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THE 2 SECTIONS 22 PAGES

Volume LIV No. 13

R EPORTER Serving Chicago Ridge, Evergreen Park, Hickory Hills, Oak Lawn, Palos Hills and Worth

USPS 118-690

75¢ $1.00

Thursday, June 6, 2013

Evergreen adopts ‘flip’ ordinance Buying, renovating and then selling THEa home in the village could cost you Baseball

Mustangs’ run 2 SECTIONS 22 PAGES ends with loss to Hilltoppers Volume XLVII No. 50

Softball

Marist upset by Sandburg in sectional final In Sports OL Park Dist. will use $4M in grant money for upgrades Oak Lawn opens new Senior Center Stories on Page 4

Reader Poll Should ComEd compensate Oak Lawn residents whose electrical appliances were damaged during a power surge in March? Vote on Facebook at The Reporter or at thereporteronline.net, call us at 448-6161 or email thereporter@comcast.net

R EPORTER

By Laura Bollin

Police News.....................2 Our Neighborhood..........4 Sudoku...........................4 School...........................5 Commentary...................6 Consumer.....................7 Crossword......................8 Death Notices.................8 Calendar........................11

columnists Dee Woods...................12 Wine Guy......................12

75¢

amount owed to the village will be deducted from the cash bond,     Evergreen Park trustees on and the owner will be refunded Monday voted unanimously to the remainder. amend the village’s building code     The ordinance amendment was ordinance and require home-buy- proposed by Evergreen Park Builders who plan to renovate and then ing Commissioner Ed Clohessy. sell – or “flip” -- their houses to Clohessy did not return multiple pay a $10,000 cash bond. calls placed during the past two     The bond will weeks seeking Chicago Ridge, Evergreen Park, Hills, Oak Lawn, Palos Hills and Worth Thursday, March 1, 2007 be required Serving for comment for Hickory this ‘We want our neighbor- story. vacant residential buildings hoods to remain strong and     “People come that will not into town and be occupied by secure. We are not here to rehab and rent     Chicago Ridge resident Karen Bruck and her friend, Keri Saikin of Detroit, hold hands during the owner. see flippers make money… homes, and we the opening lap of the Relay For Life of Tinley Park/Orland Park, held last Saturday at Tinley Park     The amendwant the work This is not about people done properly to High School. Bruck, a cancer survivor who lost her husband to the disease, was the event’s keynote ment states speaker. the bond will who want to buy something give them an inbe returned to vestment in the and make a fast buck.’ the home-buycommunity,” Sexer in 30 days — Evergreen Park Mayor ton said. “There if the planned has been an influx Jim Sexton of homes bought renovations are completed and by large companies a certificate of that don’t reside in occupancy has been issued. Ad- Evergreen Park. They buy and fix ditional $500 bonds for plumbing the homes, then rent them. We want and electrical work will also be our neighborhoods to remain strong required. If the work is not com- and secure. We are not here to see pleted within 30 days, the village flippers make money.” way ComEd handled things, he due to a power surge,” Olejniczak will notify the homeowner he or     Sexton said the ordinance will By Laura Bollin said. said. “They said they did a forshe has an additional 30 days to protect the residents of Evergreen     Energy provider ComEd has in    “I thought Oak Lawn residents mal investigation, but they didn’t complete the work. If the work is Park. not completed after that second 30-     “If you live here, this will raise formed Oak Lawn village officials and officials were very, very com- share any information. They were day period, the village will complete the value of your home,” Sexton it will not compensate customers municative with ComEd, and I judge, jury and decider throughthe work at the owner’s expense said. “This is not about people for damage caused to comput- thought what was being asked out this whole process. It was plus an administrative fee that is who want to buy something and ers and electrical appliances by was more than fair and reason- unfair and one-sided.” a power surge in March. able,” Deetjen said.     Olejniczak said ComEd is 25 percent of the project’s cost. The make a fast buck.”     The surge purportedly caused     ComEd has called the incident making too much money off of by a raccoon on March 10 knocked an “act of God” and claims no residents, and that municipalities out electricity to more than 1,000 responsibility, which has irked must to “stand together” against residents. The incident fried com- Olejniczak. the electric company. puters and other electrical appli-     “Oak Lawn is a working-class     “They are the only company I ances, according to Oak Lawn community,” the trustee said. know of that sets and increases village officials. “People are doing without tele- their prices, and tells you what     Oak Lawn village manager visions and computers because a great job they are doing,” Oleand definitely foresee having it Larry Deetjen and Trustee of ComEd’s inability to prevent jniczak said. “Anytime somethere this summer, along with Alex Olejniczak (District 2) plan a power surge. I am passionate thing happens with a power next summer, as well,” Bennett to take the case to the Illinois and vocal about this, and I am outage, it is somebody else’s stated at the Palos Hills City Commerce Commission, which not going to stop.” fault. Residents of Oak Lawn Council’s Committee Meeting regulates ComEd and will deter-     The surge and outage occurred need to stand up to ComEd, held May 30. mine if the company must pay early on a Sunday morning in an and residents throughout IlliBy Kelly White     The city is hoping to ink a for some or all of the damage. area bounded by 87th and 99th nois need to stand up to them. Correspondent 10-year deal with Moraine Val- The village plans to bring the streets and Cicero and Central Until we unite together, they ley Community College to hold matter to the commission within avenues. will continue to blow smoke     Palos Hills Friendship Fest the fest on the Triangle, Ben- the next week.     “They said all claims were de- about how great the power will move this summer back nett added.     Deetjen is disappointed in the nied for the massive power outage system is.” to its original location on the     Friendship Fest 2013 is schedso-called Moraine Valley Tri- uled to feature Woody’s Menagangle. erie Educational Wildlife Show,     The city’s annual summer Jo Don Farms Petting Zoo and festival, scheduled to be held Pony Rides and a car show, in Thursday, July 11 through Sun- addition to the always popular day, July 14, was held the past carnival and beer tent. The muthree years on a piece of prop- sical headlining act will be The erty in the 10900 block of 88th Beatles tribute band American Avenue. The event will return English, and other acts schedthis year to a triangular plot uled to perform include Infinof land owned by Moraine Val- ity, R-Gang, The Breakfast Club, ley Community College at 107th Modern Day Romeos, The DifStreet and 88th Avenue. ference and Epic. A fireworks     “We have held the Friendship display will close out the fest Fest at this location in the past on Sunday, July 14.

Walk of life

ComEd denies responsibility for damaging power surge

OL officials plan to contact state Commerce Commission

Friendship Fest heading back to Moraine Triangle American English will again headline city’s summer bash

Manhole worries prompt resident to address Village Bd. By Laura Bollin

index

USPS 118-690

    A Worth resident who claims he saw a manhole cover blow off of a sanitary sewer during a storm last week is worried about a potentially dangerous situation     Jack McGrath told the Village Board at its meeting Tuesday that a Metropolitan Water Reclamation District manhole cover had been moved off of the sanitary sewer on a sidewalk on the west side of Ridgeland Avenue at 109th Street at 11:45 p.m. May 28.     “It is right in the middle of the walkway, and with the cover off, that is 150 feet, or 15 stories, straight down,” McGrath said. “We have to go back to the drawing board, and something has to be done. That cover is usually lifted by a crane. It is a dangerous situation.”     McGrath alerted the Chicago Ridge and Worth police departments, which both responded to

his call, he said. An MWRD worker replaced the 800-pound manhole cover later that night. The cover weighs about 800 pounds.     McGrath warned a man on his bicycle about the open sewer, he said.     “I saw him almost go into the hole,” he added.     Worth Public Works Superintendent Wayne Demonbreun confirmed the manhole cover had been replaced, and said the village is working with the MWRD to find a more permanent solution.     “The cover blew off because of the storm and air pressure,” Demonbreun said. “It’s not the first time it has happened.”     McGrath is worried about the cover coming off again.     “It was put back on, until the next time it comes off,” McGrath said. “It’s an opening right in the center of the sidewalk. There were no lights on, the power was out. It is dangerous.”

Submitted photo

McCord will go a ‘Little Bit Country’     Country will be this year’s theme for the McCord Gallery & Cultural Center’s annual fundraiser planned for Saturday, Oct. 5.     So save the date as this year’s event will definitely be a rootin-tootin, heel kicking good-time. The event will take place at the historic Willowbrook Ballroom in Willow Springs, where there will be plenty of room for two-stepping and line dancing.     And to add more to the fun Arlene Adams, event chair, announced that Joel Daly, retired ABC- 7 newscaster, will be McCord’s guest of honor. Many may recall watching Joel Daly and his co-anchor Fahey Flynn for many years as the high rated “Eyewitness News Team.” Joel also has a love of country music and performed with the country band The Sundowners, playing guitar, singing and yodeling. Don’t miss this chance to meet him and hear his great stories. He was recently welcomed at McCord by committee members, Cynthia Weglarz, Arlene Adams and Carol Trzcinski (pictured above).     Plan for an evening of great country music, food and dancing. This event is McCord’s major fundraiser and keeps the McCord House open as a welcoming home for the arts. The event will also include live and silent auctions. If you are interested in helping with the event, call 671-0648 for more information.     McCord Gallery & Cultural Center is at 9602 W. Creek Road (129th and La Grange), Palos Park.


2

The Reporter Thursday, June 6, 2013

police news

Chicago Ridge     A 19-year-old man was charged with retail theft after he allegedly took merchandise with a retail value of $150 from a store at the Chicago Ridge Mall.     Jamie Rawl, of Oak Lawn, was arrested at 3:48 p.m. May 29. ***     A 39-year-old man was charged with retail theft after he allegedly took a pair of men’s shoes with a retail value of $104 from a store at the Chicago Ridge Mall.     Bryan J. Page, of Oak Lawn, was arrested at 12:25 p.m. May 31. ***     A 20-year-old man was reportedly charged with driving with a suspended license and no tail lights after police stopped the vehicle he was driving in the 10900 block of Menard Avenue.     Carlos Abeja, of Chicago, was arrested at 3:09 p.m. May 30. ***     A 25-year-old man was reportedly charged with no valid driver’s license and expired registration plates after police stopped the vehicle he was driving in the 10300 block of Ridgeland Avenue.     Fabian Retana, of Blue Island, was arrested at 5:51 p.m. May 30. ***     A 64-year-old woman was reportedly charged with no valid driver’s license, failure to signal and no valid insurance after police stopped the vehicle she was driving at the intersection of 105th Street and Major Avenue.     Jihad Sheban, of Oak Lawn, was arrested at 8 a.m. May 30. ***     Criminal damage to property was reported at noon May 28 in the 10500 block of Parkside Avenue. The window next to the entrance on the north side of the building was reported shattered. ***     Theft was reported at 6 p.m. May 28 at the Chicago Ridge Mall. A woman’s wallet was

THE

reported stolen. ***     Theft of a motor vehicle was reported at 5 p.m. May 29 at the Chicago Ridge Mall. A man reported he had lost his keys while shopping, and that when he returned to the parking lot found his 2005 Honda Odyssey was missing. ***     Theft was reported at 5 a.m. May 30 in the 6100 block of 103rd Street. The passenger’s-side window of a van was reportedly shattered, and two laptop computers and a cell phone were taken.

Evergreen Park     A 51-year-old man was charged with assault and disorderly conduct after he allegedly yelled at Standard Bank employees and threatened one of them in the 2400 block of 95th Street.     James. P. Threatt, of Chicago, was arrested at 2:50 p.m. May 24. He reportedly threatened that he would be waiting for an employee after work. ***     Two sisters were charged with battery and criminal trespass to property after they allegedly entered a woman’s home, punched her in the head, slapped her in the face and threw her to the ground in the 9600 block of Millard Avenue.     Susan M. Finn, 32, of Evergreen Park, and Jennifer J. Finn, 21, of Chicago, were arrested at 1:58 a.m. May 24. ***     A 24-year-old man was reportedly charged with theft of lost or mislaid property after police stopped a vehicle in which he was a passenger at the intersection of 95th Street and Campbell Avenue.     Deandre M. Westmoreland, of Tupelo, Miss., was arrested at 7:48 p.m. May 28. He reportedly possessed two debit cards that did not belong to him, police said. ***     A 65-year-old woman was charged with retail theft after she

REPORTER

Chicago Ridge / Evergreen Park / Hickory Hills Oak Lawn / Palos Hills / Worth Publisher Amy Richards Editor Jason Maholy Sports Editor Ken Karrson Graphic Design/Layout Kari Nelson & Jackie Santora Advertising Sales Val Draus To advertise call (708) 448-6161 To subscribe call (708) 448-6161 / Fax (708) 448-4012 Website: TheReporterOnline.net e-Mail: thereporter@comcast.net The Reporter is published weekly by the Regional Publishing Corp. 12247 S. Harlem Ave. Palos Heights, IL 60463 Office Hours: Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. - Sat. 9 a.m. to Noon Entered as periodical mail at the Post Office at Worth, Illinois, under the Act of March 3, 1879. Subscription rates: $37.00 per year by mail in Cook County. $47 per year by mail elsewhere. $1.00 per copy on newsstands and vending machines. Postmaster: Send address changes to The Reporter, 12247 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463.

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allegedly took 14 items of clothing with a retail value of $262 from a store in the 9700 block of Western Avenue.     Darlene Moore, of Chicago, was arrested at 7:46 p.m. May 28. ***     A 66-year-old woman was charged with retail theft after she allegedly took three watches with a retail value of $91 from a store in the 9700 block of Western Avenue.     Phyllis J. Dansby, of Chicago, was arrested at 4:50 p.m. May 26. ***     A 22-year-old woman was charged with retail theft after she allegedly took a mug, purse, lipstick and watch with a total retail value of $37 from a store in the 2500 block of 95th Street.     Anbria L. Hall, of Chicago, was arrested at 10:09 p.m. May 30. ***     A 22-year-old man was charged with retail theft after he allegedly took a pair of headphones with a retail value of $60 from a store in the 2500 block of 95th Street.     James E. Wright, of Riverdale, was arrested at 6:35 p.m. May 24. ***     Two Chicago women were charged with retail theft after they allegedly took merchandise from a store in the 2500 block of 95th Street.     Tequilla S. Parker, 18, and Tieshawn N. Hawkins, 19, were arrested at 4:16 p.m. May 29. Parker reportedly took five tubes of lipstick and two bottles of nail polish with a retail value of $35. Hawkins reportedly took five bottles of nail polish, three lip glosses and a pair of underwear with a retail value of $45. ***     A 19-year-old man was charged with retail theft after he allegedly took two DVDs and four Nintendo games with a retail value of $95 from a store in the 2500 block of 95th Street.     Antonio Harvest, of Chicago, was arrested at 6:56 p.m. May 28. ***     Two Chicago men were charged with criminal damage to property and retail theft after one allegedly damaged a display radio and the other took the faceplate from the radio at a store in the 2500 block of 95th Street.     Marquithe M. Haggerty, 19, and Thomas M. Graham, 18, were arrested at 7:44 p.m. May 25. Haggerty damaged the radio, and Graham removed the face plate, police said.

slippers and a t-shirt with a retail value of $118 from a store in the 4100 block of 95th Street.     Mark A. Frigo, 38, of Butler, Ind., and Brittany Herenden, 24, of Waterloo, Ind., were arrested at 4:42 p.m. May 25. ***     A 22-year-old woman was reportedly charged with DUI, improper lane usage, improper backing and no proof of insurance after police stopped the vehicle she was driving in the 4700 block of 106th Street.     Estrella Cuenca, of Chicago, was arrested at 2:51 a.m. May 24. ***     Criminal damage to property was reported at 4:40 p.m. May 28 in the 8800 block of Nashville Avenue. The rear driver’s-side window of a vehicle was reported broken. ***     Residential burglary was reported at 8:33 a.m. May 30 in the 10000     A 28-year-old man was charged block of Merrimac Avenue. A toolbox with retail theft and unlawful use worth $500 was reported taken. of a weapon after he allegedly took a bottle of Gorilla Glue with a retail value of $5.97 from a store in the 4000 block of 95th Street.     Patrick R. Carroll, of Oak Lawn, was arrested at 12:16 p.m. May 28.     Burglary was reported at 9 p.m. He possessed black metal knuckles May 31 in the 10100 block of 81st armed with a spring loaded blade, Court. A woman reportedly told police said. police she is renting a home and *** has been having problems with     Two Chicago women were charged the owner. When she arrived at with retail theft after they allegedly the home May 31 she found the took six windows with a retail value locks changed, and $50,000 that of $854 from a store in the 4000 belonged to a friend was missing, block of 95th Street. police said.     Sandy R. Jones, 36, and Lanette *** Weatherly, 46, were arrested at 4:29     Two California men were charged p.m. May 30. with forgery after they allegedly at*** tempted to cash fraudulent checks     A 45-year-old man was charged at a Currency Exchange, 9911 S. with criminal trespass to property Roberts Road. and disorderly conduct after he al-     Cristian Reyes and Edgar Aleman, legedly used the wrong identifica- both 22, were arrested at 11 a.m. tion card to sneak into a fitness May 29. Aleman was also charged club and pushed two members of with possession of a fraudulent ID a health club in the 8800 block of card, and Reyes was charged with Cicero Avenue. fraud.     Miguel A. Chacon, of Burbank,     The two men reportedly entered was arrested at 9:46 a.m. June 1. the Currency Exchange to cash He reportedly tried to enter the club checks from Starbucks. Aleman was using a Planet Fitness card. unable to cash his check because of *** the fraudulent ID card, police said.     A 33-year-old man was charged The men were reportedly found in with disorderly conduct and ob- the 9900 block of 78th Avenue. structing justice after he allegedly *** walked naked through the McDon-     A 52-year-old man was charged ald’s parking lot, 6034 W. 95th St. with criminal trespass to land af    Ryan Blasinski, of Chicago, was ter he was allegedly found hiding arrested at 7:42 a.m. May 31. in a backyard in the 8100 block of *** 98th Street.     A 22-year-old man was report-     Czeslaw Maslanka, of Chicago, edly charged with DUI, failure to was arrested at 11:50 p.m. May reduce speed to avoid an accident 30. and driving off of the roadway after *** the vehicle he was driving struck a     Burglary was reported at 6:30 house in the 10400 block of Georgia p.m. May 31 in the 7900 block of Lane. 99th Place. The homeowner report    Matthew Thomas Henehan, of edly told police that a man came     A 24-year-old woman was re- Kalamazoo, Mich., was arrested at into his yard and wanted to seal his driveway. The man diverted the portedly charged with driving with 1:53 a.m. May 26. *** homeowner’s attention to the rear a suspended license and suspend    A 56-year-old woman was reportof the garage, and after about 15 ed registration after police stopped edly charged with DUI after she minutes a car horn beeped and the the vehicle she was driving in the struck the parking garage at Addriveway sealer went outside and 9200 block of Roberts Road. vocate Christ Medical Center, 4440 left in a dark gray pickup truck.     Nicole M. Fielder, of Hickory W . 95th St. The man later noticed $200 was Hills, was arrested at 7:07 p.m.     Lynn A. Kohler, of Hometown, missing from his home. May 30. was arrested at 7:11 p.m. May     A neighbor told police someone *** 28. was driving a red pickup truck carry    A 30-year-old man was report*** ing a large gallon container holding a edly charged with driving with     Two Indiana residents were blue liquid. The person who beeped no valid license and obstructed charged with retail theft after they the horn was reportedly driving the windshield after police stopped allegedly took three pairs of jeans, a red pickup. Police believe the horn the vehicle he was driving in the skirt, two packages of bibs, a pair of was the man’s signal to leave. 9600 block of Roberts Road.     Bogdan Markowicz, of Bridgeview, was arrested at 9:03 p.m.

Porterhouse or Sirloin Patties

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Marinated Rosebud Farm Boneless Chicken Chicken Breast Kiev 6 Varieties

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Palos Hills

Ridge police to run for late state trooper

Old Fashioned Butcher Shop 10717 South Ridgeland Avenue Meat: 636-3437 Deli: 636-6203

Jack & Pat’s

***     A 39-year-old man was reportedly charged with driving while license suspended after police stopped the vehicle he was driving at the intersection of Kean Avenue and 95th Street.     Michael D. Messere, of Bourbonnais, was arrested at 5:16 p.m. May 31. ***     A 28-year-old man was cited with disorderly conduct after he allegedly urinated next to a car outside Robert’s Roadhouse, 9090 S. Roberts Road.     Joseph W. Hilliard, of Hickory Hills, was arrested at 2:08 a.m. June 2.

Hickory Hills

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    The Chicago Ridge Police Department will participate in the Special Olympics Torch Run to be held Wednesday, June 12.     Participants from the Police Department will run in honor of late Illinois State Trooper James Sauter, a former Chicago Ridge resident who died while on duty in March as he was aiding a motorist on the Tri-State Tollway near

Northlake. The group will meet at 7 a.m. at the Chicago Ridge police station, 10425 Ridgeland Ave., for a ceremony and presentation to the Sauter family.     Chicago Ridge police will pass the torch to Palos Heights police at Route 83 and Harlem Avenue. For more information call Chicago Ridge Trustee Bruce Quintos at 642-9862.

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TOWN OF PALOS ROAD DISTRICT COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS (TENTATIVE 2013/2014 BUDGET AND APPROPRIATION ORDINANCE) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing will be held by the Board of Trustees of the Town of Palos, Cook County, Illinois, to consider a tentative 2013/20143 Budget and Appropriation Ordinance of the Town of Palos Road District, Cook County, Illinois. Said hearing will be held at the Palos Town Hall, 10802 South Roberts Road, Palos Hills, Illinois, at the hour of 7:00 P.M. on July 15, 2013. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Town Board of Trustees, at the public hearing, shall adopt the tentative Budget and Appropriation Ordinance, or any part thereof, as such Board of Trustees deems necessary.

Sara Lee Honey Ham.....................$5.89 lb. Jack & Pat’s (Jumbo) Beef Hot Dogs.................$4.89 lb. Busch Summer Sausage............$5.69 lb. Macaroni or Creamy Cole Slaw..........$1.79 lb.

Sara Lee Chicken Breast...............$6.09 lb. Scott Petersen P&P Loaf.........................$3.89 lb. Jack & Pat’s (Sliced) Bacon...............................$3.39 lb. Mozzarella or Colby Jack Cheese..........$4.39 lb.

All citizens of the Town present at the hearing and desiring to be heard concerning the tentative Budget and Appropriation Ordinance will be given an opportunity to do so. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that said tentative Budget and Appropriation Ordinance is filed and made conveniently available for public inspection in the office of the Town Clerk, 10802 South Roberts Road, Palos Hills, Illinois, during regular business hours.

Dated: May 28, 2013.

Jane Nolan/s Clerk, Town of Palos Cook County, Illinois

***     Identity theft was reported at 2:50 p.m. May 29. A woman reportedly told police she lost her driver’s license in January 2010, and recently got a call from Direct TV about an outstanding bill for $594 from an address Mount Prospect. ***     Motor vehicle theft was reported at 5:30 p.m. May 30 in the 11100 block of S. Northwest Road. A 2005 Infiniti station wagon was reported missing.

Worth     A 40-year-old Worth man was charged with battery and resisting a peace officer after he allegedly attempted to punch a police officer who had asked him to get out of the vehicle the man was driving in the 10700 block of Lloyd Drive.     Norberto Vazquez was arrested at 10:14 p.m. May 25. ***     A 24-year-old woman was cited with theft after she allegedly took a cell phone from a home in the 10600 block of Southwest Highway.     Toni M. Fischer, of Chicago Ridge, was arrested at 2:10 p.m. May 20. ***     A 26-year-old woman was reportedly charged with driving with a suspended license, failure to wear a seatbelt and failure to secure a child under 8 years old after police stopped the vehicle she was driving in the 11100 block of Oketo Avenue.     Jessica A. Bowle, of Palos Hills, was arrested at 8:15 a.m. May 21. ***     A 33-year-old man was reportedly charged with driving without a valid license after police stopped the vehicle he was driving in the 7400 block of 111th Street.     Macario L. Mendoza, of Joliet, was arrested at 8:50 a.m. May 21. ***     A 28-year-old man was reportedly charged with no valid driver’s license and failure to wear a seatbelt after police stopped the vehicle he was driving in the 7400 block of 111th Street.     Adan Alvarado, of Chicago, was arrested at 7:59 a.m. May 21. ***     A 35-year-old woman was reportedly charged with driving with a suspended license after police stopped the vehicle she was driving in the 10700 block of Oak Park Avenue.     Sandra V. Brongel, of Chicago Ridge, was arrested at 9:56 p.m. May 22. ***     A 39-year-old woman was reportedly charged with driving with a suspended license, speeding and operation of an uninsured motor vehicle after police stopped the vehicle she was driving at the intersection of 111th Street and Oak Park Avenue.     Latasha D. Taylor, of Harvey, was arrested at 8:05 a.m. May 23. ***     A 49-year-old Worth woman was charged with battery after she allegedly yelled obscenities, swung a car door into a woman’s arm, and spit in the woman’s face at a mobile home park in the 7200 block of Southwest Highway.     Patricia Kluk-McAninch was arrested at 4:32 p.m. May 27. ***     A 64-year-old Worth man was cited with disorderly conduct after he allegedly yelled at a man who asked him to return a ball that had gone over his fence in the 6800 block of 109th Place.     Jan Rutkowski was cited at 5:25 p.m. May 29. ***     An 18-year-old Worth man was charged with illegal consumption of alcohol by a minor after he allegedly drank alcohol at Gale Moore Park, 109th Street and Depot Avenue.     Angel G. Carrillo was arrested at 3:39 p.m. May 31. Area police departments Chicago Ridge 425-7831 Evergreen Park 422-2142 Hickory Hills 598-4900 Oak Lawn 499-7722 Palos Hills 598-2272 Worth 448-3979

Ridge cops ticket 49 who didn’t click it     The Chicago Ridge Police Department issued 49 citations to persons not wearing seat belts, and charged two motorists with DUI during a traffic enforcement operation that included Memorial Day weekend.     The “Click it or Ticket” campaign, help in partnership with the Illinois Department of Transportation, took place May 10 to 27. Police reportedly issued 17 tickets for speeding, seven for persons driving on suspended or revoked licenses, and two for possession of drugs or drug paraphernalia. Seven drivers were cited for failing to properly secure children in child safety seats, according to police.


Thursday, June 6, 2013 The Reporter

3

What do you say? What’s the worst/best thing that could happen if video gambling is allowed in Palos Heights? (Asked at Lumes Pancake House and Lake Katherine Nature Center in Palos Heights) Photos by Emily Szymanski

Donna Gruenerg, Palos Heights     “It will bring a lower class of people into the area. Economically, Palos Heights is a great neighborhood, and I wouldn’t like to see that go down. Besides, people shouldn’t be spending their money.”

Ken Schweda, Palos Heights     “I wouldn’t like it at all. It would probably pick up some crime in the area.”

David Vasil, Palos Heights     “I don’t think it’s a good thing. It’ll bring people into this area that we might not want here.”

Jack Maide, Orland Park     “It’ll benefit the community, bring in a lot of revenue.”

Pat Meksill, Oak Forest     “It’ll be good for creating tax revenue. It’ll take some burden off the tax payers.”

Wet spring leaves Palos Hills Public Works playing catch-up By Kelly White Correspondent     The stormy end of spring has been affecting more than area residents’ outdoor recreation plants.     The Palos Hills Public Works Department is struggling to stay up-to-date on park maintenance and grass cutting because of the abnormally wet weather.     “There may be several locations throughout the city that may have grass that is in need of cutting and public works crews will be responding and will be caught up to schedule soon,” Alderman Frank Williams (5th Ward) told the City Council at its committee meeting last Thursday.     Mayor Jerry Bennett noted that within the 24 hours before last week’s meeting, the city had received 3 inches of rain.

The Public Works Department is doing its best to stay on top of all responsibilities, said Public Works Commissioner Dave Weakley.     Public Works is completing sod, concrete and asphalt restorations throughout the city, and could be completed this week if the weather holds out, Williams said. Once the restoration work has been completed, work will begin on several storm water drainage projects, ash tree removal and concrete sidewalk repairs.     “Our public works department is doing a great job, especially with the amount of work they are accomplishing, considering the amount of rain we have been receiving,” Bennett said.     The city has replaced 27 dead bushes at Town Square Park 8500 W. 103rd St. The dead bushes were replaced with spirea, lilac and burning bushes.

These new bushes are reported to be responding much better to the environment around them and are being treated for by the Public Works Department.     “The bushes simply did not perform well in our environment,” Weakley said.     Flowers have been planted at Palos Hills City Hall, 10335 Roberts Road, and flower baskets have been hung at major intersections throughout the city including 111th Street and Roberts Road.     Sod and tree planting were scheduled to begin this week along 88th Avenue, weather permitting. Construction is continuing along the reconstructed road street, with adjustment work being completed on curbs, sidewalks and storm sewer drainage. The street is scheduled to receive its final layer of asphalt this month.

Evergreen adopts stronger public protest ordinance By Laura Bollin     The Evergreen Park Village Board has approved an ordinance that will require parade organizers to pay a $50 permit fee per event.     Public demonstrations will remain free, but the ordinance will set “better ground rules” for protests, said Evergreen Park Police Chief Michael Saunders.     “When you have something like a demonstration, it is a constitutional issue,” Saunders said. “You

are very, very limited, even by ordinance, on what you can do. You have to allow people to voice their First Amendment rights.”     The Village Board decided to review the ordinance after a Chicago woman organized a demonstration along 95th Street to protest alleged racial profiling by police officers in Evergreen Park and Oak Lawn, according to Saunders.     “With this ordinance, people will have a better idea of what they can and can’t do,” Saunders said. “You can’t block a street, you

can’t block traffic, and you can’t block 95th Street because it is controlled by the Illinois Department of Transportation. People have to give the route they plan to go. They can’t run into businesses and start destroying them. It’s a common sense type of deal.”     Fines for failing to adhere to the terms of the ordinance are between $200 and $1,000, as determined by Cook County Circuit Court.     “This puts teeth in the village ordinance,” Saunders said.

Submitted photo

Trinity celebrates Commencement 2013     Commencement at Trinity Christian College celebrated the graduation of 189 traditional and 45 Adult Studies students on Saturday, May 18.     The speaker for the traditional ceremony was 1972 alumnus Dr. Justin Cooper, executive director of Christian Higher Education Canada (CHEC).     During the ceremony, Professor of History Robert Rice, of Palos Heights, was honored with emeritus status. Rice has served the college since 1979 and was honored with the inaugural Professor of the Year award in 2012. This year’s Professor of the Year award was presented to Professor of Sociology Brad Breems, of Blue Island.     For the full story and photogalleries, visit trnty.edu.

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Motorcyclist dies after crash in OL By Laura Bollin     An Alsip man died Tuesday morning after the motorcycle he was driving struck a fire hydrant and tree in Oak Lawn, according to police.     El-Jabali Baha, 24, died at the

scene of the crash near the intersection of 105th Street and Lavergne Avenue. Baha was reportedly driving west on 105th Place, continued past Lavergne Avenue and struck a fire hydrant and a tree. Baha, who was not wearing a helmet, landed near the front porch of a

home, according to police.     An Oak Lawn resident reportedly called 911 at 3:18 a.m. to report motorcycle debris in the road, and police found the damaged bike on the driveway of a home in the 10500 block of Lavergne Avenue.

Take precautions against West Nile     The Cook County Department of Public Health is advising area residents to be cautious and protect against the mosquito-transmitted West Nile Virus.     The culex mosquito is the primary carrier of West Nile virus in the Chicago area, according to Cook County Health Department chief operating officer Terry Mason.     “During hot dry weather the mosquito, breeds in small pools of stagnant water,” Mason stated in a press release. “Unless basic prevention steps are taken to limit the risk, this water can easily accumulate around homes and put people at risk for the infection.”

    Among the most effective ways to prevent West Nile infection is to reduce exposure when mosquitoes are most active, especially between dusk and dawn. Fix or replace torn or missing screens on doors and windows, get rid of areas water can accumulate mosquitoes can breed, and ensure rain gutters drain properly. Repel mosquitoes when outdoors by applying insect repellent with DEET and follow label directions, and report dead birds to the health department by calling 633-8025.     Mosquitoes can transmit the virus to humans after feeding on infected birds. Most people infected

Community Briefs Evergreen Park Mariano’s to open in December 2014

    Mariano’s Fresh Market is expected to open a new store in Evergreen Park in December 2014, Mayor Jim Sexton announced at Monday’s Village Board meeting.     The 70,000-square-foot store will be built on 7-acres at 2601 W. 95th St., the former site of the Webb Ford dealership that closed in 2008. The store is expected to employ 450 people, Sexton said.     Mariano’s in addition to selling produce and other groceries features a sushi and oyster bar, flowers, salad bar, coffee and smoothie shop, wood-fired pizza oven, seafood, homemade salsas, bakery, deli, cheese counter and prepared foods. —Laura Bollin

Worth New village attorney

    Village trustees last month voted unanimously to approve Mayor Mary Werner’s appointment of Ancel & Glink as the village’s new attorney.     The firm replaces Odelson & Sterk, which had represented the village since 2009 under former Mayor Randy Keller. Ancel & Glink partner Keri-Lyn J. Krafthefer will be the primary attorney who will serve as the Village Board’s counsel.     Krafthefer was named one of the top 50 female lawyers in the state by Illinois Super Lawyers, and has spent her entire career representing local municipalities, school districts, park districts and libraries, according to Werner. Ancel & Glink will charge the village a monthly retainer fee, rather than an hourly rate as did Odelson & Sterk. —Laura Bollin

with West Nile show no symptoms of illness and never become ill, but illness can occur three to 15 days after an infected mosquito bite. Symptoms include fever, headache and body aches. People more than 50 years old are at a higher risk for serious complications from encephalitis or meningitis. For that reason, people who experience high fever, confusion, muscle weakness, severe headaches, or a stiff neck should see a doctor immediately.     For reports on West Nile virus activity visit cookcountypublichealth. org or Facebook/ccdph, or subscribe to the health department’s Twitter feed@cook cohealth.

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4

The Reporter Thursday, June 6, 2013

Our Neighborhood

OL Park District has millions to upgrade two parks, pavilion By Laura Bollin

    Millions of dollars in state grant money will help the Oak Lawn Park District renovate two parks and landscape another.     Oak Lawn has $4 million courtesy of several grants from the Illinois Department of Natural Resources grants. The money will be used to renovate Memorial Park and the Oak Lawn Pavilion, and outfit the district’s newest park, Commissioners Park, with Photo by Laura Bollin walking path and benches, said Oak Lawn Village Manager Larry Deetjen speaks to the crowd at the ribbon cutting ceremony for the Oak Lawn Park District director Oak Lawn Senior Center, 5220 W. 105th St. The senior center is housed in the old McGugan Junior High Maddie Kelly. School building, which is shared by Advocate Christ Medical Center and South Side Baptist School.     The work at Memorial, 102nd Street and Major Avenue, will rejuvenate the surrounding neighborhood and turn the park from a dilapidated space into a place to use the Baptist school’s gym- deal to move the senior center. for people to gather, Kelly said. nasium space once a month for     “It doesn’t cut it for an official The $1.2 million renovation will a luncheon. to tell us, ‘We will do our best bring back a beloved former piece     Fitness instructor Chris Kerr and you will wait and see,’ Gillies is concerned about the lack of said. “They’ve got a long way to space for her twice-weekly exer- go to prove themselves.” cise class. She has between 30     Several of the fitness class parand 40 students in each class, ticipants plan to attend a meetBy Laura Bollin and thinks there might not be ing with Mayor Sandra Bury and By Laura Bollin enough room for all of them to other village officials to discuss     Senior citizens in Oak Lawn work out. their hopes for the senior center.     The village of Worth-owned have a new place to play cards,     “Seniors can’t always hear, The meeting is scheduled to be Water’s Edge Golf Club will opeat lunch and partake in other and they work out visually, so held at 9 a.m. Thursday, June 6 erate at a surplus for the 2013-14 activities, but some people are in our current space we have at Oak Lawn Village Hall. season. worried about the lack of space a stage where they can all see     Bury said she sees a lot of po-     Worth trustees on May 28 for exercise classes. the exercises,” Kerr said. “Here, tential in the new senior center voted unanimously to approve     The old Oak Lawn Senior Cen- there is no stage. We’re going to space. the golf course’s 2013-14 budter building, 5330 W. 95th St., was have to improvise, but it will be     “It has more space, so we can do get with expenditures of $1.46 sold to Beverly Bank and Trust for difficult because this affects the more programs,” Bury said. “No million and revenues of $1.86 $1.8 million and will be renovated seniors. They are all here for a offense to the people that like it, million. Spending at the course beginning this month into an Oak functional reason.” but there is more to do than just will be nearly identical to that Lawn Trust and Savings Bank.     Marilyn Huttel, who partici- bingo and cards. I want to part- of the previous two fiscal years, The new senior center is at 5220 pates in the fitness classes, is ner with kids and have computer according to Worth Mayor Mary W. 105th St., in the old McGu- worried about the small space. programs for the seniors.” Werner. gan Junior High School building     “We’re going from a room that     Bury also likes the new loca-     Capital projects will include shared by Advocate Christ Medi- was half the size of a large gym- tion. cal Center’s Emergency Medical nasium to this room, and we’re     “I like that it is [not along] 95th Service Academy and South Side going to be on top of each other,” Street,” Bury said. “The traffic Baptist School. Huttel said. “There was no com- made me nervous.”     The senior center includes a munication.”     The senior center is a partnermulti-purpose room that can be     Fellow participant Marje Gillies ship with Oak Lawn School District used for exercise classes, lounge said she and her other classmates 123. The village has a two-year space, kitchen facilities and a were pushed aside by Oak Lawn lease with the option to extend the staff office. Seniors will be able village officials, who made the lease for up to five years.     The Active Transportation Alliance’s annual Bike Commuter Challenge will pit more than 450 Chicago area businesses, nonprofits, schools and agencies against each other to see you who can get the highest percentage of employees biking to work next week.     This year’s competition includes Jones Lang LaSalle, Allstate Insurance, BMO Harris Bank, Orbitz, Motorola, Sears, United Airlines, Alcatel Lucent, Groupon, University of Chicago, American Medical Association and the village of Oak Lawn. Bike commuters throughout the Chicago area are expected to come out in record numbers to the Bike Pit Stops around the region to celebrate 2013 Chicago Bike Week, to be held June 8 to 14.

Oak Lawn unveils new senior center Some patrons displeased with exercise space

of the park — the rocket ship slide, which will look like a large rocket ship and be equipped with space-themed toys. Memorial will also be equipped with new walking trails, improved tennis courts and two basketball courts. An old picnic shelter will be replaced, and a new fishing pier and rock out croppings will be installed pier at Memorial Pond. Plans also include creating permanent bean bags and horseshoe are, a new splash pad play area, and new bathrooms.     Most renovations will be completed by fall, with the splash pad expected to be finished by next spring.     The Community Pavilion, 9401 Oak Park Ave., was built 25 years ago. Remodeling plans for the 26,000-square-foot expansion to cost $4 million include doubling the gymnasium space to accom-

modate four volleyball courts and two full-size basketball courts. Four new offices and a new entrance will be built on the east side of the building. The current front desk area will be removed, and the space filled by a café to include vending machines containing healthy snacks. Three offices and a massage therapy room will be built to the west of the café space.     Grant money will fund $2.5 million of the project’s cost, and the people will contribute $1.5 million.     Commissioners Park, 52nd Avenue and 89th Street, is what Kelly called a “passive park.” It will feature flower beds, walking paths, art sculptures and possibly a water fountain. Renovations for Commissioners Park will cost between $250,000 and $300,000.

Water’s Edge budget at $1.4M repairing the cart path near the second, fourth, and 13th holes, and purchasing new tables and chairs for The Edge Bar & Grill at a cost of $25,000. Worth Trustee Tedd Muersch Jr., the Village Board’s golf course committee liaison, said repairs to the cart path are definitely needed.     “You go over some of those holes, and it’s just like, ‘woo,’ like a roller coaster if you’re not paying attention,” Muersch said.     Trustee Mary Rhein said the path near the 13th hole is “dangerous bad.”     “We don’t want people getting

hurt,” she added.     Golf course manager Jim Tourloukis told the board chairs and tables at The Edge are “falling apart.” He also recommended purchasing a new sand trap rake to replace one that is seven years old. Figures were not available for how much a new raking machine would cost.     “The rake is breaking constantly,” Tourloukis said. “If there is a terrible line in the sand, people see that, and it is the little things that will make them not come back.”

Oak Lawn, Orland train stations among pit stops for Bike Commuter Challenge

This week in

THE

    The celebration includes the Bike Commuter Challenge and Bike Pit Stops as well as other events produced by the city of Chicago and numerous municipalities and government organizations. Bike Pit Stops along popular bike routes in Chicago and at suburban Metra stations provide bike commuters free coffee and goodies. The full schedule of Bike Pit Stops and other bike events are listed at http://bikecom muterchallenge.org/pitstops.     Winners will be announced at the Bike Commuter Challenge awards party for Team Leaders on July 10. To register or for more information visit bikecom muterchallenge.org and bikechi cago.us.     Pit stops in the area will be at the Metra station in Orland Park, 143rd St. and Southwest High-

REPORTER history

News and events from our archives

50 Years Ago

June 6, 1963     Green Hills Library District was in the search for a building it planned to renovate into the first permanent library. ***     NASA held an exhibit at the Museum of Science and Industry. This exhibit held 65 replicas and scale models of satellites and rockets.

25 Years Ago

June 9, 1988     Jewel Food Stores and the United States Postal service created an agreement, allowing for the purchase of stamps at cover prices at

the supermarket. However, buyers had to purchase books (20 stamps) of 25-cent stamps for $5 to take advantage of the offer. ***     Parents and school board members argued against North Palos School District 117’s open campus lunch policy, claiming it unsafe, unfair and impractical.

10 Years Ago

June 5, 2003     Two tactical police officers from Hickory Hills were sent to Carbondale to investigate the disappearance of Hickory Hills resident Martha McLees, whose husband is a convicted murderer.

SUDOKU The object of the game is to fill all the blank squares with the correct numbers. Each row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each column of 9 numbers must include all digits1 through 9 in any order. Each 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9.

(Solution on page 12)

way, from 6 to 8 a.m. Wednesday, June 12; from 6 to 8 a.m. at the Lemont Metra station, 101 Main St., on Thursday, June 13; and from 6 to 8 a.m. Friday, June 14 at the Oak Lawn Metra station, 95th St. and Museum Drive.     The Active Transportation Alliance is a nonprofit, memberbased advocacy organization that works to make bicycling, walking and public transit so safe, convenient and enjoyable. The organization builds a movement around active transportation, encourages physical activity, and aims to build a world-class transportation network. It is North America’s largest transportation advocacy organization, supported by more than 6,000 members, 1,000 volunteers and 35 full-time staff. For more information visit activetrans.org or call (312) 427-3325.

OL Garden walk     The Oak Lawn Garden Club will hold its annual Garden Walk featuring five gardens of Oak Lawn residents on Sunday, June 23.     Admission for the walk, from noon to 4 p.m., is $8. Refreshments will be served and a deluxe gift basket will be raffled off. Tickets are available at James Saunoris & Sons Nursery, 6000 W. 111th St. in Chicago Ridge, and at the gazebo on the Oak Lawn Village Green, in the 9400 block of Raymond Avenue, the day of the walk. For more information call 363-2371.

Duty, Honor, Country     Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Willard D. Kill recently participated in the system evaluation of a Chemically Hardened Expeditionary Medical Facility at Naval Weapons Station Cheatham Annex in Williamsburg, Va.     Kill completed testing the integration of a collective protection system, which is designed to protect an expeditionary medical facility against chemical, biological and radiological exposure. During the evaluation phase, medical personnel were enclosed within the facility for 72 hours. Simulated patient scenarios were conducted to provide a realistic feeling to the event.     Kill joined the Navy Reserve in September 2009. He is a 2002 graduate of Oak Lawn Community High School. Printed on Recycled Paper Please Recycle Your Reporter


Thursday, June 6, 2013 The Reporter

schools

5

Bulletin Board Evergreen Park Dist. 124

    School District 124 provides free vision, hearing, speech, language, basic concepts knowledge, and fine and gross motor skills screenings for children 3 to 5 years old who are not yet in kindergarten. Children eligible can qualify for special programs. For more information call Jean Hector at 423-0951, Ext. 2140.

Mother McAuley

    Autism activist and bestselling author Temple Grandin will be at Mother McAuley High School, 3737 W. 99 St. in Chicago at 3 p.m. Saturday, June 29. Grandin is a nationally renowned philosophical leader for both autism advocacy and animal welfare. Diagnosed in childhood with autism, she studied psychology and earned a PhD in animal science. Her book, “The Autistic Brain: Thinking Across the Spectrum,” introduces her experience with neuroimaging advances and genetic research linking brain science to behavior. Grandin shares her own brain scans, all toward promoting more effective mainstreaming and unleashing the unique advantages of autistic people. Purchase copies of “The Autistic Brain” for $20 at the circulation desk starting June 1 and receive a priority book signing number. ***     Mother McAuley High School will hold summer camps for grammar school and McAuley students. Camps include includ-

ing 13 for sports, two for music, one art camp and the Theatre “Kids Kamp.”     Athletic camps are taught by McAuley coaches. Sports include basketball, bowling, dance, diving, golf, lacrosse, running, soccer, softball, swimming, tennis, volleyball and water polo.     Music camps for guitar and fiddle are taught by McAuley orchestra director Hannah Lawson. Kathy Gordon Davis, fine arts department chairperson will head the two-week Art Camp. Kids Kamp, a three-week camp with more than a 25-year history, will be run by McAuley auditorium manager Patricia Haynes. A staff of theatre, dance and music professionals will work with the students throughout the weeks.     For detailed camp descriptions, dates, times and appropriate age groups visit mothermcauley.org and look for the Summer Camp Information link. ***     Mother McAuley Liberal Arts High School offers summer camps.     Grammar school and current McAuley students have a wide range of camps to choose from, including 13 sport camps, two music camps, an art camp, and the Theatre Kids Kamp.     McAuley summer camps offer athletes, artists, actresses and musicians from kindergarten through high school age the opportunity to develop skills by learning from and interacting with staff.

    Athletics camps are taught by McAuley coaches,     The music camps, Guitar and Fiddle, are taught by Orchestra Director Hannah Lawson.     Kathy Gordon Davis will head the two-week Art Camp, while Kids Kamp, a three-week camp with over a 25 year history, will be run by 99th Street Theatre Company Director Patricia Haynes. A staff of theatre, dance and music professionals will work with the students throughout the weeks.     Sports camps reflect the interscholastic sports that McAuley offers its students during the year: basketball, bowling, dance, diving, golf, lacrosse, running, soccer, softball, swimming, tennis, volleyball, and water polo.     All fine arts camps, which consist of guitar, fiddle, art, and the theatre Kids Kamp, are open to both girls and boys.     For detailed camp descriptions, dates, times and appropriate age groups, visit mothermcauley.org and look for the Summer Camp Information link.

No. Palos Dist. 117

    North Palos School District 117 is offering online programs to parents for registering students for the 2013-14 school year. The district will move to an online registration process and fee payment system that will replace the mail-in registration option that was used in the past. Mail-in registration will no longer be accepted. For more information call Dianne Hasler at 233-5758.

Submitted Photo

Urban art

    Oak Lawn Hometown Middle School seventhgraders Matthew Lagioia, above, and Alex Crivellone use the sidewalk as their canvas at the school’s annual Sidewalk Art Festival, during which the sidewalks outside the building at 5345 W. 99th St. in Oak Lawn are turned into an art gallery. Matthew drew the Chicago Blackwaks’ logo and Alex drew a spider.     Michael Patrick of Oak Lawn     The event is based on has been awarded a master’s de- the centuries-old art form gree in management from Mer- of street painting. Students rimack College. and their families had the *** opportunity to create their     Cecilia Baltazar of Oak own works of art. Families Lawn is part of the first gradu- came with picnic baskets, ating class from the combined umbrellas, games, and even 3+1 degree program offered by the family dog. Lewis University and College of DuPage. Baltazar graduated with a bachelor’s degree in criminal social justice. ***     Daniel Brott of Worth graduated May 5 from Hope College in Holland, Mich., with a bachelor’s Submitted Photo degree in public accounting.     University of Illinois-Chicago students Paulina Sambor and Katarzyna Ciszek, both of Oak Lawn, have been initiated     Oak Lawn Hometown Middle School student Crystal McAuliffe into The Honor Society of Phi writes a card asking Richards High School students to make Kappa Phi, the nation’s oldest healthy decisions the night of prom. and most selective collegiate honor society for all academic     For the fourth year in a row, Oak Lawn Hometown Middle disciplines. School and Richards High School have collaborated on a project     The Kelly High School Class of *** to get teenagers to choose wisely on prom night. Taking cues 1963 is planning a 50th reunion     Brittney Sexton of Oak from the “Mustang Musts” — be respectful, be responsible, be for this fall. The planning commit- Lawn is one of 23 Augustana safe — Oak Lawn Hometown students wrote and designed cards tee is seeking classmates. For more College students who, during for the Richards prom. And when the Richards students walked information or to have your name their spring break, traveled to into prom, they saw the cards waiting for them on the tables. placed on the distribution list for the Norway to study the country’s Parents and teachers continually ask teenagers to think clearly formal invitation contact Bernadette education and health care sysabout their decisions, and the messages from younger students (Bernie) Petrauskas at (630) 469- tems. While in Norway, the stuadd another voice to the campaign. 9418 or bernptrsks@yahoo.com. dents visited schools, hospitals, clinics and other sites related to a different model of social well-being. ***     Jo Pieczynski of Oak Lawn made the dean’s list for the spring 2013 semester at Costal Carolina University in Conway, S.C. Pieczynski is a sophomore majoring in English.

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***     Mark Roepke of Oak Lawn made the dean’s list for the spring 2013 semester at Monmouth College. ***     Briana Sevik of Palos Hills made the dean’s list for the spring 2013 semester at MacMurray College in Jacksonville. Sevik is a senior in the college’s interpreter preparation program (American sign language).

Submitted Photo

St. Lou art     The art club at St. Louis de Montfort School, 8840 Ridgeland Ave., wanted to get ready for summer by creating an ocean mural using paper fish, gold glitter, straws and blue paint to make their ocean come to life. Pictured here are art club members Skyy Avilez (from left), Natalia Waksmundzki, Cristian Viramontes, Jaazaniah Neary and Karen Szwajlik.

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

Notice is Hereby Given that on 7-20-13, a sale will be held at Coy’s Auto Rebuilders, 21625 Oak Street, Matteson, IL., 60443, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publication of this notice. Dorothy M. Carpenter 1992 Honda VIN# JH2PC2506NM103196 Lien Amount: $12,015.00

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ANNUAL APPROPRIATION ORDINANCE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Village President and Board of Trustees of the Village of Worth, Illinois will hold a public hearing on the proposed annual appropriation ordinance and revenue sharing expenditures for the fiscal year May 1, 2013 and ending April 30, 2014, on Tuesday, June 18, 2013 at 6:50 p.m. at the Village Hall, 7112 W. 111th Street, Worth, Illinois. Copies of the proposed annual appropriation ordinance will be available for public examination in the office of the Village Clerk, of the Village of Worth. Subsequent to the public hearing and before the final motion on said proposed annual appropriation ordinance, the President and Board of Trustees may revise, alter, increase or decrease the items contained therein.

Bonnie Price Village Clerk Village of Worth

***     Lewis University nursing student Kristyn Contreras of Oak Lawn recently volunteered with Young Hearts for Life to perform EKG screenings on students at Neuqua Valley High School in Naperville.     Young Hearts For Life is a cardiac screening program that identifies high school and college students at risk for sudden cardiac death. Lewis University students assisted with the screenings that can detect potentially life-threatening heart conditions such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, Long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome and ARVD. ***     Meredith Skala of Oak Lawn is among 30 Augustana College students who spent five weeks in Cambodia in January and February. Skala visited the temples of Angkor Wat and the cities of Phnom Penh and Siem Reap, and also taught English at a school. Skala is majoring in elementary education.

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6

The Reporter

Thursday, June 6, 2013

commentary The

Reporter

An Independent Newspaper Amy Richards Publisher

Jason Maholy Editor

Another Perspective

Republicans continue implementing Obamacare By Robert Romano

    On May 16, the Arizona Senate — supposedly controlled by Republicans — Published Weekly passed legislation that would Founded March, 16, 1960 expand Medicaid under the new health care law.     The bill would cost taxpayers across the country $2.1 billion through 2019 and add more than 100,000 to government health care rolls in Arizona.     Although she never campaigned on the idea when she ran for office in 2010, the Medicaid proposal is now the top legislative priority of Republican Gov. Jan Brewer. ‘The War of Abolition: Part I’ ran River on April 1, Union Admiral She joined other Republican in last week’s Reporter Farragut’s fleet ran past the Con- governors in Ohio, Florida, federate batteries at Grand Gulf, New Jersey, Virginia, and By Don White Mississippi. Then on April 16, Union Michigan who have similarly Admiral Porter’s gunboats ran past opened the door to imple    At Washington, D.C., on April 20, the batteries at Vicksburg, Miss. menting Obamacare — even 1863, President Lincoln signed the These operations by the Navy were as Republican candidates proclamation that admitted West in conjunction with Gen. Grant’s for office nationwide were Virginia into the Union. Exactly campaign to capture the “Gibraltar promising the party would repeal it. two months later, West Virginia of the West” — Vicksburg, Miss. was admitted as the 35th state.     The Vicksburg Campaign was     A majority of Republicans Remember, President Lincoln never carried out by Grant from October in the Arizona Senate opconsidered the secessionist states to 1862 until the July 4 surrender of posed the measure, yet somebe out of the Union. the city. Grant tried a number of how it passed. How? Major    After Gen. Hooker took command operations against the strong forti- ity Leader John McComish he spent the rest of the winter put- fications that Gen. Pemberton had (R-Phoenix) got a small ting his stamp of authority on the constructed. Those along with the handful of Republicans — six Army of the Potomac. He eliminated natural terrain of the city on a bluff, out of 17 — to vote with 13 the grand divisions and formed the near a bend in the river, made it Democrats in the Senate to cavalry into a separate corps. All of impossible to conduct a successful pass the measure. The prothis in preparation of his meeting attack. This Grant would soon find with Gen. Robert E. Lee at the out as he carried out plan after plan Battle of Chancellorsville that took with no success. place from May 1 to 4.     After these failures, he crossed     Lincoln, still not sure of Hooker’s to the west side of the river north ability to led the Army of the Po- of Vicksburg and headed south to tomac, paid not one but two vis- carry out a joint operation with Gen. its to his headquarters in April. Banks against Port Hudson, La. He Hooker had been bragging about learned that Banks was involved in his army being “The finest Army his Red River Campaign and would on the Planet,” so Lincoln came to not have troops available until May see for himself. To Lincoln, Hooker 10. Grant decided not to wait on further bragged, “My plans are per- Banks. His goal was to take Vicksfect, and when I start to carry them burg, but first he knew he had to out, may God have mercy on Gen. take out any troops that could come Lee, for I will have none.” to Pemberton’s assistance.     After fighting on May 1, Gen.     So without any lines of supply to Lee learned from Gen. Stuart that support his troops, Grant brought Hooker’s right flank was unsup- on engagements or battles at Rayported. Lee and Jackson devised mond on May 12, Jackson on May a bold plan which sent Jackson 14, Champion’s Hill on May 16 and with 26,000 men to march beyond Big Black River on May 17. This Hooker’s flank and attack. was followed by the initial assault     Jackson’s march of 14 miles took on Vicksburg on May 19, and fiall day May 2. Hooker had been nally the siege lasting until the advised of this movement and or- surrender on July 4. Pemberton’s dered Gen. Howard to be on the army of 30,000 men, along with a alert. Howard ignored the warning tremendous number of cannon , and Jackson’s troops swarmed into small arms and a large supply of his camp routing and driving his ammunition were turned over to troops two miles to the rear. Only the victorious Union army. Before darkness saved them from full pur- Washington could act, Grant pasuit and capture. roled the entire garrison.     Later that night Gen. Jackson     After the Battle of Chancellorswas reconnoitering between the ville and the loss of Jackson, Lee lines when he was shot by friendly reorganized the Army of Northern fire from troops of the 18th North Virginia. He went to three corps, Carolina. Jackson was shot three with Gen. Longstreet 1st Corps, times and had to have his left arm Gen. Ewell 2nd Corps and Gen. amputated. When Lee heard this A.P. Hill 3rd Corps. His choices news he said, “Jackson has lost his were good, but neither Ewell or left arm and I have lost my right.” Hill would live up to his expectaJackson was expected to make a tions. full recovery, but pneumonia set in     The Battle of Brandy Station, the and he died on May 10. Lee was first true cavalry combat was fought never able to find a replacement on June 9. This was also the largto fill Jackson’s boots. est cavalry battle of the war. Con    Gen. Stuart took command of federates claimed victory, but only Jackson’s troops and on Lee’s orders because they held the field at day’s they prepared to attack Hooker’s end. During this battle the Union new line of defense. When word of Cavalry earned their spurs. Gen. a Union move on his forces at Fred- Pleasonton’s troops surprised Gen. ericksburg was received, Lee had Stuart’s men with an early morning to abandon his attack on Hooker. attack. This engagement was part Leaving troops to confront Hook- of the Gettysburg Campaign. er, Lee marched against Sedgwick halting him at Salem Church. Two …To be continued. days later Hooker’s army retreated across the river. Don White is a resident of Palos     In naval action on the Mississippi Hills.

Guest Column

The War for Abolition: Pt. 2

Letters to the Editor A simple plan

Dear Editor:     For too long, politicians — both Democrats and Republicans — have been ignoring the immigration problem by putting political correctness before enforcing U.S. immigration laws.     Illegals are lawbreakers.     Arguing that illegals do jobs Americans will not do lacks common sense. Putting to work some of the 50 million welfare recipients will lessen the load off the overburdened taxpayers.     Is this solution too simplistic for the politically correct liberals? Mary Cvack Tinley Park

   The Reporter Newspaper

encourages letters to the editor.    Letters must be 350 words or less.  Letters must be signed and the name of the writer will be published. Writers must also include their address and telephone number for verification, but that information will not be published and will remain otherwise confidential. Mail letters to the editor to The Reporter, 12247 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463 or e-mail us at thereporter@ comcast.net

posal now heads to the state house, where its outcome is as of yet uncertain.     Sound familiar? It should. It has become operating strategy of Republican leadership nationwide.     Recall in the U.S. House of Representatives, a small minority of Republicans voted with Democrats to pass the tax bill on New Year’s Day that raised taxes on those making $400,000 and above, including many small businesses.     A minority of Republicans, with Democrat help, again passed the hurricane “disaster relief” bill even though it was unpaid for and was stuffed with billions in unrelated pork even as it passed with Democrat support.     And then there are all the bills that a majority of Republicans did support — but nonetheless needed a push from across the aisle to pass.     For example, the latest continuing resolution only passed with Democrat help. A majority of Republicans voted to suspend the debt ceiling until May 19 — but they needed Democrats for that vote, too, in order for it to pass. Just like in the vote on the continuing resolution that came before that. Or

when the House increased the debt ceiling in 2011.     These particular budget votes, it should be noted, had the effect of implementing Obamacare — by funding it. Some opposition party.     Commenting on the passage of the Medicaid expansion bill in the Arizona Senate, Americans for Limited Government President Nathan Mehrens said, “If Republicans offer these types of ‘alternatives’ to voters — where both parties favor expanding government dependency — why should their base support them?”     Which, when one considers all these examples, it is hard not to agree with those who throw up their hands in disgust wondering why they bothered to turn out to vote at all for limited government candidates in the last election. “What’s the point?” they might ask.     As Republican leaders seem to calculate every legislative move based on a desire to “expand” the base, if they are not careful they might find they are standing on no base at all.     Instead, they should look to the majority of Republican governors that are actually standing against implement-

ing Obamacare who are neither enacting state exchanges nor expanding the Medicaid rolls.     An opportunity may be upcoming in the House of Representatives, where Rep. Tom Price (R-Ga.) — not content with continued meaningless votes for repeal — has proposed legislation that would defund the IRS portion of Obamacare.     To show their sincerity at defunding the health care law, Republicans could rally around this proposal by attaching it to the upcoming Treasury appropriations bill and the continuing resolution coming due on Sept. 30.     In light of Gov. Brewer and other Republicans’ Obamacare acquiescence it becomes more imperative that national Republican leaders not only mouth words but take concrete actions and fight against the dramatic expansion of government. Failure to do so destroys their brand and disenfranchises their base — a recipe for electoral disaster. Robert Romano is the Senior Editor of Americans for Limited Government.

Inside the First Amendment

The Supreme Court’s self-created quagmire By Charles C. Haynes     When the U.S. Supreme Court declared legislative prayers constitutional 30 years ago, the justices sent a convoluted message to legislatures, city councils and other government bodies:     You may open your sessions with prayer, a tradition that dates back to the founding of the Republic. But don’t exploit the prayer opportunity “to proselytize or advance any one, or to disparage any other, faith or belief.” (Marsh v. Chambers, 1983)     Since nobody can agree on what that means, Americans have spent the last three decades debating and litigating who gets to pray — and what they can say — without running afoul of the Court’s murky guidance.     On May 20, the Supreme Court agreed to hear a case, Town of Greece, NY v. Galloway, which may finally clear up some of the confusion surrounding the constitutionality of saying prayers at the opening of a government meeting.     For years, the Town Board in Greece, New York arranged for local clergy to be-

gin the board’s public meetings with prayer. Although the town occasionally invited non-Christians to pray, the vast majority of the prayers were from the majority faith.     Last year, the U.S. 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals ruled the town’s prayer policy unconstitutional because “the process for selecting prayer-givers virtually ensured a Christian viewpoint.”     In their appeal to the Supreme Court, town officials argue that there was no discrimination in determining who got to pray — and nothing was done to use the prayer opportunity to promote or denigrate any religion.     Whether the Greece Town Board wins or loses, the Court’s decision in the case may provide some answers to the messy questions the Court left unanswered 30 years ago in Marsh:     Must government officials require all invocations to be non-sectarian prayers so as to avoid proselytizing? Does it pass constitutional muster to rotate prayer-givers among local faith communities? If most of the prayer volunteers are Christian, is the town or city required to recruit

other faith representatives to ensure a greater variety of prayers?     Of course, attempting to answer these questions will likely lead to more questions, such as if and when to include the one fourth of the U.S. population with no religious affiliation.     As if on cue, a few days after the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Greece, NY case, an atheist member of the Arizona House of Representatives gave the “daily prayer” by giving a message that wasn’t prayer.     The prayer-free invocation prompted considerable debate, including outrage from a Christian lawmaker who insisted on having two prayers the next day to make up for the missing prayer.     The brouhaha in Arizona illustrates the complexity of the issue before the Supreme Court, a complexity the Court itself created when it ruled legislative prayers constitutional 30 years ago.     Short of reversing Marsh by prohibiting opening prayers at legislative sessions (which this Court is very unlikely to do), the only fair alternative would appear to be a “prayer policy” that

includes everyone by rotating among the bewildering variety of faiths and beliefs represented in the most religiously diverse society in the world.     Or the Court could mandate general, universal “to-whom-it-may-concern” prayers that, in the end, satisfy no one (and exclude the nonreligious).     What the Supreme Court must not do, however, is allow any government body to endorse one faith over others by opening meetings with Christian prayers week after week.     If “no establishment” under the First Amendment means anything, it means at least this:     The government may not take sides in religion. Charles C. Haynes is director of the Religious Freedom Education Project at the Newseum, 555 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C., 20001. Web: www. religiousfreedomeducation. org<http://www.religiousfreedomeducation.org/> Email: chaynes@freedomforum.org<mailto:chaynes@ freedomforum.org>.


Thursday, June 6, 2013 The Reporter

consumer

7

Help elderly loved ones avoid financial abuse

good to be true are likely just that — untrue. Legitimate investments carry both potential risks and rewards.     • Avoid “debt-settlement” claims — If your older loved ones have debt problems, they may be especially susceptible to offers that claim to “clear up” all their debts. But there’s no quick fix to this problem and any caller who claims otherwise is likely being deceitful. Encourage your parents or grandparents to discuss their debt situation with an honest, professional debt counselor or a financial advisor.     Here’s one more thing you can do to help your parents or grandparents avoid financial fraud: If they don’t already work with a trusted, qualified financial professional, introduce them to one. If your parents have a relationship with such a professional, they will be less likely to listen to any questionable, unsolicited offers than if they were trying to manage their finances on their own.     You’re in a good position to know how much, or how little, help your elderly loved ones may need in terms of avoiding financial abuse. So be willing to do whatever it takes to help them enjoy their retirement years comfortably.

Study up on college savings     Another school year is drawing to a close — so if you have young children, they’re one year

closer to the day when they head off to college. And both you and your children need to prepare for that day. Your kids can do so by developing good study habits. As for you, it’s never too soon to start preparing for the high costs of higher education.     Just how costly is college? According to the College Board’s figures for the 2012-13 academic year, the average cost for one year at an in-state four-year public school is $22,261; for a private school, the comparable expense is $43,289. And if college costs continue rising faster than the general inflation rate, these figures will increase substantially in the years ahead.     Of course, it’s entirely possible that your kids will receive some scholarships or grants, which can significantly lower your out-of-pocket price tag. Nonetheless, it’s probably a good idea not to count on your offspring getting a “full ride” to school — which means that you may want to start exploring college-savings vehicles.     Fortunately, you have some attractive options, one of which is a 529 plan.     When you contribute to a 529 plan, your earnings accumulate tax free, provided they are used for qualified higher education expenses. (Keep in mind, though, that 529 plan distributions not used for qualified expenses may be subject to federal and state income tax and a 10% IRS penalty.) Furthermore, your 529 plan contributions may be deductible from your state taxes. However, 529 plans vary, so be sure to check with your tax advisor regarding deductibility.     A 529 plan offers other benefits, too. For one thing, the lifetime contribution limits for 529 plans are quite generous; while these limits vary by state, some plans allow contributions well in excess of $200,000. Plus,

a 529 plan is flexible: if your child, grandchild or other beneficiary decides against college or vocational school, you can transfer the unused funds to another family member, tax and penalty free.     While a 529 plan may be a good choice for building resources for college, it’s certainly not the only choice. For example, a Coverdell Education Savings Account, like a 529 plan, can generate tax-free earnings if the money is used for higher education expenses. However, you can typically only put in a maximum of $2,000 per year to a Coverdell account.     Another college-savings possibility is a custodial account, known as an UGMA or UTMA, which offers some tax benefits, no contribution limits, and may have an impact on financial aid. You might also consider investing in a zero-coupon bond that matures just when your child is ready for college. Unlike other bonds, you won’t receive regular interest payments with a zerocoupon bond, but you purchase it at a deep discount, so you might find the affordability factor to be worth considering. (Be aware, though, that even though you don’t actually receive the interest payments annually, you’ll still be liable for the taxes on them, so before purchasing a zero coupon bond, consult with your tax advisor). Whichever college-savings vehicles you choose, try to put them to work as early as you can. Before you know it, today’s first-graders will be tomorrow’s college freshmen. Scott Johnson, CFP, is a financial advisor with Edward Jones, 8146 W. 111th St., Palos Hills, 974-1965. Edward Jones does not provide legal advice. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones financial advisor.

Profits & Sense

Submitted Photo

Music on tap

    Jesse’s Tavern in Chicago Ridge features free live music with no cover charge at least four nights a week on its recently rebuilt stage. Jesse’s offers an open jam at 9 p.m. every Monday during which customers are provided tambourines and other percussion instruments to play along with performers. Karaoke night begins at 9 p.m. every Wednesday, and the first Thursday of every month is Jesse’s Jam for serious musicians looking to network. The third Thursday of the month is “Dead Night” featuring music by The Grateful Dead, and bands play beginning at approximately 9 p.m. every Saturday night. Jesse’s also offers a “Family Feud”-style trivia contest every Friday night. For more information visit Jesse’s Tavern on Facebook.

Talkin Poker

By Scott Fischman

In cash games, map out a money strategy Scott:     As a regular no-limit hold ’em cash-game player, I have a pretty good grounding in pot odds and make a lot of my plays based on this knowledge. Some of the friends I play with in home games, however, are less astute. When I figure them for a draw and make a bet that offers them incorrect pot odds, they often call where more experienced players would fold. How do I stop players like this from drawing out on me without putting my whole stack on the line and running the risk of them catching a monster? — Brett J. Dear Brett:     It’s important to feed on those mistakes when playing a no-limit cash game. If you lose, so be it. You can’t start playing badly because you’re afraid of having your opponents suck out.     In tournaments, protecting your hands and taking down pots as early as possible is vital to success. But that approach will most likely cut deeply into your cash-game profits. By keeping other players in the hand and manipulating the bets based on pot and stack sizes, you can effectively put your opponents in mistake mode.

    You shouldn’t be afraid of losing your stack. If that’s the case, then you may need to play at lower limits. You may also want to evaluate the amount you buy into the game with. When choosing how much money to put on the table, you should consider the size of the blinds, the size of the other players’ stacks, and your overall game plan for that specific table (since you know the players already). Based on those circumstances, ask yourself these types of questions:     How much money does the worst player in the game have? Is that player the dangerous, gambling type of bad, or the loosepassive type of bad? How much money do the strong players whom you like to avoid (if any) have? How “deep,” in relation to the blinds, are the majority of the stacks on the table?     Reconcile all of this information with your financial motives. Let’s say that your financial motives are to take the least volatile path at all times and book consistent winning percentages with low risk and low reward. The worst player in the game has $1,000, and he is the maniacal type, which equals volatility. That information alone is not enough to form a strategy for facing this player. You need to evaluate how “deep” he is.

    Let’s say the blinds are $2-$5, which gives that player 200 big blinds (a medium-size stack). Personally, I have to be assured that I’m not “gambling” with hands on which I’m willing to risk my entire stack. You cannot protect your hand enough, versus medium or short stacked players, to get the type of low variance you seek. However, if the blinds are $1-$2, a $1,000 buy-in would equal 500 big blinds, which is a huge stack. In that case, it might be best to buy in for at least the same stack size as the bad player, or the maximum allowed for the table.     While you are experimenting to figure out what money strategy best fits your motives, err on the side of caution — buying in for too little. I know a few cash-game pros who always buy in for the minimum allowed and then add money as needed in response to the table dynamics.    (Scott Fischman is a professional poker in both the live and online poker worlds. He has won two World Series of Poker bracelets and has accumulated nearly $3 million in career earnings. He is also the author of the poker book “Online Ace.” Send your poker questions to him at pokerquestions@gmail.com or on Twitter: @scottfischman88.)

    Marquette Bank will hold a free ladies’ day event from 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, June 15 at its branch at 8020 Harlem Ave. in Bridgeview. Shop and meet local vendors including Dove Chocolate, Essential Chiropractic, Home Bound Candles and Lia Sophia. There will be door prizes and deals from vendors. Event is open to the public. For more information call (773) 918-4504. ***     Marquette Bank will hold “Switch to Neighborhood Banking Day” Saturday, June 15 at all 23 of its Chicago-area branches. Stop by any Marquette Bank location for new customer specials and free credit history reports. For more information visit emarquettebank. com or call (888) 254-9500. ***     Marquette Bank is celebrating Customer and Neighborhood Appreciation Week from June 15 to 22 at all 23 Chicago-area branches. The bank will offer free refreshments, children’s games, prize drawings, free credit history reports, free home financing reviews and free retirement check-ups. For more information call (888) 254-9500 or visit emarquettebank. com/CNAW2013. ***     Marquette Bank will offer free document shredding from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, June 22 at its Orland Park branch, 17865 Wolf Road, and Oak Lawn branch, 8855 Ridgeland Ave. For more information call (888) 254-9500.

Submitted Photo

‘The Mac’ airs Tuesday     Ed McElroy, host of “The Ed McElroy Show” on Comcast channel 19, recently interviewed Cook County Circuit Court Judge Thomas J. Carroll (left) of the 6th Municipal District and Union of Operating Engineers Local 399 President Brian Hickey. The show will air at 8 p.m. Tuesday, June 11 and Tuesday, June 18.     McElroy is Past National Commander of Catholic War Veterans, U.S.A.

Christ Heart Institute gets three stars from Thoracic Surgeons     Advocate Christ Medical Center in Oak Lawn has for the sixth straight reporting period earned the highest rating — three stars — from the Chicago-based Society of Thoracic Surgeons for the quality of its adult open heart surgery, specifically its achieved outcomes in coronary artery bypass grafting.     Stars are awarded on the basis of a composite score that the Society of Thoracic Surgeons calculates using a combination of 11 quality measures divided into several broad categories, including risk-adjusted morbidity and mortality. A hospital earns three stars if the numbers show that the institution is likely (99 percent probability) to perform at an above-average level. About 10 percent to 15 percent of hospitals participating in the Society’s database achieve three stars.

    Advocate Christ Medical Center’s Heart and Vascular Institute teams in 2012 performed 976 adult open heart surgeries, making the Institute one of Illinois’ busiest heart centers.     Coronary artery bypass graft surgery involves using a section of another blood vessel — often one of the arteries taken from the underside of the patient’s chest wall — to bypass the portion of a coronary artery that has become blocked or severely narrowed due to coronary artery disease. One end of the graft is attached above the blockage and the other below it; the blood is rerouted through the graft so that it can reach the heart muscle easily.     Symptoms of coronary artery disease, which decreases blood flow to the heart, include chest pain, fatigue, shortness of breath and abnormal heart rhythms.

Mortgage Rates Around the Area United Trust Bank (as of June 4) 30-year fixed 15-year fixed 10-year fixed

RATES 4.000 3.125 3.000

APR 4.035 3.182 3.055

POINTS 0 0 0

RATES 4.000 3.750 3.125

APR 4.038 3.802 3.189

POINTS 0 0 .25

Prospect Federal (as of June 3) 30-year fixed 20-year fixed 15-year fixed All rates subject to change daily. Equal opportunity lenders.

D IDSI SCCOOUUNN TT RRAT ATEESS withoutdiscount discount service. without service.

It’s accident no accidentmore morepeople people trust It’s no trustState StateFarm. Farm. ErikR RNelson, Nelson, Agent Agent Erik 10200S SRoberts Roberts Road Road 10200 Palos PalosHills, Hills,ILIL60465-1539 60465-1539 Bus: Bus:708-430-7575 708-430-7575 erik.nelson.hr35@statefarm.com erik.nelson.hr35@statefarm.com

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is Hereby Given that on 7-20-13, a sale will be held at Hi-Tech Automotive, 890 S. Milwaukee Avenue, Wheeling, IL. 60090, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publication of this notice. Tatyana Abramova & Iouri Oumanski 2001 Lexus VIN# JTJHT00W913505451 Lien Amount: $8,361.50

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is Hereby Given that on 7-20-13, a sale will be held at Jordan Automotive, Inc., 3689 W. Grand Avenue, Chicago, IL. 60651, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publication of this notice. Onna Holmes & Anna Holmes 2000 Lexus VIN# JT6HF10UXY0152932 Lien Amount: $4,321.86

P040036 P040036 02/04 02/04

StateFarm FarmMutual Mutual Automobile Insurance Company in NJ), Bloomington, IL State Automobile Insurance Company (Not in (Not NJ), Bloomington, IL

This is personal. She was the cornerstone of our family. But my mother died of colon cancer when she was only 56. Let my heartbreak be your wake-up call. Colorectal cancer is the 2nd leading cancer killer in the U.S., but screening helps prevent this disease. Terrence Howard, actor/musician

If you’re 50 or older, please get screened. Screening saves lives. 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636) s www.cdc.gov/screenforlife

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Photo: Andrew Macpherson

    It’s unfortunate, but true: The elderly population may be the most vulnerable group in our society. In fact, in an effort to call attention to the problems of physical, emotional and financial abuse of the elderly, the United Nations has designated June 15 as World Elder Abuse Awareness Day. If you have older parents, or even grandparents, can you do to anything to help prevent them from being victimized, especially with regard to their finances?     Actually, there’s a lot you can do. First and foremost, you need to maintain good communications and a trusting relationship with your older family members. As long as these elements are present, you should feel free to make the following suggestions:     • Increase awareness — When it comes to financial fraud and scams, many seniors think: “It can’t happen to me.” But the facts suggest otherwise: Some 20 percent of Americans over the age of 65 admit to having been victimized by financial swindles, according to a survey by the nonprofit Investor Protection Trust. Let your loved ones know that no one in their age group is immune to financial predators.     • Guard private information — Ask your parents or grandparents to not divulge personal information over the phone. In fact, urge them to get caller ID, if they don’t have it already, and tell them that if they don’t recognize the number, don’t answer. Legitimate callers are more likely to leave messages than scammers.     • Don’t send money. Exhort your parents or grandparents to never wire money to a random account — no exceptions.     • Ignore “limited-time offers” — Your loved ones should ignore callers, mailers or emails that demand they act immediately. These offers are often overblown at best and may be fraudulent at worst.     • Don’t trust “no risk” offers — Financial offers that sound too


8

The Reporter

Thursday, June 6, 2013

Pat Bouchard, local journalist helped found the Crisis Center By Jeff Vorva     When Pat Bouchard wrote columns for the Regional News and Reporter in the 1980s, readers were never sure what they were in for.     But it usually wasn’t going to be an easygoing read.     While she concentrated on trying to keep local government officials on their toes, she was outspoken on a ton of other topics, from Grenada to Nazis and sometimes got into heated arguments with co-workers in the office on columns she penned due to her left-of-center viewpoint.     Genevieve “Pat” Bouchard died last Thursday at age 85 at Autumn Leaves of Orland Park care center. She had served approximately three decades as a journalist, editor and columnist in the area who once ran for the mayor of Worth

in 1981.     Pat Bouchard had an eye — and opinion — for the odd stories in the news.     For instance, on Sept. 4, 1986, she highlighted an item about 92year-old Rudolph Hess — Adolpf Hitler’s right-hand man — being denied televised news and political debates in prison.     “I think Hess should be exposed to the blatherings of world politicians and to the other realities that are carried into our homes by the nightly newscasts,” she wrote. “Why should a Nazi suffer less than the rest of us?”     If Mrs. Bouchard couldn’t come up with the right sentiment herself, she would find someone who did. Once she found a news nugget about a Rhode Island researcher who claimed that more people are likely to strike their kids than smack their dogs so she talked

Photo courtesy Crisis Center

Pat Bouchard shown at a Crisis Center board meeting. Attorney General Lisa Madigan is seated at the table.

to a friend who had raised five teenagers.     “Sounds reasonable to me,” the unnamed friend was quoted as saying. “My dog never snitched my pantyhose or makeup, he never told my family secrets to my inlaws, never borrowed the car and got a ticket…     “There is just no temptation to hit a loving beast who accepts you as you are … however when your darling blond daughter shows up with pink and blue hair or your son sneaks a beer out of the refrigerator … well, that’s another story.”     Mrs. Bouchard was also a columnist for other area newspapers and was a past president and founding board member of the Crisis Center for South Suburbia.     She remained active for 26 years with the Crisis Center, serving as board president from 1985-89.     At one time, she was the editor of The Reporter when the paper was owned by the Roelofs family, and she went toe-to-toe and locked horns with then-Regional editor Charles Richards.     “Of all the editors they had, she was by far the best,” Richards said. “She was tough. It was difficult for the Regional to compete with her. She beat me more times than I beat her as far as timeliness and depth of a story. She was a key to the success of the Worth-Palos Reporter.”     When the Richards family bought the Reporter in 1986, Charles Richards hired her on as a columnist.

Little Company celebrates life     Little Company of Mary Hospital employees gathered in the hospital’s Chapel on May 14 to commemorate the life and decreed of their founder, Venerable Mary Potter, and the birth of more than 200,000 babies born in the original patient tower.     The celebration Mass was presided by Rev. Benedykt Pazon from St. Bernadette Church. Pazon began the Mass with the centenary anniversary celebration of the death of the founder of the Little Company of Mary Sisters, Venerable Mary Potter.     Mary Potter was born in London in 1847. Her compassion for the sick and dying and her vision would change the lives of tens of thousands of people around the world. Her life was marked by frequent illnesses, providing her first hand insight into the loneliness and abandonment world that many of the sick and

dying feel. She overcame countless obstacles as she responded to the Holy Spirit and founded a religious congregation devoted to praying for the sick and dying which became known in 1877 as the Little Company of Mary Sisters.     Since Mary’s passing in Rome in 1913, her legacy and wholehearted commitment to God were recognized by Pope John Paul II, when Mary Potter was proclaimed “venerable” on Feb. 8, 1988. This proclamation demonstrated the Church’s validation of Mary Potter’s saintly life and acceptance of her extensive spiritual writings.     The spiritual heritage of Mary Potter is carried on throughout the world. Today, the Sisters of the Little Company of Mary continue to provide compassionate care for the sick and dying in 11 countries. Their healing touch

Funeral Directory

Palos-Gaidas

can be felt in England, Scotland, Ireland, Northern Ireland, Albania, Wales, Australia, New Zealand, South Korea, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Italy, Tonga, and the United States.     Mary Potter’s vision in America became a reality on Jan. 9, 1930 in Evergreen Park when the Sisters of Little Company of Mary opened a four-story, 150bed hospital. Since opening, more than 200,000 babies have entered the world, earning the hospital the nickname, “The Baby Hospital.”     In October 2012, Little Company of Mary made history by opening a state-of-the-art West Pavilion tower to replace the original patient tower built in 1930. The West Pavilion is a 300,000-square-foot, eight-story, 118-private rooms and baths. The West Pavilion is the new home to the Family Birth Center.

Church Corner

Death Notices

Pat Bouchard     “A large number of people knew of her work and I respected her work,” Richards said. “When she started doing columns for us, her humor began to come out. She was a good columnist for us.”     Pat Bouchard ran for Worth mayor in 1981, bucking up in a three-way dance against incumbent Dan Kumingo and fellow challenger Arthur Gnech. Kumingo won his second term, with 1,673 votes followed by Bouchard (822) and Gnech (376).     “She was a good public watchdog for the people and the village of Worth,” Kumingo said Monday.     Mrs. Bouchard was the wife of the late Robert Bouchard and the mother of Bobbie (Bill) Bain, Mark Bouchard, Patricia Bouchard (B. Lynn) Case, the grandmother of four and great grandmother of one.     Visitation was Tuesday at the Schmaedeke Funeral Home in Worth. A Mass was offered at St. Julie Billiart Church in Tinley Park on Wednesday. Interment was at Holy Sepulchre Cemetery.

Benefits & Fundraisers     Funds For Tiffani, a Spinal Cord Rehabilitation fundraiser, will be from 3 to 8 p.m. Sunday, June 30 at 115 Bourbon St., 3359 W. 111th St. in Merrionette Park. Tickets are $30 for adults, $10 for children (children 6 years and under are free) and include buffet, soft drinks, beer, wine, and live entertainment featuring Ear Candy and “American Idol” Season 10 contestant Chris Medina. There will be raffle drawings and silent auction. For more information visit fundsfortiffani.net or Facebook /TeamTiffani, or email info@ fundsfortiffani.net.     Funds will go toward the rehabilitation costs of Tiffani Ntanos, who sustained a spinal cord injury last June 9 when she dove off a boat into the Kankakee River and (Continued on page 12)

John J. Flanagan Sr.     John J. Flanagan Sr, 82, of Oak Lawn, died May 29. Visitation was scheduled for 3 to 9 p.m. today, Thursday June 6 at St. Germaine Church, 9711 S. Kolin Ave. in Oak Lawn. A funeral Mass will be held at 10 a.m. Friday, June 7 at the church. Interment will be at St. Mary Cemetery in Evergreen Park.     Mr. Flanagan is survived by his son, John; his sister, Mary Therese Rovetto; two grandchildren and one great-grandchild.     Mr. Flanagan served in the Army. He worked a teacher and principal at St. Rita of Cascia grade school and a deacon at St. Germaine Church in Oak Lawn. Barbara A. Kuzas     Barbara A. Kuzas, née Gorun, 69, died May 27, 2013. Visitation was held May 29 at BlakeLamb Funeral Home in Oak Lawn. A funeral Mass was held May 30 at Blake-Lamb Funeral Home. Interment was at Resurrection Cemetery in Justice.     Mrs. Kuzas is survived by her husband, Edward; her sons, Robert and Michael; her daughters Annette, Dawn, and Lisa; her sister Joel; nine grandchildren; and two greatgrandchildren.     Mrs. Kuzas was born in Chicago. Ronald J. Kraus     Ronald J. Kraus, 71, died May 27 in his home. Visitation was held May 30 at Lawn Funeral Home in Orland Park. A service was held May 30 at Lawn Funeral Home. Interment was at a private cemetery.     Mr. Kraus is survived by his wife, Connie; his son, Andrew; his daughter, Marlena; and many nieces and nephews.     Mr. Kraus was born in Chicago. He worked as a teacher at St. Mary School in Riverdale, Navajo Heights School in Palos Heights and St. Benedict School in Blue Island. Dorothy A. Litke     Dorothy A. Litke, née Prill, 94, of Palos Hills, died May 29 at home. Visitation was held June 2 at Schmaedeke Funeral Home in Worth. A funeral service was held June 3 at Faith Lutheran Church in Oak Lawn. Interment was at Chapel Hill Gardens South in Oak Lawn.     Mrs. Litke is survived by her sons, Paul and Frank; her daughters, Genevieve Dahl, Joann Duer, Loretta Litke and Ruth Boye; her sister, Helen Lively; and nine grandchildren,

11 great-grandchildren and one great-great grandchild.     Mrs. Litke was born in Chicago. She worked as a science technology teacher. Allen S. Marshall     Allen S. Marshall, 63, died May 25. Visitation was held May 31 at Colonial Chapel in Orland Park. The service and interment were private.     Mr. Marshall is survived by his wife, Gayle; his brother, Murray; his sons Jeff, Rob and Allen Jr.; his daughter, Allison; and his granddaughter, Grace. Father Stanley R. Rudcki     Father Stanley R. Rudcki of Palos Heights, 85, died May 22. Visitation was held May 29 at St. Alexander Church. A funeral Mass was held May 30 at St. Alexander Church. Interment was at Resurrection Cemetery in Justice.     Father Rudcki is survived by his nephew, Steven; his niece, Diane; his great-nephews, Jason and Jonathan; and his greatnieces, Laura, Kimberly, Ashley and Kristen. Donald E. Thompson     Donald E. Thompson, 91, of Oak Lawn, died May 26. Visitation was held May 29 at Colonial Chapel in Orland Park. A funeral Mass was held May 30 at Grace Fellowship Church in Oak Forest. Interment was at Chapel Hill Gardens South in Oak Lawn.     Mr. Thompson is survived by his wife, Ruth; his sons, Kenneth and Richard; his daughter, Rebecca Awdykowyz; his sister, Judith Montgomery; and six grandchildren and three greatgrandchildren.     Mr. Thompson was born in Percy. He served in the Navy during World War II. He worked as an advertising typographer in the printing industry. Dora Trotta     Dora Trotta, 87, née Corvino, of Palos Hills, died June 2 at Providence of Palos Heights. Visitation was held June 4 at Palos-Gaidas Funeral Home in Palos Hills. A funeral Mass will be held at 10 a.m. today, June 5 at Sacred Heart Church, 8245 W. 111th St. Interment will be at Holy Sepulchre Cemetery in Worth.     Mrs. Trotta is survived by her daughter, Doris Bukas; her sister, Phyllis Saulich; her brother, John; and one grandchild.     Mrs. Trotta was born in Chicago. She worked as a secretary for the Rheem Manufacturing Company in Chicago.

Crossword Puzzle

Flea Market

    Oak Lawn Community Church, Presbyterian, will hold an outdoor flea market, rummage and bake sale from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, June 22 at the church, 9000 Ridgeland Ave. For registration form or more information call 599-4025.

Most Holy Carnival

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    Most Holy Redeemer Parish, 9525 Lawndale Ave. in Evergreen Park, will hold its annual carnival Wednesday, June 12 through Sunday, June 16. For more information call 6367144.

Bible Study

    “Don’t Worry” is the theme for the summer Bible study at Pilgrim Faith United Church of Christ in Oak Lawn. Study sessions will be held at 7 p.m. on Tuesdays in June at the church, 9411 S. 51st Ave. Pastor Peggy McClanahan will lead the study, which will explore ways to worry less and be filled with peace.

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6-6-13

    This year’s theme for the Hickory Hills Presbyterian Church’s Vacation Bible School is “Colossal Coaster World — Facing Fear, Trusting God.” Sessions will be held from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Monday, June 10 to Friday, June 14 at the church, 8426 W. 95th St. The week will be filled with Bible stories, crafts, music, refreshments and recreation. Program is open to all children age four through sixth grade. For more information call 598-3100.

Church Corner

    Oak Lawn Community Church, at 9000 S. Ridgeland Ave., is seeking sellers for its annual Outdoor Flea Market to be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, June 22. Up to 39 sellers will be accepted on a first come, first served basis. The price is $15 a space, a second space is $10. For more information call the church office at 599-4025 or stop in the church office on Tuesday through Thursday between 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. (Continued on page 12)

Across

1 Smoldering bit 6 Slip a Mickey 10 It may have all the answers 14 Stiller’s partner 15 High rollers’ destination 16 Half of 10? 17 Speed skater Apolo __ Ohno 18 Health enhancer, so it’s said 20 It “is no problem. You just have to live long enough”: Groucho Marx 22 Pickup facilitator 23 “Friendly skies” co. 24 __ center 27 PC time meas. 29 Performed, in a way 32 Band that performed         “Whip It” 33 Bars in stores 34 1965 NCAA tennis champ 35 Aaron’s team for 21 seasons 37 Unexpected twist (and a hint         to what’s hidden inside 18-,         20-, 51- and 56-Across) 40 Make 41 Gloom mate 42 Rural stretch 43 “... two fives for __?” 44 Skin malady, perhaps

45 What crews use 46 Expression of disappointment 47 Bit of code 49 Hair care purchase 51 “A Moon for the Misbegotten” playwright 56 Longshoremen’s aids 59 Baggy 60 Net reading 61 “Tiger in your tank” company 62 Ban’s predecessor at the U.N. 63 Bastes, e.g. 64 Attic constructions 65 Bridge seats 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Down

Net reading “Writing on the wall” word Michigan’s Cereal City Steamy Arrested Bore Bank takeback, briefly Deprive of juice? Israel’s Meir Pre-Communism leader Thing to stop on Savings for later yrs. When repeated with “oh” in

(Answers on page 12)

        between, “Wow!” 19 Slippery swimmer 21 Mythical beast, to locals 24 Epiphanies 25 Score-tying shot 26 Olympics broadcaster Bob 27 Mideast capital 28 Last lap efforts 30 Spa sounds 31 Indigent 32 Lake creator 34 Interior decorator’s concern 35 Juiced 36 Sleep acronym 38 Cooking utensil 39 Dawn goddess 44 French onion soup topping 45 Numbers after nine, often 47 Sam & Dave, e.g. 48 Nixon’s first veep 50 Union acquisition? 51 Vandalizes, in a way 52 Gov’t. train wreck         investigators 53 Those, to Pedro 54 Future atty.’s hurdle 55 Eye part 56 “CSI: NY” airer 57 Microbrewery buy 58 Altercation


Thursday, June 6, 2013 The Reporter

Features

9

Retire Smart By Jill Schlesinger

Stock market highs: Should you buy?

Mayo Clinic

    The Dow passes 15,000! The S&P hits 1,600! It’s the best start to a year for stocks since 1999! As the stock market continues its ascent, the most frequently asked question I hear is: “Should I buy, or is a correction coming?” The answer lies in what your goals are.     Recently, Warren Buffett pre­ dicted that stocks will go “far higher” in the long run, so, for those with 10 or 20 years to go before they need their money, investing in a diversified portfolio that includes stocks makes sense. That said, stock indexes have gone 6 months without even a 5 percent correction — the last “classic” correction (defined as a 10 percent drop from the highs) occurred in the summer of 2011, when the S&P 500 plummeted by more than 17 percent after the debt-ceiling debacle.     So, is a correction coming? Of course it is, but predicting when that will happen and trying to capitalize on it is a fool’s game. That leaves many would-be stock investors with a tough choice: Should they get back into stocks after markets have more than doubled, or should they remain in their cash and bond positions?     Part of the problem is that many investors are still stinging after the 54 percent drop from October 2007 to March 2009. As if that were not enough, confidence was shaken periodically during the recovery, of HPV vaccine have been given whether from the 2010 “Flash and closely monitored. A wealth Crash,” the 2011 swoon or drops of data supports the safety and effectiveness of the vaccine.     In the past, there was concern that HPV vaccine could lead to Guillain-Barre syndrome, a neurological disorder. That was fully investigated, and no association was found. In addition, there’s absolutely no evidence to support claims that the HPV vaccine causes mental retardation.     The HPV vaccine is a safe,     Q: We were recently schedeffective anti-cancer vaccine. It uled to sail on a seven-day Carcan protect your son’s health. It nival cruise to Mexico. A few can also help prevent the spread minutes after we boarded in of cervical cancer, a disease that Long Beach, Calif., I had horcan destroy a woman’s fertility or rible kidney pains. I couldn’t end her life. Mayo Clinic strongly walk, and felt as if I was going recommends the HPV vaccine for to pass out. both girls and boys. — Robert     My husband immediately M. Jacobson, M.D., Commutook me to the medical docnity Pediatrics and Adolescent tor on board. He performed Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, an ultrasound and I asked for Minn. something for the pain. All of a    (Medical Edge from Mayo sudden he said you need to get Clinic is an educational resource off the ship because you have and doesn’t replace regular media kidney infection. Within two cal care. E-mail a question to minutes we had three Carnival medicaledge@mayo.edu, or write: employees rushing us to get our Medical Edge from Mayo Clinic, bags and they escorted us off c/o TMS, 2010 Westridge Drive, the ship. Irving, TX 75038. For more in    All the while, I could barely formation, visit www.mayoclinic. walk. One of the employees told org.) me not to worry, that I could cruise at a “later date.” Everything happened so fast. I was never given a choice of whether to stay on board or not.     We did not even unpack our bags in our room. We used none of the ship’s amenities. We had By Mark Andrews other friends on board who said that within a few hours, Car    June 6: ON THIS DATE nival had upgraded another in 1944, 150,000 Allied troops couple into our room, which stormed the beaches of Normandy, had a balcony. France, in the “D-Day” invasion     When I called the customer of Europe. In 1967, the Six-Day service number, they said I War between Israel and its Arab would not be getting any money neighbors began with pre-emptive back and I’m not able to take strikes by the Jewish nation.     June 7: ON THIS DATE in 1775, the United Colonies changed its name to the United States. In 1929, the sovereign state of Vatican City came into existence.     June 8: ON THIS DATE in 1948, the “Texaco Star Theater” made its debut on NBC-TV with Milton Berle as guest host. Berle was later named the show’s permanent host. In 1968, authorities announced the capture in London of James Earl Ray, suspected assassin of civil rights leader the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.     June 9: ON THIS DATE in 68, the Roman Emperor Nero committed suicide. In 1978, leaders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints struck down a 148-year-old policy of excluding black men from the Mormon priesthood.     June 10: ON THIS DATE in 1752, a kite flown by Benjamin Franklin was struck by lightning in his famous demonstration of electricity. In 1935, Dr. Robert Smith of Akron, Ohio, and Bill Wilson of New York formed Alcoholics Anonymous.     June 11: ON THIS DATE in 1776, the Continental Congress formed a committee to draft a Declaration of Independence from Britain. In 1927, aviator Charles Lindbergh received the first Distinguished Flying Cross ever awarded for his nonstop solo flight across the Atlantic.    (Mark Andrews can be reached via e-mail at mlandrews@embarq mail.com.)

HPV vaccine now recommended for boys     DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I’ve heard that the HPV vaccine is now being recommended for boys. Why? Does my 12-year-old son really need this?     ANSWER: Yes, the quadrivalent HPV4 (brand name Gardasil) vaccine is now routinely recommended for all boys 11 to 12 years of age. It is a good idea for boys to receive the vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. This vaccine was first developed to prevent cervical cancer in girls when they grow up to become women. But it’s important for boys to get vaccinated against HPV to protect them when they grow up to be men. The vaccine can prevent cancer, as well as prevent the spread of HPV.     HPV is a dangerous, sexually transmitted virus that can cause a host of health problems. Two strains of the virus cause 70 percent of all cervical cancer. HPV infections can also lead to other genital and anal cancers in women, and penile cancer and anal cancer in men. In addition, HPV causes genital warts, as well as mouth and throat cancers.     The HPV4 vaccine is a safe, effective vaccine that can help prevent HPV infection, cancers and warts. The vaccine is given as a series of three shots over six months. For the vaccine to be effective, a person needs to receive all three doses before being exposed to HPV infection.     The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends the HPV4 vaccine for boys 11 to 12

years old. The vaccination series can be started at age 9. The vaccine is also recommended for boys and men 13 to 22 years of age who have not been vaccinated.     This recommendation for boys to receive HPV4 alone is in addition to the recommendation for girls 11 to 12 years of age to receive either the HPV2 or the HPV4 vaccine. HPV2 is not licensed for boys or men.     The HPV4 vaccine can prevent rare cancers of the penis and anus in men, which are serious when they occur. The vaccine also prevents genital warts.     In addition, while men obviously cannot get cervical cancer, they can carry HPV and spread it to their partners. HPV is very common. About 50 percent of the population, both men and women, develop an HPV infection. Many people who carry HPV never have signs or symptoms, and they don’t know they have it. By vaccinating boys against HPV, we are helping to protect women from developing cervical cancer.     Vaccinating boys against HPV when they are 11 or 12 is good timing. At that age, children’s bodies respond to vaccines better than they do later in life. Three doses appear to give lifelong immunity. In addition, many older teenagers are sexually active. Vaccines are most effective if they’re given before the individual is at risk of being exposed to HPV.     The HPV vaccine has been proven safe. The process it went through before being approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration was extensive. Since then, more than 60 million doses

The Kid’s Doctor By Sue Hubbard, M.D. Why posture is important     Whenever I do an annual physical, I always spend some time looking at the child’s back. Why? It’s important to examine a child’s spine to check for any irregularities or disease, such as scoliosis (curvature). I also check the skin around the child’s neck and back (really, everywhere) for moles that need to be noted and watched.     As children get older, I often note that when I ask them to stand up so I can look at their backs, they slouch or slump. Each time, I can hear my own mother saying, “Susan, stand up straight, put your shoulders back!” I’m suddenly, noticeably, sitting up straighter even while typing this!     Posture is important, and at times a parent will even ask me to discuss it with their child. The 3to 10-year-old set generally stands up fairly straight, but tweens and teens are often guilty of poor posture. This is interesting, as most patients this age talk about wanting to be taller, yet they don’t even stand up straight!     Then, there are my patients who, for various teenage reasons, feel they are “too tall” and try to hide their height by slumping. In either case, slouching and slumping not only looks bad, but it’s also bad for the back. Poor posture can lead to neck and shoulder pain, a common complaint of

adolescents.     Not only do many teens have poor posture while standing, but have you ever watched as they hunch over their computers? Adolescents often spend in excess of 8 hours a day online — without paying any attention to how they’re sitting. I see many a teen with neck pain that radiates down the back and scapula. Poor posture leads to lots of muscle spasms, as well.     My advice? Urge your children to practice standing up straight. Have them try the good old-fashioned technique of standing with their back and shoulders against a wall, then see if they can step away from the wall and maintain that erect posture. And how about the old book-on-the-head trick? Younger children find balancing a book on their heads is fun.     Everything just works better with good posture. You can breathe better, your tummy muscles get tighter as you stand up straighter, and good posture takes pressure off of your back. You’ll have less neck and shoulder pain, and lastly, you’ll just look better! (Boy, would my mother be proud of me for agreeing with her now.)    (Dr. Sue Hubbard is a nationally known pediatrician and cohost of “The Kid’s Doctor” radio show. Submit questions at www. kidsdr.com.)

attributed to the European debt crisis.     Those events may explain a recent Bankrate.com Financial Security Index in which a whopping 76 percent of re­spon­ dents said that they are just saying no to stocks. Economists call this “recency bias,” which means that we use our recent experience as a guide for what will happen in the future. So when stocks are soaring, we think markets will keep rising, but when the market plunges, we become convinced that it will never rise again.     Because investors are often guided by emotions, they make bad decisions that can cost real money. The most recent example can be found with those who sold at 2009 lows and then missed out on the 130 percent rise in stocks. But erratic investor behavior is actually quite common. Year after year, research from Dalbar analyzes the difference between how investor returns compare to major indexes, and the news is not very good.     According to Dalbar’s latest Quantitative Analysis of Investor Behavior study, mutual fund investors have significantly un­derperformed the S&P 500 over the past 3, 5, 10 and 20 years. The average stock fund investor lagged the S&P 500 by nearly 4 percentage points per year from 1993 to 2012. The study notes that, “no matter what the state of the mutual fund industry, boom or bust: Investment results are more

dependent on investor behavior than on fund performance. Mutual fund investors who hold on to their investment are more successful than those who time the market.”     So, if are you asking the question about whether it is safe to buy stocks, the answer is NO — stocks are not a safe investment! And chances are, you are simply repeating your bad investing patterns of the past. But if you are the kind of person who sold out because you couldn’t handle the ups and downs of the stock market, there may be a way to enter the stock market without losing your shirt.     Consider keeping your stock allocation to a level where the gyrations don’t cause you to lose sleep — maybe just 10 to 20 percent of your portfolio. By limiting your exposure, you can partially participate in a rising stock market without getting your hat handed to you if/ when the correction eventually occurs.    (Jill Schlesinger, CFP, is the Emmy-nominated, Senior Business Analyst for CBS News. A former options trader and CIO of an investment advisory firm, Jill covers the economy, markets, investing and anything else with a dollar sign on TV, radio (including her nationally syndicated radio show), the web and her blog, “Jill on Money.” She welcomes comments and questions at askjill@jillonmoney. com.)

Travel Troubleshooter By Christopher Elliott

Kicked off my cruise for getting sick

History of the World

my cruise at a later date. I was shocked. I paid $2,000 for the cruise. I really just want to take the cruise I paid for at a later date, or get a refund. — Regina Hatfield, Sacramento, Calif.     A: I’m glad you’re feeling better. Carnival was correct to take you off the ship and seek medical treatment. Trust me, you wouldn’t have wanted to take your chances in a Mexican hospital, which may — or may not — have the same level of care as an American medical facility.     But Carnival could have been clearer about your right to retake your cruise at a later date. Under its ticket contract, the legal agreement between you and the cruise line, it could deny you boarding and refuse to offer you a refund on your cruise fare (it would, however, need to refund any port taxes it collected).     How about insurance? Well, you booked this cruise directly through Carnival, and when you called it, you weren’t offered insurance. But even if you had been offered insurance, I’m not convinced that you would have been covered. An insurance adjuster might have argued that your kidney pains were a preexisting condition and denied your claim. Don’t laugh; I’ve

seen it before.     It’s highly unusual for a passenger to be shown the door at the start of a cruise in this way. Obviously, this isn’t something you can control, and if you could, you would choose to stay healthy and enjoy your vacation.     I spoke with Carnival about your case. A representative suggested insurance might have been helpful, but stopped short of saying your claim would have been honored. I think the fact that you were not advised of insurance when you booked your cruise directly helped your case. Carnival offered you a do-over cruise.    (Christopher Elliott is the author of “Scammed: How to Save Your Money and Find Better Service in a World of Schemes, Swindles, and Shady Deals” (Wiley). He’s also the ombudsman for National Geographic Traveler magazine and the co-founder of the Consumer Travel Alliance, a nonprofit organization that advocates for travelers. Read more tips on his blog, elliott.org or e-mail him at chris@elliott.org. Christopher Elliott receives a great deal of reader mail, and though he answers them as quickly as possible, your story may not be published for several months because of a backlog of cases.)


10

The Reporter

Thursday, June 6, 2013

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Thursday, June 6, 2013 The Reporter

community calendar

11

hat’s Park Lawn Grand Raffle W Going On prize options have wheels W.O.W.

    Tickets are available for Park Lawn’s annual Grand Raffle Drawing, with the grand prize being a choice of $15,000 cash, a 2013 Ford Focus, a 2012 HarleyDavidson FXDF Fat Bob, 2013 Ford Fiesta, or a 27-foot Dutchmen Aspen Travel Trailer.     Second prize is $5,000, third prize is $3,000, fourth prize is $1,000, fifth prize is $500 and Flea Market sixth prize is $300. The seventh     The Our Lady of the Ridge through 20th prize winners will Knights of Columbus chapter each take home $200. will presents its summer flea     The Grand Raffle drawing market the second Saturday of and reception will be held July every month from 7 a.m. to 3 25 at Park Lawn School and p.m. at the church, 108th Street Activity Center, 10833 LaPorte and Ridgeland Avenue in Chicago Ave. in Oak Lawn. Tickets are Ridge. Markets will be June 8, $100 each. July 13, Aug. 10, Sept. 14 and     Tickets can be purchased by Oct. 12. The event will feature more than 35 vendors.     The Southwest Suburban Widow or Widowers’ (W.O.W.) group will meet at 7 p.m. Friday, June 7 at Zion Luthern Church, 17100 Harlem Ave. in Tinley Park. There will be entertainment and refreshments. For more information call (630) 728-9368.

Square Dancing     The Evergreen Park Recreation Department will hold Square Dance Plus lessons and workshops this summer hosted by Swing’n Sugar Squares Square Dance Club.     Workshop for experienced dancers will be from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Thursdays, June 6 through Aug. 22 (no classes July 4 and 24) at the Community Center, 3450 W. 97th St. Fee is $5 per class. Wally Smulson, one of the most popular callers in the Chicago area, will help dancers brush up on their square dance skills. For more information call Terry at (773) 351-1948 or visit swinginsugarsquares.com

Evergreen Park

    The Evergreen Youth Department has teens and young adults available to help with yard work, cleaning garages and basements, and hauling items to the dumpster. For more information call 229-3377.

Hickory Hills

Focus on Seniors

Rules of the Road

55 and Up

Pinochle

    The Worth Senior Pinochle club is seeking new members. Membership is free. Visit the group at the Worth Park District Terrace Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave., every Monday and Wednesday from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Games begin at noon. Call 448-1181 for information.

in District 122, and Covington, Hannum, Hometown, Kolmar and Sward in District 123. For more information call the FLASH director or the FLASH assistant director at 857-2420.

Get him to the Greek (Food Fest)

    Georgia Sarlas (left) and Zoe Skopec work to keep up with the demand for the Greek dessert loukoumades — fried dough balls drizzled with honey and sprinkled with cinnamon — during last year’s St. Nicholas Greek Food Festival.     The fest will be held Father’s Day weekend, Saturday, June 15 and Sunday, June 16 at the St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, 10301 Kolmar Ave. in Oak Lawn. The event will feature rides, games, live music, Worth DJ, and Greek dance troupe performances. Hours are 4 to 11 p.m. June 15 and 3 to 10 p.m. June 16.     The Worth Park District will Admission is $2 (children 12 and under are free). Call 636-5460 or visit stnicholasil.org for more information. host two sessions of Tiny Tot T-Ball, from 10 to 11 a.m. Saturdays from July 20 to Aug. 24. Classes are for children 4 to 6 years old. Children will learn the fundamentals of t-ball, sculptures. Jerry Santoni will *** catching, throwing, running, Chicago Ridge perform dulcimer music. Light     The library has an eBook ser    The Chicago Ridge Library is fielding and hitting. Both sesrefreshments will be served. The vice, Axis 360, through which sions take place at Peaks Park. at 10400 Oxford Ave. The phone artwork will be displayed at the users can download bestselling number is 423-7753. Cost is $40 for residents, $60 library through Aug. 2. eBooks for as many as 21 days *** for non-residents and includes *** directly onto a device using the     The library will present arbora t-shirt. Registration deadline     “Pirates and Shipwrecks” for Blio software application. Titles ist and horticulturist Dolly Foster is Friday, May 31. and “Butterfly Gardening” at 7 youths in sixth through 12th automatically expire at the end of *** grades will be at 3 p.m. Mon- the lending period and there are     A summer kickoff party will p.m. Tuesday, June 11. Learn day, June 24. Teens will learn no late fees. Place holds on items which plants attract butterflies be held from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. about Davey Jones’ locker, buried that are checked out. Service is Saturday June 8 at the Terrace to a garden. Program is sponsored treasures and how to talk like a only available to Green Hills cardin partnership with the Southside Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave. The pirate. Registration required. holders. To start browsing visit party will include free food and Garden Novices. *** http://ghpl.axis360.baker-taylor. entertainment, games and an Evergreen Park     A treasure hunt for students com. For more information call     The Evergreen Park Public Liinflatable obstacle course. in sixth through 12th grade will 598-8446. brary is at 9400 S. Troy Ave. The *** be at 4 p.m. Tuesday, June 25. ***     The park district is holding a phone number is 422-8522 Students will work in teams to     The library is collecting first*** smile search contest with two solve clues using library resources person accounts of stories of miliways to participate. All sum-     A program about the Earth’s that lead to a treasure. The team tary service to be donated to the mer long the park district will crust will be held at 3 p.m. Thurs- with the most correct answers in Veteran History Project of the hide its “Worth Your Smile” logo day, June 20 for children in sixth the shortest time wins. Registra- Library of Congress. The library throughout its website, worth- through 12th grades. Youths will tion required. is seeking photos, memoirs, and parkdistrict.org. To participate explore fossil fuels, geological *** wartime diaries from World War follow “Worth Park District” features and natural disasters.     The library is accepting appli- II, Korea, Vietnam, the Persian on Facebook for contest details. Registration required. cations for exhibits at its Mini Gulf, and the conflicts in Afghani*** Through Facebook participants Maker Faire to be held from 10 stan and Iraq. Call 598-8446 for will get instructions and clues on     The Read to a Teen program for a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19. more information. how to find the logo and report children in kindergarten through The event will celebrate the do-it*** back to the park district. Several second grade will be at 3:30 p.m. yourself mind set by showcasing     The library offers Freegal Muonline Smile Searches will be Thursdays from June 20 to Aug. various projects in a show-and-tell sic, a downloadable music service 1. Teens will encourage children held through the summer. format. Submit projects online that provides access to the Sony     Participants can also accept to develop a reading habit. Chil- beginning June 1 at evergreen- Music Entertainment catalog. the challenge by attending free dren will have the opportunity parklibrary.org. The catalog offers hundreds of family special events held dur- to read aloud and play a reading *** thousands of songs in more than ing the summer including the game. Each participating child     Sports writing Rob Weintraub 100 genres of music. Family Fun Movie and Play in will get a new book with every will hold a presentation and sign Oak Lawn the Park Series. Smiles Search visit. Registration required. copies of his book, “The Victory     The Oak Lawn Library is at *** Collector Cards along with adSeason: The End of World War ditional contest details will be     Children in first through fifth II and the Birth of Baseball’s 9427 S. Raymond Ave. The phone handed out at the Summer Kick- grades are invited to learn to tie- Golden Age,” at 11 a.m. Satur- number is 422-4990. *** off Party to be held from 11 dye at 3 p.m. Friday, June 21. day, June 8. The book tells the a.m. to 1 p.m. June 8 at Terrace Children should bring a washed, story of baseball and America     Donate gently-used books, magazines, CDs and videos to whitecotton t-shirt. Registration Centre Park. after World War II. Weintraub the Friends of the Oak Lawn required. *** researched the game’s Golden Library Ongoing Book Sale at ***     Little Club offers benefits Era, unearthing stories such as such as free indoor playground     Patrons of all ages are invited the little known “World Series” the Oak Lawn Public Library. The usage. Fee is $10 resident, $15 to a trip to the Cave Paintings servicemen played in a captured Friends will not accept Readers non-resident. For more infor- of Lascaux exhibit at the Field Hitler Youth stadium in the fall Digest condensed books, encyclomation call the park district. Museum on Friday, June 21. A of 1945. Copies of the book will pedias and older text books. The donation drop-off area is near the school bus departs from the li*** be available for $20. library’s Cook Avenue entrance.     The Terrace Centre, 11500 brary at 8:45 a.m. Cost is $13 for Interested parties may fill out a Beloit Ave., has an indoor children 3 to 11, $20 for persons Green Hills playground featuring slides, a 12 years and older and includes     The Green Hills Public Library short form at the Reception Booth climbing wall, tree house and transportation, general museum is at 8611 W. 103rd St. in Palos to receive a tax letter by mail more for children who can walk admission and entry into exhibit. Hills. The phone number is 598- that acknowledges their donation. Hardcover books cost 50 cents through 4 years old. Hours Children under 16 years must be 8446. each, paperbacks are 25 cents and *** are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday accompanied by an adult. ***     The library is collecting Legos magazines cost five cents each. through Friday. Fee is $1 for residents, $2 for non-residents.     Thomas the Train Time for to be used in a Lego club that Audio visual items are priced as For more information call 448- children in third grade and under will begin this summer. Bring indicated. Funds collected from the book sale support library pro7080 or visit worthparkdistrict. will be held at 1 p.m. Saturday, donations to the library. gramming and purchases that are June 22. Children will travel *** org. through train tales, create choo-     The library offers the eBook beyond their regular budget. *** choo crafts, play games, and more. platform 3M Cloud Library, and Registration required. has a touch-screen Discovery Sta-     Award-winning author Nahid *** tion where patrons can browse Sewell will discuss her novel, Park at 364-7605 or Worth at     A Worth Township advanced oil and checkout eBooks. Cloud “The Ruby Tear Catcher,” at 7 class artist reception will be held eBooks can be read on most p.m. Tuesday, June 11. Books will 361-6860.     All sales at Neat Repeats Re- from 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, June eReaders, computers, tablets and be available for purchase. *** sale benefit the clients served 22. The exhibit features a variety smart phones. Check out a 3M by the Crisis Center for South of painting styles including im- eReader at the circulation desk.     The library will host a free Suburbia. The Crisis Center for pressionistic, landscape, still life, Visit greenhillslibrary.org to get screening of the 1974 film “The (Continued on page 12) South Suburbia is a non-profit and portraiture, along with small started. community organization that provides emergency shelter and other services for individuals and families victimized by domestic violence.

Library Notes

Neat Repeats seeks volunteers

    Neat Repeats Resale stores are seeking volunteers to work in its stores in Worth and Orland Park. Share your compassion, your talent and time.     Volunteers are asked to work five hours a week. The next VolMeals on Wheels unteer Recruitment Days will be     The Evergreen Park Office of Saturday, June 15 in Orland Park, Citizens’ Services offers a Meals 9028 W. 159th St., and Worth, on Wheels program for village 7026 W. 111th St. For information residents 60 years and older call the store manager in Orland who are unable to prepare their own meals. Meals are delivered Monday through Friday. For more LEGAL information call 422-8776.     Palos Hills residents 55 years and older meet from noon to 2 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month at the Palos Hills Community Center, 8455 W. 103rd St. Tickets for events must be purchased one week in advance. Entertainment includes musicians, singers, luncheons, movies, plays and bingo.

    The Grand Raffle is an annual fundraising event for Park Lawn, a nonprofit organization offering programs and services such as adult developmental training, residential facilities, vocational training, supported employment and more for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities since 1955. For more information call Park Lawn at 425-6867 or visit parklawn.com.

Park Clips

    The Hickory Hills Park District has openings in its preschool classes. Five-day class is $1,540, three-day class (Monday, Wednesday, Friday) is $860, and two-day class (Tuesday and Thursday) is $695.Classes start in September and run through May 2014. Class times are 8:45 to 11:45 a.m. and 12:15 to 3:15 Movies on the Green p.m. The office is open Monday     The Oak Lawn Park District through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and the village of Oak Lawn will for registration. Parents must present their Movies on the Green provide child’s birth certificate event through August on the Village and immunization records. For Green, north of the Oak Lawn Li- more information call 598-1233 brary and directly east of Oak Lawn or visit hhparkdistrct.org. Village Hall, 9446 Raymond Avenue. Oak Lawn The films will begin at dusk.     The Katie Sullivan Duo will     Movies are free and no reserva- perform at 7 p.m. Friday, June tions are required. Movie-goers are 7 at the Stony Creek Clubhouse, encouraged to bring blankets, chairs 5850 W. 103rd St. Sullivan has and refreshments. Christensen’s been compared to Patsy Cline Popcorn Wagon will be on-site. and Bonnie Raitt. Cost is $12.     Upcoming movies include “The Reservations are suggested. Sandlot” (PG) on June 14 and “Twi- Food and beverage up to $6 light 2: New Moon” (PG) on July included. For more informa12. In the event of rain, signs will tion call 398-6284. be posted on the Village Green about *** the movie cancellation. For more     Duplicate bridge will be held information contact Chad Weiler at at 11:30 a.m. Mondays at the 499-7837 orcweiler@oaklawn-il.gov, Oak View Center. Cost is $7 or visit oaklawn-il.gov. per person and includes a light lunch. For more information, call 857-2200. ***     The Oak Lawn Park District Theater Program will perform “9 to 5” at 8 p.m. Friday, June 7 and Saturday, June 8; and 3 p.m. Sunday, June 9 at Oak View Marquette Club Center, 4625 W. 111th St. Tick    Seniors can join Marquette ets are $22 for adults and $21 Bank’s social club for persons 50 for seniors and children 12 and years and older, the Marquette under. Tickets can be purchased Club, at U.S. Rep. Congressman at Oak View Center. Dan Lipinski’s Senior Fair to be *** held from 10 a.m. to noon Monday,     The park district offers duJune 10 at Oak Lawn Commuplicate bridge every Monday at nity High School, 9400 Southwest 11:30 a.m. at Oak View CenHighway in Oak Lawn. Learn ter, 4625 W. 110th St. Cost is about Marquette Bank and the $7 per person and includes a benefits of being a Marquette Club light lunch. All ages are welmember including free financial come. For more information call and health seminars, social events, 857-2200. day trips and extended vacation opportunities. For more informa*** tion call 342-8404.     Registration is underway for before- and after-school FLASH Double Nickel (Fun & Learning After School     The Double Nickel Plus Chorus Hours). The park district has meets at the Community Center, partnered with Ridgeland School 3450 W. 97th St. in Evergreen District 122 and Oak LawnPark, every Wednesday at 9:30 Hometown School District 123 a.m. in Room 111. Newcomers and is in all of those districts’ are always welcome. For more elementary schools — Columbus information call 422-8776. Manor, Harnew, Kolb and Lieb     The Worth Township Seniors will hold a free Rules of the Road class from 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. Aug. 7 and Oct. 2. Appointment must be made to attend; call the Worth Township Senior Room at 371-2900, Ext. 28. Worth Township Center is at 11601 Pulaski Road in Alsip.

visiting or mailing to Park Lawn at 10833 LaPorte in Oak Lawn, or calling 425-6867. This year’s Grand Raffle is being sponsored by Terry’s Automotive Group of Orland Park and Chicago Harley-Davidson of Glenview.

NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The 2013-2014 Budget and Appropriation Ordinance 13-01 of Worth Park District Notice is hereby given to the Public that on Wednesday, June 19, 2013 at the hour of 6:00 p.m. at the Worth Park District, Room 106, 11500 Beloit Ave, Worth, Illinois, a public hearing will be held on the Budget and Appropriation Ordinance for the Worth Park District for the fiscal year beginning May 1, 2013 and ending April 30, 2014. Any person interested in said budget and ordinance may be present at said time and place and may be heard in regard to the budget and ordinance. The tentative budget may be reviewed upon request prior to said hearing by the Public at the Worth Park District. Sarah Redmond Worth Park District Board Secretary

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Thursday, June 6, 2013

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‘Magic’ leaf accelerates tissue healing     Not too long ago, I wrote about comfrey leaf and its amazing healing properties.     The Native Americans and Greeks referred to comfrey as bone-knit and bone-set. The constituent in the leaf that gives it the greatest healing power is an alkaloid known as allantoin. I use it topically for everything from skin problems, sprains and bruising to a drawing poultice. It’s a messy job cutting the leaves for use in a bath or soak, but I feel it’s worth it.     In my research, I found comfrey is being studied for use in skin disorders such as rosacea. I also learned it is being used in skin care products and make up. The reason is obvious: it’s a healing herb and helps the skin retain moisture.     As I opened my copy of the Health Sciences Institute newsletter, I found what I consider an exciting product that heavily relies on comfrey for topical healing and pain relief. The product is combined with other known herbs and con-

stituents to promote even faster healing while it eases pain.     The product is in the form of a

Mixing it up for good health By Dee Woods

gel that makes it a less troublesome application. I was researching the list of ingredients and it may be helpful to many of those who have injuries or damaged tissue.     Michele Cagan writes that the gel, known as Bruise, Strain and Tear Repair (BST), relieves crushing pain, makes bruises disappear, repairs damaged tissue and boosts circulation to accelerate healing. I know comfrey itself can eliminate bruises because I personally experimented and was

shocked at how fast it worked.     Cagan states it is useful for broken bones, torn ligaments and cartilage, rotator cuff injuries, tennis elbow, carpal tunnel syndrome, muscle pulls and tears, plantar fasciitis, impact bruising and post-surgical healing including plastic surgery. She explains three potent healing herbs are contained in the gel.     One constituent is arnica montana, a homeopathic healer shown in a 2012 animal study to improve healing of “surgically induced” wounds, and in a 2007 study was shown to reduced pain in carpal tunnel surgery patients much better than placebo.     Another constituent is comfrey, known as a bone and tissue healer; and the third healer is, of all things, rosemary oil. Rosemary oil boosts the blood flow to the injured area, “speeding healing and pain relief, and increasing flexibility. Increased blood flow also ensures that essential nutrients make their way to the injury site, and that tissue repair

by-products can be flushed from the area quickly to help minimize swelling,” according to Cagan.     Added to the three ingredients is white willow bark (constituent in aspirin), plantain for tissue regeneration, Witch Hazel, thyme to help promote circulation, vitamin C for collagen production, and cooling peppermint leaf to soothe the area.     With my own experience using comfrey, I am looking forward to trying the gel and keeping it onhand. It would seem the power of the synergistic combination of ingredients would work better than comfrey alone. If you are prone to injuries or have kids who are, you may want to keep it on hand. BST can be purchased at Nature’s Rite (888) 465-4404 or mynaturesrite. com. Dee Woods is available to give presentations about alternative health treatments and healthy living. She can be reached at deewoods@comcast.net.

Best of The Wine Guy

Golden oil can help through golden years

Whatizit?     We didn’t think last week’s “Whatizit?” was particularly brainbusting, so we either underestimated the challenge or you guys are tiring of our popular little game. We received a lot of great answers – fish scales, pineapple, baby turtle – but none of those were correct. Bella Fruendt of Hickory Hills; Robert Solner, and Theresa and George Rebersky of Worth; and Patty Vandenberg and Dana Oswald of Chicago Ridge knew it was a pinecone. Good job, readers!     By the way, apologies to Janice Mastro of Evergreen Park. She knew the previous “Whatizit?” was a Lego, but we failed to mention her in last week’s paper.     This week’s clue is: No rhyme, no reason. Send responses to thereporter@comcast.net under the subject Whatizit, and include your first and last names and where you live. Thanks for playing!

Park Clips (Continued from page 11) Great Gatsby,” starring Robert Redford and Mia Farrow, at 2 p.m. Thursday, June 13. ***     Local history coordinator Kevin Korst will hold a “Cemeteries Around Chicagoland” presentation at 7 p.m. Monday, June 17. Discover the meanings behind grave symbols, find out what famous people are buried nearby, and hear local stories and legends as you take a visual tour of what lies beneath. ***     Genealogy expert and reference librarian Kathy O’Leary will hold a class on how to use the ancestry. com database at 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 18. ***     The library will host a free screening of the 2007 film “Gone Baby Gone” at 10 a.m. Wednesday, June 19. ***     “The Black Box” by Michael Connelly is the June selection for Day & Night Reads, the library’s bi-monthly book group for adults. Two discussions of the book will be held at 2 and 7 p.m. Wednesday, June 26. ***     The library will offer trips to the Grant Park Music Festival at Millennium Park in Chicago at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 19 to listen to Pink Martini, a classical, jazz, and pop group. Another trip to the music festival will be at 4:30 p.m. July 7 to listen to “A Rodgers and Hammerstein Celebration,” during which the Grant Park Orchestra will perform songs from “Carousel,” “The King and I,” “Oklahoma,” “Showboat,” “The Sound of Music” and “South Pacific.”     In-person registration will be held in the library lobby at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, June 8. There is a two-ticket limit per person. The cost is $15 per trip. Trips are not wheelchair accessible. ***     The library sponsors three adult writers groups that meet yearround. A general interest group meets from 10 a.m. to noon on the second and fourth Saturday of each month. Writers interested in screen-writing meet from 1 to 3:30 p.m. on the second and fourth Saturday of each month. Budding children’s authors meet from 10 a.m. to noon on the third Thursday each month. Meetings include readings, critiques and writing exercises. New members are welcome anytime. No registration required. ***     The library is holding summer

SUDOKU Solution

reading programs for children and adults. Children from preschool to eighth grade are invited to participate in “Dig Into Reading,” which will run through Aug. 3. Prizes, weekly crafts and contests will also be part of the program. Residents and children who attend Oak Lawn schools will be allowed to register for special programs with their library card. High school students will be able to participate in a “Beneath the Surface” program For every 300 pages a student reads or listed to, he or she will receive a raffle ticket to apply towards the gift basket of his or he choice. When a student reaches 1,800 pages, he or she will receive a pop culture button. For every 300 pages a student reads after 1,800 pages, students can enter additional raffles. Prizes include autographed books, a comic book fan basket, and more. Adults are able to read at their own pace through the “Dig into Reading” program. For every 300 pages read, adults can apply a raffle ticket to the gift basket of their choice. For every 600, they will receive two tickets, and so on. When 1,800 pages are read, adults will receive a $5 gift card to Starbucks or the library’s BookWorm Café. Prize basket drawings will be held Tuesday, Aug. 6. ***     The library would like to add photos of patrons reading or listening to library books to the library’s Pinterest page, pinter est.com/OakLawnPL. Send photos to jchurchill@olpl.org. ***     Artist Kevin Luthardt is painting a mural in the Youth Services Department. Luthardt, the author and/or illustrator of eight picture books for children, has created more than 50 large-scale murals in schools, libraries and many other venues. The “Imagination” themed mural will be complete by the end of May. Patrons are encouraged to visit the library to watch the transformation take place on the wall closest to the Raymond Avenue entrance.

    I heard somewhere about an Israeli woman who claims her longevity is owed to drinking a glass of olive oil every day. This lady is reportedly 120 years old.     Whether she is that old can be disputed, but there is no question she is old, and there is no questioning the power of this rich, golden oil that has for thousands of years been known to heal the body both within and without. Olive oil is packed with antioxidants, good fats and vitamins. Studies have shown that it adds more than just taste to food, it may actually be one of the Creator’s gifts to help us live a long and healthy life — a veritable fountain of youth.     Olive oil was discovered as many as 8,000 years ago in the olive tree’s native region of Asia Minor — which we know today as Turkey and Syria. An olive tree can live for 1,000 years or more, and in the past, anyone caught cutting down an olive tree was put to death. It is said olives were found in Christ’s tomb.     Olive oil is produced by crush-

ing olives and olive leaves into a paste and pressing it to yield the oil. Extra virgin olive oil — the kind you should be consuming raw — comes from the first pressing and is produced using no solvents or heat. Olive oil not labeled as extra virgin is typically a blend of refined oils treated chemicals and heat to neutralize the bitter flavor. This type of oil should be used for cooking, at most.     Olive oil’s antioxidants — which if you don’t know by now are naturally occurring compounds that clean the body of free radicals, bodily pollutants that can come from the foods we eat, things we drink and air we breathe, and can damage cells and lead to cancer — come from polyphenols and include hydroxytyrosol, one of the strongest oxidant absorbers known to man and at least twice as powerful as CoQ10. It is known to help prevent cancers, namely of the skin and colon.     Olive oil is 100 percent fat, but it is about 77 percent monounsaturated fat that is good for the heart. When used moderately

with Anthony Scarano

and in place of saturated fats, it can help protect the body from cardiovascular problems, heart disease and stroke. It does this by raising the levels of high-density lipoproteins, so-called “good” cholesterol.     It is also rich in vitamins E and K. The former plays an important role in preventing heart disease, eye disorders, cancer and cognitive decline; while the latter — better known as the element potassium — helps clot blood, prevent osteoporosis and cell damage.     Use olive oil on anything and everything. Mix a tablespoon into your tuna or chicken salad

Anthony Scarano is not a doctor. He is an 88-year-old Evergreen Park resident, winemaker and certified naturopath. Suggestions in this space are solely the opinions of Mr. Scarano based on years of independent study and personal experience, and may not be beneficial to health. Wine should be consumed in moderation, as overindulgence may be harmful to health.

Health Scan Essentials for runners’ training     Palos Community Hospital will hold a free presentation by boardcertified Orthopaedic Surgeon Scott Price, M.D., of Parkview Orthopaedic Group, as he discusses the proper way to begin and maintain a safe and effective runner’s training program.     This lecture will provide information for runners at every level. Running for Kicks, Palos Heights, staff will also be available to provide proper footwear assessment and advice. A Palos Community Hospital registered dietitian will be on hand to provide nutritional information to ensure a healthy and productive running season. A question-andanswer session will follow the presentation. Light refreshments will be served.     The program will take place from 6 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 18, at Palos Health & Fitness Center, 15430 West Ave., Orland Park. Light refreshments will be served. Registration is required; call 226-2300.

‘Grief of Mary Todd’     Little Company of Mary’s Hospice Program will host a free

grief workshop seminar, “The Grief of Mary Lincoln,” based on the film “Lincoln,” from 1 to 4 p.m. Wednesday, June 12 at the Chicago Ridge Public Library, 10400 Oxford Ave. Lecture will be presented by James Cornelius, curator of the Lincoln Collection at the Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum in Springfield. Cornelius will present a lecture on the tragic life of Mary Lincoln from 1 to 2 p.m. Following the lecture there will be an opportunity to participate in a one-hour grief support group as well as the opportunity to experience a healing touch by Chaplain Peg Radakovitz. For more information or to register call Aida Pigott at (708) 229 6947.

neighborhood.     The hour-long support groups at both continuing care retirement communities will be open to questions and comments from the assembled group. Before ending, light refreshments will be served.

Benefits & Fundraisers

(Continued from page 8) struck her head on the river bottom. Ntanos had fractured her C5 and C6 vertebrae and underwent surgery, and had to relearn basic functions such as how to sit, bal    • On June 6, Smith Crossing ance and feed herself. She has since at 10501 Emilie Lane in Orland begun outpatient therapy, and last Park (enter at 104th Avenue and Sept. 14 took a step for the first 183rd Street) will welcome, as a time since the accident. Read the speaker, a geriatric nurse prac- full story at fundsfortiffani.net. titioner from Angels at Home Healthcare, which is dedicated to providing high quality homebased patient care with compassion and respect.     Smith’s director of admissions Amie Kamba and life enrichment director Dana Mahler then (Continued from page 8) will lead a discussion about the VBS Smith CCRCs challenges of caring for an aged     Oak Lawn Bible Church will relative at home. free meetings hold its annual free Vacation Bible     To reserve, call 326-2300 for caregivers coping or go to familyandfriends@ School July 22 to 26 at the church, 9435 S. 54th Ave. The program will     Chicago and southwest subur- smithcross ing.org. run from 9:30 to noon daily and ban families and caregivers of seniors living with Alzheimer’s     • June 11, Smith Village’s is open to children in kindergarten disease or dementia will meet memory support coordinator through those entering fifth grade. to discuss their concerns at one Diane Morgan will lead the This year’s program is “Colossal of two free 6:30 p.m. sessions Q&A meeting at 2320 W. 113th Coaster World.” Children need not either Thursday, June 6, at Place in Chicago. To reserve a be members of the church to attend. Smith Crossing in Orland Park seat, call (773)474-7300 or go The program is free. For more inforor Tuesday, June 11, at Smith to familyan dfriends@smithvil- mation and to register call 857-9800 or visit oaklawnbible.org. Village in Chicago’s Beverly lage.org

Worth

    The library subscribes to Zinio, an online magazine stand that enables patrons to read magazines on computers, tablets or phones using web browsers and apps. Must have Worth Library card. Zinio is accessible at worthlibrary. com. ***     The library offers Try-It Illinois, which allows access to 300 free databases from more than 40 vendors. Access Try-It at worthlibrary.com (login and password is available at the library).

The Wine Guy

sandwich, use it with apple cider vinegar and lemon juice for a delicious salad dressing, or add a tablespoon to the bowl of soup you should be eating every day. You could just take it by the spoonful, too, if you want. What really matters is that you get your daily dose of this miraculous substance.     With those fantastic meals you should also be drinking a glass or two of wine. Olive oil and wine are both components of the healthy and delicious Mediterranean diet. It seems the people of that region knew and still know a great deal about the wonders of medicinal foods.

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Sports S

The Regional News - The Reporter

outhwest

Thursday, June 6, 2013 Section 2

Page 1

Softball roundup

Lady Eagles last team standing By Anthony Nasella     There was a period of time during the month of May when Sandburg was fighting just to stay above the .500 mark after playing a very challenging schedule, both in and outside of the state of Illinois.     But Lady Eagles coach Jim Fabianski remained hopeful that regardless of the results in those contests, good ones would ultimately be achieved before the season’s conclusion.     That hope became a reality for Sandburg, which advanced to this past Monday’s Class 4A Rosemont Supersectional after posting a thrilling come-from-behind 5-4 victory over defending state champion Marist on Saturday in the Richards Sectional finale.     The Lady Eagles’ postseason run ended in Rosemont, where York administered an 8-1 defeat. Despite that season-ending setback, however, Sandburg (24-14) was the last team standing among local programs.     Its triumph over the Lady RedHawks was a memorable one, as

Sam Radunz’s sixth-inning double off Marist pitcher Audra Hecker chased in Sarah Herold with the tying run. One stanza later, Ellie Forkin’s double that short-hopped the fence in left snapped a 4-all tie and brought Candice Koch (single) home from second base.     The Lady RedHawks loaded the bags with one out in their half of the seventh, but Herold’s intentional walk to Marist standout Brooke Wyderski paid off when she fanned Haley Richy and got Brooke Wilson to pop out.     “The girls are really excited right now,” Fabianski said after the contest. “This is such a fun team to be a part of. They really believe in themselves and they’re playing at a high level.”     Fabianski said a key to the Lady Eagles’ turnaround was their ability to come together as a cohesive unit and fully understand Sandburg’s softball legacy.     “Our assistant coach makes the girls these cloaks,” he said. “One of them said, ‘When you’re ready to sacrifice the ‘me’ for the ‘we,’ it really shows how much you trust your teammates.’ That’s been a

real motivating factor.     “We have eight seniors, and some of the seniors don’t start, yet they feel they’re a big part of this. I ask them all the time, ‘What are your intentions? What do you want your legacy to be? What mark do you want to leave at Sandburg?’     “The girls’ performance is definitely answering these questions.”     Sandburg jumped out to a 1-0 lead over Marist in the top of the first on back-to-back doubles by Forkin and Katie Krzus. Following a game-tying home run by Wyderski, the Lady Eagles created a 3-1 edge for themselves on Krzus’ two-run round-tripper in the second inning.     That lead held up until the bottom of the fourth, when Kaitlin Kenny cleared the bases for Marist with her two-out double. Over the final three innings, Wyderski was walked intentionally twice and the Lady RedHawks put a total of six runners aboard, but Herold — who finished with six strikeouts — stranded all of them.     “We took another step,” Fa-

bianski said. “We really didn’t think about beating the defending state champs, Marist, or any other team. It’s about us — if you take care of you, the rest will take care of itself.”     As for the Lady RedHawks (2710), they were left to wonder what might have been.     “On game day, there’s only so much a coaching staff can do,” Marist coach Denise Bromberek said. “We can only encourage and hope for the best that the kids are ready to play and ready to execute. When it was really needed, we unfortunately didn’t execute. It was unfortunate to watch and, even now, to think about it.”     Bromberek thought Sandburg was especially juiced because the Lady RedHawks had knocked it out of the 2012 tourney en route to capturing their 4A title.     “I think that loss was more vivid in their minds than the memory we had of going downstate last year,” she said of the Lady Eagles. “They were ready to play, but we were still expecting a different outcome. We were (Continued on page 2)

Photo by Jason Maholy

Marist catcher Kaitlin Kenny congratulates a relieved Audra Hecker after the final out of last week’s 7-4 victory over Morton in the Class 4A Richards Sectional. Marist dropped the sectional championship game to Sandburg.

SXU sports summary

Shares 10th for Cougars at track nationals

Photo by Jason Maholy

Evergreen Park second baseman Brendan Walsh makes a running catch of a pop fly in shallow right field during last Saturday’s Class 3A Lincoln-Way Sectional championship tilt versus Joliet Catholic.

Class 3A Lincoln-Way West Sectional

End of the joyride JCA romps past Mustangs in finale By Ken Karrson     Sweet 16 turned sour for Evergreen Park, but there was still no bitter aftertaste.     How could there be when no one except the most optimistic individuals — and perhaps not even they — envisioned the sort of postseason run the Mustangs put together this spring? After winning the school’s first regional championship in 55 years the week before, Evergreen managed to extend its Class 3A tournament stay two more days.     The Mustangs rallied from an early 3-0 deficit to down Herscher 8-6 last Thursday in a Lincoln-

Way West Sectional semifinal, which placed them in their firstever sectional final and left them as one of only 16 Class 3A teams standing by Saturday. Lined up across the diamond from Evergreen that day was always-powerful Joliet Catholic Academy, which had knocked the Mustangs out of the playoffs two seasons ago.     Evergreen coach Mark Smyth recognized several names on the Hilltoppers’ roster, meaning a group of 2011 sophomores were now experienced seniors and an even more formidable foe. And JCA proved itself superior, as it rolled over the Mustangs 13-0 to advance into this past Monday’s

Crestwood Supersectional against Harlan.     “They’re fantastic,” Smyth said of the Hilltoppers. “It was a little bit of a frustrating end to a great run by the boys, but I’m super happy for our seniors. They did a heck of a job and it was a great accomplishment [to get this far].”     While Evergreen (17-16) had been able to expunge Herscher’s advantage, it could not duplicate that feat versus JCA after the latter struck for four first-inning runs. The Hilltoppers then added deuces in both the second and third frames to quickly turn the (Continued on page 3)

    Senior Ashley Shares finished with a flourish.     The Palos Park resident and Stagg graduate concluded her collegiate track career at St. Xavier University by placing 10th in the marathon at the 2013 NAIA Outdoor Track & Field National Championships and clocking a school-record time in the process.     Shares completed her event in 3 hours, 3 minutes, 7.30 seconds at Indiana Wesleyan University last weekend. Shares, who was 12th overall in last year’s national meet, bettered by more than 10 minutes the school standard she previously set.     While her performance highlighted Cougars’ appearance in Marion, Ind., Shares was not SXU’s only representative. Senior Mercedes Mancha, in fact, equaled her teammate’s effort by taking 10th in the 5,000-meter race-walk with a time of 28:56.07.     Occupying the No. 16 position were junior Jordan Wallace in the 3,000-steeplechase (11:43.36) and the 3,200-relay foursome of senior Jackie Ott, junior Leslie Rosario, freshman Ann Kolker and senior Rachael Dean (9:41.64). Wallace lowered her 2012 time in that same race by nearly 16 seconds.     “This was a very exciting season for our program,” Cougars coach Lisa Ebel said. “I am so proud that we had seven national-qualifying performances, and it was thrilling to have so many athletes representing SXU at the national meet.” FOOTBALL     Jimmy Coy, who quarterbacked the Cougars to the 2011 NAIA national championship, agreed to a deal on Sunday with the Calgary Stampeders of the Canadian Football League.     Coy became the first former SXU football player ever to sign a professional contract. Terms of the deal were not disclosed, as per Calgary team rules.

    The CFL regular season begins on June 28 and continues into early November.     “I am really excited for Jimmy because his dream is to play professional football and he has worked incredibly hard to get to this point,” SXU coach Mike Feminis said. “When Jimmy was working out with the Chicago Bears last month, their general manager, Phil Emery, told me how impressed he was with Jimmy and that he wouldn’t be surprised if an opportunity would come up for [Coy] in Canada if things didn’t work out right away in the NFL.     “This couldn’t have happened to a nicer young man. In his two years with us, Jimmy represented St. Xavier University and our program in such a positive manner, whether it was in the classroom, on the field or in the community.     “To have the career he had with us and then to have the chance to play professionally is unbelievable and the icing on the cake. I couldn’t be prouder of Jimmy, and I know every member of the SXU football family, from the players to the parents to the alums, are really pulling for him.”     As a senior, Coy was chosen as the 2012 NAIA National Player of the Year after ranking third in the country with 3,427 passing yards despite missing two games due to injury. During the 2011 campaign, he earned firstteam All-Mid-States Football Association recognition and led the Cougars to the national title by completing 347-of-510 passes for 4,261 yards and 42 touchdowns with just 11 interceptions. Coy also rushed for 269 yards and four TDs that year. SOFTBALL     Just days after wrapping up the best season in program history with a seventh-place national finish and school-record 50 wins, the Cougars put another exclamation

point on their exceptional year by landing two players on the 2013 NAIA Softball All-America teams.     The awards were announced last Friday at the conclusion of the NAIA Softball National Championship in Columbus, Ga.     Freshman Nicole Nonnemacher claimed a spot on the first team in a utility role, while junior Megan Nonnemacher earned secondteam honors as a pitcher. Nicole Nonnemacher was the first SXU softball player to achieve firstteam All-America status since 2006, when future Hall of Famer Colleen Kilduff became the first Cougar ever chosen as the NAIA Softball Player of the Year.     In addition, Nonnemacher was also one of just 16 players named to the NAIA Softball All-Championship squad. In her inaugural collegiate campaign, Nonnemacher paced SXU in average (.397), hits (69), doubles (13), runs scored (48) and slugging percentage (.506) on offense, and in strikeouts (school-record 263) and opponents’ average (.189) in the circle. Her other pitching stats included a 24-5 record and 1.80 earned-run average.     Megan Nonnemacher was equally impressive in the circle all season, as she topped the Cougars in wins (26), ERA (1.65), shutouts (10), starts (33) and innings pitched (199 1/3).     The elder Nonnemacher was also one of four SXU softball athletes to be named a Daktronics/ NAIA Scholar-Athlete for 2013. Joining her were seniors Kate Mollohan and Ashley Sullivan and junior Ariel Hinton. Also honored from Cougars spring teams were senior baseball player Mike Klett, senior runner Ashley Shares and junior track athlete Shane Kenney.     In order to be nominated, a student-athlete must have maintained a minimum GPA of 3.5 on a 4.0 scale and reached junior academic standing.

Class 4A Reavis Sectional

Going down quietly Vikings blanked by St. Rita in semis By Ken Karrson     Certain venues require silence, and rambunctious parties get asked to leave.     But being too quiet on a baseball field, particularly when swinging the bat, can create a big problem. And because St. Laurence picked an inopportune moment to grow silent, it was forced to exit the Class 4A state tournament.     St. Rita had lost two of three previous 2013 meetings with its Chicago Catholic League Blue rival, but the Mustangs prevailed when the stakes got high. Behind pitcher Mike Costanzo’s three-hit, five-strikeout performance, St. Rita shut down St. Laurence’s potent attack and made off with an unexpectedly easy 8-0 triumph last Thursday in a Reavis Sec-

tional semifinal.     The Mustangs came up one run short in Saturday’s finale against another CCL Blue foe, Mt. Carmel, and the Caravan went on to square off with Lockport in this past Monday’s Crestwood Supersectional.     The Vikings (28-10) had not been shut out prior to Thursday, and they took care of business handily against Costanzo in a regular-season confrontation. He was the losing pitcher in a lateApril matchup as St. Laurence whitewashed the Mustangs 7-0.     Costanzo got his revenge with relatively little difficulty, thanks largely to St. Rita’s rapid start against Vikings hurler Zach Lewis. Lewis, who entered the contest with just one setback this spring, was unable to keep the Mustangs’

sticks under control as four men smacked RBI hits.     Tyler Halas led the assault with a two-run double, but Connor McLain (double), Nate Soria and Pete Cozzi also made their presences felt. Forced to dig out of a 5-0 hole right away, St. Laurence couldn’t, as it never fully recovered from the initial onslaught.     “I thought our guys were trying to do too much, [like] trying to hit a five-run homer,” Vikings coach Pete Lotus said. “We didn’t do much wrong — we had zero errors and we actually made a few real good [fielding] plays — but they had so much momentum on their side. If we could do anything to take some of that away, Photo by Jason Maholy it would have been a good thing [because] it’s not as easy to put Saint Laurence catcher Kevin White tags out St. Rita’s Connor McClain, who was trying to score on a ground ball to third base during last week’s Class 4A Reavis Sectional semifinal. (Continued on page 3)


2

Section 2 Thursday, June 6, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

Some things not worth thinking about Bartosh     Who says we must always challenge ourselves intellectually?     OK, not everyone. Some people actually avoid it like they would a Justin Bieber concert, but there are many others who insist that everything with which they involve themselves must contain deep meaning.     Personally, I think those latter folks need to scale back the pomposity. There’s nothing wrong with mindless pursuits every once in a while, particularly where entertainment is concerned.     Reading the ramblings of a newspaper columnist might fall into that category, you know, although an argument could be made to the contrary. Nevertheless, I’m going to do my part this week to promote the idea of mental down time, a sort of vacation into vacuity, if you will.     Presented below are three stories that require absolutely no reading between the lines. They are exactly what they seem: silly little slices of pretty meaningless sporting life.     So toss your thinking caps aside and don’t bother pondering for an instant any of the following items:     • I’ll need to see some ID please: Age may only be a number, but what about when it’s two different numbers?     An Associated Press story by Ben Walker tells the charming story of a supposedly 111-yearold man recently saluted by the New York Yankees. Bernard LaPallo calls himself the Yankees’ oldest fan, and who’s to doubt him when he’s 111?     But according to Walker’s story, the man has no tangible proof of his age. Evidently, public records indicate LaPallo being born in 1910 rather than 1901, and a Guinness Records researcher stated that “many extreme age claims have turned out to be false.”

Softball roundup (Continued from page 1) definitely shocked.”     Despite the disappointment, Bromberek commended her team for the improvements it made throughout the year. She specifically praised the seven seniors who performed solidly all season and also contributed greatly to last season’s championship run.     “The girls all had a great season,” Bromberek said. “I’m going to especially miss the seniors.     “They’ve done so much for the program, and I don’t think they really know how much they’ve really done. They helped make history for this program. It’s really a rare experience.”     A notable player whose improvement impacted the team’s 2013 success was Wyderski, who clubbed 13 homers and elevated

    For the sake of argument, let’s say the researcher is correct and LaPallo is not 110, but a mere kid of 101. This makes a difference how?     Walker’s story did not indicate that LaPallo received anything of value from the Yankees. His name was put up on the scoreboard and the crowd cheered — that was it.     So what is LaPallo supposed to do — offer to give back the cheers?     He still deserves them because, frankly, 101 is pretty darned impressive as well. The majority of us will not reach that milestone, and of the ones who do, most of those individuals probably wouldn’t have the energy to follow a game on TV, let alone watch it at the ballpark.     LaPallo brags that people don’t believe he’s as old as he is because he can “pass for 65 or 70.” Big deal, Bernard. So can I.     • For the glove of the game: What will you be wearing next winter?     If it was like much of our most recent winter, the answer might be shorts and a Hawaiian shirt. But regardless, I couldn’t care less about anyone’s attire, even my own.     For some reason, however, Phillip Rivers thinks one of his clothing choices is newsworthy. Or at least it was to Ryan Wilson of CBSSports.com, as well as some other media members.     It was Wilson’s story I stumbled across, and it told readers more than anyone could possibly want to know about Rivers’ handwear. Wilson admitted as much, saying it “seems like a useless piece of information,” but then goes on to tell us why it’s really not.     It seems that 43 percent of San Diego’s 2012 wins were captured after Rivers donned gloves. There were several paragraphs’ worth of supporting information, but my eyes glazed over rather

her average by 200 points over last year.     “Brooke has always been steady defensively,” Bromberek said, “but she raised her batting average from .400 to .600. She watched the [sectional semifinal] game against Morton and observed her swing on High School Cube. She made an adjustment and she hit the home run early in the game against Sandburg.     “She’s grown a lot mentally. It’s always nice to see that she always wants to contribute. She comes from a great family and I’m so grateful to have had her for four years.” ***     Sandburg advanced to the sectional final with a 9-1 victory last Wednesday over a Hinsdale South team that stunned Mother McAuley for a regional title.     The Lady Eagles jumped ahead 4-1 on Radunz’s RBI double, Koch’s two-run homer and a solo shot by Krzus. Herold shut the door from there, and Krzus’

quickly.     All I know is Rivers plays half his games each year in what is perhaps America’s most ideal climate. Maybe that’s spoiled him to the point where he can no longer handle sub-70-degree temperatures.     Phil, I’ve got six words for you: Bart Starr. Ice Bowl. No gloves.     • Stone Cold says so: Dallas Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo should be used to all the criticism by now, but a new voice recently weighed in on his football-related shortcomings.     Pro wrestler Steve “Stone Cold” Austin is doing a podcast these days, and he ventured outside the boundaries of the squared circle when he took calls and the topic turned to the Dallas Cowboys. As a Texan, Austin has more than a passing interest in the Coyboys’ on-field fortunes, and he said that while Romo is “a damn good quarterback, he [soils] the bed at the most inopportune times. So when I look for leadership, I can’t say that Tony Romo is the clear-cut leader.”     Of course, Romo is operating at a disadvantage because the outcomes of his sporting activities are not scripted ahead of time. I’m curious as to how legendary Stone Cold would have become without that little asset in his possession.     Austin is not a football novice — he received a full scholarship to the University of North Texas once upon a time, but opted to forgo college and become a wrestler instead. His bankbook says he made a wise move.     And, as is true with any sports fan, Stone Cold is entitled to his opinion, which in this case is pretty accurate. Saying Romo just “needs to do some brain work” isn’t exactly the most constructive criticism, but again Austin’s not really off-base.     After all, Stone Cold wasn’t the one who let Jessica Simpson get away.

second homer of the day — good for three runs — sent Sandburg on its way.     Krzus finished 4-for-4 with four RBI, while Koch went 3-for-4 with two doubles in addition to her round-tripper and four RBI. Herold struck out 10 Lady Hornets batters.     “We’re taking this in little steps — inch by inch, pitch by pitch, out by out,” Koch said of Sandburg, which had won 13 of its last 15 games at that juncture.     The Lady Eagles broke the contest open in the bottom of the fourth when Brooke Heimerl and Koch hit back-to-back doubles, Forkin walked and Krzus ripped a three-run homer over the fence in center to make it 8-1. Koch added an RBI double in the fifth.     Fabianski said all the ups and downs of the season prior to Sandburg’s revival have served the team well.     “With our strength of schedule, everything that has happened up to now has prepared us for this,” he said. “We’ve lost leads and we’ve come from behind in other games. We’ve been down the block a few times. We’ve realized that we can’t take things for granted.     “We have the utmost respect for anybody who has gotten this far. We’re smart enough to know that there’s very little difference in the quality of teams at this point of the season. It’s about the will and heart and the ability to stay motivated.” MARIST     The Lady RedHawks reached the sectional-title game with a 7-4 victory over Morton last Tuesday.     Marist played errorless ball as Wyderski led the way with seven assists. Wilson drove in three runs and Erica Nagel two to highlight the offensive end for the Lady RedHawks.     Over the first five innings, Marist scored all of the runs as well. Two misplays by Morton and Nagel’s single resulted in a tworun second. In the fifth, Kenny started things off with a single before Nagel’s RBI double and Wilson’s three-run triple put the game beyond reach.

EVERGREEN PARK     The Lady Mustangs were eliminated in last Friday’s Class 3A Nazareth Sectional semifinal contest as they suffered an 11-1 defeat against Glenbard South Photo by Jason Maholy Marist third baseman Katie Caulfield fields a ground ball before in five innings. Megan Beckow throwing to first for the final out of last week’s Class 4A Richards doubled and scored the only run for Evergreen Park (14-13). Sectional semifinal win over Morton.

Submitted photo

Palos Heights resident Peter Scheid, of Redhawks Wrestling Club, (right) takes on undefeated state champion, Rahveon Valentine at the 2013 Illinois Kids Wrestling Federation state championship at the BMO Harris Bank Center in Rockford. Scheid is ready to take his ‘big man style’ to the next level as he prepares for next year’s state championship.

Wrestler’s next goal: state title Scheid also eyes future spot on Marist varsity roster By Kevin M. Coyne     For wrestler Peter Scheid, it’s time to hang up the baseball glove and retire the lacrosse stick.     The 12-year-old Palos Heights resident is ready to win the next Illinois Kids Wrestling Federation state championship.     The 122-pound Scheid, who competes for the Redhawks Wrestling Club, placed second in his weight division at the 2013 IKWF state event, held at the BMO Harris Bank Center in Rockford. A couple weeks after the meet, the wrestling standout said, “The best is yet to come,” as he trained and continued to sharpen his skills for next year’s IKWF meet.     “My first goal was to make it to state, which I did last year,” Scheid said. “Then placing in state was my next goal, which I did this year. Now, my goal is to win state.”     Scheid has wrestled for six years as a “part-timer.” During the summer months, he could be found playing defense for the Oak Forest Fury lacrosse team or baseball at a Palos Heights field.     But after going on a tear in regionals, sectionals and the state tournament, Scheid is now concentrating on his mat activities. He wants to stand on top of the podium in 2014.     “My son, Pete, puts the time in and is very dedicated and coachable,” Pete Scheid Sr. said. “He’s very determined and focused, and he believes in himself     Pete Sr., Fran Blake, Dan Joda and Mike O’Brien, a former wrestling standout from Marist who earned a state title in 1983, coach the younger Scheid.     “I owe a lot to my coaches for teaching me the proper technique

Photo by Kevin Coyne

Pete Scheid, a 12-year-old Palos Heights resident, took second place for the Redhawks Wrestling Club in the 122-pound division at the Illinois Kids Wrestling Federation state meet. and helping me train in folkstyle,” Pete Jr. said. “Overall, they’ve given me a lot more confidence, both on the mat and in my everyday life.”     Young Pete is not the only wrestling Scheid. His 10-yearold brother, David, also wrestles for the Redhawks Wrestling Club and placed fifth at state in the Bantam Division, while 7-year-old Teagan is able to jump in with the boys from time to time and has a “mean takedown,” according to her mother, Peggi.     “It was a lot harder to watch

when the boys were younger, but as they got older it became a little easier to watch them wrestle,” Peggi said. “As a mom, it’s nice to see each of my sons benefit. Even if they don’t win, they’ll try harder next time and continue to learn more.”     This year, Pete Jr. has taken his big-man wrestling style to the next level by adding quickness and more technique to his repertoire. After training during the school year, he was able to thrive in the 122-pound weight class, which consisted of over 70 wrestlers at the state meet.     In his final match, Scheid came up short against undefeated Rahveon Valentine of The Law Wrestling Club in Lena, Ill. Valentine won the Marty Combes Award for Outstanding Novice Wrestler and had a perfect no-points-against record.     “I was pretty nervous before the championship, and I spent most of my time looking at who I was facing next,” Scheid said. “I think [Valentine] watched some of my earlier matches and was a lot more prepared for the final match since he figured it would be him and I in the finals.”     After graduation from Independence Middle School next year, Scheid plans on attending Marist. His offensive wrestling style and under-hook move will make him an asset to the RedHawks in the near future.     “My goal in high school is to compete with the best wrestlers at Marist and make the varsity team,” Scheid said. “I want to train with the best wrestlers at Marist if I don’t make the team, but my goal is to make the varsity team and become an even better wrestler.”

Trinity sports report

Reidsma 12th in NAIA 5K final By Tim Cronin     Trinity Christian College junior track whiz Andy Reidsma qualified for the NAIA Championship at three different distances. Usually, that means competing in all three races, but not when one of the three is the 5,000-meter run, a grueling test of 3.11 miles.     Then, a choice must be made. Reidsma, who also qualified in the 1,500 and marathon, decided to go for the middle distance and, thus, withdrew from the other events at last weekend’s national meet at Indiana Wesleyan in Marion, Ind.     That paid off with a near-personal-best time of 14 minutes, 49.96 seconds and a 12th-place finish in the finals. And that run came a day after Reidsma took sixth in the qualifying race with a clocking of 14:58.31.     Reidsma had registered a personal best of 14:48.92 in the CCAC Championship meet in Joliet, which also established a Trolls record. To come within a second of that time the day after running the same distance in a qualifying race was nothing short of outstanding.     It also bodes well for what Reidsma can do in both cross country — where the same 5,000meter distance is often employed — and track as a senior.     Reidsma was showered with honors at the end of the season, including Trinity’s Male Athlete of the Year award, the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic

Conference Track Performer of on-campus facilities and the conthe Year designation, and All- struction of the Route 83 athletic America honors from both the fields. NAIA and National Christian College Athletic Association. BASEBALL     Shortstop Ryan Kiesel collected ***     Junior Kaitlin Feddema was all-region and All-CCAC honors named the Trolls’ Female Ath- for his play this past season. lete of the Year for her volleyball     Kiesel’s .383 average and school-record 28 steals led the exploits.     Feddema led Trinity to a na- Trolls, as did his hit (70) and tional tournament berth and runs scored (52) totals. Kiesel also regional title under the NCCAA picked up scholar-athlete awards banner, and individually paced from four groups. the Trolls in kills and service re-     Left fielder Bill Miller was ception. Like Reidsma, she picked named to the CCAC’s second up a passel of honors, including team and all-region squad after All-America and All-CCAC plau- batting .327 and leading Trinity dits, as well as scholar-athlete with 49 RBI while coaxing 39 walks from opposing pitchers. awards.     Other award winners from Danny Britt was placed on the Trinity’s athletic honors night CCAC’s second team via his pitchincluded Hannah Schaap, Kyle ing, which included a 6-6 record Van Earden and George Vander and one save, while seniors Chris Velde. Schaap, a senior cross Tidmore and Dan Townsend and country and track distance run- sophomore Taylor Boice scored ner, earned the women’s athlet- scholar-athlete honors. ics award. She spent part of her spring semester student-teachingSIGN UP TO GET FREE in Kenya. SIGN UP TO GET FREE AMBER ALERTS     Van Earden, another cross AMBER ALERTS country and track athlete, was ON YOUR PHONE. ON YOURCELL CELL PHONE. given the men’s athletics award. He graduated after the fall se- wirelessamberalerts.org wirelessamberalerts.org mester with a double major in sociology and theology.     Vander Velde received the Rich Kooy Award, given to a Trinity community member who made a significant contribution to the A child is calling for help. athletic department’s development. The vice president of A child is calling for help. campus development, Vander Velde oversaw the expansion of


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, June 6, 2013 Section 2

3

Community sports news Palos Thunder 12U team places second

    The Palos Thunder 12U travel baseball team placed second in a Memorial Day tournament held at PBO Fields.     Comprising the Thunder roster were Dan Born, Sydney Downs, Jaylan George, Darren Hall, Danny Hoge, Jimmy Knight, George Murray, Chris Olchowka, Connor Pulido, Geoffrey Robinson, Eli Rynkiewicz and William Stark. Dan Hoge, Ed Stark, Brian Rynkiewicz and Matt Hoge were the coaches.

Mt. Assisi athletes honored

    A number of Mt. Assisi studentathletes were recognized for excellence both in their respective sports and the classroom at the school’s spring-awards banquet on May 23.     The keynote speaker for the event was 1996 graduate Cassidy Wall, a three-time state champion in track and cross country while competing for the late Bill Bradna. She took first in the 1,600-meter run at the 1994 state track meet, placed first in the 1994 state cross country event and won the 3,200-run in 1995 in Charleston.     Current Screeching Eagles athletes receiving the Girls Catholic Athletic Conference All-Academic Award for maintaining a grade-point average of at least 3.0 during the spring were Charlotte Anderson, Karen Arreola, Madeline Cahue, Tessa Dearth, Sharon Desparrois, Miranda Donnelly, Jordan Garcia, Natalie Gath, Emma Gontarek, Shyann Koenig, Juliana Layman, Jordan Lenihan, Abby Maloy, Kylie Maloy, Kylie McGivney, Katie O’Leary (Oak Lawn), Lily Olguin (Palos Park), Samantha Pakula, Madilyn Peters, Nicole Pratl (Chicago Ridge), Jorie Pudil, Gina Serio, Kathy Sojka, Sarah Spencer, Colleen Sullivan, Clare Wasilewska, Mary Kate Wetzel (Palos Heights), Tori White and Molly Williams (Orland Park).     MVP awards were given to Serio and Wetzel in soccer, Donnelly and Shyann Koenig in track, and Chicago Ridge’s Sabrina Miller in softball. Other award recipients included soccer players Danielle Herbst of Hickory Hills (Eagle Award) and Madilyn Peters (Best Freshman); softball players Terri Dearth (Best Offensive Player), Molly Murphy (Most Improved), Jordan Lenihan (Eagle Spirit Award), Dana Bunting (Freshman Futures) and Abby Maloy (Freshman Futures); and track athletes Pratl (Top Newcomer)

Submitted photo

The Palos Thunder 12U travel baseball team finished second at a Memorial Day tournament. and Courtney Kosiewicz of Palos Hills (Prefontaine Award).

Advantage Basketball Camp coming to Chicago Ridge

are Desmond Clark, Allan Ellis, Kris Haines, Al Harris, Jim Morrissey and Mickey Pruitt.     The camp will provide noncontact instruction to youngsters aged 6-14. Awards and prizes will be given out during the week and a replica Chicago Bears helmet will be handed to one individual.     The cost is $399. For more information, call (312) 226-7776 or visit www.BearsCamps.com.

    An Advantage Basketball Camp will be held in Chicago Ridge at the Frontier Park Fieldhouse July 8-12 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. daily.     The camp, one of several being conducted in the Chicagoland area during the month of July, will focus on the teaching of ball-handling and shooting Trinity Christian to conduct skills. For more information, summer camps call (425) 670-8877, email info@     Trinity Christian College will advantagebasketball.com or visit offer a wide variety of week www.advantagebasketball.com. long sports camps for youngsters during the months of June and Bears youth camp slated July. for south suburbs     Included among them will be     Frankfort will be one of 18 separate ones for both boys’ and sites for a Chicago Bears Youth girls’ basketball, plus baseball, Football Camp this summer. soccer, track and volleyball. Boys’     The weeklong session will run basketball will be held in two sesJuly 8-12 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. sions (June 10-14 and July 15-19) daily at the Hallmark Sports and is open to grades 3-8, while Club. Among the former Bears the girls’ camp is designed for scheduled to offer instruction grades 5-12 and will run June 17-

Sports wrap By Anthony Nasella     It took Sandburg’s girls’ soccer team three years to get back to a supersectional, and then parts of two days to complete that match last week.     Unfortunately for the Lady Eagles, they were unable to find the net in a hard-fought match against a Hinsdale Central team that was looking for its first trip to the state semifinals in four years. Sandburg dropped a 2-0 verdict last Wednesday in the Class 3A Lewis University Supersectional.     The Lady Red Devils scored their first goal just 5:13 into the match, which began on Tuesday. However, a thunderstorm halted play right after Casey May tallied and the match was suspended.     When play resumed on Wednesday, Alex Otto tallied with 15:09 left in regulation to close out the scoring.     The Lady Eagles, who had won nine of their previous 10

Vikings (Continued from page 1) pressure on their defense when you’re down five runs.     “We’ve always hit [Costanzo] pretty well, but you could see he had a different mind-set pitching with a 5-0 lead. You have the comfort of not having to be too fine or be afraid of making a mistake.”     Once the early damage was done, Lewis settled down and threw commendably. He wound up with eight strikeouts and scattered seven hits from the second inning on.     Rain delayed the start of the game for 45 minutes, and Lotus wondered if that might have had a negative psychological impact on his staff ace. Whether or not that was indeed a factor is debatable, but Lotus admitted being surprised at Lewis’ initial struggles.     “It wasn’t the best situation for him, but his ERA was like .43, so

matches, were attempting to make the semifinals for the first time since they finished second in 2010.     “The girls played very hard,” Sandburg coach Desi Vuillaume said. “Obviously, I’m not happy with the loss, but I’m happy with the way the girls played hard until the end. We had shots on goal and good scoring opportunities, but the scores just didn’t come our way.     “I think the goal [on Tuesday] kind of hurt with us having the layoff, but for 90 percent of the game, I thought we possessed the ball and had plenty of opportunities, especially that first half. And in the second half, we kept the pressure up.”     Despite giving up the two goals, Lady Eagles netminder Nicole Kulovitz recorded eight saves. Hinsdale Central, meanwhile, kept up the intensity on the defensive end as it limited limiting Sandburg’s offense to just two shots on goal in the final period.

    “The girls obviously wanted a better result,” Vuillaume said. “But anytime you can finish among the top eight teams in the state, that’s a good accomplishment.”     Despite having to stare at a onegoal deficit for nearly 24 hours, the Lady Eagles came out focused on Wednesday and outplayed the Lady Red Devils for significant stretches.     Sandburg (16-6-3) secured three corner kicks and had three long free kicks in the first half, but came up dry as Hinsdale Central goalie Riley Glenn made three saves and central defender Katie Camden cleared the other three balls.     Vuillaume said it will be tough for the Lady Eagles to lose seven girls to graduation, but he is encouraged by the return of a strong core group.     “We’ll be back and in the hunt again next season,” he said. “We’ll definitely miss our seniors, though. They were a great group of girls.”

you don’t expect that,” Lotus said. “It was one bad inning he threw, and they found some holes and got a couple two-out hits. I felt bad for Zach because he’s been such a tremendous leader for us and he’s a great kid.”     While Lewis was able to right himself, St. Laurence’s offense never did get on track. Singles by Lewis, Mike Kornacker and Ryan Rybakowski were all the Vikings had to show for themselves in the way of production, and they never pushed a runner beyond second base.     Insurance runs for St. Rita were tacked on in the sixth and seventh frames, with McLain, Jake Shepski and Marty Bechina (double) all collecting RBI hits. Halas doubled in front of Bechina in the final inning.     “It was a tough way to go out,” Lotus said, “but if we had given the game to them, I would have been a lot more disappointed. When we meet any of those [CCL Blue] teams at any point in the season, it’s going to be a tough game, mentally draining

and physically draining, which is probably one of the reasons kids go to those schools.”     Although Lewis now departs the scene, St. Laurence will return several regulars from the 2013 lineup next spring. Lotus obviously hopes the Vikings make a deeper run in the 2014 tournament, but he’ll still look back fondly on the season just concluded.     “I think we had a tremendous team as far as chemistry and guys getting along — that’s the biggest thing,” Lotus said. “It was just an added bonus that we won a regional and the Catholic League Blue.”

Statistics St. Rita St. Laurence

21. The baseball camp, for grades 1-8, will also be conducted June 17-21.     The soccer, track and volleyball camps are open to both boys and girls. Soccer, for grades K-8, will run June 24-28; track, for grades 3-8, will go July 8-12; and volleyball, for grades 5-9, will be held July 22-26.     Trinity head coaches and athletes will serve as camp instructors. In addition, individual bas-

ketball instruction will be offered throughout the summer.     For more information or to register online, visit www.trnty. edu/summercamps. For questions, contact the athletics department at 239-4779.

Mustangs

bit and would come around, and every time we called on somebody to pinch hit or spot start, they came through. That’s what’s fun: when all the guys contribute.” Evergreen Park 8 Herscher 6     The Tigers, who beat Chicago Christian during the 2012 postseason and finished third in Class 2A, put the Mustangs into an immediate hole on Thursday, but Mike Reuter (two-run double) and Venhuizen (RBI single) made sure that edge had disappeared by the end of the opening stanza.     Smyth cited Evergreen’s rapid response as the key to its longterm well-being.     “That’s the thing about Herscher — they’re used to being there [in the sectional round] and expect to win,” he said. “We were sticking our foot in, so to speak, so to answer back right away was huge. We came out swinging the bats and it was our best offensive game of the year.”     Reuter was unquestionably the Mustangs’ ringleader. Still mourning the recent loss of his grandparents, the Evergreen outfielder poured his emotions into his performance, and he concluded the day with five RBI after slugging a three-run homer in the second to put his squad in front to stay.     Mike Rizzo stroked an RBI single in the third and the Mustangs also tallied on a passed ball to increase their lead to 8-3. Venhuizen nearly made it 10-3 when he crushed a ball, but a Tigers outfielder hauled it in and kept

(Continued from page 1) contest into a lopsided one.     “If we’re going to beat this team, we have to hang in there and catch a break somewhere,” Smyth said. “Once they got up 4-0, they were swinging comfortably and we were back on our heels.”     The Mustangs managed only two hits off JCA hurler Sam Couch, one of them a bunt single by Keyshawn Carpenter. Kyle Venhuizen delivered Evergreen’s other safety in the seventh.     Junior Frank Meisl absorbed the pitching loss for the Mustangs, but he’ll be back for another go-around next spring. So, too, will several other athletes, as Evergreen counted only two upperclassmen among Saturday’s starters.     “We should have [good] pitching and defense again [in 2014],” Smyth said. “But we need to get off to a good start. That’s something we haven’t done yet.”     The Mustangs’ ledger once stood at 3-10, but a seven-game victory streak got things righted and Evergreen played .700 ball over its last 20 games. So what shifted the Mustangs’ fortunes so dramatically?     “The best thing about the group is they got along together so well,” Smyth said. “I think that’s the biggest reason we were able to turn it around. If those guys didn’t like each other and weren’t good buddies, I don’t know how it would have been when we were 3-10.     “I knew they could play a little

Marist outlasts Oak Lawn in regional volleyball

    Matt Munro’s double-double of 11 blocks and 10 kills propelled

Marist’s boys’ volleyball team to a 25-19, 21-25, 25-17 victory over Oak Lawn in a regional match.     Morty Berglind contributed eight kills, 16 digs and a service ace for the RedHawks (20-15), while Mike Schreiber distributed 30 assists and registered two aces. Also helping out were Brendan Hopkins (team-high 17 digs), Tom Inzinga (four kills, four blocks) and Bill Kennedy (two aces). it from becoming an extra-base hit.     However, Herscher still had a lot of ground to make up, and Venhuizen settled down after that rocky first frame to hold the Tigers at bay through the fourth.     “With Kyle on the mound, I felt we could compete with anybody in the state,” Smyth said. “Kyle didn’t have his best stuff — he pitched basically the whole game with a fastball — but he gutted it out.     Venhuizen’s defense let him down a bit in the fifth, which enabled Herscher to score twice and narrow the gap. The Tigers collected another marker in the sixth and then put runners on second and third in the seventh before Meisl closed them out in relief by fanning the final batter.     “Over the last two or 2½ weeks, we got into a nice practice routine and nice pregame routine,” Smyth said. “We kind of caught fire, we beat some quality teams and we made it a great thing to remember.”

Statistics Herscher Evergreen Park

300 021 0 - 6 332 000 x - 8

Evergreen Park 2B: Reuter. HR: Reuter. RBI: Reuter 5, Rizzo, Venhuizen. WP: Venhuizen (4-3). Joliet Catholic Evergreen Park

422 001 4 - 13 000 000 0 -   0

Evergreen Park LP: Meisl (6-3).

�������������������������� � leads his team off the field after last Saturday’s loss to Joliet Evergreen Park coach Mark Smyth Catholic in the Class 3A Lincoln-Way West Sectional title game. 500 002 1 - 8 ����������������������������� 000 000 0 - 0

St. Rita 2B: Halas 2, Bechina, McLain. RBI: Halas 2, McLain 2, Bechina, Cozzi, Shepski, Soria. WP: Costanzo (10-3). St. Laurence LP: Lewis (7-2).

Photo by Jason Maholy

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Out & About

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Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond The Regional News - The Reporter

Section 2

Thursday, June 6, 2013

Videoview by Jay Bobbin

Summit Entertainment

Jesse Eisenberg portrays one of four magicians who use their illusionist acts to rob banks in “Now You See Me.” Woody Harrelson, Isla Fisher and Mark Ruffalo also star.

A less-than-magical movie

    (NOTICE: Ratings for each film begin with a ‘star’ rating — one star meaning ‘poor,’ four meaning ‘excellent’ — followed by the Motion Picture Association of America rating, and then by a family-viewing guide, the key for which appears below.)     STARTING THIS WEEK: “IDENTITY THIEF”: Their styles differ, but Jason Bateman and Melissa McCarthy make for a reasonably amusing pairing in this comedy, containing a sufficient amount of the raunchy humor both have become associated with. McCarthy plays the title thief, whose lifting of a Denver businessman’s (Bateman) identity prompts him to travel to Florida to find her, bring her back and get his situation corrected. Others are on their trail, though, complicating things considerably. Amanda

Peet, Jon Favreau, Robert Patrick and hip-hop star T.I. are featured. DVD extras: “making-of” documentary; outtakes. *** (R and unrated versions: AS, P) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand)     “A GOOD DAY TO DIE HARD”: Mild fun if you don’t overthink it, here’s round five for Bruce Willis as renegade New York cop John McClane in this no-frills action tale, which has the everrugged hero “yippee-ki-ay”-ing through Russia ... and destroying a good chunk of it along the way. He goes there to help his estranged son (Jai Courtney) out of trouble, only to find his offspring is secretly a CIA agent who’s neck-deep in government intrigue. Needless to say, everresourceful Dad shows the kid a thing or two. Mary Elizabeth Winstead briefly reprises her role

from the preceding “Live Free or Die Hard” as McClane’s daughter. ** (R: P, V) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand)     “WARM BODIES”: One couple — a zombie and a human, played by Nicholas Hoult (“Jack the Giant Slayer”) and Teresa Palmer — could be the key to restoring the world from a rampage of the undead in this satire of a genre, played unusually straight for something of its nature. The fellow is the zombie who saves the young woman, one of the few humans left, from others of his kind. Their ensuing relationship could have an impact on many others. John Malkovich and Rob Corddry also appear. DVD extras: nine “making-of” documentaries; audio commentary by Hoult, Palmer and director-screen(Continued on page 6 )

‘Now You See Me’ destined to disappear from theaters by Jase Howell     At one point in “Now You See Me,” a character explains how magicians build their acts, with each tier being more impressive than the last, and culminating in a sort of grand finale.     Unfortunately, the screenwriters did not carry the same principles to the script.     “Now You See Me” is a great example of the “what if?” kind of film. It has plenty of potential, but for various reasons sinks like a Chicago Cubs’ prospect. The premise of magicians robbing banks is intriguing, and the cast is loaded with talent, yet it is never pieced together properly and the results are far from spectacular.     We first see our characters applying their skills as street magicians. J. Daniel Atlas (Jesse Eisenberg) is a cocky illusionist waiting for a break to the big time, Merritt McKinney (Woody Harrelson) is a mentalist with a bizarre sense of humor looking to get back to the big time, Henley Reeves (Isla Fisher) is the sexy escape artist, and Jack Wilder (Dave Franco) is a streethustler. The four magicians each receive invites to a Tarot reading by an unseen benefactor who wants the four team up to pull of their most elaborate stunt to date.     The film then cuts to one year later, and the magicians are selling out arenas under the name the Four Horsemen. During a show they pull off a stunt which supposedly teleports an audience member to Paris in order to empty a vault and vacuum the money back to the states and make it rain on the audience. This is all an illusion, obviously, except the vault has indeed been robbed. This brings in FBI agent Dylan Rhodes (Mark Ruf-

falo) and Interpol agent Alma Dray (Melanie Laurent) to investigate how the Horsemen pulled this off. Without proof, though, the authorities can’t hold the magicians, so the four are free to amp up their game with their next show.     Also showing interest is ex-magician-turned-reality-show-star Thaddeus Bradley (Morgan Freeman). In interviews with Rhodes and Dray, we see Bradley can figure out the nuts and bolts of the events, but can’t quite see to where exactly it’s taking them. Nor for that matter can the Horsemen’s financier, Arthur Tressler (Michael Caine).     We eventually will find out the end game, but it’s pretty much of a letdown, as is much before it. One of the significant problems here is we’re not sure who to identify with. With a plot like this we would think the magicians, yet we spend no more time with them than an audience member at one of their shows. The script, perhaps purposely, keeps us

in the dark as to who these characters really are. Franco’s character in particular is so thin I believe he may have been included so the filmmakers could use the Four Horsemen moniker. We spend the most time with the two agents, and watch them go through the typical male-female partner cliches.     There are a few elements of magician folklore sprinkled in here and there, but halfway through we realize this film may not have much of anything up its sleeve. Perhaps the most disappointing aspect are the tricks themselves — they are really not quite as clever as we might expect. That’s pretty tough to overcome given that the film is more or less predicated on magic tricks. The film has a few sleight of hand tricks at the end in an attempt to salvage something, but by this point it’s doubtful anyone watching cares. The real magic here is how quickly this film makes our interest disappear.

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Section 2

Thursday, June 6, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

Out & About

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

Broaden Your Horizons This week Film Discussion Group to Celebrate Eight Years

Submitted photo

Summer art for kids    Creative outdoor art classes for kids begin June 17 at The Log Cabin Art Center, 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park.    Two-week sessions begin June 17, July 8 and July 29. One week sessions begin July 1 and 22. Classes meet Monday, Wednesday, and Friday mornings from 9 until 11 a.m.    Shown above, Claudia Kaczmarczak busily places embellishments onto her oil-pastel landscape.    The children will explore the Center’s farm, woods, fields and creeks, immersing themselves in the natural world, and using natural objects for many of their creative projects.    Summer art instructors Sarah Heflin and Heather Young will teach groups of children, ranging from Kindergarten to 9th grade. All use a variety of artistic media and techniques, including drawing, painting, pottery, papermaking, papier-mâché, printmaking and more. Classes are kept small to encourage individual self-expression and safe outdoor exploration.    A two-week session costs $110; a one-week session costs $60. All materials are included in the price. Registration is required. Call 361-3650.

Videoview

    1. Modern Vampires of the City, Vampire Weekend, XL Recordings     2. Love is Everything, George Strait, MCA Nashville     3. Demi, Demi Lovato, Holly­ wood Records     4. The Great Gatsby: Music From Baz Luhrmann’s Film, Soundtrack, Water Tower Mu­ sic/Interscope Records     5. Golden, Lady Antebellum, Capitol Nashville     6. Now 46, Various ar­ tists,Universal Music Group     7. The 20/20 Experience, Justin Timberlake, RCA

Spirituality book club     The Center’s spirituality book club is meeting on Monday, June 17, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park     Led by Pastoral Director Chris Hopkins, the group will discuss “If the Church were Christian: Rediscovering the Values of Jesus” by Phillip Gulley. Gulley is a Quaker minister who reflects upon what the church might look like if it refocused on the priorities of Jesus.     Registration is requested. Call The Center at 361-3650.

Summer Science Camp at McCord

Plein Aire sketch trips

Nature’s Tangles workshop at McCord     Learn to “tangle” and create mini-pieces of art at the McCord Gallery and Cultural Center this Saturday, June 8, 10 a.m. to noon.     The Zentangle art movement uses basic elements of drawing to make repetitive patterns. No art experience required. The class will explore nature’s tangles and how to capture the natural world of patterns with curves, spirals and plant patterns. Students will learn nine patterns and create up to five note cards. The class will be taught by Beth Leahy. Fees are $22. All materials provided.     The McCord Gallery and Cultural Center is at 9602 W. Creek Road (129th St. and La Grange Road), Palos Park. To register or for information, call 671-0648 or visit mccordgallery.org.

Upcoming ‘Wreck-It Ralph’ at Moraine Valley     Moraine Valley Community College will host Movie in the Moonlight at 8:30 p.m. Saturday, June 22. Disney’s “Wreck-It-Ralph” will be shown on a 16-foot inflatable screen on the Gateway between Buildings F and M, on campus at 9000 W. College Parkway in Palos Hills. The event is free. Bring own blanket, chairs and food. Snacks will be sold. Alcohol is not allowed. In the event of inclement weather, the movie will be shown in the Moraine Rooms in Building M. The movie is subject to change. For more information call 974-5375.

Basketry classes     The Log Cabin Center for the Arts, 12700 Southwest Highway

    Can science and art be related? Find out when you register your child for session I of Summer Science Camp with Dr. Lyne Marie Treat at the McCord Gallery & Cultural Center, Wednesdays, June 12 to July 10, ages 5 to 7, from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. and ages 7 to 12, 12:30 to 2 p.m. Session II to follow, July 17 through Aug. 7.     Young scientists will enjoy interactive discovery, outdoor challenges, and hands-on applications of the scientific principles as they explore how science affects the world around them. Students will build and race their own cars, create edible science, and use chemical reactions to explore everyday items. Fees per session are $50 for members, $55 for non-members. All materials provided.     The McCord Gallery & Cultural Center is at 9602 W. Creek Road (129th St. and La Grange Road), Palos Park. To register or for inWoodcarving classes formation, call 671-0648 or visit     Carver Susan Alexander will mccordgallery.org. offer new sessions of Woodcarving Classes at The Log Cabin Center for the Arts, 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park, beginning Wednesday evening, June 19, 6:30 p.m., and Thursday morning, June 20, 10 a.m.     1. Can’t Hold Us, Macklemore     Alexander is an experienced & Ryan Lewis, featuring Ray carver and carving magazine Dalton, Macklemore columnist who has been working     2. Just Give Me a Reason, with Center woodcarving teacher Pink, featuring Nate Ruess, RCA Keith Miller, who will return in Record the fall. Woodcarving students     3. Mirrors, Justin Timberlake, will learn and practice techniques RCA Records of carving using basswood and     4. When I Was Your Man, butternut, in order to make 3-6 Bruno Mars, Atlantic Records beginning projects such as gnome     5. Stay, Rihanna, featuring homes, angels and Santas. ExpeMikky Ekko, Def Jam rienced carvers design their own     6. Cruise, Florida Georgia projects. Line, featuring Nelly, Republic     Woodcarving classes cost $84 Nashville for six weeks. Students may buy     7. Come & Get It, Selena a carving knife and wood in class Gomez, Hollywood Records for approximately $25. Registra    8. Radioactive, Imagine Dra­ tion is required. gons, Kid Ina Korner/Inter­scope     9. I Love It, Icona Pop, fea­ turing Charli XCX, Big Beat Records/Atlantic     10. Get Lucky, Daft Punk, featuring Pharrell Williams, Columbia

    Plein Aire sketching and watercolor field trips are offered this summer by The Log Cabin Center for the Arts on Thursdays, from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., from June 13 through Aug. 8.     Led by art instructor Lois Hrejsa, the field trips take place at a variety of locations and several private residences throughout the Chicago area, including Palos, Frankfort, Willow Springs, Wheaton, Justice, Oak Brook and Chicago. Hrejsa offers both instruction and critique.     Some previous art experience is necessary. Registration is required. Students pay $22 per session, payable by check the day of the trip. Details and driving directions are available at The Center upon registration. Participants usually carpool and bring a picnic lunch. Call The Center at 361-3650.

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Omarr’s Weekly Astrological Forecast by Jeraldine Saunders     ARIES (March 21-April 19): Baby steps are better than crawling. The courage to move forward even when bombarded by doubts or on uncertain ground will create momentum. Use logic to overcome obstacles this week.     TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Knowledge is power. The more you know and learn, the easier it will be to make and keep money this week. Respect sound advice from trusted advisers rather than trying to figure it out for yourself.     GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Rather than rocking the boat, pick up a paddle and choose a clear direction. You can count on being diverted from impulsive actions by a guardian angel in the week to come — if you heed friendly advice.     CANCER (June 21-July 22): Put on your thinking cap. Mercury is traveling through your sign and you might get a chance to figure something out in a creative way during the week ahead. Put your best thoughts down on paper.     LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Think

before you act. In the first part of the week, you might be tempted to take spur-of-the-moment steps or change something that is better left alone. You will benefit by the advice of trusted friends.     VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Strive for popularity this week, but you don’t bend over backward to earn esteem. Keep relationships in perspective; someone who asks much of you may be doing you a favor by showing you your limits.     LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Multitasking could be counterproductive in the approaching week. You may find that you can do one thing well or several things poorly. Focus on one thing at a time; avoid frequent changes of direction.     SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Suspicions may be grounded in fact. It might be wise to check the facts twice before embarking on new enterprises in the early part of the week. Someone may only show you what you want to see.     SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-

Dec. 21): Tit for tat. Remain open and sincere with others in the upcoming week and they will reciprocate. You may be called upon to be generous to those who helped you in the past.     CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Focus on constructive activities in the week ahead. You can wrap things up that have been pending for a long time with a flourish. Remain secure in your solid routine and a reliable work ethic.     AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In the week to come, you might meet up with people who have your best interests at heart. There’s a whole world of endless possibilities to explore. Accept invitations to find opportunities.     PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Fads fade and won’t fit your future. You can’t alter your fate by changing your clothes or your habits. You will be considered more trustworthy and reliable if you stick to routines in the week ahead.

Top Country Albums     1. Love is Everything, George Strait, MCA Nashville     2. Golden, Lady Antebellum, Capitol Nashville     3. Annie Up, Pistol Annies, SONY NASHVILLE/RCA     4. Based on a True Story..., Blake Shelton, Warner Bros.     5. Life on a Rock, Kenny Chesney,Blue Chair Records, LLC / Columbia Nashville     6. Love Will..., Trace Adkins, Show Dog Universal Music     7. Here’s To The Good Times, Florida Georgia Line, Republic Nashville     8. Pioneer, The Band Perry, Republic Nashville     9. Nashville: The Music of Nashville: Season 1: Volume 2, Soundtrack, Big Machine Records     10. Two Lanes of Freedom, Tim McGraw, Big Machine Records

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    1. Finding Nemo 3-D, Walt Disney Studios, G     2. Django Unchained, The Weinstein Company, R     3. Cloud Atlas, Warner Bros., R     4. Silver Linings Playbook, The Weinstein Company, R     5. Lincoln, Touchstone Pictures, PG-13     6. Killing Them Softly, The Weinstein Company, R     7. Texas Chainsaw 3D, Lionsgate, R     8. Gangster Squad, Warner Bros., R     9. Mama, Universal Pictures, PG-13     10. A Haunted House, Open Road Films, R

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    Summer Kick Off will be held from 7:30-10:30 p.m. June 7 at The Bridge Teen Center, 15555 S. 71st Court, Orland Park. Live music from Wings of a Hero and free samples from Famous Dave’s. This free event is for teens in 7th through 12th grade.     • Saturday Night — 7:30-10:30 p.m. June 8, music from Lightfoot plus free samples from Cinnabon. This event is exclusively for students in 10th-12th grade and is free with a student membership application or $5 with a school ID.     • What’s It Like To Be: A Secret Service Agent — 2:30-4 p.m. June 11, delves the career of Orland Park Police Chief McCarthy. This free program is for teens in 7th through 12th grade.     • I had A Dream Last Night — 1:30-2:30 p.m. June 11, program focusing on writing and sharing a dream you recently had. This free program is for teens in 7th through 12th grade.     • Gardening — 4:30-5:30 p.m. June 11. Participants will learn the must-knows by planting flowers and herbs. This free program is for teens in 7th through 12th grade.     • Grilling in the Summer — 45:30 p.m. June 12, a culinary program with Chef Jason and Mike from Rock Bottom. Participants will learn the rules to grilling so you can become a grill master. This free program is for high school students only.     • Electrical Engineering — 34:30 p.m. June 13, program with DeVry University. Participants will learn the basics of electrical engineering and how to wire a fan, FM radio, and more. This free program is for teens in 7th through 12th grade.     • Song Writing — 4:30-5:30 p.m. June 13, for students interested in learning several techniques to put thoughts and emotions into verse. This free program is for teens in

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cluded on new DVD and Blu-ray collections of Eastwood’s movies. *** (Not rated: P, V)     COMING SOON: “HANSEL & GRETEL: WITCH HUNTERS” (June 11): Jeremy Renner and Gemma Arterton play adult, vengeful versions of the fairy-tale characters. (R: AS, N, P, GV)     “HOUSE OF CARDS” (June 11): A politician (Kevin Spacey) breaks virtually every rule to even the score with those who denied him a coveted post. Robin Wright and Kate Mara also star. (Not rated: AS, P)     “THE NEWSROOM: THE COMPLETE FIRST SEASON” (June 11): Executive producer Aaron Sorkin’s HBO drama about a cable news network casts Jeff Daniels as the main anchor. (Not rated: AS, P)     “OZ THE GREAT AND POWERFUL” (June 11): A magician’s (James Franco) bid to benefit from a fantastical land hits some snags; director Sam Raimi’s cast also includes Mila Kunis and Michelle Williams. (PG: P, V)     “SNITCH” (June 11): In a bid to get his jailed son freed, a man (Dwayne Johnson) makes a deal with the DEA to work as an undercover operative. Susan Sarandon and Barry Pepper also star. (PG-13: AS, V)     “JACK THE GIANT SLAYER” (June 18): To rescue a princess, brave young Jack (Nicholas Hoult) ascends a beanstalk to a literal land of giants. (PG-13: P, V)     FAMILY-VIEWING GUIDE KEY: AS, adult situations; N, nudity; P, profanity; V, violence; GV, particularly graphic violence.

The Bridge Teen Center upcoming events

S T. N

(Continued from page 5) writer Jonathan Levine; deleted scenes; outtakes. *** (PG-13: AS, P, V) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand)     “ESCAPE FROM PLANET EARTH”: Another all-star voice cast fuels an animated fantasy, as this adventure takes a famous astronaut (voice of Brendan Fraser) to a planet from which a distress call has been issued. Instead, it’s a trap set for the spaceman by a renegade military general (voice of William Shatner), and the hero has to figure out his own escape and a rescue for the entire world. Jessica Alba, Sarah Jessica Parker, Sofia Vergara and Ricky Gervais also are heard. DVD extras: “making-of” documentary; audio commentary by director Cal Brunker; deleted and alternate scenes; music featurettes. *** (PG: AS, P) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand)     “BREAKING BAD: THE FIFTH SEASON”: With the final episodes of the acclaimed drama series set to begin their AMC run in August, the eight stories leading up to those — note that this set isn’t called the “Complete Fifth Season” — are presented here. Meth maker and dealer Walter White (multiple Emmy winner Bryan Cranston) is at something of a loss after the way the frantic machinations of Season 4 ended, and he tries to strike an uneasy alliance with Mike (Jonathan Banks) to make things come out right ... within his range of ethics, that is. An extra Episode 8 scene created specifically for home video viewers is included. DVD extras: “making-of” documentaries; audio commentary by cast and crew; deleted scenes; outtakes; audition footage; rehearsal footage; artwork featurette. *** (Not rated: AS, P, V) (Also on Blu-ray)     “EASTWOOD DIRECTS: THE UNTOLD STORY”: Numerous actors have benefited from the directing talent of Clint Eastwood over the past 40 years, many of them earning Oscars for their work with him ... Morgan Freeman, Hilary Swank, Gene Hackman, Sean Penn and Tim Robbins among them. Some of them comment on his mastery behind the camera; so do Meryl Streep and fellow filmmaker Martin Scorsese in this clip-laden documentary in-

    CineVerse, the Oak Lawn Park District’s free weekly film discussion group, will celebrate its 8th anniversary and examine Preston Sturges’ classic comedy “Sullivan’s Travels” (1941) from 7 to 10 p.m. Wednesday, June 12 at Oak View Center, 4625 W. 110th St. in Oak Lawn (check building signage for room number). For more information call 529-9028 or visit cineversegroup.blogspot. com.

    For more information, call 3613650.

7th through 12th grade. in Palos Park, will offer three     To sign up, call 532-0500 or three-week summer basketry visit thebridgeteencenter.org. workshops beginning Thursday, June 13, July 11 and August 8, from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Center Cinema     Each workshop consists of three     “8 1/2” by Federico Fellini will Thursday morning classes, durbe shown this Friday, June 7, at ing which new basketry students 6:15 p.m., as part of the monthly make an easy beautiful wood-botCenter Cinema series at The Cen- tomed basket, with their choice ter, 12700 Southwest Highway, of colored trim. Instructor Ann Palos Park. Fowler will help returning or expe    Fellini’s Oscar-winning autobio- rienced students choose a basket graphical masterpiece is on the style and pattern appropriate to Sight and Sound poll of the best their experience level, or students movies of all time, a listing which may finish up un-completed basthe Center Cinema film series is kets from previous classes. currently surveying.     Each three-week basketry work    A discussion follows the movie. shop costs $42, plus a $12.50 mateFree popcorn is served. No fee rials fee. Registration is required. is charged but registration is Call The Center at 361-3650 or necessary. Call The Center at visit thecenterpalos.org. 361-3650.

ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX CHURCH GROUNDS • 10301 S. KOLMAR • OAK LAWN


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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION GUIDANCE RESIDENTIAL, LLC Plaintiff, -v.MOHAMMAD M. MOSA, LINDA MOSA, 20040000384, LLC, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 10 CH 043183 8746 S. 81ST AVENUE HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 18, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 20, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8746 S. 81ST AVENUE, HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 Property Index No. 23-02-205-029. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certied funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certied funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to conrmation by the court. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certicate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after conrmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court le to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court le or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to le number 14-10-34967. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 1410-34967 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 10 CH 043183 TJSC#: 33-7212 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I535100

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION CITIMORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, -v.ZUHAIR ABDELLATIF, NAZIK HALAH, BROOK HILLS HOMEOWNER’S ASSOCIATION Defendants 10 CH 038418 17124 KROPP COURT ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on November 21, 2011, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 20, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 17124 KROPP COURT, ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-30-401-008. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certied funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certied funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to conrmation by the court. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certicate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after conrmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court le to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court le or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to le number 14-10-30214. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-10-30214 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 10 CH 038418 TJSC#: 33-12448 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I535528

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL A S S O C I A T I O N � P l a i n t i f f , � v . � JAN KIRCHOF, ''MERS'' MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR CITIBANK, N.A., CITIBANK, N.A., RIVIERA REGAL II CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION Defendants 11 CH 04179 11108 S. 84TH AVE., UNIT 3A Palos Hills, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 11, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on July 15, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 11108 S. 84TH AVE., UNIT 3A, Palos Hills, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-23-101-116-1124, 23-23-101-116-1029. The real estate is improved with a residential condominium. The judgment amount was $108,433.20. Sale terms: The bid amount, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, shall be paid in certified funds immediately by the highest and best bidder at the conclusion of the sale. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff's attorney: HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Attorney Code. 40387 Case Number: 11 CH 04179 TJSC#: 33-9905 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I528746

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION CAMA PLAN FBO IRA ACCOUNT #T090415 P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � LUCITA C. RODRIGUEZ; JUAN RODRIGUEZ; U N K N O W N � OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS D e f e n d a n t s , � 12 CH 33156 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on April 11, 2013 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, July 12, 2013 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � P.I.N. 27-22-422-007-0000. Commonly known as 16336 Pepperwood Trail, Orland Hills, IL 60487. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. THE SALE SHALL BE SUBJECT TO GENERAL TAXES, SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS AND TO A PRIOR RECORDED FIRST MORTGAGE Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call Mr. Anthony Porto at Plaintiff's Attorney, Freedman Anselmo Lindberg LLC, 1807 West Diehl Road, Naperville, Illinois 60563-1890. (866) 402-8661. For Bidding instructions visit www.fal-illinois.com 24 hours prior to sale. F12060038 INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I536844

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For Notice Sale

For Notice Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION HOMEWARD RESIDENTIAL, INC. P l a i n t i f f , � v . � SAMIA S. HASAN, NIHAD HANNOUN, HERITAGE POINTE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION D e f e n d a n t s � 12 CH 26125 8206 W. 111TH ST., UNIT 2-3D Palos Hills, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 11, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on July 16, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8206 W. 111TH ST., UNIT 2-3D, Palos Hills, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-14-400-137-1024. The real estate is improved with a residential condominium. The judgment amount was $170,820.43. Sale terms: The bid amount, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, shall be paid in certified funds immediately by the highest and best bidder at the conclusion of the sale. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff's attorney: HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Attorney Code. 40387 Case Number: 12 CH 26125 TJSC#: 33-10480 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I530135

For Notice Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N � TCF NATIONAL BANK P l a i n t i f f , � v . � DEAN H. GOLTZ A/K/A DEAN GOLTZ, 9420 GREENBRIAR CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION F/K/A HICKORY OAKS CONDOMINIUM UNIT TWO ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 12 CH 42039 9420 GREENBRIAR ROAD, UNIT #3D AND UNIT #G16 Hickory Hills, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 21, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 27, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9420 GREENBRIAR ROAD, UNIT #3D AND UNIT #G16, Hickory Hills, IL 60457 Property Index No. 23-02-303-110-1020 (UNIT# 3D) & 23-02-303-110-1040 (UNIT #G16). The real estate is improved with a condominium. The judgment amount was $154,999.80. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff's attorney: DAVID T. COHEN, DAVID T. COHEN & ASSOCIATES, 10729 WEST 159TH STREET, ORLAND PARK, IL 60467, (708) 460-7711. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. DAVID T. COHEN & ASSOCIATES 10729 WEST 159TH STREET ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 (708) 460-7711 Attorney Code. 25602 Case Number: 12 CH 42039 TJSC#: 33-4971 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I536185

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For Notice Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION METLIFE HOME LOAN, A DIVISION OF METLIFE BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, v s . � AGNIESZKA ZAJDA; MARCIN PSZCZOLA; THE R I V I E R A � IN PALOS IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION; U N K N O W N � OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; D e f e n d a n t s , � 12 CH 5588 PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on December 12, 2012, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Monday, June 24, 2013, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 23-23-112-036-0000. Commonly known as 7 COUR MASSON, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a townhouse residence. The purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 of the Condominium Property Act Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For information: Visit our website at http://service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1128909. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I532442

For Notice Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT, CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL A S S O C I A T I O N , � P l a i n t i f f � V . � PATRICIA S. HENRICKSON; CONDOMINIUMS OF EDELWEISS, INC.; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, D e f e n d a n t s � 11 CH 19739 Property Address: 11541 AUTOBAHN DRIVE E UNIT 202 PALOS PARK, IL 60464 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE C O N D O M I N I U M � Fisher and Shapiro file # 11-051808 (It is advised that interested parties consult with their own attorneys before bidding at mortgage foreclosure s a l e s . ) � PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered on March 28, 2013, Kallen Realty Services, Inc., as Selling Official will at 12:30 p.m. on July 1, 2013, at 205 W. Randolph Street, Suite 1020, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real property: Commonly known as 11541 Autobahn Drive E, Unit 202, Palos Park, IL 60464 Permanent Index No.: 23-23-416-027-1052 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a dwelling. The property will NOT be open for inspection. The purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). The judgment amount was $166,483.18. Sale terms for non-parties: 10% of successful bid immediately at conclusion of auction, balance by 12:30 p.m. the next business day, both by cashier's checks; and no refunds. The sale shall be subject to general real estate taxes, special taxes, special assessments, special taxes levied, and superior liens, if any. The property is offered "as is," with no express or implied warranties and without any representation as to the quality of title or recourse to Plaintiff. Prospective bidders are admonished to review the court file to verify all information and to view auction rules at w w w . k a l l e n r s . c o m . � For information: Sale Clerk, Fisher and Shapiro, Attorney # 42168, 2121 Waukegan Road, Suite 301, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015, (847) 498-9990, between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. weekdays only. I525180

For Notice Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION PNC BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION; P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � BLAZEJ BIELAWSKI; COMMUNITY SAVINGS BANK, A S � TRUSTEE UTA #LT-1964 DATED 10/28/04; U N K N O W N � BENEFICIARIES OF COMMUNITY SAVINGS BANK, A S � TRUSTEE UTA #LT-1964 DATED 10/28/04; AND UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD C L A I M A N T S ; � D e f e n d a n t s , � 10 CH 29381 PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on April 9, 2013, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, July 12, 2013, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 23-14-406-010. Commonly known as 10742 East Olympia Circle, Palos Hills, IL 60465. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For information: Visit our website at http://service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1019108. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I536807

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For Notice Sale

For Notice Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, -v.JOSE A. GARCIA, JUDITH A. GARCIA, CONCORD CONDOMINIUM IX, CHRISTIAN LOPEZ, LILLIANA RUEDE, STATE OF ILLINOIS, TOWN OF CICERO, NORTHERN ILLINOIS GAS COMPANY A/K/A NICOR GAS COMPANY, TD AUTO FINANCE LLC A/K/A DAIMLERCHRYSLER FINANCIAL SERVICE AMERICAS LLC, 1001 MASTER TENANT, LLC D/B/A AUTOMATIC LOFTS, JESSICA A. JAQUES, CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA), N.A. F/K/A CAPITAL ONE BANK, MIDLAND FUNDING LLC, BANKFINANCIAL, FSB, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 11 CH 022167 8924 W. 140TH STREET UNIT #203 ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 29, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on July 2, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 8924 W. 140TH STREET UNIT #203, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-03-400-040-1007. The real estate is improved with a condo/townhouse. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-18812. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 1411-18812 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 11 CH 022167 TJSC#: 33-8438 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I537477

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION STANDARD BANK AND TRUST COMPANY, Plaintiff, -v.JOHN J. FARANO, JR., LEO WILCZEK, JR., STANDARD BANK AND TRUST, NOT PERSONALLY BUT AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF TRUST NUMBER 20209 DATED JANUARY 22, 2008, UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF STANDARD BANK AND TRUST AS TRUSTEE UNDER TRUST AGREEMENT DATED JANUARY 22, 2008, AND KNOWN AS TRUST NO. 20209, UNKNOWN OWNERS-TENANTS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 12 CH 6756 9750 W. 167TH ST. Orland Hills, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on May 22, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on July 2, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9750 W. 167TH ST., Orland Hills, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-21-402-008-0000. The real estate is improved with vacant land. The judgment amount was $878,396.16. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: NOONAN & LIEBERMAN, 105 W. ADAMS ST., SUITE 1100, Chicago, IL 60603, (312) 212-4028. Please refer to file number 169228. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. NOONAN & LIEBERMAN 105 W. ADAMS ST., SUITE 1100 Chicago, IL 60603 (312) 212-4028 Attorney File No. 1692-28 Attorney Code. 38245 Case Number: 12 CH 6756 TJSC#: 33-13091 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I537891

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8

Section 2 Thursday, June 6, 2013

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For Notice Sale

For Sale Notice

For Notice Sale

For Sale Notice

For Notice Sale

For Notice Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, -v.VINCENT S. MARUSZAK A/K/A VINCENT MARUSZAK, LINDA M. MARUSZAK, CITY OF CHICAGO, STATE OF ILLINOIS, COLE TAYLOR BANK Defendants 12 CH 003443 13011 S. WINNEBAGO ROAD PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 27, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on July 1, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 13011 S. WINNEBAGO ROAD, PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 Property Index No. 23-36-219-013. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-05612. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 1411-05612 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 12 CH 003443 TJSC#: 33-8099 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I537057

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, -v.MARY SULLIVAN A/K/A MARY E. SULLIVAN A/ K/A MARY ELLEN SULLIVAN, TREETOP CONDOMINIUM #44-45 ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 12 CH 004296 15349 WEST AVENUE UNIT #4506 ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 25, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 27, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 15349 WEST AVENUE UNIT #4506, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-16-209-048-1012. The real estate is improved with a condo/townhouse. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-38560. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 1411-38560 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 12 CH 004296 TJSC#: 33-7825 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I536549

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, -v.AIDAN F. FINN, MARGARET L. STACK A/K/A MARGARET L. FINN, STATE BANK OF COUNTRYSIDE Defendants 10 CH 037128 8613 W. 123RD STREET PALOS PARK, IL 60464 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 28, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on July 1, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8613 W. 123RD STREET, PALOS PARK, IL 60464 Property Index No. 2326-300-019. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-10-29759. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 1410-29759 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 10 CH 037128 TJSC#: 33-8135 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I537063

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE, FOR NEW CENTURY HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2004-4 Plaintiff, -v.RICHARD JESSE, CAROL M. JESSE, FOUNDERS BANK, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF A TRUST AGREEMENT DATED MARCH 31, 2005 AND KNOWN AS TRUST NUMBER 6658, NEW CENTURY MORTGAGE CORPORATION Defendants 12 CH 34237 16431 SOUTH 89TH AVENUE Orland Park, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 20, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 24, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 16431 SOUTH 89TH AVENUE, Orland Park, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27224060060000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $216,396.03. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: RANDALL S. MILLER & ASSOCIATES, 120 N. LASALLE STREET, SUITE 1140, Chicago, IL 60602, (312) 239-3432. Please refer to file number 12IL00337-1. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. RANDALL S. MILLER & ASSOCIATES 120 N. LASALLE STREET, SUITE 1140 Chicago, IL 60602 (312) 239-3432 Attorney File No. 12IL00337-1 Attorney Code. 46689 Case Number: 12 CH 34237 TJSC#: 33-7305 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I533067

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK N.A. Plaintiff, -v.ABDEL ABUISNEINEH, COLONADES CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION #1 Defendants 12 CH 012200 7305 TIFFANY DRIVE UNIT #3B ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 11, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 13, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 7305 TIFFANY DRIVE UNIT #3B, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-13-409-018-1010. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-12-09354. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 1412-09354 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 12 CH 012200 TJSC#: 33-6868 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I533831

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION UNITED CENTRAL BANK, A TEXAS BANKING CORPORATION Plaintiff, -v.JOY CHEMMACHEL, SHILA J. CHEMMACHEL, JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., REPUBLIC BANK OF CHICAGO, THE STATE OF ILLINOIS, UNITED STATES SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 11 CH 18855 8801 W. 87TH STREET Hickory Hills, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on May 2, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 14, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8801 W. 87TH STREET, Hickory Hills, IL 60457 Property Index No. 23-03-201-014-0000. The real estate is improved with a gasoline station. The judgment amount was $2,119,574.83. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. Where a sale of real estate is made to satisfy a lien prior to that of the United States, the United States shall have one year from the date of sale within which to redeem, except that with respect to a lien arising under the internal revenue laws the period shall be 120 days or the period allowable for redemption under State law, whichever is longer, and in any case in which, under the provisions of section 505 of the Housing Act of 1950, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1701k), and subsection (d) of section 3720 of title 38 of the United States Code, the right to redeem does not arise, there shall be no right of redemption. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: NADA DJORDJEVIC, BOODELL & DOMANSKIS, LLC, 353 North Clark Street, Suite 1800, Chicago, IL 60654, (312) 938-4070. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. BOODELL & DOMANSKIS, LLC 353 North Clark Street, Suite 1800 Chicago, IL 60654 (312) 938-4070 Attorney Code. 46656 Case Number: 11 CH 18855 TJSC#: 33-11810 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I533791

It’s time for a

Spring

Garage Sale! Cleaning out your home or garage not only adds up to extra space...it adds up to extra cash, too!

For Notice Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF Cook County, Illinois, County Department, Chancery Division. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � Jessica Wojtysiak; The Hills Homeowners Association; The Hills of Palos Condominium Association; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants D e f e n d a n t s , � 12 CH 34350 Sheriff's # 130371 F12080312 CHOH Pursuant to a Judgment made and entered by said Court in the above entitled cause, Thomas J. Dart, Sheriff of Cook County, Illinois, will on July 8, 2013, at 1pm in room LL06 of the Richard J. Daley Center, 50 West Washington Street, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction the following described premises and real estate mentioned in said Judgment: Common Address: 3 Cinnamon Creek Drive Unit 32S and G1-D-15 and P-1-9-15, Palos Hills, 60465 P.I.N: 23-10-200-015-1015; 23-10-200-015-1041 Improvements: This property consists of a Residential Condominium Unit with parking space. Sale shall be under the following terms: payment of not less than ten percent (10%) of the amount of the successful and highest bid to be paid to the Sheriff by cashier's check or certified funds at the sale; and the full remaining balance to be paid to the Sheriff by cashier's check or certified funds within twenty-four (24) hours after the sale. Sale shall be subject to general taxes, special a s s e s s m e n t s . � Premise will NOT be open for inspection. The purchaser of a condominium unit, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments as required by 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1) Firm Information: Plaintiff's Attorney FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC Anthony Porto 1807 W. DIEHL., Ste 333 Naperville, IL 60566-7228 forecl o s u r e n o t i c e @ f a l - i l l i n o i s . c o m � 866-402-8661 fax 630-428-4620 For bidding instructions, visit www.fal-illinois.com This is an attempt to collect a debt pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I529762

Do you Have a home for sale? Call today to place your ad today!

(708) 448-4000

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REGIONAL PUBLISHING CORP. 12243 S. Harlem Ave. Palos Heights, IL 60463-0932

Call (708) 448-4000 HOURS: Mon. thru Fri. 9 A.M. to 5 P.M. Sat. 9 A.M. to Noon


The Regional News - The Reporter

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Thursday, June 6, 2013 Section 2

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Garage Sale

Piano Tuning

FLOOR TILE 490 sq. ft. of 12” x 12” glazed ceramic floor tile. Ice Cap Brown (light brown). Will sell individually or all together. $.75 per tile.

FRIDAY, JUNE 7th & SATURDAY, JUNE 8th 9 A.M. to 2 P.M.

PIANO TUNING

The original Nordic Track Sequoia ski machine/cross country skier. Sturdy solid pine framing with redwood finish, adjustable arm and leg resistance and monitor. Folds down for storage. Barely used, excellent condition. $100. Call (708) 458-9233 leave message

HUGE 5 FAMILY SALE!

708/636-8212

Help Wanted

Wanted

EXPERIENCED CLEANING LADY WANTED for immediate start. Must be licensed driver with dependable vehicle. Good pay.

WE BUY

Cars • Trucks • Vans Runing OR Not TOP DOLLAR PAID Call (708) 205-8241

Call (708) 636-4030

Kitchen Helpers The Pancake Factory Pancake Maker, $15. Magnawave Perfection Microwave Roaster, $25. Magnawave Perfection Junior Roaster, $15. Xpress Ready-Set-Go, $20. GE Digital 6.5 quart slow cooker, $25. All are brand new. Call (708) 458-9233

Garage Sale THURSDAY, JUNE 6th, FRIDAY, JUNE 7th & SATURDAY, JUNE 8th 9 A.M. to 4 P.M.

Class A CDL BLACK HORSE CARRIERS has New Business and is looking for full time drivers in the Chicago Ridge area: New Tractors with paid Satellite radio, dedicated routes, no touch freight, M-F work, AM and PM start times, Home daily, No weekends, $800 plus a week. These full time positions come with medical, dental and vision benefits. If you have 3 yrs. Exp. and a Class A CDL with a clean MVR call:

Older Chevy Astro van in reasonbly good running condition. Must have 2 rear doors (not 3).

219-841-9113 or email todd@blackhorsecarriers.com.

Call Tim or Pat B. at (708) 448-4000

EOE. Drug Testing is a condition of employment

9210 S. 88th Ave. Hickory Hills

CALL TODAY TO PLACE YOUR AD!

Automotive $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ $ $ $ $$$ TOP CASH $$$ $ $ $ $ FOR YOUR JUNK $ $ $ CAR, TRUCK, VAN $ $ $ $ (708) $ $ $ 448-9155 $$ $ $ $10 off any tow service $ $ $ $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

Small engines, snowblowers, regular and riding lawnmowers, bicycles. Reasonably priced or free. Call (815) 468-7819

Wanted to Buy

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Blacktop

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Colman’s RV We buy/consign used Campers & RV's! 217-787-8653 www.colmansrv.com

EMPOWER YOUR MIND, Expand your earning potential! Learn an exciting NEW business skill at your own pace. An open mind Can fill your wallet! www.gbaoyl.com

HELP WANTED DRIVERS EXPERIENCED OTR DRIVERS VAN DIVISION: Runs 48 States, heavy from WI to Philadelphia-BaltimoreMD area. Flex home time. 99% No-Touch, Top Pay! Vacation/401K/Vision/Dental/ Disability/Health. Require Class A CDL, 2yrs OTR exp. good MVR/References req. Call Ruth/Mike TTI, Inc. 1-800-558-2664 www.TTItrucking.com Class A CDL Flatbed Drivers Needed. Excellent Pay & Benefits. 6 month exp., Min 23yrs of age. 877-261-2101. YOUR NEW DRIVING JOB IS ONE PHONE CALL AWAY! Experienced CDL-A Drivers and Recent Grads - Excellent Benefits, Weekly Hometime, Paid training. 888-362-8608 AverittCareers.com. Equal Opportunity Employer

DRIVERS: $3000 Sign-On, $58-$63K/year. Tired of OTR? This is THE OPPORTUNITY for YOU! Home Weekly, 2-3 Day Regional Routes. 1-Year T/T Experience. Apply Online: www.MBMcareers.com Drivers - CDL-A DRIVERS NEEDED! Solos up to 38¢ / mile. 50¢ / mile for Hazmat Teams. New Trucks Arriving Daily! 800-942-2104 Ext. 7308 or 7307 www.TotalMS.com Tanker & Flatbed Company Drivers / Independent Contractors! Immediate Placement Available Best Opportunities in the Trucking Business CALL TODAY 800-277-0212 or www.primeinc.com

Company Driver: Solo and Team OTR Lanes. Sign-On bonus: Solos - $2000 & Teams - $5000. Competitive Pay. Great Hometime. CDL-A with 1 year OTR & Hazmat. 888705-3217 or apply online at www.drivenctrans.com

LEGAL SERVICES

Ed’s

ROYAL FLUSH

LANDSCAPING Lawn Maintenance Hedge Trimming Retaining Walls Snow Removal Complete Landscaping

EDWARD SIEARS Cell:

Masonry

Paving Driveways • Parking Lots Resurfacing • Sealcoating FREE ESTIMATES

Paul Lally’s Masonry Inc.

708-423-9594

— Since 1988 —

TUCKPOINTING • BRICK WORK ALL CHIMNEY REPAIRS CONCRETE WORK Free Estimates • Fully Insured

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Plumbing & Sewer

POWER ROD MAINLINE & SINKS Tubs and Toilets Catch Basins Cleaned & Repaired Water Jetting Broken Pipes Detected with TV Camera

Most lines rodded-$49.95

10% OFF REPAIRS 24 Hour Service • Free Estimates LICENSED/BONDED/INSURED

708.424.6350 708.229.0123

www.royalflushplumbingandsewer.com

Plumbing & Sewer

5% OFF before 7/15/13 with this ad

(708) 448-8866

GEORGE’S

Cleaning,�������� Moving & Organizing

PLUMBING & SEWER

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Flood Control Specialists All Types of Plumbing Repairs

Painting

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J & D Painting We Beat Any Price! INTERIOR/EXTERIOR

Dry Wall Repairs Family Owned Over 30 Years $

99 Room Special

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CALL TODAY TO PLACE YOUR AD!

• • • • • •

Hot water tanks • Bathroom installations Toilets, Tubs, Sinks & Faucets Sewers rodded • Sump pumps Sewers inspected by camera Foundation leaks repaired Battery back-up systems

FREE ESTIMATES (most cases) Quality Work - Reasonable Prices 40 years experience - Lic. #SL574

708.952.1833

No Job Too Big or Too Small

— FREE ESTIMATES — ORLAND PARK

Place your ad in the Service Directory!

Remodeling

From the Ground Up

REMODELING

Decks • Home Remodeling Custom Woodworking

CALL JOSH 708.639.8483

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

TRAINING/EDUCATION ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home *Medical, *Business *Criminal Justice *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer and Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 888-336-5053 www.CenturaOnline.com SERVE TO LEARN. Earn money for college, train for a career, receive excellent pay and benefits. Serve in the National Guard. Call 1-800-GO-GUARD or visit nationalguard.com

All Real Estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are herby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1 (800) 669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1 (800) 927-9275.

Place your ad in the CLASSIFIEDS.

June 20–22

Call Today!

Wisconsin Music Arts Festival

CALL TODAY PLACE YOUR AD!

MT197441

ADOPTION

Drivers-CDL-A $5,000 SIGNON BONUS For exp’d solo OTR drivers & O/O’s Tuition reimbursement also available! New Student Pay & Lease Program USA TRUCK 877-5215775 www.GoUSATruck.com

Plumbing

Business:

Cleaning Services

ILLINOIS CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING NETWORK

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

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Landscaping

773.767.2095 312.446.9035

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THE BOAT DOCK We Buy & Consign Used Boats! 217-793-7300 theboatdock.com

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Business & Service Directory

Boswell Blacktop

DRIVERS

HUGE 4 FAMILY SALE Clothing, household. A Variety of Everything

BOATS

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$50.00

REPAIRS EXTRA — 35 years experience — Call F. Stan Ignell

16749 92nd Ave. Orland Hills

Please TEXT or call Call (708) 921-8056

Need to place your ad in more than 300 newspapers throughout Illinois? Call Illinois Press Advertising Service 217-241-1700 or visit www.illinoispress.org

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For Sale

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9

Monroe, Wisconsin Tickets & information: monroeartscenter.com 608-325-5700 888-596-1249


10

Section 2

Thursday, June 6, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

Same great people, same great service Soon with more access and more convenience

                    2    0.   0  2 .  2 / 00        04  ,    0.3   2        2      3   0 0  3 0 .    %,)  3  3 2 43  4.     !(   3 3  . ( )  ) 0  0$.  2   004.  .   00   2 4 /   2  ..  2 .    /    3    .  /  /. /  00 3  2  . 2 .    2   3    '  1    (    /  6  2     0    0  4  4 2 . 2    2        00  (/ 3    4  . &   0 /0.  3* -.     /   . /6  / 1 / 4 0 3  2   1      . 42       /      0 .   3  2 43  %  3 3 . 0   0443   0  04 4  .  .   2  43     /0  2   2 4 2 . 0  0  4 0.   3   3  . 4 2 0     2  3  0    4/  004.  4     2 It is our pledge to continue to provide the same personal, personal banking experience, from the same great people you know and trust. (/4 2 41 .     3   3). //       03 /3  4  . 6  3  / 

* 44 *

&4 & *0 &4&*0 President and CEO, Citizens Financial Bank *+

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FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS This communication contains forward-looking statements made pursuant to the safe-harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such forward-looking statements can often, but not always, be identified by the use of words like â&#x20AC;&#x153;believeâ&#x20AC;?, â&#x20AC;&#x153;continueâ&#x20AC;?, â&#x20AC;&#x153;patternâ&#x20AC;?, â&#x20AC;&#x153;estimateâ&#x20AC;?, â&#x20AC;&#x153;projectâ&#x20AC;?, â&#x20AC;&#x153;intendâ&#x20AC;?, â&#x20AC;&#x153;anticipateâ&#x20AC;?, â&#x20AC;&#x153;expectâ&#x20AC;? and similar expressions or future or conditional verbs such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;willâ&#x20AC;?, wouldâ&#x20AC;?, â&#x20AC;&#x153;shouldâ&#x20AC;?, â&#x20AC;&#x153;couldâ&#x20AC;?, â&#x20AC;&#x153;mightâ&#x20AC;?, â&#x20AC;&#x153;canâ&#x20AC;?, â&#x20AC;&#x153;mayâ&#x20AC;?, or similar expressions. These forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements relating to the benefits of the proposed merger (the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mergerâ&#x20AC;?) between First Merchants Corporation (â&#x20AC;&#x153;First Merchantsâ&#x20AC;?) and CFS Bancorp, Inc. (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Citizensâ&#x20AC;?), including future financial and operating results, cost savings, enhanced revenues, and accretion/dilution to reported earnings that may be realized from the Merger, as well as other statements of expectations regarding the Merger, and other statements of First Merchantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; goals, intentions and expectations; statements regarding the First Merchantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; business plan and growth strategies; statements regarding the asset quality of First Merchantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; loan and investment portfolios; and estimates of First Merchantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; risks and future costs and benefits, whether with respect to the Merger or otherwise. These forward-looking statements are subject to significant risks, assumptions and uncertainties that may cause results to differ materially from those set forth in forward-looking statements, including, among other things: the risk that the businesses of the First Merchants and Citizens will not be integrated successfully or such integration may be more difficult, time-consuming or costly than expected; expected revenue synergies and cost savings from the Merger may not be fully realized or realized within the expected time frame; revenues following the Merger may be lower than expected; customer and employee relationships and business operations may be disrupted by the Merger; the ability to obtain required governmental and stockholder approvals, and the ability to complete the Merger on the expected timeframe; possible changes in economic and business conditions; the existence or exacerbation of general geopolitical instability and uncertainty; the ability of First Merchants and Citizens to integrate recent acquisitions and attract new customers; possible changes in monetary and fiscal policies, and laws and regulations; the effects of easing restrictions on participants in the financial services industry; the cost and other effects of legal and administrative cases; possible changes in the credit worthiness of customers and the possible impairment of collectability of loans; fluctuations in market rates of interest; competitive factors in the banking industry; changes in the banking legislation or regulatory requirements of federal and state agencies applicable to bank holding companies and banks like First Merchantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; affiliate banks; continued availability of earnings and excess capital sufficient for the lawful and prudent declaration of dividends; changes in market, economic, operational, liquidity, credit and interest rate risks associated with the First Merchantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; business; and other risks and factors identified in each of First Merchantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. First Merchants does not undertake any obligation to update any forward-looking statement, whether written or oral, relating to the matters discussed in this presentation or news release. In addition, First Merchantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and Citizensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; past results of operations do not necessarily indicate either of their anticipated future results, whether the Merger is effectuated or not. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION The proposed Merger will be submitted to First Merchantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and Citizensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; stockholders for their consideration. In connection with the proposed Merger, First Merchants will file with the SEC a Registration Statement on Form S-4 that will include a Joint Proxy Statement for First Merchants and Citizens and a Prospectus of First Merchants, as well as other relevant documents concerning the proposed transaction. STOCKHOLDERS ARE URGED TO READ THE REGISTRATION STATEMENT AND THE CORRESPONDING PROXY STATEMENT AND PROSPECTUS REGARDING THE MERGER WHEN THEY BECOME AVAILABLE, AS WELL AS ANY OTHER RELEVANT DOCUMENTS FILED WITH THE SEC, TOGETHER WITH ALL AMENDMENTS OR SUPPLEMENTS TO THOSE DOCUMENTS, AS THEY ALL CONTAIN IMPORTANT INFORMATION. Once filed, you may obtain a free copy of the Proxy Statement and Prospectus, when they become available, as well as other filings containing information about First Merchants and Citizens, at the SECâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Web Site (http://www.sec.gov). You may also obtain these documents, free of charge, by accessing First Merchantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Web site (http://www.firstmerchants.com) under the tab â&#x20AC;&#x153;Investors,â&#x20AC;? then under the heading â&#x20AC;&#x153;Financial Information,â&#x20AC;? and finally under the link â&#x20AC;&#x153;SEC Filings,â&#x20AC;? or by accessing Citizensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Web Site (http://www.mybankcitizens.com) under the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Investor Relationsâ&#x20AC;? tab, then under the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Financial Documentsâ&#x20AC;? tab, and finally under the link â&#x20AC;&#x153;SEC Filings.â&#x20AC;? First Merchants and Citizens and their respective directors and executive officers may be deemed to be participants in the solicitation of proxies from the stockholders of First Merchants and Citizens in connection with the proposed Merger. INFORMATION ABOUT THE DIRECTORS AND EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF FIRST MERCHANTS IS SET FORTH IN THE DEFINITIVE PROXY STATEMENT FOR FIRST MERCHANTSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 2013 ANNUAL MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS FILED WITH THE SEC ON MARCH 29, 2013 AND FIRST MERCHANTSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K FILED ON MARCH 15, 2013. INFORMATION ABOUT THE DIRECTORS AND EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF CITIZENS IS SET FORTH IN THE DEFINITIVE PROXY STATEMENT FOR CITIZENSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 2013 ANNUAL MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS FILED WITH THE SEC ON APRIL 2, 2013. Additional information regarding the interests of those participants and other persons who may be deemed participants in the transaction may be obtained by reading the Proxy Statement and Prospectus regarding the proposed Merger when they become available. Free copies of these documents may be obtained as described in the preceding paragraph.

Reporter(2 sections) 6 6 13  

Reporter_6-6-13

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