Page 1

Walker Nature Center

A LOOK INSIDE • Calendar 4 • Kids’ Corner 6 • The Good, the Bad and the Banned 7

Nature Notes MARCH By Sharon Gurtz

• • • •

Bluebirds are looking for nests. Groundhogs emerge and mate. Spotted Salamanders lay eggs in vernal pools. Maple trees have red blooms.

APRIL • • • •

Dogwood and Red Bud trees bloom. American Toads lay eggs in ponds and streams. Spring Azure and Tiger Swallowtail butterflies are in flight. Bloodroot, Trillium and Virginia Bluebells bloom.

MAY • • • •

Barred Owl babies are active. White-tailed Deer are born. May Apple, Wood Poppy and Jack-in-the-Pulpit bloom. Eastern Box Turtles lay eggs.

BRANCHING OUT Planting for a Web of Life By Idalina Walker

Have you spent the winter feeding Numerous studies have shown that and admiring the local birds? The seed insect populations have declined by 45 you put out was certainly appreciated percent in the last 40 years. A simple by our feathered friends. But with the indicator you may have observed is the arrival of spring, our local birds go relatively fewer smashed bugs on your into overdrive, searching for habitat windshield after a long car trip. So what that has a suitable insect population can you do to help the insect population to feed its young. Did you know which is such an integral part of that it takes more than 6,000 the food chain? caterpillars to feed a healthy clutch of chickadees to Where it all begins maturity? Where the Nature is organized caterpillars come from into ecosystems within and which species of which there are complex plants they live on food webs. When we are questions that we learned about simple need to ask ourselves food chains in our first more frequently, biology classes, “grass” especially if we try to was a common example think like a chickadee. of the basic trophic level. But as our understanding of Many native insects have evolved ecosystems deepens, we come to be dependent on specific host to appreciate that it’s not as simple as plants, resistant to any toxins which the hawk that ate the mouse that ate they may contain. They lay their eggs the grasshopper which dined on the on these hosts so that their young grass. In reality, all grass is not created will have an instant and nutritious equal and monocultures of grass that meal once hatched. Unfortunately, comprise the perfect lawns in much of non-native landscaping plants and suburbia are having a drastic effect on invasives have different chemistry the health of our ecosystems. than their native counterparts. Continued on page 2 Laying eggs on them will lead to a caterpillar’s demise.

Spring 17 Volume Nineteen


Walker Nature Center 11450 Glade Drive, Reston, VA 20191

Planting for a Web of Life Continued from page 1 It is often said that biodiversity is the key to a healthy ecosystem, but many people have yet to learn that biodiversity starts in their own yards.

Enjoy year-round access to trails, free parking and restroom facilities dawn to dusk.

FEATURES

It takes a village

72 acres of forested land, a picnic pavilion, demonstration gardens, educational signage, a campfire ring, two streams, a pond, the entrance to 44-acre Lake Audubon and an interpretive green building, known as Nature House.

Integrating native plants into the spaces that surround you could be a rewarding undertaking this spring. Think of the happiness you would feel as you watch songbirds and butterflies find a safe and scrumptious haven within your backyard or on your balcony. Your efforts could be the difference between a pair of chickadees or bluebirds raising young in your neighborhood or having to look for habitat elsewhere. If you have had poor luck with gardening in the past, it may improve with native plants. While all new plantings require some TLC to get started, once established, native plants are typically more resilient to temperature and precipitation fluctuations and less afflicted by pests and disease.

NATURE HOUSE HOURS

Experiment on a small scale in order to learn what works for your yard. If space is limited, you can begin with a deep container planter or just a few plants in a bare spot.

Monday–Friday 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Closed on Tuesdays

Saturday 10 a.m.–1 p.m. Sunday 1–4 p.m. CLOSED May 29 Memorial Day

FOR MORE INFORMATION

703-476-9689 • www.reston.org naturecenter@reston.org

Where to start

Checklist • Designate your planting area. • Evaluate your conditions, especially sunlight, moisture and soil. • Know your region. Reston is in the Piedmont Region of the mid-Atlantic. • Research what plants are native and will grow in your conditions. • Select some host plants for the butterflies (milkweed, asters, violets, etc.). • Make a seasonal plan. Note bloom times and which plants are evergreen versus deciduous.

www.facebook.com/walkernaturecenter

@restonnature Groups: Please call ahead to arrange your visit. Branching Out is a quarterly publication of the Walker Nature Center (WNC), owned and operated by Reston Association. The mission of the WNC is to foster an environmental stewardship ethic in the community. It is named after Reston’s first Open Space and Nature Center Director, Vernon J. Walker.

Creating a haven

You can have it all, a beautiful garden that supports a variety of wildlife. It is an amazing experience to create your own food web right in your yard. Whether you are looking to eventually transform your entire garden or simply add some plants to an existing plot, you can start with removing invasives and replanting with natives. While you may be planning for wildflowers, don’t forget to mix in some ferns for lush greenery and some woody natives such as Northern Spicebush, Highbush Blueberry or Arrowwood Viburnum. Many of them are important host plants, too. Monarch caterpillar feeding on Milkweed Sources Bringing Nature Home by Doug Tallamy Plant NoVa Natives by the Virginia Native Plant Society (available at Nature House)

Branching Out is printed on 100 percent recycled paper using soy ink. It is produced using 100 percent wind power. Please recycle.

2

(Asclepias tuberosa)


Please and Thank You By Katie Shaw

Bird Walks 7:30-10:30 a.m. Free for adults.

Volunteers and donors play essential roles in nature center operations and environmental stewardship in Reston. We are grateful to everyone who shares their time and resources to the benefit of the community. Spring will be bursting with volunteer opportunities around Reston’s Arbor Day and Earth Day. We are also looking to train new Welcome Desk Assistants to greet visitors and help with activity reservations and sales transactions at Nature House. Contact habrock@reston.org or fill out the volunteer application at www.reston.org.

Cosponsored by Audubon Society of Northern Virginia and The Bird Feeder store. No registration required.

Sunrise Valley Wetlands & Polo Fields Sunday, March 19 Park on the left (west) side of the office building at 12700 Sunrise Valley Drive.

Lower Glade Stream Valley Sunday, April 9 Park on Glade Drive near Twin Branches Road.

Twin Branches Nature Trail Sunday, April 23 Park on Glade Drive near Twin Branches Road.

Glade Stream Valley/Sapsucker Woods Sunday, May 7 Park at Glade Pool, 11550 Glade Drive.

Stratton Woods Park Sunday, May 21 Park at Stratton Woods Park, 2431 Fox Mill Road.

Charitable donations are also greatly appreciated. Tax deductible contributions are gratefully received by our 501c3 supporting organization, Friends of Reston, 11450 Glade Drive, Reston, VA 20191 or donate online at www.friendsofreston.org. Include a note that your donation is for the nature center. You will receive a letter for tax purposes. We also encourage you to check out our Amazon.com wish list. Under “Wish List,” select “Find a Wish List or Registry.” Type in “Walker Nature Center.” Purchase an item and Amazon will ship it directly to us. In-kind gifts are also tax-deductible, and we will send a letter for your records.

Donors:

Charlie & Julie Bond, Doug & Penelope Britt, Damien DeAntonio in honor of Annielle’s 4th birthday, Marilyn Dicke, Michele Esposito, Alicia & Luiz Figueiredo, John & Karen Olive, Norbert Pink, David Shaw, Chuck & Beverly Veatch, Eric Weinstein

Volunteers:

Native Plant Sale Place orders by Friday, March 31, 5 p.m. Pick up on Saturday, April 15, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Species to include a variety of sun and shade loving wildflowers and ferns.

Joanne & David Bauer, Matt Bender, Julie & Charlie Bond, Tom Blackburn, Bill and Della Brown, Bill Burton, Anne Cannizzaro, Emma Cantwell, Ian Carmack, Don Coram, Freya De Cola, Marilyn Dicke, Stacey Evers, Millan Fentress, June Ferrara, Michael Filchock, Cindy Foster, Janine Greenwood, Carol & Jay Hadlock, Heidi & John Lankau, Peter Larkins, Steve & Doreen Larson, Julia Persing, Pat Lenz, Paulette Lincoln-Baker, Raja & Rita Mazumder, Sharon McHugh, Mary McLean, Ilene & Jim McNeal, Tony Musgrave, Cynthia O’Connell, Terri Ostrowski, Barbara Paolucci, Ellen Perrins, Jim Seret, Kay & Jillian Schmid, Sandra Twohie, Brenda Van Doorn, Jenny Vick, Verna Webb

See the plant list on the order form available online at www.reston.org and at Nature House.

Contact naturecenter@reston.org or 703-476-9689 for more information.

Special thanks to Audubon Society of Northern Virginia for partnering with us to bring the Audubon Photography Awards Show to the Nature Center.

3


WALKER NATURE C Register online with WebTrac www.restonwebtrac.org

NEW- Advance registration, including payment, is required for all nature activities unless otherwise noted. A WebTrac account is required. New accounts may take up to two business days for approval. If you have questions, need assistance or prefer not to register online, contact naturecenter@reston.org or 703-476-9689 ext. 3.

All programs will be held at the Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive, unless otherwise noted. Refunds are available with two weeks’ notice or if we cancel for any reason. Activities may be canceled due to severe weather, severe weather warnings or low enrollment. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

March

DR. SEUSS’S BIRTHDAY PARTY

Come to a birthday party for Dr. Seuss, one of America’s favorite children’s authors. Did you know that Dr. Seuss based many of his characters off his memories of trips to the zoo? See how his imaginative stories were often inspired by nature. Create your own extraordinary creatures and celebrate with a birthday treat and trufulla trees. Register by Feb. 27. 106121008 3/2 Thu 10:00 am -11:00 am or 1:30 pm -2:30 pm Ages 3-5 $7/RA Member, $9/Non-member RAPTOR EXPLORATION

Meet a wildlife rehabilitator from the Raptor Conservancy and see some live raptors up close. Then go for a walk to see old raptor nest sites and learn where and what to look for as evidence of new nest activity. Register by March 1. 106011008 3/4 Sat 10:30 am -12:00 pm All Ages $7/RA Member, $9/Non-member NATURE SHAPES

There are all kinds of shapes to be found in nature. Look for circles in trees, triangles on birds and square-shaped rocks. Make a shape bracelet that will help you on our hike. Eat a snack of different shapes, too. Register by March 2. 106111001 3/6 Mon 10:00 am-11:00 am or 3/7 Tue 10:00 am -11:00 am Ages 18-35 months $7/RA Member, $9/Non-member

ORGANIC GARDENING

Organic gardening uses landscape design and the environment to maximize the health and the development of plants and soil without the use of commercial pesticides and fertilizers. Learn about this method of sustainable gardening, and bring your questions. Registration required by March 7. 106201006 3/9 Thu 7:00 pm-8:00 pm Adults $5/RA Member, $7/Non-member PARENTS’ NIGHT OUT: ST. PADDY’S DAY

Parents: Enjoy a night to yourselves while your kids have a blast at the nature center. Kids: Green is the theme for this night of fun. Make a green craft and mix together a snack made up of green-colored foods. Go on a night hike and look for leprechauns hiding along the trails. Play some group games and end the night by watching cartoons starring our favorite animal characters. Registration required by March 14. 106131010 3/17 Fri 7:00 pm-9:30 pm Ages 5 -12 $15/RA Member, $20/Non-member SPRING BULB CONTAINERS

Fill your home with the beauty and fragrance of the season naturally. Revel in the coming of spring by planting beautiful bulbs that will blossom indoors. Learn which bulbs to plant in containers, how to care for them and take home a planter to watch grow. All supplies included. Register by March 23. 106011012 Sun All Ages

3/26 2:00 pm-3:00 pm $7/RA Member, $9/Non-member

FILM: HOMETOWN HABITAT

This documentary shows how and why native plants are critical to the survival and vitality of local ecosystems. Entomologist Doug Tallamy sounds the alarm on the misuse of non-native plants in landscaping as well as habitat and species loss,

4

showing how each individual has the power to conserve resources, restore wildlife habitat and bring beauty to their patch of earth. Registration recommended by March 30. 106201051 Fri Adults

3/31 7:00 pm-9:00 pm Free, $5 suggested donation

April NATURE FOOLS’ DAY

Animals can play all kinds of tricks on one another. Discover who uses camouflage to hide in plain sight. Learn why some animals mimic others in sound or sight. Look at photo examples of animal “foolery” and take a short hike to see what we can find. Register by March 29. 206011008 4/1 Sat 11:00 am-12:00 pm All Ages $5/RA Member, $7/Non-member LITTLE SPROUTS

The perfect time to teach little ones about plant life is now. This simple kid’s science project is a hands-on way to show what really happens to seeds buried in the earth. Grow seeds with toddlers and explore the wonders of life. Go on an adventure to look for new plants and share a themed snack. Register by March 31. 206111001 4/3 Mon 10:00 am -11:00 am or 4/4 Tue 10:00 am-11:00 am Ages 18-35 months $7/RA Member, $9/Non-member


CENTER CALENDAR MR. GRASS HEAD CREATIONS

Growing grass heads is a fun way for kids to celebrate spring with their own patch of green grass. Take a nature walk to find the first signs of the greening of the season. Read a story about spring and decorate grass head planter to take home. Register by April 10. 206121008 4/13 Thu 10:00 am -11:00 am or 1:30 pm -2:30 pm Ages 3-5 $7/RA Member, $9/Non-member EARTH DAY PROJECT

Celebrate Earth Day by digging in to spruce up the nature center with new plantings and fresh woodchipped trails. Individuals, families and companies are encouraged to participate. Register by April 10. Groups with more than 5 people, contact habrock@reston.org or 703-435-7986. 206011202 Mon Adults and Children 5+

4/17 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm Free

A DIFFERENT WAY: LIVING SIMPLY IN A COMPLEX WORLD

Join this six-week discussion course to examine how the concept “living simply so that others may simply live” resonates in the modern world. People choose simple living for many reasons—to invest time in things that matter most, reduce waste, use technology intentionally, or question messages that tell them what to believe or who to be. Connect individual values and actions to the larger picture and seek to empower others to make change in their lives, communities and the world. Receive a book of readings that form the basis of each discussion. You will be contacted to pick up your book when it arrives. Registration required by April 3. Facilitator: Helene Shore 206201004 4/17-5/22 Mondays 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm Adults $46/RA member, $58/Non-member EARTH DAY FUN

Celebrate our big blue planet at this carnival style Earth Day program. Activities will include recycling games and craft making. Register by April 19. 206131008 4/22 Sat 11:00 am -12:00 pm Ages 5-12 $6/RA Member, $8/Non-member child

FILM: THIS CHANGES EVERYTHING

An epic attempt to re-imagine the vast challenge of climate change, this film presents seven groups on the front lines of environmental struggles from India to Montana and Alberta to Beijing. Inspired by Naomi Klein’s non-fiction best-seller, Klein builds to an exciting idea that we can seize the crisis of climate change and transform our economic system into something better. Registration recommended by April 27. 206201051 4/28 Fri 7:00 pm-9:00 pm Adults Free, $5 suggested donation

May TREE FRIENDS

Trees are important to every living creature. Discover how they provide food, shelter and oxygen to animals and people. Meet some big trees, make a tree craft and enjoy a story and snack in their shade. Register by April 28. 206111001 5/1 Mon 10:00 am-11:00 am or 5/2 Tue 10:00 am-11:00 am Ages 18-35 months $7/RA Member, $9/Non-member MOTHER’S DAY TEA PARTY

Bring your mom to a delightful morning at the Nature Center. Sip tea or juice and sample a variety of pastries and fruits. Make a bouquet of paper flowers for mom to display on her special day. Take a stroll through the gardens to look for spring-blooming wildflowers. Register by May 10. 206011008 5/13 Sat 10:30 am-11:30 am All Ages $7/RA Member, $9/Non-member WINE TASTING

Sample red and white wines along with a variety of meats, cheeses and crackers inside Nature House. Tour the gardens and a short walking trail with a naturalist, looking for spring wildflowers and birds. Bring a friend or meet a new one. Registration required by May 16.

CAMPFIRE: NIGHT SOUNDS

Frogs croak and katydids chirp. Summer is a noisy time of year in nature. Insects and birds fill the air with sounds. Listen and discover who is making them through stories, songs and fun activities. Park on Soapstone Dr. between Glade Dr. and Lawyers Road Register by May 16. 206011003 5/19 Fri 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm Walker Nature Center Fire Ring All Ages $6/RA Member, $8/Non-member TURTLE TRACKING

Learn all about all our wonderful Reston turtles. Some live on land. Some live in water. Look at turtle shells, meet a box turtle, and make a turtle craft. Finish your adventure by going on a turtle search. Register by May 20. 206121008 5/23 Tue 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm or 5/24 Wed 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm Ages 3-5 $7/RA Member, $9/Non-member FILM: CAN YOU DIG THIS

Four unlikely gardeners in South Los Angeles discover what happens when they put their hands in the soil. See how the urban gardening movement is taking root, transforming neighborhoods and changing lives in the process. These “gangster gardeners” have created an inspirational oasis in the middle of one of the most notoriously dangerous places in America. Registration recommended by May 25. 206201051 5/26 Fri 7:00 pm-9:00 pm Adults Free, $5 suggested donation SALAMANDER SEARCH

Ever wonder where to find salamanders? Which ones live in the water? Which ones live under logs? Learn about the Reston’s salamanders and go on a search to find some slimy ones. Register by May 25. 206011008 Sun All Ages

5/28 1:30 pm-3:00 pm $6/RA Member, $8/Non-member

106201006 5/25 Thu 4:30 pm-6:00 pm Adults 55+ $12/RA Member, $16/Non-member

5


Cottontail Puppet Materials:

Brown paper lunch bag Markers Paper Cotton balls Glue Scissors

Directions:

1. Lay the paper bag down on a table. Make sure the flap is facing up. 2. Use markers to draw two eyes, a nose, a mouth and whiskers on the flap. 3. Cut out two rabbit ear shapes from the paper. If the paper is white, use your markers to give it some brown color. 4. Flip the bag over so that the flap faces down. Glue the bottom of the ears to the top edge of the bag. The ears should stick up above the bag. 5. Glue 4-5 cotton balls in the center of the bag for the rabbit’s tail. 6. Once the glue is dry, put your hand inside the paper bag. You can make the puppet “talk” by making the flap move.

Here Comes the Cottontail By Earl the Squirrel (with help from Abby Stocking)

The sight of wildflowers blooming can be quite exciting – and not just for humans. When wildflowers first appear, we forest animals know that the seasons are changing from winter to spring. This is important to us because in the winter, food can be hard to find. But in spring, new plants with their soft green parts and delicious flowers give us much more food to fill our bellies. One animal that really looks forward to these new plants is the Cottontail Rabbit. Cottontail Rabbits are a soft grayish brown color. They get their names because they have a white tail that looks like a big cotton ball. Cottontails can live in forest edges, meadows and grassy areas. Unlike me, they cannot climb trees. Rabbits get their food from plants that are low to the ground. Although rabbits are often shown eating carrots in cartoons, in nature they prefer wild strawberries, clover and grasses. They will also eat foods from people’s vegetable gardens. Be sure to protect your plants with a small fence if you want to keep Peter Rabbit from eating your favorite veggies before you get a chance!

Word Search

Find and circle the words in the list below. Words can be horizontal, vertical, diagonal or backwards. W A F U C R E T T I L A C Q N

R I U V K F B S V T W I O G K

S E L G S S C X Q W O Z T U T

C X V D M P H E W W T H T X F

Z K Z O F H U Z L U D U O O A

S V C W L L R F I J A G N Z X

Z J I F Z C O I J D G N T J Q

S G R L C U U W V X H I A K P

D J U A X R A M E M X R I T A

Q K N C L E W R X R U P L T T

S T R A W B E R R Y Y S I O W

R S Y D N P A U T E Q B P H U

U H R D I H D D T F B M R U X

U E Q X D D X Z E A X N I N C

C Y B L K D L Y R K A W S X Z

Cottontail Wildflower Litter Rabbit Clover Spring Strawberry

Like wildflowers, baby rabbits begin to appear soon after spring arrives. A mama rabbit usually has 3-6 babies at one time. A group of baby rabbits is called a litter. A mama rabbit could have 3-4 litters between spring and early fall. Now that’s a lot of rabbits! The babies stay in their nest for the first two weeks of their lives. The nest is usually a hole in the ground that has a soft layer of leaves, grass and fur. After about one month, the babies move out on their own. This spring, get outside and enjoy the show of wildflowers on a path or trail near you. Who knows, maybe you’ll even be lucky enough to spot an adorable Cottontail Rabbit that is enjoying the wildflowers, too.

6

Kids’ Corner


The Good, the Bad and the Banned By Sharon Gurtz

There are “good” plants that are desirable to have in our yards because they are attractive and benefit other species, but there are also plants that, despite their good looks, can harm our local environment, landing them on the “bad” list. Plants considered most harmful can end up on a list of “banned” plants that Reston Association(RA) – and other organizations charged with protecting our natural environment – prohibit residents from planting and encourage residents to remove if found in their yards.

Invaders amongst us

It may sound like something from a science fiction movie, but we have invasive species among us. They have been introduced to our area, either accidentally or on purpose. When introduced in a new area, these plants do not have the natural wildlife consumers, parasites or diseases that keep their populations in check. Growth is typically aggressive and can smother native wildflowers, shrubs or trees and lead to a lack of biodiversity. There are non-native naturalized plants that are not invasive in nature, but the ones that should really get our attention are the ones that send up a tangle of vines or spread quickly via underground runners.

Expanded list of prohibited plants in Reston

Since 2008, RA has banned the planting of eight well-known invasive species such as Bamboo (Bambusa spp.) and Flowering Pears (Pyrus calleryana cultivars). In 2016, the RA Board of Directors expanded this list to include all plants on the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) Heritage Program’s invasive plant list.

This is a large list including 90 invasive plant species that threaten or potentially threaten natural areas, parks and other protected lands in Virginia. Unfortunately, prohibited does not mean unavailable. Many of the species on the list can be purchased at nurseries and garden centers. Two popular examples are Periwinkle (Vinca major and minor) and English Ivy (Hedera helix), which are sold as ground cover plants for shade. When shopping for alternatives, look for Green and Gold (Chrysogonum virginianum), Golden Ragwort (Packera aurea), Virginia Creeper (Pathenocissus quinquefolia) as well as a number of native ferns. These plants are also deer resistant.

English ivy (Hedera helix) Photo by: Chris Evans Country: United States Organization: University of Illinois http://www.forestryimages.org

We recommend that residents review the DCR list and seek good native plant alternatives. Removing invasive plants and filling those gaps with natives will enhance your yard by protecting your trees, reducing mosquitoes and helping the animals that depend on them such as butterflies. Native plants can be purchased at our spring sale (see page 3) or from the native plant sections of local nurseries.

For more information • • •

View the complete list of Reston’s banned plants at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/ natural-heritage/invsppdflist. Purchase the guide Native Plants for Northern Virginia at the Nature Center or view it online at www.novaregion.org/DocumentCenter/ View/10615. Grab RA’s Invasive Plants brochure at the Nature Center or view it online at www.reston.org

Periwinkle (Vinca minor) Photo by: Deena Sharon Chadi Country: United States http://www.forestryimages.org

Please direct questions to RA’s environmental resource staff at CSFstaff@ reston.org or 703-437-7658 or the Nature Center at naturecenter@reston.org or 703-476-9689.

Reston’s Arbor Day Reston’s Arbor Day Friday, March 24 (rain or shine) 9:30 a.m.– Noon Locations: TBD

Reston is a Tree City USA as certified by the National Arbor Day Foundation. Join us as we plant and celebrate trees and shrubs. Volunteers will be treated to a pizza lunch following a special flag raising ceremony. Register at www.restonwebtrac.org. Groups–please contact Ha Brock at ha@reston.org or 703-435-7986. Perfect for gardeners, small companies, scout groups and students.

7


PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID RESTON, VA PERMIT NO. 21

www.reston.org Walker Nature Center 11450 Glade Drive Reston, Virginia 20191

NATURE HOUSE 5K RUN & WALK

Saturday, April 8, 8 a.m. Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive

Adult $25 before April 1 $30 regular Children $15 before April 1 $20 regular Register at www.active.com or in person starting at 7 a.m. on race day. Get into nature on one of the most scenic courses in the area. There will be lots of prizes and refreshments following the race.

Volunteers needed. Contact habrock@ reston.org or call 703-435-7986.

Sat, May 6, 1-5 pm (rain or shine)

Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive All Ages Welcome. FREE Entertainment Live Animals Fishing Activities Craft Making for Kids Displays and Information from Environmental Groups Canoe and Kayak Rentals on Lake Audubon ($5) Native Plant Sale with Nature By Design

Volunteers needed. Contact habrock@reston.org or call 703-435-7986. Entertainment Sponsor: Reston Community Center Ride your bike or walk to the event for a free drink.

See www.restonwebtrac.org for more event updates.

Spring 17 Volume Nineteen

Profile for Reston Association

Branching out spring 2017  

WNC Newsletter

Branching out spring 2017  

WNC Newsletter