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THE REGIONAL NEWS Named best small weekly in Illinois five times by the Illinois Press Association

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Serving Palos, Orland and Worth townships and neighboring communities

77th Year, NO. 28 • 3 Sections

PALOS TOWNSHIP

Brannigan, protestors unmoved One year later, battle of wills continues at Monday’s meeting

By Anthony Caciopo Regional News Editor

Photos by Anthony Caciopo

Above: Nancy Clark-Jurek of the Palos Heights Woman’s Club waves to parade-goers as she walks alongside the club’s trolley on Harlem Avenue July 4. She is the Woman’s Club Education Department chair. Below: Olympic gold medal-winner Kendall Coyne, grand marshal of the parade, greets her many fans at the Palos Heights Independence Day parade.

Palos residents celebrate the Fourth of July in style By Anthony Caciopo Regional News Editor

They were, at times, drowned out by a cacophony of horns, sirens, shouts and laughter from the Palos Heights 4th of July parade, but it didn’t stop sisters Jarita and Jasmine Steward from lifting their voices in song on Harlem Avenue. “Three cheers for the red, white and blue,” they sang from the 1800s patriotic song “Columbia, the Gem of The Ocean” as children Mariah Johnson and Marquis Steward picked up candy near the curb. “We’re here for the fun, the festivities, to basically celebrate the 4th of July,” said Jasmine. “The kids love the parade every year, and they like to dress up, too. The candy is an added bonus.” Our mother used to work at Elim (Christian Services) in Palos Heights,” said Jarita who, along with Jasmine,

lives in Country Club Hills. Heather and Brandon Lewis live in Palos Heights and were almost late for the parade, but for good reason. They had another to attend. “We got here around 30 seconds before the sirens first started,” said Brandon, who explained that he, his wife and their children were in Hinsdale for that community’s parade. “I grew up from Clarendon Hills, so I wanted the kids to be part of that,” he said, noting that at the Hinsdale parade “you see a lot of big bands and stuff like that. Then, you come here to see a lot of people marching that you know, people who matter to the community.” Brandon explained that the family positioned themselves strategically at the Hinsdale parade so they could get back to Palos Heights in time.

It’s been a year-long standoff, one month at a time, at an unassuming office building in Palos Hills where an elected official is under pressure to resign because of comments she made about Muslims and Middle Eastern people. “Hey-hey, ho-ho, Sharon Brannigan’s got to go!” was one of many rallying cries heard Monday at the monthly Board of Trustees meeting—the same rallying cry heard last month and the month before that, all the way back to July, 2017.

See PALOS TWP., Page 2

ORLAND PARK

Local physician charged with health care fraud

By Dermot Connolly Staff Writer

An Orland Park physician is among several Chicago-area medical professionals facing federal criminal charges as part of the largest health care fraud enforcement action in Department of Justice history, according to federal authorities. Dr. Florentino Leong, a geriatric medicine specialist with an office at 13341 Southwest Highway, was charged with health care fraud and making fall statements in a healthcare matter. Allegedly, he falsely certified patients for home-health services

See FOURTH, Page 2

“Today marks one year where we have been protesting and exercising our constitutional rights, as citizens of the United States, against racist remarks of a woman who not only represents this township’s constituency but also is planning on increasing her authority by running for Congress,” said a woman who identified herself as Linda with Arab American Family Services. Citing statistics she claimed documented the growth of the local Muslim population, Linda addressed Brannigan and other board members during the public commentary portion of the meeting. “The Chicago area is home to one of the largest Palestinian communities in the country,” Linda said. “Unfortunately for you, it

reimbursed by Medicare, according to the charges announced on June 28 by FBI officials in Chicago. Dr. Ruben Inocencio, 77, of Skokie, was charged with the same offenses. Prosecutors said they both authorized in-home services for patients they knew were not confined to their homes and did not require such services. Leong, whose home address is listed on Dunmore Drive in Orland Park, was scheduled to be arraigned before U.S. District Judge Manish S. Shah on the same day the charges were revealed. Assistant U.S. Attorney Stephen Chahn Lee is prosecuting the case. See ORLAND PARK, Page 3

McDonald takes command as Palos Fire chief By Anthony Caciopo Regional News Editor

Talk with new Palos Fire Protection District Chief Michael McDonald about his job and it’s easy to hear the passion. “I love this department,” he’ll tell you. “I’m honored to be part of this department. I look forward to going to work. I don’t consider it a job.” McDonald took the helm of the Palos Fire Protection District June 29, assuming command from now-former Chief James Graben,

who retired. Graben was profiled in the July 5 edition of The Regional. And McDonald said he didn’t have any real aspirations to lead the department, at least not until recently. “To be honest with you, I’ve was always comfortable in the spot I was in,” he said, referring to his previous position as deputy chief and shift commander before that. “I always thought the chief would be the chief,” he said of Graben’s 38-year tenure with the District, which started when Gra-

ben became a volunteer firefighter while still a teenager. McDonald hired on with the Palos Fire Protection District as a part-timer in 1989 after a totally random encounter in Palos Park as he drove past Station 1 on West 123rd Street in Palos Park. “It’s kind of funny. I saw a sign on the marquis. It said they were looking for volunteers. I said ‘I’d like to do that.’” McDonald had a solid career at that time, fixing computers, employed by the Midwest Stock Exchange and flying around the

country doing repairs. “This (a job in the fire service) was something totally, totally different,” he said. McDonald’s application was accepted by the District. He went through the fire training academy and was hired. “I’ve always worked two jobs my whole life,” McDonald said. “The next year, I went and worked for the Palos Heights Fire Protection District, for 17 years. Photo by Anthony Caciopo “Basically, I just came through the ranks,” he explained, and Chief Michael McDonald of the Palos Fire Protection District stands outside Station 1 at 8815 W. 123rd St. in Palos Park. He took command last week

See CHIEF, Page 2 following the retirement of longtime Chief James Graben.

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Visit us on the web at www.theregionalnews.com • email: TheRegional@comcast.net • To advertise, call 708-448-4000


2 Thursday, July 12, 2018

The Regional News

ORLAND PARK

Board hires consultant to review Downtown Triangle proposals By Dermot Connolly Staff Writer

Orland Park village officials are working with a consultant as they decide between the proposals offered by two finalists bidding to redevelop the remaining parcels of land in the Downtown Main Street Triangle. The Orland Park Village Board approved a contract with SB Friedman Development Advisors at the July 2 meeting, at a cost not to exceed $30,000. According to the Development Services department, the money will come out of the Tax Increment Financing account, because the Triangle is located in a TIF district. SB Friedman will assist the village in deciding between the proposals that were due Monday by the two finalists, which Village Manager Joe La Margo said are Structured Development, based in Chicago, and Edwards Realty Co. of Orland Park. “The request for proposals both came in and are currently under review,” said La Margo on Tuesday. Development Services staff, in

recommending SB Friedman, said the company would be “assisting in the review process, review the proposals, specifically as it relates to proposed financial terms, fiscal impacts, and other related matters. This review and analysis, combined with the selection committee input, will help the Village Board in their final selection of a developer.” SB Friedman said in its letter of intent that it would be looking at sales tax projections, and estimating village costs as well as the impacts of other affected taxing bodies to help determine which of the two final proposals would benefit the village most. The officials noted that SB Friedman does extensive economic development consulting throughout the Chicago area and statewide, and has worked with the village before. The village board began its search for developers in February, after deciding that the remaining parcels of land available in the 27-acre Main Street Triangle property northwest of 143rd Street and LaGrange Road should be developed as one unit, rather than

separately. There are five sites, totaling about nine acres available for development. Already located in the Downtown Triangle are the Ninety7Fifty on the Park apartments, the University of Chicago Medicine Center for Advanced Care, which has a CVS pharmacy on the first floor, and a multilevel parking garage between the two developments that is shared by the village and the medical center. The decision to market all the available sites as a single site came after a proposal fell through by Bradford Properties to build an upscale Cinepolis multiplex movie theater on a 1.9-acre portion. That occurred after plans were announced for an AMC multiplex to be built on the Sears site in Orland Square Mall, less than a mile away. In addition to that site east of Ninety7Fifty and north of the parking garage, the other available parcels include one just west of Ninety7Fifty, another between the medical center and 142nd Street, and two more north of 142nd Street and east of the Metra train station that borders the Triangle.

Photo by Anthony Caciopo

Rallying outside Palos Township headquarters Monday evening, people call for the resignation of Trustee Sharon Brannigan during the monthly board meeting. At least 75 people were on hand to continue to pressure her and her fellow board members.

Palos Twp.

Continued from Page 1

would be impossible for you to get rid of us and that is why we keep showing up here and will continue to show up here.” The small meeting room, which holds 40 seats for the public, was again packed on Monday. Just as many additional people stood in the vestibule and outside the building. More than 100 people showed up for the first protest on July 10, 2017 and attendance hasn’t fluctuated much in all the subsequent months. Brannigan is under fire for postings she made on social media about Muslims and Middle Eastern people. Protestors at Monday’s meeting for the first time carried placards printed with screen shots of her social media pages, showing now-deleted messages in which she asks “Why are all our schools filling with Middle East students without proper documentation?” Other postings that have been deemed offensive include one on Facebook in which Brannigan describes watching President Trump and family on a trip to the Middle East in May 2017. Photos by Anthony Caciopo “Am particularly proud that Flute players with the Independence Junior High School Patriots Band perform on the 4th of July along Harlem our women are not wearing headAvenue during the parade. They are (from left) Ismari Rodriguez, Hamiley Truty, Nicole Swierczek and Maggie scarves. We American women are Klingner. being represented with dignity!” she wrote. Trustee Brannigan last year issued a clarification, then an apoloContinued from Page 1 gy, both of which were published in their entity in The Regional You don’t want to miss the beginning,” he said News. However, neither has been as daughter Zoey, 4 and son Riley, 2, waved to accepted by those who seek her parade marchers from the curb. “Kendall Coyne is removal from the board. Her apolthe grand marshal today and the kids are excited ogy has been almost universally to see her.” dismissed as insincere or too-little, Within seconds, Coyne cruised past atop the foldtoo-late by her opponents. ed convertible roof of a 1956 Buick Special being But despite the pressure on her, driven by Bob and Bonnie Starzyk. Coyne is a and the pressure on the board of Palos Heights native and a gold medal-winning trustees to in turn pressure her to player with the U.S. women’s ice hockey team in resign, Branningan has told The the 2018 Winter Olympics in Korea. Regional on more than one ocThis year’s parade in Palos Heights again featured dozens of vehicles and marching contingents, including military veterans, emergency services vehicles, civic organizations, church groups, school groups, JoAnn Adams of Orland Park enjoys a Rainbow Cone scout troops, local elected officials and more. at Memorial Park before fireworks at Lake Katherine But from curbside, it was the patriotic spirit that Nature Center on July 3. Continued from Page 1 moved some of the parade watchers. pointed out a situation in the fireThe Lewis family, who had arrived at the parade fighting industry that is markedly just in time, included Palos Heights resident Crystal different these days than when he Page, Heather Lewis’ mother. She couldn’t help but was hired. get choked up with memories of her late father, “We have difficulty getting peoGeorge Ausherman, a World War II Navy veteran ple,” McDonald said, and it’s not who had served aboard an aircraft carrier. just limited to the Palos area. “With a few tears in our eyes,” she said, pausing “All across the country, at the to collect herself after being asked her feelings on seminars and fire conferences, the anniversary of the country’s birth. everybody has indicated they’re Less than a block away, Frank Magana of Orland having a hard time getting people.” Park waved a miniature flag as the parade rolled McDonald, who ran the Disby. He said he and his family have come to Palos trict 2 training academy for many Heights for Independence Day the past four years. years, said that attracting a new “We love the parade, we love the atmosphere,” generation of people to the fire he said. “It’s the 4th of July, I’m American so I’m service will be one of his areas celebrating America.” of focus as the new chief. Festivities marking our nation’s birth weren’t lim“When I ran the academy, we ited to the parade, however. The evening before were flush with people,” he reat Memorial Park on College Drive, the activities called. “As of late, it’s been chalwere plentiful. lenging. Things have changed in Food vendors, children’s attractions, carnival the past ten years. We used to get games, a music DJ and lots of opportunities to traditionally blue-collar workers: mingle and relax were clearly being enjoyed by a plumbers, pipefitters, construction big crowd, in anticipation of a fireworks show over workers, anything to do with the Lake Katherine after dusk. trades. But even the trades are “My daughter suggested it,” said Palos Heights having a difficult time,” he said. resident Dianna Navarro, noting that it was first her “It’s computers, computers, visit to the city’s pre-Fourth activities. computers. We need to reach “I’m glad we came,” said her daughter, Joanna out to the grade schools, the high Migo of St. Charles. “it cooled down, we got some schools, let them know what we good food and my girls like the games. We’re getting “I’m having fun and thanking the veterans,” said Carol do and give them some options.” ready for the fireworks.” McDonald was born and raised The Navarro-Migo family were seated on the Jones, sporting a fancy hat in red, white and blue during festivities at City Hall/Memorial Park. in Chicago, in the Back of The lawn in front of City Hall, where one of Migo’s daughters, Izzy played with an inflatable alien fig“And because of our grandkids, we want to stay Yards and Roseland neighborhoods. He has three brothers and a ure measuring four feet tall that she had won at around,” said Beverly. a carnival game. She dubbed the alien “George.” The Averys were setting up not only for themselves, sister. He attended Mendel, Fenger Setting themselves up for an excellent view of the “but to save a spot for our friends,” said Beverly. and Thornridge high schools. McDonald is married to Jennifer fireworks to come, Art and Beverly Avery fussed “Our grandkids are around and hopefully they’ll (nee Markovich), who attended with the placement of their lawn chairs and laughed want to sit near us and not all the way over there.” Sandburg High School. It’s his when it was noticed by The Regional. But when The Regional passed by about an hour second marriage and the couple “We’re looking for the perfect spot and we finally later, not long before the start of the fireworks dis- live locally. found it,” said Beverly with a smile. “We’ve been play, Art and Beverly were gone. As the new chief of the Palos coming her year after year.” Perhaps their quest for the “perfect” spot had Fire Protection District, McDonArt said he and Beverly have lived in Palos Heights ald spends much of his time since 1970. “It’s a great place for a lot of reasons.” continued.

Fourth

Chief

casion she isn’t going anywhere. “As you can see, almost all is the same old comments about the same old posts,” she wrote in an email Tuesday morning. “I do think that a few of the comments by the protesters however are now becoming more introspective and perhaps that is a good thing for all of us and communication can begin. Again, I am hopeful that the law will be recognized and respected and we can move on.” But any introspection detected amid the public commentary Monday night was in short supply to the sentiments that have dominated the meeting process since last year. “You should be ashamed of yourself, and you should leave,” said one of about a dozen people who spoke publically that are clearly opposed to her. “Isn’t it about time you all take a stand?” said Basem Kawar to the entire board. Kawar is the national coordinator of the National Network of Arab American Communities. “Isn’t it about time you all join us in our demand for her resignation? She’s bringing this entire board down. This is a shame upon this board.” Palos Township covers all or parts of Palos Heights, Palos Hills, Palos Park, Orland Park, Willow Springs, Worth, Bridgeview and Hickory Hills. The board is comprised of four trustees, including Brannigan; the township supervisor; assessor; highway commissioner and clerk. All positions are elected. Township Supervisor Colleen Schumann has repeatedly informed the protestors that she, nor anyone else, has the power to force Brannigan from a position to which the public elected her. Schumann has also on several occasions officially distanced the board from Brannigan’s social media posts. At Monday’s meeting, at least a few people were not in opposition

to the trustee. Outside the building, before the meeting room doors were opened, a man and a woman who preferred to not be identified spoke briefly to The Regional. “Here to support Sharon Barnnigan,” said the woman. “She’s a good person,” said the man. When asked to explain what he meant, he said “I don’t want to talk to you no more” and ended the interaction. John T. took to the microphone to say “I don’t know what’s in your heart. I want to remind everyone that we all have had moments. “I do believe there’s been a lot of name-calling and ridicule directed at you,” he said, suggesting that perhaps a larger agenda is at play, an agenda in which politics is playing a role. “Over the last year, since I’ve been coming to these meetings, the majority of people who have spoken against you have used ridicule to express their feelings,” he said. “When I’ve spoken to some of the people in this room, oneon-one, they seem to be reasonable and willing to listen, which suggests to me there’s something bigger going on that does not involve Sharon Brannigan.” John T. said more leaders have to get involved. We need a town-hall meeting, made up of our political leaders—not just the township trustees, but our mayors, aldermen, school board members, even Congressman Lipinkski,” he said. “A forum all of us can get answers to our questions from our elected officials. “As far as Sharon Brannigan is concerned,” said John T., “stop the ridicule. “If you like candidate Brannigan, vote yes. If you don’t, vote for someone else,” he said. Brannigan ran unsuccessfully against Lipinksi in 2014. Her term as trustee comes up for vote in 2020.

concentrating on, simply stated, running the overall operations of the department. His duties include, but are not limited to, administration, daily events, equipment outages, personnel and a certain amount of financial responsibility. Becoming deputy chief, his most recent past position, threw him a bit of a curve ball with his long-time, traditional schedule of a fireman. “I used to be out on the streets,” he said. “It was a big transition. The biggest change for me was time. As a fireman, we’d be working 24 hours on, 48 hours off. Now I’m here eight hours a day.” Leading a department of 40 fulltime and part-time firefighters/ paramedics, McDonald can’t say enough about his personnel, who run 3,000 calls per year. “This is a great group of guys,” he said. “When that buzzer goes off, there’s nobody more professional.” McDonald’s promotion to chief has come at an age which might raise an eyebrow or two. He’s 64. But he puts no stock in any conceptions—and misconceptions—about age. “These guys keep me young,” he said. “It’s wonderful. You want to compete with these guys. I may not win, but I’m certainly in the ballgame. That’s what keeps me going. “It’s a great thing, the energy, the commitment. We have a great relationship. Some people probably don’t even know how old I am. We all learn from each other. They get the opportunity to talk to an older guy. We may be different ages, or different everything, but we’re all the same,” McDonald

said. The Palos Fire Protection District has three boats and a specialty-trained dive team. “We have people on hazmat teams, and we do rope rescue (high altitude),” he said. Being part of MABAS (Mutual Aid Box Alarm System), “We’ve got all these specialty people together and we all work together.” District boundaries are the Calumet-Sag Channel on the north, 135th Street on the south, WillCook Road on the west and 76th Avenue on the east. The most memorable experience in his career, said McDonald, was the 1999 Amtrak crash in Bourbonnais, Illinois, that took the lives of 11 people when the train struck a truck loaded with steel at a grade crossing. “There were hundreds of firemen there,” he said. “Our group was assigned to the sleeping cars. The fatalities were there.” McDonald pauses as he recalls his experience that night, and offers no further details for the record. But even in those grimmest times, McDonald calls his job gratifying. “Every time we go out, even in a bad situation, you see some kind of a good outcome,” he said, perhaps reflecting on the 21 people who were rescued from that train crash. “How many people go to work and see they’ve made a change? It really warms your heart to go somewhere and find someone in their worst situation and be able to help them out. “Palos (Park) and Palos Heights are blessed with the people we have working here,” he said.


The Regional News

Resources, not jail, a new tool for Palos Park police to use By Michael Gilbert Correspondent

Having a mental illness is not a crime so why should it be treated as one? That is the assessment of the Palos Park Police Department, which is taking a new approach to how it handles mental health and substance-use calls. “The Palos Park Police Department acknowledges these are tough cases and an arrest is not going to solve the problem,” Police Commissioner Dan Polk said at the Village Council meeting Monday. “This is where an officer must be creative about how they can get someone engaged and how they can get them help. Officers are now working on these cases with the goal to connect people to services like drug treatment or inpatient therapy instead of taking them to jail.” Polk said previously a “police officer had a relatively limited number of tools” when dealing with these types of cases. “You either file a complaint, submit a ticket or give a talking to somebody and probably 80 percent of the time that solves the problem,” he said. “We do occasionally get call-backs from a family member who is concerned about the behavior of another family member, but the person isn’t doing anything illegal. I’m a firm

believer in looking for tools for people and I believe in a lot of training, so in conjunction with Police Chief (Joe) Miller we’ve found a couple of programs where we can give officers a couple other tools for their tool box in order to respond to these types of calls.” Polk said Police Cmdr. John Sawyer has been training the department’s eight full-time officers on how to handle calls involving mental health or substance use. This may involve treating the call more as a social service issue than a police issue, or distributing information to the person on ways in which he or she can get help. The department has also welcomed guest speakers to address the force. Donations from the Palos Park Woman’s Club or the Palos Park Police Foundation have covered the cost of the speakers and presenters, Polk said. “The chances of getting a social service person out when calling 911 is zero so rather than think down traditional police-type lines my guys have to have other responses,” Polk said. “We are working to have all officers fine tune their skills to deescalate situations by getting people the crisis behavioral health assessment they need. “We want our officers to interact with them not as potential criminals and offer some alternatives instead of giving them a ticket and locking them up in jail or

a hospital. We need to think of ourselves as more than just police officers.” This new method was at times “a hard sell” for the officers, but Polk said they “appreciate” having other alternatives to handle these situations. “We encourage our residents to say something if they see something, so if they see a person acting erratically they may not know if (that person) needs medical health or if they have committed a crime or are thinking about committing a crime,” Polk said. “Once the officer sees what the situation is, thanks to these new training methods, they can intervene with other opportunities that don’t involve the traditional police ways. “We want people in these situations to know we are not here to arrest them. There are things we can help them with. If you need a place to dry out we can help you with that, or if you need a place to consider a rehab program we can give you the resources.” Polk described the mental health care in the United States as “suboptimal” and it obviously has not improved with closure of many state mental health facilities. “How do you deal with that problem?” Polk asked. “We are trying to deal with it in two different ways. The first is to provide alternative services to people who need them and the second is to

lobby for more resources with our legislators in Springfield.” Polk said he, Miller and Mayor John Mahoney make frequent trips to Springfield to address representatives and explain that these issues often fall to police when they really should not. “We feel strongly about these issues and it is important for us to voice it,” Polk said. “You can argue about what type of reaction it has received but it’s still important to make it known.” With all of the department’s full-time officers now trained and instituting the new methods, Polk said the onus is now on training the force’s part-time members. “We want to try and use a different philosophy and mindset to get a different outcome,” he said. In other news, the council voted 4-0 to appoint Kathy Finan to the Palos Park Library Board. Finan, a 22-year resident of Palos Park, will fill the term of Erin Ferguson, who resigned last month. Finan’s term is to expire in June 2021. Finan is a former nurse in the Chicago Public School system. She is also an active parishioner at Our Lady of the Woods Parish and is the co-founder and secretary of the Palos Park Pedalers Bike Club. The library board meets at 7 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month. All meetings are held at the Palos Park Public Library, 12330 Forest Glen Blvd.

AERO agrees to buy Queen of Peace

Organization serves special ed students By Bob Bong AERO Special Education Cooperative announced last week it had reached an agreement in principle to purchase the former Queen of Peace High School in Burbank for $3.25 million. Picone Advisory Group aided the Sinsinawa Dominican Sisters in the negotiations for the 13-acre campus at 7659 S. Linder Ave. The Queen of Peace site includes two buildings, a parking lot and athletic fields, and green space. AERO was formed in 1963 to provide special education services for students with physical and intellectual disabilities from 11 public school districts in the southwest suburbs including Argo, Evergreen Park, Reavis and Oak Lawn high schools along with seven of their feeder elementary districts. These services are provided in

both public and private schools throughout portions of Stickney, Worth, and Lyons townships. AERO, a legal entity under the School Code of Illinois, is governed by a board comprised of one board of education member from each of the 11 districts in the cooperative. AERO is funded through a combination of local school district funds, state and federal grants, and state reimbursement. AERO owns a building in Burbank and leases a school building and classrooms from member schools in the cooperative. AERO said in a news release that the purchase will give the co-op the option to centralize its operations in educating hundreds of students from pre-K through 12th grade as well as young adults through age 22. AERO said the purchase of the Queen of Peace property will allow the co-op to enhance the services that it delivers to the most vulner-

able students in its communities. Indian Springs School District 109 Supt. Blair Nuccio, who has been on the co-op’s executive board since 1999, said the deal was “absolutely great for the coop. They could have sold it to anybody.” “Every year, we are always looking for new space,” he said. “We’re always looking for new options, more room. Co-op enrollment keeps climbing. This definitely helps with that. I’m very excited about this.” He cautioned, however, that the deal is not yet finalized. “We are still trying to nail down the details.” He also said there was no clear timetable on when the school might be ready to take in special ed students. “We are discussing all options on how well it fits the needs of special ed students,” he said. “It was a general high school. We have to see how that works for our special need students.”

Summit School District 104 also is a member of the co-op. Supt. Troy Whelan said the deal was “potentially good for the co-op.” “It will provide some options for the co-op. It will provide a permanent place for the students.” Co-op executive director James Gunnell did not return a call seeking comment. The Sinsinawa Dominican Sisters opened Queen of Peace High School in 1962 and closed it at the completion of the 2017 school year. The Catholic, all-girl, college preparatory school educated more than 15,000 women over 55 years.   Many of the Queen of Peace students transferred to neighboring St. Laurence High School, which agreed to go co-ed after the girls’ school announced it was closing last year. Other member elementary districts include Willow Springs District 108, Central Stickney District 110, Burbank District 111, Ridgeland District 122, and Evergreen Park District 124.

Palos Health cooking demo at July 18 Palos Market MOPS, Palos Library, Day Dreamer Jewelry at Community Tents

Palos Health dieticians will be at the Palos Heights Farmers Market on July 18 with cooking demonstrations on the hour starting at 9 a.m. Health and nutrition information along with upcoming programming information will be available. The demonstrations will take place at the City Tent. The Mothers of Preschoolers at Palos Heights Christian Reformed Church (MOPS) will join the Community Tent from 7-10 a.m. Representatives will have group information, which provides friendship, fun and childcare to mothers of preschoolers. More information can be found at www.mops.org/ groups/paloscrc The Palos Heights Library then joins the Community Tent from 10 a.m. to noon with “Bears and Berries” Story Hour. Stop by for fun stories, crafts and other activities. Library staff will be on hand with programming information, library card sign up and giveaways. Rita Schultz and her beautiful Day Dreamer Jewelry will be at the other Community Tent. Designed with love, inspired by nature, Rita makes earrings, bracelets and necklaces. Stop by for the latest creations.

Orland Park Continued from Page 1

Attempts to reach Leong by phone this week were unsuccessful, with all available telephone numbers found to be either changed or disconnected. He was among more than 600 defendants charged nationwide as

Summer is in full swing at the farm stands! All summer fruit and many summer vegetables are coming into the market every week. Sample produce available includes all varieties of berries, cherries, apricots, plums, peaches, melons, peppers, broccoli, cauliflower, tomatoes, beans, beets, carrots, eggplant, onions, corn and more. Many other food items are also at the market on a weekly basis. They include breads, multiple types of bakery items, pies, noodles, cheeses, eggs, butter, jams, jellies, local honey, olive oils, vinegars, beef, pork, chicken, salsas and pasta. You’ll find BBQ sauces and Italian peppers, three different varieties of ready-to-eat tamales, pizza and pizza products, ready-to-bake

pizza, pesto, organic and vegan frozen vegetable patties, soups, desserts, iced tea and packaged teas. Our vendors also have beautiful perennial and annual plants, herbs and fresh-cut flowers. Get ready for summer barbeques and parties with the Pampered Chef, who has everything you will need. Naturally scented olive oil soaps and other personal care products are available. The market’s Facebook page will showcase all available produce at the start of the market day. Check www.Facebook.com/ PalosHeightsFarmersMarket. Stop in early for best selection. Make sure to stop by the City Tent to pick up and have your Frequent Shopper Card endorsed. Patrons will earn double credit on their Frequent Shopper Cards for all canned and fresh food donations. Canned donations are given to Palos United Methodist Church, 12101 S, Harlem Ave. in Palos Heights. Fresh food donations are given to Operation Blessing in Alsip. All completed Frequent Shopper Cards will be entered into a market gift certificate raffle every month. LINK cards are accepted at the Palos market. Stop by the City Tent to start the process. “Palos Bucks” Double Value Matching dollars of up to $15 will be offered weekly.

Pick up this week’s recipe, “Cucumber Salad” at the City Tent. This year’s recipes are courtesy of Palos Health dieticians. The recipe will also be part of our weekly email, Facebook page and city webpage, www.palosheights.org. Today is the last day to purchase raffle tickets for next week’s Car Classic Event. The Car Classic Event will be held on Thursday, July 19 from 5-9 p.m. This is the 15th anniversary and will feature hundreds of classic cars, a live band, delicious food and beverages, and more. More information about the Car Classic event can be found at www.palosheights. org/events/carclassic. Volunteers are needed! Email carclassic@ palosheights.org or contact Bob Starzyk at (708) 334-4848 for more information. The market would like to acknowledge and thank this year’s sponsors. They include: Palos Health, CIBC Bank, City of Palos Heights/Mayor Bob Straz, CNB Bank and Trust, United Trust Bank, Running for Kicks, Golden Shoes and Camille’s Confections. Additional information about the market can be obtained at www. palosheights.org, by emailing farmersmarket@palosheights. org, calling (708) 361-1800 or visiting the Palos Heights Farmers Market page on Facebook.

part of the enforcement action taken by the Medicare Fraud Strike Force. They including more than 150 physicians, nurses and other licensed medical professionals, for their alleged participation in health care fraud schemes involving approximately $2 billion in false billings. Several doctors face charges for allegedly prescribing

and distributing opioids and other narcotics, and the Department of Health and Human Services has initiated suspension actions against numerous doctors, nurses and pharmacists. The Medicare Fraud Strike Force, which operates in nine locations across the United States, is a partnership between federal

agencies such as the Department of Justice Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney’s offices and state Medicaid fraud control units. Since its inception in March 2007, the Strike Force has charged more than 3,700 defendants who collectively have been accused of falsely billing the Medicare program for more than $14 billion.

Thursday, July 12, 2018

3

POLICE BLOTTER: PALOS HEIGHTS Suspended license

DUI

Chayce A. Nunez-McClellan, 26, of Bolingbrook, was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop at 1:09 a.m. July 5, in the 6300 block of West Route 83. Police said a license plate registered to another vehicle was attached to the car he was driving, and he was cited for improper use of registration. He is due in court on Aug. 13. Darius A. Sims Jr., 23, of Merrillville, Ind., was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop at 8:08 p.m. July 4, in the 7100 block of West Route 83. Police said he was also cited for driving without insurance and failure to wear a seatbelt. He is due in court on Aug. 21.

Charles M. Grady, 37, of Palos Hills, was charged with driving under the influence of alcohol following a traffic stop at 12:38 a.m. Saturday, in the 7100 block of West College Drive. Police said he showed signs of impairment and was also cited for improper lane usage. He is due in court on Aug. 21. John P. Leonard, 61, of Oak Forest, was charged with driving under the influence of alcohol following a traffic stop at 11:21 p.m. Sunday, in the 13400 block of South Ridgeland Avenue. Police said he showed signs of impairment and was also cited for driving with one headlight. He is due in court on Aug. 21.

POLICE BLOTTER: PALOS PARK Unlicensed driving Enrique Rodriguez, 43, of Palos Hills, was charged with driving without a valid license following a traffic stop at 6:07 p.m. July 3, in the 12500 block of South LaGrange Avenue. Police said he was also cited for speeding 68 mph in a 45-mph zone. Court information was not available.

Drug paraphernalia Andraya L. Livingston, 20, of Schaumburg, was issued a local adjudication citation for possession of drug paraphernalia following a traffic stop at 2:47 a.m. June 30, at Route 83 and Kean Avenue. Police said a glass pipe

and a marijuana grinder with drug residue on them were in the center console. She was also cited for failure to use a turn signal when required. Livingston is due at a hearing in Palos Park Village Hall on Aug. 1. Henry T. Pacer, 25, of Palos Park, was issued a local adjudication ticket for possession of drug paraphernalia following a traffic stop at 3:45 a.m. June 30, at 119th Street and 82nd Avenue. Police said he was carrying a hypodermic needle and a pipe used to smoke crack cocaine. He was also issued a verbal warning about having a loud muffler. He is due at a hearing in Palos Park Village Hall on Aug. 1.

POLICE BLOTTER: ORLAND PARK Retail theft Teshiana L. Perkins, 23, of Charlotte, NC, was charged with retail theft at JC Penney in Orland Square Mall at 4:07 p.m. June 25. Police said she and a juvenile girl filled bags with miscellaneous clothing and left the store with them. The merchandise totaled $386 in value. Another girl was with them but she was not carrying anything and wasn’t charged. Police said Perkins was also charged with contributing to the delinquency of a minor and is due in court on Aug. 17. Daijane A, Echefula, 25, of Chicago, was charged with retail theft at Sunglass Hut in Orland Square Mall at 4:10 p.m. June 11. Police said she took a pair of Prada sunglasses worth $400, and a pair of Ray Ban worth $173. She is due in court on July 17.

DUI Robert E. Zygmunt, 47, of Orland Park, was charged with driving under the influence of drugs following a traffic stop at 8:22 p.m. June 25, in the parking lot of Burger King, 14601 S. LaGrange Road. Police said he was found asleep, slumped over the wheel of a running car. A straw with heroin residue was found in the car, according to police, and Zygmunt showed signs of drug use. He is due in court on July 19.

Possession of stolen property Leah A. Zerlentes, 35, of Orland Park, was charged with possession of stolen property at the La Senza store in Orland Square Mall at 5:54 p.m. June 26. Police said Zerlantes was also cited for

criminal trespassing because she was already banned from entering the mall for being a “frequent shoplifter.” She was stopped after officers watched her leave the store with four bras worth a total of $171.80 in her bags. They said she also was carrying merchandise from several other stores without any receipts. She is due in court on Aug. 3.

Revoked license Christopher L. Mansbridge, 37, of Worth, was charged with driving with a revoked license following a traffic stop at 9:58 p.m. June 13. He was also cited for driving without insurance, a defective windshield, and was issued municipal violations for possession of cannabis and drug paraphernalia after 7 grams of cannabis, a vaporizer pen containing cannabis oil, and a glass cannabis pipe were found in the center console. He was due in court on July 2.

Drug possession Jacqueline M. Benoit, 32, of Orland Park, was charged with possession of a controlled substance following a traffic stop at 8:36 p.m. June 16, in the 9500 block of West 151st Street. Police said she was a passenger in the car and appeared to be under the influence of drugs. They said she was carrying two Schedule 4 pills. She was also cited for illegal transportation of alcohol and held for a bond hearing. The driver, Kelley M. Adams of Orland Park, 32, was charged with driving with a suspended license and illegal lane usage. She is due in court on July 20.


4 Thursday, July 12, 2018

Dem Day needs less corn, more red meat Back in the old, old days, Mayor Richard J. Daley would pack passenger trains full of loyalists and send them all to the Illinois State Fair’s Democrat Day rally, where they were treated to rousing speeches by party leaders and candidates. Gov. Rod Blagojevich kept that tradition alive on a somewhat smaller scale by chartering buses filled with supporters. For decades, both parties’ state fair rallies have been considered the unofficial kick-off to Illinois’ campaign season. In odd-numbered years between elections, candidates have often used the rallies to showcase their campaigns ahead of the following spring primary season. Many of those potential candidates make big speeches and bus their supporters to Springfield to show their strength and then never even file to run for election, realizing that they don’t have what it takes. Illinois is a bigger state than most people realize. Its regional and hyper-local politics can be maddening to novices with big egos. Most other off-year speakers are weeded out by the party primaries. By the time of the August event ahead of the even-year general election, the number of candidates who show up to speak is whittled down to a handful. Aside from the potential candidates, the state fair treats the political class (campaign contributors, labor leaders, legislative staff, etc.) to a big get-together before the November elections (or the legislative fall veto session, as the case may be), so lots of candidates up and down the ballot use the opportunity to raise money. The rallies always provide political reporters with something to write about in what would otherwise be a slow news month, when most normal people are on vacation or have otherwise completely tuned out politics of all kinds. But the annual event really started to lose its appeal for the Democratic powers back in 2012, when AFSCME packed the Democrat Day rally with thousands of green-shirted protesters who angrily and loudly shouted down every Democratic speaker, including Gov. Pat Quinn and House Speaker Michael J. Madigan. AFSCME and other public employee unions were furious at Quinn and the Democratic leadership for pushing pension reforms that would reduce their retirement income and benefits. The following year, after a massive pension reform bill had passed and was signed into law and Gov. Quinn picked up a Democratic primary opponent, Quinn canceled the rally’s speeches. The Democrats still had free food and beer at the traditional Director’s Lawn venue, but live music blared from the loudspeakers instead of politicians’ voices. Republicans, for their part, required that attendees obtain tickets in advance before being allowed access to their event, mainly out of concern that the Democrats could try to disrupt their shindig the way AFSCME did to them. By then, though, the focus had already started to shift away from the Democrats’ rally to a morning brunch at a local hotel hosted by county party chairs. The speeches given at that event were largely repeated verbatim at the afternoon fairgrounds rally, so lots of party regulars eventually got bored and didn’t even bother attending the afternoon rally. Why sit in the hot sun and oppressive humidity (or pouring rain, as the case may be) to listen to the exact same speeches you just heard a few hours earlier? Last year, Speaker Madigan canceled the state fair rally altogether. He never much cared for it anyway. One year, reporters literally surrounded his golf cart when he refused to answer questions and wouldn’t let him move. Plus, a huge number of Democratic candidates for statewide office that year would’ve made for an unwieldy and divisive event (particularly since some candidates were running on pointedly anti-Madigan platforms). The annual Democrat Day is managed by the Democratic Party of Illinois unless the party holds the governor’s office. But it doesn’t look like DPI will be all that involved with the rally this August. “I suspect whatever goes on at the fairgrounds will be done more by the statewide campaigns than anybody else,” Madigan spokesman Steve Brown said the other day. Brown said the rally “largely duplicates what the county chairs do” and it had become “less and less an opportunity to communicate with people.” It does appear that the fairgrounds rally will be revived, although Democratic gubernatorial nominee J.B. Pritzker’s campaign is staying mum about what it will look like. They’re still “working on the details,” I was told not long ago, but are “excited for a great day.” Frankly, the whole thing needs a reboot. Ditch the hokey straw bales and endless dreary speeches and give us something interesting.

OPINION

The Regional News

RICH MILLER

Pfleger publicity stunts do nothing to stop violence I don’t blame Rev. Michael Pfleger for trying to get publicity to protest the continuing violence in Chicago. Pfleger shut down part of the Dan Ryan Expressway with hundreds of supporters July 7 to put a spotlight on “crime, joblessness and poverty” in Chicago’s neighborhoods. The disruptive protest did shine a strong light, but did it do much to really stop the violence? In fact, other than the hard work of the Chicago Police Department, little else seems to be done to prevent the violence. Crime in Pfleger’s community of Auburn-Gresham is almost triple the average in the state of Illinois, according to AreaVibes.com and is 30 percent higher than the Chicago average — and Chicago’s crime average is pretty miserable. If you live in Chicago, you are playing the odds against survival. Pfleger has dedicated his life to fighting for the rights of the poor. He graduated from Quigley South, Loyola University and University of St. Mary of the Lake, and was ordained a Catholic priest in 1975. He became pastor of St. Sabina parish in 1981 in the Auburn Gresham neighborhood on Chicago’s Southwest Side. The community is roughly bounded by Western Avenue on the west, 75th Street on the north, 95th Street on the south and the Dan Ryan to the east. Pfleger is German American; his parish is African American. That alone is notable. All Pfleger did with his organized protest was to anger the public and disrupt commuters — although in truth, many commuters are suburbanites traveling to and from the Loop from Chicago’s south suburbs, where crime is also higher than most other suburban communities.   Even if Pfleger blocked the Stevenson

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Expressway, the Eisenhower Expressway and the Kennedy Expressway, would it really have made a difference, other than just shine a spotlight on Chicago’s violence? What should Pfleger do? Crime in Chicago has always been a problem but in recent years it has worsened with record annual highs and lows that are still shocking. (Editor’s note: According to City of Chicago statistics, the number of murders to date in 2018 is fewer than the same periods in 2016 and 2017). I’m not a social scientist, but I think I can guess that Chicago’s crime is driven by the excessive poverty in most of the communities where crime is at the highest. Wealthy Chicagoans lock themselves up in Loop high-rises and gentrified neighborhoods. Many suburbanites drive in and drive out, with their doors locked. Chicago’s politicians are not doing much. They’re too busy trying to raise money to cover the pensions and benefits they have handed out generously to their loyal supporters over the years. Instead of stopping the crime, they scream about it. They point fingers everywhere, except at themselves. Chicago’s crime is everyone else’s fault, not Chicago’s fault. Mayor Rahm Emanuel talks a lot about fighting crime but can’t really do much better than any of his predecessors. Even when Chicago’s mayors were African American, Eugene Sawyer and Harold Washington, the crime wave

Changing attitudes: Underage drinking is not ‘rite of passage’ By Cynthia Frymark

The need to provide meanRich Miller also publishes Capitol Fax, a daily political newslet- ingful education on the ter, and CapitolFax.com. dangers of underage drinking and drug use has never been greater. A few facts help to highlight that need: • Alcohol and drugs are the leading factors in teenage suicide. • More than 23 million people over the age of 12 are addicted to alcohol and other Owned and operated by Southwest Regional Publishing Co. drugs. Mark Hornung, Chief Operating Officer Young people, like adults, drink alcohol for many difThe Business Side The News Side ferent reasons. Some of the Donna Brown, Sales Director Anthony Caciopo, Editor reasons may seem obvious Monica Cotter, Finance Director Dermot Connolly, Reporter Mike Russell, Production Director Jason Maholy, Sports Editor but understanding the feelings Bonnie Hesik, Pre-press Manager Lauren Ziemann, Art Director behind these reasons — as Chuck Ingwersen, Designer well as how everyday teen life comes into play — can be Southwest Regional Publishing difficult. 12243 S. Harlem Ave. Young people often drink to Palos Heights, IL 60463 check out from family probPhone: (708) 448-4000 lems or issues with school and Fax: (708) 448-4012 grades; loneliness, low self-esWebsite: www.theregionalnews.com teem, depression, anxiety disemail: TheRegional@comcast.net order and other mental health Office hours: Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. issues can contribute; they may Deadlines drink to deal with the presEditorial: Noon, Saturday • Advertising: 5 p.m., Monday sures of everyday social situSubscription rates: Local, delivered by mail, $49 a year in advance. Out-of-State, $58 ations, to change their image

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RAY HANANIA

remained strong. Meanwhile, the city is forced to pay outrageous settlements to the alleged victims of police violence, which brings me to an important point. Do you realize that more lawsuits are filed against the Chicago Police Department and City of Chicago by victims of violence—in many cases street gang members whose parents assert they were “angels”—than are filed against the street gang members? We spend more time bashing the Chicago Police and blaming them for violence and less time on the street gangs that actually take more lives than a few errant police officers. Like Pfleger’s protest, the focus on violence is on the politics, not on the solution. Instead of taking responsibility for the violence as failed parents, failed Chicago aldermen and failed Catholic priests who declare vows to protect their parishes, they point fingers of blame at everyone else. The police! The suburbs! The State of Illinois! Raising taxes and throwing money at the problem is not the answer. The answer is that the people of Chicago need to wake up and be accountable. Yes, the parents are responsible and the parents and the people who live in this communities need to get out into the streets and take them back. Blocking an expressway does nothing, other than remind us all of how poorly the problem of violence is being addressed. Ray Hanania is an award-winning former Chicago City Hall reporter and political columnist. Reach him on his website at  www.Hanania.com  or email him at  rghanania@gmail.com

or to fit in when moving to a new school or town; to gain confidence or lose inhibitions. As kids get older and alcohol and drugs enter the picture, parents are faced with a unique set of challenges. Parents often forgive underage drinking as a “rite of passage.” They can simply sit back and hope their kids will “get through it.” Parents can and should change their attitude and take an active role in learning about alcohol and drugs — and help their kids to do the same. It is important to take advantage of “teachable moments” when parents and other adults can help kids learn about underage drinking and drug use. It’s more than having “the big talk” one time but about being there for them when the issues come up — on TV, at the movies, on the radio; about celebrities or sports figures, or about their friends. According to the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, here are some guidelines that can help parents talk about alcohol and drug use:

Listen before you talk. For kids, knowing that someone is really listening is most important. Ask open-ended questions. Be involved. Be honest and open. Be positive. Talking about these issues can build bridges rather than walls. And remember, addiction is a chronic, progressive disease that can be linked to family history and genetics. So, if you there is a family history of problems be matter of fact about it, as one would be with any other chronic disease, such as heart disease, diabetes or cancer. “Alcohol and drug use is a very risky business for young people,” says Andrew Pucher, President and Chief Executive Officer of NCADD, “and parents can make a difference. The longer children delay drinking and drug use, the less likely they are to develop problems associated with it. That’s why it is so important to help your child make smart decisions about alcohol and drug use.” In fostering “changing attitudes,” parents can help kids

understand that drinking isn’t a “rite of passage.” It’s not a way to feel or be independent, “cool,” or to fit in socially. Young people can learn that alcohol is not necessary for having a good time. Non-use of alcohol is a healthy and viable option and we can learn to respect another person’s decision not to drink alcohol. Additionally, I urge local businesses, community organizations, colleges, schools, administrators, and government agencies to get involved in these activities. It can make a tremendous difference in our community as we reach out to those who are most vulnerable and help our next generation avoid the many problems that underage alcohol and drug use can bring. Cynthia Frymark is president of the Coalition for a Drug free Lyons Township. Find the Coalition online at www. drugfreelyonstownship.org and on Facebook by using the keyword CoalitionForDFLT. For more information about Alcohol Awareness Month, contact NCADD or one of its local affiliates at  www.ncadd.org

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BUSINESS

The Regional News

FINANCIAL FOCUS

Thursday, July 12, 2018

5

Help protect vulnerable family members from financial scam artists If you have older family members whose cognitive functions or decision-making abilities have declined, or who are lonely or recently widowed, you might need to help protect them against financial scams. What steps should you take? First of all, try to gain a good sense of their overall financial activity. Look for red flags, such as a reluctance to discuss money matters, consistently unpaid bills, unexplained withdrawals, mysterious wire transfers or a sudden need to purchase large quantities of gift cards. And watch out for new “best friends” or caretakers who show an unusual interest in your loved one’s finances.

Matthew Van Howe Edward Jones

Whether or not you’ve observed any of these activities, you can help your elderly family members by making these moves: • Have checks (such as Social Security payments) directly deposited. You can help your family members avoid a lot of potential trouble by having their checks deposited directly into their bank accounts. • Seek permission to become a

joint account owner. By becoming a joint account owner on your elderly family members’ checking and savings accounts, you can review statements for suspicious activity. Of course, your loved ones may be initially reluctant to add your name, but if you have a good relationship with them, you should be able to explain the benefits. • Shred bank statements, credit card offers and notices of lottery or sweepstakes winnings. One of the most useful gifts you can give to your elderly family members may be a shredder. Encourage them to use it to shred old bank statements, credit card offers and other financial documents.

• Get on a “do not call” list. Telephone scammers are persistent and devious. By registering your family members’ house and cell phones at www.donotcall.gov, you may be able to reduce their exposure to unwanted calls. • Obtain power of attorney. By creating a power of attorney, your loved ones can designate you or another trusted relative or friend to assist with their finances now – for day-to-day assistance and protection from scammers — and later, should they become incapacitated. Again, you will need to employ some sensitivity when discussing this issue. • Check references of caretakers. As mentioned above, some care-

COMINGS & GOINGS

takers are, unfortunately, dishonest. Before you hire one, check out this person’s references. And even when you do, be careful — scam artists have been known to use accomplices as references, so you will need to be thorough in your research and questions. • Get to know your family members’ financial advisors. If possible, become acquainted with your older family members’ financial advisors. Any reputable advisor will welcome a connection with their clients’ loved ones. And if you are involved in any estate plans, this multi-generational relationship will prove beneficial for everyone. • Ask to meet any new “friends”

Supplied photos

Left: The lounge area at Top Chef Quickfire at Toyota Park in Bridgeview. Right: Spectra chefs show off some of the new menu items available at Top Chef Quickfire concession stand at Toyota Park in Bridgeview.

‘Top Chef’ concession stand opens at Toyota Park

Jiffy Lube closes in Palos Heights The Jiffy Lube auto shop at 12861 S. Harlem Ave. in Palos Heights closed last month. There is a sign on the building directing customers to a Jiffy Lube location at 5401 W. 159th St. in Oak Forest.

Chicago Ridge Mall offers Holiday Pop-Up Battle Robin Wilson won the first Battle of the Pop-Up at Chicago Ridge Mall and opened her custom hair business Le’ Tresses in June, which has been well-received by the community. The response to the first challenge has inspired Chicago Ridge Mall to offer a second Pop-Up Battle for the upcoming holiday season. “We’re excited to announce a second Battle of the Pop-Up for the holiday season,” said Sandy

Midway-area bakery to close for vacation

BOB BONG Martinez, Chicago Ridge Mall’s marketing director. “There has been a lot of community support for our local tenants and we are thrilled to add a holiday contest and look forward to seeing the ideas.” The Battle of the Pop-Up Challenge asks area entrepreneurs to submit plans and concepts for fresh, innovative ideas, now through Friday, July 20.  The winner receives a rent-free space for six months, use of existing store fixtures, and free utilities. The winner also receives a $500 merchandising package from the center that includes interior signage, table-printed displays, and graphic design services. To enter, participants must be prepared to obtain a business license by Oct. 16 and operate their store during mall hours from Thursday, Nov. 1, through Saturday, April 30, 2019. Entries will be judged on business strategy, concept creativity and likelihood of profitability, among other criteria. There is no cost to enter. Applicants can enter on the Chicago Ridge Mall website or drop off an entry at the mall management office. For complete rules, visit the mall’s Facebook pages. Winners will be notified the week of Aug. 15. Louis Joliet Mall in Joliet, The Promenade Mall in Bolingbrook and Southlake Mall in Hobart, Ind., are also holding their own Holiday Battle of the Pop-Up challenges. Information can be found on their Facebook pages.

It’s vacation time at Pticek’s Bakery, 5523 S. Narragansett Ave. The bakery will be closed from Sunday, July 15, to Tuesday, Aug. 14, for its annual summer vacation break.

Fifth Third finally opening in Bridgeview Fifth Third Bank is finally ready to open its branch at 7200 W. 87th St. in Bridgeview. The building has been unused since it was remodeled more than four years ago. The Cincinnati-based financial announced late last month that the Bridgeview building was one of seven new financial centers that were being opened in Florida, Michigan and Illinois. “We are pleased to add these new locations to our existing financial center networks in Florida, Illinois and Michigan,” Phil McHugh, head of Fifth Third’s Consumer Bank said in a release. “Our consultative approach allows our staff to identify the needs of our customers and then propose solutions to those needs. These centers will offer a full range of banking, home-ownership and retirement-planning services.” The new financial centers represent a key part of Fifth Third’s growth strategy, even as its digital transactions are growing. Financial centers offer consultations and expertise from financial experts. “Our financial centers are an important part of delivering the best experience to our customers,” Mike Butera, head of Fifth Third’s retail banking business, said in a release. “We want to give our customers the right balance between digital and personal. Think about wanting to check your account balance on your app, deposit a check through your phone, get cash from the ATM

Mortgage Rates Around the Area First Midwest Bank (as of July 9) 30-year fixed 15-year fixed 30-year fixed Jumbo

RATES APR POINTS 4.500 4.045 0 4.000 4.055 0 4.500 4.555 0

United Trust Bank (as of July 9) 30-year fixed 15-year fixed 10-year fixed

RATES APR POINTS 4.625 4.647 0 4.125 4.162 0 4.250 4.304 0

Prospect Savings Bank (as of July 10) 30-year fixed 20-year fixed 15-year fixed

This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

AREA PROPERTY TRANSFERS Following are the property transfers in the area, according to the latest report, as received from the Cook County Recorder of Deeds Office. The Regional News does not attempt to correct errors made by that office.

Bravo Media and Spectra, the new venue manager at Toyota Park, have launched a new kind of concession stand at the stadium in Bridgeview that offers soccer fans more than hot dogs and nachos. Top Chef Quickfire, named after the Bravo network’s hit culinary competition show, opened June 30 and features a menu inspired by winning creations from the show’s past contestants including season 15 winner Joe Flamm from Spiaggia and former Chicago chefs Radhika Desai and Dale Talde. Other chefs slated to contribute dishes to the rotating menu include Carrie Baird, Chris Scott, Spike Mendelsohn, Tre Wilcox, Cliff Crooks, and Harold Dieterle. Bravo described it as the first-ever premium concession stand concept. “Our community loves its food as much as its sports,” Bridgeview Mayor Steve Landek said. “’Top Chef’ opening its first fast-casual concept at Toyota Park in Bridgeview will delight soccer fans and foodies alike.” Scott Swiger, Spectra’s Vice President, Culinary Excellence, said, “We decided on a Top Chef Quickfire concept because it makes high-end cuisine approachable for fans to enjoy, while enhancing the experience of going to a soccer game. Spectra is an industry innovator, so we’re excited to be partnering with ‘Top Chef’ to bring their culinary artistry from television and put it in the hands of their fans. They’ll get an actual taste of what they’ve been seeing on-screen for 15 seasons now.” Top Chef Quickfire will be open during home games for the Chicago Fire and Chicago Red Stars soccer teams and other major events. Both Bravo and Spectra are divisions of Comcast.

they have met online. When someone is lonely, they become vulnerable to online friendships. Sometimes, these new friends make promises of meeting, but never show — and then they suddenly need money for one reason or another. It can be challenging to guard against all threats posed by the scammers of the world. But by staying alert and taking the appropriate preventive actions, you may be able to help safeguard your loved ones’ financial security.

RATES APR POINTS 4.500 4.617 0 4.250 4.410 0 3.875 4.077 0

All rates subject to change daily. Equal opportunity lenders.

and stop at a financial center to talk about a home equity line.” If you see a new business in town or wonder what happened to an old favorite, drop me a line at bobbong@hotmail.com. You can track business openings and closings at  http://bobbongonbusiness.com/

Orland Park Meyers Christine to Woulfe Therese M, 7646 158th Ct, Unit #7646, $180,000.00; Walsh Dennis G to Cabral Paul C, 14349 Wooded Path Ln, $400,000.00; Deutsche Bk Natl Trust Co Tr to Max Remodelers Inc, 15159 Hilltop Ct, $140,000.00; Wyatt George Tr to Vazquez Jacalyn A, 14158 Cristina Ave, $335,000.00; Mandujano Antonio to Karadsheh Mazin, 9230 Whitehall Ln, Unit #53A, $168,500.00; Young Thomas E Tr to Martin Lisa A, 17731 Bernard Dr, Unit #1A, $165,000.00; Petraucosta Karen T Tr to Siepak Rick, 14236 Margerita Ave, $225,000.00; First Midwest Bk Tr to Patel Arvindkumar M, 10735 Nevada Ct, Unit #47, $185,000.00; Marquette Bk Tr to Chicago Title Land Trust Co Tr, 15311 Aster St, Unit #99, $133,000.00; Jablecki Howard C to Musleh Jehan, 11663 Glenview Dr, $305,000.00; Marquette Bk Tr to Pisanko Albert, 14563 West Ave, $214,000.00; Milosheski Mitko to Christie

Breanne M, 15710 Orlan Brook DrUnit #157, $159,000.00; Sierakowski Graziella Adm to Peralta Mario, 9404 166th Ct, Unit #9404, $194,500.00; Walz James to Atra Mohammad J, 9326 Waterford Ln, Unit #A, $155,000.00; Lococo Charles D to Gniadek Mark, 14219 Margerita Ave, $280,000.00; Moore Regina M to Camp Nathan T, 15156 Royal Georgian Rd, $285,000.00; Lombardi Luigi to Alyaqoobi Yousif, 9101 Wheeler Dr, $320,000.00; Dill Gerald to Esparza Maria I, 14566 Golf Rd, $430,000.00. Palos Heights Doherty Kathleen to Yager Jacob, 13218 Westview Dr, Unit #132182A, $147,000.00; Oaklawn Prop Llc to Masud Sana J, 128 Augusta Dr, $395,000.00; White Rosalie to Talw Prop Llc, 12634 London Ln, Unit #2, $125,000.00. Palos Park Kepka Alan G Tr to Basch Wayne A, 11 McCord Trace, $375,000.00; Gilbert Marjory A Tr to Schulte James, 12329 Seminole Rd, $400,000.00; Hinkes David T to Robinson Claire, 12116 93rd Ave, $165,000.00; Patricoski Thomas S Tr to Leggett Dennis L, 12210 S 86th Ave, $510,000.00.


6 Thursday, July 12, 2018

The Regional News

DEATH NOTICES Pearl M. Beukinga

Pearl M. Beukinga (nee TerMaat), 89, died July 5. Mrs. Beukinga, formerly of Palos Heights, was a resident of Palos Park at the time of her death. She worked as a secretary Pearl M. Beukinga for a doctor’s office. Survivors include Mrs. Beukinga’s daugh-

ters, Debra Boomsma and Cheryl Windau; son, Rudy Jr.; sister, Beatrice Grysen; eight grandchildren; 11 great-grandchildren and many nieces and nephews. Services were Tuesday at Colonial Chapel in Orland Park. Interment took place at Fairmount-Willow Hills Memorial Park.

John W. ‘Jack’ Walsh

John W. “Jack” Walsh, 86, died July 6. Mr. Walsh had been living in

Palos Park. He was a U.S. Army Korean War veteran and a lieutenant with the Chicago Department of Aviation. Survivors include his sons, John Jr. and Steve; daughters, Kathleen Chavez, Sue Healy and Kelly Tandyk; 17 grandchildren; 16 great-grandchildren and many nieces and nephews. Services were Monday from Thornridge Funeral Home in Orland Park to Our Lady of The Woods Church. Interment was at Holy Sepulchre Cemetery.

PICK OF THE LITTER

Medicine can treat asthma in cats JOHN FLEMING DVM • Prairie StateVet.com

Dear Dr. Fleming, I have a 9-year old Siamese cat, Boots, who has been coughing for the past three years. I finally took him to a vet who suspected he has asthma. The vet went over a number of possibilities for the coughing and outlined all of tests we would need to do to confirm the diagnosis. I never realized there were so many causes of cough. I told her that I did not want to do any tests and asked if we could just try to treat possible asthma first, which my vet agreed to. Ever since the vet gave a long-acting steroid injection (she recommended pills but Boot’s other name is Satan when it comes to giving medicine) my cat stopped coughing within 48 hours. It is like a miracle. Can you tell me more about asthma in cats? Jean, Worth Jean, Congratulations on taking Boots in for treatment after watching him cough for three years. There is an elegant article in last month’s Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association about how we need to redefine, as a profession, what should be considered the “Standard of Care (SOC) in Veterinary Medicine.” Standard of Care essentially represents the minimum acceptable level of care. We can offer so much high-tech care for pets nowadays. As the author notes, “There is increasing recognition that in veterinary medicine, the SOC, rather than representing a single baseline for the minimum-accepted level of care, should instead [now] reflect a continuum of acceptable care that takes into account available evidence-based medicine, client expectations of care, and financial limitations that may limit diagnostic and treatment options. “Because animals are considered property (like a lawnmower) in the eyes of the law, and owners are generally entitled to decide how much or how little to spend on their pet’s care, veterinarians are all too often faced with ill or injured pets whose owners essentially dictate what the standard of care is going to be. “Faced with a choice between

Meet Murphy, Megan and Penelope from Palos Heights. Murphy is a grand 7-year old Labrador Retriever and is very affectionate to his family. Just take a look!

providing what might be considered substandard care and providing no care, vets will typically default to providing some care even if they know better options exist. Legally, veterinarians cannot provide care that falls below SOC, but in reality, veterinarians commonly do so because of client’s decisions.” Your care of Boots once again confirms to me what I consider to be the standard of care and that is, in my world, the SOC is equal to, but never greater than, what a client is willing to do for his or her own pet. Incidentally, you also here remind us of Veterinary Truism No. 2 which says “Cats Can’t Be Medicated.” Feline asthma is a recurring respiratory compromise featuring constriction of the lung’s airways. First, excess mucous forms, then the airway walls swell with inflammation and finally the airway walls muscles go into spasm which results in the constrictions of the airways. When the airways are constricted the cat cannot draw in a deep breath. The cat coughs, is intolerant of exercise and wheezes. Sometimes the only apparent sign is a chronic, low-grade cough like Boots has had. This problem can occur spontaneously or as a result of an allergy to something. Because of the constricted airways the volume of air the cat can move is reduced. Often there is a great deal of effort seen in the cat’s breathing. The abdomen appears to be working to push air out and the breaths are rapid and

shallow. Some cats breathe with their mouths open. After seeing the above signs the next step is chest radiographs. However, even with X-Rays, the diagnosis can be complicated and asthma is famously over-diagnosed on radiographs. Procedures that can retrieve cells from the lower respiratory tract may be helpful if asthma is suspect but the radiographs are normal. Such procedures include bronchoscopy and a tracheal wash under anesthesia. One important feature of feline asthma is that the airway constriction is reversible. In an emergency situation a small dose of epinephrine can reverse the crisis in as little as 15 minutes. Response to long-acting steroids like Depo-Medrol usually yields a positive response in a day or two. Sometimes diagnostic tests leave room for question and one simply has to go with medical treatment and regard the response to therapy (RRT) as best-evidence that the diagnosis is correct. Treatment options include long-acting steroid injections, oral steroids and steroid inhalers, of which Flovent is the most popular. Cats are generally started on a combination of oral steroids and the metered dose inhaler. The animal is then gradually weaned over the inhaler only. If you would like to see the inhaler used in cats look at www.aerokat.com. I would maintain that thanks are the highest form of thought, and that gratitude is happiness doubled by wonder. — G. K. Chesterton

Orland Park student dons ‘white coat’ to begin med school rotations Andrew Villasenor of Orland Park received a white coat at the White Coat Ceremony at Lincoln Memorial University-DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine (LMU-DCOM) in Harrogate, Tennessee, on June 16. The special White Coat Ceremony at LMU-DCOM marks a student’s entrance into the clinical rotations of their medical school training. Villasenor is beginning his third-year as an osteopathic medical student at LMU-DCOM. He received an undergraduate degree from Illinois Wesleyan Universi-

ty and will start clinical rotations this fall. The first White Coat Ceremony was held in 1993 at Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons. It is now a standard ritual in institutions of both allopathic and osteopathic medical education across the country. During the ceremony, each medical student is presented and “robed” with his or her short white laboratory coat, formalizing and welcoming the student’s entrance into the study of medicine. The White Coat Ceremony is a time for medical students to hear words of

Answers

Sudoku

Puzzle on Page 7

Puzzle on Page 7

wisdom and encouragement from their mentors, LMU-DCOM explained in a news release. The ceremony provides students an opportunity to reflect on what it means to become a physician and to reaffirm their commitment to becoming physicians.

Fr. Hicks from St. Elizabeth Seton to be ordained aux. bishop Rev. Ronald A. Hicks, former associate pastor at St. Elizabeth Seton Parish in Orland Hills, is among three new auxiliary bishops named by the Archdiocese of Chicago. Hicks served at St. Elizabeth Seton from 1996 to 1999. A native of Harvey, Illinois, he was born on August 4, 1967 to Ron and Roselee Hicks. Hicks grew up in South Holland and attended St. Jude the Apostle Parish and elementary school there.  He graduated from Quigley Seminary South in Chicago in 1985 and received his Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy from Niles College of Loyola University Chicago in 1989. He also received his Master of Divinity degree in 1994 and his Doctor of Ministry degree in 2003, both from the University of St. Mary of the Lake in Mundelein. Hicks was ordained a priest for the Archdiocese of Chicago by Cardinal Joseph Bernardin on May 21, 1994. Before serving at St. Elizabeth Seton, he was an associate pastor at Our Lady of Mercy Parish in Chicago from 1994 to 1996. After his time at St. Elizabeth Seton, he lived and ministered at St. Joseph College Seminary in Chicago as the Dean of For-

mation until 2005. In July of that year, with permission from Cardinal Francis George, Fr. Hicks moved to El Salvador to begin his five-year term as Regional Director of Nuestros Pequeño Hermanos (NPH) in Central America. NPH cares for more than 3,400 orphaned and abandoned children in nine countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. From 2010 to 2014, Hicks served as the Dean of Formation at Mundelein Seminary. During that time, he also assisted with weekend masses at St. Jerome Parish in Rogers Park.

Hicks was appointed Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Chicago by Cardinal Cupich on January 1, 2015. Since then, it has been his practice to celebrate mass in a different parish in the Archdiocese each weekend. The other new auxiliary bishops are Rev. George J. Rassas and Rev. Francis J. Kane. The Episcopal Ordination of the bishops-elect will take place at Holy Name Cathedral in Chicago on September 17.  Bishop-elect Hicks will remain in his role as Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Chicago.

LEGAL NOTICE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations for Cook County, Illinois and Incorporated Areas The Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency has issued a preliminary Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM), and where applicable, Flood Insurance Study (FIS) report, reflecting proposed flood hazard determinations within Cook County, Illinois and Incorporated Areas. These flood hazard determinations may include the addition or modification of Base Flood Elevations, base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard Area boundaries or zone designations, or the regulatory floodway. Technical information or comments are solicited on the proposed flood hazard determinations shown on the preliminary FIRM and/or FIS report for Cook County, Illinois and Incorporated Areas. These flood hazard determinations are the basis for the floodplain management measures that your community is required to either adopt or show evidence of being already in effect in order to qualify or remain qualified for participation in the National Flood Insurance Program. However, before these determinations are effective for floodplain management purposes, you will be provided an opportunity to appeal the proposed information. For information on the statutory 90-day period provided for appeals, as well as a complete listing of the communities affected and the locations where copies of the FIRM are available for review, please visit FEMA’s website at www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/fhm/bfe, or call the FEMA Map Information eXchange (FMIX) toll free at 1-877-FEMA-MAP (1-877-3362627).


The Regional News

Thursday, July 12, 2018

COMMUNITY NOTES McDermed workshop will help with U.S.  citizenship application State Rep. Margo McDermed (R-37th) is hosting a workshop to help with the application process for becoming a U.S. citizen. McDermed represents a portion of Orland Park. All district residents are welcome to attend the workshop, which will be held at 10 a.m. July 14 at the New Lenox Public Library, 120 Veterans Pkwy. The workshop is being held in conjunction with the Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights and its partners. Volunteers from various organizations will be on hand to help assist applicants in completing the necessary forms and documents.  To be eligible for citizenship, and individual must be a legal, permanent resident of the United States for at least five years, or if married to a U.S. citizen, a legal, permanent resident for three years. Applicants should bring required documents with them to

LIBRARY NOTES Tour the world with Palos Hts. Library program Note: The library will close early at 5 p.m. July 19th. Architectural Tour of the World, Tuesday, July 17, 6:30 p.m. Buckle up and get ready for a tour around the globe with international traveler Jasmine Blaze as played by Educational Entertainer Martina Mathisen and learn about the architectural wonders from around the world. Tuesday Evening Book Discussion July 17, 7 p.m. Join us for a discussion of the novel “Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine” by Gail Honeyman. Copies of the book are available at the Front Desk. New members always welcome.  Book & Film, July 19, 2 p.m. Join us for a brief discussion and then watch the movie based on the book. All participants will be entered into a drawing to win a paperback copy of the book. The film “Wonder,” based on the book by R.J. Palacio, will be shown. Runtime is 113 minutes. The following clubs meet each Tuesday at the library: Needle Club (for knitting and crocheting) 10 a.m. – noon; Scrabble Club, 1-3 p.m. and Mah Jongg, 1-4 p.m. Space will be limited. Please call to register. More information can be obtained by calling the library at (708) 448-1473 or visiting www. palosheightslibrary.org. The Palos Heights Public Library is located at 12501 S. 71st Ave.

Plenty for kids to do at Palos Heights Library Reading Takes You Everywhere us currently running through July 28. It’s open to all ages. Have you ever wanted to visit Hogwarts, fly to Neverland with Peter Pan or explore Willy Wonka’s Chocolate Factory? Now’s your chance. Sign up for summer reading and visit the Youth and Teen Services Department where they will transform the library into places from your favorite books. Here’s How It Works Visit the Youth and Teen Services Department through July 28 to register for the Summer Reading program. Start reading. Choose anything you like—fiction, nonfiction, audiobooks, graphic novels, magazines, newspapers—because everything counts. When you are halfway done, bring your reading log to the Youth and Teen Services Department to pick up prizes. Complete your entire reading log and return it to the Youth Services Desk before 5 p.m. on July 28 to pick out a free book. Movie Mondays are being offered from noon to 2 p.m. through July 23. All ages are welcome. On July 16 – Dr. Seuss’ “How the Grinch Stole Christmas” (Rated: PG) will be screened. Checkmate! It’s matches of chess held at 6 p.m. Mondays through July 23, open to all ages. 6 pm, Story Book Walk at Lake Katherine through July 28. Families can explore the trail and read “Duncan the Story Dragon” by Amanda Driscoll. Weather permitting, the book will be displayed for 4 weeks. Laser Comedy Show will be held at 10 a.m. tomorrow, July 13, open to all ages. Performing artist Chris Fair will use Laser Reactive Technology to draw characters and scenery like a live comic book on a glow-in-the-dark screen, which the lines fade in moments like a high-tech Etch A Sketch. Lego Builders for all ages will be offered at 11 a.m. July 14. A Butterfly Release Extravagan-

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

the workshop. These items are listed at McDermed’s website, www.repmcdermed.com. More information can be obtained by calling her office at (815) 2772079.

suggests that residents wishing to appeal should check with the township receptionist at (708) 3712900 before coming. Peak periods have resulted in a wait in excess of one hour.

Worth Twp. homeowners have until July 18 to appeal taxes

Hospitality Expo coming to Orland Park

The deadline for Worth Township homeowners to appeal their residential property taxes is July 18 at township offices, 11601 S. Pulaski Rd., Alsip. Worth Township covers the eastern portion of Palos Heights, which can be generally described as east of Harlem Avenue. The township also covers Alsip, Blue Island, Bridgeview, Chicago Ridge, Crestwood, Evergreen Park, Hometown, Merrionette Park, Oak Lawn, Robbins (north quarter) and Worth (east of Harlem). The Worth Township assessor’s office is open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.  Assessor Shaun C. Murphy

za will take place at 1 p.m. July 17 for kids of all ages. Celebrate butterflies being released with stories, crafts, games and face painting. Weather permitting. Good Night Baby, July 17, 6 p.m., and July 17, 10 a.m., for ages 0-18 months. Seuss Snacks Creations will be held on July 18, 2 pm, grades K-3. Seuss Scavenger Hunt will be offered July 18, 4 p.m., grades 6-12 “Who Yourself” July 19, 2 p.m., grades 4-5. Turn yourself into one of Dr. Seuss’s wacky characters. The library will provide make-up and hair supplies to help you transform from a library patron to a silly someone who would fit perfectly in one of Dr. Seuss’s zany tales. Farmer’s Market Story Times first and third Wednesday each month at 10 a.m. Enjoy outdoor stories and crafts at the Palos Heights Farmer’s Market, located at 12217 S. Harlem Ave. The library will close early at 5 p.m. on July 19. More information can be obtained by calling the library at (708) 448-1473 or visiting www. palosheightslibrary.org. The Palos Heights Public Library is located at 12501 S. 71st Ave.

Orland Library schedules two-dozen activities A wide variety of programs have been announced at the Orland Park Public Library, 14921 S. Ravinia Ave. For more information, or to register for any activities that require it, call (708) 428-5100 or visit www.orlandparklibrary.org Microsoft Word Part 1 – July 12 at 11:30 a.m. Adults will learn to create and save documents. Prerequisite: Mouse skills Intro to iPad 2 – July 12 at 6 p.m. Adults, bring your iPad and learn how to customize your settings and use applications. Night Owl Storytime – July 12 at 6:30 p.m. Children birth-47 months with a parent or adult caregiver. Come hear stories and songs to end the day on a happy note. Romance Book Discussion – July 12 at 7 p.m. Adults, please join us as we discuss “I, Eliza Hamilton” by Susan Holloway Scott. Storytime Takes You Everywhere – July 13 at 10 a.m. Children of all ages with an adult parent or caregiver. Join us in the summer sunshine as we take storytime outside! Meet us at a new location in Orland Park each week. This week we will be at Schussler Park, 14609 Poplar Rd. In the event of rain, storytime will be relocated to the library plaza. Microsoft PowerPoint Part 2 – July 13 at 11:30 a.m. Adults will learn about other options. Prerequisite: PowerPoint Part 1. Uno, Dos, Crafts & More! – July 13 at 6:30 p.m. Children ages 3 and up with an adult parent or caregiver. One story and a few activities is all it takes to learn our Spanish word of the week! Join this hands-on program to explore a new language through crafts, songs, games and more. Un cuento y un par de actividades es todo lo que necesitas para aprender nuestra palabra de la semana en Español! Únete a este didáctico programa para explorar el idioma a través de manualidades, canciones, juegos y mas. Meet the Artist: James Bowden – July 13 at 7 p.m. Two- and three-dimensional works of art using sturdy carved wooden blocks alongside bright colors and abstract lines. DIY Drop-In: Smorgasbord! – July 13 at 7 p.m. Adults, miss one of our crafting opportunities? We’ve got you covered by revisiting some past craft activities. All supplies provided. No registration required but space is limited — priority is given to OPPL cardholders.

7

The Chicago Southwest Hospitality EXPO will take place from 3 to 7 p.m. on Tuesday, July 24th at the Orland Park Civic Center, 14750 S. Ravinia Ave. More than 50 exhibitors will be available at the expo, which is designed to aid those planning events such as corporate meetings, luncheons, golf outings or holiday parties. Complimentary food and drinks from area restaurants and venues will be offered, as well as raffle prizes. There is no admission charge to the event, but registration is required. Registration information may be obtained at www.orlandparkchamber.org

Bright Starts Family Storytime – July 14 at 10 a.m. Children of all ages and their families. Start your weekend off right. Bring the family together for stories, songs and fun. BINGO! – July 14 at 2 p.m. Adults, join us for coffee and bingo in the afternoon! Registration not required, space is limited. Summer Concert Series - Moraine Valley Community College Jazz Band – July 15 at 2 p.m. Join us for Moraine Valley’s Jazz Band as they explore a wide range of styles from the classic swing of Duke Ellington and Count Basie to soulful blues, burning Latin-Jazz and gritty funk. Also featured will be contemporary works by Fitzgerald and Frank Sinatra.  Community Helper Storytime – July 16 at 10 a.m. Children of all ages with an adult parent or caregiver. Join us for storytimes about the helpers in your neighborhood. Each week we will have a special guest from our community! Weiss Financial Ratings & Reference USA Business – July 16 at 6 p.m. Learn how to use powerful new tools to protect your finances, invest wisely, grow your wealth, and learn more about your finances with Weiss Financial Ratings. Find useful data on virtually any publicly held business with Reference USA Business. No registration required but space is limited — priority given to OPPL cardholders. Adult Book Discussion – July 17 at 10 a.m. Adults, join us as we read “Roanoke Girls” by Amy Engel. Once Upon A Time Family Storytime – July 17 at 10 a.m. Children of all ages, drop in for stories, music, and finger-plays to build pre-reading skills. Librarians make each experience unique.  Is Cloud Storage Right For Me? – July 17 at 6 p.m. Cloud storage allows you to store and share data over the internet, from innumerable access points and devices. Gain a better understanding and learn how to use cloud storage services including OneDrive, Dropbox, iCloud, and Google Drive.   eBooks, eMagazines, eReaders, Oh My! – July 17 at 6 p.m. Adults have too many devices to learn? Can’t remember what app you need? Drop by the Adult Services reference desk for a one-on-one lesson with an available librarian. Please be sure to bring your device(s) with you and have your account log-in information on hand so we can best assist you.   Hooray For Bollywood - Let’s Dance – July 17 at 7 p.m. Join us to enjoy the beauty of the Indian Dance and Indian Music through an interactive Bollywood Dance workshop by the local dance guru “DEEPTHI CHIRUVURI” from Bolly Dancefit. Building Blocks for Babies – July 18 at 9:30 a.m. or 10:30 a.m. Children ages birth-23 months with a parent or caregiver. Spend time interacting with your baby during this storytime especially designed for our youngest audience.  The Great Worm Race  – July 18 at 1 p.m. Children 3 years old through 5th grade with a parent or caregiver. On your mark, get set, go! Pick a worm (provided by the library) and watch it race towards the finish. Bitcoin And Beyond: Making Sense of Cryptocurrency – July 18 at 6 p.m. Bitcoin has been buzzed about for years now, but what is it? How does it achieve its value? And what does the future look like for Cryptocurrencies in general? Have these and many more questions answered at this informational session. Mystery Book Discussion – July 18 at 7 p.m. Adults, join us as we discuss “In the Woods” by Tana French.​

ACROSS 1. Begetter 6. Arrived extinct 9. Lacking the power to hear 13. Epic 14. Aboriginal Japanese 15. Jar used for cooking 16. British nobleman 17. Smart 18. Israeli stateswoman 19. Outer space matter that reaches the ground 21. Instrument 22. Infections 23. Holiday (informal) 24. Spanish be 25. Not even 28. Chewie’s friend Solo 29. Garments 31. Geological times 33. Music City 36. Cubes 38. Important Chinese principle 39. Closes tightly 41. Forms a boundary 44. Knife 45. Plants of the lily family 46. A turn around the track 48. Midway between northeast and east 49. Type of degree 51. Midway between north and northwest 52. Profession 54. Musical note patterns 56. Deeply cuts 60. Muharraq Island town 61. Emaciation 62. Weaver bird 63. One point east of northeast 64. Scherzer and Kershaw are two 65. Rice dish 66. Nasdaq code 67. Danish krone 68. Enzyme DOWN 1. Carpe __ 2. Wings

3. Loose soil 4. Earnhardt and Jarrett are two 5. 3 feet 6. Fasts 7. Erstwhile 8. Diving seabird 9. Houses 10. Ancient Greek City 11. Type of skirt 12. Greek village 14. Estranges 17. Scottish island 20. Express delight 21. Cosmopolitan city 23. Letter of Hebrew alphabet 25. Largest English dictionary (abbr.) 26. Flow 27. Shoal-forming fishes 29. Footwear parts 30. Schedule of events 32. Songs to one’s sweetheart

34. Test for high schoolers 35. Enthusiasm 37. Streets have them 40. One point east of due south 42. Cut the grass 43. Rattling breaths 47. For each 49. Marketing term 50. One who challenges 52. Sword 53. Polio vaccine developer 55. Film version of “Waterloo Bridge” 56. Want 57. Rhythmic pattern in Indian music 58. Young hawk 59. Harmless 61. Small amount 65. Palladium (Answers on page 6)

SUDOKU

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle! (Answers on page 6)

STUDENT NEWS Moraine Valley releases academic achievement lists Moraine Valley Community College has released the students named to its Dean’s List, President’s List and Part-time Student Scholastic Achievement List for the spring 2018 semester. Students are listed by the town in which they live. Qualification for the President’s List is a semester grade point average of 3.75 to 4.00. Visit morainevalley.edu/president18 to view this list. Qualification for the Dean’s List is a semester grade point average of 3.50 to 3.749. Visit morainevalley. edu/dean18 to view this list. Part-time students on the Scholastic Achievement List have a cumulative grade point average of 3.5 or higher, 24 or more credit hours earned and at least a 3.5 grade point average for the semester the distinction is received. Qualified students must earn three to eight credit hours during the semester the distinction is received. Visit morainevalley.edu/parttime18 to view this list.

Area athletes recognized for academics Matthew O’Dea of Orland Park was among 66 Western New England University student athletes honored recently as the Commonwealth Coast Conference (CCC) announced its Spring Academic All-Conference Team. In order to be recognized as a member of the Spring Academic All-Conference Team a student-athlete must have a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.3 (on a 4.0 scale) and must have also attained sophomore status. O’Dea is working toward a degree in Psychology. Orland Park resident Molly Traverso is among student-athletes at John Carroll University, University Heights, Ohio, who have earned a cumulative grade point average of 3.25 or higher while participating in sports, service, and various campus groups and activities. Traverso is a varsity tennis player at the school.

Photo by Joe Boyle

WHATIZIT?

The clue for this week’s Whatizit (above) is: Not round. We had a few readers who knew that last week’s photo quiz was none other than St. Catherine of Alexandria School, 10621 S. Kedvale Ave., Oak Lawn. We would have also accepted St. Catherine of Alexandria Church. The first person to answer correctly was Rich Rahn, of Evergreen Park. He mentioned both church and school at the Kedvale Avenue location. Oak Lawn resident Steve Rosenbaum also mentioned St. Catherine is the home of the “Chargers.” Palos Park resident Ron Wagenhofer also knew it was St. Catherine of Alexandria Parish. St. Catherine of Alexandria School is a pre-kindergarten through eighth grade facility. The school enrollment is over 460. The school offers band, violin lessons, before and after school care programs, scouting, children’s choir, voice lessons and sports activities.

Residential Loans Made Easy Financing the home of your dreams should be a pain-free process. We’re here to walk you through every step! We offer the following programs for residential mortgages: • Fixed Rate Loans • Adjustable Rate Loans

• Balloon Loans • Interest Only Loans

Contact John Hyland, President; or Robert Hoholik today!

12330 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463 (708) 728-9900 • Fax (708) 728-9270 • UTBHome.com


8 Thursday, July 12, 2018

Kidney Transplant Transport Pod

The Regional News

Used to transport donor kidneys to destination for transplant

Raquel Garcia-Roca, MD Transplant Surgeon

innovation dedication

Where high-tech meets the human touch. By pairing compassionate care with the latest medical technology, Dr. Garcia-Roca can measure the function of donor organs prior to transplantation surgery. The kidney transplant pod allows her to make informed decisions, resulting in the best outcomes for her patients. Just another example of how the exceptional caregivers at Loyola Medicine treat the whole person—body and soul.

#BodyAndSoul Š2018 Loyola Medicine

Find a doctor or convenient location near you at loyolamedicine.org


SPORTS The Regional News • The Reporter

Ken Karrson, SportsSports EditorEditor • sports@regionalpublishing.com Jason Maholy, • sports@regionalpublishing.com

Thursday, July 12, 2018 Thursday, March 5, 2015

Southwest Section Southwest • Section•2, Page 1 2, Page 1

He shoots, he scores

Orland Park native Alex Broadhurst achieves dream of playing in NHL By Jason Maholy Sports Editor

Supplied photo

Former Sandburg wrestler Pat Brucki went 28-10 and qualified for the NCAA Championships during his freshman year at Princeton.

Grappling with adversity A serious knee injury couldn’t stop former Sandburg great Pat Brucki from qualifying for the NCAA tournament in his first year at Princeton Jason Maholy Sports Editor

Pat Brucki described his freshman year at Princeton University as “enlightening.” The Orland Park resident and Sandburg graduate has always embraced soaking in all he can and learning from his experiences, so he was perhaps perfectly suited for the rich opportunities college life offers when he headed to New Jersey last fall. Whether meeting people from all walks of life, opening his mind to different ideas or appreciating simply being a student on a beautiful campus of an historic and prestigious Ivy League school, Brucki tried not to let anything that could help him grow as a person elude him. “I learned so much in so many different areas, just an awesome opportunity,” he said of his first year at Princeton. “I’d been expecting the experience for a long time, but to see that opportunity come to fruition was pretty special. I grew as a person, and that’s

Supplied photo

Pat Brucki, of Orland Park, became only the third freshman wrestler in Princeton history to qualify for the NCAA Championships. Brucki went 1-2 at the tournament.

what’s most important to me.” Brucki, a four-time state qualifying wrestler who won three state medals including a state title, also grew as a grappler. A stellar season that saw him become only the third freshman wrestler in Princeton history to qualify for the NCAA Championships may have ended better had a torn knee ligament late in the year not hobbled him. Brucki won 10 of his first 11 matches en

route to finishing 28-10, and along the way took first place at the Princeton Open and defeated two opponents ranked in the top 10 at 197 pounds. He was ranked as high as 12th nationally, earned second-team AllIvy League honors, and was awarded the Hooker Trophy as the Tigers’ most improved freshman. The success did not come easy, and though Brucki often made winning look effortless while going 94-4 over his final two years of high school, his achievements have always come as the result of hard work and perseverance. College wrestling has merely provided him new mountains to climb, and it was evident from the start he was entering a whole new realm of competition. “You’re going into a new, foreign environment,” he said. “It’s a sport I’ve been doing for the better part of my life, but jumping from one level to another it’s almost a completely new sport, entirely.” Much of Brucki’s focus early on was making the subtle technique changes necessary to compete successfully at the college level. He tried to sponge up the flood of information coming from a staff of coaches trying to help ease his transition from high school to college, so he could get the most out of his abilities. “It’s cool to see, especially over the course See BRUCKI, Page 2

Alex Broadhurst has lived and breathed hockey for the better part of his relatively young life. The Orland Park native first laced up a pair of hockey skates — well, not by himself — when he was 3 years old, and by age 5 he was playing in a Squirt league. At age 16 he left home and moved to Wisconsin to play with the Green Bay Gamblers of the Tier I junior level United States Hockey League. Through every step through junior hockey and the professional ranks, Broadhurst has seemed destined for big things. After a successful first season in Green Bay, during which he scored 13 goals and assisted on 20 more in 55 games, the forward’s hometown Chicago Blackhawks drafted him in the seventh round of the 2011 NHL Entry Draft. He excelled the following season, netting 26 goals and dishing out 47 assists in 53 regular-season game, then had nine goals and nine assists in 12 playoff contests as the Gamblers won the Clark Cup as USHL champions. Four years later he helped the Lake Erie Monsters (now Cleveland) to the Calder Cup, recording 36 points in the regular season and

another 12 points on three goals and nine assists in 17 postseason games. Broadhurst, 25, has seen no shortage of individual or team successes, and he has dressed in hundreds of locker rooms during his hockey career; but it was a surreal experience for him when he walked into the locker room on April 3. There, hanging in his newest locker, was a Columbus Blue Jackets sweater adorned with his last name. Alex Broadhurst had made it to the NHL, and he would be taking the ice that evening against the Detroit Red Wings, one of the league’s storied franchises and a team that, as a lifelong Blackhawks fan, Broadhurst grew up rooting against. “You’ve got your nameplate and jersey, and it’s all hung up when you walk in — that was something special. And you see your number on the board with the (shift) lines. It was an unbelievable feeling. It was definitely something special, something I’ll always remember, for sure.” The realization that Broadhurst was set to make his NHL debut didn’t really hit him until he was suiting up alongside star players See BROADHURST, Page 2

Supplied photo

Alex Broadhurst, of Orland Park, seen here playing in an exhibition game with the Columbus Blue Jackets, made his official NHL debut with Columbus on April 3 in a game against the Detroit Red Wings.

Trendel ready to fly with RedHawks By Jon DePaolis Correspondent

The Marist boys basketball team is coming off a 27-win season and a Class 4A sectional final appearance, so walking into a program that has had coaching stability and much success for the past 18 years could seem like a daunting task. But for new head coach Tim Trendel Trendel the challenge is part of the reason he was attracted to the position. Trendel officially took over the RedHawks boys basketball program last

Marist’s new boys basketball head coach embraces the challenge of leading one of the area’s top programs

month after eight years in the same position at Providence. In Marist, he joins a program led for the past 18 years by Gene Nolan, who is now the head coach at Naperville Central. “We kind of came in eight years ago at Providence and rebuilt it into one of the better programs in the area,” Trendel said. “Now, the scary thing [could be] going into a program that already has got the established reputation for athletics and basketball. But that was something that attracted me — that challenge to

see if I could do it and continue on the successes. “They have had a great, long line of coaches, going back to Ed Molitor, Ken Styler and Gene Nolan. The personal challenge is to see if I can go into a spot that has that reputation and that glamour and [see if] I can do this.” Trendel pointed to the athletic tradition at Marist as another reason he was attracted to the coaching job. He vcalled Marist one of the premier schools in the Chicago area.

“When you’re talking about high school athletics, I think one of the top [athletic] programs in the state — whether it be football, basketball, baseball or any of the sports — [Marist] is right up there,” he said. “And along with everything else they’ve got going on at the school — their academics, the kids, the families. They are on the verge of building a $15 million science wing. “To me, everything about Marist jumps off the page at you.” Trendel will have some familiarity

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with the teams Marist will face in the 2018-19 season. Earlier in his career, he was an assistant coach at St. Patrick High School — also in the East Suburban Catholic Conference. With Trendel being hired comparatively late in the game, the Marist basketball team went ahead with its already-planned summer program under the direction of assistant coaches. Trendel was able to get his first look at the team about two weeks ago, and has thus far liked what he has seen. Expected to return are starting guards Nile Hill and Dorion Pendleton, both of who played significant roles on last year’s team that had Chicago Pubic League powerhouse Simeon on the See TRENDEL, Page 2

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Section 2 Thursday, July 12, 2018

The Regional News - The Reporter

Whitecaps douse Fire comeback

Nikolic’s 32nd goal with Fire not enough in loss to Vancouver From staff reports

The Chicago Fire fell behind by two goals in their match with Vancouver, and a late comeback attempt couldn’t prevent them from dropping their first game in more than a month. The Whitecaps’ Kei Kamara scored twice, including what proved to be the game-winner in the 72nd minute, as the hosts defended their home turf with a 3-2 victory on Saturday, July 7 at BC Place. The loss was the Fire’s first since a May 30 setback to Philadelphia, a stretch that included two wins and three draws in MLS play, along with two victories in the Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup. The Fire entered this week 6-8-5 (23 points). Vancouver is 7-7-5 (26 points). Kamara opened the scoring in the 28th minute when he got on the end of a loose ball in the box and poked it in with his right foot. The Fire equalized in the 42nd minute when Kevin Ellis received a throw-in from Dax McCarty on the right, deep in the Whitecaps’ half. Ellis fought off his defender and drove a low cross to Nemanja Nikolic in front of the goal. With the inside of his right foot, Nikolic redirected the ball into goal to pull Chicago level. The Whitecaps regained the lead in the 47th minute when Jordan Mutch broke through and slotted in a left-footed shot from inside the box. Kamara added to Vancouver’s advantage in the 72nd minute with his finish from close range for the 3-1 lead. Tony Tchani pulled the Fire within one with a right-footed volley in the 81st minute. Diego Campos whipped in a corner from the left that fell to Ellis, who took a short touch to push the ball to Tchani. With his back towards goal, Tchani quickly turned and on the bounce blasted his right-footed shot into the net. Fire head coach Veljko Paunovic took the loss in stride, but knows his squad

Photo courtesy of Chicago Fire/MLS

The Fire’s Aleksandar Katai battles for the ball during a game against Vancouver on Saturday, July 7 at BC Place.

left some plays on the field. “We did well in many occasions, but we obviously didn’t do well in other moments,” Paunovic said. “The Whitecaps have a good team. We matched many times their qualities and we exposed their weaknesses. We were close. I am proud of our team, of the character of playing until the end, and how we adjusted and how we reacted to the goals. Huge credit to the Whitecaps but we could’ve done better with the goals, it’s on us.” Paunovic said the Fire had the control of the game before allowing the early second-half goal, and that the team is playing well but must be more consistent the second half of the season. “From now, everything is going to become more difficult,” he said. “There will be more urgency from all the teams fighting for the spot, being right on the edge. That puts you in the situation that you know you are the team to beat every game. There’s a lot in play. We have to

be at our best. We have to prepare, there is no time. No excuses for anything but I believe our locker room gets that, and we’re doing our best. “After six months now of working together, they know each other better, and they like each other better. That’s helpful. That’s how the team should be. That’s something that will guide us through the rest of the season.” Fire midfieder Bastian Schweinsteiger was more critical of his team’s performance. “We gave away three goals,” he said. “It’s too much, then it’s not easy to win the game. Some minutes we played well, we had possession, we played to the right player, and in some parts, we didn’t. We gave away the goals and we lost. “We need to improve our game, to improve the level and then you will win or become more consistent. We have too many ups and downs and then we struggle to make the points and we end up where

Brucki

Fire notes

• Saturday’s loss snapped Chicago’s seven-match unbeaten streak across MLS and U.S. Open Cup play. • Nemanja Nikolic found net for the second straight game, registering his 32nd MLS regular season goal in 52 appearances. The 32 goals tie Nikolic with former Fire standout Josh Wolff (1998-2002) for fourth-most in club history. Including U.S. Open Cup, Nikolic now has 35 goals in all competitions for the Fire, with an overall strike rate of .67 goals per 90 minutes with the Men In Red. • Midfielder Tony Tchani entered the game in the 78th minute and promptly scored his first goal as a member of the Fire three minutes later, doing so against the team that dealt him to Chicago earlier this year. The 29-year-old spent the 2017

Broadhurst

Continued from Page 1 of the year,” he said of the noticeable improvements that would come. “You can see it in your own wrestling and your teammates’, and you just kind feed off each other.” Brucki had heard from many sources about the grind of a college wresting season, and while it was certainly a lot of difficult and intense work, it was to him just business as usual. “I work hard in as many areas (of life) as possible... that’s what I’m used to,” he said. “If you work hard you’re going to work hard no matter what you’re doing. I feel like I transitioned really, really well in that sense — in the ethic — because I’ve been pushing myself for a long part of my life and it’s really rewarded me in a lot of ways.” Brucki’s hard work on the mat paid off in his first ever collegiate wrestling tournament, the Princeton Open, in which he took first place in front of the home crowd. He said he was more nervous during his first practice and first week of practice than he was during that tourney, but the adage is that if one is prepared there is no reason to be nervous. And Brucki had essentially been preparing for this moment since he first became passionate about the sport. “I was really calm, kept my mind open and focused on wrestling like myself,” he said. “It’s about not thinking too much about who it is your up against or worrying about the stakes at hand, because it’s just another match.” Winning that first tourney in Princeton’s gym was “very special,” he said, and expressed his appreciation for the coaches and practice partners who helped him be ready for that moment. “We trained really hard for the first month or two months and it really showed, we had a really good showing that weekend as a team,” he added. The adversity Brucki expected would eventually come, but he faced the challenges with the same beyond-his-years maturity that helped him reach great heights at Sandburg. “The losses were easier to count than the wins, they burn with you a little bit more,” he said. “Of course, it’s humbling. You’re just one of a big group of guys from all across the country, and you’re wrestling 22-, 23-, 24-year-old men. “But at the same time, I wouldn’t have gotten to where I am now or where I’m going to be without losing matches along the way, so I’m not foreign to that. I’ve been taken down thousands of times throughout my life, it’s just about limiting those takedowns.” The more challenging task, he said, was responding positively to the adversity he faced and learning from his mistakes, and doing that without straying from what has brought him success. Overanalyzing and picking apart every small mistake, or being fixated on winning or losing, is counterproductive, he added. “It’s about keeping the same mindset, being the same wrestler every time,” he explained. “If you start focusing on the outcome, worrying about the win or the loss, that’s when you start to forget the steps of the process. Its focusing on the process to get to where you want to be, instead of

we are. That’s the reason.”

Continued from Page 1

Supplied photo

Pat Brucki is focused on having an All-American caliber season in 2019.

focusing on the outcome.” That process hit a bump in the road when Brucki tore the posterior cruciate ligament in his right knee during practice just days before the Eastern Intercollegiate Wrestling Association Championships. The injury took him largely off the mat as far as practice was concerned, and required him to wear a brace with which he never became comfortable. He entered the tournament seeded second and placed fifth after losing in the semifinals to Pennsylvania’s Frank Mattiace, a former All-American Brucki had beaten earlier in the season. Still, he was one of four Tigers to qualify for the NCAA Championships. Brucki won his first match before falling to top-ranked Kollin Moore of Ohio State in the second round, and he was eliminated when he dropped his first consolation match. The “sloppy end” to his season did not sit well with Brucki, who was wrestling the best he ever had before the injury. “I felt so dialed in at that point in the year, we were going into the [EIWA] tournament and I was ready to go, I was feeling like a million bucks,” he said. “Then all [the injury] did was kind of plant a seed in my head and changed who I wanted to be a little bit. I felt like I was wrestling on one leg, and that’s not any fun, let alone painful, and at the most important part of the year. “But nobody cares about excuses, everybody has them, they only care about the outcome.” True to form, Brucki isn’t dwelling on the disappointment, but rather is using it to fuel his already intense desire to be an AllAmerican in 2019. The knee is still healing, but feeling strong, and Brucki expects to be ready to go when wrestling season begins in late October. “Going through the NCAAs with that definitely put me through some adversity and hopefully I’m better off in the future because of it,” he said. “You can run away from adversity or embrace the challenge and you can say, ‘Yeah, that’s what happened, but I’m better off because of it. I didn’t achieve what I wanted to achieve, but I learned from it.’ ”

Cam Atkinson and Artemi Panarin. Later that evening he would be on the ice playing center against the likes of longtime Red Wings players Henrik Zetterberg, Niklas Kronwall and Justin Abdelkader. “I grew up a Blackhawks fan and that’s a big rivalry (with Detroit), so it was definitely cool getting to play against guys like that,” he said. “It was an honor.” Broadhurst admitted to being a bit overwhelmed as he took part in the pre-game skate in front of some 18,000 fans at Columbus’ Nationwide Arena. “It was something else, coming out from warmups,” he said, adding that veteran defenseman Jack Johnson came up to him about halfway through the skate and offered some helpful advice. “He told me to take a second and take it in, your first game only comes once so enjoy it. I kind of listed to him and settled in, and once the first period came I got my legs under me and I was fine out there. “I was actually really worried about it, really nervous. But it’s just hockey, it’s just like riding a bike. My shift came and it was awesome, and it was, ‘Okay, I can actually do this and keep up with these guys,’ and once I did that I was good to go.” Broadhurst’s family — mom Valerie, dad Terry Jr. and brother Terry — were there to share the moment with him. His dad has been among his biggest supporters, and coached both him and Terry during their youth playing days. “Just seeing them after the game and seeing how happy they were and seeing it in their eyes, it was a really cool moment, really special,” he said. Broadhurst appeared in two games with Columbus, and did not record any goals or assists. He was on the playoff roster but did not appear in the postseason, which saw the Blue Jackets eliminated in the first round by the eventual Stanley Cup champion Washington Capitals. And while he was determined before to attain his dream of playing in the NHL, the

Trendel

Continued from Page 1 ropes in the Class 4A Thornton Sectional championship game. “They have a couple starters coming back from a very successful team the last couple of years, so that is something exciting to build upon,” Trendel said. “We’ve got some pieces coming back with that experience. There are some other good guards, too, so I think that will be a strength of ours.” He also doesn’t plan to reinvent

season with Carl Robinson’s Whitecaps, starting 27 games and scoring four goals in that time. Saturday’s goal was Tchani’s 15th career MLS goal in his 209th appearance. • Defender Kevin Ellis recorded the primary assist on both Fire goals in the game, doubling his assist total on the year (four). It was the first multi-assist game of Ellis’ 84-game MLS career.  • Fellow defender Jonathan Campbell also was credited with an assist, his first since October 16, 2016.  • The Fire are 1-5-3 vs. Western Conference opponents in 2018, with another cross-conference road trip looming July 14 at FC Dallas.  • Chicago finished with a 16-14 edge in total shots and maintained 64.8 percent of possession on the evening.  • The Whitecaps have won all four fixtures in the series played in Vancouver and lead the overall series 5-2-2.

experience of actually being there has made him even hungrier to stay. “I’ve seen what it takes to make it, and now that I’ve got a little bit of a taste of it and know how to get there, hopefully I can stay on that path.”

The Waiting Game

in Green Bay at age 16, he wasn’t exactly following the best nutritional guidelines. “You learn at a young age you’re probably not eating as healthy as you should, being a kid and eating pizza and all that,” he said. “I’ve changed my diet, basically I was trying to find the energy to be able to last a full season. I struggled with that. “But you learn that once you eat healthy and take care of your body you can really push the limits and not tire out during the season. For me it was about seeing it work, and once I saw it work and how much better I can perform taking care of my body it was just easy, and now for me it’s an everyday thing.”

That path to the NHL seemed at times to be longer than Broadhurst had hoped, and he acknowledged there were moments we was discouraged to the point he thought he might never attain his dream. “When you’re a young kid coming into pro hockey you think it’s going to happen right away, and you think if it doesn’t, as you get older you think it may never happen,” he said. “It was definitely a hard road, I had to wait my turn and elevate my game in order to get to the big leagues. “But I listened to my coaches, stayed patient and everything’s been working out so far, so I’ve just got to stay with it.” Broadhurst has excelled at every level at which he’s played, but this season with Cleveland was his most consistent from start to finish, he said. In 66 games with the Monsters he scored 22 goals and assisted on 19 others. The 19 assists and .62 points-pergame average were both professional career highs. Finding that consistency — day-in, day-out — has been the most challenging aspect of being a pro, he said. “I’ve had real good years in the past and won championships in a couple different leagues, so it’s hard to say what was my greatest season or what was my best season, but I was definitely a lot more consistent this season,” he added. “There was no slowing down in the stats or in my game, and I think that’s one of the reasons I did wind up getting that first NHL game.” Broadhurst also cited an improved diet and training regimen as crucial contributors to his success. He has always recovered relatively quickly, and he is still young, but the past three years he has paid more attention to maintaining his health, in particular being able to be strong at the end of the season. He noted that when he first moved away from home to play

After giving his body some time to recuperate after the 2017-18 season, Broadhurst returned to the ice at the beginning of July. This week, he was among several area hockey players — including his brother Terry, women’s Team USA member Kendall Coyne and Blackhawks defenseman Alex DeBrincat — and numerous current and former NHL players who will play in the eight-team Chicago Pro Hockey League. The new summer league will provide professional hockey players at all levels the opportunity to maintain their edge while playing in competitive games during the offseason. “I think it’s a great thing,” Broadhurst said. “It’s going to be good to help us to stay in shape in the summer and actually play in some games, rather than just be on the ice for practice, so I’m excited about it.” The Broadhurst brothers will play for Team Centric Wealth Management, while Coyne and Blackhawks forward Nick Schmaltz will play for Team Jack Phelan Auto Group. After that, it’s back to work, and Broadhurst for one can hardly wait to get to Blue Jackets training camp in September. “I haven’t taken as much time off as I usually do, just because I got that taste of it and I want to do everything to get back on the team,” he said. “I’ve been dreaming since I was a kid of playing in the NHL.”

the wheel, as the new coach of the RedHawks said he hopes to build on what the players and Nolan have already established. “I think they won 27 games the last couple of years, so I think one of the key points we are going to hammer on is that we’re not here to change a whole lot,” Trendel said. “We’re here to kind of build on a lot of what the foundation of was laid by Coach Nolan and the coaches before him.” In terms of Xs and Os, Trendel said he plans to run an up-tempo, pushthe-basketball-in-transition brand of

basketball. He also plans on running an aggressive defensive scheme with “hard-nosed, man-to-man style of play.” Trendel said he is grateful to the administrators at Providence who gave him his start as a head coach. He also thanked the staff at Marist for this new opportunity. “I’m very thankful to the people at Marist for taking a chance here,” he said. “I’m excited about the opportunity, and I think you’re going to see some good things coming from us the next few years.”

Back on Ice


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, July 12, 2018 Section 2

3

NIFTY FIFTY Red Stars’ Dames is first head coach in league to reach 50 wins with one team From staff reports When the Red Stars defeated the Washington Spirit 2-0 on July 1, it was more than just the squad’s fourth consecutive game without a defeat. The victory was the 50th in the career of Red Stars head coach Rory Dames, who became the fourth coach in league history to hit that number. Dames Dames joined Seattle’s Vlatko Andonovski, Utah’s Laura Harvey and Portland’s Mark Parsons on that exclusive list; however, Dames is the first to win his first 50 games with the same team. Dames coached in the Women’s Premier Soccer League in 2011 and the Women’s Premier Soccer League Elite in 2012, earning eight and nine wins, respectively. Then, Dames and the Red Stars entered the inaugural NWSL season the following year.

2013: Just Starting Out

Photos courtesy of Chicago Red Stars

Red Stars forward Sam Kerr tallied a hat trick in a 3-1 win over Sky Blue on Saturday, July 7.

Kerr tricks out in win over Sky Blue Aussie forward tallies thrice as Red Stars rebound from loss to Courage From staff reports Sam Kerr recorded her first hat trick as a member of the Red Stars during a recordsetting performance, and Chicago rebounded from a loss earlier last week to defeat Sky Blue FC 3-1 last Saturday in Piscataway, New Jersey. The victory moved the Red Stars into second place in the NWSL. Kerr, who spent the past three seasons with Sky Blue, was a one-woman wrecking crew against her former team, scoring in the 40th, 46th and 64th minutes. Kerr was involved in nearly every Chicago scoring chance, the first coming when the game was still scoreless and she when nearly slid the ball into the net, but was denied by the post. Then, with just minutes remaining in the first half, she Kerr used her speed to create another opportunity, making a pass into the box for Michele Vasconcelos, who hit the ball off the frame from close range. She finally tallied when, on a counter attack, her shot from the top of the box flew past a diving Kailen Sheridan and gave the Red Stars a 1-0 lead. The Red Stars’ Alyssa Mautz chased a free kick by goalkeeper Alyssa Naeher down on the right side of the field and crossed the ball near the top of the box, where Kerr was able to control the ball and boot a rocket past Sheridan. Seconds into the second half, Kerr made NWSL history by becoming the first player in league history to score 50 career goals. Chicago striker Yuki Nagasato sent a lofted ball up the field for an open Kerr, who spread wide and bounced the ball just out of the reach of Sheridan to extend the lead the two goals. Kerr completed the hat trick with another assist from Nagasato, who sent another lofted ball Kerr controlled entering the box and slotted it past a sliding Sheridan. The goal was Kerr’s league-leading eight of the season. Sky Blue thwarted Chicago’s shutout effort in the 73rd minute when Imani Dorsey threaded the ball between a diving Naeher and defender Arin Gilliland. The win helped the Red Stars move past a lopsided loss to NWSL front-runner North Carolina on Independence Day. The 4-1 setback was Chicago’s fourth defeat of the season. Yuki Nagasato notched the Chicago goal on a penalty kick in second-half stoppage time. Earning majority of the possession early on, Chicago was able to create multiple shots to put the pressure on the Courage, but couldn’t find the net. Kerr nearly had a goal but her

Record: 8-8-6 (30 points) After the previous leagues folding, the NWSL began and the Red Stars got off to a rough start. Chicago earned two points in the first six matches, and wouldn’t earn their first victory until two months into the season when they defeated the Portland Thorns, 2-0. The month of June saw a better showing, while in July the Red Stars only fell once. But Chicago was unable to keep the momentum to the end, as its 30 points wasn’t enough to put the Red Stars in playoff contention finishing in sixth place. Key Acquired Players: F-Zakiya Bywaters (draft) F-Jen Hoy (draft) F-Ella Masar (signed) GK-Erin McLeod (allocation) M-Lori Chalupny (signed) M-Alyssa Mautz (Supplemental Draft)

2014: Playoff Spot Taken Away

Chicago midfielder Vanessa DiBernardo brings the ball upfield during a loss to the North Carolina Courage on July 4.

one-on-one opportunity ricocheted off the cross bar. The Courage took the lead in the 20th minute when Crystal Dunn struck the ball from the top of the box and bounced it past a diving Naeher for the game’s only goal of the first half. The Red Stars were unable to find any momentum in the second half, and saw only three in the first 20 minutes of the second session. North Carolina extended their lead in the 67th minute when Lynn Williams’ shot from the top of the box deflected in off the crossbar. The game got ou of hand just two minutes later when Debinha’s chipped a shot over a

Level

Oak Lawn Lightning holding travel team baseball tryouts for 2019 The Oak Lawn Baseball Lightning travel teams will hold tryouts for the 2019 season on the days listed in the accompanying chart. For more information visit oaklawnbaseball.com

diving Naeher. The two goals in two minutes gave the Courage a commanding 3-0 lead. Chicago was filed again when a Danielle Colaprico cross found Kerr in the box for an easy tap in, but was called offsides. North Carolina put the finishing touch on the match in the 87th minute when Naeher came off her line and misjudged the clearance. Williams picked the ball up and skidded it across the face of the goal, where substitute Kristen Hamilton placed it into the net. The Red Stars return to Chicago for their last three games at Toyota Park this season. The next game is scheudled for 7 p.m. Saturday, July 14 against the Seattle Reign.

Age Cutoff Date

Sept 1st 8U - PT Part time 9U - FT May 1st Part time   May 1st 10U - PT Part time   May 1st 11U - FT Full time   11U - PT May 1st Part time   May 1st 12U - FT Full time   May 1st 12U - PT Part time   13U May 1st Full time   14U - FT May 1st Full time  

Time

Field

Thursday, Aug. 2 Wednesday, Aug. 8

5:30pm – 7pm 5:30pm – 7pm

SAC1 SAC1

Thursday, Aug. 2 Wednesday, Aug. 8

7pm – 8:30pm 7pm – 8:30pm

SAC1 SAC1

Tuesday, July 24 Monday, July 30

5:30pm – 7pm 5:30pm – 7pm

SAC1 SAC1

Wednesday, July 18 Thursday, July 26

6:30pm – 8pm 6pm – 7:30pm

KOLB KOLB

Wednesday, July 25 Wednesday, Aug. 1

7pm – 8:30pm 5:30pm – 7pm

KOLB KOLB

Wednesday, July 25 Tuesday, July 31

5:30pm – 7pm 5:30pm – 7pm

KOLB KOLB

Saturday, July 28 Wednesday, Aug. 1

10am – 11:30am 7pm – 8:30pm

KOLB KOLB

Monday, July 23 Monday, July 30

5:30pm – 7pm 7pm – 8:30pm

SAC2 SAC2

Thursday, July 19 Monday, July 23

7pm – 8:30pm 7pm – 8:30pm

SAC2 SAC2

Record: 9-7-8 (35 pts.) In the second season, the Red Stars saw a better showing as they went on a six-game undefeated streak. But Chicago turned around and did the opposite, going seven games without a victory. The Red Stars finished the regular season with 35 points, tying the Washington Spirit for the final spot to compete in the post season; however, via Washington sweeping the season series with Chicago, the Red Stars were relegated to fifth place and missed the NWSL Playoffs. Key Acquired Players: D-Julie Johnston (draft) D-Abby Erceg (signed) D-Sam Johnson (trialist) F-Christen Press (allocation) GK-Karina LaBlanc (trade) M-Vanessa DiBernardo (draft) M-Emily van Egmond (signed)

2015: First Playoff Berth

Record: 8-3-9 (33 pts.) 2015 was historic for the Red Stars, as they not only turned their fortunes, but lost only three matches in the regular season. Off to a hot streak, Chicago held the top spot in the standings for 10 weeks. With multiple draws, the Red Stars dropped in points to Seattle Reign FC, who finished in first, while Chicago stole second place from FC Kansas City by one point. With their first playoff berth, the Red Stars were to face Kansas City, a team they defeated and drew against in the regular season. The semifinal didn’t quite go Chicago’s way as the Red Stars fell 3-0 to the eventual NWSL Champions. Key Acquired Players: M-Danielle Colaprico (draft) D-Arin Gilliland (draft) F-Sofia Huerta (draft)

2016: Starting of a Semifinal Streak Record: 9-5-6 (33 pts.) After an opening season loss on the road, Chicago went on an eight-game undefeated streak, then was hit with three-straight 2-0 losses on the road to the three top teams in the league: Portland, Western New York and Washington. For most of the season, the Red Stars fell into one of the top four spots, always being a postseason contender. Making their way into the semifinals, Chicago was up against the Spirit, who they defeated 3-1 the week prior. But the result was against the Red Stars, as Washington scored in overtime to take them to NWSL Championship,

leaving Chicago with its second semifinal defeat. Key Acquired Players: D-Sarah Gorden (draft) D-Katie Naughton (draft) GK-Alyssa Naeher (trade)

2017: Third Time’s Not the Charm Record: 11-7-6 (39 pts.) The season started the same, as the Red Stars lost in their opening match against the Houston Dash. In only two weeks during the season did Chicago placed below the top four, maintaining second or third place most of the season. The Red Stars were struck with a defeating three-game losing streak at home during an eight-day span near the end of the season. It wasn’t until the second-to-last match that solidified the Red Stars’ spot in the postseason. In the semifinal, the Red Stars faced North Carolina, who could never find a point against Chicago. But that all changed in the final minute of the semifinal match, during which Denise O’Sullivan scored the lone goal to once again spoil the Red Stars’ sights at advancing to the NWSL Finals. Key Acquired Players: F-Yuki Nagasato (signed) F-Michele Vasconcelos (draft) M-Morgan Brian (trade)

2018: Rory Hits 50

Record: 5-3-7 (22 pts.) *as of July 1, 2018 For the first time in two years, the Red Stars earned a point against Houston in the season opener to start the season on the right foot. Chicago’s year has been interesting from the get-go, finishing a current league-high seven draws. The Red Stars have solidified a spot in the middle of the pack, switching between fifth and sixth place in the past month. In a turn of events, Chicago fell to the Orlando Pride not once, but twice in May for the first time in Orlando’s existence. But coming off the loss, the Red Stars went on a four-game undefeated streak, finishing with his 50th victory in a 2-0 shutout against the Washington Spirit, earning Dames the milestone. Key Acquired Players: F-Sam Kerr (trade) GK-Emily Boyd (draft) M-Nikki Stanton (trade) M-Rosie White (Dispersal Draft) Dames is in his eighth season at the helm of the Red Stars, after leading them to two league finals and a USASA’s National Women’s Cup triumph in 2012. The past three seasons Dames has guided the team to playoff contention and is looking to capture the title in 2018. Dames also serves as the Director of Coaching and Player Development for Chicago’s Eclipse Select Soccer Club, which consisted of three teams when the Illinois native took over in 1996 and today boasts over 50 male and female teams with more than 750 players ranging from ages 8-19. Dames has led Eclipse Select to many accomplishments over the past ten years, including being recognized as the top girls soccer club in the nation by Soccer America in 2007 and 2008, as well as by NationalSoccerRanking.com in 2007. Over the years, Dames has lead the club to eight national championships, six national finals, eleven regional championships, 17 UYSA MRL championships and 37 Illinois State Cup championships. Born and raised in Chicagoland, the Red Stars Head Coach played his high school soccer at St. Viator in Arlington Heights until graduating in 1991. Next, he went on to star for St. Louis University, winning several conference championships and making an appearance in the NCAA Final Four. Dames then joined the Rockford Raptors for one professional season. After his college career, Dames went on to coach not only Eclipse Select but also his high school alma mater. He would serve as Varsity Girls Head Coach at St. Viator for eight seasons (19972005) and guide his teams to seven conference championships and seven regional titles. Dames made five trips to the Elite Eight during his tenure at St. Viator, winning three state championships. The man in charge of the Red Stars continues his work at the youth level, having turned Eclipse Select into one of the best known and most respected girls clubs in the nation. He also serves as the ID2 National Girls Director.


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The Reporter Newspapers Call 448-6161 Deadline 5 p.m. Monday Hours M-F 9 to 5 Houses For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION U.S. BANK TRUST, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR LSF9 MASTER PARTICIPATION TRUST Plaintiff, -v.JANICE LADIK, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA-DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY-INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, ORLAN-BROOK CONDOMINIUM OWNER’S ASSOCIATION Defendants 17 CH 12880 15813 S. ORLAN BROOK DR., UNIT #50 ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 4, 2018, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 14, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 15813 S. ORLAN BROOK DR., UNIT #50, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-14-302-018-1050, 27-14302-018-1150. The real estate is improved with a residential condominium. The judgment amount was $75,516.29. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. Where a sale of real estate is made to satisfy a lien prior to that of the United States, the United States shall have one year from the date of sale within which to redeem, except that with respect to a lien arising under the internal revenue laws the period shall be 120 days or the period allowable for redemption under State law, whichever is longer, and in any case in which, under the provisions of section 505 of the Housing Act of 1950, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1701k), and subsection (d) of section 3720 of title 38 of the United States Code, the right to redeem does not arise, there shall be no right of redemption. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: HEAVNER, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719 Please refer to file number 281150-9804112382. If the sale is not confirmed for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the purchase price paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Fax #: (217) 422-1754 CookPleadings@hsbattys.com Attorney File No. 281150-9804112382 Attorney Code. 40387 Case Number: 17 CH 12880 TJSC#: 38-3016 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I3083782

Houses For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE IN TRUST FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDERS OF MORGAN STANLEY ABS CAPITAL I INC., TRUST 2007-HE6, MORGAN PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-HE6; Plaintiff, vs. MIKE MIKRUT AKA MICHAEL J. MIKRUT; UNKNOWN OWNERS, GENERALLY AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 16 CH 8711 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on March 8, 2018 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Wednesday, August 22, 2018 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real estate: P.I.N. 23-02-215-024-0000. Commonly known as 8035 West 89th Street, Hickory Hills, IL 60457. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call Mr. Anthony Porto at Plaintiff’s Attorney, Kluever & Platt, L.L.C., 150 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60601. (312) 981-7385. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I3092737

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Houses For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC Plaintiff, -v.KEVIN MELFI A/K/A KEVIN R. MELFI, JULIA A. MELFI A/K/A JULIE A. MELFI A/K/A JULIE MELFI, STATE BANK OF COUNTRYSIDE, AS TRUSTEE, UNDER A TRUST AGREEMENT DATED AUGUST 27, 1990 AND KNOWN AS TRUST NUMBER 90978, DITECH FINANCIAL LLC, TD BANK USA, N.A., MIDLAND FUNDING LLC, CITY OF PALOS HEIGHTS, AN ILLINOIS MUNICIPAL CORPORATION, STATE OF ILLINOIS, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Defendants 16 CH 16274 12548 SOUTH 76TH AVENUE Palos Heights, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on May 10, 2018, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 13, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 12548 SOUTH 76TH AVENUE, Palos Heights, IL 60463 Property Index No. 23-25-302-001-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $258,141.17. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. Where a sale of real estate is made to satisfy a lien prior to that of the United States, the United States shall have one year from the date of sale within which to redeem, except that with respect to a lien arising under the internal revenue laws the period shall be 120 days or the period allowable for redemption under State law, whichever is longer, and in any case in which, under the provisions of section 505 of the Housing Act of 1950, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1701k), and subsection (d) of section 3720 of title 38 of the United States Code, the right to redeem does not arise, there shall be no right of redemption. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, contact The sales clerk, SHAPIRO KREISMAN & ASSOCIATES, LLC, 2121 WAUKEGAN RD., SUITE 301, Bannockburn, IL 60015, (847) 291-1717 For information call between the hours of 1pm - 3pm. Please refer to file number 16-081646. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. SHAPIRO KREISMAN & ASSOCIATES, LLC 2121 WAUKEGAN RD., SUITE 301 Bannockburn, IL 60015 (847) 291-1717 E-Mail: ILNotices@logs.com Attorney File No. 16-081646 Attorney Code. 42168 Case Number: 16 CH 16274 TJSC#: 38-4370 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I3088971

Houses For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION BAYVIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLC; Plaintiff, vs. KRISTINE PETERSON; BROOK HILLS P.U.D. HOMEOWNER’S ASSOCIATION; JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 18 CH 204 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Tuesday, August 14, 2018 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real estate: P.I.N. 27-30-406-015-0000. Commonly known as 17409 Highwood Drive, Orland Park, IL 60467. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call the Sales Clerk at Plaintiff’s Attorney, The Wirbicki Law Group, 33 West Monroe Street, Chicago, Illinois 60603. (312) 360-9455 W17-1416. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I3092232

Houses For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION PACIFIC UNION FINANCIAL, LLC Plaintiff, -v.NAIL TADROS, LUBNA HAMATMEH-TADROS Defendants 2018 CH 00225 10510 RIDGEWOOD DRIVE PALOS PARK, IL 60464 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 3, 2018, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 13, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 10510 RIDGEWOOD DRIVE, PALOS PARK, IL 60464 Property Index No. 23-32-205-010-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876 Please refer to file number 14-17-17373. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 E-Mail: pleadings@il.cslegal.com Attorney File No. 14-17-17373 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 2018 CH 00225 TJSC#: 38-3107 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I3086514

Houses For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION (‘’FANNIE MAE’’), A CORPORATION ORGANIZED AND EXISTING UNDER THE LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Plaintiff, -v.MARY C PELECH, OAK HILLS CONDOMINIUM I ASSOCIATION, OAK HILLS COUNTRY CLUB VILLAGE COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 17 CH 08234 7657 GOLF DRIVE, UNIT 1B PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on May 16, 2018, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 17, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 7657 GOLF DRIVE, UNIT 1B, PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 Property Index No. 23-36-303-143-1086. The real estate is improved with a residential condominium. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce, LLC, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street, Suite 1200, Chicago, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 346-9088. Please refer to file number 262909. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce, LLC One North Dearborn Street, Suite 1200 Chicago, IL 60602 (312) 346-9088 E-Mail: pleadings@mccalla.com Attorney File No. 262909 Attorney Code. 61256 Case Number: 17 CH 08234 TJSC#: 38-4207 I3090322

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-1 Plaintiff, -v.DANIEL CAGALA AKA DANIEL J. CAGALA AKA DANIEL J. CAGALA JR., CAROLYN CAGALA AKA CAROLYN D. CAGALA, VILLAGE OF OAK LAWN, STACEY VALLARTA, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 16 CH 11326 10721 LAWLER AVENUE Oak Lawn, IL 60453 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on December 5, 2017, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on July 26, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 10721 LAWLER AVENUE, Oak Lawn, IL 60453

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, -v.ALAN FELSENTHAL, ANGELIQUE MCGLASHAN, VILLAGE OF OAKLAWN, VILLAGE OF PALOS PARK, CITIBANK (SOUTH DAKOTA) N.A., UNKNOWN OWNERS-TENANTS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 16 CH 04406 9850 WILD CHERRY LANE Palos Park, IL 60464 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on May 8, 2018, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 7, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9850 WILD CHERRY LANE, Palos Park, IL 60464

Property Index No. 24-16-417-007-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $221,189.86. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in AS IS condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, or a unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). In accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(h-1) and (h-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the property, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subsections (g)(1) and (g)(4) of section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, contact the sales department, Anselmo Lindberg & Associates, LLC, 1771 W. Diehl Road, Suite 120, NAPERVILLE, IL 60563, (630) 453-6960 For bidding instructions, visit www. AnselmoLindberg.com. Please refer to file number F16070135.

Property Index No. 23-28-407-007-0000. The real estate is improved with a single unit dwelling. The judgment amount was $310,315.66. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in AS IS condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, contact Plaintiff s attorney: WEISS MCCLELLAND LLC, 105 WEST ADAMS STREET, SUITE 1850, Chicago, IL 60603, (312) 605-3500 Please refer to file number IL-003866.

THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. Anselmo Lindberg & Associates, LLC 1771 W. Diehl Road, Suite 120 NAPERVILLE, IL 60563 (630) 453-6960 E-Mail: foreclosurenotice@anselmolindberg.com Attorney File No. F16070135 Attorney ARDC No. 3126232 Attorney Code. 58852 Case Number: 16 CH 11326 TJSC#: 38-5182 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose.

THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. WEISS MCCLELLAND LLC 105 WEST ADAMS STREET, SUITE 1850 Chicago, IL 60603 (312) 605-3500 E-Mail: intake@wmlegal.com Attorney File No. IL-003866 Attorney Code. 56284 Case Number: 16 CH 04406 TJSC#: 38-4172 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose.


6

Section 2 Thursday, July 12, 2018

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Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

OUT & ABOUT

The Regional News • The Reporter

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Southwest • Section 2, Page 7

Registration still open for the Center summer camps It’s not too late to register for summer camps at the Center, 12700 Southwest Hwy. in Palos Park. “If you’re still looking for an incredible summer experience for your child, please call the Center about our children’s farm programs. Though some programs are full, many still have openings,” said the organization through its website. Junior Farmers is offered to children ages 3-8. This is a farm and animal-based experience for young children. Sessions are one week in length, meeting Monday through Friday. Farm Explorers is a five-day

experience that will mimic the Center’s residential camps in a daytime-only format. Campers, entering grades 2-7, will spend lots of time at the farm with the animals and horses. There will also be other activities offered including hiking, camp crafts, cookouts, group games, singing and more. Farm Camp is one of the longest running programs and is offered to children entering grades 4-7. It’s a coed residential camping program and is offered in 5- and 12-night sessions. Outdoor Adventure for Teens is 12 nights of adventure and exploration through onsite and offsite experiences for 8th and 9th grad-

ers. The program will utilize the farm animals and horses as well as offsite experiences such as hiking trips, overnight campouts and adventure challenges. Senior Outdoor Leadership is designed to give participants an out-of-doors, leadership experience like no other. Offered to teens entering grades 10-12, this program focuses on group dynamics and leadership skills through onsite activities and offsite trips. Registration and more information may be obtained by calling the Center at (708) 361-3650 or visiting www.thecenterpalos.org for an application.

What a day for hot dogs and pet dogs in Palos Park Music and hot dog lovers can gather from 5 to 7:30 p.m. July 19 at the Village Green in Palos Park for live tunes and the classic American edible. The hot dog has been around since the 1800s and is synonymous with baseball, summer and picnics. Bring the entire family and enjoy a hot-off-the-grill hot dog with all the fixings. Complete meals of hot dog, chips and a drink will also be available.

Enjoy a picnic atmosphere and live musical entertainment by David Gaidas and Mitch Mayer. Village Green is located behind the Palos Park Recreation and Parks facility at 8901 W. 123rd St. Beginning at 5:30 p.m. on the same day and at the same location, a pet parade will be held, with check-in beginning at 5 p.m. under the gazebo. The first registered pets will receive a treat, said a publicity

blurb on the Palos Park calendar of events. Registration is free. Pets—not limited to dogs, of course—will parade through the park during Hot Dog Day to be judged for a chance at a prize basket. The event may be cancelled due to inclement weather. More information can be obtained by calling the Recreation and Parks department at 708- 6713760.

5 reasons why summer camp is a good choice for kids Summer vacation offers students a respite from lessons and the routine of school. Children might once have eagerly awaited those final days of classes so they could lounge poolside, skip rocks across ponds and spend the long days of the season playing with friends. But many of today’s youngsters spend much of their summer vacations indoors playing with their digital devices. Perhaps that’s why one of the last vestiges of the classic summer vacation escape — summer camp — remains such a viable option for parents who want their children to get outdoors once the school year ends. Although kids needn’t be in camp all summer long, a week or two can benefit campers of all ages. The following are five reasons why summer camp might be the right fit this year. 1. Explore talents. Summer camps help young people explore their unique interests and talents. Under an organized, yet

often easygoing, camp schedule, kids can dabble in sports, arts and crafts, leadership, community support, and so many other activities that may not be fully available to them elsewhere. 2. Physical activity: Lots of camps build their itineraries around physical activities that takes place outdoors. Campers may spend their time swimming, running, hiking, playing sports, climbing, and so much more. This can be a welcome change for kids accustomed to living sedentary lifestyles. Regular physical activity has many health benefits and can set a foundation for healthy habits as an adult. 3. Gain confidence. Day and sleepaway camps offer campers the opportunity to get comfortable in their own skin. Camps can foster activities in self-esteem by removing the academic measures of success and fill in with noncompetitive opportunities to succeed. Campers learn independence, decision-making skills and

the ability to thrive outside of the shadow of their parents, siblings or other students. 4. Try new things. Camp gives children the chance to try new things, whether that’s learning to cook, exploring new environments or embracing a new sport or leisure activity. Opening oneself up to new opportunities can build character and prove enlightening for children. 5. Make new friends. Camp is a great place to meet new people and make lifelong friends. Campers flood in from areas near and far. This provides kids with a chance to expand their social circles beyond their immediate neighborhoods and schools. Camps benefit children in a variety of ways. Lessons learned in camp can strengthen values, build confidence, develop coping mechanisms when adversity strikes, and enable campers to make lifelong friends.

ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, your head is in the stars and your feet are on the ground, but this outlook is working for you. Just do not live in fantasy land too long.

inevitable will only make the transition tougher.

numbers. If you can rally together a team, you can accomplish much of your to-do list for the week in half of the time.

Learn to write about travel at the Bridge Teen Center HOROSCOPES The Bridge Teen Center, 15555 S. 71st Ct., Orland Park, offers several free events for teens in seventh through 12th grade.  For more information, call (708) 532-0500 or visit www. thebridgeteencenter.org. “Ready Up!” Gamers’ Challenge & Classic Pacman Tournament w/ The Local and Texas Roadhouse will be held from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. July 13. The Bridge Teen Center, 15555 S. 71st Court, Orland Park. Students will compete in the Fortnite High Score Challenge and Classic Pacman Tournament. They will also be able to play Super Smash Bros on the Big Screen in the Big Room. Student will also be able to enjoy warm cinnamon buttered rolls from Texas Roadhouse while listening to the MG Bailey. Project Serve: Thrift Store is

open from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. July 17. Students will volunteer their time at The Bridge Thrift Store, which keeps The Bridge Teen Center open and free for teens like you. Tasks will include sorting, cleaning, and shelving their donated items. Come help out! Community service hours will be given. Perler Bead Crafts will be made from 4:30 to 6:00 p.m. July 17. Students will make a coaster or keychain using colorful plastic beads that will be arranged on a peg board. Soul Café: Dealing With Emotions w/ Michelle Krepps, LCSW will be offered from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. July 18. Students will make a DIY “Daily Mood Flip Chart” as a new way to help communicate their emotions to anyone who walks into their room!

Experimental Musical Instruments w/ Joe Rauen will sound off from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. July 18. Students will see how random objects make their way into a unique and functional musical instrument with the one-man-band, Joe Rauen. They will get inspired by this musician who made his dreams of making music a reality unlike any other. The “What It’s Like To Be” series will host travel writer Dave Kaczynski from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. July 19. Students will hear from a professional writer and photographer who is passionate about traveling the world. This travel writer will share some great stories from the countries he has seen and teach them how to use their environment for interesting and genuine writing.

Travel on a budget and still have fun Many people are passionate about traveling. Travel, whether it’s domestic or international, can be an invaluable way to experience other cultures, meet new people and get a sense of history. As valuable as travel can be, many people feel they cannot afford to travel. However, there are ways to travel on a budget and still have fun. • Stay close to home. Men and women traveling on limited budgets can save money and still have fun by staying close to home. The closer your destination to your home, the less costly your trip figures to be. By visiting destinations that are within driving distances, travelers can save money on the cost of airfare, which is typically among the most expensive components of traveling. Road trips also afford travelers ample flexibility that might not be available to travelers who are traveling abroad. That flexibility can make road trips more fun than more structured vacations. • Choose affordable destinations. Overseas travel is not necessarily more expensive than domestic travel. Certain destinations are ideal for bargain hunters year-round. Research affordable destinations via a Google search or utilize the “deals” sections on travel websites such as Orbitz¨. • Cook some of your meals.

Food is among the most costly expenses for travelers. Men and women can save some money by cooking some of their meals during their vacations. Doing so saves money on dining out, and travelers willing to experiment by cooking dishes native to the places they’re visiting can have some fun in the kitchen. • Travel during the offseason. Avoiding certain destinations during the height of their tourism seasons is another great way to save. The cost of lodging and airfare peaks during tourist season, but travelers willing to travel during the offseason can save substantial amounts of money. In addition to saving money on lodging and airfare, travelers who plan their

vacations during the offseason may also save money on local attractions. • Do your homework regarding your destination. Thanks to websites such as TripAdvisor¨, travelers can now learn as much as they want to learn about a given destination before they ever visit it. Such websites can be invaluable resources to travelers who want to enjoy their vacations but must do so on a budget. Research affordable tourist attractions and restaurants, even looking for free activities. Such research can be fun and make for more enjoyable trips. Travelers who must travel on budgets can still have fun and make lasting memories on their vacations.

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, just when you thought a relationship had gone as far as it could go, things start to change this week. Plenty of excitement is coming your way. GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21 You might get word of something exciting or new coming your way, Gemini. A chance to socialize with others or even a job opportunity may be on the horizon. Keep an eye out. CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22 This is a week for having fun and letting loose, Cancer. These may be things you haven’t done in some time and you can certainly use a break from the norm. LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23 You may be reticent to go back to work, especially if you are coming off of an extended vacation, Leo. But putting off the

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, there may be some buzz surrounding your social life this week if you are game for taking chances. It may be time to pursue a burgeoning friendship. LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 Are you ready for a well-calculated risk, Libra? If so, then a startup venture, sizable investment or converting a hobby into a career could be the way to go. SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22 You can’t lie to yourself, Scorpio, so own up to anything that needs improving. Take some time for some serious self-reflection and devise a plan to fix things. SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/ Dec 21 Love and support are all around you this week, Sagittarius. This support couldn’t come soon enough. Some extra support will help you overcome an obstacle. CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, there is strength in

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 Thoughts about how you can work less but earn more may have been swirling through your mind, Aquarius. Write down your plan and determine how to make it happen. PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20 Truth may be stranger than fiction this week, Pisces. Before you believe that something is false, gather all the facts.

FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS

JULY 12 Loni Love, Comic (47) JULY 13 Harrison Ford, Actor (76) JULY 14 Dan Reynolds, Singer (31) JULY 15 Diane Kruger, Actress (42) JULY 16 Corey Feldman, Actor (47) JULY 17 Angela Merkel, Politician (64) JULY 18 Kristen Bell, Actress (38)


Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

OUT & ABOUT

The Regional News • The Reporter

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Southwest • Section 2, Page 8

Charity golf outing will benefit those affected by domestic violence The Crisis Center for South Suburbia (CCSS) will host its annual Dianne Masters Cup Charity Golf Outing August 14 at the  Silver Lake Country Club  in Orland Park. The event, sponsored by Exelon, benefits individuals and families affected by domestic violence. An estimated 200 people are expected to participate in the annual tournament, making it the fifth sold-out event in a row, said organizers in a news release.  The event pays tribute to the Crisis Center’s founder, Dianne Masters, who would have celebrated her 72nd birthday last month. Masters established a crisis hotline in the kitchen of her

home to help victims of domestic violence. Tragically, in 1982, Dianne lost her life at the hands of her husband. But for those closest to her, it strengthened their resolve to continue the mission, said CCSS. Continental breakfast at the course and registration will begin at 7:30 a.m., followed by a shotgun start at 9 a.m. Lunch will be provided on the course by the Candos Agency, a Farmer’s Insurance Company. The outing also features popular contests, such as Chipping to the Raft, Ball Launcher and more, all with a chance to win prizes.  Following the tournament, a cocktail and dinner reception is hosted in the clubhouse.

The nine-hole option on Silver Lake’s Rolling Hills  course is returning this year and a 12:30 start offers a fun afternoon out on the links with friends and colleagues. Golfers will have the opportunity to participate in trivia and contests on the course, as well as the cocktail and dinner reception following the round. Not a golfer? Silver Lake Country Club provides an exceptional steak and chicken buffet. Dinner tickets can be purchased separately for just $50 per person. The evening also includes raffles, trivia, and the opportunity to mingle with the CCSS family, friends and supporters. Opportunities to partner with CCSS through sponsorship are

also available for those who would like to promote their business or honor a family member or friend, while providing muchneeded support for those served at the shelter. According to CCSS, the nonprofit organization continues to honor Dianne Masters’ legacy by partnering with the community to provide safety, strength and hope to over 2,000 victims of domestic violence each year. More information about sponsoring or participating may be obtained by visiting the Crisis Center’s website at www.crisiscenter.org or contacting Jessica Brooks at (708) 429-7255, ext. 136.

Time has come for grillmasters to gear up Grilling season has returned for the millions of people who live in regions where grilling is unlikely to happen during the winter months. While standard fare like hot dogs and hamburgers may suffice for backyard barbecues with lots of friends and family, when the party is smaller, grillmasters may want to up their games and try their hands at something new. Tri tip steak is cut from the bottom of the sirloin and is popular on the West Coast of the United States, but this cut, which is suited to marinating and rubbing, can be enjoyed anywhere. Those who want to give tri tip steak a shot may find it sold as bottom sirloin roast in their local grocery store or butcher shop. But once you find the right cut, the following recipe for “Grilled Tri Tip With Black Olive Aioli” courtesy of Bill Niman and Janet Fletcher’s “The Niman Ranch Cookbook” (Wiley) is sure to please you and your guests the next time you fire up the grill. GRILLED TRI TIP WITH BLACK OLIVE AIOLI Serves 4 to 6 • 1 tri tip steak, 21/2 pounds • 1 tablespoon olive oil • 2 tablespoons fresh rosemary leaves, chopped • 1 tablespoon freshly cracked black pepper • 1/4 cup finely chopped pitted oil-cured black olives • 1 cup aioli (see below) • 1 tablespoon coarse sea

salt • Cayenne pepper Place the steak in a small, nonreactive baking dish. Combine the olive oil, rosemary and black pepper in a small bowl and stir well. Rub the mixture evenly over the tri tip. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 8 hours or up to 24. hours. Remove the tri tip from the refrigerator 11/2 hours before cooking. Prepare and light a charcoal grill for direct cooking. Add the olives to the aioli and season with cayenne. When the grill is at its hottest (when the coals are red and glowing and it’s too hot to hold your hand over the grill for more than a couple of seconds), remove the tri tip from the marinade, wipe off any excess marinade, and season on both sides with sea salt. Place the steak on the cooking grate directly over the coals, cover the grill, and cook, turning once, for about 20 minutes, or until a thermometer inserted into the thickest part reads 130 F for medium rare. Transfer to a cutting board and let rest for 5 to 10 minutes. Cut the tri tip into thin slices across the grain and arrange on a platter. Serve with aioli. AIOLI Makes about 1 cup • 1 small clove garlic • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard • 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice

the cooking grates. Wire brushes are ideal for cleaning cooking grates. Such brushes can quickly remove grease and food particles, saving grill owners the trouble of scrubbing away with traditional sponges. Once the wire brush’s work is done, you can then clean the grill with a soapy sponge. • Remove food that fell into the well. Food inevitably falls into the well of a grill no matter how skilled a grillmaster might be. If

Warmer weather sends scores of golfers to their favorite courses each and every day. Golf is a challenging pastime, but a few pointers can help golfers hone their short games, long games and everything in between. • Choose the right clubs. There is more to selecting clubs than pulling any old iron out of your golf bag and whacking away. Wind, hazards and obstructions in landing areas should influence your decision of which club to use. Novice golfers may want to rely on their caddies to make club recommendations, and as they become more confident in their abilities they can start to make their own choices. • Anchor your feet. Anchor your foot behind the ball to drive the ball further. Right-handed players will keep the right foot anchored, and lefties will do the opposite. Do not lift your foot prematurely; otherwise, you can lose power and distance. • Identify your weaknesses. As with any hobby, identifying those areas that need the most work can help you become a better golfer. Keep track of each shot you take, and then look at the results to see which areas of your game need

Laugh along with comedy cabaret at McCord Gallery

• 2 egg yolks • 1 cup olive oil To make by hand, chop the garlic and salt together on a cutting board until a paste forms. Transfer to a deep mixing bowl and wrap a damp towel around the base of the bowl to keep it from sliding around the counter as you work. Whisk in the mustard, lemon juice and egg yolks. While whisking continuously and vigorously, add the olive oil in a slow, thin, steady stream until all of it has been incorporated and the

left to fester in the well, such foods can pose a safety risk and promote the growth of bacteria. • Clean the remaining areas of the grill. Marinade, sauce or condiments may find their way onto areas of your grill, and if left unattended, such substances can make a grill very dirty over time. Remove these substances after each barbecue to keep your grill looking new through the summer.

mixture is thick and completely emulsified. To make the aioli in a food processor, place the garlic and salt in the work bowl and process to chop as finely as possible. Add the mustard and lemon juice and pulse to combine. Add the egg yolks and, with the motor running, add the olive oil in a slow, thin, steady stream until all of it has been incorporated and the mixture is thick and completely emulsified. Cover and refrigerate for up to 24 hours until needed.

“You can’t be serious!” described as a fun-filled comedy cabaret will be staged at 7 p.m. Aug. 10 at McCord Gallery & Cultural Center, 9602 W. Creek Dr. In Palos Park. “Especially these days, when our world seems laden with bad news and bad tempers, it is so important to laugh,” said McCord in a publicity release. “’You Can’t Be Serious!’ provides a comic lens through which to look at the situations we all face in life.” The show will feature contemporary and classic songs and stories that will make the audience “laugh so hard your sides will hurt. Remember, laughter is the best medicine. We’ll see you in stitches—the good kind!” Tickets are $35 each. More information can be obtained by calling McCord at (708) 671-0648 or visiting www.mccordgallery.org.

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Musicians from the Illinois Philharmonic Orchestra will perform at Lake Katherine Nature Center & Botanic Gardens from 6:30 to 8 p.m. August 15. “Lake Katherine’s lovely clubhouse lawn provides the backdrop for an evening of beautiful music provided by the IPO string quartet,” the orchestra announced in a news release. Entry for “Sunset Sonata” includes two complimentary cocktails from the Harvest Room restaurant, garnished with herbs from Lake Katherine’s very own herb garden. Music starts at 7 p.m. The cost is $40 per person. Lake Katherine Nature Center is located at 7402 Lake Katherine Dr., Palos Heights. More information may be obtained by calling (708) 361-1873.

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the most work. • Fix your alignment. Align your shots by assessing the target from behind the ball. Then set the clubface behind the golf ball and align it with the target before you enter your stance. • Use your torso for power. The torso is essential to a solid swing. Practice rotating from your core to control your backswing and then maintain the same spine angle and posture on the downswing. • Use the wind. Not every golf game will be played in perfect weather. A good player knows how to make adjustments for the wind depending on the shot. Use the wind to your advantage when you can, and adjust your swing when hitting into the wind. • Become a better chipper. Many players put so much emphasis on their backswings and putt shots that they fail to devote any practice to chips. All shots are important for golfers trying to shed strokes off of their scores. • Keep fit. Maintaining or improving your physical strength and overall health can help your golf game. Exercise and eat right, and you will have more endurance on the links.

BROADEN YOUR HORIZONS

How to clean your grill during summer Grilling season has arrived, and amateur grillmasters everywhere are gearing up for another summer of backyard barbecues and family dinners outside under the summer sun. But once you fire up that grill and cook your first hot dog of the season, your work is not quite done. Cleaning the grill after you have eaten makes it easier to prolong the life of your grill and ensure the foods you eat are safe to consume. • Turn the grill off. Unless you own a charcoal grill, chances are your grill has dials that govern how hot the grill gets when cooking. Make sure these dials are turned to the off position before you start cleaning. If your’s is a gas grill, disconnect the gas while wearing gloves to reduce your risk of accident or injury. • Use the residual heat to make cleaning easier. The sooner you start cleaning the grill after you cook, the easier it might be to make the cooking surfaces sparkle. That’s because the residual heat can make it easier to remove any leftover buildup from barbecue sauce or seasoning that stuck to the grill after you removed your food. • Use a wire brush to clean

9 ways to improve your golf game

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Regional news 7 12 18  
Regional news 7 12 18