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Walker Nature Center

A LOOK INSIDE • Calendar 4 • Kids’ Corner 6 • Green Living 7 • Nature Camps 8

BRANCHING OUT

Nature Notes Herds, Habitat and Humans JUNE By Pam Findley

• • •

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail and Common Wood Nymph butterflies are seen. Northern Red-backed Salamanders lay eggs. Butterfly Weed, Threadleaf Coreopsis and Bee Balm bloom. Elderberry and Viburnum shrubs bloom.

JULY •

Fireflies, Praying Mantis and Katydids are common. Black Cohosh, Cardinal Flower and Purple Coneflower bloom. Black Rat Snakes lay eggs.

Black Raspberries ripen.

AUGUST • • • •

Asters, sunflowers and goldenrod bloom. Fall bird migration begins. Eastern Box Turtle and Snapping Turtle eggs hatch. Wild cherries and blueberries ripen.

By Susan Sims

White-tailed Deer have been the subject of films, stories and legends embodying grace and power, but with deer populations on the rise, people have come to see another side of this common mammal. White-tailed Deer are abundant in backyards, gardens and open spaces throughout Reston, often browsing on landscaping and jumping into roadways. This has led to management programs that work to conserve habitat and control deer populations.

White-tailed Deer live about five years in the wild. In captivity, they can live up to 14, though it is illegal in Virginia to keep a deer as a pet. They get their name from the long white hair that grows on the underside of their tail and on the rump. They can outperform the average athlete, clocking in at 35 miles an hour and jumping eight feet high.

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Adaptable, Fast and Hungry

White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) vary in color ranging from reddish brown in summer to gray in winter. They have white fur around the eyes, muzzle and throat. Deer are herbivores with a specialized four-chambered stomach allowing them to consume a variety of plants, including poison ivy. They prefer woodland habitat rife with leaves, twigs, grass and lichens, but are highly adaptable. Deer eat eight pounds of food per 100 pounds of body weight daily. Weighing 100 – 200 pounds, that’s a lot of salads.

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Summer | 19 | Volume Twenty One


Herds, Habitat and Humans continued from page 1

WALKER NATURE CENTER

Females, known as does, generally give birth to two fawns in June following a seven-month gestation period. Fawns are born with white spots on their hindquarters that fade with age. Fawns are unlikely to be predated on in Reston except for the occasional coyote or bobcat. Most harassment comes in the form of off-leash dogs. If you encounter a fawn bedded down and alone, please leave it alone. Its mother is foraging for food and will return to her baby.

11450 Glade Drive, Reston, VA 20191 Enjoy year-round access to trails, free parking and restroom facilities dawn to dusk.

FEATURES

Male deer, called bucks, sprout antlers in the spring. By late summer, antlers are fully developed, growing several centimeters a day. They attract mates and are used by bucks to defend territory. They fall off annually, usually in late winter, providing nutrients for many animals including squirrels, mice, foxes and opossums.

72 acres of forested land, a picnic pavilion, demonstration gardens, educational signage, a campfire ring, two streams, a pond, the entrance to 44-acre Lake Audubon and an interpretive green building, known as Nature House.

NATURE HOUSE HOURS

Monday–Friday 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Closed on Tuesdays Saturday 10 a.m.–1 p.m. Sunday 1–4 p.m.

CLOSED

July 4 Independence Day

Bucking a Trend: Once a Threatened Species

Deer have a history of being a resource for humans by providing meat, pelts, sinew, and artistic inspiration. Following the arrival of European settlers in 1600, hunting increased and went largely unregulated for years. Whitetailed Deer were nearly extirpated by 1900. Through concerted efforts including habitat management, hunting regulation, and repopulation, White-tailed Deer eventually sprang back from the brink in the 1930s.

While this was a conservation success, it coincided with increased human growth. This close proximity with humans resulted in more car accidents with deer, an ongoing concern. Alert driving can help limit these collisions. Pay careful attention between October and December when males are in “rut,” searching for mates between dusk and dawn. White-tailed Deer have also exceeded the ecological carrying capacity of many natural areas, eating more plants than an area is capable of producing, destroying habitat for birds and insects. Deer browse further reduces the ability of native plants to reproduce, altering ecosystems for decades. Habitat restoration and deer fencing provides some abatement but balancing the overall population remains a focus.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

703-476-9689 • www.reston.org naturecenter@reston.org www.facebook.com/walkernaturecenter @restonnature @walkernaturecenter Groups: Please call ahead to arrange your visit. Branching Out is a quarterly publication of the Walker Nature Center (WNC), owned and operated by Reston Association. The mission of the WNC is to foster an environmental stewardship ethic in the community. It is named after Reston’s first Open Space and Nature Center Director, Vernon J. Walker.

Branching Out is printed on 100 percent recycled paper using soy ink. It is produced using 100 percent wind power. Please recycle.

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Deer and People: Meet Me in the Middle

Concerns over deer population led the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF) to institute new deer management protocols in the 1990s. VDGIF began to focus on species control through managed hunts, assistance for damaged crops, and land management education. Fairfax County maintains an archery hunting program at local parks to control deer including Difficult Run Stream Valley and Fred Crabtree near Reston. Overpopulation of deer can spread disease throughout the herd. One concern is Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD), which has been identified in four Virginia counties – Frederick, Clarke, Warren and Shenandoah. It is a fatal neurological illness, but there is no known link between CWD and humans. Another concern is Lyme disease caused by the deer tick and spread to humans via tick bite. Managed deer hunts help control population, prevent illness and provide opportunities for scientists to evaluate herd health. White-tailed Deer have an unbreakable connection with humans. From myths to movies and food on the table, they hold a long-standing place in human history. Land specialists, volunteers and citizens working together can ensure pragmatic management that helps conserve and promote a balanced ecosystem for the future. To learn about deer management and ways to limit conflicts, visit https://www.dgif.virginia.gov/wildlife/deer/


Wildlife Counts & Classes

Adults. Counts are free. Classes are $5 or free for count participants. Meet at the Nature Center, then explore Reston’s natural areas. Enjoy a free lunch, tally results and swap stories afterwards. Advance registration required.

Summer Bird Count

206201205 Sat

6/1 6:45 am – 12:00 pm

Butterfly Class: An Introduction

Learn to identify Reston’s common butterflies and get a basic introduction to their life history. 306201205 7/18 Thu 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Butterfly Count

Data will be submitted to the North American Butterfly Association. 306201205 7/20 Sat 9:45 am - 1:00 pm

Dragonfly Class: An Introduction

Learn to identify Reston’s common dragonflies and get a basic introduction to their behavior. 306201205 7/25 Thu 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Dragonfly Count

306201205 Sat

7/27 9:45 am-1:00 pm

FAIRY FESTIVAL All Ages • Saturday, July 13 • 10-11:30 a.m. $7/RA Member, $9/Non-member • Register by July 10 Calling all fairies young and old! Experience the magic of gossamer wings, fairy wands and whimsical tales. Explore a woodland trail filled with fairy houses and help to build a fairy house from natural materials. Sip fairy tea and enjoy refreshments with the Fairy Queen. Make a craft and find hidden fairies.

Please and Thank You By Katie Shaw Volunteers and donors play essential roles in Nature Center operations and environmental stewardship in Reston. Many thanks to all of the volunteers who helped with spring activities, including Earth Month events and the Apple Day of Service. Summer will bring great opportunities like participating in a wildlife count or Fairy Festival. If you’d like to get involved, contact Volunteer Reston Manager habrock@reston.org or fill out the volunteer application at www.reston.org.

Donors:

Chadwick Washington Moriarity Elmore & Bunn, Friends of Reston, Harris Teeter, John Marshall Bank, Odin Feldman Pittleman, Perron Chiropractic, Reston Community Center, Reston Garden Club, and all 130 participants and prize donors at the Nature Center 5K!

Volunteers:

Aamina Ahmad; Kevin Alegre; David Alfert; Fatima Alic; Dan Allen; American College of Radiology; Jan Archibald; Nayeli Arriola; Oliver Astor; Claudia Bascope; Joanne & David Bauer; Matt Bender; Angelie Benn; Julie & Charlie Bond; Bill Brown; Mary Brown; Nayya Buitrago; Bill Burton; Carlos Cabrera; Anne Cannizzaro; CDW; Abhiram Chadive; Caitlin Connelly; Don Coram; Grace David; Freya De Cola; Michael DeLillio; Marilyn Dicke; Ellen Douglas; Jody Douglas; Robin Duska; Sara Eddins; Cathe Fadel; June Ferrara; Nora Fotuhi; George Mason University (SAIL); First Line Technology; Kathleen Goh; Henry Goldberg; Cindy Gottel; Patricia Giles; Anu Girish; Maya & Ryan Gray; Janine Greenwood; Iman Hadji; Carol & Jay Hadlock; Christopher Hamilton; Harvest Heartwell; Maricela Hernandez-Recinos; Noel Htay; Graham Ishaq; RJ Jaamac; Jasper Ji; Keren Kabundi; Patricia Kardian; Maynur Karluk; Palmer & Mason Kasprowics; Ethan Ko; Mona Khalil; Abeer Khan; Juliette Lanser; Elice Larsen; Pat Lenz; Carmen Leon; Winnie Liang; Amanda Lichy; Paulette Lincoln-Baker; Anna Long; Elizabeth Luu; Mohamad Maalik; Dayna Mabry; Kristin Mace-LaCroix; Robert Macke; Priscilla Maradiaga; Lela Martinez; Sharon McHugh; Tara Mohammad-Razi; Jordan Meyer; Haleigh Morris; Kieran Murthy; Dhruv Naik; Terri Ostrowski; Julie & Nate Owen; Brenda Padilla; George Paine; Barbara Paolucci; Ethan Park; Barbara Pelzner; Ellen Perrins; Angela Pham; Elizabeth Piper; Mary Portelly; Danny Ramprashad; John Rankin; Jessica Reese; Talia Romero; Dina Roscigno; Tom Rubino; Gianna Ruiz-Arenas; Shafiya & Zaid Salahuddin; Abdelkarim & Ibrahim Sayed; Dana Schiebe; Nicholas Schimmel; Jim Seeley; Jim Seret; Parita & Zacharia Shah; Erik Silk; Surekha Sridhar; Bonnie Stauber; Rosemary Stefaniak; Margo Sterling; Laird Sutherland; Noelle Talarek; Anna Teodoro; Julie Thompson; Aiden Totten; Jonathan Villa; Patricia Wagner; Eve Wallin; Caleb, Joshua, & Victoria Wang; Michael Warder; Bob Williamson; Jack & Miye Wire; Brenda Van Doorn; Verna Webb; Betty Yakobson; Ethan Ye; Athan & Brook Zhang

Children and adults are encouraged to wear fairy costumes. Bring a homemade fairy house to display for a chance to win a prize!

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Register online with WebTrac www.restonwebtrac.org

Advance registration, including payment, is required for all nature activities unless otherwise noted. A WebTrac account is required for online registration. New accounts may take up to two business days for approval. If you have questions, need assistance or prefer not to register online, contact naturecenter@reston.org or 703-476-9689 ext. 5.

All programs will be held at the Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive, unless otherwise noted. Refunds are available with two weeks’ notice or if we cancel for any reason. Activities may be canceled due to severe weather, severe weather warnings or low enrollment. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

JUNE

NAME THAT ANIMAL

Can you tell an animal by just its eyes, nose, ears or tail? Play animal guessing games and match tails to animals hidden along the trail. Use your ears to listen to different animal sounds and make an animal mask. Register by May 31. 206121008 Mon Ages 3-5

6/3 10:00 am – 11:00 am $6/RA Member, $8/Non-member

OWL PROWL

Meet a wildlife rehabilitator from Secret Garden Birds and Bees for an up-close look at some live owls of Virginia. Then prowl along the trails in search of the Nature Center’s resident owls. It will be a hootin’ good time. Register by June 4. 206011008 6/7 Fri 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm WNC Fire Ring on Soapstone Dr. between Glade Dr. and Lawyers Rd. Adults & Children 5+ $7/RA Member, $9/Non-member DUCKY DAYS

Quack, quack! Join the duckling parade. Learn why male mallards are bright and how mother ducks care for their young. Waddle like a duck and make a ducky craft. Float duckies in water and look at a pond to see where real ducks could swim. Register by June 7. 206111001 Mon 6/10 Or Tue 6/11 10:00 am – 11:00 am Ages 18-35 months $7/RA Member, $9/Non-member

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CAMPFIRE- CELEBRATE SUMMER

206201051 6/28 Fri 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm Adults Free

206011003 6/14 Fri 7:00 pm– 8:30 pm WNC Fire Ring on Soapstone Drive between Glade Drive and Lawyers Road All Ages $6/RA Member, $8/Non-member

Summer is here, and it’s time to explore new territory. Make a walking stick that can travel with you on your next adventure. Choose the perfect stick, make a leather grip, and engrave your name or initials. All supplies included. Register by June 26.

School’s out for summer! Join us around the campfire. Sing songs, share stories and enjoy a memorable evening full of fun. Make a campfire cone- a fun twist on a marshmallow treat. Register by June 11.

JUNE BIRD WALK- WALKER NATURE CENTER/ LOWER SNAKEDEN STREAM VALLEY 6/16 Sun 7:30 am – 10:30 am Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive

WALKING STICK WORKSHOP

206131012 6/29 Sat 11:00 am–12:00 pm Ages 5-12 $8/RA Member, $10/Non-member

JULY

LAKE ANNE PADDLE

KIDS FISHING DERBY

Bring your fishing rod or borrow one of ours to compete in this fun morning of fishing. No experience necessary. We’ll provide bait, prizes and light refreshments. A fishing license is not required for kids. Adults are not permitted to fish during the kids’ time. Register by June 19. 206101301 6/22 Sat 9:30 am – 11:30 am Lake Audubon Boat Ramp, 2070 Twin Branches Road Ages 3-15 $5/RA Member, $7/Non-member

Canoe or kayak on Lake Anne with a naturalist. Search for wildlife that call the lake home. Learn some lake history and how residents can help the local watershed. We’ll look for waterfowl in the cove and enjoy a relaxing evening paddle. Boats and safety equipment provided. Register by July 1.

306011007 7/5 Fri 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm Lake Anne Plaza Boat Docks Adults and Children 10+ $7/RA Member, $9/Non-member

ENV. FILM- CHASING CORAL

Coral reefs around the world are vanishing at an unprecedented rate. A team of divers, photographers and scientists set out on a thrilling ocean adventure to discover why and to reveal the underwater mystery to the world. Registration recommended by June 27.

JULY BIRD WALK- TWIN BRANCHES NATURE TRAIL 7/7 Sun 7:30 am – 10:30 am Park on Glade Drive near Twin Branches Road.


BUZZING BEES

Flowers are blooming, and bees are busy gathering nectar and pollen. Get your own antennae and stingers and fly like a bee. Make a bee craft and taste a honey treat. Look for bees buzzing around flowers. Park at Hunters Woods Pool. Register by July 5. 306111001 Mon 7/8 Or Tue 7/9 10:00 am – 11:00 am Hunters Woods Pavilion - 2501 Reston Parkway Ages 18-35 months $7/RA Member, $9/Non-member CAMPFIRE- STARLIGHT AND FIRELIGHT

Enjoy the beauty of the night sky while sitting around a glowing campfire. Hear stories of the constellations and sing starry songs. Make a “Milky Way” s’more and watch stardust sizzle in the fire. Register by July 23.

306011008 7/31 Wed 7:30 pm– 9:00 pm The Lake House, 11450 Baron Cameron Ave. Adults and Children 5+ $6/RA Member, $8/Non-member

AUGUST

SUMMER SHORTS FILM FEST

Temperatures are hot outside, so join us inside for some of the coolest short films that shed new light on environmental topics in concise, creative and sometimes quirky ways. Popcorn and drinks for sale. Suggested donation $5. Copresented by Friends of Reston. Register by August 1.

306201052 8/2 Fri 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm Adult Free 206011003 7/26 Fri 7:00 pm–8:30 pm WNC Fire Ring on Soapstone Drive between Glade Drive and Lawyers Road All Ages $6/RA Member, $8/Non-member KNEE DEEP IN A CREEK

Hot days are perfect for dipping your feet into the cool water. Explore Snakeden Branch stream looking for tadpoles, minnows and other creatures. Wear your wading shoes and clothes that can get dirty. Nets and buckets provided. Register by July 24.

WHOSE HOOF?

What do horses, deer and unicorns have in common? They all have hooved feet! Take a journey through Reston’s history at the Pony Barn Pavilion. Make a footprint craft, and use your imagination on a short “trot” through the woods. Register by August 2.

What makes them glow and why do they do it? Learn what they eat and where they live. How can you attract them to your yard? Stroll by Lake Newport and explore Brown’s Chapel Park to catch a glimpse of this bioluminescent phenomenon. Make a glowing craft to take home. Register by July 28.

Stretch your summer experience by joining us for some fun around the campfire. Play games, share stories, sing silly songs and toast marshmallows with your family and friends. Register by August 13.

306011003 8/16 Fri 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm All Ages $6/RA Member, $8/Non-member STREAM SLOSH

Dip into a cool stream to escape the heat. Use a net to search for fish and frogs, and take a peek under rocks to look for insects. Wear wading shoes and clothes that can get dirty. Nets and buckets provided. Register by Aug. 15.

306011007 8/17 Sat 10:30 am – 12:00 pm All Ages $5/RA Member, $7/Non-member SUPER SLIME

Really gross or very cool, slime is important for many animals. Learn why some animals need slime to survive, and look for slimy creatures under logs and leaves. Make some slime of your 306111001 own. Register by August 18.

Mon 8/5 Or Tue 8/6 10:00 am – 11:00 am Ages 18-35 months $7/RA Member, $9/Non-member Pony Barn pavilion, Steeplechase Drive and Triple 306121008 Crown Road 7/27 Sat 10:30 am – 12:00 pm MOTHS BY MOONLIGHT Ages 3-5 $5/RA Member, $7/Non-member Moths are nocturnal insects that are important FIREFLIES IN JULY

CAMPFIRE FUN

pollinators and a source of food for many animals. We’ll set a light trap so you can get an up close look. Discover how moths can improve your yard, and how you can attract them. You’ll be amazed at the diversity of moths observed in Reston. Register by August 4.

306121008 8/21 Wed Ages 3-5

10:00 am – 11:00 am $6/RA Member, $8/Non-member

CRICKET CRAWL

Participate in a regional citizen science project to better understand cricket populations in the area. Meet for a crash course in cricket and katydid calls. Then go outside to listen for our target species and record our findings. Register by August 20.

306011008 306011008 8/23 8/7 Fri 8:00 pm – 9:00 pm Wed 8:00 pm – 9:00 pm Adults and Children 7+ $5/RA Member, $7/Non-member Adults and Children 5+ $5/RA Member, $7/Non-member

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Bat Craft

Steps

Materials

Cardboard tube (toilet paper or paper towel) Googly eyes Black or brown construction paper Brown or black paint Glue Single hole punch (optional) Black pipe cleaners (optional)

1. Paint the cardboard tube brown or black. Let dry. 2. Cut wings from construction paper. 3. Glue wings onto the back of the tube. 4. Glue on googly eyes. 5. Cut small, paper triangles for ears. Glue them onto the tube. 6. For legs, punch two holes at the bottom of the tube. 7. Cut a black pipe cleaner in half. Attach each piece to a hole.

Going Batty

By Earl the Squirrel (with help from Kelly Michienzi)

What’s small, brown, has wings, eats bugs and has amazing superpowers? Bats! Don’t worry, there’s no reason to be afraid of these cute winged animals. Bats are important because they eat bugs. In fact, the 7 types found in Reston are insectivores which means they only eat insects. Our smallest bat, the Little Brown Bat, can eat up to 1,000 bugs an hour! So, if you’re tired of pesky mosquitoes, encourage bats to visit your yard. One way is to install a bat house. Bat houses provide a safe place for bats to sleep and raise young. Bats are nocturnal which means they are active at night. The best time to see them flying and catching bugs is in the evening as it gets dark. Find an open area such as a field or lake that is surrounded by trees and look to the sky. If you’re lucky, they will show off their acrobatic skills while catching their dinner. Do you know what superpower bats have? Echolocation! The sound comes out of their mouths or noses, depending on the species. It is so high pitched that people can’t hear it. The sound travels like a wave that bounces off objects. The bat can figure out how far away the object is, how big it is and what direction it is moving by carefully listening to the echoes that come back to them. Pretty cool, right? If you’ve wondered why we don’t see bats in the winter, it’s because they are hibernating. Bats stay cozy and warm in a cave, rock crevice or tree hollow and sleep most of the season. They hang upside down and wrap their wings around their body. Their heart rate and breathing slows way down. A hibernating bat can go 15 minutes or longer between breaths. Talk about a superpower. How long can you hold your breath?

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Now that summer is here, keep an eye out for our bat friends. They will be very busy filling their bellies with bugs. And remember, unless you are a mosquito, there is no need to be afraid of these amazing creatures.

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Kids’ Corner


Green Living- Be Water Wise By Abby Stocking

With four lakes, three ponds and over 20 miles of streams, much of Reston’s charm is drawn from its beautiful waterways. The lakes alone provide ample opportunities for recreation like fishing or boating, wildlife viewing, and relaxation. Because of their importance to our community, we would be wise to consider what is going on beneath the picturesque surfaces. With record amounts of rainfall in 2018, our waterways were put to the test. Higher amounts of sediment and litter were observed. We also had algal blooms in at least three of our lakes indicating nutrient levels had gone out of balance, likely due to excess chemicals entering the water. As a community, it is our responsibility to keep our waterways healthy and vibrant. Here are four ways you can help. 1. Reduce chemical use on lawns and gardens. Consider organic alternatives such as compost or leaf mulch. Make it yourself in a compost bin or buy it commercially. If you have professional help with your lawn and garden, ask your provider to switch to organic products. 2. Install a rain barrel. Rain barrels attach to your downspouts, collecting water that can be used on gardens during dry weather. They reduce water usage and slow down water as it drains from roofs.

This helps to decrease sediments that end up in our lakes. Dredging sediment from the lakes is one of Reston Association’s most costly projects.

4. Reduce lawn size and replace with native plants. You will use less water and fertilizer. This should save your pocket book and increase the natural beauty of your landscape.

3. Install a rain garden. Rain gardens are specially designed to capture the flow of water from roofs, patios, driveways or lawns. They are an attractive way to temporarily hold and soak up water, reducing runoff. Water-loving native plants and soil filter pollutants out of the runoff. Installation may require professional help. A great homeowner’s guide to rain garden design and construction is available at https://bit.ly/2D1ISUT.

These are just a few of the steps that you can make to keep our lakes and streams thriving and our community as beautiful as ever.

Meet Pam Findley: Nature Center Specialist

My love of nature, especially animals, started at an early age, leading to degrees in Animal Science, Biology, and Animal Science Technology. I interned at the National Zoo where my duties included caring for river otters, sea lions and wolves. I worked for 5 years as a veterinary technician at the VirginiaMaryland College of Veterinary Medicine in Blacksburg. It was my participation with the Fairfax Master Naturalists that led me to volunteer at Walker Nature Center in 2011. After a few months, I was delighted to join the staff as a seasonal Teacher Naturalist. I am excited about my new year-round position and look forward to serving our patrons in this role. My interests include spending time with my family, visiting natural places, hiking, photography, reading, and singing in my church choir.

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PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID RESTON, VA PERMIT NO. 21

www.reston.org Walker Nature Center 11450 Glade Drive Reston, Virginia 20191

Come to Camp at the Walker Nature Center Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive Questions? Contact 703-435-6518 or kmichienzi@reston.org

Nature Tots Ages: Days: Time:

Walker’s Rangers

3 – 5 by Sept. 30, 2019 (Campers must be potty trained.)

Ages:

6 – 9 by Sept. 30, 2019

Monday – Friday, Four One-week sessions

Days:

Monday – Friday, Four one-week sessions

A.M. Session: 8:45-11:45 a.m., P.M. Session: 1-4 p.m.

Time:

9 a.m. - Noon

Fee: RA members–Sessions 1B, 3B, 4A = $95/session Session 2A= $76/session Non-members– Sessions 1B, 3B, 4A = $120/session Session 2A = $96/session

Session 1B: June 24-28 Fairy Tale Adventures Session 2A: July 1, 2, 3, 5 No Camp on July 4 Nature’s Rainbow Session 3B: July 22-26 Growing Up

Fee: RA members-$95/session Non-members-$120/session

Session 2B: July 8-12 Things with Wings Session 3A: July 15-19 Nature’s Cuisine Session 4B: August 5-9 Dirt Detectives Session 5A: August 12-16 Water Wonders

Session 4A: July 29-August 2 Summer Splash

Winter Volume Twenty | 1918/19 | Volume Summer Twenty One

Profile for Reston Association

Branching Out Summer 2019  

WNC Newsletter

Branching Out Summer 2019  

WNC Newsletter