Page 1

THE Volume LVIX, No. 18

Local athletes enjoying success away from home

Trendel eager to lead Marist basketball

SPORTS: Section 2

SPORTS

REPORTER

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Thursday, July 12, 2018

Military dog gets a special honor before his passing By Dermot Connolly Some military heroes come back from war with tales, and others just have wagging tails, like Lion, a Belgian Malinois who retired to Palos Hills six years ago after 10 years of service with the U.S. Navy. Wayne Danalewich, of Palos Hills, explained that Lion was partnered with his son Keith for five years before being retired at age 10, as is mandatory for military working dogs. Lion stayed for a few months with Keith, who was stationed in Florida at that time. But when he was transferred, Lion moved in with Wayne and his wife, Mary Ann, in Palos Hills. When old age caught up with Lion in recent months, and he was struggling with pneumonia, Wayne said he wanted to give the dog a sendoff befitting the veteran that he was. “I was bringing him to the Summit Animal Hospital (to be put to sleep), and I asked around and the Summit police said they would give him a proper sendoff. We went to the station and they gave him his last ride in a police car, lights and all, wearing his militaryissued collar and military working dog patch,” Danalewich said. “The police were really good about it. They stuck around the whole time. One of the officers stayed with him the whole time. We planned to take him in a couple of days later, and they had a lot of things arranged, the white gloves for the honor guard and everything. But he was really suffering and I decided he couldn’t

Photo by Anthony Caciopo

Rallying outside Palos Township headquarters Monday evening, people call for the resignation of Trustee Sharon Brannigan during the monthly board meeting. At least 80 people were on hand to continue to pressure her and her fellow board members.

Brannigan, protesters unmoved one year later Monday’s meeting just the latest in a battle of wills By Anthony Caciopo

I

t’s been a year-long standoff, one month at a time, at an unassuming office building in Palos Hills where an elected official is under pressure to resign because of comments she made about Muslims and Middle Eastern people.

“Hey-hey, ho-ho, Sharon Brannigan’s got to go!” was one of many rallying cries heard Monday at the monthly Board of Trustees meeting — the same rallying cry heard last month and the month before that, all the way back to July 2017. “Today marks one year where we have been protesting and exercising our constitutional rights, as citizens of the United States, against racist remarks of a woman who not only represents this township’s constituency but also is planning on increasing her authority by running for Congress,” said a woman who identified herself as Linda with Arab American Family Services. Citing U.S. Census statistics she claimed documented the growth of the local Muslim population, Linda addressed Brannigan and other board members during the public commentary portion of the meeting. “The Chicago area is home to one of the largest Palestinian communities in the country,” Linda said. “Unfortunately for you, it would be impossible for you to get rid of us and that is why we keep showing up here and will continue to show up here.” The small meeting room, which holds 40 seats for the public, was again packed on Monday. Just as many additional people stood in the vestibule and outside the building at 10802 S. See BRANNIGAN, Page 9

They will arrive in the hundreds on a day in which participants can have fun, just like everyone else. DisABILITY Day will be held from 3 to 7 p.m. Saturday, July 14 at Marist High School, 4200 W. 115th St., Chicago. The Disability Defenders have organized the event. The non-profit organization serves individuals with development and intellectual disabilities within the local community.

wait any longer. So, we took him in on June 20, just a few days after his 16th birthday.” “He really was a special dog. He saved so many lives. During his 10-year career, he traveled all over the world as a bomb specialist, trained to sniff out explosives. He has been everywhere, from Djibouti in Africa, to Japan, Thailand, and Diego Garcia, an island in the Indian Ocean,” said Danalewich. Upon his retirement in Japan, Lion received an official commendation medal for meritorious See DOG, Page 9

Dist. 127.5 prepares for changes at Finley Junior High School By Joe Boyle

Photo by Anthony Caciopo

Placards used by protestors are left on seats at the Palos Township Board of Trustees meeting. The placards show the now-deleted social media postings Brannigan made, which many people have found offensive and racist.

Marist alum, students work to make DisABILITY Day memorable By Joe Boyle

Submitted photo

Keith Danalewich, of Palos Hills, with his military working dog, Lion, when he was retired in 2012 after 10 years of service to the U.S. Navy.

“The entire event is done with the idea of having it through the eyes of someone who has a disability,” said Alexander Lyons, who created disABILITY Day after graduating from Marist in 2016. “We will have about 20 kids from Marist and a set-up crew and other volunteers of about 60 to 70 people. I serve as a monitor and the Marist kids do a great job of going out in the community to get support and help with the games.” Lyons said that a large crowd will be in attendance on disABILITY Day.

“Yes, we will have about 500 coming through during the course of the day, in and out,” said Lyons, a former Palos Heights resident who graduated from St Alexander Elementary School. The event is an indoor carnival in which disabled individuals will get an opportunity to play a variety of games that include a form of bowling, Bozo Buckets and a duck pond game. Students from Marist who graduated See DisABILITY, Page 9

Changes are in store at Finley Junior High School in Chicago Ridge, but the chain of command will continue to run smoothly as it has in the past, according to District 127.5 School District officials. Laura Grachan, who has served as principal at Finley Junior High School, 10835 S. Lombard Ave., for the past 12 years, will retire at the end of the 2018-2019 school year. She will be replaced by Geoffrey Youngberg for the 2019-2020 school year. Youngberg has worked for District 127.5 for the past eight years. He has served as the assistant principal at Finley and will become the associate principal for the 2018-19 school year. The title is a familiar one to Grachan, who was also hired as an assistant principal at Finley before becoming the associate principal during the final year of Mary McDonald’s term as principal. “It’s been a heck of a ride,” said Grachan, 55. “I’ve trained four men who went on to become principals. And Geoffrey is one of them. He does such a fantastic

job here.” Youngberg was appointed to his new position last month. Dr. Kevin P. Russell, superintendent of School District 127.5, is pleased with the selection of Youngberg, but also expressed his appreciation for Grachan’s years of “service and dedication to countless students, staff and community members.” Youngberg has also served District 127.5 as a physical education teacher, coach, dean and assistant principal. In addition to his role as a teacher, coach and administrator, he has held many leadership responsibilities, including serving as the district’s transportation director, athletic director, a member of the school improvement team, and a curriculum writer. He co-led the district’s English Language Arts Curriculum Committee, for which Finley Junior High School received a model school award under his leadership. Other committees Youngberg served on and helped lead include the Performance Evaluation Review Act (PERA) Committee, the Discipline Committee, See Dist 127.5, Page 9

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2 The Reporter

Thursday, July 12, 2018

POLICE REPORTS Chicago Ridge Aggravated battery

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Ameen Assaf, 33, of the 11400 block of South Nashville Avenue, Worth, was arrested on two outstanding warrants for aggravated battery following a traffic stop at 8:45 p.m. last Thursday, in the 11100 block of South Ridgeland Avenue. Police said he was also cited for driving a car without valid registration and obstruction of identification because he initially gave police a driver’s license that was determined to be his brother’s. He is due in court on Aug. 10.

Photo by Dermot Connolly

Shriners in mini-convertibles entertained the crowds during the July 3 Evergreen Park Independence Day Parade on 95th Street.

Oak Lawn woman arrested in Chicago for allegedly soliciting rides from cars A 46-year-old Oak Lawn woman was charged by Chicago police with soliciting a ride on a public roadway after she was arrested on the city’s Southwest Side on June 29. Theresa M. Simadis, of the 6300 block of West 93rd Street, was arrested near 47th and Kilpatrick at 9:48 p.m. According to police, she was “observed flagging down cars with male occupants in an attempt to solicit a ride.”

Battery offense

John Abbate, 54, of Port St. Lucie, Fla., was charged with assault after police responded to a disturbance at the Blue Star Motel, 7150 W. 103rd St., at 1:13 a.m. June 4. Police said he allegedly shoved someone several times during an altercation. He is due in court on Aug. 16.

Suspended license

Simadis

• Kenneth Sutton, 30, of the 300 block of Birch Drive, Glenwood, was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop at 7:14 p.m. July 3 in the 10200 block of South Ridgeland Avenue. Police said he was also cited for failure to signal when required. He is due in court on July 20. • Melissa Whitton, 41, of Clubhouse Drive, Justice, was charged with driving with a suspended license in the 10300 block of Southwest Highway at 12:43 a.m. June 30. Police said she was also cited for driving without a rear registration light. She is due in court on Aug. 10.

Residential property taxes can be appealed in Worth Township through July 18 The Cook County Assessor has opened the window for appealing residential property taxes in Worth Township with the deadline set for Wednesday, July 18. Appeals can be made locally at the Worth Township office, 11601 S. Pulaski Road, Alsip. Property tax appeals can be made for the suburban communities of Alsip, Blue Island, Bridgeview, Chicago Ridge, Crestwood, Evergreen

Park, Hometown, Merrionette Park, Oak Lawn, the east half of Palos Heights, the north quarter of Robbins, and Worth (east of Harlem Avenue). The assessor’s hours are from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. today (Thursday, July 12); Friday, July 13; Monday, July 16; Tuesday, July 17; and July 18. Before arriving, check with the Township receptionist, (708) 371-2900, on the length of lines.

Unlicensed driving

• Olma Ashak, 26, of the 9800 block of South Nottingham Avenue, Chicago Ridge, was charged with driving without a valid license following a traffic stop at 2:29 p.m. July 2 in the 10200 block of South Harlem Avenue. Police said she was also cited for driving without insurance and failure to wear a seatbelt. She is due in court on July 20. • Juan Sujug-Tamal, 36, of the 4000 block of West 81st Street, Chicago, was charged with driving without a valid license at 12:05 p.m. July 4 in the 9800 block of South Ridgeland Avenue. Police said he was also issued violations for driving an overweight truck and not having the correct license classification. He is due in court on Aug. 10.

Evergreen Park Drug possession

Russae Jones, 18, of Chicago, was charged with possession of cannabis following a traffic stop at 2:17 a.m. July 3 in the 3200 block of West 95th Street. Police said she was a passenger in the car and was carrying 40.7 grams

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• Laveras Delaney, 24, of Chicago, was charged with retail theft at Walmart, 2500 W. 95th St., at 1:20 p.m. June 30. Police said he took a T-shirt and socks worth $13.18 in total. • Watona Halloway, 45, of Chicago, was charged with retail theft at Walmart, 2500 W. 95th St., at 11:09 a.m. last Thursday. Police said he took a watch worth $12.89. He was also charged with disorderly conduct. • Selena Anderson, 24, of Bourbonnais, was charged with retail theft at Meijer, 9200 S. Western Ave., at 5:12 p.m. May 29. Police said she took a DVD and four miscellaneous items worth $133.96 in total.

Battery offense

Donnell Houston, 30, of Chicago, was charged with battery after allegedly hitting a woman with a brick as she slept at a bus shelter in the 2400 block of West 95th Street. Police said the 23-year-old woman was homeless. Houston allegedly struck her in the head with the brick for no apparent reason.

Hickory Hills

Suspended license

• Justin A. Jones, 29, of the 500 block of Hoxie Avenue, Calumet City, was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop at 11:12 a.m. July 3 in the 9500 block of South 78th Avenue. Police said he was also cited for disobeying a stop sign. He is due in court on Aug. 16. • Ronald L. Garron, 50, of the 7500 block of West 64th Street, Summit, was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop at 11:08 a.m. Friday in the 8700 block of Roberts Road. Police said he was also cited for driving a car with expired registration. He is due in court on Aug. 16. Piotr Chrzaszyc, 36, of the 8100 block of West 87th Street, Hickory Hills, was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop at 6:29 p.m. Sunday in the 8600 block of South Thomas Charles Lane. Police said he was also cited for speeding 52 mph in a 35-mph zone and driving without insurance. He is due in court on July 30. • Quintine L. Brown, 28, of the 8000 block of South Sacramento Avenue, Chicago, was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop at 11:06 a.m. Tuesday in the 8700 block of South 83rd Court. Police said he was also cited for driving without a front registration plate and no insurance. He is due in court on Aug. 16.

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of cannabis separated into three bags, a digital scale and a stun gun. She was also charged with possession of cannabis with intent to deliver, unlawful use of a weapon and possession of drug paraphernalia. The driver, Isiah Montgomery, 18, of Calumet City, was also charged with possession of a controlled substance after .2 grams of the Ecstasy drug was found in his possession.

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Anthony S. Blomquist, 29, of Burbank, was charged with possession of cannabis following a traffic stop at 3:10 a.m. June 30 in the 5200 block of West 111th Street. Police said a bag containing 27 grams of cannabis was found in the car. He was also cited for speeding and having an overly loud muffler. He is due in court on July 27.

Assault charge

Sierra D. Brown, 22, of Lansing, was issued a local ordinance violation for assault after allegedly causing a disturbance at 5:55 p.m. July 2 at Haggerty Buick, 9301 S. Cicero Ave. Police said they were called to the scene after Brown arrived and started shouting and

threatening a man and woman who were there buying a car. The man was her ex-boyfriend, and police said she admitted that if someone had not separated them, her intention was to fight the woman. She was also cited for disorderly conduct and is due at a hearing in Oak Lawn Village Hall on Aug. 7.

Battery offense

Craig A. Rupar, 24, of Worth, was charged with battery following a disturbance at 12:51 a.m. July 2 at a home on Rutherford Avenue. Police said Rupar struck a man multiple times in the head. Brittni L. Sobanski, 26, of Orland Park, was also arrested and charged with obstructing a police officer after she repeatedly interfered while Rupar was being taken into custody. They are both due in court on Aug. 17.

DUI charge

John W. Holden Jr., 59, of Chicago, was charged with driving under the influence of alcohol following a traffic stop at 2:39 a.m. July 2 in the 3800 block of West 95th Street. Police said he registered .170 blood-alcohol content on a breath test. He was also cited for speeding an improper lane usage. He is due in court on July 20.

Drug possession

Gustavo Salazar, 21, of Joliet, was charged with possession of a controlled substance after police investigated suspicious activity in a van parked in an apartment building lot at 6:39 p.m. July 1 in the 9500 block of Southwest Highway. Police said Salazar was stopped after running from the vehicle. Police said he was carrying two Ecstasy tablets and an electronic scale. He was also cited for possession of a controlled substance with intent to deliver, possession of drug paraphernalia, and obstructing a peace officer. He was held for a bond hearing.

Reckless driving

Manuel Silva, 19, of Chicago, was charged with reckless driving following a traffic stop at 8:15 p.m. July 1 in the 4400 block of West 95th Street. Police said he and another driver, who got away, appeared to be drag racing, driving 60 mph in a 30-mph zone. They said he was also cited for aggravated speeding, driving without a license, disobeying a traffic control signal, operating an electronic communication device while driving, and driving without insurance. He was held for a bond hearing because he was already out on felony bond for a weapon charge. Police said that in that case, he accidentally shot himself in the thigh while carrying an illegal gun in his waistband.

Criminal damage

Robert t. Tomasek, 37, of Oak Lawn, was charged with criminal damage to property following an altercation with police outside his home in the 9700 block of South 50th Court at 5:59 a.m. June 30. Police said he was followed to his house from Pulaski Road, where he was seen driving a vehicle with a damaged tire, which fell off before he arrived at his house. Police said he broke an officer’s watch during a struggle while being handcuffed. He was also cited for obstructing a peace officer, four counts of resisting a peace officer, and citations for failure to report an accident, driving off the roadway, and damage to village property. He is due in court today, July 12.

Palos Hills

Burglary charge

• An unspecified amount of money was reported stolen from a “cash box” in the pool area of a residential complex in the 11200 block of South 85th Avenue at 10 a.m. July 2. • Money and several cartons of cigarettes were reported missing following a burglary of the Marathon gas station, 11056 Southwest

Highway, which police discovered at 2:30 a.m. July 3. Police said the front glass door was broken.

Criminal trespassing

Hasan Alshoaibi, 31, of Hickory Hills, was charged with criminal trespassing to a vehicle following a traffic stop at 7 p.m. July 2 in the 10500 block of South Roberts Road. He was also charged with possession of a controlled substance, illegal use of dealer plates, driving without a seatbelt, and driving without insurance. His passenger, Osama Alsharebi, 41, of Hickory Hills, was also charged with criminal trespassing to the vehicle, which had been reported stolen. Alshoaibi was held for a bond hearing, while Alsharebi is due in court on Aug. 15.

Battery offense

Danielle Allen, 22, of Palos Hills, was charged with battery following a fight with a friend at 10:30 p.m. July 3. Police said Allen and the other woman were arguing over an article of clothing when Allen pushed her to the ground. She was held for a bond hearing on July 4.

Suspended license

Wael Salah, 58, of Oak Forest, was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop at 2 p.m. Friday in the 10300 block of South Roberts Road. Police said he was also cited for driving without insurance, and improper use of registration. He is due in court on July 26.

Unlicensed driving

Darius Brinkus, 44, of Palos Hills, was charged with driving without a valid license following a traffic stop at 11 p.m. Friday in the 8600 block of West 103rd Street. Police said he was also cited for improper lane usage, driving with a defective windshield and failure to use a turn signal when required. He is due in court on July 26.

Identity theft

A Palos Hills resident reported an identity theft complaint at noon on Sunday. The person reported receiving a bill from Ingalls Hospital with a request for insurance information. Evidently someone had used their information to receive treatment there because the Palos Hills resident had never been to that hospital.

Drug overdose

Police used Narcan to revive a woman suffering from a heroin overdose at 10:30 p.m. July 4 in the 11200 block of Roberts Road. Police said they found the woman unconscious when they were called to the scene, and the Narcan was administered quickly. She was then transported to Palos Community Hospital for further treatment.

Garage fire

Police assisted firefighters handling a garage fire in the 8800 block of West 100th Street at 3 p.m. Sunday. Police said no one was at home in the attached residence. No injuries were reported and the cause of the fire is under investigation.

Worth

Unlicensed driving

Sam Maglaris, 33, of the 10600 block of South Lockwood Avenue, Oak Lawn, was charged with driving without a license following a two-car crash at 7:32 a.m. Friday in the 6800 block of West 111th Street. Police said he was also cited for failure to reduce speed to avoid an accident. He is due in court on Aug. 20.

Suspended license

Keira M. Keough, 20, of the 5700 block of West 128th Street, Crestwood, was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop in the 11100 block of South Octavia Avenue at 11:49 p.m. July 6. Police said she was also cited for speeding 48 mph in a 35-mph zone and driving without insurance. She is due in court on Aug. 20. Police reports are provided by law enforcement agencies. Charges are not evidence of guilt. They are a record of police actions taken, and persons charged with a crime are presumed innocent until proved guilty in a court of law.

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Thursday, July 12, 2018

The Reporter

3

OAK LAWN VILLAGE BOARD MEETING

Fourth of July parade treats

Fire department overtime costs draw board’s concern

Right: Oak Lawn Mayor Sandra Bury waves to the crowd and passes out candy to the kids at the annual Fourth of July Parade that started at 95th Street and 51st Avenue. Lower right: Cong. Dan Lipinski (D-3rd) passes out candy to children near 95th and Cook Avenue. Lower left: Dr. Kenneth Yerkes, DDS, an Oak Lawn resident and a Republican write-in candidate in the 3rd Congressional District race, plays the saxophone during the parade.

By Dermot Connolly

Photos by Joe Boyle

CHICAGO RIDGE

New office building joins medical facilities By Dermot Connolly

A newly built professional office building recently opened on Southwest Highway in Chicago Ridge, on land where the firehouse once stood, is adding to the “medical corridor” feel of the village’s section of the thoroughfare. Local contractor/developer James L. Waner has developed the building on a 1.25-acre blighted parcel of land at 10258 Southwest Highway that was purchased from the village last June. The site had been vacant for about eight years, since the old fire station was razed, and transformed into a one-story 9,050-square-foot Prairie Style professional office building “We opened in December. We built it in five months,” Waner said on Monday. “We thought the location would be very good for a medical building because it is almost exactly halfway between (Advocate) Christ Hospital in Oak Lawn and Palos Hospital in Palos Heights. I checked and it is about an eight-minute drive to either one.” He said that before the building was completed, it began attracting attention from medical professionals, and Vascular Surgery Associates, a group of cardiothoracic vascular surgeons, moved in. The professional building still has 5,375 square feet available for rent. “It is designed in a way that the available space can be divided as needed,” said Waner. “A group of dentists has expressed interest in it now.” The developer said it also doesn’t hurt that it

is close to other medical buildings. “We also built the urology building at 10400 Southwest Highway,” noted Waner, referring to a similar-looking two-story building that is occupied by Associated Urological Specialists. When the Chicago Ridge Village Board rezoned the vacant property at 10258 Southwest Highway last June, allowing for the medical building to be constructed, Mayor Chuck Tokar noted that the village’s section of Southwest Highway was turning into somewhat of a medical corridor, which he said would be a good thing considering the demographics of the surrounding area. Since then, on June 21, Tokar participated in a ribbon-cutting at a new medical building that opened at 10604 Southwest Highway. That glassfronted building, which had been under construction for about a year, is owned by a group of doctors. They are mainly oncologists affiliated with Advocate Christ Medical Center and Palos Hospital. It has office space for 25 to 30 doctors, and has facilities to provide chemotherapy, blood testing and other services. Adding to the medical services provided in the area, right beside the newest medical building is Chicago Ridge Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, at 10602 Southwest Highway. A couple of blocks south, a Davita kidney dialysis center is at 10511 S. Harlem Ave. In the other direction, just off Southwest Highway in Oak Lawn, is the Women’s Care Group building at 5851 W. 95th St., another Waner Enterprises development.

Overtime costs accrued by the fire department was cited as a main reason behind a $3.8 million deficit in the operating budget for 2017 during a presentation on the annual audit findings at the Oak Lawn Village Board meeting on Tuesday. Jeff George and Jeff Slade, of the auditing firm of RSM, said that overall in 2017 the village saw a revenue increase of $14.9 million, largely due to increased returns in pension investment portfolios and a decrease in pension liabilities. They stressed that the village received a “clean opinion,” meaning there was no problem with the accounting practices. But they said the general fund loss of $3.8 million in the operating budget will likely be an ongoing problem unless a solution is found to the overtime costs. Slade said that $1.4 million of that loss was due to “timing issues,” meaning that the budgeted sale of a vacant building at 9500 S. 50th Court was not finalized early enough to be counted, as well as the $600,000 that Advocate Christ Medical Center agreed to pay the village in lieu of property taxes. Another $1 million of the deficit is due to “budget shortfalls,” caused by less revenue than expected coming in from property tax and home rule taxes. “It was a year-end deficit but we’re pretty much back to whole,” said Trustee Bud Stalker (5th). But George said that the problem will occur this year Finance Director Brian Hani-

Submitted photo

A new medical building owned by a group of oncologists officially opened at 10604 Southwest Highway in Chicago Ridge on June 21.

Photo by Dermot Connolly

A new Prairie-style professional office building opened at the beginning of this year at 10258 Southwest Highway in Chicago Ridge, on the site of the original Chicago Ridge fire department.

Skin care concerns?

not needed but is dictated by an archaic, 1992 agreement that the union refuses to bargain over. “If the union’s position is sta-

“The village has tried to right that ship, but the union is fighting us on that. It is an ongoing problem.”

— Oak Lawn Mayor Sandra Bury

in the fire department. “Although we have narrowed the gap in what we owe the pensions, we still have an overtime problem that needs to be addressed with firefighting and ambulatory services,” said Hanigan. He said $2 million has been budgeted this year for overtime, but the department is in line to spend $3.1 million. “The village has tried to right that ship, but the union is fighting us on that. It is an ongoing problem,” said Mayor Sandra Bury. “This is virtual overtime. It is not affecting the health or safety of our residents,” said Village Manager Larry Deetjen. “It is a structural deficit. We’re spending close to $3 million that is

tus quo, under Illinois law, we have been unable to change that paradigm.” Deetjen said he was referring to “mandatory minimum staffing levels” that the village is bound to, requiring 21 firefighters to be working every shift. He said the agreement was made when there were more than 80 people working in the department, but that number has been reduced to 64 due to retirements. “We haven’t needed to fill those positions so this requires us to call them back for overtime. But they are not needed,” said Deetjen. He said the village has appealed to the Illinois State Labor Board for a ruling on the issue and that is decision is expected about July 20.

Crisis Center to host Dianne Masters golf tourney on Aug. 14

The Crisis Center for South Suburbia will host the annual Dianne Masters Cup Charity Golf Outing that will be held Tuesday, Aug. 14 at the Silver Lake Country Club, 14700 S. 82nd Ave., Orland Park. An estimated 200 people are expected to participate in the annual tournament that benefits individuals and families affected by domestic violence. This will be the fifth straight sold out tournament. Continental breakfast at the course and registration will begin at 7:30 a.m., followed by a shotgun start at 9 a.m. Lunch will be provided on the course. The outing also features contests such as Chipping to the Raft and Ball Launcher. Participants will have an opportunity to win prizes. Following the tournament, a cocktail and dinner reception will be hosted in the clubhouse. The nine-hole option at Silver Lake will also be offered beginning at 12:30 p.m. Golfers will have the chance to participate in trivia and contests on the course, as well as the cocktail and dinner reception following the round. For those individuals who do not golf, they can have a steak and chicken buffet dinner at the Silver Lake Country Club. Dinner tickets can be purchased separately for just over $50 per person. The evening includes raffles, trivia and the opportunity to converse with CCSS members and supporters. Opportunities to partner with CCSS through sponsorships are available to promote a business or honor a family member or friend. Individuals interested in sponsoring or participating in the tournament can call Jessica Brooks, (708) 4297255, ext. 136, or visit the website at https://crisisctr.org/events/golf.

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Our Neighborhood

4 The Reporter

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Oak Lawn performers prove that they’ve got talent

The eighth annual Oak Lawn’s Got Talent! competition featured a variety of singers and gymnasts on July 4 just outside the Stony Creek Clubhouse in the village. The annual event has been held at

Centennial Park in the past, but due to renovations taking place at the park, the competition was moved to Stony Creek and the Oak Lawn Park District’s “Fun in the Park was moved to Memorial Park. Participating in this year’s contest

was singer Amelie Cruz, who sang Josh Groban’s “To Where You Are”; The Suvadas (Ralahna, Randy and Lynn), who sang Alice Merton’s “No Roots”; and singer and guitarist Cami Nutile, who performed Dodie Clark’s “Would

You Be So Kind.” Gymnast Jalkyla Mobley performed a routine. Shannon Lamacki and Charlotte Tebo also performed a gymnastics routine. Nutile was chosen as the 2018 Oak Lawn’s Got Talent! contest. She received

a certificate and performed before the fireworks show that night at Richards High School. The annual contest was sponsored this year by the Oak Lawn Park District and the Oak Lawn Arts Commission. Cami Nutile performs the Dodie Clark song “Would You Be So Kind” during the 2018 Oak Lawn’s Got Talent! competition held July 4.

Shannon Lamacki (top) and Charlotte Tebo perform a gymnastics routine at the Oak Lawn’s Got Talent! event on July 4 near the Stony Creek Clubhouse.

Photos by Joe Boyle

Singer and guitarist Cami Nutile displays the winner’s certificate after being voted the winner of the 2018 Oak Lawn’s Got Talent! Competition.

Jalkyla Mobley performs a gymnastics routine at the Oak Lawn’s Got Talent! competition that is sponsored in part by the Oak Lawn Park District and the Oak Lawn Arts Commission.

The Suvadas (Ralahna, Randy and Lynn) perform a version of Alice Merton’s “No Roots” at the Oak Lawn’s Got Talent! competition on July 4.

American Red Cross seeking donors during blood shortage

An emergency blood shortage is prompting the American Red Cross to issue an urgent call for eligible donors of all blood types — especially type O — to give now and help save lives. The Red Cross escalated its call for blood and platelet donors after the Independence Day week for donations. More than 550 fewer blood drives were organized by businesses and other community groups last week than during a typical week as individuals across the country celebrated the holiday and enjoyed summer activities. This could equate to as many as 15,000 fewer donations than needed, causing donations to now be distributed to hospitals faster than they come in. “Each and every day, individuals across the country depend on blood and platelet donations for lifesaving treatments and emergency care, so it’s critical that people donate now to meet these needs,” said Laura McGuire, external communica-

tions, Red Cross Blood Services. “Whether you’ve never donated or give a couple of times a year, you’re needed to give as soon as possible to help save patient lives. Yours may be the donation a patient is counting on.” This need is especially critical for type O blood donors. Type O is the most in-demand blood type and often the first be depleted from hospital shelves during a shortage. Type O negative is the universal blood type and what emergency room personnel reach for when there is no time to determine the blood type of patients in the most serious situations. Type O positive is the most common blood type and can be transfused to Rh-positive patients of any blood type. Appointments to donate can be arranged by calling (800) 733-2767 or visit RedCrossBlood. org. Residents can also use the free Red Cross donor app.

Compiled by Joe Boyle

News and events from our archives • 50 years ago

Boys prepare for Southwest Suburban Soap Box Derby race From the July 11, 1968 issue:

The story: Boys entering the Southwest Suburban Soap Box Derby race will try to meet the challenge on Saturday, July 20 when they put their homemade coasting cars through the official inspection test. Once a racer passes inspection, it is put in the hands of the race organization for safekeeping. Contestants do not touch their cars until race day. The Derby championship will be held Sunday, July 28 on the overpass at 79th Street and Oketo Avenue in Bridgeview. The winner will receive a $500 savings bond and a trophy. The quote: “The rules are drawn up with the boy’s benefit in mind to guarantee safety and fair play,” said Hickory Hills resident Jack Madey, Derby director. “Of course, we want every boy to pass inspection. That’s why it is important they be aware of the rules.”

• 25 years ago

Palos Hills approves Waste Management’s bid From the July 8, 1993 issue:

The story: Despite an attempt to table the matter, the Palos Hills City Council unanimously accepted Waste Management’s bid for the city garbage contract last Thursday night. Waste Management is the city’s current carrier. The new contract calls for a $9.77 charge per month. Ald. Joel Thomas said the Public Works Recycling Committee recommended continuing the contract with Waste Management because it was the low bid, but also because of the company’s travel record, financial statements and commitment to recycling education. Before the vote, Ald. Edward Kryczka moved to table the matter to determine if a rebate can be given by Waste Management. But Mayor Gerald Bennett said that question should not be considered at this time. The quote: “You’re asking for something that was not part of the contract,” Bennett said.

• 10 years ago

Worth woman uses gourds for her art From the July 10, 2008 issue:

The story: When one thinks of different types of canvases for art, gourds may not rank high on the list. But for Worth resident Karen Caldwell, gourds provide the perfect outlet for her artistic style. Caldwell can be found selling her hand-crafted gourds at local farmer’s markets during the summer. She lives and works out of her mother’s home in Worth, where she grew up. Her uncle, Vernon Templin, served as Worth’s mayor from 1955 to 1961. Caldwell, 64, has sculpted gourds; glued glass to them to make mosaics; and turned them in to purses, codices and drums. However, she mostly enjoys drawing and painting them. The quote: “I love the shapes,” Caldwell said. “Gourds are never boring; always interesting. What more could you ask for?”


Thursday, July 12, 2018

The Reporter

WHATIZIT?

Photo by Joe Boyle

The clue for this week’s Whatizit (above) is: Not round. A few readers correctly answered that last week’s photo quiz was none other than St. Catherine of Alexandria School, 10621 S. Kedvale Ave., Oak Lawn. We would have also accepted St. Catherine of Alexandria Church. The first person to answer correctly was Rich Rahn, of Evergreen Park. He mentioned both the church and school at the Kedvale Avenue location. Oak Lawn resident Steve Rosenbaum also mentioned St. Catherine is the home of the “Chargers.” Palos Park resident Ron Wagenhofer also knew it was St. Catherine of Alexandria Parish. St. Catherine of Alexandria School is a pre-kindergarten through eighth-grade facility. The school enrollment is over 460. The school offers band, violin lessons, before and after-school care programs, scouting, children’s choir, voice lessons and sports activities.

SUDOKU

Palos Health cooking demo will be featured at July 18 Farmers Market Palos Health Dieticians will be at the Palos Heights Farmers Market on Wednesday, July 18 with cooking demonstrations on the hour starting at 9 a.m. at the market, 12217 S. Harlem Ave. In addition, health and nutrition information along with upcoming programming details will be available. The demonstrations will take place at the City Tent. The Mothers of Preschoolers at Palos Heights Christian Reformed Church (MOPS) will join the Community Tent from 7 to 10 a.m. Group representatives will have group information, which provides friendship, fun and childcare to mothers of preschoolers. More information can be found at mops. org/groups/paloscrc. The Palos Heights Library then joins the Community Tent from 10 a.m. to noon for “Bears and Berries” Story Hour. Residents can stop by for stories, crafts and other activities. Library staff will be on hand with programming information, library card sign up and other giveaways. Rita Schultz and her Day Dreamer Jewelry will be at the other Community Tent. She makes earrings, bracelets and necklaces. Visitors can stop by for the latest creations. All summer fruit and many summer vegetables are coming into the market every week. Sample produce available includes all varieties of berries, cherries, apricots, plums, peaches, melons, peppers, broccoli, cauliflower, tomatoes, beans, beets, carrots, eggplant, onions and corn. A large selection of food items is also at the market on a weekly basis. They include breads and multiple types of bakery items, pies and noodles, cheeses, eggs, butter, jams and jellies, local honey, olive oils and vinegars, beef, pork and chicken, salsas, pasta and barbecue sauces and Italian peppers, three different varieties of ready to eat

Moraine Valley biology professor officiates alumni wedding Solution on Page 9

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

ACROSS 1. Begetter 6. Arrived extinct 9. Lacking the power to hear 13. Epic 14. Aboriginal Japanese 15. Jar used for cooking 16. British nobleman 17. Smart 18. Israeli stateswoman 19. Outer space matter that reaches the ground 21. Instrument 22. Infections 23. Holiday (informal) 24. Spanish be 25. Not even 28. Chewie’s friend Solo 29. Garments 31. Geological times 33. Music City 36. Cubes 38. Important Chinese principle 39. Closes tightly 41. Forms a boundary 44. Knife 45. Plants of the lily family 46. A turn around the track 48. Midway between northeast and east 49. Type of degree 51. Midway between north and northwest 52. Profession 54. Musical note patterns 56. Deeply cuts 60. Muharraq Island town 61. Emaciation 62. Weaver bird 63. One point east of northeast 64. Scherzer and Kershaw are two 65. Rice dish 66. Nasdaq code 67. Danish krone 68. Enzyme

DOWN 1. Carpe __ 2. Wings 3. Loose soil 4. Earnhardt and Jarrett are two 5. 3 feet 6. Fasts 7. Erstwhile 8. Diving seabird 9. Houses 10. Ancient Greek City 11. Type of skirt 12. Greek village 14. Estranges 17. Scottish island 20. Express delight 21. Cosmopolitan city 23. Letter of Hebrew alphabet 25. Largest English dictionary (abbr.) 26. Flow 27. Shoal-forming fishes 29. Footwear parts 30. Schedule of events 32. Songs to one’s sweetheart 34. Test for high schoolers 35. Enthusiasm 37. Streets have them 40. One point east of due south 42. Cut the grass 43. Rattling breaths 47. For each 49. Marketing term 50. One who challenges 52. Sword 53. Polio vaccine developer 55. Film version of “Waterloo Bridge” 56. Want 57. Rhythmic pattern in Indian music 58. Young hawk 59. Harmless 61. Small amount 65. Palladium Answers on Page 9

5

Michelle Zurawski, a biology professor at Moraine Valley Community College in Palos Hills, can share stories about having a lasting impact on the lives of her students. But her latest story takes the cake. On June 15, Zurawski officiated the wedding of Jen Krasny, from Worth, and Kevin Davenport, of New Lenox, two alumni who met in her Introduction to marine biology course six years ago. Over the course of their relationship, the couple said they always knew two things for certain about their future nuptials. They’d get married in nature — they chose White Pines Wedding Canyon in Mount Morris, Ill. And, they wanted Zurawski to help them tie the knot. “We both knew we wanted Michelle,” the bride said. “We were really nervous about it. It’s a lot to ask of somebody, and you never know what they’re going to feel about that. She didn’t hesitate at all.” Zurawski said she was “overwhelmed with joy” when asked to play such an important role at their wedding. “What an honor to be such an integral part of their love story,” she said. “This is only one of the biggest days of their entire life, so I’ve been working very hard to make it special. I respect them so much.” The mutual admiration began in spring 2012 during Zurawski’s annual marine biology course, which includes a trip to Belize. Davenport was in his first year at Moraine Valley. And, Krasny, who took the course in 2010, decided to take it again as an independent study for her burgeoning career at Shedd Aquarium in Chicago. During the wedding ceremony, Zurawski called it “the best decision of Jen’s life.” “When we were in the class I didn’t see that relationship developing,” the professor said. “But, as soon as we got back from the trip, I noticed some pairing up.” A few months later, Krasny and Davenport were a couple, and after both graduated from Moraine Valley, it was clear Zurawski would be more than just a former professor from their past.

Supplied photo

More summer vegetables will be in stock at the next Palos Heights Farmers Market.

tamales, pizza and pizza products, ready to bake pizza, pesto, and organic and vegan frozen vegetable patties, soups, desserts, iced tea and packaged teas. The vendors also have perennial and annual plants, herbs and fresh cut flowers. Summer barbecues and party ideas from the Pampered Chef will be provided. Naturally scented olive oil soaps and other personal care products are available. The market’s Facebook page will showcase all available produce at the start of the market day: www.Facebook.com/PalosHeightsFarmersMarket.

Residents can stop by the City Tent to pick up and have their card endorsed. Patrons will earn double credit on their frequent shopper cards for all canned and fresh food donations. Canned donations are given to Palos United Methodist Church, 12101 S Harlem Ave., Palos Heights. Fresh food donations are given to Operation Blessing in Alsip. All completed frequent shopper cards will be entered into a Market gift certificate raffle every month. LINK cards are accepted at the Palos market. Stop by the City Tent to start the process. “Palos Bucks” Double Value Matching dollars of up to $15 will be offered weekly. Pick up this week’s recipe, “Cucumber Salad,” at the City Tent. This year’s recipes are courtesy of Palos Health Dieticians. The recipe will also be attached to the weekly email, Facebook page, City webpage (www. palosheights.org). Today (Thursday, July 12) is the last day to purchase raffle tickets for tomorrow’s Car Classic Event. The Car Classic Event will be held from 5 to 9 p.m. Thursday July 19. This is the 15th anniversary and will feature hundreds of classic cars, a live band, food and beverages. More information about the Car Classic event can be found at www. palosheights.org/events/carclassic. Volunteers are needed. Email carclassic@palosheights. org for more information. The market would like to acknowledge and thank this year’s Market sponsors. They include Palos Health, CIBC Bank, Palos Heights Mayor Bob Straz, CNB Bank and Trust, United Trust Bank, Running for Kicks, Golden Shoes and Camille’s Confections. Additional information about the market can be obtained at www.palosheights.org, by emailing farmersmarket@palosheights.org, calling (708) 361-1800, or visiting the Palos Heights Farmers Market page on Facebook.


6 The Reporter

THE

COMMENTARY

Thursday, July 12, 2018

REPORTER

An Independent Newspaper Published Weekly Founded March 16, 1960

Ray Hanania

Dem Day needs less corn, more red meat

Pfleger publicity stunts do nothing to stop violence

B

ack in the old, old days, Mayor Richard J. Daley would pack passenger trains full of loyalists and send them all to the Illinois State Fair’s Democrat Day rally, where they were treated to rousing speeches by party leaders and candidates. Gov. Rod Blagojevich kept that tradition alive on a somewhat smaller scale by chartering buses filled with supporters. For decades, both parties’ state fair rallies have been considered the unofficial kick-off to Illinois’ campaign season. In odd-numbered years between elections, candidates have often used the rallies to showcase their campaigns ahead of the following spring primary season. Many of those potential candidates make big speeches and bus their supporters to Springfield Rich Miller to show their strength and then never even file to run for election, realizing that they don’t have what it takes. Illinois is a bigger state than most people realize. Its regional and hyper-local politics can be maddening to novices with big egos. Most other off-year speakers are weeded out by the party primaries. By the time of the August event ahead of the even-year general election, the number of candidates who show up to speak is whittled down to a handful. Aside from the potential candidates, the state fair treats the political class (campaign contributors, labor leaders, legislative staff, etc.) to a big get-together before the November elections (or the legislative fall veto session, as the case may be), so lots of candidates up and down the ballot use the opportunity to raise money. The rallies always provide political reporters with something to write about in what would otherwise be a slow news month, when most normal people are on vacation or have otherwise completely tuned out politics of all kinds. But the annual event really started to lose its appeal for the Democratic powers back in 2012, when AFSCME packed the Democrat Day rally with thousands of green-shirted protesters who angrily and loudly shouted down every Democratic speaker, including Gov. Pat Quinn and House Speaker Michael J. Madigan. AFSCME and other public employee unions were furious at Quinn and the Democratic leadership for pushing pension reforms that would reduce their retirement income and benefits. The following year, after a massive pension reform bill had passed and was signed into law and Gov. Quinn picked up a Democratic primary opponent, Quinn canceled the rally’s speeches. The Democrats still had free food and beer at the traditional Director’s Lawn venue, but live music blared from the loudspeakers instead of politicians’ voices. Republicans, for their part, required that attendees obtain tickets in advance before being allowed access to their event, mainly out of concern that the Democrats could try to disrupt their shindig the way AFSCME did to them. By then, though, the focus had already started to shift away from the Democrats’ rally to a morning brunch at a local hotel hosted by county party chairs. The speeches given at that event were largely repeated verbatim at the afternoon fairgrounds rally, so lots of party regulars eventually got bored and didn’t even bother attending the afternoon rally. Why sit in the hot sun and oppressive humidity (or pouring rain, as the case may be) to listen to the exact same speeches you just heard a few hours earlier? Last year, Speaker Madigan canceled the state fair rally altogether. He never much cared for it anyway. One year, reporters literally surrounded his golf cart when he refused to answer questions and wouldn’t let him move. Plus, a huge number of Democratic candidates for statewide office that year would’ve made for an unwieldy and divisive event (particularly since some candidates were running on pointedly anti-Madigan platforms). The annual Democrat Day is managed by the Democratic Party of Illinois unless the party holds the governor’s office. But it doesn’t look like DPI will be all that involved with the rally this August. “I suspect whatever goes on at the fairgrounds will be done more by the statewide campaigns than anybody else,” Madigan spokesman Steve Brown said the other day. Brown said the rally “largely duplicates what the county chairs do” and it had become “less and less an opportunity to communicate with people.” It does appear that the fairgrounds rally will be revived, although Democratic gubernatorial nominee J.B. Pritzker’s campaign is staying mum about what it will look like. They’re still “working on the details,” I was told not long ago, but are “excited for a great day.” Frankly, the whole thing needs a reboot. Ditch the hokey straw bales and endless dreary speeches and give us something interesting. Rich Miller also publishes Capitol Fax, a daily political newsletter, and CapitolFax.com.

I GUEST COMMENTARY

A change of culture and heart needed to stop Chicago violence

By James E. Gierach

My idea for stopping much of Chicago’s gun violence is to remove the reason kids in gangs are shooting one another. My idea requires a change in the economics that supports, drives and perpetuates Chicago gangs, Larry Hoover Gangster Disciples-type gangs, Al Capone-type gangs and ‘El Chapo’ Guzman-type gangs and cartels. My idea requires a cultural change, a new way of thinking about drugs, gangs and guns. But my idea has been slow to catch fire in the eye of media leaders. And it has been slow to catch fire in the hearts and minds of the public. Repeating, my idea requires a cultural change and new thinking. What change? Just say “yes” to drugs. Did I lose you? We must learn that tolerating drug use is not condoning drug abuse by others. Is there one among us who thinks we can have a “drug-free” world as the United Nations policymakers fantasized in posters and rhetoric 10 years ago? Do you believe there is a moment in time when the world has been drug-free, or when some “bad fruit” has not been prohibited, even in the Garden of Eden? The other guy’s ‘vice’ is always worse than my vice. His behavior is always more unacceptable than my behavior. He smokes, he drinks, he uses drugs, he gambles, he’s not heterosexual, monogamous, he’s black, Jewish, Muslim, Mexican, Chinese, atheist, he’s a woman, he’s a liberal. Zero tolerance is not a virtue. The nearer law and public policy approaches zero tolerance, particularly of adult consensual behavior, the narrower life’s bridge to liberty and happiness. On the other hand, tolerance and understanding are virtues. Concretely, my idea to stop Chicago violence is to take the profit out of drugs, as we once did with alcohol. Legalize, control and regulate mindaltering substances. License drug outlets, limit the number of licenses, require content labels and warnings, control the

manufacture and distribution of drugs. Take a third to half the money out of the illegal drug trade by making drugs legal. Some experts have estimated the illegal drug trade is a $500 billion a year business worldwide. By making drug sales legal, the huge prohibitionprice inflation is negated and economic incentive harnessed. Legalizing drugs will not make gangs disappear. But illegal drug market revenues will no longer rival those of Walgreens, as the Gangster Disciples’ revenues purportedly once did. Also legalizing drugs will not make guns go away, but it will stop youngsters like the South Side Chicago Bland child, a grade schooler, from wanting to sell drugs just long enough to buy a Jeep Cherokee in the early 1990s for which he was shot in the head and killed in his front yard. Legalizing drugs will not eliminate all Chicago gang bloodshed, but a 3-yearold child killed in errant gang-crossfire on Chicago’s West Side circa 2000 might still be alive today. A long line of Chicago police superintendents has unwaveringly pointed the finger at drug turf wars and drug dealing as the cause of most Chicago homicides and gunfire. It will take a cultural change and a change of heart, economically motivated, to stop Chicago’s epidemic drug prohibition violence. It will take drug legalization. The Chicago Sun-Times has been inviting public comment and ideas aimed to curb Chicago gun violence in a project called “31 Bullets,” the project name derived by dividing the billions of bullets manufactured in the U.S. annually by the U.S. population that works out to be 31 Bullets for each man, woman and child. Hopefully, one bullet can be spared on the difficult lesson broached here, so the public might consider a new drug policy to stop violence.

Palos Park resident James E. Gierach is a former Cook County assistant state’s attorney who worked Branch 66 (Homicide/Sex) in the early 1970s and formerly served as vice chairman of Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP), a nonprofit educational organization.

Technology takes mystery out of dating By Kevin Lee The answer to the title is not on Tinder, Bumble, or any other algorithm that attempts to trick you into thinking it could match your heart with what it wants. If you are old enough to crave love as opposed to the one-night stand, the beautiful thing about it is, you already know what, who, and how to love. The trouble with finding love in the 21st century and beyond is much of the mystery has been taken away by said dating apps and online services. It’s Just Lunch is not just lunch. It’s desperate people who have given up on meeting people in the thick of it — the courageous heroes and heroines that make life interesting and worth living. eHarmony has no harmony. Harmony could be found on the dance floor, picking a guitar, or watching a no-hitter. A binary algorithm matching what the mind or lust

thinks it wants hinders rather than helps you match with happiness. Tinder is where the creeps lie in the shadow of a chauvinists’ swipe. I must admit that I’m 6-foot-4 and that comes with privilege. However, I used to be so shy, I would look away from any girl I was attracted to in the middle school and high school halls. Oh, the passive humanity — times I do not miss and would not wish upon my worst enemy. Those rites of passage are when you learn and confidence comes not from a self-help book or therapy but continually putting oneself in flow of courage. The good men are out there. They are nice. When you’re ready, you’re ready, and you will know. The app knows not what thy heart can feel. Kevin Lee is a former Oak Lawn resident and a graduate of Richards High School.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Navy must take sensible approach to racial diversity According to an op-ed by Pat Buchanan, starting back in about 2009, the U.S. Naval Academy (USNA) lowered its enrollment standards for incoming freshmen so the Navy could increase its racial diversity. The USNA is on a campaign to increase minority naval officers to approximate the nonwhite enlisted percentage of the Fleet, which is 40 percent minority personnel. Unfortunately, the USNA turns away applicants with SAT scores above 600 and As and Bs in their high school courses in favor of students with SAT scores in the 500s and C grades. Minority students with SATs in the 300s and 400s and C and D grades are admitted

after attending a one-year preparatory school. These future officers will be in charge of operating complex naval weapons systems and making critical decisions impacting the security of our country. Don’t we want the most intelligent and able naval officers filling these highly responsible positions in the Fleet? As a former Navy enlisted man and naval officer, I am concerned about our Navy’s ability to conduct operations that project U.S. sea power in the world. Our Navy must right itself. — Donald Moskowitz, Londonderry, N.H.

don’t blame Father Michael Pfleger for trying to get publicity to protest the continuing violence in Chicago. Pfleger shut down a part of the Dan Ryan Expressway on Saturday to put a spotlight on “crime, joblessness and poverty” in Chicago’s neighborhoods. The disruptive protest did shine a strong light, but did it do much to really stop the violence? In fact, other than the hard work of the Chicago Police Department, it seems little else is being done to prevent the violence. Crime in Pfleger’s community of Auburn-Gresham is almost triple the average in the state of Illinois, according to “AreaVibes.com,” and 30 percent higher than the Chicago average — and Chicago’s crime average is pretty miserable. If you live in Chicago, you are playing the odds against survival. Pfleger has dedicated his life to fighting for the rights of the poor for years. He graduated from Quigley South, Loyola and became a Catholic priest in 1975, taking over as pastor of St. Sabina Church in 1981. The parish is on Chicago’s Southwest Side bounded by Western Avenue on the west and 75th Street on the north, 95th Street on the south and the Dan Ryan to the east. His parish is African American. That alone is notable. All Pfleger did with his organized protest was to anger the public and disrupt commuters — although in truth, many commuters are suburbanites traveling to and from the Loop from Chicago’s south suburbs, where crime is also higher than most other suburban communities. Even if Pfleger blocked the Stevenson Expressway, the Eisenhower Expressway and the Kennedy Expressway, would it really have made a difference, other than just shine a spotlight on Chicago’s violence? What should Pfleger do? Crime in Chicago has always been a problem but in recent years it has worsened with record annual highs and lows that are still shocking. I’m not a social scientist, but I think I can guess that Chicago’s crime is driven by the excessive poverty in most of the communities where crime is at the highest. Wealthy Chicagoans lock themselves up in Loop high-rises and gentrified neighborhoods. Many suburbanites drive in and drive out, with their doors locked. Chicago’s politicians are not doing much. They’re too busy trying to raise money to cover the pensions and benefits they have handed out generously to their loyal supporters over the years. Instead of stopping the crime, they scream about it. They point fingers everywhere except at themselves. Mayor Rahm Emanuel talks a lot about fighting crime but can’t really do much better than any of his predecessors. The crime wave remained strong even when Harold Washington and Eugene Sawyer, both African Americans, served as mayor of Chicago. Meanwhile, the city is forced to pay outrageous settlements to the alleged victims of police violence, which brings me to an important point. Do you realize that more lawsuits are filed against the Chicago Police Department and City of Chicago by victims of violence, in many cases street gang members whose parents assert they were “angels,” than are filed against the street gang members? We spend more time bashing the Chicago police and blaming them for violence and less time on the street gangs that actually take more lives than a few errant police officers. Like Pfleger’s protest, the focus on violence is on the politics, not on the solution. Instead of failed parents taking responsibility, failed Chicago aldermen and failed Catholic priests declare vows to protect their wards and parishes, respectively. They point fingers of blame at everyone else. It’s the police! The suburbs! The state of Illinois! Raising taxes and throwing money at the problem is not the answer. The answer is that the people of Chicago need to wake up and be accountable. The parents are responsible and the parents and the people who live in these communities need to get out into the streets and take them back. Blocking an expressway does nothing, other than remind us all of how poorly the problem of violence is being addressed. Ray Hanania is an award-winning former Chicago City Hall reporter and political columnist. Reach him on his website at www.Hanania.com or email him at rghanania@gmail.com


Thursday, July 12, 2018

The Reporter

7

Hurley cites accomplishments of Special Olympics in Illinois Local legislators to host free shredding event on Friday

With July marking the 50th anniversary of the creation of Special Olympics, state Rep. Fran Hurley (D-35th), a board member of Special Olympics Illinois, is highlighting the organization’s legacy and commitment to transforming the lives of people with intellectual disabilities. “Special Olympics brings athletes of all ages and abilities together, promoting inclusion and improving lives through sports training and competition,” said Hurley. “As a board member, I’m extremely appreciative of the combined efforts of all involved with this program, particularly the volunteers and families that make this experience so special for our athletes.” Hurley recently supported a bipartisan budget plan that includes funding for the operation of Special Olympics, in addition to funding generated from the sale of the Special Olympics Illinois scratch-off lottery ticket. She also introduced House Resolution 1002, recognizing the 50th anniversary of Special Olympics, celebrating the accomplishments of Justice Anne Burke and congratulating all Special Olympic athletes, past and present, on their accomplishments. More than 4,500 athletes participated in this year’s “Parade of Athletes” at Soldier Field, where the Special Olympics was first held in 1968. In commemoration of the organization’s 50th anniversary, many festivities are planned for the week of July 17

Residents are invited to protect themselves from identity theft by taking advantage of a free document shredding event in Palos Park on Friday, July 13. State Sen. Bill Cunningham (D18th) and state Rep. Fran Hurley (D-35th) are co-hosting the service, which will take place from 1 to 3 p.m. at Palos East Elementary School, 7700 W. 127th St. Residents can bring confidential documents that are printed with personally identifiable information to be safely shredded. This includes old bank statements, old pay stubs, tax returns older than seven years, bills, receipts,

Supplied photo

State Rep. Fran Hurley (D-35th, at right) gathers with athletes at the Special Olympics opening ceremony at Soldier Field.

in Chicago, including an inaugural soccer tournament that will hold its final matches at Toyota Park in Bridgeview. A total of 24 international football/soccer teams will compete. Additionally, the Law Enforcement Torch Run will take place on July 20 along the lakefront, leading to the ceremonial lighting of the Eternal Flame of Hope monument, which will be a permanent fixture at Soldier Field. Registration for the run is $75 and open to law enforcement, Special Olympics athletes and the public.

Participants are able to sign up for the full four miles or just the last two. The structured run will conclude after entering Soldier Field as the Flame of Hope is delivered to the Eternal Flame Ceremony. The Flame of Hope symbolizes Special Olympics’ bright vision of advancing the talents and abilities of people with intellectual disabilities. On Saturday, July 21, Special Olympics athletes, families, friends and supporters will kick off the next 50 years with a Global Day of Inclusion celebration at Soldier Field. The free, family-

friendly festival will offer sports activities, interactive games, exhibits, food and live entertainment. Chance the Rapper will also headline a Special Olympics charity concert at Northerly Island, 1300 S. Lynn White Dr., featuring Usher, Smokey Robinson, Daya, Jason Mraz, O.A.R. and Francis and the Lights. A full calendar of events is available at https://www.specialolympics.org/50th-anniversaryevent-schedule.aspx. For more information on Special Olympics, or to get involved, visit www. soill.org.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR CHICAGO RIDGE Seeking ‘Little Chefs’ for cooking classes

The next Little Chef Cooking class sessions will be held for children ages 4 to 6 from 6 to 7 p.m. Wednesdays through July 25, at the Freedom Activity Center, 6252 W. Birmingham St., Chicago Ridge. Children will have an opportunity to make a new recipe, along with working on a coloring sheet or activity to go with it. Participants should dress appropriately because it could be messy. The registration fee is $15 for residents and $25 for non-residents. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 636-4900.

Girls Movie and Makeover Night is planned

Movie and Makeover Night will be held from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Friday, July 13 at the Freedom Activity Center, 6252 W. Birmingham St., Chicago Ridge. The event is for girls only from age 6 to 14. Girls can get together for a night of friends, films, fun and a fresh look. The registration fee is $7 for residents and $12 for non-residents. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 636-4900.

Free Play Mondays to be held at Freedom Activity Center

The Chicago Ridge Park District will offer Free Play Mondays through the summer at the Freedom Activity Center, 6252 S. Birmingham St. Children ages 4 to 6 can play from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.; ages 7 to 9 from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.; and ages 10 to 14 from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Sessions will continue through Aug. 13. Kids will engage in games such as tag, freezeball, Saturn ball, rock climbing and kickball. The focus will be on kids running around and burning off energy. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 636-4900 or visit www.chicagoridgeparks.com.

Chicago Ridge Park District hosts Experience the Parks 5K Run/Walks

The Chicago Ridge Park District will be hosting an Experience the Park 5K Run/ Walk beginning at 8:30 a.m. Saturday, July 14 while participants will run or walk through Freedom Park, Menard Park and Memorial Park while tackling a few obstacles along the way. The registration fee is $10 per person and includes a T-shirt and pancake breakfast. Registration is available online at www.chicagoridgeparks.com or in person at the Freedom Activity Center, 6252 W. Birmingham St., or the Frontier Field House, 9807 S. Sayre Ave. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 636-4900.

Board Game Days will be held at Freedom Activity Center

The Chicago Park District will hold Board Game Card Game days will be held this summer at the Freedom Activity Center, 6252 W. Birmingham St., Chicago Ridge. Children can be dropped for a night of board games. Sessions will be held from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. for 4- to 6-year-olds; 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. for 4- to 6-year-olds; and 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. for 10- to 14-year-olds Wednesdays through Aug. 15. Games include Monopoly, Chutes and Ladders, Trouble, Clue, Scrabble, Risk, Uno and Rummy. Games can challenge children scholastically and help develop social skills. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 636-4900.

Zumba classes

The next session of zumba classes will be held from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays, July 19 through Aug. 23, at the Freedom Activity Center, 6252 W. Birmingham St., Chicago Ridge.

The program is designed for both the athlete and the beginner. The dance rhythms include meringue, salsa and reggae. The program is for participants ages 18 and over. The fee is $41 for residents and $51 for non-residents. The fee for both classes is $66 for residents and $86 for non-residents. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 636-4900.

Traverse Wall Climbing session at Freedom Activity Center

The next Traverse Wall Climbing session will be held from 6 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, July 17 at the Freedom Activity Center, 6252 W. Birmingham St, Chicago Ridge. The program is for kids ages 7 to 10. The registration fee is $15 for residents and $25 for non-residents. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 636-4900.

HICKORY HILLS

Preschool sessions begin in September

The Hickory Hills Park District Preschool sessions for families who would like to register their children for a variety of classes, which begin in September. Preschool classes will be held from 8:45 to 11:45 a.m. or 12:15 to 3:15 p.m. five days a week. Full-time sessions will be held Monday through Friday for $172 a year. Classes on Monday, Wednesday and Friday are $960 a year. Classes for two days a week, Tuesday and Thursday, are $785 a year. Classes will continue through next May. The office is open Monday through Friday for registration. In order to register, a child’s birth certificate and immunization records are required. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 598-1233 or visit www.hhparkdistrict.org.

Preschool, kindergarten before and after care is offered

Preschool and kindergarten before and after care sessions are being offered through the Hickory Hills Park District. Parents who have children who are enrolled in half-day preschool or kindergarten can also be signed up for the before and after care program. The Before after care program takes place 8:45 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The fee is $80 for residents and $85 for non-residents per week for the before care program. The fee is $102 for residents and $107 for non-residents per week for the after care program. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 598-1233 or visit www.hhparkdistrict.org.

OAK LAWN

Vacation Bible School to be held at Oak Lawn Bible Church

The annual Vacation Bible School will be offered from Monday, July 16 through Friday, July 20 at the Oak Lawn Bible Church, 9435 S. 54th Ave. The program will be held from 9 a.m. to noon daily and is open to children entering preschool (ages 3 and 4) through those entering the fifth grade.Thisyear’s program theme is “Game On! Gearing Up for Life’s Big Game.” Each day kids will make crafts, play games, enjoy snacks, sing songs, and learn about missions. The program is free and children do not need to be members of the church to attend. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 857-9800 or visit www.oaklawnbible.org. To register online, go to oaklawnbible.org/vbs.

PALOS HILLS Friendship Fest to return to Palos Hills

The City of Palos Hills Resource and Recreation Department will be hosting their

annual Friendship Festival on the grounds of Moraine Valley Community College, 107th Street and 88th Avenue, from today (Thursday, July 12) through Sunday, July 15. This event will include a carnival, kids’ entertainment, adult bands, food vendors and conclude with a fireworks display on Sunday night. Mega bands are currently being sold at the Palos Hills Community Center, 8455 W.103rd St. Mega bands are $40 if purchased before noon on July 12. They are $50 at the fest. For more information about Friendship Fest, call (708) 430-4500.

Palos Twp. hosts health services

A variety of health services and other programs will be offered this summer at the Palos Township Community Center, 10802 S. Roberts Road, Palos Hills. Healthy heart screening will be held from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, July 17. Fees do apply. Residents should call for an appointment. Free bingo will be held at 10 a.m. Thursday, July 19. Cholesterol and HA1C sessions will be held from 8:30 to 12:30 p.m. Monday, July 23. Fees do apply. Residents should call for an appointment. Hearing screenings will be held from 9 a.m. to noon Tuesday, July 24. The sessions are free but call for appointments. A free Medicare seminar will be held on Wednesday, July 25. A free presentation on back and neck problems will be held at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 1. More information about the Medicare seminar and registration for the back and neck problems presentation and other programs can be be arranged by calling (708) 598-2441.

‘Touch a Truck’ event to be held at Town Square Park

The Palos Hills Community Resource and Recreation Department is hosting “Touch a Truck” from 10 a.m. to noon Friday, July 27 at Town Square Park, 8455 W. 103rd St., Palos Hills. The free event offers young children and their families the opportunity to sit in, touch, discover and safely explore big trucks and other objects on wheels. Kids will have an opportunity of pressing buttons, climbing into different vehicles and meet the men and women drive them. Anyone who would like to display a vehicle or have questions can call the Community Center, (708) 430-4500.

National Night Out to be held in Palos Hills

The City of Palos Hills Resource and Recreation Department, in cooperation with the City of Palos Hills Police Department, North Palos Fire Protection District and Green Hills Public Library District, will be hosting a National Night Out on Tuesday, Aug. 7. The free event will take place from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Town Square Park, 8455 W. 103rd St., Palos Hills. National Night Out is offered throughout the country, once a year and gives local police the opportunity to interact with local agencies and create community camaraderie. Activities include a performance from a rock ‘n roll band, Centerfold; a balloon artist; face painter; and tours of both police and fire vehicles. An inflatable obstacle course and bingo will also be offered. More information can be obtained by calling the Palos Hills Community Center, (708) 430-4500.

WORTH

Outdoor concert to be held at Marrs-Meyer AL Post

The outdoor music festival continues with a performance from 7 to 11 p.m. Saturday, July 21 in the parking lot at the Marrs-Meyer American Legion Post, 11001 S. Depot Ave., Worth. The Legends of Rock and Roll will perform. Admission is free. Food will be available and raffles will be held.

invoices, credit card applications and outdated medical records. The service is free and available to residents of the 18th Senate District and 35th House District. No commercial document shredding will be available. Participants are limited to two boxes per vehicle. Paper clips, staples and other bindings should be removed from all documents before shredding. Cardboard boxes may not be left at the event site. Shredding will be done until the shred trucks reach capacity. More information can be obtained by calling Cunningham’s office at (773) 445-8128.

DEATH NOTICES Michael Brady Michael T. Brady,72, died Friday at his Hickory Hills home. Mr. Brady sold automobile parts at an automotive center. Survivors include a daughter, Aeleen Kailer; son, Michael Brady; brothers, James and Daniel Brady; and two grandchildren. Interment was private. Arrangements were made by Lack & Sons Funeral Home.

Lillian Breyer Lillian A. Breyer (nee Mullner), 84, a former Worth resident, died Friday at her home in Naperville. Mrs. Breyer was a homemaker. Survivors include a daughter, Laura Kapala; son, Ken Breyer; five grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. Services were Saturday from Schmaedeke Funeral Home to Our Lady of the Ridge Church. Interment followed at St. Mary Cemetery.

Herbert Lundberg Herbert A. Lundberg, 87, a Palos Hills resident, died July 3 at Palos Hospital. Mr. Lundberg, a U.S. Korean War Navy veteran, was a 34-year employee with AT&T. He was a member of the Harald Viking Lodge 13. He was a longtime parishioner of Sacred Heart Church. Survivors include his wife, Helen (nee Arcuri); daughter, Sandra Leonard; sons, Leonard and Michael; four grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Services were Tuesday from Hills Funeral Home to Sacred Heart Church. Interment with full military honors followed at Holy Sepulchre Cemetery.

Richard Skowron Richard T. Skowron, 76, a Hickory Hills resident, died June 30 at the Long Term Care Center in Joliet. Mr. Skowron, a U.S. Army veteran, was a retired carpenter for the University of Illinois at Chicago. Survivors include daughters, Lynn Phelan, Dawn Mani and Sharon Skowron; brother, Gustav Skowron; seven grandchildren; two greatgrandchildren; and many nieces and nephews. Services were Saturday from Hills Funeral Home to St. Patricia Church. Interment followed at Resurrection Cemetery.

Daniel Tiggelaar Daniel J. Tiggelaar, 67, died June 28 at his Evergreen Park home. Mr. Tiggelaar was an electrician. He was the past commander and member of the Evergreen Park American Legion Post 854. Survivors include daughters, Jill Niemiec and Julie Popovic; two grandchildren; and close relatives and friends. Services were July 2 at Kosary Funeral Home. Interment followed at Lincoln National Cemetery.


8 The Reporter

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Help protect vulnerable family members from scam artists

COMINGS & GOINGS

Chicago Ridge Mall offers Holiday Pop-Up Battle

R

obin Wilson won the first Battle of the PopUp at Chicago Ridge Mall and opened her custom hair business Le’ Tresses in June, which has been well received by the community. The response to the first challenge has inspired Chicago Ridge Mall to offer a Bob second PopBong Up Battle for the upcoming holiday season. “We’re excited to announce a second Battle of the PopUp for the holiday season,” said Sandy Martinez, Chicago Ridge Mall’s marketing director. “There has been a lot of community support for our local tenants and we are thrilled to add a holiday contest and look forward to seeing the ideas.” The Battle of the Pop-Up Challenge asks area entrepreneurs to submit plans and concepts for fresh, innovative ideas, now through Friday, July 20. The winner receives a rent-free space for six months, use of existing store fixtures, and free utilities. The winner also receives a $500 merchandising package from the center that includes interior signage, table-printed displays, and graphic design services. To enter, participants must be prepared to obtain a business license by Oct. 16 and operate their store during mall hours from Thursday, Nov. 1, through Saturday, April 30, 2019. Entries will be judged on business strategy, concept creativity, and likelihood of profitability among other criteria. There is no cost to enter. Applicants can enter on the Chicago Ridge Mall website or drop off an entry at the mall management office. For complete rules, visit the mall’s Facebook pages. Winners will be notified the

I

week of Aug. 15. Southlake Mall in Hobart, Ind., Louis Joliet Mall in Joliet and The Promenade Mall in Bolingbrook are also holding their own Holiday Battle of the Pop-Up challenges. Information can be found on their Facebook pages.

‘Top Chef’ concession stand opens at Toyota Park

Bravo Media and Spectra, the new venue manager at Toyota Park, have launched a new kind of concession stand at the stadium in Bridgeview that offers soccer fans more than hot dogs and nachos. Top Chef Quickfire, named after the Bravo network’s hit culinary competition show, opened June 30 and features a menu inspired by winning creations from the show’s past contestants including season 15 winner Joe Flamm from Spiaggia and former Chicago chefs Radhika Desai and Dale Talde. Other chefs slated to contribute dishes to the rotating menu include Carrie Baird, Chris Scott, Spike Mendelsohn, Tre Wilcox, Cliff Crooks, and Harold Dieterle. Bravo described it as the first-ever premium concession stand concept. “Our community loves its food as much as its sports,” Bridgeview Mayor Steve Landek said. “’Top Chef’ opening its first fast-casual concept at Toyota Park in Bridgeview will delight soccer fans and foodies alike.” Scott Swiger, Spectra’s Vice President, Culinary Excellence, said, “We decided on a Top ChefQuickfire concept because it makes high-end cuisine approachable for fans to enjoy, while enhancing the experience of going to a soccer game. Spectra is an industry innovator, so we’re excited to be partnering with ‘Top Chef’ to bring their culinary artistry from television and put it in the hands of their fans. They’ll

Supplied photo

Spectra chefs show off some of the new menu items available at Top Chef Quickfire concession stand at Toyota Park in Bridgeview.

get an actual taste of what they’ve been seeing on-screen for 15 seasons now.” Top Chef Quickfire will be open during home games for the Chicago Fire and Chicago Red Stars soccer teams and other major events. Both Bravo and Spectra are divisions of Comcast.

Jiffy Lube closes in Palos Heights

The Jiffy Lube auto shop at 12861 S. Harlem Ave. in Palos Heights closed last month. There is a sign on the building directing customers to a Jiffy Lube location at 5401 W. 159th St. in Oak Forest.

Fifth Third finally opening in Bridgeview

Fifth Third Bank is finally ready to open its branch at 7200 W. 87th St. in Bridgeview. The building has been unused since it was remodeled more than four years ago. The Cincinnati-based financial announced late last month that the Bridgeview building was one of seven new financial centers that were being opened in Florida, Michigan and Illinois. “We are pleased to add these new locations to our existing financial center networks in Florida, Illinois and Michigan,”

Phil McHugh, head of Fifth Third’s Consumer Bank said in a release. “Our consultative approach allows our staff to identify the needs of our customers and then propose solutions to those needs. These centers will offer a full range of banking, home-ownership and retirement-planning services.” The new financial centers represent a key part of Fifth Third’s growth strategy, even as its digital transactions are growing. Financial centers offer consultations and expertise from financial experts. “Our financial centers are an important part of delivering the best experience to our customers,” Mike Butera, head of Fifth Third’s retail banking business, said in a release. “We want to give our customers the right balance between digital and personal. Think about wanting to check your account balance on your app, deposit a check through your phone, get cash from the ATM and stop at a financial center to talk about a home equity line.” If you see a new business in town or wonder what happened to an old favorite, drop me a line at bobbong@hotmail. com. You can track business openings and closings at http:// bobbongonbusiness.com/

Donors honored at Children’s Museum in Oak Lawn event

A private event was held last month at the Children’s Museum in Oak Lawn to show appreciation for the support of it donors. The event was sponsored by Buschbach Insurance and Thrivent Financial and included a variety of desserts that complimented wine provided by Cooper’s Hawk of Oak Lawn. The night’s entertainment included music on the harp by Raquel Caneva. Oak Lawn Mayor Sandra Bury was one of multiple speakers

and highlighted the impact that the museum and its donors’ contributions have on the local community. Adam Woodworth, the museum’s executive director, addressed attendees to thank both board members and donors for their continued support. Woodworth announced that the museum’s founder, Carol Marsh, will be present for the museum’s 15th anniversary celebration on July 21 at Lake

Shore Park. Donors also received a preview of the museum’s upcoming Topography Table made in partnership with Lockport Township High School. The new exhibit will give visitors the ability to create landforms such as hills and valleys by using sand. Users will experience augmented reality as lower areas in the table fill with water that is projected onto the sand.

AREA PROPERTY TRANSFERS Following are the property transfers in the area, according to the latest report, as received from the Cook County Recorder of Deeds Office. The Reporter Newspaper does not attempt to correct errors made by that office.

Chicago Ridge

Arthurs Brian to McGury Terese R, 10435 Barnard Dr, $195,000.00; Graham Rodger S Jr Ind Extr to Plebani Paolo, 10716 Oak Ave, $196,000.00; Premiere Rlty Services & Investments Inc to Makuch Tomasz, 10524 Ridge Cove Dr, Unit #28B, $111,000.00.

Evergreen Park Agent Equity Partners Llc to Pinnacle Dream Home Inc, 9923 S Trumbull Ave, $120,000.00; Brosman Dennis J to Mallett Kendall, 9136 S Harding Ave, $195,000.00; Herzog David R Tr to Zamora Edwin, 8831 S Mozart St, $122,000.00; Yerkes Michael Tr to Rayas Bulmaro, 8758 S Talman Ave, $160,000.00; Chicago Title Land Trust Co Tr

LEGAL NOTICE

to Keila Sharon, 9144 S Troy St, $165,000.00.

Hickory Hills Zarco Genaro to Niezgoda Marek J, 8607 Kean Ave, $215,000.00; Sison Jose to Karbowniczek Wit, 9337 S 82nd Ave, $350,000.00; Judicial Sales Corp to Mohammed Saleem, 9018 W 91st Pl, $165,500.00.

Oak Lawn Hill Amber to Hawkins Mary S, 4009 93rd Pl, Unit #40093B, $60,500.00; Bell Gary J Tr to Naik Sagar S, 5008 107th St, $185,000.00; Kilbourn 111 Llc to Tdpensija Llc - Kilbourn Series, 11036 Kilbourn Ave, $1,100,000.00; Seneczko Emil to Serna Jaime, 5913 W 99th St, $167,500.00; Donlin Nolan M to Larsen Fred E, 9217 50th Ave, $165,000.00; Marquette Bk Tr to Eid Ayman Abu, 6204 W 93rd Pl, $330,000.00; Kocolowski Elaine to Garcia Martha E Valencia, 4034 Almansa Ln, $110,000.00; Giadla Holdings Llc to Goldentree Prop Llc, 10326 Mayfield Ave, $715,000.00; Oak Lawn Ctr 835 Llc to Hsg-Kre

Ol Prop Owner Llc, 6701 W 95th St, $10,345,500.00; Hennawi Mohammad Z to Alarayshi Ahmed, 11036 W 111th St, Unit #110363D, $109,000.00; Hand Bernard Sr to Pausz Victoria, 11040 Jodan Dr, Unit #110401B, $115,000.00; Nash Joseph to Clark Kellie, 10608 Laramie Ave, $240,000.00; Giadla Holdings Llc-10310 Mayfield to Goldentree Prop Llc, 10310 Mayfield Ave, $705,000.00; De Pasquale Kristin to Leser Adam, 5209 W 88th St, $170,000.00; Finance Amer Reverse Llc to Costache Ana, 9820 Pulaski Rd, Unit #1122, $68,000.00; Bojko Elzbieta to Awad Saket, 9621 Melvina Ave, $240,000.00; Wilson Maureen Tr to Montvidas Linas, 10121 Maple Ave, $210,000.00; Deutsche Bk Natl Trust Co to Byrer Jesse E, 9013 51st Ave, $130,500.00; Mateyack Mary Ann to Bansley Frank N, 9619 Mansfield Ave, $150,000.00; Chicago Title Land Trust Co Tr to Burk Maureen, 10517 Tripp Ave, $125,000.00.

Palos Hills Herr Brian M to Sularz Leszek Zenon, 11139 East Rd, Unit #1.14E+19, $133,000.00; Intercounty Judicial Sales Corp to Mdeina Michael, 10735 W Olympia Cir, $230,000.00; Chicago Title Land Trust Co Tr to Engelschall Janet, 11312 Sycamore Ln, Unt #67A, $156,000.00; Intercounty Judicial Sales Corp to Dgdb Llc Series II, 10523 S 80th Ct, $81,500.00; Deeb Mohammed to Deni Intesar Al, 9019 W Windsor Dr, $300,000.00; Intercounty Judicial Sales Corp to Joe Inv Llc, 7956 W Tiffany Ct, $126,000.00.

Worth Matulik Michael S to Kinderbay Ryan A, 10627 S Worth Ave, $150,000.00; McNulty Const Llc to Camacho Enrique Jr, 7013 W Crandall Ave, $229,000.00; Kurnat Mariusz to Koscak Stefan, 10840 S Oak Park Ave, $220,000.00; Roach Dawn M to Waller Thomas E, 11432 S Neenah Ave, $190,000.00.

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

Notice is Hereby Given that on 8-26-18, a sale will be held at Sam’s Auto Sales & Repair Service at 6815 S. Western Avenue, Chicago, Il. 60636, 773-776-7076, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the Laws, of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within Thirty days of the publication of this notice.

Notice is Hereby Given that on 8-26-18, a sale will be held at J & R Service Center, Inc. at 405 N. State, Route 53, Gardner, Il. 60424, 815-252-8829, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within Thirty days of the publication of this notice.

LAMONT HARRIS

Notice is Hereby Given that on 8-26-18, a sale will be held at Excellence Auto Care, Inc. dba Steve’s Auto Care at 5717 W. 87th Street, Oak Lawn, Il. 60453, 708529-3343, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within Thirty days of the publication of this notice.

MATTHEW W. SCOTT

2007 CHEVROLET

2014 KIA

ISAIAH JOHNSON, JR. & WALID M. ABELHADI

Vin # 1GNET13H772250037

Vin # KNAGM4A79E5495361

2003 INFINITI

Lien Amount: $10,776.00

Lien Amount: $6,047.34

Vin # JNKCV54E73H202850 Lien Amount: $2,208.89

f you have older family members whose cognitive functions or decision-making abilities have declined, or who are lonely or recently widowed, you might need to help protect them against financial scams. What steps should you take? First of all, try to gain a good sense of their overall financial activity. Look for red flags, such as a reluctance to discuss money matters, consistently unpaid bills, unexplained withdrawals, mysterious wire transfers or a sudden need to purchase large quantities of gift cards. And watch out for new “best friends” or caretakers who show an unusual interest in your loved one’s finances. Whether or not you’ve observed any of these activities, you can help your elderly family members by making these moves: • Have checks (such as Social Security payments) directly deposited. You can help Scott a lot of potenJohnson your family members avoid tial trouble by having their checks deposited directly into their bank accounts. • Seek permission to become a joint account owner. By becoming a joint account owner on your elderly family members’ checking and savings accounts, you can review statements for suspicious activity. Of course, your loved ones may be initially reluctant to add your name, but if you have a good relationship with them, you should be able to explain the benefits. • Shred bank statements, credit card offers and notices of lottery or sweepstakes winnings. One of the most useful gifts you can give to your elderly family members may be a shredder. Encourage them to use it to shred old bank statements, credit card offers and other financial documents. • Get on a “do not call” list. Telephone scammers are persistent and devious. By registering your family members’ house and cellphones at www.donotcall.gov, you may be able to reduce their exposure to unwanted calls. • Obtain power of attorney. By creating a power of attorney, your loved ones can designate you or another trusted relative or friend to assist with their finances now – for dayto-day assistance and protection from scammers – and later, should they become incapacitated. Again, you will need to employ some sensitivity when discussing this issue. • Check references of caretakers. As mentioned above, some caretakers are, unfortunately, dishonest. Before you hire one, check out this person’s references. And even when you do, be careful – scam artists have been known to use accomplices as references, so you will need to be thorough in your research and questions. • Get to know your family members’ financial advisors. If possible, become acquainted with your older family members’ financial advisors. Any reputable advisor will welcome a connection with their clients’ loved ones. And if you are involved in any estate plans, this multi-generational relationship will prove beneficial for everyone. • Ask to meet any new “friends” they have met online. When someone is lonely, they become vulnerable to online friendships. Sometimes, these new friends make promises of meeting, but never show – and then they suddenly need money for one reason or another. It can be challenging to guard against all threats posed by the scammers of the world. But by staying alert and taking the appropriate preventive actions, you may be able to help safeguard your loved ones’ financial security. Scott Johnson, CFP, is a financial advisor with Edward Jones, 8146 W. 111th St., Palos Hills, (708) 974-1965. Edward Jones does not provide legal advice. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones financial advisor.

Moraine Valley accepting nominations for its 2019 Alumni Hall of Fame Moraine Valley Community College is accepting nominations for its 2019 Alumni Hall of Fame, created to recognize and honor alumni who have excelled in their professional fields, made an impact through volunteerism in their community or have made service contributions to the college. Nominees must have earned a minimum of 30 credit hours at Moraine Valley and are eligible for consideration 10 years from the date of their last registered class. Completed nomination forms must be received by midnight on Sept. 30. Those selected for the Alumni Hall of Fame will be honored at a reception Feb. 21, 2019, where

they will receive their award. “We have so many alumni who are out in the world making a difference, both professionally and personally,” said Patti Friend, director of Alumni and Annual Programs. “The Hall of Fame showcases the best of the best from Moraine Valley and we welcome the opportunity to recognize them.” Complete information on the nomination process, as well as the nomination form and highlights of previous year’s inductees, are available at morainevalley.edu/hofnomination. More information can be obtained by contacting Friend at friendp5@morainevalley.edu or (708) 974-5551.

Hickory Hills Woodworking Club to meet at different location on July 12 The Hickory Hills Woodworking Club will hold their next meeting from 7 to 9 p.m. today (Thursday, July 12) at the Rockier Store, 15758 S. LaGrange Road, Orland Park. The woodworking club usu-

ally meets the second Thursday of every month (excluding December) at the Oak View Center in Oak Lawn. Anyone who is interested in joining the club is invited to attend tonight’s meeting.

Mortgage Rates Around the Area First Midwest Bank (as of July 9) 30-year fixed 15-year fixed 30-year fixed Jumbo

RATES 4.500 4.000 4.500

United Trust Bank (as of July 9) 30-year fixed 15-year fixed 10-year fixed

RATES 4.625 4.125 4.250

Prospect Savings Bank (as of July 10) 30-year fixed 20-year fixed 15-year fixed

RATES 4.500 4.250 3.875

APR 4.045 4.055 4.555

POINTS 0 0 0

APR 4.647 4.162 4.304

POINTS 0 0 0

APR 4.617 4.410 4.077

POINTS 0 0 0

All rates subject to change daily. Equal opportunity lenders.


The Reporter

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Dog

Continued from Page 1

service as an explosive-patrol working dog from the Department of the Navy. The commendation that came with the medal awarded in 2012 states that he was honored for demonstrating “keen detection ability during three tours of duty in Afghanistan, Iraq and Djibouti.” It stated that Lion conducted 32 combat missions, detecting 165 pounds of high-grade military explosives, numerous assault rifles, and IEDs (improvised explosive devices) with no loss of life or injury. It went on to state that Lion’s attention to detail was pivotal in allowing servicemen and women to complete 23,000 building, vehicle and open-air inspections, and 5,000 explosive inspections. “He remained a very active dog when he came here,” said Danalewich. “We walked three to five miles a day.” Danalewhich said he also occasionally took Lion to an obstacle course for training dogs near 135th and Harlem Avenue in Palos Heights. “He really liked that,” he said. “He was very obedient. He never needed to be on a leash when we were out walking and would come to heel right away. The neighbors were amazed by

Dist. 127.5

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the Encore Curriculum Renewal Committee, the Safety Committee, and the Response to Intervention (RtI) Committee. Youngberg earned a bachelor’s degree in elementary education with a physical education emphasis from Eastern Illinois University. He also earned a sports management master’s degree from Eastern Illinois University and a master’s degree in educational administration from Concordia University. Youngberg lives in New Lenox with his wife, Michelle, and their son, Grayson. “I am excited, honored, and humbled to have been named the next principal of Finley Junior High School, a school that is blessed to have exceptional staff, outstanding students, and a great community,” Youngberg said. “I look forward to the years to come and building upon the many accomplishments at Finley Junior High School. Go Vikings!” “Youngberg brings enthusiasm, a love of working with children, a wealth of experience, and a passion for the vision and mission of Chicago Ridge School District 127.5,” Russell said. “Geoff is a true leader in learning who will continue the great things taking place at Finley Junior High.” The Finley Junior High staff, Grachan, and Youngberg will work closely together over the

DisABILITY Continued from Page 1

in May and others who are entering their senior year will help these individuals take part in the activities. Many of the participants have physical ailments, so the carnivallike event is held indoors. The heat and changes in weather may be difficult for these individuals to cope with, Lyons said. Special food will be made available for the guests with their disabilities in mind. Lyons pointed out that the Disability Defenders are not directly associated with Marist High School. The group supports and works with Blue Cap, Elim Christian Services, Garden Center Services, Park Lawn in Oak Lawn, and the Sertoma Center for the disabled. Together, with these organizations, they reach out to provide opportunities and fun activities for the disabled and mentally challenged. “Marist has been generous in hosting this event,” Lyons said about his alma mater. “That’s the beauty of all this. My vote is to empower these Marist students to work with donors and these individuals. The board of directors we have also provides a lot of support.” This will be the third year of the disABILITY Day program at Marist. Lyons came up with the idea of holding the event after

SUDOKU

Answers

that. “He responded to hand motions. I learned all the signals for him to do things like crawl toward me, like he was taught to do because of being under gunfire when he was on duty. But I didn’t make him do that stuff much. I figured he was retired,” said Danalewich. “He was a very quiet dog. He was kind of a loner. He very seldom barked, because he wasn’t allowed to when he was on duty. You would have to get him very excited to do that. “But he was very protective. If someone came in the house, especially if they were carrying a gun, because he could smell the gunpowder, he would lie between the person and my wife and me,” he added. “He was telling us to be wary of that person.” Danalewich, whose wife, Mary Ann, died in 2014, said he was sorry that his son, Keith, could not come home to see Lion one last time. But Keith is stationed in Washington state now and was at sea when it happened. Lion was cremated and Danalewich said he is just waiting for a specially made decorative box for the dog’s remains to be completed. It will have his military insignia and his official number, F384, emblazoned on it. “I’m not burying him. He’s going to be in my house forever,” he said. next year to ensure a smooth transition, Russell said. Youngberg will officially begin as principal on Monday, July 1, 2019. During her final year, Grachan said she will continue to introduce programs and hold events at Finley. A program saluting veterans will be held at the school in honor of Veterans Day. “I’m going to be moving on to other tasks,” said Grachan, who arrived at Finley after holding several administrative posts at other schools that including teaching for a year in Germany. “We have been making great strides at Finley. We do so much here and the teachers do such a great job. Seventy-five percent of the staff I had a hand in hiring. And the ones I didn’t hire. I wish I did. They are all so great and fantastic.” Although she still enjoys serving as principal, Grachan said it is time to step aside. “As you age, you just have more added responsibilities,” said Grachan, who lives in Homer Glen. “I’ve been lucky and fortunate to work here at Finley. You want to give it your all. But it is a job that has long hours.” Grachan would like to spend more time at home with her husband and see her two daughters more often. She also has a grandson. Although she is leaving as principal, Grachan will not completely retire. “I’ve had some offers and I will be looking into them,” she said. serving his senior service hours at Park Lawn in Oak Lawn while at Marist. Most of those activities were held outdoors. That’s when he came up with the idea of holding an indoor carnival for these individuals in air-conditioned comfort. “The biggest thing is to have people with disabilities feel good about themselves,” Lyons said. “We want to create an awareness for everyone and that people with disabilities should feel comfortable and have fun.” Along with the games, Lyons said the guests will be treated to live music and raffle baskets. Lyons said that through the efforts of the Marist students, volunteers and donors, the event should raise $10,000. Most of the funding will go to families who have individuals with special needs. Money will also go to organizations that the Disability Defenders partner with. “Thousands of prizes will be given out,” Lyons said. “We want to make sure that everyone goes home with a prize.” Lyons, who now lives in Chicago, will graduate from Arizona State University in December with a degree in organizational leadership. He believes disABILITY Day will have another strong turnout Saturday. “I’m incredibly passionate about this,” Lyons said. “We would like it to be even bigger, and it will be. Lots of donors come from the Palos area. Palos Heights and other communities have been incredibly generous.”

CROSSWORD

Answers

9

Hockey champ World champion hockey player and Evergreen Park resident Abbey Murphy waves to the crowd during the Evergreen Park Independence Day Parade on July 3. Murphy, who is going into her junior year at Mother McAuley High School, played on the under-18 USA team that won the World Women’s Championships sponsored by the International Ice Hockey Foundation last January in Russia. Photo by Dermot Connolly

Brannigan

Continued from Page 1

Roberts Road, Palos Hills. More than 100 people showed up for the first protest on July 10, 2017, and attendance hasn’t fluctuated much in all the subsequent months. Brannigan is under fire for postings she made on social media about Muslims and Middle Eastern people. Protestors at Monday’s meeting for the first time carried placards printed with screen shots of her social media pages, showing nowdeleted messages in which she asks, “Why are all our schools filling with Middle East students without proper documentation?” Other postings that have been deemed offensive include one on Facebook in which Brannigan describes watching President Trump and family on a trip to the Middle East in May 2017. “Am particularly proud that our women are not wearing headscarves. We American women are being represented with dignity!” she wrote. Brannigan last year issued a clarification, then an apology, both of which were published in their entity in The Reporter. However, neither has been accepted by people who seek her removal from the board. Her apology has been almost universally dismissed as insincere or too little, too late by her opponents. But despite the pressure on her and the pressure on the board of trustees to, in turn, pressure her to resign, Brannigan has told The Reporter on more than one occasion she isn’t going anywhere. “As you can see, almost all is the same old comments about the same old posts,” she wrote in an email Tuesday morning. “I do think that a few of the comments by the protesters however are now becoming more

introspective and perhaps that is a good thing for all of us and communication can begin. Again, I am hopeful that the law will be recognized and respected and we can move on.” But any introspection detected amid the public commentary Monday night was in short supply to the sentiments that have dominated the meeting process since last year. “You should be ashamed of yourself, and you should leave,” said one of about a dozen people clearly opposed to her who spoke publicly at the meeting. “Isn’t it about time you all take a stand?” said Basem Kawar to the entire board. Kawar is the national coordinator of the National Network of Arab American Communities. “Isn’t it about time you all join us in our demand for her resignation? She’s bringing this entire board down. This is a shame upon this board.” Palos Township covers all or parts of Palos Heights, Palos Hills, Palos Park, Orland Park, Willow Springs, Worth, Bridgeview and Hickory Hills. The board is comprised of four trustees, including Brannigan, as well as the township supervisor, assessor, highway commissioner and clerk. All positions are elected. Township Supervisor Colleen Schumann has repeatedly informed the protestors that she, nor anyone else, has the power to force Brannigan from a position to which the public elected her. Schumann has also on several occasions officially distanced the board from the thoughts and language Brannigan used in her controversial social media posts. But at Monday’s meeting, at least a few people were not in opposition to the trustee. Outside the building, before the meeting room doors were opened, a man and a woman who preferred to not be identified spoke briefly to The Reporter.

“Here to support Sharon Brannigan, that’s all,” said the woman. “She’s a good person,” said the man. When asked to explain what he meant, he claimed he was being challenged by the question. “I don’t want to talk to you no more,” he said, and ended the interaction. John T. took to the microphone to say: “I don’t know what’s in your heart. I want to remind everyone that we all have had moments. “I do believe there’s been a lot of namecalling and ridicule directed at you,” he said, suggesting that perhaps a larger agenda is at work, an agenda in which politics is playing a role. “Over the last year, since I’ve been coming to these meetings, the majority of people who have spoken against you have used ridicule to express their feelings,” he said. “When I’ve spoken to some of the people in this room, one-on-one, they seem to be reasonable and willing to listen, which suggests to me there’s something bigger going on that does not involve Sharon Brannigan.” John T. said more leaders have to get involved. “We need a town hall meeting, made up of our political leaders — not just the township trustees, but our mayors, aldermen, school board members, even Congressman Lipinski,” he said. “A forum all of us can get answers to our questions from our elected officials.” Brannigan ran unsuccessfully against Lipinski in 2014. Her seat as trustee comes up for election in 2021. “As far as Sharon Brannigan is concerned,” said John T., “stop the ridicule.” “If you like candidate Brannigan, vote yes. If you don’t, vote for someone else,” he said. The next general meeting of the Palos Township Board will be held at 7 p.m. Monday, Aug. 13 at 10802 S. Roberts Road, Palos Hills.

LIBRARY HAPPENINGS

OAK LAWN

‘Friends’ to host trip to see onewoman play about Ann Landers

A trip to see the “The Lady with All the Answers: Ann Landers” will be held on Wednesday, Aug. 8 through the Friends of the Oak Lawn Library, 9427 S. Raymond Ave. Guests of the Oak Lawn Library will meet at 11 a.m. at the library to see the performance at the Theatre at the Center in Munster, Ind. The scheduled return will be about 5 p.m. This one-woman play unfolds in 1975 when advice columnist Landers can be seen in her Lake Shore Drive apartment in Chicago. She shares some of her stories as she prepares to write the most difficult column of her career. Lunch is served in the theater’s dining room before the performance. The registration fee is $68 for members and $73 for non-members. Only cash or checks are the accepted forms of payment. No refunds or exchanges will be given. The trip is not wheelchair accessible. More information can be obtained by calling Joanne Neff, (708) 422-4990, or visit www.olpl.org.

Michelle’s ‘Magical Poodles’ to visit library

Michelle, with her trained poodles, presents dog history, safety and the importance of service animals for youths from 1 to 1:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 17 at the Oak Lawn Library. Guests who stay after the program can meet Michelle and ask questions about her “Magic Poodles.” More information about this this and other youth programs can be obtained by calling (708) 422-4990 or visit www.olpl.org.

All aboard greatest train journeys

A program that will focus on the world’s greatest train journeys will be held at 7 p.m. Monday, July 23 at the Oak Lawn Library. World traveler Bill Helmuth will take the audience on a journey about the Orient Express. He will discuss traveling from London to Venice; the Central Asia train from Moscow to Tashkent, Uzbekistan; the Blue Train from Cape Town to Johannesburg, South Africa; the great trains of India and Trans-Siberian; 6,000 miles from Beijing, China to St. Petersburg, Russia; and the scenery from San Francisco to Chicago. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 422-4990 or register online at www.olpl.org.

Teens can take part in science from around the world

Teens can meet high school students from

different cultures and discuss science from around the world during a session scheduled for 7 p.m. Thursday, July 26 at the Oak Lawn Library. Tech gadgets are also provided for use during the session. Snacks will also be served. More information about this and other young adult programs can be obtained by calling (708) 422-4990 or visit www.olpl.org.

Improve Playhouse presents ‘Narnia’ adaption

Families can journey to the land of Narnia in this fun-filled adaptation of the C.S. Lewis’s children’s classic from 1 to 2 p.m. Tuesday, July 31 at the Oak Lawn Library. The Improv Playhouse will will present this program entitled “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe.”For more information about this and other youth programs, call (708) 422-4990 or visit www.olpl.org.

PALOS HILLS

Chef to provide summer meal ideas

Chef Susan Maddox will share recipes that can be found in summer gardens and local farmers markets with a session scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Monday, July 16 at the Green Hills Library, 10331 S. Interlochen Drive, Palos Hills. Tastings will be provided. This event is for adults only. The session is limited to 75. Register online at www.greenhillslibrary.org.

Luau party to be held at library

A luau party featuring Hawaii-themed games will be held for kids ages 10 to 17 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 17 at the Green Hills Library. Participants can make a summer craft, eat tropical desserts and snacks, and take pictures at the photo booth. The session is limited to 40. Register online at www.greenhillslibrary.org.

Science lab sessions are offered for youths

A science lab session will be held for youths beginning at 6 p.m. Wednesday, July 18 at the Green Hills Library. Miss Emily will lead the group in science experiments. Children of all ages are welcome. However, kids under age 6 must be assisted by a caregiver. Register online at www.greenhillslibrary.org.

Passport Pals to visit ‘new country’

Children ages 7 and up can participate in the “Passport Pals” program, which will be held at 6 p.m. Thursday, July 19 at the Green

Hills Library. Youngsters will “travel to a new country” every month and learn about that nation’s history and culture. Registration is limited to 25. Register online at www. greenhillslibrary.org.

Program is offered for adults to stimulate brain function

A cutting-edge brain fitness program based on neuroplasticity that activates all six functions of the brain will be offered at 10 a.m. Friday, July 20 at the Green Hills Library. The exercises are based on everyday movements that are natural and organic that focus on the healthy longevity of the body and mind. The event is for adults only. The session is limited to 40. Register online at www.greenhillslibrary.org.

‘Young Rembrandts’ will learn about art’

A program that will teach children how to drawing using fun techniques will be held at 6 p.m. Tuesday, July 24 at the Green Hills Library. Kids will learn about drawing and art while developing academic, conceptual and critical thinking skills. The program is designed for children ages 5 and up. Register online at www.greenhillslibrary.org.

Book discussion is offered for kids

A book discussion for kids ages 10 to 17 will be offered from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 25 at the Green Hills Library. Miss Natalie will lead the discussion, which will be followed by a craft session. Snacks will be provided. Copies of the books will be available at the youth services desk. Registration is limited to 15. Register online at wwwgreenhillslibrary.org.

Fact and Fiction Book Group will meet

The Fact and Fiction Book Group will meet at 7 p.m. Thursday, July 26 at the Green Hills Library. The book that will be discussed is “Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine” by Gail Honeyman. Copies of the book will be available at the circulation desk. Register online at www.greenhillslibrary.org.

‘Phantom Thread’ is next Morning Movie

‘Phantom Thread’ will be the next Morning Movie to be presented for adults only at 10 a.m. Friday, July 27 at the Green Hills Library. Popcorn and drinks will be served. One lucky person will win a copy of the movie. Register online at www.greenhillslibrary.org.


10 The Reporter

Thursday, July 12, 2018

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Students from the Class of 2018 at Shepard High School with the 10 highest grade point averages gather for a photo. The students are (front row, from left) Adam Zatar, Delaney Lyons, Isabella Gorzelniowski, Meghan Hills, Rachel Habbal, (back row, from left) Lauren Banicki, Alana Born, Jacob Kalabich, Rebecca Ruger and Angeline Schmelzer.

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Students from the Class of 2018 with the 10 highest grade-point averages from Shepard High School were recently honored. Each graduated with Honors with Distinction, the highest level possible in District 218, and earned Illinois State Scholar honors. The students include Lauren Banicki, a peer mentor and member of Astros Dance Team. She will attend St. Xavier University in the fall. Alana Born, captain of the Scholastic Bowl who qualified for French National Honor Society, also made the elite list. She will study history at Illinois State University. Isabella Gorzelniowski, a student ambassador and a member of Leo Club and student council who played soccer and ran cross country, also made the top 10. She will attend the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Also earning top 10 scholastic honors was Rachel Habbal, a state tennis qualifier for three straight years and was president of the National Honor Society. She plans to study biology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Meghan Hill, a state qualifier in badminton and a member of the student council and Shepard Ambassadors, was honored. She will study biology at Carthage College.

Jacob Kalabich, a member of the jazz band, marching band, pep band, and the U.S. Air Force JROTC competitive cyber security team that placed fourth in the nation, also made the list. He plans to study chemistry at Lewis University. The list also includes Delaney Lyons, captain of Mathletes and a member of the Leo Club and the cross country team. She will study nursing at Loyola University Chicago. Rebecca Ruger, captain of the speech team and a band section leader, was also honored. She also participated in jazz band, Mathletes and Scholastic Bowl. She plans to study psychology and neuroscience at Bradley University. Angeline Schmelzer, editor of the student newspaper and the percussion section leader for band, was honored. She also participated in the German Club, Book Club and Presidents Club. She plans to study journalism at Bradley University. Adam Zatar, the vice president of the NHS who competed in Mathletes, Scholastic Bowl, cross country and track, also was honored. He will study material science and engineering at the University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign.

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SPORTS The Regional News • The Reporter

Ken Karrson, SportsSports EditorEditor • sports@regionalpublishing.com Jason Maholy, • sports@regionalpublishing.com

Thursday, July 12, 2018 Thursday, March 5, 2015

Southwest Section Southwest • Section•2, Page 1 2, Page 1

He shoots, he scores

Orland Park native Alex Broadhurst achieves dream of playing in NHL By Jason Maholy Sports Editor

Supplied photo

Former Sandburg wrestler Pat Brucki went 28-10 and qualified for the NCAA Championships during his freshman year at Princeton.

Grappling with adversity A serious knee injury couldn’t stop former Sandburg great Pat Brucki from qualifying for the NCAA tournament in his first year at Princeton Jason Maholy Sports Editor

Pat Brucki described his freshman year at Princeton University as “enlightening.” The Orland Park resident and Sandburg graduate has always embraced soaking in all he can and learning from his experiences, so he was perhaps perfectly suited for the rich opportunities college life offers when he headed to New Jersey last fall. Whether meeting people from all walks of life, opening his mind to different ideas or appreciating simply being a student on a beautiful campus of an historic and prestigious Ivy League school, Brucki tried not to let anything that could help him grow as a person elude him. “I learned so much in so many different areas, just an awesome opportunity,” he said of his first year at Princeton. “I’d been expecting the experience for a long time, but to see that opportunity come to fruition was pretty special. I grew as a person, and that’s

Supplied photo

Pat Brucki, of Orland Park, became only the third freshman wrestler in Princeton history to qualify for the NCAA Championships. Brucki went 1-2 at the tournament.

what’s most important to me.” Brucki, a four-time state qualifying wrestler who won three state medals including a state title, also grew as a grappler. A stellar season that saw him become only the third freshman wrestler in Princeton history to qualify for the NCAA Championships may have ended better had a torn knee ligament late in the year not hobbled him. Brucki won 10 of his first 11 matches en

route to finishing 28-10, and along the way took first place at the Princeton Open and defeated two opponents ranked in the top 10 at 197 pounds. He was ranked as high as 12th nationally, earned second-team AllIvy League honors, and was awarded the Hooker Trophy as the Tigers’ most improved freshman. The success did not come easy, and though Brucki often made winning look effortless while going 94-4 over his final two years of high school, his achievements have always come as the result of hard work and perseverance. College wrestling has merely provided him new mountains to climb, and it was evident from the start he was entering a whole new realm of competition. “You’re going into a new, foreign environment,” he said. “It’s a sport I’ve been doing for the better part of my life, but jumping from one level to another it’s almost a completely new sport, entirely.” Much of Brucki’s focus early on was making the subtle technique changes necessary to compete successfully at the college level. He tried to sponge up the flood of information coming from a staff of coaches trying to help ease his transition from high school to college, so he could get the most out of his abilities. “It’s cool to see, especially over the course See BRUCKI, Page 2

Alex Broadhurst has lived and breathed hockey for the better part of his relatively young life. The Orland Park native first laced up a pair of hockey skates — well, not by himself — when he was 3 years old, and by age 5 he was playing in a Squirt league. At age 16 he left home and moved to Wisconsin to play with the Green Bay Gamblers of the Tier I junior level United States Hockey League. Through every step through junior hockey and the professional ranks, Broadhurst has seemed destined for big things. After a successful first season in Green Bay, during which he scored 13 goals and assisted on 20 more in 55 games, the forward’s hometown Chicago Blackhawks drafted him in the seventh round of the 2011 NHL Entry Draft. He excelled the following season, netting 26 goals and dishing out 47 assists in 53 regular-season game, then had nine goals and nine assists in 12 playoff contests as the Gamblers won the Clark Cup as USHL champions. Four years later he helped the Lake Erie Monsters (now Cleveland) to the Calder Cup, recording 36 points in the regular season and

another 12 points on three goals and nine assists in 17 postseason games. Broadhurst, 25, has seen no shortage of individual or team successes, and he has dressed in hundreds of locker rooms during his hockey career; but it was a surreal experience for him when he walked into the locker room on April 3. There, hanging in his newest locker, was a Columbus Blue Jackets sweater adorned with his last name. Alex Broadhurst had made it to the NHL, and he would be taking the ice that evening against the Detroit Red Wings, one of the league’s storied franchises and a team that, as a lifelong Blackhawks fan, Broadhurst grew up rooting against. “You’ve got your nameplate and jersey, and it’s all hung up when you walk in — that was something special. And you see your number on the board with the (shift) lines. It was an unbelievable feeling. It was definitely something special, something I’ll always remember, for sure.” The realization that Broadhurst was set to make his NHL debut didn’t really hit him until he was suiting up alongside star players See BROADHURST, Page 2

Supplied photo

Alex Broadhurst, of Orland Park, seen here playing in an exhibition game with the Columbus Blue Jackets, made his official NHL debut with Columbus on April 3 in a game against the Detroit Red Wings.

Trendel ready to fly with RedHawks By Jon DePaolis Correspondent

The Marist boys basketball team is coming off a 27-win season and a Class 4A sectional final appearance, so walking into a program that has had coaching stability and much success for the past 18 years could seem like a daunting task. But for new head coach Tim Trendel Trendel the challenge is part of the reason he was attracted to the position. Trendel officially took over the RedHawks boys basketball program last

Marist’s new boys basketball head coach embraces the challenge of leading one of the area’s top programs

month after eight years in the same position at Providence. In Marist, he joins a program led for the past 18 years by Gene Nolan, who is now the head coach at Naperville Central. “We kind of came in eight years ago at Providence and rebuilt it into one of the better programs in the area,” Trendel said. “Now, the scary thing [could be] going into a program that already has got the established reputation for athletics and basketball. But that was something that attracted me — that challenge to

see if I could do it and continue on the successes. “They have had a great, long line of coaches, going back to Ed Molitor, Ken Styler and Gene Nolan. The personal challenge is to see if I can go into a spot that has that reputation and that glamour and [see if] I can do this.” Trendel pointed to the athletic tradition at Marist as another reason he was attracted to the coaching job. He vcalled Marist one of the premier schools in the Chicago area.

“When you’re talking about high school athletics, I think one of the top [athletic] programs in the state — whether it be football, basketball, baseball or any of the sports — [Marist] is right up there,” he said. “And along with everything else they’ve got going on at the school — their academics, the kids, the families. They are on the verge of building a $15 million science wing. “To me, everything about Marist jumps off the page at you.” Trendel will have some familiarity

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with the teams Marist will face in the 2018-19 season. Earlier in his career, he was an assistant coach at St. Patrick High School — also in the East Suburban Catholic Conference. With Trendel being hired comparatively late in the game, the Marist basketball team went ahead with its already-planned summer program under the direction of assistant coaches. Trendel was able to get his first look at the team about two weeks ago, and has thus far liked what he has seen. Expected to return are starting guards Nile Hill and Dorion Pendleton, both of who played significant roles on last year’s team that had Chicago Pubic League powerhouse Simeon on the See TRENDEL, Page 2

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2

Section 2 Thursday, July 12, 2018

The Regional News - The Reporter

Whitecaps douse Fire comeback

Nikolic’s 32nd goal with Fire not enough in loss to Vancouver From staff reports

The Chicago Fire fell behind by two goals in their match with Vancouver, and a late comeback attempt couldn’t prevent them from dropping their first game in more than a month. The Whitecaps’ Kei Kamara scored twice, including what proved to be the game-winner in the 72nd minute, as the hosts defended their home turf with a 3-2 victory on Saturday, July 7 at BC Place. The loss was the Fire’s first since a May 30 setback to Philadelphia, a stretch that included two wins and three draws in MLS play, along with two victories in the Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup. The Fire entered this week 6-8-5 (23 points). Vancouver is 7-7-5 (26 points). Kamara opened the scoring in the 28th minute when he got on the end of a loose ball in the box and poked it in with his right foot. The Fire equalized in the 42nd minute when Kevin Ellis received a throw-in from Dax McCarty on the right, deep in the Whitecaps’ half. Ellis fought off his defender and drove a low cross to Nemanja Nikolic in front of the goal. With the inside of his right foot, Nikolic redirected the ball into goal to pull Chicago level. The Whitecaps regained the lead in the 47th minute when Jordan Mutch broke through and slotted in a left-footed shot from inside the box. Kamara added to Vancouver’s advantage in the 72nd minute with his finish from close range for the 3-1 lead. Tony Tchani pulled the Fire within one with a right-footed volley in the 81st minute. Diego Campos whipped in a corner from the left that fell to Ellis, who took a short touch to push the ball to Tchani. With his back towards goal, Tchani quickly turned and on the bounce blasted his right-footed shot into the net. Fire head coach Veljko Paunovic took the loss in stride, but knows his squad

Photo courtesy of Chicago Fire/MLS

The Fire’s Aleksandar Katai battles for the ball during a game against Vancouver on Saturday, July 7 at BC Place.

left some plays on the field. “We did well in many occasions, but we obviously didn’t do well in other moments,” Paunovic said. “The Whitecaps have a good team. We matched many times their qualities and we exposed their weaknesses. We were close. I am proud of our team, of the character of playing until the end, and how we adjusted and how we reacted to the goals. Huge credit to the Whitecaps but we could’ve done better with the goals, it’s on us.” Paunovic said the Fire had the control of the game before allowing the early second-half goal, and that the team is playing well but must be more consistent the second half of the season. “From now, everything is going to become more difficult,” he said. “There will be more urgency from all the teams fighting for the spot, being right on the edge. That puts you in the situation that you know you are the team to beat every game. There’s a lot in play. We have to

be at our best. We have to prepare, there is no time. No excuses for anything but I believe our locker room gets that, and we’re doing our best. “After six months now of working together, they know each other better, and they like each other better. That’s helpful. That’s how the team should be. That’s something that will guide us through the rest of the season.” Fire midfieder Bastian Schweinsteiger was more critical of his team’s performance. “We gave away three goals,” he said. “It’s too much, then it’s not easy to win the game. Some minutes we played well, we had possession, we played to the right player, and in some parts, we didn’t. We gave away the goals and we lost. “We need to improve our game, to improve the level and then you will win or become more consistent. We have too many ups and downs and then we struggle to make the points and we end up where

Brucki

Fire notes

• Saturday’s loss snapped Chicago’s seven-match unbeaten streak across MLS and U.S. Open Cup play. • Nemanja Nikolic found net for the second straight game, registering his 32nd MLS regular season goal in 52 appearances. The 32 goals tie Nikolic with former Fire standout Josh Wolff (1998-2002) for fourth-most in club history. Including U.S. Open Cup, Nikolic now has 35 goals in all competitions for the Fire, with an overall strike rate of .67 goals per 90 minutes with the Men In Red. • Midfielder Tony Tchani entered the game in the 78th minute and promptly scored his first goal as a member of the Fire three minutes later, doing so against the team that dealt him to Chicago earlier this year. The 29-year-old spent the 2017

Broadhurst

Continued from Page 1 of the year,” he said of the noticeable improvements that would come. “You can see it in your own wrestling and your teammates’, and you just kind feed off each other.” Brucki had heard from many sources about the grind of a college wresting season, and while it was certainly a lot of difficult and intense work, it was to him just business as usual. “I work hard in as many areas (of life) as possible... that’s what I’m used to,” he said. “If you work hard you’re going to work hard no matter what you’re doing. I feel like I transitioned really, really well in that sense — in the ethic — because I’ve been pushing myself for a long part of my life and it’s really rewarded me in a lot of ways.” Brucki’s hard work on the mat paid off in his first ever collegiate wrestling tournament, the Princeton Open, in which he took first place in front of the home crowd. He said he was more nervous during his first practice and first week of practice than he was during that tourney, but the adage is that if one is prepared there is no reason to be nervous. And Brucki had essentially been preparing for this moment since he first became passionate about the sport. “I was really calm, kept my mind open and focused on wrestling like myself,” he said. “It’s about not thinking too much about who it is your up against or worrying about the stakes at hand, because it’s just another match.” Winning that first tourney in Princeton’s gym was “very special,” he said, and expressed his appreciation for the coaches and practice partners who helped him be ready for that moment. “We trained really hard for the first month or two months and it really showed, we had a really good showing that weekend as a team,” he added. The adversity Brucki expected would eventually come, but he faced the challenges with the same beyond-his-years maturity that helped him reach great heights at Sandburg. “The losses were easier to count than the wins, they burn with you a little bit more,” he said. “Of course, it’s humbling. You’re just one of a big group of guys from all across the country, and you’re wrestling 22-, 23-, 24-year-old men. “But at the same time, I wouldn’t have gotten to where I am now or where I’m going to be without losing matches along the way, so I’m not foreign to that. I’ve been taken down thousands of times throughout my life, it’s just about limiting those takedowns.” The more challenging task, he said, was responding positively to the adversity he faced and learning from his mistakes, and doing that without straying from what has brought him success. Overanalyzing and picking apart every small mistake, or being fixated on winning or losing, is counterproductive, he added. “It’s about keeping the same mindset, being the same wrestler every time,” he explained. “If you start focusing on the outcome, worrying about the win or the loss, that’s when you start to forget the steps of the process. Its focusing on the process to get to where you want to be, instead of

we are. That’s the reason.”

Continued from Page 1

Supplied photo

Pat Brucki is focused on having an All-American caliber season in 2019.

focusing on the outcome.” That process hit a bump in the road when Brucki tore the posterior cruciate ligament in his right knee during practice just days before the Eastern Intercollegiate Wrestling Association Championships. The injury took him largely off the mat as far as practice was concerned, and required him to wear a brace with which he never became comfortable. He entered the tournament seeded second and placed fifth after losing in the semifinals to Pennsylvania’s Frank Mattiace, a former All-American Brucki had beaten earlier in the season. Still, he was one of four Tigers to qualify for the NCAA Championships. Brucki won his first match before falling to top-ranked Kollin Moore of Ohio State in the second round, and he was eliminated when he dropped his first consolation match. The “sloppy end” to his season did not sit well with Brucki, who was wrestling the best he ever had before the injury. “I felt so dialed in at that point in the year, we were going into the [EIWA] tournament and I was ready to go, I was feeling like a million bucks,” he said. “Then all [the injury] did was kind of plant a seed in my head and changed who I wanted to be a little bit. I felt like I was wrestling on one leg, and that’s not any fun, let alone painful, and at the most important part of the year. “But nobody cares about excuses, everybody has them, they only care about the outcome.” True to form, Brucki isn’t dwelling on the disappointment, but rather is using it to fuel his already intense desire to be an AllAmerican in 2019. The knee is still healing, but feeling strong, and Brucki expects to be ready to go when wrestling season begins in late October. “Going through the NCAAs with that definitely put me through some adversity and hopefully I’m better off in the future because of it,” he said. “You can run away from adversity or embrace the challenge and you can say, ‘Yeah, that’s what happened, but I’m better off because of it. I didn’t achieve what I wanted to achieve, but I learned from it.’ ”

Cam Atkinson and Artemi Panarin. Later that evening he would be on the ice playing center against the likes of longtime Red Wings players Henrik Zetterberg, Niklas Kronwall and Justin Abdelkader. “I grew up a Blackhawks fan and that’s a big rivalry (with Detroit), so it was definitely cool getting to play against guys like that,” he said. “It was an honor.” Broadhurst admitted to being a bit overwhelmed as he took part in the pre-game skate in front of some 18,000 fans at Columbus’ Nationwide Arena. “It was something else, coming out from warmups,” he said, adding that veteran defenseman Jack Johnson came up to him about halfway through the skate and offered some helpful advice. “He told me to take a second and take it in, your first game only comes once so enjoy it. I kind of listed to him and settled in, and once the first period came I got my legs under me and I was fine out there. “I was actually really worried about it, really nervous. But it’s just hockey, it’s just like riding a bike. My shift came and it was awesome, and it was, ‘Okay, I can actually do this and keep up with these guys,’ and once I did that I was good to go.” Broadhurst’s family — mom Valerie, dad Terry Jr. and brother Terry — were there to share the moment with him. His dad has been among his biggest supporters, and coached both him and Terry during their youth playing days. “Just seeing them after the game and seeing how happy they were and seeing it in their eyes, it was a really cool moment, really special,” he said. Broadhurst appeared in two games with Columbus, and did not record any goals or assists. He was on the playoff roster but did not appear in the postseason, which saw the Blue Jackets eliminated in the first round by the eventual Stanley Cup champion Washington Capitals. And while he was determined before to attain his dream of playing in the NHL, the

Trendel

Continued from Page 1 ropes in the Class 4A Thornton Sectional championship game. “They have a couple starters coming back from a very successful team the last couple of years, so that is something exciting to build upon,” Trendel said. “We’ve got some pieces coming back with that experience. There are some other good guards, too, so I think that will be a strength of ours.” He also doesn’t plan to reinvent

season with Carl Robinson’s Whitecaps, starting 27 games and scoring four goals in that time. Saturday’s goal was Tchani’s 15th career MLS goal in his 209th appearance. • Defender Kevin Ellis recorded the primary assist on both Fire goals in the game, doubling his assist total on the year (four). It was the first multi-assist game of Ellis’ 84-game MLS career.  • Fellow defender Jonathan Campbell also was credited with an assist, his first since October 16, 2016.  • The Fire are 1-5-3 vs. Western Conference opponents in 2018, with another cross-conference road trip looming July 14 at FC Dallas.  • Chicago finished with a 16-14 edge in total shots and maintained 64.8 percent of possession on the evening.  • The Whitecaps have won all four fixtures in the series played in Vancouver and lead the overall series 5-2-2.

experience of actually being there has made him even hungrier to stay. “I’ve seen what it takes to make it, and now that I’ve got a little bit of a taste of it and know how to get there, hopefully I can stay on that path.”

The Waiting Game

in Green Bay at age 16, he wasn’t exactly following the best nutritional guidelines. “You learn at a young age you’re probably not eating as healthy as you should, being a kid and eating pizza and all that,” he said. “I’ve changed my diet, basically I was trying to find the energy to be able to last a full season. I struggled with that. “But you learn that once you eat healthy and take care of your body you can really push the limits and not tire out during the season. For me it was about seeing it work, and once I saw it work and how much better I can perform taking care of my body it was just easy, and now for me it’s an everyday thing.”

That path to the NHL seemed at times to be longer than Broadhurst had hoped, and he acknowledged there were moments we was discouraged to the point he thought he might never attain his dream. “When you’re a young kid coming into pro hockey you think it’s going to happen right away, and you think if it doesn’t, as you get older you think it may never happen,” he said. “It was definitely a hard road, I had to wait my turn and elevate my game in order to get to the big leagues. “But I listened to my coaches, stayed patient and everything’s been working out so far, so I’ve just got to stay with it.” Broadhurst has excelled at every level at which he’s played, but this season with Cleveland was his most consistent from start to finish, he said. In 66 games with the Monsters he scored 22 goals and assisted on 19 others. The 19 assists and .62 points-pergame average were both professional career highs. Finding that consistency — day-in, day-out — has been the most challenging aspect of being a pro, he said. “I’ve had real good years in the past and won championships in a couple different leagues, so it’s hard to say what was my greatest season or what was my best season, but I was definitely a lot more consistent this season,” he added. “There was no slowing down in the stats or in my game, and I think that’s one of the reasons I did wind up getting that first NHL game.” Broadhurst also cited an improved diet and training regimen as crucial contributors to his success. He has always recovered relatively quickly, and he is still young, but the past three years he has paid more attention to maintaining his health, in particular being able to be strong at the end of the season. He noted that when he first moved away from home to play

After giving his body some time to recuperate after the 2017-18 season, Broadhurst returned to the ice at the beginning of July. This week, he was among several area hockey players — including his brother Terry, women’s Team USA member Kendall Coyne and Blackhawks defenseman Alex DeBrincat — and numerous current and former NHL players who will play in the eight-team Chicago Pro Hockey League. The new summer league will provide professional hockey players at all levels the opportunity to maintain their edge while playing in competitive games during the offseason. “I think it’s a great thing,” Broadhurst said. “It’s going to be good to help us to stay in shape in the summer and actually play in some games, rather than just be on the ice for practice, so I’m excited about it.” The Broadhurst brothers will play for Team Centric Wealth Management, while Coyne and Blackhawks forward Nick Schmaltz will play for Team Jack Phelan Auto Group. After that, it’s back to work, and Broadhurst for one can hardly wait to get to Blue Jackets training camp in September. “I haven’t taken as much time off as I usually do, just because I got that taste of it and I want to do everything to get back on the team,” he said. “I’ve been dreaming since I was a kid of playing in the NHL.”

the wheel, as the new coach of the RedHawks said he hopes to build on what the players and Nolan have already established. “I think they won 27 games the last couple of years, so I think one of the key points we are going to hammer on is that we’re not here to change a whole lot,” Trendel said. “We’re here to kind of build on a lot of what the foundation of was laid by Coach Nolan and the coaches before him.” In terms of Xs and Os, Trendel said he plans to run an up-tempo, pushthe-basketball-in-transition brand of

basketball. He also plans on running an aggressive defensive scheme with “hard-nosed, man-to-man style of play.” Trendel said he is grateful to the administrators at Providence who gave him his start as a head coach. He also thanked the staff at Marist for this new opportunity. “I’m very thankful to the people at Marist for taking a chance here,” he said. “I’m excited about the opportunity, and I think you’re going to see some good things coming from us the next few years.”

Back on Ice


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, July 12, 2018 Section 2

3

NIFTY FIFTY Red Stars’ Dames is first head coach in league to reach 50 wins with one team From staff reports When the Red Stars defeated the Washington Spirit 2-0 on July 1, it was more than just the squad’s fourth consecutive game without a defeat. The victory was the 50th in the career of Red Stars head coach Rory Dames, who became the fourth coach in league history to hit that number. Dames Dames joined Seattle’s Vlatko Andonovski, Utah’s Laura Harvey and Portland’s Mark Parsons on that exclusive list; however, Dames is the first to win his first 50 games with the same team. Dames coached in the Women’s Premier Soccer League in 2011 and the Women’s Premier Soccer League Elite in 2012, earning eight and nine wins, respectively. Then, Dames and the Red Stars entered the inaugural NWSL season the following year.

2013: Just Starting Out

Photos courtesy of Chicago Red Stars

Red Stars forward Sam Kerr tallied a hat trick in a 3-1 win over Sky Blue on Saturday, July 7.

Kerr tricks out in win over Sky Blue Aussie forward tallies thrice as Red Stars rebound from loss to Courage From staff reports Sam Kerr recorded her first hat trick as a member of the Red Stars during a recordsetting performance, and Chicago rebounded from a loss earlier last week to defeat Sky Blue FC 3-1 last Saturday in Piscataway, New Jersey. The victory moved the Red Stars into second place in the NWSL. Kerr, who spent the past three seasons with Sky Blue, was a one-woman wrecking crew against her former team, scoring in the 40th, 46th and 64th minutes. Kerr was involved in nearly every Chicago scoring chance, the first coming when the game was still scoreless and she when nearly slid the ball into the net, but was denied by the post. Then, with just minutes remaining in the first half, she Kerr used her speed to create another opportunity, making a pass into the box for Michele Vasconcelos, who hit the ball off the frame from close range. She finally tallied when, on a counter attack, her shot from the top of the box flew past a diving Kailen Sheridan and gave the Red Stars a 1-0 lead. The Red Stars’ Alyssa Mautz chased a free kick by goalkeeper Alyssa Naeher down on the right side of the field and crossed the ball near the top of the box, where Kerr was able to control the ball and boot a rocket past Sheridan. Seconds into the second half, Kerr made NWSL history by becoming the first player in league history to score 50 career goals. Chicago striker Yuki Nagasato sent a lofted ball up the field for an open Kerr, who spread wide and bounced the ball just out of the reach of Sheridan to extend the lead the two goals. Kerr completed the hat trick with another assist from Nagasato, who sent another lofted ball Kerr controlled entering the box and slotted it past a sliding Sheridan. The goal was Kerr’s league-leading eight of the season. Sky Blue thwarted Chicago’s shutout effort in the 73rd minute when Imani Dorsey threaded the ball between a diving Naeher and defender Arin Gilliland. The win helped the Red Stars move past a lopsided loss to NWSL front-runner North Carolina on Independence Day. The 4-1 setback was Chicago’s fourth defeat of the season. Yuki Nagasato notched the Chicago goal on a penalty kick in second-half stoppage time. Earning majority of the possession early on, Chicago was able to create multiple shots to put the pressure on the Courage, but couldn’t find the net. Kerr nearly had a goal but her

Record: 8-8-6 (30 points) After the previous leagues folding, the NWSL began and the Red Stars got off to a rough start. Chicago earned two points in the first six matches, and wouldn’t earn their first victory until two months into the season when they defeated the Portland Thorns, 2-0. The month of June saw a better showing, while in July the Red Stars only fell once. But Chicago was unable to keep the momentum to the end, as its 30 points wasn’t enough to put the Red Stars in playoff contention finishing in sixth place. Key Acquired Players: F-Zakiya Bywaters (draft) F-Jen Hoy (draft) F-Ella Masar (signed) GK-Erin McLeod (allocation) M-Lori Chalupny (signed) M-Alyssa Mautz (Supplemental Draft)

2014: Playoff Spot Taken Away

Chicago midfielder Vanessa DiBernardo brings the ball upfield during a loss to the North Carolina Courage on July 4.

one-on-one opportunity ricocheted off the cross bar. The Courage took the lead in the 20th minute when Crystal Dunn struck the ball from the top of the box and bounced it past a diving Naeher for the game’s only goal of the first half. The Red Stars were unable to find any momentum in the second half, and saw only three in the first 20 minutes of the second session. North Carolina extended their lead in the 67th minute when Lynn Williams’ shot from the top of the box deflected in off the crossbar. The game got ou of hand just two minutes later when Debinha’s chipped a shot over a

Level

Oak Lawn Lightning holding travel team baseball tryouts for 2019 The Oak Lawn Baseball Lightning travel teams will hold tryouts for the 2019 season on the days listed in the accompanying chart. For more information visit oaklawnbaseball.com

diving Naeher. The two goals in two minutes gave the Courage a commanding 3-0 lead. Chicago was filed again when a Danielle Colaprico cross found Kerr in the box for an easy tap in, but was called offsides. North Carolina put the finishing touch on the match in the 87th minute when Naeher came off her line and misjudged the clearance. Williams picked the ball up and skidded it across the face of the goal, where substitute Kristen Hamilton placed it into the net. The Red Stars return to Chicago for their last three games at Toyota Park this season. The next game is scheudled for 7 p.m. Saturday, July 14 against the Seattle Reign.

Age Cutoff Date

Sept 1st 8U - PT Part time 9U - FT May 1st Part time   May 1st 10U - PT Part time   May 1st 11U - FT Full time   11U - PT May 1st Part time   May 1st 12U - FT Full time   May 1st 12U - PT Part time   13U May 1st Full time   14U - FT May 1st Full time  

Time

Field

Thursday, Aug. 2 Wednesday, Aug. 8

5:30pm – 7pm 5:30pm – 7pm

SAC1 SAC1

Thursday, Aug. 2 Wednesday, Aug. 8

7pm – 8:30pm 7pm – 8:30pm

SAC1 SAC1

Tuesday, July 24 Monday, July 30

5:30pm – 7pm 5:30pm – 7pm

SAC1 SAC1

Wednesday, July 18 Thursday, July 26

6:30pm – 8pm 6pm – 7:30pm

KOLB KOLB

Wednesday, July 25 Wednesday, Aug. 1

7pm – 8:30pm 5:30pm – 7pm

KOLB KOLB

Wednesday, July 25 Tuesday, July 31

5:30pm – 7pm 5:30pm – 7pm

KOLB KOLB

Saturday, July 28 Wednesday, Aug. 1

10am – 11:30am 7pm – 8:30pm

KOLB KOLB

Monday, July 23 Monday, July 30

5:30pm – 7pm 7pm – 8:30pm

SAC2 SAC2

Thursday, July 19 Monday, July 23

7pm – 8:30pm 7pm – 8:30pm

SAC2 SAC2

Record: 9-7-8 (35 pts.) In the second season, the Red Stars saw a better showing as they went on a six-game undefeated streak. But Chicago turned around and did the opposite, going seven games without a victory. The Red Stars finished the regular season with 35 points, tying the Washington Spirit for the final spot to compete in the post season; however, via Washington sweeping the season series with Chicago, the Red Stars were relegated to fifth place and missed the NWSL Playoffs. Key Acquired Players: D-Julie Johnston (draft) D-Abby Erceg (signed) D-Sam Johnson (trialist) F-Christen Press (allocation) GK-Karina LaBlanc (trade) M-Vanessa DiBernardo (draft) M-Emily van Egmond (signed)

2015: First Playoff Berth

Record: 8-3-9 (33 pts.) 2015 was historic for the Red Stars, as they not only turned their fortunes, but lost only three matches in the regular season. Off to a hot streak, Chicago held the top spot in the standings for 10 weeks. With multiple draws, the Red Stars dropped in points to Seattle Reign FC, who finished in first, while Chicago stole second place from FC Kansas City by one point. With their first playoff berth, the Red Stars were to face Kansas City, a team they defeated and drew against in the regular season. The semifinal didn’t quite go Chicago’s way as the Red Stars fell 3-0 to the eventual NWSL Champions. Key Acquired Players: M-Danielle Colaprico (draft) D-Arin Gilliland (draft) F-Sofia Huerta (draft)

2016: Starting of a Semifinal Streak Record: 9-5-6 (33 pts.) After an opening season loss on the road, Chicago went on an eight-game undefeated streak, then was hit with three-straight 2-0 losses on the road to the three top teams in the league: Portland, Western New York and Washington. For most of the season, the Red Stars fell into one of the top four spots, always being a postseason contender. Making their way into the semifinals, Chicago was up against the Spirit, who they defeated 3-1 the week prior. But the result was against the Red Stars, as Washington scored in overtime to take them to NWSL Championship,

leaving Chicago with its second semifinal defeat. Key Acquired Players: D-Sarah Gorden (draft) D-Katie Naughton (draft) GK-Alyssa Naeher (trade)

2017: Third Time’s Not the Charm Record: 11-7-6 (39 pts.) The season started the same, as the Red Stars lost in their opening match against the Houston Dash. In only two weeks during the season did Chicago placed below the top four, maintaining second or third place most of the season. The Red Stars were struck with a defeating three-game losing streak at home during an eight-day span near the end of the season. It wasn’t until the second-to-last match that solidified the Red Stars’ spot in the postseason. In the semifinal, the Red Stars faced North Carolina, who could never find a point against Chicago. But that all changed in the final minute of the semifinal match, during which Denise O’Sullivan scored the lone goal to once again spoil the Red Stars’ sights at advancing to the NWSL Finals. Key Acquired Players: F-Yuki Nagasato (signed) F-Michele Vasconcelos (draft) M-Morgan Brian (trade)

2018: Rory Hits 50

Record: 5-3-7 (22 pts.) *as of July 1, 2018 For the first time in two years, the Red Stars earned a point against Houston in the season opener to start the season on the right foot. Chicago’s year has been interesting from the get-go, finishing a current league-high seven draws. The Red Stars have solidified a spot in the middle of the pack, switching between fifth and sixth place in the past month. In a turn of events, Chicago fell to the Orlando Pride not once, but twice in May for the first time in Orlando’s existence. But coming off the loss, the Red Stars went on a four-game undefeated streak, finishing with his 50th victory in a 2-0 shutout against the Washington Spirit, earning Dames the milestone. Key Acquired Players: F-Sam Kerr (trade) GK-Emily Boyd (draft) M-Nikki Stanton (trade) M-Rosie White (Dispersal Draft) Dames is in his eighth season at the helm of the Red Stars, after leading them to two league finals and a USASA’s National Women’s Cup triumph in 2012. The past three seasons Dames has guided the team to playoff contention and is looking to capture the title in 2018. Dames also serves as the Director of Coaching and Player Development for Chicago’s Eclipse Select Soccer Club, which consisted of three teams when the Illinois native took over in 1996 and today boasts over 50 male and female teams with more than 750 players ranging from ages 8-19. Dames has led Eclipse Select to many accomplishments over the past ten years, including being recognized as the top girls soccer club in the nation by Soccer America in 2007 and 2008, as well as by NationalSoccerRanking.com in 2007. Over the years, Dames has lead the club to eight national championships, six national finals, eleven regional championships, 17 UYSA MRL championships and 37 Illinois State Cup championships. Born and raised in Chicagoland, the Red Stars Head Coach played his high school soccer at St. Viator in Arlington Heights until graduating in 1991. Next, he went on to star for St. Louis University, winning several conference championships and making an appearance in the NCAA Final Four. Dames then joined the Rockford Raptors for one professional season. After his college career, Dames went on to coach not only Eclipse Select but also his high school alma mater. He would serve as Varsity Girls Head Coach at St. Viator for eight seasons (19972005) and guide his teams to seven conference championships and seven regional titles. Dames made five trips to the Elite Eight during his tenure at St. Viator, winning three state championships. The man in charge of the Red Stars continues his work at the youth level, having turned Eclipse Select into one of the best known and most respected girls clubs in the nation. He also serves as the ID2 National Girls Director.


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Section 2 Thursday, July 12, 2018

The Reporter Newspapers Call 448-6161 Deadline 5 p.m. Monday Hours M-F 9 to 5 Houses For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION U.S. BANK TRUST, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR LSF9 MASTER PARTICIPATION TRUST Plaintiff, -v.JANICE LADIK, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA-DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY-INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, ORLAN-BROOK CONDOMINIUM OWNER’S ASSOCIATION Defendants 17 CH 12880 15813 S. ORLAN BROOK DR., UNIT #50 ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 4, 2018, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 14, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 15813 S. ORLAN BROOK DR., UNIT #50, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-14-302-018-1050, 27-14302-018-1150. The real estate is improved with a residential condominium. The judgment amount was $75,516.29. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. Where a sale of real estate is made to satisfy a lien prior to that of the United States, the United States shall have one year from the date of sale within which to redeem, except that with respect to a lien arising under the internal revenue laws the period shall be 120 days or the period allowable for redemption under State law, whichever is longer, and in any case in which, under the provisions of section 505 of the Housing Act of 1950, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1701k), and subsection (d) of section 3720 of title 38 of the United States Code, the right to redeem does not arise, there shall be no right of redemption. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: HEAVNER, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719 Please refer to file number 281150-9804112382. If the sale is not confirmed for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the purchase price paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Fax #: (217) 422-1754 CookPleadings@hsbattys.com Attorney File No. 281150-9804112382 Attorney Code. 40387 Case Number: 17 CH 12880 TJSC#: 38-3016 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I3083782

Houses For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE IN TRUST FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDERS OF MORGAN STANLEY ABS CAPITAL I INC., TRUST 2007-HE6, MORGAN PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-HE6; Plaintiff, vs. MIKE MIKRUT AKA MICHAEL J. MIKRUT; UNKNOWN OWNERS, GENERALLY AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 16 CH 8711 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on March 8, 2018 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Wednesday, August 22, 2018 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real estate: P.I.N. 23-02-215-024-0000. Commonly known as 8035 West 89th Street, Hickory Hills, IL 60457. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call Mr. Anthony Porto at Plaintiff’s Attorney, Kluever & Platt, L.L.C., 150 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60601. (312) 981-7385. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I3092737

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Houses For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC Plaintiff, -v.KEVIN MELFI A/K/A KEVIN R. MELFI, JULIA A. MELFI A/K/A JULIE A. MELFI A/K/A JULIE MELFI, STATE BANK OF COUNTRYSIDE, AS TRUSTEE, UNDER A TRUST AGREEMENT DATED AUGUST 27, 1990 AND KNOWN AS TRUST NUMBER 90978, DITECH FINANCIAL LLC, TD BANK USA, N.A., MIDLAND FUNDING LLC, CITY OF PALOS HEIGHTS, AN ILLINOIS MUNICIPAL CORPORATION, STATE OF ILLINOIS, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Defendants 16 CH 16274 12548 SOUTH 76TH AVENUE Palos Heights, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on May 10, 2018, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 13, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 12548 SOUTH 76TH AVENUE, Palos Heights, IL 60463 Property Index No. 23-25-302-001-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $258,141.17. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. Where a sale of real estate is made to satisfy a lien prior to that of the United States, the United States shall have one year from the date of sale within which to redeem, except that with respect to a lien arising under the internal revenue laws the period shall be 120 days or the period allowable for redemption under State law, whichever is longer, and in any case in which, under the provisions of section 505 of the Housing Act of 1950, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1701k), and subsection (d) of section 3720 of title 38 of the United States Code, the right to redeem does not arise, there shall be no right of redemption. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, contact The sales clerk, SHAPIRO KREISMAN & ASSOCIATES, LLC, 2121 WAUKEGAN RD., SUITE 301, Bannockburn, IL 60015, (847) 291-1717 For information call between the hours of 1pm - 3pm. Please refer to file number 16-081646. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. SHAPIRO KREISMAN & ASSOCIATES, LLC 2121 WAUKEGAN RD., SUITE 301 Bannockburn, IL 60015 (847) 291-1717 E-Mail: ILNotices@logs.com Attorney File No. 16-081646 Attorney Code. 42168 Case Number: 16 CH 16274 TJSC#: 38-4370 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I3088971

Houses For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION BAYVIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLC; Plaintiff, vs. KRISTINE PETERSON; BROOK HILLS P.U.D. HOMEOWNER’S ASSOCIATION; JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 18 CH 204 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Tuesday, August 14, 2018 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real estate: P.I.N. 27-30-406-015-0000. Commonly known as 17409 Highwood Drive, Orland Park, IL 60467. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call the Sales Clerk at Plaintiff’s Attorney, The Wirbicki Law Group, 33 West Monroe Street, Chicago, Illinois 60603. (312) 360-9455 W17-1416. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I3092232

Houses For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION PACIFIC UNION FINANCIAL, LLC Plaintiff, -v.NAIL TADROS, LUBNA HAMATMEH-TADROS Defendants 2018 CH 00225 10510 RIDGEWOOD DRIVE PALOS PARK, IL 60464 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 3, 2018, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 13, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 10510 RIDGEWOOD DRIVE, PALOS PARK, IL 60464 Property Index No. 23-32-205-010-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876 Please refer to file number 14-17-17373. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 E-Mail: pleadings@il.cslegal.com Attorney File No. 14-17-17373 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 2018 CH 00225 TJSC#: 38-3107 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I3086514

Houses For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION (‘’FANNIE MAE’’), A CORPORATION ORGANIZED AND EXISTING UNDER THE LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Plaintiff, -v.MARY C PELECH, OAK HILLS CONDOMINIUM I ASSOCIATION, OAK HILLS COUNTRY CLUB VILLAGE COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 17 CH 08234 7657 GOLF DRIVE, UNIT 1B PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on May 16, 2018, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 17, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 7657 GOLF DRIVE, UNIT 1B, PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 Property Index No. 23-36-303-143-1086. The real estate is improved with a residential condominium. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce, LLC, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street, Suite 1200, Chicago, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 346-9088. Please refer to file number 262909. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce, LLC One North Dearborn Street, Suite 1200 Chicago, IL 60602 (312) 346-9088 E-Mail: pleadings@mccalla.com Attorney File No. 262909 Attorney Code. 61256 Case Number: 17 CH 08234 TJSC#: 38-4207 I3090322

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-1 Plaintiff, -v.DANIEL CAGALA AKA DANIEL J. CAGALA AKA DANIEL J. CAGALA JR., CAROLYN CAGALA AKA CAROLYN D. CAGALA, VILLAGE OF OAK LAWN, STACEY VALLARTA, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 16 CH 11326 10721 LAWLER AVENUE Oak Lawn, IL 60453 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on December 5, 2017, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on July 26, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 10721 LAWLER AVENUE, Oak Lawn, IL 60453

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, -v.ALAN FELSENTHAL, ANGELIQUE MCGLASHAN, VILLAGE OF OAKLAWN, VILLAGE OF PALOS PARK, CITIBANK (SOUTH DAKOTA) N.A., UNKNOWN OWNERS-TENANTS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 16 CH 04406 9850 WILD CHERRY LANE Palos Park, IL 60464 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on May 8, 2018, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 7, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9850 WILD CHERRY LANE, Palos Park, IL 60464

Property Index No. 24-16-417-007-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $221,189.86. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in AS IS condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, or a unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). In accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(h-1) and (h-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the property, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subsections (g)(1) and (g)(4) of section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, contact the sales department, Anselmo Lindberg & Associates, LLC, 1771 W. Diehl Road, Suite 120, NAPERVILLE, IL 60563, (630) 453-6960 For bidding instructions, visit www. AnselmoLindberg.com. Please refer to file number F16070135.

Property Index No. 23-28-407-007-0000. The real estate is improved with a single unit dwelling. The judgment amount was $310,315.66. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in AS IS condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, contact Plaintiff s attorney: WEISS MCCLELLAND LLC, 105 WEST ADAMS STREET, SUITE 1850, Chicago, IL 60603, (312) 605-3500 Please refer to file number IL-003866.

THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. Anselmo Lindberg & Associates, LLC 1771 W. Diehl Road, Suite 120 NAPERVILLE, IL 60563 (630) 453-6960 E-Mail: foreclosurenotice@anselmolindberg.com Attorney File No. F16070135 Attorney ARDC No. 3126232 Attorney Code. 58852 Case Number: 16 CH 11326 TJSC#: 38-5182 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose.

THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. WEISS MCCLELLAND LLC 105 WEST ADAMS STREET, SUITE 1850 Chicago, IL 60603 (312) 605-3500 E-Mail: intake@wmlegal.com Attorney File No. IL-003866 Attorney Code. 56284 Case Number: 16 CH 04406 TJSC#: 38-4172 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose.


6

Section 2 Thursday, July 12, 2018

The Regional News - The Reporter

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Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

OUT & ABOUT

The Regional News • The Reporter

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Southwest • Section 2, Page 7

Registration still open for the Center summer camps It’s not too late to register for summer camps at the Center, 12700 Southwest Hwy. in Palos Park. “If you’re still looking for an incredible summer experience for your child, please call the Center about our children’s farm programs. Though some programs are full, many still have openings,” said the organization through its website. Junior Farmers is offered to children ages 3-8. This is a farm and animal-based experience for young children. Sessions are one week in length, meeting Monday through Friday. Farm Explorers is a five-day

experience that will mimic the Center’s residential camps in a daytime-only format. Campers, entering grades 2-7, will spend lots of time at the farm with the animals and horses. There will also be other activities offered including hiking, camp crafts, cookouts, group games, singing and more. Farm Camp is one of the longest running programs and is offered to children entering grades 4-7. It’s a coed residential camping program and is offered in 5- and 12-night sessions. Outdoor Adventure for Teens is 12 nights of adventure and exploration through onsite and offsite experiences for 8th and 9th grad-

ers. The program will utilize the farm animals and horses as well as offsite experiences such as hiking trips, overnight campouts and adventure challenges. Senior Outdoor Leadership is designed to give participants an out-of-doors, leadership experience like no other. Offered to teens entering grades 10-12, this program focuses on group dynamics and leadership skills through onsite activities and offsite trips. Registration and more information may be obtained by calling the Center at (708) 361-3650 or visiting www.thecenterpalos.org for an application.

What a day for hot dogs and pet dogs in Palos Park Music and hot dog lovers can gather from 5 to 7:30 p.m. July 19 at the Village Green in Palos Park for live tunes and the classic American edible. The hot dog has been around since the 1800s and is synonymous with baseball, summer and picnics. Bring the entire family and enjoy a hot-off-the-grill hot dog with all the fixings. Complete meals of hot dog, chips and a drink will also be available.

Enjoy a picnic atmosphere and live musical entertainment by David Gaidas and Mitch Mayer. Village Green is located behind the Palos Park Recreation and Parks facility at 8901 W. 123rd St. Beginning at 5:30 p.m. on the same day and at the same location, a pet parade will be held, with check-in beginning at 5 p.m. under the gazebo. The first registered pets will receive a treat, said a publicity

blurb on the Palos Park calendar of events. Registration is free. Pets—not limited to dogs, of course—will parade through the park during Hot Dog Day to be judged for a chance at a prize basket. The event may be cancelled due to inclement weather. More information can be obtained by calling the Recreation and Parks department at 708- 6713760.

5 reasons why summer camp is a good choice for kids Summer vacation offers students a respite from lessons and the routine of school. Children might once have eagerly awaited those final days of classes so they could lounge poolside, skip rocks across ponds and spend the long days of the season playing with friends. But many of today’s youngsters spend much of their summer vacations indoors playing with their digital devices. Perhaps that’s why one of the last vestiges of the classic summer vacation escape — summer camp — remains such a viable option for parents who want their children to get outdoors once the school year ends. Although kids needn’t be in camp all summer long, a week or two can benefit campers of all ages. The following are five reasons why summer camp might be the right fit this year. 1. Explore talents. Summer camps help young people explore their unique interests and talents. Under an organized, yet

often easygoing, camp schedule, kids can dabble in sports, arts and crafts, leadership, community support, and so many other activities that may not be fully available to them elsewhere. 2. Physical activity: Lots of camps build their itineraries around physical activities that takes place outdoors. Campers may spend their time swimming, running, hiking, playing sports, climbing, and so much more. This can be a welcome change for kids accustomed to living sedentary lifestyles. Regular physical activity has many health benefits and can set a foundation for healthy habits as an adult. 3. Gain confidence. Day and sleepaway camps offer campers the opportunity to get comfortable in their own skin. Camps can foster activities in self-esteem by removing the academic measures of success and fill in with noncompetitive opportunities to succeed. Campers learn independence, decision-making skills and

the ability to thrive outside of the shadow of their parents, siblings or other students. 4. Try new things. Camp gives children the chance to try new things, whether that’s learning to cook, exploring new environments or embracing a new sport or leisure activity. Opening oneself up to new opportunities can build character and prove enlightening for children. 5. Make new friends. Camp is a great place to meet new people and make lifelong friends. Campers flood in from areas near and far. This provides kids with a chance to expand their social circles beyond their immediate neighborhoods and schools. Camps benefit children in a variety of ways. Lessons learned in camp can strengthen values, build confidence, develop coping mechanisms when adversity strikes, and enable campers to make lifelong friends.

ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, your head is in the stars and your feet are on the ground, but this outlook is working for you. Just do not live in fantasy land too long.

inevitable will only make the transition tougher.

numbers. If you can rally together a team, you can accomplish much of your to-do list for the week in half of the time.

Learn to write about travel at the Bridge Teen Center HOROSCOPES The Bridge Teen Center, 15555 S. 71st Ct., Orland Park, offers several free events for teens in seventh through 12th grade.  For more information, call (708) 532-0500 or visit www. thebridgeteencenter.org. “Ready Up!” Gamers’ Challenge & Classic Pacman Tournament w/ The Local and Texas Roadhouse will be held from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. July 13. The Bridge Teen Center, 15555 S. 71st Court, Orland Park. Students will compete in the Fortnite High Score Challenge and Classic Pacman Tournament. They will also be able to play Super Smash Bros on the Big Screen in the Big Room. Student will also be able to enjoy warm cinnamon buttered rolls from Texas Roadhouse while listening to the MG Bailey. Project Serve: Thrift Store is

open from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. July 17. Students will volunteer their time at The Bridge Thrift Store, which keeps The Bridge Teen Center open and free for teens like you. Tasks will include sorting, cleaning, and shelving their donated items. Come help out! Community service hours will be given. Perler Bead Crafts will be made from 4:30 to 6:00 p.m. July 17. Students will make a coaster or keychain using colorful plastic beads that will be arranged on a peg board. Soul Café: Dealing With Emotions w/ Michelle Krepps, LCSW will be offered from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. July 18. Students will make a DIY “Daily Mood Flip Chart” as a new way to help communicate their emotions to anyone who walks into their room!

Experimental Musical Instruments w/ Joe Rauen will sound off from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. July 18. Students will see how random objects make their way into a unique and functional musical instrument with the one-man-band, Joe Rauen. They will get inspired by this musician who made his dreams of making music a reality unlike any other. The “What It’s Like To Be” series will host travel writer Dave Kaczynski from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. July 19. Students will hear from a professional writer and photographer who is passionate about traveling the world. This travel writer will share some great stories from the countries he has seen and teach them how to use their environment for interesting and genuine writing.

Travel on a budget and still have fun Many people are passionate about traveling. Travel, whether it’s domestic or international, can be an invaluable way to experience other cultures, meet new people and get a sense of history. As valuable as travel can be, many people feel they cannot afford to travel. However, there are ways to travel on a budget and still have fun. • Stay close to home. Men and women traveling on limited budgets can save money and still have fun by staying close to home. The closer your destination to your home, the less costly your trip figures to be. By visiting destinations that are within driving distances, travelers can save money on the cost of airfare, which is typically among the most expensive components of traveling. Road trips also afford travelers ample flexibility that might not be available to travelers who are traveling abroad. That flexibility can make road trips more fun than more structured vacations. • Choose affordable destinations. Overseas travel is not necessarily more expensive than domestic travel. Certain destinations are ideal for bargain hunters year-round. Research affordable destinations via a Google search or utilize the “deals” sections on travel websites such as Orbitz¨. • Cook some of your meals.

Food is among the most costly expenses for travelers. Men and women can save some money by cooking some of their meals during their vacations. Doing so saves money on dining out, and travelers willing to experiment by cooking dishes native to the places they’re visiting can have some fun in the kitchen. • Travel during the offseason. Avoiding certain destinations during the height of their tourism seasons is another great way to save. The cost of lodging and airfare peaks during tourist season, but travelers willing to travel during the offseason can save substantial amounts of money. In addition to saving money on lodging and airfare, travelers who plan their

vacations during the offseason may also save money on local attractions. • Do your homework regarding your destination. Thanks to websites such as TripAdvisor¨, travelers can now learn as much as they want to learn about a given destination before they ever visit it. Such websites can be invaluable resources to travelers who want to enjoy their vacations but must do so on a budget. Research affordable tourist attractions and restaurants, even looking for free activities. Such research can be fun and make for more enjoyable trips. Travelers who must travel on budgets can still have fun and make lasting memories on their vacations.

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, just when you thought a relationship had gone as far as it could go, things start to change this week. Plenty of excitement is coming your way. GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21 You might get word of something exciting or new coming your way, Gemini. A chance to socialize with others or even a job opportunity may be on the horizon. Keep an eye out. CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22 This is a week for having fun and letting loose, Cancer. These may be things you haven’t done in some time and you can certainly use a break from the norm. LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23 You may be reticent to go back to work, especially if you are coming off of an extended vacation, Leo. But putting off the

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, there may be some buzz surrounding your social life this week if you are game for taking chances. It may be time to pursue a burgeoning friendship. LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 Are you ready for a well-calculated risk, Libra? If so, then a startup venture, sizable investment or converting a hobby into a career could be the way to go. SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22 You can’t lie to yourself, Scorpio, so own up to anything that needs improving. Take some time for some serious self-reflection and devise a plan to fix things. SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/ Dec 21 Love and support are all around you this week, Sagittarius. This support couldn’t come soon enough. Some extra support will help you overcome an obstacle. CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, there is strength in

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 Thoughts about how you can work less but earn more may have been swirling through your mind, Aquarius. Write down your plan and determine how to make it happen. PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20 Truth may be stranger than fiction this week, Pisces. Before you believe that something is false, gather all the facts.

FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS

JULY 12 Loni Love, Comic (47) JULY 13 Harrison Ford, Actor (76) JULY 14 Dan Reynolds, Singer (31) JULY 15 Diane Kruger, Actress (42) JULY 16 Corey Feldman, Actor (47) JULY 17 Angela Merkel, Politician (64) JULY 18 Kristen Bell, Actress (38)


Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

OUT & ABOUT

The Regional News • The Reporter

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Southwest • Section 2, Page 8

Charity golf outing will benefit those affected by domestic violence The Crisis Center for South Suburbia (CCSS) will host its annual Dianne Masters Cup Charity Golf Outing August 14 at the  Silver Lake Country Club  in Orland Park. The event, sponsored by Exelon, benefits individuals and families affected by domestic violence. An estimated 200 people are expected to participate in the annual tournament, making it the fifth sold-out event in a row, said organizers in a news release.  The event pays tribute to the Crisis Center’s founder, Dianne Masters, who would have celebrated her 72nd birthday last month. Masters established a crisis hotline in the kitchen of her

home to help victims of domestic violence. Tragically, in 1982, Dianne lost her life at the hands of her husband. But for those closest to her, it strengthened their resolve to continue the mission, said CCSS. Continental breakfast at the course and registration will begin at 7:30 a.m., followed by a shotgun start at 9 a.m. Lunch will be provided on the course by the Candos Agency, a Farmer’s Insurance Company. The outing also features popular contests, such as Chipping to the Raft, Ball Launcher and more, all with a chance to win prizes.  Following the tournament, a cocktail and dinner reception is hosted in the clubhouse.

The nine-hole option on Silver Lake’s Rolling Hills  course is returning this year and a 12:30 start offers a fun afternoon out on the links with friends and colleagues. Golfers will have the opportunity to participate in trivia and contests on the course, as well as the cocktail and dinner reception following the round. Not a golfer? Silver Lake Country Club provides an exceptional steak and chicken buffet. Dinner tickets can be purchased separately for just $50 per person. The evening also includes raffles, trivia, and the opportunity to mingle with the CCSS family, friends and supporters. Opportunities to partner with CCSS through sponsorship are

also available for those who would like to promote their business or honor a family member or friend, while providing muchneeded support for those served at the shelter. According to CCSS, the nonprofit organization continues to honor Dianne Masters’ legacy by partnering with the community to provide safety, strength and hope to over 2,000 victims of domestic violence each year. More information about sponsoring or participating may be obtained by visiting the Crisis Center’s website at www.crisiscenter.org or contacting Jessica Brooks at (708) 429-7255, ext. 136.

Time has come for grillmasters to gear up Grilling season has returned for the millions of people who live in regions where grilling is unlikely to happen during the winter months. While standard fare like hot dogs and hamburgers may suffice for backyard barbecues with lots of friends and family, when the party is smaller, grillmasters may want to up their games and try their hands at something new. Tri tip steak is cut from the bottom of the sirloin and is popular on the West Coast of the United States, but this cut, which is suited to marinating and rubbing, can be enjoyed anywhere. Those who want to give tri tip steak a shot may find it sold as bottom sirloin roast in their local grocery store or butcher shop. But once you find the right cut, the following recipe for “Grilled Tri Tip With Black Olive Aioli” courtesy of Bill Niman and Janet Fletcher’s “The Niman Ranch Cookbook” (Wiley) is sure to please you and your guests the next time you fire up the grill. GRILLED TRI TIP WITH BLACK OLIVE AIOLI Serves 4 to 6 • 1 tri tip steak, 21/2 pounds • 1 tablespoon olive oil • 2 tablespoons fresh rosemary leaves, chopped • 1 tablespoon freshly cracked black pepper • 1/4 cup finely chopped pitted oil-cured black olives • 1 cup aioli (see below) • 1 tablespoon coarse sea

salt • Cayenne pepper Place the steak in a small, nonreactive baking dish. Combine the olive oil, rosemary and black pepper in a small bowl and stir well. Rub the mixture evenly over the tri tip. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 8 hours or up to 24. hours. Remove the tri tip from the refrigerator 11/2 hours before cooking. Prepare and light a charcoal grill for direct cooking. Add the olives to the aioli and season with cayenne. When the grill is at its hottest (when the coals are red and glowing and it’s too hot to hold your hand over the grill for more than a couple of seconds), remove the tri tip from the marinade, wipe off any excess marinade, and season on both sides with sea salt. Place the steak on the cooking grate directly over the coals, cover the grill, and cook, turning once, for about 20 minutes, or until a thermometer inserted into the thickest part reads 130 F for medium rare. Transfer to a cutting board and let rest for 5 to 10 minutes. Cut the tri tip into thin slices across the grain and arrange on a platter. Serve with aioli. AIOLI Makes about 1 cup • 1 small clove garlic • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard • 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice

the cooking grates. Wire brushes are ideal for cleaning cooking grates. Such brushes can quickly remove grease and food particles, saving grill owners the trouble of scrubbing away with traditional sponges. Once the wire brush’s work is done, you can then clean the grill with a soapy sponge. • Remove food that fell into the well. Food inevitably falls into the well of a grill no matter how skilled a grillmaster might be. If

Warmer weather sends scores of golfers to their favorite courses each and every day. Golf is a challenging pastime, but a few pointers can help golfers hone their short games, long games and everything in between. • Choose the right clubs. There is more to selecting clubs than pulling any old iron out of your golf bag and whacking away. Wind, hazards and obstructions in landing areas should influence your decision of which club to use. Novice golfers may want to rely on their caddies to make club recommendations, and as they become more confident in their abilities they can start to make their own choices. • Anchor your feet. Anchor your foot behind the ball to drive the ball further. Right-handed players will keep the right foot anchored, and lefties will do the opposite. Do not lift your foot prematurely; otherwise, you can lose power and distance. • Identify your weaknesses. As with any hobby, identifying those areas that need the most work can help you become a better golfer. Keep track of each shot you take, and then look at the results to see which areas of your game need

Laugh along with comedy cabaret at McCord Gallery

• 2 egg yolks • 1 cup olive oil To make by hand, chop the garlic and salt together on a cutting board until a paste forms. Transfer to a deep mixing bowl and wrap a damp towel around the base of the bowl to keep it from sliding around the counter as you work. Whisk in the mustard, lemon juice and egg yolks. While whisking continuously and vigorously, add the olive oil in a slow, thin, steady stream until all of it has been incorporated and the

left to fester in the well, such foods can pose a safety risk and promote the growth of bacteria. • Clean the remaining areas of the grill. Marinade, sauce or condiments may find their way onto areas of your grill, and if left unattended, such substances can make a grill very dirty over time. Remove these substances after each barbecue to keep your grill looking new through the summer.

mixture is thick and completely emulsified. To make the aioli in a food processor, place the garlic and salt in the work bowl and process to chop as finely as possible. Add the mustard and lemon juice and pulse to combine. Add the egg yolks and, with the motor running, add the olive oil in a slow, thin, steady stream until all of it has been incorporated and the mixture is thick and completely emulsified. Cover and refrigerate for up to 24 hours until needed.

“You can’t be serious!” described as a fun-filled comedy cabaret will be staged at 7 p.m. Aug. 10 at McCord Gallery & Cultural Center, 9602 W. Creek Dr. In Palos Park. “Especially these days, when our world seems laden with bad news and bad tempers, it is so important to laugh,” said McCord in a publicity release. “’You Can’t Be Serious!’ provides a comic lens through which to look at the situations we all face in life.” The show will feature contemporary and classic songs and stories that will make the audience “laugh so hard your sides will hurt. Remember, laughter is the best medicine. We’ll see you in stitches—the good kind!” Tickets are $35 each. More information can be obtained by calling McCord at (708) 671-0648 or visiting www.mccordgallery.org.

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Musicians from the Illinois Philharmonic Orchestra will perform at Lake Katherine Nature Center & Botanic Gardens from 6:30 to 8 p.m. August 15. “Lake Katherine’s lovely clubhouse lawn provides the backdrop for an evening of beautiful music provided by the IPO string quartet,” the orchestra announced in a news release. Entry for “Sunset Sonata” includes two complimentary cocktails from the Harvest Room restaurant, garnished with herbs from Lake Katherine’s very own herb garden. Music starts at 7 p.m. The cost is $40 per person. Lake Katherine Nature Center is located at 7402 Lake Katherine Dr., Palos Heights. More information may be obtained by calling (708) 361-1873.

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the most work. • Fix your alignment. Align your shots by assessing the target from behind the ball. Then set the clubface behind the golf ball and align it with the target before you enter your stance. • Use your torso for power. The torso is essential to a solid swing. Practice rotating from your core to control your backswing and then maintain the same spine angle and posture on the downswing. • Use the wind. Not every golf game will be played in perfect weather. A good player knows how to make adjustments for the wind depending on the shot. Use the wind to your advantage when you can, and adjust your swing when hitting into the wind. • Become a better chipper. Many players put so much emphasis on their backswings and putt shots that they fail to devote any practice to chips. All shots are important for golfers trying to shed strokes off of their scores. • Keep fit. Maintaining or improving your physical strength and overall health can help your golf game. Exercise and eat right, and you will have more endurance on the links.

BROADEN YOUR HORIZONS

How to clean your grill during summer Grilling season has arrived, and amateur grillmasters everywhere are gearing up for another summer of backyard barbecues and family dinners outside under the summer sun. But once you fire up that grill and cook your first hot dog of the season, your work is not quite done. Cleaning the grill after you have eaten makes it easier to prolong the life of your grill and ensure the foods you eat are safe to consume. • Turn the grill off. Unless you own a charcoal grill, chances are your grill has dials that govern how hot the grill gets when cooking. Make sure these dials are turned to the off position before you start cleaning. If your’s is a gas grill, disconnect the gas while wearing gloves to reduce your risk of accident or injury. • Use the residual heat to make cleaning easier. The sooner you start cleaning the grill after you cook, the easier it might be to make the cooking surfaces sparkle. That’s because the residual heat can make it easier to remove any leftover buildup from barbecue sauce or seasoning that stuck to the grill after you removed your food. • Use a wire brush to clean

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Reporter 7 12 18  
Reporter 7 12 18