from the Greater Reston Arts Center (GRACE) and the office of the initiative for Public Art-Reston (IPAR), is expected to continue engaging the public for the next two years, the anticipated longevity of its all-natural materials. This direct interaction is exactly what Dougherty — a working artist for 30 years whose monumental, site-specific installations are so much in demand that he does only 10 a year — wanted. Intentionally incorporating windows at child height and other “avenues of viewing” and positioning the installation near the sidewalk, Dougherty said he creates works that are “inviting and encourage interaction,” that make “people feel welcomed in … say to them maybe I can go in there.” Public engagement was built into the installation project from its earliest stages. Working side by side with shifting teams of community volunteers — some who helped harvest the installation’s indigenous materials and others who

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participated in the actual construction — Dougherty said, “I can single-handedly make a work with an assistant, but it is a richer experience to have volunteers. The interplay between the public and myself and the volunteers, that is the thrill of making it.” Comparing Reston to other cosmopolitan places like San Francisco, Boston and Santa Barbara, Dougherty — who also is creating an interior piece for the November reopening of the Smithsonian’s Renwick Gallery — added he was drawn to Reston in part because it is a place “where people can appreciate what you do … have artistic sensibilities, think about art and big cultural ideas.” The installation’s ability to engage does not surprise its presenting partners, GRACE and IPAR, which received major monetary support for the project from Willowsford, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Arts Council of Fairfax County, Reston Community Center, Reston Town Center Association, MEDA, Inc., and in-kind support from Reston Association, Hyatt Regency Reston, Red Thinking, and Storycatcher Productions. “We are already reaping the anticipated benefits,” said Holly McCullough, GRACE executive director, recalling, “When we approached [Dougherty], we talked about Reston’s history as a community invested in nature and the arts.” She added, “With its magical space and secretive, mysterious quality, it activates both the imagination and memory. … It contributes something unique and original to the Reston environment. … And since it’s up for two years, it should provide lots of opportunities for long-range engagement … a point of departure

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

for inspiration and dialogue.” Anne Delaney, IPAR’s exLEARN MORE ecutive director, also relishes the To learn more about unique personal bond that is dePatrick Dougherty and the veloping between the public and sculptural installations that this unique work of art. “We have he has created throughout seen it already happen,” she said. the world, visit his website “Patrick Dougherty's public artwork www.stickwork.net. To will remain long after the piece has learn more about “A Bird decayed. It will leave an indelible in the Hand,” Dougherty’s image in people's minds and hearts.” sculptural installation in Reston, visit the websites of Janet Rems is secretary of the its sponsoring partners — Greater Reston Arts Center’s www.restonarts.org for the Board of Directors and is chairGreater Reston Arts Center man of the Initiative for Public and www.publicartreston. Art-Reston’s Communications Committee. org for the Initiative for The former editor of The Reston Times, she Public Art-Reston. regularly freelances for The Fairfax County Times.


“WITH ITS MAGICAL SPACE AND SECRETIVE, MYSTERIOUS QUALITY, IT ACTIVATES BOTH THE IMAGINATION AND MEMORY. … IT CONTRIBUTES SOMETHING UNIQUE AND ORIGINAL TO THE RESTON ENVIRONMENT.” – Holly Koons McCullough, executive director, Greater Reston Arts Center WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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AROUND RESTON | HOT SPOTS | LOCAL INTEREST | TRENDING

The Non-Profit in Your Backyard BY JESSICA ROBINSON  PHOTOGRAPHY BY AMANDA LOWE

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


T

here are so many charities and nonprofits working to make the world a better place. But did you know that there is one nonprofit working to make your backyard a better place?

Who We Are

Friends of Reston is committed to improving Reston’s landscape — both natural and structural. Established in 1999, Friends of Reston is a not-for-profit 501(c) (3) organization with a mission to support Reston Association in performing charitable, educational and scientific projects. Friends of Reston is proud to have led the capital campaign to build Nature House, the year-round environmental education building that was officially opened and given to Reston Association in the fall of 2009. We successfully raised over $1.5M for the design and construction of the building, which is a model of sustainable design and green construction. Nature House received LEED Gold Certification by the U.S. Green Building Council and is used by community groups and individuals. We encourage you to visit Nature House at Reston Association’s 72acre Walker Nature Center, located at 11450 Glade Drive. While Nature House is what we are best known for, Friends of Reston continues its work by raising funds for a variety of community projects, including scholarships, tree planting, facility enhancements, and much more. Some of our past and current projects include: ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

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RA Camps Scholarship Program (Over $78,000 for 175 kids) RA Tennis Scholarship Program 50 Trees for Reston’s 50th Anniversary Adopt-A-Bench Program for recreation areas and pathways (Over $23,000 for 48 benches) Adopt-A-Recycling Bin Program for recreation areas Adopt-A-Bike Rack

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Program (new for 2015) Traveling Nature Trunks loaned to Reston schools Habitat restoration and invasive exotic plant removal Stream monitoring in Snakeden Branch with South Lakes High School Demonstration Stormwater Management Trail at Brown’s Chapel Park Cedar Ridge Community Garden Memorial Swing Set at Purple Beech Recreation Area in honor of John Keith Re-energize Reston Challenge with Local Energy Alliance Program (LEAP) Bluebird nest boxes

Official Bird of Reston

With all of Reston’s 50th anniversary celebrations in 2014, Friends of Reston realized it was time to recognize one of our wild neighbors. As our community is known for its wonderful natural areas and wildlife, we launched the campaign to name an official bird of Reston. At the end of September 2014, a total of 2,748 votes revealed the winner, the Pileated Woodpecker. The official bird became a new Reston mascot, affectionately known as Walker the Woodpecker by his Nature Center comrades Earl the Squirrel and Myrtle the Turtle. He made his debut at the Holiday Parade at Reston Town Center last November.

Nurturing Nature House

In continued support of Nature House, Friends of Reston holds storytelling nights each March and September with the inimitable troupe of Better Said Than Done. Their stories for adults bring laughter and tears while also adding to our fundraising. We also host screenings of environmental films throughout the year. Last April we celebrated the 12th Annual Fund Run, a 5K event that attracts hundreds of runners and walkers of all ages. Over the years, these dollars have gone towards an interesting assortment of items for the Nature Center’s education program — from

microscopes and trail cameras to taxidermy mounts and GPS units.

org/AboutRestonAssociation/ FriendsofReston.

Looking Forward

Five Ways You Can Help

Friends of Reston’s goal is to raise at least $10,000 for RA Camps scholarships each year and explore new ways to support RA’s youth tennis program. In the realm of Community Sustainability Projects, we are looking to identify new opportunities to support garden plots throughout Reston, and we are working with RA Covenants staff to establish a program that assists financially challenged residents with required exterior home repairs. In the area of recreation improvements, Friends of Reston would like to determine the feasibility of establishing a new fitness trail on the south side of Reston.

Help Us Help the Community

As the non-profit in your backyard, Friends of Reston looks to Reston residents to guide us towards new, important community improvements. It is only through input, help, and financial support from the community that we can continue to serve Reston. Friends of Reston operates with an all-volunteer board of directors that works together to accomplish the organization’s successes. You can reach Friends of Reston by contacting our Executive Director, Katie Shaw, at kshaw@reston.org or 703-4356510. For the latest updates, follow Friends of Reston on Facebook or visit our web page on Reston.

1.

Make a donation. Checks are gratefully received at Friends of Reston, 11450 Glade Drive, Reston VA 20191. You can also donate online with a credit card or PayPal account. Visit our Facebook page or website and click the “Donate Now” button. 2. Adopt a bench, bike rack or recycling bin. Sponsoring a needed item for one of RA’s park facilities is a great way to memorialize a loved one, promote your organization or commemorate a special occasion. 3. Volunteer at Friends of Reston events. We need help at storytelling nights, tree plantings and our annual 5K event. 4. Donate in-kind materials or services to the Nature Center, camps or a charitable home improvement project. 5. Partner with us on your own community project. We want to hear from people who have great ideas for Reston’s backyard and are willing to donate time and/or money to help make it happen. We love Reston, and we know you do, too. Jessica Robinson, President, Friends of Reston.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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AROUND RESTON | HOT SPOTS | LOCAL INTEREST | TRENDING

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


WAKE & ROLL BY KELLEY WESTENHOFF

R

iding our bikes to school back in the 60s and 70s was a means to speed our trips as well as declare our independence. Most of us didn’t bother with locks, and few parents rode along. The bike to school scene is very different these days, and it’s the rare school that has a high turnout of bike riders. The schools in Reston (a Bronze Bicycle-Friendly Community) are on a mission to change that. Lake Anne Elementary School is a language-immersion school, so many families are out of district. Under ordinary circumstances, time and distance might preclude their child’s participation in the PTA’s monthly “Walk and Roll.” But Melissa Romano, the organizer of the event, as well as Lake Anne’s participation in the International Walk and Bike to School Days, ensures that all kids can participate by starting the ride at a tennis court near the school. Parents can drop off their child and bike, and everyone goes together. Distance from school isn’t necessarily a barrier to riding the entire way. Siblings Aurora and Embry Eddy live in Herndon but attend Hunters Woods Elementary where their mom is on staff. All three of them ride the four miles to school together as often as possible. Sixth grader Aurora says, “​The best thing about riding to school in the morning is that we get to see all sorts of animals when we ride through the

paths in the woods." Third grader Embry’s favorite part is “going down the steep, steep hills and over all the bumpy parts.” Parents cite two barriers to riding to school: time and safety. Both of those can be minimized with planning and dedication. Modern parents are busy though, so why would a parent bother? How about this — research shows that kids who walk or ride to school perform better in school for the first four hours of the day. Parents who can adjust their schedules to periodically ride with their children influence their children’s perception of safety, their spatial awareness of their neighborhood, and get to talk about all of the sights, sounds, and smells along the way. Middle and high school students have to be tremendously selfmotivated to bike, especially on the cold dark winter mornings. Class of 2015 South Lakes student John Westenhoff offered to purchase a school parking pass if his parents would let him drive rather than catch the bus. For a variety of reasons, they said no, so he rode his bike the two miles almost entirely via Reston Association paths every morning. He was able to leave home after 7 instead of standing at the bus stop by 6:30 a.m. His comment, “The real reason I ride my bike is that it’s independence, and in nice weather. It’s awesome.” He found that by staying on the RA paths, he could avoid the snarl of

“​THE BEST THING ABOUT RIDING TO SCHOOL IN THE MORNING IS THAT WE GET TO SEE ALL SORTS OF ANIMALS WHEN WE RIDE THROUGH THE PATHS IN THE WOODS."

– Aurora

traffic around the school morning and afternoon. The recent graduate plans to continue the practice when he starts university in the fall in Wyoming. If your child wants to ride a bike to school, RA’s Pedestrian & Bicycle Advisory Committee recommends, “Try using some time over the summer to practice confident riding, and pre-ride the route to school. All of the Reston schools participate in the Safe Routes program. Contact your PTA representative to find out your school’s details. And if you need help coaching a reluctant rider, or even want to learn to ride better yourself so you can ride with your child, contact us!” Kelley Westenhoff lives, bikes, plays, and gets involved in Reston. She is currently chair of the Pedestrian & Bicycling Advisory Committee.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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MEMBER SERVICES

POOL & TENNIS PASSES

MEMBER SERVICES

Two Easy Ways to Purchase Pool & Tennis Passes

1. Online — www.reston.org, 2. Walk-In — Come to Reston Association Member Services; our staff is happy to assist you. Please Note: A current pass is required for anyone (age 1 or older) visiting pools or tennis courts. Receipts will not be accepted onsite. Customers must be at least 18 years of age to purchase. For replacement passes, please visit Member Services.

MEMBERS

Welcome to the 2015 season. We are happy to serve you again this year. All members must be in good standing and provide proof of owning or renting a Reston Association property.

POOL & TENNIS PASS

PRICE

Adults, 18 years & older $25 Children under 18 $10 Family Pass Package* $70 *Includes two adult and two to four child passes Season Long Guest Pass* $40 *Allows admittance of one guest, regardless of age, with passholder. Address on guest pass must match host passholder. Tennis Key Tag* $3 *with purchase of pass ƒƒ

Members may purchase a pass for themselves, one additional adult household member, and all household members under the age of 18. Two additional passes may be purchased for family members 18-22 years of age in person or online with prior approval from Member Services.

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The summer may be winding down, but our pools are still open with the last two open until September 27. Tennis courts are open year-round , weather permitting.

HOURS OF OPERATION

Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m.- 5 p.m.

NON-MEMBERS CORPORATE PASSES GUESTS WELCOME

We are happy to welcome persons who live outside Reston or in a portion of Reston that is not part of Reston Association. We offer a variety of non-member passes to meet your needs. Prices are half off for the remainder of the season, except for the Season Long Guest Pass and the 10 & Under Tennis Pass.

If you work in Reston and are seeking a weekday-only pass, please consider these options. Prices are half off for the remainder of the season.

PASS OPTIONS

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PRICE

Family Pool & Tennis $630 Family ZIP code pass* $530 *Zip code within Reston but not part of Reston Association. Proper documentation and in-person purchase required. Family Pool Only $600 Family Tennis Only $360 Couple Pool & Tennis $545 Couple Pool Only $530 Couple Tennis Only $315 Individual Pool & Tennis $455 Individual Pool Only $370 Individual Tennis Only $255 10 and Under Tennis Pass* $35 *Only valid for North Shore courts for children's practice. North Shore has six 36foot courts designed specifically for children. Children must be accompanied by an adult who does not need a pass. No photographs necessary for this pass. Available online or in person. Season Long Guest Pass* $50 *Allows admittance of one guest, regardless of age, with passholder. Address on guest pass must match host passholder. ƒƒ ƒƒ

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12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Reston, VA 20191-3404 Email: member_services@reston.org Phone: 703-435-6530

All non-member passes require a photograph. If you are a returning passholder from last year, you can purchase online and use the existing picture; however, if purchasing for the first time, you must do so in person. We recommend children have their picture updated at least every two years.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

PASS OPTIONS

Pool & Tennis Pool Only Tennis Only

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PRICE

$260 $210 $225

Sold individually. Photograph and proof of employment in Reston required. In-person purchase only.

TRIAL 4-DAY PASSES

Four-day pass option for travelers or those interested in trying the membership before committing to the season.

PASS OPTIONS

PRICE

Individual $50 Family* $100 *Admits up to six family members ƒƒ

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Trial passes are good for four consecutive calendar days at all Reston Association pools and tennis courts. One pass per household each season. Purchase a non-member pass within 10 days after your trial and the trial amount will be applied to your balance.

As a pool passholder (member or non-member) you may bring guests when visiting the pool or tennis facilities. Options are available to purchase in advance or onsite. Guests must be accompanied by a passholder at all times.

PRE-PAID PUNCH PASS Tennis court guests Pool adult guests Pool child guests

PRICE $40 $40 $20

ON-SITE GUEST PASS Tennis One-day

PRICE $10

Pre-paid punch passes are valid for five guest entries and can be used for multiple guests at one time. This is a great option to eliminate carrying cash and is equivalent to a 20 percent discount compared to buying five visits individually.

Passholders may purchase a oneday guest pass from the roving court monitor at the tennis courts. Cash only.

Adult Pool One-day $10 (18 years and older) Child Pool One-day $5 (17 or younger) Passholder may purchase a one-day guest pass from the pool staff at any pool. Cash only. Handwritten receipts will be issued at time of purchase.

For more information on our facilities and programs, please refer to the Aquatics and Tennis sections. Refund Policy: All pool and tennis passes and shipping are nonrefundable.


UPDATE

YOUR ACCOUNT Get current information from Reston Association about our programs and events

Please take a moment to update your online profile so we can contact you about upcoming classes, registration dates, and notify you directly if there’s a change to a program for which you are registered. To edit your account, please follow these simple steps: 1. Go to www.reston.org. 2. Click on ‘login’ in the top right corner of the screen. 3. Enter your username and password. If you forgot either one, click the appropriate link to have it sent to you via email. 4. Once logged in, click on "My Account" in the upper righthand corner of the webpage, then, click on the "My profile" link in the right menu. 5. Within your profile, you can add household members, edit phone numbers, and edit email addresses. In order to edit a birthdate, please contact our Member Services department. Many of our programs and classes are only available to individuals within a certain age bracket, so this must be filled in correctly in order to register. If you have questions about your account or need any further assistance, please do not hesitate to contact Member Services via email at member_services@reston.org or by phone at 703-435-6530. We look forward to serving you.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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AQUATICS

CPR & First Scuba Aid Training Courses Ages 12+ Reston Association is excited to be an authorized provider of American Red Cross Health and Safety programs and will begin offering CPR, First Aid, and AED training this fall. All courses will be taught by certified instructors, and the fee includes all class materials. Six student minimum in each class. Registration now open online at www.reston.org or in person at our Member Services desk.

01

Adult, Child, and Infant CPR/AED and First Aid October 11, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive $75 $95

02

Adult, Child, and Infant CPR/AED and First Aid December 12, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive $75 $95

03

Knowledge and Skill Development Weekends Select one September 25-27 October 23-25 November 20-22 December 18-20

Fridays,6:30-9:30 p.m. Saturdays, 7 a.m.-2 p.m. Sundays, 2-7 p.m. $320 $360

01

Open Water Weekends

Can be scheduled upon request with instructor. Taught by a Professional Association of Dive Instructors (PADI) Master Scuba Diver Trainer (MSDT), these classes will lead to certification as a PADI Open Water Diver. The course consists of two phases; one in the classroom and pool and the last in open water. Medical history screening and prerequisite skill test (200-yard swim and 10-minute survival tread/float) are required for this course. NOTE: You must complete both the Knowledge and Skill Development Weekend and the Open Water Evaluation Weekend to receive certification; however, each weekend is priced separately so that you can choose to complete both here in Reston or take only the first phase here and then complete your certification, with a PADI Diver Trainer, while on vacation.

02

For additional information or to request a registration packet please contact Frank Wilson at frank@deep-blue-scuba.com or 571-437-5189.

03 PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

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RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS. FOR MORE INFO ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


Interested in Working for Reston Association Next Summer? Reston Association is proud to employ over 300 members of the Reston community every summer across our different Parks and Recreation programs and while many return year after year, we’re always interested in meeting new, qualified people. To work for Reston Association aquatics applicants must be 15 years old and have obtained the following American Red Cross certifications: ✓✓ Lifeguarding ✓✓ First Aid ✓✓ CPR/AED Classes in Lifeguard Training are held at various indoor facilities in the fall and winter months and classes held here at Reston Association will be advertised in the spring edition of Reston magazine. If you have questions about working for RA Aquatics or want help finding a certification course, please contact Brad at bwilson@reston.org WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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AQUATICS

DEAP – Drowning Education Awareness Program Reston Community Center and Reston Association present DEAP, a “land-based” Drowning Education Awareness Program. This program offers two opportunities targeted for different audiences and community civic groups to learn water safety skills.

Water Safety Presentation (Adults)

A free 90-minute presentation offered to rotary clubs, PTAs, home school networks, church groups, and other civic organizations; focuses on the importance of water safety

Longfellow’s WHALE Tales (Children 5 –12 years old)

A free one-hour interactive classroom water safety presentation offered to Cub Scouts, Webelos, Daisy, Brownie, and Junior Girl Scout troops, and daycare centers. MORE INFORMATION Book a group class or learn more about the DEAP program: Reston Community Center (RCC) 703-476-4500 option 2

Reston Association (RA) 703-435-6543

**FREE – DEAP programs are free for Reston residents and employees of Reston businesses.**

Surf Reston

Surf Reston will help you enjoy the fastest growing paddlesport with attention to safety, fitness and the environment. Sessions are guided by certified instructors with no more than five paddlers per instructor. Join us for weekly sessions held primarily on Thursday evenings and weekends at Lake Anne, every other Wednesdays at Lake Audubon, and monthly at Lake Newport and Lake Thoreau. Special requests for dates and times are available as well

Intro class $40

$45

Make your reservation at www.surfreston.com

Swim Teams Reston Swim Team Association (RSTA)

RSTA is an independent, developmental youth league for 6-18 year olds. Winter Swim registration is open now. Information and Registration: 703-326-0526 or www.rsta.org

Reston Masters Swim Team (RMST)

The RMST is an adult (18 and older) swim league for Reston-area residents operating under the Potomac Valley Local Masters Swimming Committee, which is part of United States Masters Swimming (USMS). Fall/winter team is forming now. Information and Registration: www.restonmasters.com

Kayak and Canoe

Canoe Kayak and Paddle Company offers a variety of classes and trips for all skill levels. Check out the introduction classes held in our own Lake Audubon or venture farther from home on a scenic trip in our nation’s capital. Contact Mike for details, 703-264-8911, or check them out online at www.kayakreston.com

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


Pool Facilities & Features Amenities: ADAcompliant amenities on site. Please see pool description for specific amenities.

Dogwood

703-476-5717 2460 Green Range Road

Lane depth: 3.5-5 feet Length: 25 meters Amenities: Beach-style entry

and water play feature, in-water benches, and plank-style diving board. Amenities: Fully compliant parking lot and bathhouse, in-water wheelchair, pool-side chair lift. Nearby: Exterior water feature with an exterior IPAR sculpture fountain, picnic pavilion, The Greens and Bordeaux Recreation area.

Glade

Lake Newport

North Shore

Lane depth: 3.5-12.5 feet Length: 25 meters Amenities: Two-story water

Lane depth: 3.5-5.5 feet Length: 50 meters Amenities: Two 1-meter diving

Lane depth: 3-11 feet Length: 25 meters Amenities: Heated spa,

703-476-5732 11550 Glade Drive

slide, in-water benches, 1-meter diving board, heated spa, and wading pool with beach-style entry and water play fountains. Nearby: Lighted clay tennis courts, basketball court, tot lot, Walker Nature Education Center and access to Turquoise Trail.

Lake Audubon

703-860-3080 2070 Twin Branches Road

Lane depth: 3-5 feet Length: 25 meters Amenities: Plank-style diving

board, grass picnic area, and wading pool. Nearby: Basketball courts, tot lot, boat launch ramp, and access to Turquoise Trail.

703-467-0694 11601 Lake Newport Road

boards, wading pool, covered picnic area with charcoal grills, and sand volleyball court. Nearby: Basketball courts, tot lot, soccer/ball fields, and access to Blue Trail.

Lake Thoreau

703-860-0640 2040 Upper Lakes Drive

Lane depth: 3-5 feet Amenities: Heated spa, plank-

style diving board, wading pool, and grass picnic area. Nearby: Scenic views of Lake Thoreau and access to Red Trail.

North Hills

703-435-6769 1325 North Village Road

Lane depth: 2-5 feet Length: 25 meters Amenities: Heated spa, wading

pool with fountain, covered picnic area, and large grass picnic area. Amenity: Pool-side chair lift Nearby: Lighted clay tennis courts and access to Pink Trail.

703-689-4091 11515 North Shore Drive

seasonally heated main pool, covered picnic area, grass picnic area, wading pool, and plankstyle diving board. Amenity: Pool-side chair lift Nearby: QuickStart children’s tennis courts, Lake Anne Plaza, and access to Green and Blue trails. NOTE: Parking only on North Shore Drive

Ridge Heights

703-476-7084 11400 Ridge Heights Road

Lane depth: 3-5 feet Length: 25 meters Amenities: Seasonally heated

main pool, wading pool, two grass picnic areas, and plankstyle diving board. Amenity: Pool-side chair lift Nearby: Langston Hughes Middle School, South Lakes High School, and access to Red Trail.

MISSING SOMETHING? Reston pools collect thousands of lost and found items each season and we would rather give them back to you than donate them. Please contact the aquatics office at aquaticsinfo@reston.org with a description of the item(s) you believe was lost at the pool and we will be in touch if it is found. All unclaimed items will be donated at the end of October.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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AQUATICS

2015 POOL SCHEDULE OPEN SWIM TIMES

POOL

Weekdays

Weekends

DROP-IN FITNESS HOURS (for pass holders age 16+)

CLOSED DAY

Season 4: August 17-September 7 Dogwood Pool

11 a.m.-7 p.m.

11 a.m.-7 p.m.

Thursday

Glade Pool & Spa

11 a.m.-7 p.m.

11 a.m.-7 p.m.

Monday

Lake Audubon Pool

Weekends Only

11 a.m.-7 p.m.

Lake Newport Pool

10 a.m.-8 p.m.

11 a.m.-8 p.m.

Friday

Lake Thoreau Pool & Spa

10 a.m.-7:30 p.m.

10 a.m.-8 p.m.

Wednesday

North Hills Pool & Spa

11 a.m.-7 p.m.

10 a.m.-7 p.m.

Tuesday

North Shore Heated Pool & Spa

11 a.m.-9 p.m.

11 a.m.-7 p.m.

Monday

Ridge Heights Heated Pool

11 a.m.-8 p.m.

11 a.m.-7 p.m.

Thursday

North Shore Heated Pool & Spa

3-7 p.m.

11 a.m.-7 p.m.

Ridge Heights Heated Pool

3-7 p.m.

11 a.m.-7 p.m.

6-8:30 a.m. Weekdays 7:30-10 p.m. M/T/R/F

7-9 a.m. Weekdays

Season 5: September 8-27

Inclement Weather

In the event of a storm (or if the weather is cool, raining or drizzling), all Reston Association pools will close, with two exceptions: Lake Thoreau and North Shore Pools (unless normally closed on that day).

7-9 p.m. Weekdays (Sept. 2-5)

Lightning

All Reston Association pools will close until one-half hour after the last sound of thunder or visible lightning.

Programs/Lessons

All programs, lessons, and private rentals will continue unless otherwise stated. Cancellations will be determined onsite at event time.

EXCEPTIONS TO POOL SCHEDULE Labor Day

Reston Triathlon

End of pool season

Sept. 7 All pools except North Shore and Ridge Heights close for the season.

Sept. 13 Race start at Lake Audubon Pool. For details see www. restontriathlon.org.

Sept. 27 All remaining pools close for the season.

Reston Association Aquatics staff would like to thank the following businesses for the goods, services, time and effort they are donating to our 2015 aquatic season. Dr. Stephan Tisseront

Jerry’s Subs and Pizza

Dominion Pawn and Jewelry

Atrium Environmental Health

www.tisserontorthodontics.com 703-773-1200

www.jerrysusa.com 703-707-0036

www.dominionpawn.com 703-365-7999

www.atriumehs.com 703-689-9482

The M Group www. mgrouparchitects.com 703-448-8786

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


Thank You to Everyone Who Visited a Reston Pool this Summer for Another Great Year!

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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CAMPS

Camp Registration Registration and related forms are available online at www.reston.org. If you prefer to register in person or bring in your forms, our address is: ATTN: Camps Reston Association 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Reston, VA 20191 Faxed registrations are not accepted. A 24-hour drop box is located in front of the building on the side facing Sunrise Valley Drive.

Payment & Refunds ƒƒ

ƒƒ

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A $75 non-refundable deposit per camper per session is required at registration. Deposits are credited toward the total cost of the program. Deposits may be transferred as a deposit to another RA Camps session within the same year. They may not be used toward a camp balance. Full payment for all sessions and services is required by November 16. Refunds, minus applicable deposits, may be recovered until December 1. See Camp Handbook, also available online, for complete refund policies and procedures. Returned checks will result in a fee.

Holiday Break Camp

Camper Forms ƒƒ

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ƒƒ

Certain forms are required for participation in RA Camps. Campers without all required forms will not be permitted to participate in camp. Forms are available on the RA website or by contacting the camp office at 703-435-6567. All forms for Holiday Break Camp are due December 4, 2015 and forms for Spring Break Camp are due March 7, 2016.

General Information ƒƒ ƒƒ

ƒƒ

Minimum age requirements must be met by December 31, 2015. Maximum age requirements must be met by the first day of each session. Maximum staff-to-camper ratio is one to twelve.

Ages 6-11 by December 31, 2015 December 21-23 & December 28-30 (six days) 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. (includes extended care), Brown’s Chapel, 1575 Brown’s Chapel Road. $200/session $225/session

It's the holiday season, there is no school, and the kids are home. What to do? We have the answer. You thought RA only offered camps during the summer? Well no more. New this winter, enjoy the peace of mind that comes with knowing where your child is and that he or she is having a memorable day making new friends, learning a new craft, or playing fun sports and games. Registration for this inaugural holiday break camp will begin starting October 5, 2015. Spaces are limited, so be sure to register early.

Campers will… ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

Participate in games, music, drama, and crafts. Explore and learn about nature through hands-on activities and experiences. Expand their creativity and sense of wonder. Have a daily snack provided by RA; however, lunch is not provided. Build social skills through small group interactions. If weather permits…play outside.

Waiting List ƒƒ ƒƒ

If the camp you are looking to register for is full, add them to the waitless. To register for the waitlist, you can contact Member Services, or if you have an account online, go to RA Marketplace, click on the camp your are interested in and click on the child's name to then be added to the waitlist.

Spring Break Camp

Spring, of course, brings spring break and those springy young bodies looking for exploration and fun after being cooped up for four months or more. How about a camp that lets your kids have a ball while diving into an enriching activity that they might not encounter during the average school day? New this spring we are offering such a program for your kids to get outside and explore Reston, while thinking summer is just around the corner. Not sure Ages 6-12 by June 1, 2016 if your child will like summer March 21-25 and 28 (six days), camp? Try this version of camp 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. (includes extended and see if RA Summer camps care), Glade Room,11550 Glade Drive might be in your future. $200/session $225/session PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

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RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS. FOR MORE INFO ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


Get Ready in 2016 for the Best Summer Ever Summer Camp just ended and you are thinking about school and the year ahead. However, we want to remind parents and campers about the 2016 RA Summer Camp Season. Check the spring issue of RA’s magazine for complete details and steps to register.

Registration Begins: ƒƒ ƒƒ

Reston members registration begins Monday, January 25, 2016 Non-member registration begins Monday, February 1, 2016

CAMP OFFERINGS Nature Tots (ages 3-5)

Camp on Wheels (ages 6-13)

Junior Lifeguard (ages 13-15)

Walkers Rangers (ages 6-8)

Day Camp (ages 7-11)

Pop Golf (ages 5-12)

Junior Day Camp (ages 5-7)

Science Camp (ages 8-12)

*Engineering w/ Legos (ages 6-9)

Sportsters (ages 6-9)

Teen Camp (ages 11-14)

*Lego Robotics (9-12)

Triathlon Camp (ages 7-12)

Counselor in Training (14-16)

* Wilderness Camp (ages 8-12)

*New in 2016 Check out the camps section of the website for further details in December.

RA CAMPS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

Help make a child’s summer come to life by sending them to Reston Association Camps program.You don’t have to know a child to be their hero. Open your heart and help a little girl or boy experience a world of adventure and a lifetime of memories.

2015 Camp Donors Friends of Reston Long & Foster- Reston Offices Reston Garden Club Reston Kids Triathlon

Children living in an economically-disadvantaged situation may never have the chance to know the wonders and joy of summer camp without your help. The need is great.You can help send a kid to camp, today.Will you please help us reach more hard working families this summer, our fellow neighbors, who are in need? If you would like to make a donation to the scholarship fund or learn more details to help, please contact Camp Program Manager at dmerenick@reston.org or call 703-435-6567.

Tax-deductible donations are gratefully received by RA Camps’ 501(c)(3) supporting organization, Friends of Reston.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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NATURE

Reston Reston is a community founded on the preservation and

appreciation of natural areas. To this day, a strong environmental stewardship ethic is nurtured in the community. Over 1,300 acres of open space are maintained by Reston Association, including more than 800 acres of woodlands, four lakes, three ponds, four wetlands, 50 meadows, and 20 miles of streams. Environmental education programs are provided by the Walker Nature Center, and ample opportunities exist for volunteers to help care for our local environment. Explore, protect and enjoy the nature of Reston.

Walker Nature Center Located at 11450 Glade Drive, the Nature Center provides a variety of educational and recreational programs and amenities.

The mission of the Center is to foster an environmental stewardship ethic in the community. The Center enhances people’s awareness, knowledge, appreciation, and enjoyment of the environment. The 72-acre wooded site features: ƒƒ One mile of loop trails ƒƒ An education building known as Nature House ƒƒ A picnic pavilion ƒƒ Picnic tables and trailside benches ƒƒ A campfire ring ƒƒ Outdoor displays and interpretive signs ƒƒ Demonstration gardens and meadows ƒƒ A pond ƒƒ The Glade Stream Valley ƒƒ Snakeden Branch stream’s entrance to 44-acre Lake Audubon

Environmental Volunteers

NATURE HOUSE Free parking, restroom and trail access dawn to dusk, 365 days a year.

Habitat Heroes Help protect the trees and other native plants in our natural areas. See page 94. Storm Drain Marking Help mark storm drains that flow to local streams and the Chesapeake Bay. See page 96. Fall Stream Clean Up Saturday, October 17, 10 a.m. – Noon. See page 96. Halloween Volunteers Help at the Nature Center’s special event night. See page 97.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Visit Nature House to: ƒƒ Enjoy exhibits and displays. ƒƒ See some native animals up close. ƒƒ Talk with a naturalist. ƒƒ Use the nature resource library. ƒƒ Do a simple activity or read a nature story with a child. ƒƒ Learn about the green features of this LEED Gold building.

HOURS

MONDAY, WEDNESDAY – FRIDAY

9 a.m.-5 p.m.

TUESDAY Closed SATURDAY

10 a.m.-1 p.m.

SUNDAY 1-4 p.m. Check holiday schedule for additional closings.


RENT SPACE AT THE WALKER NATURE CENTER WALKER NATURE CENTER 11450 GLADE DRIVE

Looking for the perfect spot for a community meeting, family gathering or business retreat? Affordable and attractive rentals are available at the Nature Center.

Nature House Multipurpose Room

664 square feet of space, capacity 94 people, seats 44 people with tables and chairs. Parking and restroom access. RA Member or Reston not-for-profit fee $35/hr. Non-member or Non-Reston not-for-profit fee $55/hr. For profit/corporate fee $80/hr.

Nature Center Pavilion

576-square-foot pavilion with picnic tables and bench seating in a beautiful woodland setting. Parking and restroom access. RA Member or Reston not-for-profit fee $25/hr. Non-member or Non-Reston not-for-profit fee $35/hr. For profit/corporate fee $55/hr.

Campfire Ring

Campfire pit with bench seating, small pavilion and picnic tables. Roadside parking. No restroom. Renters must supply their own wood and water to extinguish the fire. RA Member or Reston not-for-profit fee $15/hr. Non-member or Non-Reston not-for-profit fee $20/hr. For profit/corporate fee $25/hr. PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS. FOR MORE INFO ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

For details and reservations, call 703-476-9689 and press 3 or email naturecenter@reston.org.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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NATURE

All Ages All ages welcome. Children

under 12 must be accompanied by an adult.

01

Campfire Fun

Friday, August 28, 7-8:30 p.m. WNC Campfire Ring – on Soapstone Drive, between Glade Drive and Lawyers Road. Reserve by August 25. $7/person $9/person

Summer is winding down. What better way to end the season than around a crackling campfire. Sing songs, tell jokes, play games and roast marshmallows during this evening of old fashioned fun.

Sunset Stroll

Friday, September 4, 6:30-7:30 p.m.Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive. Reserve by September 1. $5/person $7/person

Start the Labor Day weekend with a relaxing stroll through nature. Ramble through a stream valley in search of animals getting ready to turn in for the night and try to catch a glimpse of nocturnal creatures waking up. Enjoy the color change over Lake Audubon as the sun sets and watch for bats circling above the water.

02

Babes in the Woods

18 - 35 months. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

03

Busy Squirrels

Monday, September 14 or Tuesday, September 15, 10-11 a.m.Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive. Reserve by September 10. $7/child $9/child

Acorns are falling from the trees and squirrels are hiding them away for a winter’s day. Listen to a story about a busy squirrel and make a squirrel craft. Munch like a squirrel on a crunchy snack, and then look for acorns along the trails.

01

Tiny Acorns, Mighty Oaks

Monday, October 5 or Tuesday, October 6, 10-11 a.m.Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive. Reserve by October 1. $7/child $9/child

Acorns may be small, but they grow into towering oaks. Go on a hike in search of acorns and oaks big and small. Find out which animals eat acorns and live in trees. Make an acorn craft to take home.

02

Fall Leaf Lab

Sunday, October 4, 2-3 p.m. Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive. Reserve by October 1. $7/person $9/person

Trees are showing their true colors as their green fades into beautiful reds, yellows and oranges. Identify trees by their leaves and bark and play tree bingo. Conduct simple experiments like separating leaf color pigments. Sample tree treats and make a caramel apple to take home.

Nature programs may be cancelled in the event of severe weather, severe weather warnings, or low enrollment. Advance reservations are required for all fee-based programs. Call 703-476-9689 and press 5 or email naturecenter@reston.org. PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

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RA MEMBERS AND

03 00

NON-MEMBERS. FOR MORE INFO ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


Halloween House & Trick-or-Treat Trail You’re invited to the best family friendly Halloween event this side of Transylvania — RAIN OR SHINE. Walker Nature Center,11450 Glade Drive, Reston VA 20191 Gate opens 15 minutes prior to the event start time. Please park along Glade Drive or at Glade Pool, and bring a flashlight. Meet a creative cast of characters, including live animals, along our stroller friendly, nature themed Trick-or-Treat Trail and inside our Nature House turned Halloween House for this very special evening. Enjoy jack-o-lanterns, carnival style games, sound and light effects, and creatures of the night. This is NOT a horror show or a haunted house. Children must be accompanied by an adult at all times. Ticket price includes a Trick-or-Treat bag. Additional concessions (ex. popcorn, cotton candy, apple cider) will be on sale. Participants are encouraged to wear non-scary costumes, and enjoy the activities at their own selfguided pace. For more info, call 703-476-9689, and press 5 or email naturecenter@reston.org. To volunteer, see page 97.

Choose from one of four event times:

FRIDAY, OCT. 23, 6-7:15 PM OR 7:30-8:45 PM SATURDAY, OCT. 24, 6-7:15 PM OR 7:30-8:45 PM $10/PERSON

(Adults and children who are 18 months or older must have a ticket.)

ADVANCE TICKETS ONLY

Tickets go on sale Thursday, October 1 at 9 a.m. A $1.54/ticket service charge will be applied to all sales. All event times sell out on the first day. We highly recommend that you purchase your tickets online on Oct. 1. Buy your tickets online at www.eventbrite.com at the following links: http://halloweenhousefri1.eventbrite.com http://halloweenhousefri2.eventbrite.com http://halloweenhousesat1.eventbrite.com http://halloweenhousesat2.eventbrite.com

PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS. FOR MORE INFO ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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NATURE

Preschool Fall Nature Happenings Discovery 3-5 years. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Series 3-5 years 01

Splendid Spiders

Wednesday, September 9 10-11 a.m. or 1:30-2:30 p.m. Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive. Reserve by September 4. $7/child $9/child

Some spiders are drab shades of brown or black, while others have beautiful colors. Learn how their color helps spiders survive. Make a colorful spider craft, and take a short hike in search of spiders.

02

Snakes Big and Small

Tuesday, October 13, 10-11 a.m. or 1:30-2:30 p.m.Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive. Reserve by October 9. $7/child $9/child

Take one last look for snakes before the fall weather gets too cold. Discover how big and how small snakes can be in Reston. Make a scaly craft and meet a snake up close.

03

Your chance to register for the Nature Center’s seasonal pre-K programs as a package. Young children have a natural curiosity about the world around them. Introduce your child to the joys of nature at these engaging programs. Each program in the four-part series will include fun and educational activities such as short exploratory hikes, simple nature crafts and entertaining stories based around a different seasonal theme or featured animal. Parents/caregivers must supervise their children and assist them with the activities. The fee will be collected at the first program in the series. Co-sponsored by Reston Community Center.

01

Thursdays, September 10, October 15, November 12, December 17, 1:30-2:30 p.m. Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive. Reserve by September 7. $28/child, RA or RCC Members $36/child

Nature programs may be cancelled in the event of severe weather, severe weather warnings, or low enrollment. Advance reservations are required for all fee-based programs. Call 703-476-9689 and press 5 or email naturecenter@reston.org.

02

Join the Walker Nature Center’s electronic mailing list.

Receive the quarterly newsletter, Branching Out, as well as announcements of upcoming special events. To subscribe, email naturecenter@reston.org. You can also email nature questions to this address. Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/walkernaturecenter

PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

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RA MEMBERS AND

03 NON-MEMBERS. FOR MORE INFO ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


Planning a Birthday Party? Bring the kids and the cake to a fun-filled, creative party at the Nature Center. Thematic parties include a two-hour facility rental, 45 minutes of staff-led activities, and party favors. Choose from the following themes:

Nature Detectives Ages 3-7

Learn to be a good nature detective by using your eyes, ears, nose and hands. Play sensory guessing games, find what doesn’t belong on our “unnature” trail, and follow clues to solve a mystery animal’s trail. Favors include a magnifying hand lens, a mininotebook and a Nature Center pencil. The birthday child receives an Earl the Squirrel stuffed toy.

Dinosaurs Ages 3-9

Share what you know about these amazing animals. Uncover bones and shells like a paleontologist, and make your own fossil imprints in clay. Go on a dinosaur egg hunt that will lead you to a nest full of eggs. Favors include a dinosaur egg, a dinosaur sticker and a fossil imprint. The birthday child receives a dinosaur coloring book (ages 3-5) or sticker book (ages 6-9). PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

Nature Crafts Ages 3-12

Learn new skills and nature facts as you make a variety of crafts to take home.Younger crafters will make bug boxes, rock insects, and wildlife masks or puppets. Older crafters will try their hands at leather crafts, bird feeders and beads.

How to Book

Campfire Fun Ages 7-12

Parties are held at the campfire ring off of Soapstone Drive. Program includes nature jokes, stories, songs, and games around the campfire. S’mores provided. Favors include a glow stick and red hot candies. The birthday child gets a Nature Center flashlight.

RA MEMBERS AND

• • •

Parties may be booked up to three months in advance. Weekend dates are limited and fill quickly. Consider a weekday afternoon or evening party. Maximum 15 children per party.

$175/RA member $200/Non-members Call 703-476-9689 and press 3 or email naturecenter@reston.org.

NON-MEMBERS. FOR MORE INFO ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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NATURE

School Programs

The Walker Nature Center offers free elementary programs for Reston schools, as well as programs for preschools and non-Reston schools at affordable rates.

Elementary Field Trips ƒƒ ƒƒ

Preschool Field Trips and Classroom Visits

Fall,Winter, Spring 1 ½ to 2 hours

Topics include: Earth Cycles, Sensory Awareness, Habitats, Trees, Geology, Watersheds

Elementary Classroom Visits ƒƒ ƒƒ

Winter only 50 minutes

ƒƒ ƒƒ

Fall,Winter, Spring 45 minutes

Topics include: Fall Frolic, Crack-aNut, Winter in the Woods, Animals in Winter, Spring Splendor Fee: $45/program (Reston schools), $75/program (Non-Reston schools)

Topics include: Season of Change, Wild About Weather, Winter Survival, Wonderful Watersheds, Animal Adaptations

Contact enviroed@reston.org or call 703-435-6509 for more information and reservations.

Attention Scout Leaders The Walker Nature Center can help your organization earn patches and badges. Make a Date with a Naturalist to... Educational Program

Lead a fun and educational program in an achievement area such as: Fun, Feathers and Ferns, Into the Wild, Into the Woods, Wildlife, Eco-action, Earth Connections, Earth is Our Home, Earth and Sky, Water Everywhere, Senses, Animals and more. $5/scout (min. charge $50)

$7/scout (min. charge $70)

Campfire Program

Lead a Campfire Fun or Campfire Cookery program. $6/scout (min. charge $60)

$8/scout (min. charge $80)

The Campfire Ring can also be rented for self-use.You bring the wood and the water. Rental Fee:

$15/hr.

$20/hr.

Community Service Project

Lead a Community Service Project with your group. FREE.

Activity kits are also available on loan for Birds, Trees and Watershed requirements. Call 703-476-9689 and press 3 or email naturecenter@reston.org for details and reservations. Fees subject to change.

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Adult Programs 16 years to adult

01 Worm Composting

Sunday, September 13, 2-3:30 p.m.Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive. Reserve by September 10. $30/bin $35/bin

Ever thought about composting but just don't have the space? Worm composting is a natural method of recycling food waste. It’s so simple and odor free that it can be done anywhere. See an established bin and make one to take home. Learn how to turn your kitchen scraps into rich organic soil and compost tea. Co-sponsored by Reston Community Center.

Fall Container Planting

Wednesday, September 16, 2-3 p.m.Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive. $12/ person $16/person

Learn what plants can be used in a fall container garden. For seniors 55 years and older. See page 76 for details.

Green Homes & Gardens

Tuesday, September 22, 1:30-3:30 p.m.Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive. Reserve by September 19. $5/person $7/person

Presented in cooperation with the RA 55+ Committee. See page 77 for details.

Nature programs may be cancelled in the event of severe weather, severe weather warnings, or low enrollment. Advance reservations are required for all fee-based programs. Call 703-476-9689 and press 5 or email naturecenter@ reston.org. PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

02

Backyard Composting

Thursday, October 1, 7-8 p.m. Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive. Reserve by September 28. $5/person $7/person

Dealing with all of the fallen leaves in the yard can be tough. Learn how to recycle them the natural way. Plants will love the rich organic soil that your composting efforts provide. Also learn how kitchen waste and other yard debris can be composted right in your own backyard. Co-sponsored by Sustainable Reston.

Nature Walk: Reston National Golf Course

01

Saturday, October 3, 1-3 p.m. Meet at South Lakes Park, 11100 South Lakes Drive. Reserve by September 30.

Join a naturalist from the Walker Nature Center to learn about the natural resources and experiences that this valuable open space provides. Look for a variety of birds, and visit old field and pond habitats. Cosponsored by Reston Historic Trust.

03

Home Energy Efficiency

Thursday, November 5, 7-8 p.m.Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive. Reserve by November 2. $5/person $7/person

02

Cold weather is on its way. Do you want to improve your home’s energy use to make it more efficient, comfortable and cost effective? Learn how from a representative of LEAP (Local Energy Alliance Program). LEAP is a non-profit leader that coordinates energy efficiency improvements of homes through a Home Performance with ENERGY STAR program. Co-sponsored by Reston Community Center.

03 RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS. FOR MORE INFO ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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NATURE

Bird16 years Walks to adult

Free. No reservations required.

Beginning and expert birders are invited to help find birds in some of Reston’s most beautiful natural areas. Co-sponsored by Audubon Society of Northern Virginia and The Bird Feeder store.

September Bird Walk: Buttermilk Creek Trail

Sunday, September 13, 7:3010:30 a.m. Buttermilk Creek Nature Trail, 11032 Ring Road, park at Uplands Pool Leader: Bill Brown

October Bird Walk: Sunrise Valley Wetland Park and Polo Fields Sunday, October 11, 7:3010:30 a.m. Sunrise Valley Wetlands, 12700 Sunrise Valley Drive. Park on the left (west) side of the office building. Leader: Matt Bender

November Bird Walk: Brown's Chapel Park & Lake Newport Sunday, November 8, 7:3010:30 a.m. Brown's Chapel, 1575 Brown’s Chapel Road Leader: Jean Tatalias

Storytelling Night Where there’s smoke, there’s fire. Adults Only

Saturday, September 19, 8 p.m., Walker Nature Center

Come out for a fun evening of personal storytelling as told by Virginia’s premiere storytelling troupe Better Said Than Done. The show is intended for an adult audience. Refreshments (beer, wine, coffee, sodas and snacks) available for purchase. Fee: $15 On sale at http://eventbrite.com or at the door. Advance tickets are recommended due to limited seating. All proceeds benefit Friends of Reston for Community Projects.

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8 Prohibited Plants in Reston Invasive plants are non-native to our region. They spread quickly and outcompete our native vegetation. Often, invasive plants get their start in yards and gardens where they can become a serious problem for the property owner and adversely affect neighboring private property, as well as RA natural areas. The proliferation of these plants decreases plant diversity and harms the wildlife that depend on native plants for food and shelter. Many invasives overtake native shrubs and trees that are a signature of the Reston community. Efforts to control these species on RA property are ongoing and costly. We are grateful for the many volunteers who have worked diligently to remove invasive plants and educate our members about their harmful effects. By resolution of Reston Association's Board of Directors, the Use and Maintenance Standards for all properties that fall under the Reston deed were amended in May of 2008

Free

Brush Chipping

to include a ban on these eight invasive plants. If you would like to learn more about invasive plants, visit “Plants” on the “Natural Resources” page in the “Nature” section of our website, www.reston.org. If you would like to volunteer to help control invasive plants in Reston, contact Ha Brock via email at habrock@reston.org. Please direct questions to our environmental resource staff at 703-437-7658. Thank you for your cooperation in not planting any of these species in Reston.

Banned Invasive Plants

 Flowering Pears (Pyrus calleryana cultivars)  Burning Bush (Euonymus alata)  Japanese Barberry (Berberis thunbergii)  Bush Honeysuckles (Lonicera spp.)  Bamboos (Bambusa spp.)  Wisteria (Wisteria spp.)  English Ivy (Hedera helix)  Bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus)

THE NATURE OF RESTON Photos by: Charles A. Veatch Text By: Claudia Thompson-Deahl An art photography, nature and informational book and guide to Reston’s habitats all in one beautiful hard-bound volume. ON SALE for $20 at Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive All proceeds from the book sales go to the Walker Nature Center.

Dispose of Brush

RA’s brush chipping program offers you a place to bring your brush for chipping at no cost. RA Guidelines state that no brush may be dumped on RA property. Just drop off your brush at the locations listed below and RA crews will chip it for use on RA open space. PLEASE: Brush only (Branches should be less than 4 inches in diameter.) No leaves, grass clippings, dirt, trash, paper, vines, thorns or other debris. Brush may be dropped off at any time during the days listed. No contractors.

Chipping Dates & Sites September 19-20 Lake Audubon Pool 2070 Twin Branches Road October 17-18 Central Services Facility 12250 Sunset Hills Road

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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NATURE

Who’s Dumping On RA Property?

Do you have a Green Thumb?

What to do with all those leaves?

It is that time of year when leaf litter is abundant. Reston’s woods, streams and meadows need your help. If you have not yet determined a plan for your yard debris, our staff is happy to speak with you about proper disposal methods. Please contact the Environmental Resources Team at 703-437-7658 or at csfstaff@reston.org.

What about all of these branches?

Check out the Brush Chipping collection sites on page 69.

Inspections and Encroachments

Reston Association will begin conducting inspections of the natural areas and other RA land in November. Reston Association’s environmental staff will be walking the property lines and the common space in search of hazardous trees, invasive plants and encroachment on the common natural area by residents. Encroachment can include the dumping of yard debris such as leaves,

branches, grass clippings, potted plants, Christmas trees, or pruning remains. We are also looking for trash or erosion. Every year, RA conducts these inspections to ensure the health of the ecosystem and wildlife habitats. Reston residents, in partnership with RA, are responsible for protecting an irreplaceable community asset. Keeping Reston open space healthy and useful for everyone is easier if we all do our part. Dumping damages these natural areas and violates both Fairfax County laws and the Code of Virginia. We appreciate your help and your cooperation in following the RA Rules for proper disposal of your yard debris. Please help RA staff by reducing the dumping and encroachment violations.

A Unique Way to Recognize Someone or Something Make a lasting community enhancement. Donations are appreciated in any amount and are tax-deductible. Sponsoring a needed item for one of our park facilities is a great way to memorialize a loved one, promote your organization or commemorate a special occasion. Full donation amounts include an engraved plaque if desired. Locations are based upon community need as well as your preference. After a location has been agreed upon with RA staff, donations are gratefully received by its 501(c)(3) supporting organization, Friends of Reston, 11450 Glade Drive, Reston VA 20191. Please make checks payable to Friends of Reston, and write the item you are donating towards in the memo section of your check. Contact CSFstaff@reston.org or call 703-437-7658.

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Adopt-A-Bench

Help to increase seating along Reston’s pathways and at recreational areas such as tennis courts. Pathway benches are recycled plastic with heavy duty steel supports and in-ground installation. Tennis benches are lighter weight and surface mounted.

Reston Association’s garden plots are available for members to rent on an annual basis. Reserve early. The plots rent quickly. Plant flowers and vegetables at one of our four convenient locations. Contact Csfstaff@reston.org or 703-437-7658.

Pathway/ Recreation Area Bench: $850

Tennis Bench: $235

Adopt-A-Recycling Bin

Help Reston increase recycling in the community. Bins are especially needed at picnic pavilions and tennis courts. The bins are made from recycled plastic lumber and fastened to a sturdy, recycled, cast-aluminum frame.

Recycling Bin: $1000

Adopt-A-Bike Rack

Help promote bicycling as an alternative form of transportation by providing a convenient way for patrons to secure their bikes at our recreational facilities. The racks have a heavy duty frame and a 4-loop design.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Bike Rack: $750


Reston Association

Conference Center

12001 Sunrise Valley Drive | Reston | Virginia | 20191 | www.reston.org

HOLD YOUR NEXT MEETING CLOSE TO HOME Ideal for ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

Corporate events Community meetings Workshops Training Programs

Tech Info ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

Accommodates ƒƒ ƒƒ

Small groups of 35 or less Large groups up to 150

Features ƒƒ ƒƒ

Flexible floor spaces Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-10 p.m. Saturdays, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

70” LCD TV with Laptop projection capability Wireless connectivity in Extras (additional fee) each room ƒƒ Pantry with microwave, coffee Ceiling-mounted projectors maker and refrigerator and projection screens ƒƒ Audio visual equipment Wireless microphone capability in tabletop, handheld, or clip-on/lavalierestyle

Rates: $30-$90/hr. Contact: Member Services to make your reservations at reservations@reston.org or 703-435-6530.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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SPECIAL EVENTS Reston Association has something for everyone including trips to local places of interest, monthly movies for seniors and a community yard sale, just to name a few. Join us at one of Reston Association’s many facilities and see what’s in it for you. Visit the Parks, Recreation & Events section at www.reston.org.

Children’s Events

Ages 3-5 years. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

01

Halloween Fun

Wednesday, October 21, 11 a.m.- Noon Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive. $7 $9

Dress up in your favorite costume and join the fun with hands-on activities, crafts and go trick-or-treating around the Association office. Registration required.

02 Pilgrims & Indians Thanksgiving Party

Thursday, November 12, 10-11 a.m. Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive $7 $9

Gobble, Gobble! Join us for a morning of fun with the Reston Association. We will have a variety of activities and Thanksgiving crafts. Great event for a mom’s group, play dates and stay-at-home parents. Registration required.

All Ages All ages are welcome. Children

under 12 must be accompanied by an adult.

03

01

Ice Cream Socials

Hot enough for you? Come out to the pool and enjoy some refreshing ice cream as you lounge poolside. Make sundaes for the kids and for yourself. Supplies are limited. FREE. These events are cancelled in the event of rain or threatening rain. Contact Ashleigh@reston. org or call 703-435-6577 for more information or weatherrelated cancellations. Wednesday, September 9, 4 p.m. - until ice cream is gone Ridge Heights Pool, 11400 Ridge Heights Road Monday, September 21, 4 p.m. - until ice cream is gone North Shore Pool, 11515 North Shore Drive

02

03 TO REGISTER FOR EVENTS, CONTACT ASHLEIGH@RESTON.ORG OR CALL 703-435-6577. PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

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NON-MEMBERS


Bike Tour d' Art Saturday, September 26, 9-11 a.m. FREE

Join some of our Reston Association Board of Directors, as well as members of the Pedestrian and Bicycle Advisory Committee (PBAC) for the second annual Tour d' Art. The guided tour will begin and end at the Lake Newport Tennis Court parking lot the morning of the Multicultural Festival. Cyclists will ride along Reston's beautiful paths and roads where they will stop to enjoy Reston's featured art works that include colorful murals and commissioned sculptures. Cyclists are encouraged to bring water and nutritional snacks. All riders must have the ability to keep up with a group averaging 12 mph, over a 2-hour period, including multiple hills. Helmets are required for riders under 15 and all participants must sign a waiver. Waivers will be available at the event or can be found at www.reston.org. Registration is required, as space is limited in order to ensure a safe and manageable tour. Contact pbac@reston.org to register or for more information.

Walk to School Day Wednesday, October 7

In celebration of Reston's status as a Bronze Level Bicycle-Friendly Community by the League of American Bicyclists, the Reston Pedestrian and Bicycling Advisory Committee is challenging all eight of Reston's elementary schools as well as Langston Hughes Middle School to participate in International Walk to School Day on October 7. This will be the third year for this coordinated effort. Once again, there will be a friendly competition between the elementary schools to see who can get the most students walking to school as well as the highest percentage of school population. If you would like to get involved, contact cyclinginreston@gmail.com or contact the PTA representative at your local school.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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SPECIAL EVENTS

Reston Presents… All ages are welcome. Children

under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. Reston Presents is a bi-monthly lecture and presentation series that highlights the multifaceted talents of local residents. Topics include anything from cooking demonstrations to stories from war veterans and book signings with local authors. Reston Presents…is sponsored by the Reston Association and the Reston Community Center.

Reston Presents… Reston Association Covenants Process

Monday, September 14, 7-9 p.m. Reston Community Center at Lake Anne, 1609 Washington Plaza, FREE

This month Reston Association staff will discuss the importance of the covenants and design review process to aging in place. Topics will include using the design review process to making necessary modifications to your home, tips for children of 55+ adults on how to help maintain their parents' homes. This program is for educational purposes only; there will be no solicitation or obligations of attendees. Registration required.

01

Reston Presents… ”Alive Inside” Monday, November 9, 7-9 p.m. Reston Community Center at Lake Anne, 1609 Washington Plaza, FREE

their youth. There will be time for discussion following the film. This program is for educational purposes only. There will be no solicitation or obligations of attendees. Registration required.

Adult Events 02 Community Yard Sale

Saturday, September 12 (rain date, 9/13), 8:30 a.m.-Noon Reston Association parking lot, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive. VENDOR SPACE IS SOLD OUT

01

Ninety-five families will be selling a variety of items, so this event is a great opportunity to browse for bargains for a new home or a college dorm. Contact Ashleigh@reston.org or 703-435-6577 for information on weather related cancellations.

03

Wine & Design

Ages: 21 years and older Friday, September 18, 7-9:30 p.m. Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive. $45 $56

Looking to uncork unknown talent? Bring a friend, unleash your creative side, and join us for an evening of painting. Paint, canvas, brushes and a glass of wine will be provided while our experienced instructor guides you step by step through the process. At the end of the night, take home your masterpiece. Don’t worry, no experience is necessary. Registration required.

This month GraceFul Care will sponsor a showing of Alive Inside, a 78-minute film which received a 2014 Sundance Film Festival award. The film is a cinematic exploration of music’s capacity to reawaken our souls. It chronicles the astonishing experiences of individuals around the country who have been revitalized by the simple act of listening to the music of

02

03

TO REGISTER FOR EVENTS, CONTACT ASHLEIGH@RESTON.ORG OR CALL 703-435-6577. PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

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RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS


Reston Multicultural Festival Saturday, September 26, 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Lake Anne Village Center, 1609 Washington Plaza Rain or Shine

This annual event brings together the people of Reston to celebrate our rich medley of cultures. The festival will include a Naturalization Ceremony where America’s newest citizens will take the Oath of Allegiance. This has become a tradition at the Multicultural Festival and is a moving and fitting beginning to a day that celebrates our diversity. National Heritage Award Fellows will be presented at the festival. The Fellows are “living national treasures” who make a splendid addition to the event. The festival is hosted by the Lake Anne Plaza and co-sponsored by Reston Association, with partners from a variety of Reston based organizations and businesses. The Naturalization Ceremony is done in partnership with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). This signature Reston event honors the diversity that is one of our greatest assets. Everyone is encouraged to dress in attire from their own cultural roots and share the stories that we gather on the pathways of our lives. Check out www.restoncommunitycenter or call 703-476-4500 for more information.

Thursday, October 8 6:30-9 p.m. Reston Association 2001 Sunrise Valley Drive ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

Come learn more about Reston Association (RA) and the many services, amenities and programs it provides for you. Learn about the history of Reston and what’s on the horizon Meet with your RA Covenants Advisor and learn about the services they provide property owners Talk with RA Parks and Recreation staff about programs, events and facilities Learn how to navigate RA’s new website (www.reston.org) so you can access important association and community resources Explore how you can get involved in Reston, serve on the RA Board or one of our many committees and give back to the community

Light refreshments will be available and door prizes will be awarded. Please RSVP to member_services@reston.org or call 703-435-6530.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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SPECIAL EVENTS

Events 55+ 55 years and older Senior Movie Day

Wednesdays: Aug. 26, Featuring, ‘American Sniper’ Sept. 23, 'I'll See You in My Dreams' Oct. 28, 'Age of Adaline' *Nov. 18, TBD (*one week early due to the holiday) Doors open at 9:15 a.m. Showtime is at 10 a.m. Reston Town Center Bow-Tie Cinemas

The Reston Association, in cooperation with Reston Town Center Bow-Tie Cinemas, presents, "Meet Me at the Movies." Join us on the fourth Wednesday of each month. Refreshments are provided and door prizes are distributed prior to the movie. Movie titles are posted at www.reston.org.

01

Multimodal Bike Ride

Wednesday, September 9, 10 a.m. FREE

Join us for a social bike ride led by a League of American Bicyclists Certified Instructor. Meet at the Plaza at the WiehleReston Station at 9:45 a.m. with your bike, helmet, filled water bottle, bike lock and Smart Trip card. At 10 a.m., we'll board the Silver Line to the city and take a lovely ride along the waterfront near the Navy Yard. Bring money for metro and lunch. We will head back in time to use the metro system before rush hour. Registration required as space is limited. Cancelled in the event of rain.

02

Container Planting

Wednesday, September 16, 2-3 p.m.Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive. $12 $16

Are your summer annual plants fading but you still want decorative planters that last into the colder months? Learn what plants can be used in a fall container garden. Also, discover other creative items to use such as gourds or branches. Listen to a presentation, then plant a small container garden to take home. Registration required. Must cancel within 72 hours to receive a refund.

01

03

Senior Social: Western Theme

Thursday, September 24, 1:30-3 p.m. Reston Community Center at Hunters Woods, 2310 Colts Neck Road. $5 $10

Yee-haw! Saddle up and ‘git’ on over for a rip-roarin’ roundup — the Senior Social. Plan your calendar, socialize and enjoy light refreshments while learning about upcoming 55+ trips, classes, and events. Optional: wear your western duds (attire) to enter the contest for Best Gent and Best Lady costume prizes. This event is co-sponsored by Reston Community Center and Reston Association. Registration required. Must cancel within 72 hours to receive a refund.

02

Letterboxing Adventure

Sunday, September 27, 1-2:30 p.m.Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive. $6 person $8 person

Grandparents — bring your grandchildren out for a fun and exciting letterboxing quest. Use clues to find hidden caches and discover what happens to some of our animals as the weather changes. Our adventure will take us all over the Nature Center. Registration required. Must cancel within 72 hours to receive a refund.

03

TO REGISTER FOR EVENTS, CONTACT ASHLEIGH@RESTON.ORG OR CALL 703-435-6577. PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

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RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS


Green Homes & Gardens BY LEE ALBRITTON

This is an event that you won’t want to miss. It’s all about being “Green.” What does that mean? On the government website (www.usa.gov) we find that “going green means practicing an environmentally friendly and ecologically responsible lifestyle, as well as making decisions to help protect the environment and sustain natural resources…” “Basically, green living refers to a way of life that contributes towards maintaining the natural ecological balance in the environment and preserving the planet and its natural systems and resources.” (www. all-recycling-facts.com/benefitsof-going-green.html) There are many things you can do to live a green life. At this event you will learn how you can help in the following areas: ƒƒ reduce pollution ƒƒ conserve natural resources ƒƒ recycle non-biodegradable products ƒƒ contribute to conservation of forests and wildlife ƒƒ cultivate more plants and trees on vacant lands ƒƒ help maintain the ecological balance on the earth. Many of us want to be environmentally friendly but don’t know where to start. We invite you to join us and listen to the experts tell us how to do just that. We have expert speakers and their topics are diverse and timely. For many of us, being green consists of recycling cans and bottles, using reusable grocery bags, or adding solar panels

EXPERT SPEAKERS

Ages: 55+ Tuesday, September 22 1:30-3:30 p.m. Walker Nature Center, 11450 North Shore Drive $5/RA Members $7/Non-members Contact Ashleigh@ reston.org or 703-4356577 to register.

to our homes. Those are good starts but there is so much more we can do. We can learn how to increase our home’s value with energy efficient improvements. When remodeling, we can look for recycled and renewable materials. We can garden with more organic practices. All of these things help to reduce our impact on the environment. By introducing green practices into our homes and gardens, we can help reduce waste, conserve natural resources, improve both air and water quality and preserve precious resources for future generations. Register to join us at the Walker Nature Center. Bring any questions and listen to what these experts have to say and learn all you can about how to have your own Green Home and Garden.

Shayne Sandner, BPI, BA, Project Manager. Shayne is a Certified BPI (Building Performance Institute) Envelope Specialist and Building Analyst, as well as an EPA Certified Renovator. He will talk about how homeowners can start (or continue) their own “energy journey.” A typical energy journey starts with education as homeowners become mindful of how they live and their use of home energy. Next comes home energy conservation, followed by energy efficiency, followed finally by the introduction of renewable energy sources. As a bonus, his talk will also address how to best prepare your home for winter. Mina Fies, Certified Green Professional and Founder and CEO of Synergy Design & Construction here in Reston. Knowing many homeowners avoid making changes to their homes out of fear of the remodeling process, Mina and her husband founded Synergy Design & Construction in Reston, VA. Mina believes understanding and embracing the spaces around us is the key to living healthier, happier, and more environmentally friendly lives. Remodeling can often be a wasteful endeavor when it’s not done right. Learn key steps to take during your renovation and create a space that supports your family, the environment, and your wallet. ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

B est materials choices to make and which ones to avoid Efficient jobsite practices Design strategies that will save you money

Claudia Thomspon-Deahl, Reston Association’s Senior Environmental Resource Manager. Claudia has worked at RA for over 30 years. She promotes planting native plants for wildlife, is an Arborist, and a charter member of the Virginia Native Plant Society. She will be talking about plants to create a wildlife-friendly garden so you can do your part to restore a natural habitat. If you provide the basics for a wildlife friendly garden, they will come. Plant a shrub that flowers for pollinators, dense shrubs for cover and set aside the chemicals for a better life for you and wildlife. Sustainable landscaping includes creating habitat by attracting butterflies, hummingbirds and other beneficial wildlife. Natural landscaping encompasses a variety of practices developed in response to environmental issues.

Lee is an interior designer and remodeling expert who lives, works, and plays in Reston. She is also a member of the Reston Association’s 55+ Advisory Commitee. WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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SPECIAL EVENTS

Events 55+ 55 years and older 01 Navigating the Local Transit System

Tuesday, October 6, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive. FREE

Become familiar with the regional transit systems through an innovative transportation experience. Ride the MATT (Mobile Accessible Travel Training) bus, which is a handson learning experience. Learn “travel training” tips — by learning to read bus schedules and route maps, learning how to determine and pay fares, how to signal the driver to stop, as well as other bus travel skills. The bus will stop at the Silver Line, where participants will learn how to determine the fare and purchase Metrorail fare cards, load a provided SmarTrip card, read the rail system map and board the train to travel by rail. Registration is required.

02

Jigsaw Puzzle & Lunch

Wednesday, October 14, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive. $11 $15

Do you like to put together jigsaw puzzles? Join us as an individual or as a couple for this fun event. Each team will be doing a Reston-themed puzzle to see how much you can finish in the time allotted. Enjoy coffee and conversation while doing one of America's favorite pasttimes. Lunch will be provided. Payment due at the event. Registration required.

03 Appraisal Roadshow

01

Thursday, November 5, 10 a.m.-Noon Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive. $7 $10

Bring your jewelry, silver, coins, furniture, paintings, documents, or other heirlooms to discover their age and value. Certified appraisers with Peenstra Antiques and gemologists from Paradigm Experts will provide free appraisals, consultations and advice on your prized possessions. You are welcome to bring one item. You do not need to bring an item to attend. Registration required as space is limited.

02

55+ Advisory Committee This committee, established by the Reston Association, is charged with developing and implementing programs to benefit Reston’s senior adults. If you have visited Reston Town Center’s theater recently to see a movie and enjoy coffee and pastries with friends, then you have seen the work of the 55+ Advisory Committee firsthand. We are looking for NEW ideas and FRESH perspectives. Give something back to your community by volunteering your time and join this active senior committee. Where: Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive When: 2nd Tuesday of each month from 2-3:30 p.m.

03

TO REGISTER FOR EVENTS, CONTACT ASHLEIGH@RESTON.ORG OR CALL 703-435-6577. PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

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55+ Trips and Tours 55 years and older Reston Association’s 55+ Advisory Committee will take a variety of trips this year to locations such as museums, shows and local places of interest. Join us as we have fun visiting the area’s hot spots. For upcoming trip dates, details and to get on our trip mailing list, contact Ashleigh@reston.org or call 703-435-6577.

Trip to Toby’s Dinner Theater to see Ragtime

Wednesday, Oct. 7, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Bus pick-up times & locations: 9:00 a.m. Hunters Woods Shopping Center (Ledo Pizza) 9:15 a.m. Thoreau Place, 1951 Sagewood Lane 9:30 a.m. Lake Anne Plaza parking lot $65 $71

Join Reston Association for a chartered bus trip to enjoy a buffet lunch and show at Toby’s Dinner Theater in Columbia, MD. Ragtime is a world and a society encapsulated in the three families of E.L. Doctorow’s tale: one upper middle class WASP, one EuropeanJewish immigrant, and one Black who is a generation removed from slavery. Called by Time Magazine "a triumph for the stage, this acclaimed musical is filled with pageantry, emotion and hope, bursting onto the stage like no other musical. All sales are final. Registration form can be found on our website at www.reston.org.

Parks & Recreation Paid Internship Provides administrative support and customer service to the Parks & Recreation department. Assists the events coordinator in planning, implementing and evaluating a variety of events and programs for all ages throughout the Reston community. Fields patron concerns, assists aquatic staff with filing and seasonal staff database management. Assists with calendar template for aquatics scheduling software. Organizes and maintains recreational signage throughout the department. Performs data entry for both the aquatics and camp departments. Manages camp paperwork and communication with parents throughout the registration process. Assists in planning activities, trips, and supplies for a variety of camps.

SPRING 2016

Internship lasts from mid-January or February through mid-April to early May (start and end dates are flexible). Minimum Qualifications: 55 Candidate must be working towards an undergraduate or graduate degree in Parks & Recreation or related field. 55 Must be at least 18 years old with a good driving record and valid driver’s license. 55 Must be able to lift 20+pounds. 55 Must be able to work 20-30 hours per week, including occasional evenings and weekends. 55 Applicant should be familiar with Microsoft Word, Excel, and Outlook and enjoy working with the public. $1,000 stipend paid ($500 at half way point and $500 at the end). Application available on our careers website at https://careers.reston. org in November. Contact Ashleigh@ reston.org or 703-435-6577 for more information.

TO REGISTER FOR EVENTS, CONTACT ASHLEIGH@RESTON.ORG OR CALL 703-435-6577. PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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TENNIS

Tennis 10 and Under Tennis is a whole new ball

game. Balls, rackets and courts sized right for kids. It’s all about the play. Children learn best when they have an opportunity to play and have fun. Reston Tennis Youth classes focus on practice, learn and play using the QuickStart format. Children will learn to play tennis by playing tennis. Reston Tennis implements the games-based approach to tennis, which means involving participants in tennis play within the first hour of the program.

01

Munchkins Tennis (ages 3-4)

This exciting new play format for learning tennis is designed to bring kids into the game by utilizing specialized equipment, shorter court dimensions and modified scoring — all tailored to age and size. Kids enjoy a fun, motivating introduction to tennis emphasizing fun and play. It’s the fast, fun way to get kids into tennis and keep them playing. Parents or guardians must be present and join in the fun. Once a week for six weeks. Session 4: Sept. 11-Oct. 17 Friday, 3-3:45 p.m., 3:45-4 p.m. Saturdays, 9-10:45 a.m., 10-10:45 a.m. North Shore Courts $98 $106

Aces

This exciting new play format for learning tennis is designed to bring kids into the game by utilizing specialized equipment, shorter court dimensions and modified scoring — all tailored to age and size. Kids enjoy a fun, motivating introduction to tennis, emphasizing fun and play. It’s the fast, fun way to get kids into tennis and keep them playing. We encourage a parent or guardian to join in the fun to make this class a success. The emphasis will be on learn, practice and play. To be enrolled in Aces II, you must have completed Aces I. Parents or guardians must be present and join in the fun.

02

01

Aces I (ages 5-7)

Once a week for six weeks. Session 4: Sept. 11-Oct. 19 Fridays, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Saturdays, 9-10 a.m., 10-11 a.m., Noon-1 p.m. North Shore Courts $102 $110

Aces II (ages 5-8)

Once a week for six weeks. Session 4: Sept. 11-Oct. 19 Mondays, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Fridays, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Saturdays, 11 a.m.-Noon, Noon-1 p.m. North Shore Courts $102 $110

03

Aces III (ages 6-9)

Once a week for six weeks. Session 4: Sept. 12-Oct. 19 Mondays, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Saturdays, 11 a.m.-Noon North Shore Courts $102 $110

02

03 PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

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RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS. FOR MORE INFO ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


Learn, Practice and Play for Juniors

Teen Tennis Teens will enjoy tennis with

01 Level One (ages 8-12)

02 Level One (ages 13-16)

Twice a week for three weeks. Session 9: Sept 8-24 Session 10: Sept. 29-Oct. 15 Tuesday/Thursday, 5-6 p.m., Lake Newport $122 $130

Twice a week for three weeks. Session 8: Sept. 8-24 Session 9: Sept. 28-Oct. 15

This class is for players with little or no tennis background.

Level One (ages 8-12)

This class is for players with little or no tennis background. Once a week for six weeks. Session 4: Sept 12-Oct.17 Saturday, 9-11 a.m., Autumnwood Courts Saturday, 11a.m.-Noon, Autumnwood Courts $122 $130

Level Two (ages 8-12)

This class is for students who have taken Level One. Twice a week for three weeks. Session 9: Sept 7-23 Session 10: Sept. 28-Oct. 14

Labor Day Monday class held Tuesday Sept. 8.

Monday/Wednesday, 5-6 p.m., Lake Newport Courts $122 $130

their peers and learn the fundamentals of tennis techniques and strokes. Emphasis is on fun, fitness and play. Class size limited to six.

This class is for players with little or no tennis background.

Labor Day Monday class held Tuesday Sept. 8. Monday/Thursday, 6-7 p.m., Shadowood Courts $122 $130

01

Level Two (ages 13-16) This class is for students who have taken Level One.

Twice a week for three weeks. Session 8: Sept. 8-24 Session 9: Sept 28-Oct. 15

Labor Day Monday class held Tuesday Sept. 8. Monday/Thursday, 7-8 p.m., Shadowood Courts $122 $130

03

Level Three

Teenage players advancing beyond level two should contact the tennis office at 703-435-6502 for an evaluation.

02

Level Two (ages 8-12)

This class is for students who have taken Level One. Once a week for six weeks. Session 4: Sept 12-Oct.17 Saturday, 10-11 a.m., Autumnwood Courts $122 $130

03 PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS. FOR MORE INFO ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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TENNIS

Futures This is RA’s highest level junior

class for ages eight to twelve years olds. Students must be able to rally with QuickStart green dot and regulation size tennis balls. Students should have experience playing matches in USTA leagues or sanctioned tournaments. This match play program will develop competitive skills for both singles and doubles under actual match conditions. Emphasis will be on strategy, conditioning and footwork. Players must be competitive to enter this program. CHUME BERTRAND

Chume is a PTR-certified associate instructor. She has been involved with tennis since she moved to the Reston area in 1991. Chume has been very active with USTA junior tennis. She plays tennis competitively in many local tennis leagues. ROD PAOLINI

Rod particularly enjoys working with young children. He employs various activities and games that develop the skills needed for tennis. He invites parents to be involved in the lesson in order to learn and play together. Rod is a PTR-certified instructor.

01

Futures I (ages 8-12)

Orange dot ball with coach Chume Bertrand. Once a week for six weeks. Session 4: Sept. 8-Oct. 13 Tuesday, 5-6:30 p.m., Hook Road Courts $182 $190

Futures I Advanced (ages 8-12)

Orange dot ball with coach Chume Bertrand. Once a week for six weeks. Session 4: Sept. 10-Oct. 15 Thursday, 5-6:30 p.m., Hook Road Courts $182 $190

Futures II (ages 8-12)

01

Green dot ball with coach Chume Bertrand.

Once a week for six weeks. Session 4: Sept. 9-Oct. 14 Wednesday, 5-6:30 p.m., Lake Newport Courts $182 $190

02

Futures III (ages 8-12)

Regulation ball with coach Chume Bertrand.

Once a week for six weeks. Session 4: Sept. 14-Oct. 19 Monday, 5-6:30., Lake Newport Courts $182 $190

Futures I (ages 8-12)

Orange dot ball with coach Rod Paolini. While this course will work on improving basic strokes, the emphasis will be on developing game tactics and strategy for match competition. There will be drills for footwork, shot preparation, and recovery. A third of every lesson will be devoted to match play.

02

Twice a week for three weeks. Session 8: Sept. 8-23 Session 9: Sept. 28-Oct. 14

Labor Day Monday class held Tuesday Sept. 8.

Monday/Wednesday, 5:306:30 p.m., Hook Road Courts $122 $130

03 PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

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RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS. FOR MORE INFO ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


High School Tennis Innovations Development Program (ages 12-17)

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This is Reston Association’s highest level of play for juniors. This program is for rising high school players and those already in high school. This match play program will develop competitive skills for both singles and doubles play under actual match conditions. Emphasis will be on strategy, conditioning and footwork. Players must already be competitive to enter this program. Twice a week for three weeks. Session 8: Sept 8-24 Session 9: Sept. 29-Oct. 15 Tuesday/Thursday, 4:30-6 p.m., Autumnwood Courts $182 $190

PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

Varsity Player Development

(ages 15-17) Varsity Player Development is the highest level class for juniors in Reston Tennis. It is designed for boys and girls high school varsity singles players and USTA Mid-Atlantic tournament players with competitive rankings. Participation in the class is by invitation or tryout only. Classes are structured to focus on singles match play, along with some competitive drills and doubles. Coaches organize match ups and provide assessments of players' shot production, tactics and strategy, movement and fitness, and mental strength. Video analysis is also used to improve players' technical skills and match play performances. Additionally, coaches take an interest in the players' tournament play, offering guidance on tournament selection and evaluation of results. Twice a week for three weeks. Session 8: Sept 7-23 Session 9: Sept. 28-Oct. 14 Monday/Wednesday, 4:30-6 p.m., Autumnwood Courts $182 $190

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS. FOR MORE INFO ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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Adult Tennis 17 years and older Beginners

Introduces serve, volley, forehand and backhand strokes, court positions and tennis terms.

Advanced Beginners

Reviews beginners’ strokes with an emphasis on stroke execution. Introduces lob and overhead, scoring and rules. Students must know the basic strokes and forehand rallying.

Intermediate

For those wishing to perfect their strokes through drills with an emphasis on consistency, singles and doubles strategy and match play. Note: We cannot guarantee court preference. On some occasions, classes may be combined at one location or students may be asked to move from one level to another to maximize the ability for congenial class instruction.

01

Beginners

Groups of three to five students meet with one instructor. Twice a week for three weeks. Session 8: Sept. 7-24 Session 9: Sept. 28-Oct 15

Labor Day Monday class will be made up Sept. 8.

Tuesday/Thursday, 6-7 p.m., Lake Newport Monday/Wednesday, 8-9 p.m., Lake Newport $132 $140

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Intermediates

Groups of three to five students meet with one instructor. Twice a week for three weeks. Session 8: Sept. 7-24 Session 9: Sept. 28-Oct 15

Labor Day Monday class will be made up Sept. 8.

Tuesday/Thursday, 8-9 p.m., Lake Newport Monday/Wednesday, 7-8 p.m., Lake Newport $132 $140

Beginners

Groups of three to five students meet with one instructor. Once a week for four weeks. Session 6: Sept. 12-Oct 3 Session 7: Oct. 10-31 Saturday, Noon.-1 p.m., Autumnwood Courts $132 $140

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03 Advanced Beginners

Groups of three to five students meet with one instructor. Once a week for four weeks. Session 6: Sept. 12-Oct. 3 Session 7: Oct. 10-Oct. 31 Saturday, 10:30 a.m.-Noon, Autumnwood Courts $132 $140

Intermediate

Once a week for four weeks. Session 6: Sept. 12-Oct. 3 Session 7: Oct. 10-31 Saturday, 9-10:30 a.m., Autumnwood Courts $132 $140

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Advanced Beginners

Groups of three to five students meet with one instructor. Twice a week for three weeks. Session 8: Sept. 7-24 Session 9: Sept. 28-Oct. 15

Labor Day Monday class will be made up Sept. 8.

Tuesday/Thursday, 7-8 p.m., Lake Newport Monday/Wednesday, 6-7 p.m., Lake Newport $132 $140

PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

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03 RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS. FOR MORE INFO ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


RESTON ASSOCIATION PRO SHOP

Featuring Racquets available for demo. Call 703.435.6502 or email tennis@reston.org for more info on Babolat performance products

00 FB.COM/BABOLAT

@BABOLAT

PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS. FOR MORE INFO ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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TENNIS

Stroke of the Week 17 years and older 01

Three to eight players. Must register at least one week in advance. Tuesday, 7-8:30 p.m., Shadowood Thursday, 10-11:30 a.m., Shadowood Book four strokes and receive a 5 percent discount. $28 $30

TUES STROKE Aug. 25 Volleys and half volleys Sept. 1 Overheads and lobs Sept. 8 Doubles strategy Sept. 15 Serves Sept. 22 Serve and volley — attack the net Sept. 29 Backhands: one- and two-handed Oct. 6 Forehands Oct. 13 Doubles strategy THURS STROKE Aug. 27 Forehands Sept. 3 Backhands: one- and two-handed Sept. 10 Doubles strategy Sept. 17 Serves Sept. 24 Forehands Oct. 1 Backhands: one- and two-handed Oct. 8 Volleys and half volleys Oct. 15 Serves

Adult Serve and Return 17 years and older 02

Groups of up to four students meet once a week for four weeks to become masters of their serve. The serve is the most important stroke in tennis. It starts the game. Without being able to serve, you cannot play the game of tennis. In this class you will learn a kick serve, a slice serve and increase the pace and velocity of your flat serve. Let the games begin. Session 6: Aug. 25-Sept. 15 Session 7: Sept. 22-Oct. 13 Tuesday, 6-7 p.m., Shadowood $88 $90

60s Doubles Tennis for Seniors Ages: 55+

Beginner tennis lessons for seniors. This new version of tennis is played on a smaller court (60-feet) using a lower compression ball. This class will cover all aspects of the game including forehand, backhand, volley and serve. The first 60-minutes is a lesson, the last 30-minutes of each class is match play. Short courts mean more touch with longer rallies the way tennis used to be. This new way of playing is spreading fast since it is easy to learn, fun to play, social and keeps you active. Class size is limited to six students. For more information please contact Juan in the tennis office at 703-435-6534 or Juan@reston.org Classes are once a week for four weeks. Session 4: Sept. 15-Oct. 6 Tuesday, 9-10:30 a.m., Hook Road Courts. $80 $85

PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

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01

RA MEMBERS AND

02

PRIVATE TENNIS LESSONS For those who prefer more individual instruction or for the player needing a flexible schedule. PRIVATE: $70/hour

$72/hour

SEMI PRIVATE: $36 person/hour

$38 person/hour

Book a series of six private lessons or semi-private lessons and receive a 5 percent discount.

NON-MEMBERS. FOR MORE INFO ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


THE 2015 US OPEN | THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 3 | 6 AM-11 PM

Who will be the next King or Queen of Tennis? Come see all the players and all the storylines that play out

in this year’s U.S. Open. Contact RA Tennis at tennis@reston. org or call 703-435-6502 for details about our same-day bus trip up to New York during the tournament’s first week for a day session on Thursday, September 3. Availability is limited, so contact us today. $175/RA members, $185/Non-members

Men's & Women's Singles & Doubles

Sponsor by Dr. Hani Thariani, Orthodontist

Doubles Play: Saturday, Sept. 19 Singles Play: Sunday, Sept. 20 Location: Lake Newport Tennis Courts, Level: NTRP Brackets for 3.0, 3.5, 4.0 and 4.5 players Players guaranteed at least two matches! $30 charitable donation per player

Play tennis to benefit two great causes. All funds go directly to one of these two organizations:

Registration: August 1 at www.restontennis.org More Info: http://www.restontennis.org/rally-for-a-cause-charity-tournament/tournament-info or email rally4acause@restontennis.org

PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS. FOR MORE INFO ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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TENNIS

Adults Tennis Leagues 18 years and older

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Greater Washington Tennis League

This is a women’s competitive league. All levels of players are invited to join one of our teams in the Greater Washington Daytime Doubles Tennis League. League play occurs in the spring and fall. Reston Association sponsors four women’s teams in this league. Start Date: April 7 Teams: B-2, C-1 Women play at Lake Newport, Hook Road and Autumnwood on weekday mornings or travel to other area clubs. $19 *$21 *Non-members must purchase a RA tennis membership to participate.

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Mixed Doubles Flight

If you are looking to play more tennis with your partner, we invite you to join our Mixed Doubles Flight. All levels of play are welcome. Match results are used to sort the flight so everyone has a good, competitive match each week. You must have a partner to play in this flight; partners are not assigned. You are also responsible for finding a substitute to play with your partner when you cannot play yourself. (All substitutes must be RA residents or members.) However, if both team members must miss a week, you are not responsible for a substitute team if you notify the flight coordinator in advance. If you have any questions before then, please contact the tennis office or send an email to tennis@reston.org.

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Senior Round Robin Ages: 55+

Still looking for competitive, fun play? Join the senior interReston league. The format will be doubles. Session 4: Sept. 4-Oct. 8 Fridays, 9-11 a.m., Hook Road Courts. $17 for six weeks of play per person.

Drop-In Tennis

Tuesday, 7-10 p.m., Lake Newport Tennis Courts: 1,2,5,6

*Drop-in tennis is for Reston Association Members and tennis members only. Non-members must purchase an RA tennis membership to participate.

How it works: You must have your RA pass with you to participate. Bring a can of balls and your game. Doubles will be the format when people are waiting to play. Teams will play best of five games using NO-AD scoring. The winning team will stay on the same court but will split and no longer be partners. Losing team will slide to the next court down where a winning team will have split and will accept one player each. If the court next to you has not finished, you are asked to wait outside the court or on a bench. This format will continue until nobody is waiting to play. Once people are waiting to play, you are asked to go back to the five game NO-AD matches. Courts one and two should be used by players 3.5 and below when no line is present. Courts five and six should be used for 3.5 and above when no line is present. If court three has no lessons at 9 p.m., it will be reserved for dropin tennis. Call the tennis office at 703-435-6502 for details.

August 21-October 23 Fridays, 7-11 p.m. Lake Newport Tennis Courts $25/person $27/person PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

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01

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03 RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS. FOR MORE INFO ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


RA Tennis Court Rules WHO MAY USE THE COURTS ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

ƒƒ

eston Association R Members only with their membership cards. Guests must have a guest pass and be accompanied by the host member. Players must show membership cards and guest passes on the changeover. Reston Association instructors are the only persons permitted to give lessons on a fee-paying basis on RA courts.

PRIORITY OF PLAY ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

OURT CHANGES ARE C MADE ON THE HOUR. Please show your pass when entering the court. Play is limited to one hour for singles and two hours for doubles when other players are waiting.

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layers who use the court P for a fraction of an hour must vacate on the hour when others are waiting to play.

RESERVING A COURT ƒƒ

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Mens Singles Ladder

layers must place P membership card or key tag and racquet (or racquet cover) on a numbered hook on courtside gates. Failure to display both racket or cover and membership card or key tag means court is not reserved. Players reserving courts must remain courtside while waiting to play. Players may not reserve courts while playing. One member may reserve a court to use a ball machine or ball hopper. Reston Association may reserve courts for lessons, tournaments, junior activity, league play and court rentals. Check our online calendar www.reston.org.

RULES FOR COURT USE ƒƒ ƒƒ

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OURTS ARE TO BE USED C FOR TENNIS ONLY. Players are required to use tennis shoes when using the courts. (No jogging or soccer shoes.) Bicycles, skates, skateboards, baby carriages, playpens, strollers, radios and pets are not allowed on the courts. Children who are not playing tennis are not allowed on the courts. Please dispose of trash in proper receptacles.

RULES ENFORCEMENT ƒƒ

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eston Association and R staff, court monitors and Reston Tennis Association officers will enforce the rules of court play. Failure to adhere to the rules will result in loss of court privileges. RA cards are available at Reston Association headquarters or online at www.reston.org. Guest passes can be purchased from court monitors. For further information, call 703-435-6530.

TENNIS INFO Info on our Reston Tennis News Facebook page www.facebook.com/ RestonTennisNews

Find the following up-to-date information in the tennis section on the Reston Association website at www.reston.org ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

RTT Score Board is listed at www.restontennis.org Tennis ladder is listed on www.tennisengine.com USTA Tournament and entry forms are listed on www.usta.com

Tennis Key Tags

Great for easy identification and your convenience. Key tags are available for $3. Come to RA to purchase one.

Tennis Lesson Gift Certificates

Tennis gift certificates are available at the Reston Association Tennis Office. Please call 703-435-6502 or visit our website at www.reston.org

TENNIS COURTS Lighted Courts

The following 26 RA courts are lighted until 11 p.m. for night play. ƒƒ Autumnwood Courts ƒƒ Glade Clay Courts ƒƒ Hook Road Courts ƒƒ Lake Newport Courts ƒƒ North Hills Clay Courts ƒƒ Shadowood Courts

We are offering Mens Adult Singles Ladder. Upon completion of registering, you will receive a password to the online ladder. For more information, please contact Rob Tucker at 703-435-6502 or tennis@reston.org.

Practice Walls ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

Colts Neck Hook Road Lake Anne Park

Fee: $20 per person.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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TENNIS

ROBERT TUCKER Robert is the Reston Tennis Program Manager who lives in Reston. With two decades of experience in tennis sales, he is the “go to” guy when you’re trying to find the right equipment for your game.

HARMEN WARAICH Harmen is new to the staff and will be one of our lead instructors for Tennis Aces and Munchkin classes. Harmen is currently ranked #1 on the South Lakes High School girls team and enjoys working with juniors of all levels. Intermediate to advanced players will enjoy private hitting sessions with her.

ROD PAOLINI Rod particularly enjoys working with young children. He employs various activities and games that develop the skills needed for tennis. He invites parents to be involved in the lesson in order to learn and play together. Rod is a PTR-certified instructor.

MARK STEEDS Mark is a USPTA certified Tennis Professional. He specializes in adult group lessons. Mark also enjoys teaching private lessons to children and adults at all levels.

NICK ORIS Nick Oris is in charge of our Munchkin tennis program, but works with juniors of all ages. Known for his high energy and enthusiasm, Nick has his kids putting their best foot forward from day one. Tennis should be fun and he makes sure of it.

CHUME BERTRAND Chume is a PTR-certified associate instructor. She has been involved with tennis since she moved to the Reston area in 1991. Chume has been very active with USTA junior tennis. She plays tennis competitively in many local tennis leagues.

PETE STAPLES A native of Australia, Peter is a PTR-certified instructor now living in Reston. He is passionate about tennis and loves to share his love of the game with high-energy instruction. His other passion is tennis photography. Peter photographs the pros at the Citi Open Tournament, as well as many other ATP tour events.

JESSICA KEENER Jess began teaching for Reston in 2005. She is a PTR certified instructor and is known for her passionate and high intensity attitude. She loves to work with upcoming juniors, teaching them the tactical and mental aspects of the game. Jess recently competed and received a spot in the mixed doubles draw of the qualifying tournament en route to the U.S. Open Grand Slam in 2014.

YASMINE HASAN Yasmine will be working with all levels of Reston Juniors between the ages of 3-17. Tennis is her passion and it shows from the moment students start to work with her. Adults looking to fine tune their games or who are looking for a steady hitting partner should take advantage of her private lessons.

JIM ELDER Jim has an Elite Professional certification from the USPTA and chairs the USTA Mid-Atlantic Adult Ranking Committee. He is also the VP of Northern VA Tennis League, in charge of the 42 team men's division. In 2014, he was ranked #4 in MAS 65 singles.

JUAN FIGUEROA Juan is a PTR tennis instructor. He has been playing tennis since 1984 and became a certified tennis instructor in 2003. Juan loves working with children of all ages. He also works with adults and loves to improve their game.

BILL WOOD As a lifelong player and enthusiast, Bill loves giving back to the sport of tennis. For the past two years, he has been teaching juniors at the Herndon Community Center and also serves as the Head Tennis Coach at Herndon High School. Certified by USPTR in Spring 2012.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


TENNIS BIRTHDAY PARTIES Let one of our professionally-trained tennis pros lead the group in fun-filled instructional activities. Group size can range from six to twelve children. You supply the refreshments and we will supply the courts for 90 minutes, racquets, balls, staff and a prize for each child, plus a free lesson for the birthday child, to be arranged at a later date. Call the tennis office at 703-435-6502 to schedule.

Fee: $190-$230, depending on size of the group.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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GET INVOLVED | VOLUNTEER | COMMUNITY OUTREACH

Get Involved this Fall Volunteer Reston seeks to build a strong, healthy and engaged community by connecting volunteers of all ages with opportunities to serve in Reston. Our volunteers make an immeasurable impact, not only on RA, but to our community as a whole.

The mission of Volunteer Reston is to enhance Reston Association’s services and programs by matching the varied talents of individuals and groups of all ages, interests and skill with a variety of engaging and challenging projects and endeavors. RA volunteers come from all walks of life and include high school, middle school and college students, retirees, scouts, individuals, families and businesses. Some of these volunteers have been involved in Reston for many years. They participate in one-time events, serve on the Board of Directors or advisory committees, while others return to the same events each year. Our volunteers all have one thing in common — they care about the Reston community.

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Are you a Boy Scout looking for a Life or Eagle Service Project or a Girl Scout looking for a Silver or Gold Service Project? If so, we have some ideas for you and would welcome the opportunity to assist scouts in the completion of projects benefiting the Reston community. To discuss project ideas, you will need to be an approved volunteer with Reston Association. Go to www.reston.org and click on the “About Reston Association” tab to complete the online volunteer application.

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This past year's projects included cleaning our streams, lakes and natural areas; assisting at our trout fishing event; spending workdays at the Walker Nature Center; removing invasive plants; planting native species; and monitoring streams.

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Projects Scout troops, school groups and other organized youth groups or clubs can also participate in the Habitat Heroes Program. For more information on scout projects contact Ha Brock, RA volunteer supervisor at 703435-7986, or email habrock@ reston.org.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Do You Need Service Hours for School? Often times we find that individuals (such as middle and high school students) are required to perform a specified number of community service hours. If this is the case, then you may be able to complete up to 8 hours of community service by working one of our special events, such as festivals, Habitat Heroes, and watershed cleanups, to name a few. We cannot guarantee that you'll be able to complete all of the hours you need during one special event. Each special event will have a limited number of spots available for volunteers, so it is very important you notify us well in advance of your desire to work a special event. To volunteer or learn more about how you can get involved in Reston, you can call Ha Brock at 703-4357986, or email habrock@reston.org and she can help provide ideas and options that are well suited for your talents. You can also visit the RA website at www.reston.org and click on the “Get Involved” tab for more information or to complete the online volunteer application.


RESTON MULTICULTURAL FESTIVAL CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS SEPT. 26

Saturday, Sept. 26,(Rain Or Shine) Lake Anne Plaza, 1609-A Washington Plaza, Reston,Virginia

Volunteers are an essential part of the festival and each year it takes more than 100 volunteers to make the event a community success. Please carefully review the list of possible job descriptions. Volunteers will receive a food voucher and a festival volunteer T-shirt. The Reston Multicultural Festival is an annual event that brings together the people of Reston to celebrate our rich medley of cultures. The festival opening will include a Naturalization Ceremony where America’s newest citizens will take the Oath of Allegiance. Come and share with family, friends, and neighbors the music, entertainment, dress, food, and cultural treasures from all over the world that are all right here. The Reston Multicultural Festival is hosted by the Lake Anne of Reston Condominium Association and co-sponsored by the Reston Association, with partners from a variety of Reston-based organizations and businesses. This signature Reston event honors the diversity that is one of our greatest assets.

FESTIVAL VOLUNTEER SCHEDULE To volunteer go to: http://bit.ly/1RMLGmB or email habrock@reston.org

Please specify which day and shifts you would like to work. If you are taking on more than two shifts we will provide you with breaks in between shifts. Volunteer Hours: 7:30 a.m.-8 p.m.

Volunteers must be 13 years or older. Younger volunteers must be accompanied by an adult.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 25 3-6 p.m. Festival set-up – Tasks include

placing signage (includes the use of some simple tools) and setting up tables and chairs.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 26 7:30-11 a.m. Set-up – Tasks include

placing signage around the plaza, decorating, covering tables, setting up children’s area and much more. 10:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Specific jobs at the

festival (see Job Descriptions below).

2:30 - 6 p.m. Specific jobs at the festival

(see Job Descriptions below).

6 - 8 p.m. Breakdown – Taking down festival signs, removing table cloths, breaking down tables and chairs.

JOB DESCRIPTIONS Parking Attendant Control access to parking lot, direct the public to parking areas around the plaza. Volunteers must be 18 years or older. Floaters Relieving volunteers for breaks. Floaters must have flexibility. Activity Assistant Volunteers will assist with hands-on arts and craft-making activities with school-aged children. Volunteers will be assigned tasks by staff.

Survey Takers Volunteers will walk around festival site asking attendees to fill out a brief survey. Volunteers should be outgoing and comfortable talking with people. Concession Assist with selling popcorn, hot dogs and cotton candy. Set-up/Break Down Set-up crew in the morning will help with decorating the plaza, setting up tables, chairs, table cloths. May be required to do heavy lifting. Please note: set-up will take place as early as 7:30 a.m. and break down will begin at 6 p.m. WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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GET INVOLVED | VOLUNTEER | COMMUNITY OUTREACH

Restore Native Habitat & Trails in Reston

Habitat Heroes

Help preserve biodiversity in Reston’s natural areas

Our native trees, ferns and wildflowers are under attack by invasive plants like English ivy, Japanese honeysuckle and bamboo. We need heroes like you to join us in rescuing Reston’s beautiful parkland. These fast-growing, aggressive plants escape from people’s yards and threaten local ecosystems, taking away vital food and habitat from already stressed wildlife populations. Please join us and spend a couple of hours in our parkland protecting our natural areas. You don’t need to be an expert to assist in protecting and restoring Reston’s woods. Our volunteering opportunities each month provide you with all the training you need to become an honorary Habitat Hero! We do a lot of invasive removal year-round. In the fall, we also focus some of our efforts

on replanting of shrubs and trees, as it is the best time of year to plant for maximum survivability and site restoration. For all projects: Please wear insect repellant, a long sleeve shirt and pants to reduce scratches from plants, biting insects, thorns, and exposure to poison ivy. RA will provide pre-and post-poison ivy block, tools, gloves, snacks and water. Youth aged 10 to 13 are welcome but require parent or guardian supervision at the project site. For more information or to volunteer, contact Ha Brock, RA volunteer supervisor, at habrock@reston. org or 703-435-7986.

PROJECT SITES Unsnarl Oriental Bittersweet

SEPT.

26

Sept. 26, 10 a.m.-Noon Stones Throw Natural Area

The heavy vines of Oriental Bittersweet continue to strangle trees and take over shrubs in the natural area at Stone Throw Drive. Oriental Bittersweet is one of the most invasive and vigorous weeds in Reston. Please help us eradicate this aggressive vine and liberate our native plants. Meet at the asphalt path near the intersection of Fieldview Drive and Stones Throw Drive, across the street from 11300 Stones Throw Drive. Look for the RA truck.

Stop the Choking Hazard and Plant Natives

NOV.

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Nov. 21, 10 a.m.-Noon The Turquoise Trail

Volunteers will meet at the Hunters Woods Pool parking lot and walk to the natural area to remove English ivy that is choking out the native trees and groundcovers. Volunteers will dig roots and pull the vines until the English ivy is removed. Then we will plant native trees, shrubs and groundcovers to help restore the site. Volunteers will see a difference as they restore the natural area to a healthy wildlife habitat.

October Habitat Heroes will celebrate NeighborWoods Month. See page 95.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

The Habitat Heroes started with a bang this year with over 30 volunteers joining Reston Association staff at the Sunrise Valley Rec Area off Oldfield Drive. The volunteers were energetic and ready to tear down invasive Japanese bush honeysuckle, despite the 34-degree weather. Volunteers filled two huge dump trucks and left more onsite to be chipped. In April, Habitat Heroes tackled English ivy and garlic mustard to continue the restoration of the Colts Neck natural area, a site near Hunters Woods Pool. They helped remove the re-sprouts of ivy that would, if they had a chance, take over large oaks and tulip poplars in the woods. Two Habitat Heroes decided they wanted to find garlic mustard patches and together pulled over 20 pounds of garlic mustard in less than a hour and half. Volunteers made a big impact on Invasive Plant Removal Day at Old Trail Drive natural area. Volunteers pulled almost 600 pounds of garlic mustard. What a success. Along with the participants of the Garlic Mustard Challenge 2015, dedicated community members pulled 1,134 pounds of garlic mustard throughout Reston. That’s 200 pounds more than last year.

Garlic Mustard Challenge 2015 Winners

Thank you to all those who participated in the Garlic Mustard Challenge this year. The winners of this year’s Challenge are: Domenick DiPasquale – Individual Category

CA Technologies – Small and Corporate Group Categories Reston Environmental Action (REACT) – Large Group Category A special thank you to Dr. Jennie Holah and her South Lakes high school class and to Carol Mills, for participating in this year’s Challenge. If you are interested in pulling garlic mustard in Reston, please contact Patricia Greenberg, environmental resource supervisor, at 703-435-6552, or email pgreenberg@reston.org.


OCT. 24, 9 AM-NOON

Pulling Invasives & Planting Natives This October, tens of thousands of volunteers will turn out for National NeighborWoods Month, an annual initiative to improve local neighborhoods by planting and caring for trees. Organized by the Alliance for Community Trees (ACTrees), National NeighborWoods Month is a volunteer-driven campaign. Over the last decade, more than 170,000 volunteers have planted over 300,000 trees in all 50 states. Join us for NeighborWoods Month at the Sunrise Valley Rec Area. We will battle invasive bush honeysuckle, one of the many invasive shrubs taking over the natural area surrounding the Sunrise Valley Rec Area. These shrubs produce tons of seeds and spread rapidly, decreasing the space for native plants to thrive. This fall we will also plant native trees and shrubs to help restore the natural area. RA needs as many hands as possible to cut and uproot these shrubs and help create space for native plants to grow. Meet at the entrance steps between 1080310807 Oldfield Drive. Look for the RA truck.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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GET INVOLVED | VOLUNTEER | COMMUNITY OUTREACH

Our Volunteers Really Dig Us

Some say it’s the tree planting they like the best. Some like the fact that they can cultivate an idea and watch it flourish. In some cases, RA volunteers actually do “dig” into the dirt to plant a few seedlings. You can make a difference in your community, be involved in something you like, meet some interesting people and learn some new skills in the process. Planting trees may not be what you’re into, but there are plenty of other areas in which to “grow.” RA is seeking volunteers to help enhance the community in a variety of areas. There are many opportunities available in such areas as environment and ecology, the Walker Nature Education Center, recreational programs and facilities, special events and many more.

Stream Monitoring Sept. 26, 9 a.m.- Noon Oct. 17, 1-4 p.m. Nov. 14, Noon- 3 p.m.

RA welcomes new volunteers to assist with stream monitoring at several locations throughout Reston. Get involved with a small team during all seasons to collect data and identify insects with the goal of assessing the health of Reston’s streams. Not only do you get to learn about Reston’s streams, it also provides an opportunity to make new friends. If you are interested in assisting with stream monitoring for more than one or two sessions, training and practice opportunities are offered by joining seasoned volunteers and RA staff. You can earn a stream monitoring certificate after successfully demonstrating your ability to identify macro-invertebrates. Each monitoring session consists of 2-3 hours. Any interest and commitment level is appreciated.

Storm Drain Marking Project

What can you do to protect our local streams, lakes and the Chesapeake Bay? One way is to participate in the Storm Drain Marking Project. Our storm drains prevent flooding of roads and neighborhoods by carrying rain and snowmelt away from streets and sidewalks. Unlike water from our taps and tub, water flowing into our storm drains is not treated. Storm drains connect directly to our streams and empty into our lakes. Trash, pet waste, motor oil, paint and other materials dumped or washed into storm drains pollute our watersheds and ultimately, the Chesapeake Bay. Markers on each storm drain remind all of us to keep storm drains and our streams clean. Since there are over 4,000 storm drains in Reston, many volunteers are needed to mark the storm drains and to help educate the community about the connection between the storm drains and our streams and lakes. Everybody is encouraged to participate. Many storm drains in Reston are on private roads. In order for volunteers to mark the drains, clusters need to grant permission first. Contact your local cluster board member and get your neighborhood involved today. The Storm Drain Marking Project in Reston is sponsored by the Fairfax County Department of Public Works and Environmental Services, the Northern VA Soil and Water Conservation District, the Virginia Department of TransportationNorthern VA District, and Reston Association. To get your project started or for more information, contact Nicki Bellezza at 703-435-6560, Nicki@ reston.org.

For more information, contact Ha Brock at 703-435-7986 or email habrock@reston.org.

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Fall Stream Cleanup Oct. 17, 10 a.m.-Noon Rain or shine All ages are welcome.

Where?

Snakeden Branch Upper — meet at Hunters Woods Village Center Snakeden Branch Middle — meet at Soapstone Drive Cedar Ridge Apartments

Why?

Tons of trash ends up in the Potomac River and the Chesapeake Bay every year from our watersheds. Litter is harmful and an eyesore in our neighborhoods and open spaces. Let’s do our part. It is amazing what a group of people can accomplish in a few hours.

HOW?

For more information, or to volunteer contact Ha Brock, at 703-435-7986 or email at habrock@reston.org. Please sign up by October 10. Gloves and supplies are provided.


Halloween House & Trick-or-Treat Trail JOB DESCRIPTIONS Casting Call — Halloween characters needed. All costumes and scripts will be provided. Volunteers will receive talking points and suggested dialogue. To be a character, we hope you will understand and stay committed to this wonderful community service. Volunteers will receive their script at orientation. Walker the Woodpecker & Myrtle the Turtle — Kids love Walker and Myrtle. They love having their picture taken. We need a volunteer to wear the costumes. This person needs excellent people skills and should be able to animate the character without talking. We also need an escort to help lead Walker & Myrtle around and help children pose for pictures. This job requires standing and walking.

Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive, Reston, VA Rain or shine event Volunteers will receive pizza dinner.

Concessions — Preparing, serving and selling popcorn, cotton candy and beverages. Face Painting — Paint simple animals and shapes on children’s faces. Design choices are usually pre-determined. Minimal artistic skill necessary. Supplies provided. Carnival Activities — Responsible for assisting children play Halloween-related carnival games and crafts. Volunteers will also distribute prizes and candy. Trick-or-Treat Trail Assistant (Start) — Welcome patrons to the trail, check for hand stamps, explain the rules of the trail and hand out trick-or-treat bags.

Friday, Oct. 23 & Saturday, Oct. 24 4:30-9:30 p.m.

We’re looking for fun-loving, energetic Halloween volunteers to bring this event to the community. Teen and adult volunteers are needed. Volunteers between ages of 13-14 must have an adult chaperone. Volunteers 15 and older are eligible to be a character. To volunteer go to: http://bit.ly/1NqzXt6 Volunteer Orientation: There will be a volunteer orientation on Wednesday, Oct. 14 from 6-7 p.m. at the event location, Walker Nature Center. The meeting is very important for everyone who is interested in helping out. All characters must attend.

Trick-or-Treat Trail Assistant (End) — Stop patrons from entering the trail, direct them to the start and pass out candy. Breakdown — Stay after to help us breakdown the different stations at 9:30. Great opportunity to earn extra service hours.

For more information, contact Ha Brock, RA volunteer supervisor at habrock@reston.org or 703-435-7986. Volunteers must be pre-registered to help with this event.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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GET INVOLVED | VOLUNTEER | COMMUNITY OUTREACH

Team Building with a Difference Corporate Volunteer Program

Our Corporate Volunteer Programs offer expertise in community service to corporations by creating customized, hands-on group volunteer projects that complement team building, leadership development, and philanthropy initiatives. Through this program, Reston Association staff will fully develop and coordinate all aspects of your company’s community service volunteer project.

Who We Are

Reston Association is one the largest community associations in the U.S. We serve over 60,000 residents in Reston. Even though we’re not a “town” per se, we provide services and programs similar to a town or city government. We own and maintain over 1,300 acres of parkland, 15 outdoor pools, 48 tennis courts, a 72-acre Nature Center, 55 miles of pathways and four man-made lakes. Living in Reston is like living in a park. Your project will go through the Friends of Reston, a 501(c)(3) organization established in 1999 to support the Reston Association in bringing valuable projects to the community. The Friends group allows the association to tap into other resources to bring great community projects to fruition on our land, at our facilities and within our programs.

Corporate Day of Service Partners CA Technologies – 2015 Garlic Mustard Challenge Winner

Miye Wire, LLC

Clarke – 2014 Community Partner of the Year

Raymond James Financial Services, Inc.

Deloitte – 2009 Community Partner of the Year

Razorsight

CareFusion

Why Partner With Us

Be recognized in your support. ƒƒ An article and photos of your "give back” project will be printed in RA’s Reston magazine, mailed to 22,000 households and have a long shelf life. ƒƒ Your company’s name will be listed on the event flyer which is distributed throughout Reston prior to the event, if time permits. ƒƒ RA’s volunteer supervisor will work with you to design a volunteer experience that will have a major impact on those you serve while also making sure we stay aligned with your corporate philanthropic mission.

UNLIMITED OPPORTUNITIES

Should you have something specific in mind, we would love to hear your ideas.

Boards & Committees

Serve on our Board or Committees. Our Advisory Committees are where you can really immerse yourself in a cause or area that suits you. Advisory Committees are comprised of RA members who provide advice on Association matters and perform such duties as may be requested by the Board of Directors. Advisory Committees exist for a term of one year from the annual or initial meeting of the Board of Directors and may be renewed at the discretion of the Board of Directors. The Board currently has seven such committees: ƒƒ The Community Engagement Advisory Committee ƒƒ The Environmental Advisory Committee ƒƒ The Parks & Recreation Advisory Committee ƒƒ The Pedestrian and Bicycling Advisory Committee ƒƒ The 55+ Advisory Committee ƒƒ The Tennis Advisory Committee ƒƒ The Transportation Advisory Committee Each committee is comprised of up to 15 members, includes a Board member and at least one staff liaison and generally meets once per month. More information on the committees and an application can be found at www.reston.org.

Northrop Grumman

Software AG Sprint

comScore

The Merritt Group

Fannie Mae

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Special Project Donations

Donate funds towards the purchase of plants and supplies or engage employees to participate in special service projects during the work week.

Habitat Heroes

Help restore Reston's natural areas by clearing invasive species and increasing biodiversity. Participate in a half-day or fullday event during the week or join a scheduled Saturday event March through November.

Annual Events

Sponsor and engage employees in a one-day special event such as MLK Day of Service (January), 5K Fund Run (April), Spring Festival (May), Reston Multicultural Festival (September) or the Halloween House & Trick-or-Treat Trail to benefit the Nature House (October).

Adopt-a-Recycling Bin Donate funds towards the purchase of recycling bins to increase recycling in Reston.

For more information or to volunteer, contact Ha Brock at habrock@reston.org or 703-435-7986.

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Corporate Teambuilding Service Projects We offer smart, easy and impactful ways for your employees to get involved in the community, while building team camaraderie. We can do half-or fullday volunteer projects for your employees. We can even build custom projects tailored specifically to your company’s needs. We take care of everything from A-Z; all you need to do is show up with your employees.

Small Group Project (3-10 People) Environmental Project with Razorsight

Medium Group Project (10-25 People) Lake Cleanup with Northrop Grumman

Large Group Project (25+ People) Restoration & Certified Wildlife Habitat Project with Deloitte

MLK, Jr. Day of Service (January) Community members can make their “day off” a “day on” by celebrating the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. through meaningful service. Reston Association will partner with multiple local nonprofits including the Closet, Southgate Community Center and Cornerstones, offering volunteer opportunities that address critical community issues.

Earth Day (April) Earth Day is celebrated around the world, and Reston Association observes it with volunteer projects that focus on preserving and beautifying Reston's environments. Take an active role in preserving natural habitats and making Reston a cleaner and greener place to live.

National Volunteering Day of Service

National Volunteering Days of Service are national volunteer days that unite individuals, families, service clubs, businesses, schools, and faithbased organizations in volunteerism throughout the year. Join us for one or more signature volunteer events.

Our team is ready to work with your company. To get started, or for more ideas on corporate volunteerism contact Ha Brock, Volunteer Supervisor, at habrock@reston.org. | WWW.RESTON.ORG FALL 2015

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BOARD & GOVERNANCE | ORGANIZATIONAL GOALS | DIRECTORS

BOARD ACTIONS MARCH-MAY 2015

The following actions were taken by the RA Board of Directors at meetings held in the months of March 2015 through May 2015. Please note that some of the motions below are abbreviated. To access the full motions, please see the board meeting minutes found in the Governance section of www.reston.org.

March 26, 2015

ƒƒ Adopted the March 26, 2015 Consent Calendar, including motions on the following: • Adoption of Regular Meeting Agenda • Approval of Regular Board Meeting Minutes – February 26, 2015 • March 2015 Legal Committee Report • Committee Appointments ƒƒ Adopted a schedule for the board of directors to consider adding to the Reston Association the real property known as Comstock Partners LC – BLVD Residential at Reston Station, including public hearing dates. ƒƒ Authorized the CEO to further negotiate terms and conditions for the addition of the Comstock BLVD property, including but not limited to, conditions for the payment of $650,000 in July 2015, and for the naming rights of the former Reston Visitors Center, also known as the Tetra property, if the pending referendum for the purchase of the Tetra property proves successful. ƒƒ Approved the proposed Tetra property purchase referendum question and fact sheet as amended. ƒƒ Approved the 2016-2020 Strategic Plan for the Reston Association. ƒƒ Approved the conditional purchase contract for the Tetra property, and directed staff to release the appraisals received by the association upon execution of the contract. ƒƒ Ratified the decision and response of the CEO to Mr. Irwin Flashman regarding a request for inspection of association records, and directed staff to provide him with copies of the requested appraisals once the conditional contract for the Tetra Property is fully executed.

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ƒƒ Directed staff to provide a testimony to the Board of Supervisors at a public hearing on a proposed land swap by the County Park Authority of their 5-acre Reston Town Green property in exchange for a 2.6-acre urban green, along with approximately 90,000 square feet of planned density in this district for park uses, and other considerations.

May 11, 2015

ƒƒ Authorized the CEO to pursue a loan upon terms and conditions favorable to the Reston Association to finance the purchase of the Tetra property consistent with the referendum and the purchase contract. ƒƒ Approved the request of PetMAC, subject to an agreement approved by Reston Association’s Legal Counsel, to use Lake Anne for a dock diving demonstration during its grand opening celebration to be held on Saturday, May 30, 2015. ƒƒ Directed the law firm of Odin, Feldman & Pittleman, PC to coordinate with Fairfax County, its Zoning Administrator and other homeowners adjacent to the golf course, to file an appeal to the Circuit Court regarding the April 15, 2015 decision of the Fairfax County Board of Zoning Appeals regarding Case # A2012-HM-020 RN Golf Management, LLC.

May 28, 2015

ƒƒ Adopted the May 28, 2015 Consent Calendar, including motions on the following: • Adoption of Regular Meeting Agenda • Approval of Minutes of Initial Meeting of New Board – April 15, 2015 • Approval of Minutes for Special Board Meeting – May 11, 2015

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

• April & May 2015 Legal Committee Reports • Secretary’s Certificate • Banking Resolution • Committee Appointments ƒƒ Approved the CEO’s 2015 Performance Plan ƒƒ Moved that the Tall Oaks Village Center should be re-developed to include a substantial residential component. In addition, the Center should include neighborhood serving retail and services and a public open space oriented to the Tall Oaks Assisted Living Facility. ƒƒ Authorized staff to reallocate the $160,000 set aside in the 2015 Capital Assets Acquisition Fund for the purchase of equipment/ software related to acquiring a “Document Management Solution” to the 2015 Operating Fund. ƒƒ Approved the agenda for a special Work Session to prioritize the 2016/2017 budget suggestions.


MEET THE BOARD & OFFICERS | BOARDOFDIRECTORS@RESTON.ORG

Ellen Graves, President Apartment Owners’ Representative BODgraves@reston.org

Michael R. Sanio, Vice-President At-Large Director BODmichaelsanio@reston.org

Eve Thompson, Secretary Lake Anne-Tall Oaks District Director BODthompson@reston.org

Dannielle LaRosa, Treasurer North Point District Director BODLaRosa@reston.org

Ken Knueven At-Large Director BODKnueven@reston.org

Lucinda Shannon Hunters Woods/Dogwood District Director BODshannon@reston.org

Julie Bitzer South Lakes District Director BODbitzer@reston.org

Ray Wedell At-Large Director BODwedell@reston.org

Jeff Thomas At-Large Director BODthomas@reston.org

Cate Fulkerson Chief Executive Officer cate@reston.org

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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INFO & RESOURCES | GUIDELINES | FACILITIES | MAP

RA Picnic Pavilions

Plan summer outdoor private parties or weddings, group and corporate gatherings, or family picnics at one of our six affordable pavilions. Available for rent seven days a week from April through October. To reserve, contact Member Services at reservations@reston.org or by calling 703-435-6530. Rental Fees: $155/RA Members, $310/Corporate and Non-members

DOGWOOD PICNIC PAVILION 2460 Green Range Drive, near Reston Parkway and Glade Drive Size: 1200 square feet

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Spray and play water feature and restroom facility available April through October, 10 a.m. to dusk. Water feature is a mosaic-clad fountain, a commissioned public artwork Four picnic tables under cover and a large built-in grill Features ADA-accessible parking lot and pavilion area Water fountain, including doggie fountain feature located outside pool Parking shared with pool facility or at curbside Pool access is not included in private reservation unless included in pool party rental. For more information, contact Aquatics at aquaticsinfo@reston.org

BROWN’S CHAPEL PICNIC PAVILION 11300 Baron Cameron Avenue, near Brown’s Chapel

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Four picnic tables and one grill under cover Restroom facility Near a basketball court, ball fields, an exercise trail and a tot lot Lake Newport also nearby for fishing off the dock/dam Available on a first-come, firstserve basis at no charge

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LAKE ANNE PICNIC PAVILION

NORTH HILLS PICNIC PAVILION

TEMPORARY ROAD PICNIC PAVILION

11301 North Shore Drive Size: 900 square feet

Center Harbor Road and North Village Road Size: 1,024 square feet

Corner of North Shore Drive and Temporary Road Size: 892 square feet

Located near historic Lake Anne, this pavilion offers a wide variety of activities for fun-seekers of all ages. ƒƒ Water spray fountain available April through October ƒƒ Seven picnic tables under cover and two large grills ƒƒ Restroom facility ƒƒ Water and electricity ƒƒ Tot lot, benches, and ample parking, including curbside ƒƒ Basketball court, tennis court, and sand volleyball court nearby; however, not included in private reservation

Lovely setting year-round for larger gatherings from parties to wedding receptions to troop/ scout meetings. ƒƒ Eight picnic tables under cover and three large brick barbecue grills ƒƒ Two portable restrooms ƒƒ Electricity, water, lights, and a water fountain ƒƒ Tot lot, ample parking and green space

HUNTERS WOODS PICNIC PAVILION Corner of Steeplechase Drive and Reston Parkway Size: 842 square feet

Great space for a small group picnic while enjoying the nearby pool or the park’s soccer/football field or basketball courts. Don’t forget your pool passes. Pool access not included in private reservation. ƒƒ Four picnic tables under cover (two are ADA accessible) and one grill ƒƒ Ample parking (shared parking at Hunters Woods Pool or Hunters Woods Park) ƒƒ Pool restrooms are available during pool open hours

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

PONY BARN Corner of Steeplechase Drive and Triple Crown Road Size: 2,006 square feet

The perfect spot for a family picnic, scout gatherings, or other group meetings. Visitors have easy access to nearby Glade Stream Valley Park. ƒƒ Eight picnic tables and one large grill ƒƒ Two portable restrooms ƒƒ Water fountain ƒƒ Wood-chipped tot lot equipped with swings and a jungle gym ƒƒ Parking available in 11 parking spaces

Situated in a wooded, park-like setting, this pavilion has a large, level field, excellent for activities such as croquet, horseshoes, and badminton. This is a great space for larger group gatherings. ƒƒ Seven picnic tables and one large grill ƒƒ Two portable restrooms ƒƒ Two swing sets and four benches situated throughout the park ƒƒ Water fountain ƒƒ Parking available in 16 marked spaces or at curbside


RA Community Buildings The Glade Room and Brown’s Chapel are frequently used for: ƒƒ Group & business functions ƒƒ Classes, workshops & training programs ƒƒ Community meetings ƒƒ Birthday parties and wedding ceremonies & receptions ƒƒ Cluster meetings ƒƒ Troop/Scout meetings ƒƒ Faith group meetings ƒƒ Club functions

Rental Fees: $20-$70 per hour (security deposit required). Available for Members and Non-members year-round.

BROWN’S CHAPEL

GLADE ROOM

11300 Baron Cameron Avenue Size: 914 square feet

11550 Glade Drive Size: 881 square feet

A very cozy and affordable facility close to home. Its tall ceilings provide excellent acoustics and its park-like grounds offer a lovely setting. The facility has chairs to seat 50 people, 3 tables, restroom facilities, heating, air conditioning and ample parking.

This facility is equipped with chairs to seat 75 people, 4 tables, restroom facilities, heating and air conditioning. Enjoy nearby facilities such as tennis courts, tot lot, and the Glade Pool. Don’t forget your pool & tennis passes. Pool & tennis court access not included in private reservation.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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INFO & RESOURCES | MAP | FACILITIES | GUIDELINES

Reston Association Common Area 1. Owners, including Owners of property adjacent to the Common Area, shall not attempt to nor improve, alter, landscape or mow Reston Association (RA) Common Area. 2. Owners, including Owners of property adjacent to the Common Area, shall confine all fencing (including invisible fencing), sheds, or any other development to their own property. 3. RA meadows in the Common Area shall be mowed annually by RA staff only. 4. Smoking is prohibited within all RA Community Buildings, and is also prohibited in all Pool facilities; on and within all Tennis Court facilities and Picnic Pavilions; on all Ballfields, Multi-purpose Courts, Garden Plots or Garden Plot Areas; and on or within Tot-Lots or TotLot Areas. This smoking ban is also in effect within a fifty (50)-foot-wide perimeter around the exterior of any building or the boundary of any facility, to the extent that such fifty (50)-foot area, or any portion thereof, comprises RA Common Area. The utilization of electronic cigarettes is also prohibited on these RA common areas. On those Association Common Areas where smoking is not prohibited by this resolution, RA strongly discourages smoking and requests that all persons refrain from smoking.

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5. Horseback riding shall be confined to designated bridle paths. 6. Dogs are to be walked on a leash in accordance with Fairfax County regulations. Cats, while on Common Area, must also be walked on a leash. Except for service dogs, no pets are permitted on active recreation areas, including but not limited to, such areas as playgrounds, picnic and multi-purpose courts, and play fields. 7. Dumping of any refuse, including but not limited to, grass clippings, leaves, Christmas trees, appliances, old sofas, crank case oil, etc., is prohibited. [Also see Amended Deed Section VI.2(b).] 8. No invasive exotic plants or animals (especially invasive plants such as bamboo and English ivy) shall be introduced to the RA Common Area. 9. Unless specifically authorized by the Association, the use of any motor vehicles or other motorized vehicle, other than governmental police, fire and rescue vehicles, on walkways or other Common Area is prohibited. [Also see Amended Deed Section VI.2(db)(10).] 10. Loitering, as defined by Fairfax County Code Article 1 Section 5-1-2, is prohibited. Specifically, it shall be unacceptable for any person to loiter at, on, or in RA Common Area in the following manner: a. To interfere, impede or hinder the free passage of pedestrian or authorized vehicular traffic; b. To threaten or do physical harm to

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

another member or members of the public; c. To threaten or do physical damage to the Common Area; or d. To breach the peace or engage in disorderly conduct by the use of words or acts or other conduct that clearly threaten, intimidate or present a danger to others. Except where 10 a-d apply, before contacting local law enforcement, Reston Association, in its sole discretion, may contact an appropriate organization(s) to assist in the intervention with or removal of individuals from the Common Area. 11. Unless specifically authorized by the RA Board of Directors, the following actions are prohibited in the RA Common Area: a. Carrying or discharging of firearms, air guns, archery equipment, including but not limited to, bow and arrow, and B-B guns; b. Hunting, trapping, harvesting or collecting of any wildlife, including but not limited to, mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians; c. Feeding of nondomesticated wild animals (except songbirds); d. Practices that attract non-domesticated wild animals or those that may be vectors for infectious diseases, including but not limited to, leaving pet food out of doors overnight in a location accessible to nondomesticated wild animals;

e. Fires or burning; f. Overnight camping; g. Harvesting or collecting plant life, except as authorized by the Association. 12. Fishing in the Association’s Lakes and Ponds is permitted as per Section 8(i) of Common Area Rules & Regulations Resolution 2 on Lake Use & Access. 13. Geocaching [use of Geographic Positioning Systems (GPS)] to locate a cache of materials is permitted only by Members under the following rules: a. Members interested in performing geocaching must notify the Association of all cache sites; b. Cache sites located on the Common Area must be completely hidden from view; c. Cache sites are not permitted near wildflowers, a wildlife nest or den; d. Cache sites located in the Association’s Common Area, known as the Walker Nature Education Center, must be no more than ten feet from a pathway or trail edge; e. The Association shall not be held liable for any injuries or personal property damage incurred by those participating in geocaching on the Common Area. 14. The Board of Directors may, for specific management purposes on certain properties, amend these rules or implement additional rules to meet land and resource management objectives.


Fishing and Boating Guidelines Reston’s four man-made lakes — Anne, Thoreau, Audubon, and Newport — along with Reston’s two ponds — Bright and Butler — cover 125 acres and provide recreation and stormwater management for the community. While swimming and ice skating are not permitted, fishing, boating, wildlife watching, and lakeside picnicking are available to RA members and their guests.

Fishing in Reston

Fishing is allowed on all of Reston’s lakes and ponds from designated areas. Species of fish that may be caught include: largemouth bass, channel catfish, crappie, blue gill and sunfish. ƒƒ ƒƒ

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nglers 16 years and older A must have a VA fishing license. Residents may fish from RA-owned property, which includes the dams on each lake. Much of the shoreline around each lake is private. Please respect the “No Trespassing” and “Private Property” areas indicated by signs. Please do not remove or damage shoreline vegetation. Please do not litter. Please do not feed ducks, geese or other waterfowl. Help protect people and wildlife. Please take all lines, lures and hooks with you when you leave.

Places to Fish

Lake Newport: Along the dam (Park at Brown’s Chapel Park.)

golf course, and along timber wall at Purple Beach. Lake Audubon: Along dam by Lake Thoreau, at boat ramp by Lake Audubon Pool off Twin Branches Road, and along shoreline for 150 feet near Nature Center. (Docks are private.)

Boating in Reston

Reston’s four lakes are also available for boating. Whether you want to launch your own craft or rent a boat at Lake Anne (inseason only), ample opportunities exist to get on the water. We suggest taking your favorite book out, having a floating picnic or fishing for largemouth bass. ƒƒ

Lake Anne: Along the Lake Anne Plaza steps and public docks, along south shore of the canal and along the dam. Lake Thoreau: Along 80 feet of shoreline and the public dock near Lake Thoreau pool, along dam by Lake Audubon, along bridge near

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free general access permit A for hand-carried boats to four lakes is available at RA headquarters, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, during regular office hours. Proof of boat size is required. The concrete boat ramp at Lake Audubon, off of Twin Branches Road, is available

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to launch boats from trailers. (Electric motors only) Access points are monitored between April and October.

Other general access points for hand-carried boats include: ƒƒ On Lake Thoreau, the grassy area by the underpass at the intersection of South Lakes Dr. and Ridge Heights Road; ƒƒ On Lake Anne, the area at the north end of the dam at the intersection of Wiehle Ave. and Inlet Court; ƒƒ On Lake Newport, at the east end of the dam at the wooden dock.

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Boat Reminders ƒƒ

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oats (jon boats, canoes, B deck boats, sailboats, etc.) may be up to 18 feet long, and no more than 10 feet wide. One electric motor (no gas motors) up to three horsepower or the equivalent of 80 pounds of thrust may be used. Inflatables must have three

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separate compartments and sidewalls. All boats are required to have a wearable flotation device for each passenger on board. All boats left in the water between November 1 and March 31 require a permanent mooring permit. Only lakefront owners may permanently moor a boat on Reston’s lakes. Individual clusters or condo associations, which own lakefront property, have specific rules regarding mooring boats consistent with RA rules and regulations. For more information, see Resolution 2: Lake Use Access in the Governing Documents. If you see an abandoned boat floating around or you have lost your boat on our lakes, call Watershed Specialist Will Peterson at 703-435-6535 to help track it down.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2015

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INFO & RESOURCES | GUIDELINES | FACILITIES | MAP RESTON ASSOCIATION HEADQUARTERS (14)

NEWBRIDGE TENNIS COURTS (17)

BROWN’S CHAPEL PARK (4)

RESTON ASSOCIATION CENTRAL SERVICES FACILITY (10)

WALKER NATURE EDUCATION CENTER (30)

12001 SUNRISE VALLEY DRIVE 703-435-6530

11718 GOLF COURSE SQUARE

BARON CAMERON AVENUE

NORTH HILLS POOL (1)

SHADOWOOD TENNIS COURTS (23)

HUNTERS WOODS PICNIC PAVILION (25)

12250 SUNSET HILLS ROAD 703-437-7658

11450 GLADE DRIVE 703-476-9689

1325 NORTH VILLAGE ROAD

2201 SPRINGWOOD DRIVE

STEEPLECHASE DRIVE

TEMPORARY ROAD PICNIC PAVILION (11)

NORTH HILLS TENNIS COURTS (1)

LAKE ANNE PICNIC PAVILION (6)

TEMPORARY ROAD/NORTH SHORE DRIVE

WALKER NATURE EDUCATION CENTER CAMPFIRE RING (31)

AUTUMNWOOD POOL (2) 11950 WALNUT BRANCH ROAD

1325 NORTH VILLAGE ROAD

11301 NORTH SHORE DRIVE

DOGWOOD POOL (24)

HOOK ROAD TENNIS COURTS (9)

NORTH HILLS PICNIC PAVILION (1)

2460 GREEN RANGE ROAD

FAIRWAY DRIVE/HOOK ROAD

1325 NORTH VILLAGE ROAD

GLADE POOL (29)

AUTUMNWOOD TENNIS COURTS (2)

PONY BARN PICNIC PAVILION (28)

11950 WALNUT BRANCH ROAD

TRIPLE CROWN/ STEEPLECHASE DRIVE

11550 GLADE DRIVE

GOLF COURSE ISLAND POOL (12) 11301 LINKS DRIVE

BARTON HILL TENNIS COURTS (20)

HUNTERS WOODS POOL (26)

SUNRISE VALLEY DRIVE/ BARTON HILL ROAD

2501 RESTON PARKWAY

LAKE AUDUBON POOL (22)

COLTS NECK TENNIS COURTS (27) COLTS NECK ROAD

2070 TWIN BRANCHES ROAD

LAKE NEWPORT POOL (3)

GLADE TENNIS COURTS (29) 11550 GLADE DRIVE

11601 LAKE NEWPORT ROAD

LAKE THOREAU POOL (19) 2040 UPPER LAKES DRIVE

NEWBRIDGE POOL (17) 11768 GOLF COURSE SQUARE

TALL OAKS POOL (13) 12025 NORTH SHORE DRIVE

UPLANDS POOL (7) 11032 RING ROAD

LAKE ANNE TENNIS COURTS (6)

NORTH SHORE POOL (8)

11301 NORTH SHORE DRIVE

11515 NORTH SHORE DRIVE

RIDGE HEIGHTS POOL (21)

NORTH SHORE QUICKSTART 36 FT TENNIS COURTS (8)

11400 RIDGE HEIGHTS ROAD

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106

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PRSRT STD US POSTAGE  PAID RESTON, VA PERMIT NO.21

Profile for Reston Association

Reston Fall 2015  

Reston Association publication

Reston Fall 2015  

Reston Association publication