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THE 73rd Year, No. 12

REGIONAL NEWS — Illinois Press Association

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Thursday, March 20, 2014

Gorman after easy primary win will help Rauner vs. Gov. Quinn by Tim Hadac staff reporter Orland Park Republican Elizabeth “Liz” Doody Gorman continued on her path to a fourth term as Cook County commissioner in the 17th District, besting Burr Ridge resident Barbara Bellar in Tuesday’s Illinois primary election. With all 261 precincts counted, Gorman held a commanding lead with 13,180 votes (59.29 percent) versus Bellar’s tally of 9,051 votes (40.71 percent) Gorman will square off in November against fellow Orland Park resident Jim Hickey, who ran unopposed on the Democratic side. Bellar did not respond to email or phone requests for comment from The Regional News on Tuesday night, and Gorman, when asked, said she did not receive a concession call from Bellar. Photo by Jeff Vorva Gorman, a self-described conIncumbent Liz Gorman, campaigning in front of the Orland Park servative “on fiscal and social Sportsplex on Tuesday morning, knocked out Barbara Bellar for issues,” is perhaps best known the Republican nod in the 17th District Cook County commissioner for her successful leadership role race. in opposing and later repealing

sides of the aisle, and that the best and most lasting solutions are often bipartisan ones. If re-elected in November, Gorman plans to “continue the reform movement that is underway at Cook County. At no other time in recent memory has Cook County made the kinds of positive strides in reform than over the last four years, she said. She added that she plans to “remain vigilant in my effort to reform tax and fee measures wherever possible, to have the 133 percent tax hike pushed Cook County continue to invest by then-County Board President in innovative technology to reduce Todd Stroger in 2008 and passed costs and improve efficiencies for by the board’s Democratic ma- county services and programs, and jority. to stabilize the long-term fiscal Whether Gorman is actually health of the county.” a conservative was much of the Beyond her own race, Gorman focus of Bellar’s campaign. Bel- was a huge winner on Tuesday in lar attempted to portray her as a terms of the gubernatorial race. She RINO (Republican in Name Only), was an early and forceful supporter but most GOP primary voters did of winner Bruce Rauner, mustering not appear to be buying it. a wide swath of suburban RepubThe Republican committeeman lican organizations and individuals of Orland Township, Gorman con- in recent months in what turned sistently brushed off the criticism out to be a close race. by countering that governing ef“Cook County [votes] put fectively in a two-party system Rauner over the top,” Gorman includes give-and-take on both told The Regional News via phone

2014

late Tuesday night, while on her way back to Orland Park from Rauner’s headquarters in the Loop. She is expected to play a locally pivotal role in Rauner’s campaign to unseat Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn in the fall, a race that began at 1:22 a.m. Wednesday, when Rauner’s campaign sent out a blast email claiming that Quinn’s political operatives are “already tonight…starting to run a new attack ad against me. Can you believe it? They can’t even wait a day to start. So I can’t wait a day to ask. I’d planned a simple thank you note. But they’re running brand new negative general election ads as I type. Could you possibly donate $5, $25, $50, $100, $250, $500, or even $1,000 tonight?” Gorman predicted a bruising battle ahead in the Rauner vs. Quinn match. “We’re going to do all we can to get [Rauner] to the finish line, and I think his message of change and of economic recovery will be well received by voters in Cook County and across the state.”

Heights’ Brannigan vows to be ‘ruthless’ vs. unbeaten Lipinski by Bob Rakow staff reporter Palos Heights Republican Sharon Brannigan spoke with confidence Tuesday night about her chances of defeating entrenched Democratic incumbent U.S. Rep. Dan Lipinski, the son and designated political heir of the similarly entrenched former Congressman William O. Lipinski, in November. “I’m going to ruthless,” Brannigan said during a phone interview from Giordano’s in Orland Park where she spent the night with supporters. “It looks like I got it. I ran a nice, clean race,” said Brannigan, who handily defeated her opponent, Diane Harris of Joliet, in the 3rd Congressional District primary race. Brannigan, 52, a Palos Heights resident, had success throughout the 3rd District. Unofficial vote totals show Brannigan with 17,725 votes to 10,506 ballots cast for Harris. Brannigan ran strong in both Chicago, where she garnered 70 percent of the vote, and the Cook County portion of the district, where she collected 63 percent of the vote. The election was somewhat closer in Will County, Harris’ base of support. Lipinski ran unopposed in the

Democratic primary, but still made the rounds meeting and greeting people in Chicago and the suburbs. That included a stop at the Orland Park Sportsplex in the morning. In an election-night statement thanking supporters, Lipinski said: “So many families are still struggling to make ends meet and are frustrated at Washington’s partisan bickering. Tonight I am celebrating this victory, but tomorrow morning it is back to work to help improve the daily lives of people in the 3rd District and across our nation.” Brannigan is a Palos Township trustee elected to the town board last April as a member of a slate assembled by Palos GOP Committeeman Sean Morrison that made a clean sweep of the trustee seats. She said she will focus almost exclusively on ObamaCare and Lipinski’s support of the measure in an effort to defeat him.“It has affected people across the board,” Brannigan said. “I want to see the repeal of it.” She added that she’ll campaign in support of term limits—three terms for Congress, two terms for Senate—during a race in which she’ll be a decided underdog. “This is a bipartisan issue,” she said.

Voters in Oak Lawn on Tuesday overwhelmingly supported a binding referendum that calls for term limits for members of the village board. Beginning in April 2015, board members will be limited to three consecutive terms. Brannigan said she is a stronger Republican candidate than those faced by Lipinski in the past. She said her background as a small business owner, elected official and recognition in both the suburban and Chicago portions of the district will be helpful. She added that she will rely heavily on social media to advance her campaign. Lipinski has never faced a serious re-election challenge, having defeated seven candidates in five races. Lipinski succeeded his father, U.S. Rep. William O. Lipinski. Brannigan and her husband, Mike, own Sherry’s Flower Shoppe in Orland Park, and she says that her perspective as a small-business owner will bring a fresh approach to Congress. She chided the Obama Administration as one that “seeks to punish businesses across the nation” and has made it “increasingly difficult for middle class families to hang on to what they have and keep what they earn because of out-of-control spending, over taxa-

tion and over regulation.” Brannigan was sharply critical of the federal Affordable Care Act during the primary race, which she says “was forced upon me and my family, and now it’s unfortunately the law of the land. This law is an intrusion into our personal and professional lives, has caused the reduction of healthcare services and has led to the increase in premiums – this is not what was promised to the American people,” she said.

Sharon Brannigan, shown talking to a voter at the Palos Park Recreation Center Tuesday afternoon, won the opportunity to take on Dan Lipinski in November for the 3rd District Congressional seat after she beat Diane M. Harris.

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Congressman Dan Lipinski (center) campaigned at the Orland Park Sportsplex Tuesday morning. Even though Lipinski was uncontested Tuesday, he made stops in Chicago and various suburbs to meet and greet voters.

Heights’ Lawler edges out Barrett in 15th Subcircuit by Tim Hadac staff reporter

Submitted photo

A triumphal return to Palos South Sixth-graders engulf U.S. women’s hockey team silver medalist Kendall Coyne (center) at the St. Patrick’s Day assembly held in her honor at Palos South Middle School Monday after her return from the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. Coyne is a Palos South grad. More on Page 3. The community is invited to meet Coyne today (Thursday) from 4 to 6 p.m., at a reception at the Palos Heights Public Library, where Mayor Bob Straz will present her with a gift from the city to honor her accomplishments.

some fantastic people, had tremendous support for which I’m grateful. It really strengthened The Democratic primary battle my faith in our system.” for the bench in the Cook CounBarrett’s candidacy began long ty Circuit Court’s 15th judicial before the official announcement subcircuit (Sterba vacancy) went of his campaign when he began to the wire Tuesday night and making the rounds of speaking spilled into early Wednesday beappearances before area senior fore the Cook County Clerk’s Ofcitizen and other community fice released a final count, at 1:13 groups and fraternal organizaa.m., showing that Chris Lawler tions, discussing the law and his of Palos Heights had edged Miinterest in the sport of hockey, as chael B. Barrett of Orland Park both a referee and president of a by a mere 14 votes. youth hockey organization. With all 291 precincts reporting, Lawler already serves as a Lawler finished with 4,168 votes Chris Lawler judge, appointed to his position (25.98 percent), with Barrett an last year by the Illinois Supreme eyelash away with 4,154 votes Regional News on Tuesday night. Court upon the retirement of (25.89 percent). He ran a highly visible campaign, Judge David Sterba, also a Palos Bringing up the rear in the race with prominent blue and white Heights resident. He is assigned were Robbin Perkins of Matteson yard signs across Palos Heights, in to the 6th District Courthouse with 2,996 votes (18.67 percent), his race to best Barrett, who was in Markham. Sondra Denmark of Matteson the slated candidate of the Cook Barrett is a partner in the law with 2,785 votes (17.36 percent), County Democratic Party. firm Barrett & Sramek, 6442 W. and Mary Beth Duffy of Tinley Barrett, reached at his home in 127th St., Palos Heights, where Park with 1,942 votes (12.10 Orland Park on Tuesday night, he concentrates in civil trial litipercent). told The Regional News that “win, gation, personal injury, workers Lawler did not respond to a lose or draw, this campaign has request for comment from The been a great experience. I’ve met (See 15th Subcircuit, Page 3)




The Regional News Thursday, March 20, 2014

View from Trinity by Dr. Steven Timmermans

Spring: Spirits lift Hats off to snowplow drivers and those who have pushed snow blowers and shovels all winter. And make that winter hats off. And gloves off. And scarfs off. And bulky jackets off. We are ready for spring! But quite seriously, we owe a debt of gratitude to those who have kept streets as clean as possible this past winter season, whether that’s local municipal or county workers. At Trinity, our crew of workers—including student snow shovelers—have ignored the time clock, time and time again, coming early and staying late to push snow off our roads and paths. At times, I’ve harbored a regressive wish to be a kid again, as I have eyed the mountains of snow that plows have created. I remember playing King of the Hill in grade school, pushing and being pushed off snow mounds. It’s probably quite true that those mountains of snow were much smaller than I remember them, but the mountains created this past winter were the highest any of us have seen in recent years. As we joyfully enter spring, we would do well to remember that in any season, there are those who attend to work required to keep life running smoothly and to bring added dimensions to our lives. At some point, crews will be repainting lanes on our roads and highways. City crews and Lake Katherine friends will be at work turning fountains back on along with other water supplies

as the danger of freezing pipes is now nearly past. In Trinity’s neighborhood, the Navajo Hills Homeowners Association will be sprucing up our entries off from College Drive and 127th, eventually even planting flowers. This is a time when we break out of our homes and begin to experience the beauty and warmth of the outdoors. This is a time, too, when many take to the roads, jogging or running, and to empty lots and playgrounds, kicking soccer balls and batting baseballs. As we all pour out of our homes and offices, suddenly our vision needs to be more acute, as drivers share the roads with bicyclists and runners, and children need to re-learn looking both ways. Enjoy, spring is arriving and the winter is past. The Bible’s book of Solomon, often called the Song of Songs, includes verses that reflect the joy many of us wish to express; just substitute the word snow for rain! See! The winter is past; the rains are over and gone. Flowers appear on the earth; the season of singing has come, The cooing of doves is heard in our land. The fig tree forms its early fruit; the blossoming vines spread their fragrance. May these coming days of spring, after a hardy winter, envelope us like a sweet fragrance! Steve Timmermans, Ph.D., is the president of Trinity Christian College in Palos Heights.

Readers Write Columnist misrepresents Arizona conscience protection Dear editor: I don’t understand why The Regional allows such ignorant, and biased reporting as Bob Rakow’s piece on March 8 misrepresenting the Arizona bill that sought to clarify the state’s religious liberty protections, and lauding a federal judge who struck down the Texas ban on same sex marriage. Your columnist obviously never read the Arizona bill; it never mentions gays, nor does it deny them any rights or even infer this (I am enclosing a copy). And, he apparently likes rule by fiat, which is what the Texas judicial decision is all about. The column doesn’t just comment on the issues, it blows them way out of proportion. It also attacks anyone who would disagree with your columnist’s take on these issues. He goes on and on, nonsensically equating homosexual marriage rights with black repression and discrimination. What a lot of drivel! The question isn’t whether people opposed to gay marriage on religious grounds should provide their services for gay weddings; it is whether they should be compelled to by government. Critics of the much-maligned Arizona bill pride themselves on their live-and-let-live openmindedness, but they are highly moralistic in their support of gay marriage, judgmental of those who oppose it and tolerant of only one point of view on the issue — their own. Maybe The Regional could provide a little balance and fairness

to offset the left wing ideologue you already have on staff. Or maybe you could just have your editor use a little discretion and tone it down. Mike Lahart Palos Heights

HHS mandate: religious freedom in the balance Dear editor: The U.S. Supreme Court on March 25 will begin hearing a number of lawsuits opposing the Obamacare HHS Mandate requiring businesses to buy insurance coverage for birth control, abortifacient drugs, and sterilizations for their employees despite the fact that doing so is contrary to the employer’s religious convictions. Among the more than 94 lawsuits some are from religious organizations of one kind or another that aren’t religious enough to suit Kathleen Sebelius or her boss. The view that it is just those contrary Catholics who oppose the HHS Mandate is simply not true. The suits include Catholic, Evangelical, Rabbinical, Mormon, Krishna, and Jehovah Witness organizations. Lay businesses involved are family owned not corporations. Hobby Lobby, Conestoga Wood Specialists, and AutoCam Automotive & AutoCam Medical are among the many in that group. Plaintiffs object to the mandate on the grounds that it coerces the violation of religious beliefs; prevents being faithful to their Biblical founding; is sinful and immoral providing contraception that causes the same effect as abortion; forces them to choose between religious conviction,

eliminating employees’ benefits, or shutting down their businesses. The First Amendment gives us the freedom of religion, not freedom from religion, and allows us the freedom to exercise that religion. The entities in these lawsuits do not wish to check their religion at the door of their organizations. America has a history of protecting religious freedom. Despite the requirement for school attendance to age 17, the Amish won in Wisconsin with their position that age 16 was enough education according to their religious tradition. Jehovah Witnesses were by their religion not allowed to salute the flag and won in court. A Seventh Day Adventist employee refused to work Saturdays, her Sabbath. She was fired because of it, but the court allowed her to collect unemployment. When a religion was denied in court the right to use a drug in a religious ceremony, the backlash was so severe that Congress passed the Religious Freedom Restoration Act in deference to that freedom. It prevents a federal law from burdening a person’s free exercise of his/her religion. The Amish and Indian tribes are exempt from the Mandate. Obama has rewarded many of his faithful followers from it as well. It is estimated that some 100 million employees of favored unions and other businesses are exempted. He remains consistently inconsistent. I certainly hope that the Justices’ decisions on this matter reflect a faithful adherence to America’s foundational principles. Meanwhile, though its unlikely that our timid homilists will mention it, I urge you to start praying that the Supreme Court

Inside the First Amendment

Celebrating two First Amendment landmark moments by Gene Policinski No one I know sent flowers or candy, but on March 9 we all had cause to celebrate the anniversaries of two very different First Amendment landmark moments. Sixty years ago, on March 9, 1954, CBS’ Edward R. Murrow hosted an episode of the primetime television program “See It Now,” in which he successfully exposed Sen. Joseph McCarthy’s mean-spirited and shoddy tactics in pursuing alleged communists in the U.S. government. And on March 9, 1964, the U.S. Supreme Court, in deciding New York Times v. Sullivan, set a new national standard for “uninhibited, robust and wide-open” discussion on matter of public concern and on the performance and conduct of public officials. Some say the ruling effectively provided a second ratification of the First Amendment’s protection of the freedoms of speech and press. The Murrow broadcast program contributed to McCarthy’s

downward slide toward Senate censure later that year, prompted also by eight weeks of misbegotten televised hearings targeting the U.S. Army. McCarthy had soared to national fame following a 1950 speech in which he claimed to have the names of “205 communists” in the U.S. State Department. By 1954, his combative style and high-profile congressional hearings involving hundreds of government officials had captured national attention and boosted his political power. With film clips showing McCarthy’s tactics and a no holds-barred narrative, Murrow told viewers that “no one familiar with the history of this country can deny that congressional committees are useful. It is necessary to investigate before legislating, but the line between investigating and persecuting is a very fine one and the junior Senator from Wisconsin has stepped over it repeatedly.” Murrow said to his audience that “we must not confuse dissent with disloyalty. We must remember always that accusation

is not proof and that conviction depends upon evidence and due process of law. ... We are not descended from fearful men — not from men who feared to write, to speak, to associate and to defend causes that were, for the moment, unpopular.” A decade later, the Supreme Court ruled in a case involving an advertisement published in The New York Times in 1960. The ad claimed “an unprecedented wave of terror” against civilrights workers, particularly in Alabama. Even though a Montgomery, Ala., city commissioner, L. B. Sullivan, was not named, he sued the newspaper and those who “signed” the ad, citing a number of factual errors. Alabama law — and what well may have been biased state courts — favored Sullivan and he was awarded $500,000 in damages. In overturning the verdict, the U.S. Supreme Court set out a new libel standard for public officials: “actual malice,” a high standard requiring proof the speaker or writer knew a statement was false, or had recklessly

disregarded whether it was true or false. Justice William Brennan Jr., citing an earlier decision, Whitney v. California, wrote in the Sullivan opinion that “public discussion is a political duty.” Brennan said the court “ ... against the background of a profound national commitment to the principle that debate on public issues should be uninhibited, robust, and wide-open, and that it may well include vehement, caustic, and sometimes unpleasantly sharp attacks on government and public officials.” Neither Murrow’s medium nor the Sullivan decision survives unscathed. The news media, protected in part to be a “watchdog on government,” is castigated as biased, inept or even irrelevant. Some legal critics, including Justice Antonin Scalia, see Sullivan as an affront to the intent of the nation’s founders in balancing freedom speech and protection of reputation and as an intrusion on each state’s right to create its own libel laws. But none can deny that each,

in its own way, helped re-shaped contemporary American life and how as a nation we perceive and apply our core freedoms of free press and free speech. In an era in which few Americans can name the five freedoms of the First Amendment (religion, speech, press, assembly and petition) — and more importantly, many aren’t sure how those freedoms apply to their daily lives — Murrow, Brennan and colleagues provided historic proof of the power of the rule of law and the ultimate value of the Bill of Rights. The Murrow and Sullivan anniversaries are opportunities for more than a celebration of history. Rather, they are a chance to revel in our individual freedom to speak out, and in our power to challenge the powerful.

Barb Butler, Palos Hills “I’m looking forward to using the track and the pool, because I love to walk. You can do as much as possible, even when the weather isn’t cooperating. I love to swim. You can get and upper and lower body workout without stress.”

Mary Dunn, Palos Hills “I’m anxious to see the cardio equipment. The Nu Step is the only thing I can use because of my back. It’s the only cardio exercise that is low stress. I want to use the pool because I love to walk. It’s the same thing, low stress. Regular walking is a little hard on my back.”

Darryl Butler, Palos Hills “I want to use the track and find a personal trainer. I also want to take swimming lessons. I need that. I’ve been a runner for 20 to 25 years. I just had my 65th birthday and I want to keep working everything, to keep everything working.”

Gene Policinski is chief operating officer of the Newseum Institute and senior vice president of the Institute’s First Amendment Center. He can be reached at gpolicinski@newseum. org.

of the United Sates (SCOTUS) remembers why people came to these shores in the first place. Mary Sue McWilliams Palos Heights

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iewfinder

What do you look forward to using the most at the Moraine Valley Community College Health, Fitness and Recreation Center? (Asked last Sunday at the new facility’s open house)

Photos by Joan Hadac

Mary Grill, Palos Heights “I want to use the treadmills and equipment upstairs. The berry smoothies are delicious, too.”

Nick Weibel, Orland Park “I’m mostly just looking forward to coming here because it’s a new facility. It’s something different, something new.”


The Regional News Thursday, March 20, 2014



Next Palos Dist. 118 schools chief hired within Scarsellsa will succeed Dubec as superintendent by Tim Hadac staff reporter

that with confidence because I’ve been in so many places where the students are less fortunate In a room with an A-shaped than ours.” roof, Anthony Scarsella made the One of those places, coincidengrade last Thursday. tally, is the very school district On a 6-1 vote, Scarsella was where Scarsella was educated named the new superintendent as a boy. “I graduated from the of schools of Palos Community first school district [Youngstown, Consolidated School District 118, Ohio] to be labeled ‘failing’ and at a special board of education taken over by the state,” he noted meeting held at administrative with a rueful smile. “I think back headquarters, 8800 W. 119th St., about that and reflect on what an Palos Park. amazing journey it’s been to be apCasting the lone vote of dis- pointed the next superintendent sent was board member Katie of this district, coming from that Thomason. kind of a background.” “We had a few really outstandHe begins his new duties July 1 ing candidates in our search, and will succeed Dr. Joseph Dubec, including Anthony Scarsella,” who is retiring after eight years Thomason explained. “I favored in the post. an external candidate who I feel Scarsella’s “prior performance was better qualified and a better in the district” set him apart from fit with the desired characteristics the approximately 30 other apexpressed by our community. Ob- plicants for the position, board viously, the majority of my fellow President Sheila Pacholski said. board members chose Anthony. “Plus, when we conducted our I respect their decision and will final round of interviews, we gave support Anthony 100 percent. the finalists two homework asI’ve had the pleasure of getting signments: one had to do with to know him better during my Common Core, which we are time on the board, and I’m con- all dealing with in Illinois, and fident he will do a fine job as our the other was a ‘change agent’ new superintendent.” question about how do you deal Scarsella, a Chicago resident, with change successfully…and has been employed by the district his presentation showed us how for seven years and has served clearly he had thought about our as assistant superintendent for district and how his vision was business services for the last five. our vision.” Before that he was a regional auChange doesn’t really happen ditor for the Illinois State Board overnight, Scarsella added. “It’s of Education. a process, and it involves having “In that capacity, I visited a lot all of the stakeholders around the of school districts, a lot of schools,” table to offer input. [With Comhe said after the meeting. “When mon Core implementation], we’re I say that this is really a special going through one of the biggest place for kids to be, I can say changes that school districts have

Submitted photo

Pausing for a photo after last Thursday’s meeting are School District 118 Board of Education members Nadine Antonini (from left), Meredith Marran, Secretary MariJo Calacci, President Sheila Pacholski, incoming Superintendent Anthony Scarsella, Vice President Catherine Maier, Katie Thomason, and John Faustino. gone through, curriculum wise, in decades—and it’s our job to understand this is a multi-year process, that we need to engage our parents, our community, our teachers, it’s going to be a team effort.” Scarsella hailed Dubec as “a great mentor to me” and said the superintendent “has left me a well-run, high achieving school district. The challenge for me is to build upon all the successes that have been achieved under his leadership, to make sure we’re focused on continuous improvement.” The feeling was mutual, as Dubec described his successor as “just a super individual for the district for the last seven years” and “has really excelled” as a business manager.

“He’s just been fabulous, a hard worker. I can’t say enough about him,” Dubec added. “He has been really committed to the community here. He loves the kids and the teachers, and he sees this not just as a job, but as a commitment to help others.” Scarsella said he looks forward to “being more visible” at the district’s three schools in the fall, a welcome break from previous duties that had kept him busy at district headquarters. The incoming superintendent holds master’s degrees in school business management from Northern Illinois University, and public policy and finance from American University in Washington D.C. He earned bachelor’s degrees in both education and history from the University of Cincinnati.

Currently, he is completing his doctorate in education administration at Northern Illinois University. Scarsella began his career as a classroom teacher at the middle and high school levels. According to a statement released by the district, Scarsella was “heavily involved in all district operations including technology, curriculum, personnel and finance. His leadership on the Palos 118 administrative team has led to expansion of instructional technology, improvements in school security and safety and high student performance. He oversaw balanced budgets for each year of his tenure and received the Association of School Business Officials International prestigious Meritorious Bud-

get Award for the past three years.” Dubec cracked a smile when asked about his plans after June 30. “I’m taking a vacation out east,” he said. “We have some relatives in the Boston area. “I always told my wife that when I retire, the first thing I want to do is take a fall vacation, because in our business, there is no fall vacation. You have to be here,” he concluded. “So we may just drive around and enjoy the fall up in Maine and maybe a few other places.” District 118 schools have a current enrollment of 1,928 students from the village of Palos Park, the western half of the city of Palos Heights, the northern portion of the city of Palos Hills, and adjacent unincorporated areas.

Palos South cheers famed daughter Kendall Coyne

U.S. Olympic Women’s Hockey silver medalist Kendall Coyne is welcomed by a standing ovation at Palos South Middle School, her alma mater, on Monday, St. Patrick’s Day. by Kerry Treacy Palos District 118

message U.S. Olympic Women’s Hockey silver medalist Kendall Coyne gave to Palos South Middle “Find what you love and go School students when she came out there and do it,” was the for a visit on St. Patrick’s Day.

Kendall Coyne plays goalie in a shootout with 18 lucky students at the welcome assembly at Palos South. Palos South welcomed Coyne back to her alma mater with an assembly held in her honor, where she encouraged the young crowd to follow their dreams. In her address to the students, Coyne reminisced about her most memorable times at Palos South where she graduated in 2006, fondly recalling the floor hockey unit in P.E. class, enjoying the Trash Can Band music assembly, and taking Spanish for the first time. She encouraged the young audience, “Don’t be afraid to try something new. You may love it or hate it but unless you’ll try it, you’ll never know.” Her former PE teacher at South, Roy Bullard introduced

15th Subcircuit (Continued from page 1)

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Evening with Dr. Principe will benefit Dist. 230 schools Time is fast running out to join the District 230 Foundation’s planned Health and Wellness Evening with Dr. John Principe, founder of WellBeingMD and Palos Heights TV Channel 4’s “The Mindful Kitchen” program. The dinner and vendors event will be held Thursday, April 3, from 4:30 to 9 p.m., at Silver Lake Country Club, 14700 S. 82nd Ave. in Orland Park. Health and wellness vendors open at 4:30 p.m. Dinner served at 6:30 p.m. Dr. Principe speaks at 7:30 p.m. Raffle prizes announced at 8:45 p.m. Tickets cost $30, includes access to vendors and raffles, a healthy dinner with recipes provided by Dr. Principe, and Dr. Principe’s Wellness talk. Payment can be made online at http://www.d230foundation. org/ or by check made payable to: District 230 Foundation, 15100 S. 94th Ave., Orland Park, IL 60462. Or call 349-5759.

compensation, wrongful death, criminal defense and appellate practice. He has been an attorney for 22 years. Lawler will face voters in the Tuesday, Nov. 4 general election, although there is no Republican nominee to face in the race in heavily Democratic Cook County. Lawler, who emphasized throughout the campaign that he is the only sitting judge in the race, may have been hampered by what some political analysts have called an anti-incumbent mood this primary season. Other judicial incumbents went down to defeat Tuesday, including Judges Diana Embil and Freddrenna Lyle. Among his strengths as a candidate, Lawler was well known to many in the Southwest Suburban community in and around Palos Heights for his volunteer service in a variety of capacities to his parish, St. Alexander Church in

his former student. “She has been an exceptional young lady long before she achieved Olympic fame….Number 26 on the ice, but number one in our hearts.” During the assembly, Coyne participated in a shoot-out with 18 lucky students, and shot autographed T-shirts into the crowd. Afterwards, she spent time throughout all three lunch periods visiting with students, signing autographs, and posing for pictures. They all had the opportunity to see the silver medal up close, but were most impressed by how much it weighed. “Its been overwhelming coming back to Palos South, a place where I attended for three years,” said

Coyne. “It’s really special to me to see how excited all the kids are.” To show support for Coyne competing in the winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, students and staff throughout Palos 118 were able to purchase USA Hockey T-shirts with Coyne’s name and number on the back. At the assembly, she was presented with a check for $1,200 in proceeds from the T-shirt sales for the For Julie Foundation, a charity close to the Coyne family’s heart. The foundation was established in memory of Julianne Doody, a 13-year-old girl who died in July of 2002, less than 14 weeks after being diagnosed with acute

Myelogenous Leukemia (AML), an aggressive form of cancer. She was a close friend of the Coyne family. Coyne attends and plays hockey for Northeastern University in Boston, where she is majoring in communications and minoring in Spanish. She took a hiatus from classes to train for the Olympics and fulfill a graduation requirement of serving an internship. Coyne began hers earlier this month with the Chicago Blackhawks in media relations. Coyne and her brothers Jake and Kevin, and sister Bailey, attended Palos South Middle School, and Palos West Elementary, where she was to visit on Tuesday.

Palos Heights; as well as his alma mater Marist High School and Catholic Charities. The race also was a test of political muscle, with both Barrett and Lawler lining up camps of local committeemen, mayors and others. Lawler had the backing of Palos Heights Mayor Robert Straz, as well as the mayors of Crestwood, Midlothian, and Oak Forest. Barrett was supported by Orland Park Mayor Daniel McLaughlin, Palos Hills Mayor Gerald R. Bennett, and Orland

Hills Mayor Kyle Hastings. Both men claimed the backing of the mayors of Alsip and Tinley Park. Both men had lined up significant support from organized labor.

With all 291 precincts reporting, Coughlin finished with 6,694 votes (44 percent), besting Flossmoor resident and incumbent Judge Diana Embil, who trailed with 6,198 votes (40.74 percent), and Orland Park resident John S. Fotopoulos bringing up the rear with 2,321 tallies (15.26 percent). Coughlin will again face voters in the Tuesday, Nov. 4 general election, although there is no Republican nominee to face in the race in heavily Democratic Cook County.

Doody vacancy Less frenzied and noticed was the other race in the 15th judicial subcircuit, to fill the Doody vacancy. Orland Park resident Patrick Kevin Coughlin fought his way to victory in a fairly tight race.

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The Regional News Thursday, March 20, 2014

Rauner rallies here on eve of victory GOP nominee takes aim at Quinn after primary win By Jeff Vorva This man is so rich, he not only has money to burn, he has money to buy fire departments. Opponents have called him a “bazillionaire’’ although he says he is not even a billionaire. But he has some cash. Bruce Rauner spent a reported $6 million of his own dough on the campaign that wrapped up Tuesday night and that was only a primary. But he needed every penny in what turned out to be a close race. Even before he dispatched Bill Brady, Kirk Dillard and Dan Rutherford in the Republican Primary, the Winnetka venture capitalist took aim at seated governor Pat Quinn – his November opponent. “We’re going to sweep Pat Quinn into the dustbin of history,” Rauner told a crowd estimated of 500 at the Lexington House in Hickory Hills on Monday night during his final rally before the election. His speech was less than five minutes but it was full of Quinn bashing without a syllable

A gentleman dressed in a period costume was a part of the festivities at Lexington House in Hickory Hills Monday night.

directed to his primary foes. It was almost as if they didn’t exist. But Dillard made Rauner sweat a little Tuesday night after watching a double-digit percentage lead shrink to two percent at about 9:30 p.m. During that time, Quinn was already running television commercials bashing Rauner so the mud started slinging at Rauner’s face before he could wipe the sweat off his brow. But the man who wants to make big noise from Winnetka claimed victory an hour later as he had the unofficial two-percent lead with 97 percent of the precincts reporting. It was closer win than expected. Dillard received crossover votes — Democrats voting on the Republican ballot — in Democraticheavy Chicago. “There are some thoughtful Democrats out there,” Dillard told reporters at what he was hoping would be a victory party while he was inching closer to Rauner. “I welcome them.’’ But the night ultimately belonged to Rauner, who is vowing that he will be the next governor. Republican Governors Association Chairman Chris Christie threw his weight and Hosannas Rauner’s way late Tuesday night in a statement. “It’s time to leave behind the days of high unemployment and job losses, skyrocketing taxes, unaccountable spending and failing schools that have blighted the last five years in Illinois under Pat Quinn,” Christie wrote. “Illinois is ready for a real leader: someone who can’t be bought or intimidated. Illinois is ready for a governor who is willing to solve the toughest of problems, not avoid them; for a governor who works to foster economic growth,

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Republican gubernatorial candidate Bruce Rauner told a crowd in Hickory Hills Monday night that Pat Quinn was the “worst governor in America’’ during his rally. not stifle it; for a governor who can balance a budget without saddling the taxpayers time and time again; for a governor who refuses to endure the persistent failure of government that has racked Illinois for years.” Rauner took to the stage Monday night in Hickory Hills with the Rolling Stones’ “Start Me Up” blaring on the PA system and well-dressed adults acting like kids at a rock concert yelling “Bruce! Bruce! Bruce!” “This is our year,” Rauner said. “This is our election. We’re going to sweep Pat Quinn into the dustbin of Illinois history. We’re going

to turn our state around just like Indiana did and Wisconsin is being turned around and Michigan is being turned around. We are going to shake up Springfield and transform our state.’’ He was just getting warmed up. “Pat Quinn is the worst governor in America,” Rauner said. “He has buried the people of Illinois. He is driving up our taxes. He is driving our employers out of the state. He’s driving our unemployment through the roof. He had defunded our schools. “He is a failure. We are going to get him gone.’’

After the Quinn-essential bashing of the governor, Rauner got around to what he wants to accomplish if he gets the votes in November. “We want to go to work for you,’’ Rauner said. “We want to do four things. No. 1, we want more jobs and a pro-business economy, No. 2, lower taxes and spending in Springfield, No. 3 great education and No. 4, term limits – eight years and out.’’ Not everyone was a Rauner fan that night. Near the entrance of the Lexington House stood a handful of protesters who loudly booed any

car that drove into the lot. They had signs the said “Billionaire Bruce: I iz buying your state,” “Union yes, Rauner No’’ and “Rauner is a downer.’’ On the other side of the driveway, a guy wearing a period costume holding up a sign that said .01%ers for RAUNER! cheered as loud as he could as cars came while police kept an amused eye on the proceedings from a distance. Quinn had an easier time with his opponent in the primary, beating Tio Hardiman by gobbling up 72 percent of the vote according to returns counted late Tuesday night.

Palos Township power switch referendum loses by one vote by Jack Murray Regional News editor By a margin of a single vote, voters who live in unincorporated Palos Township defeated the electrical aggregation referendum on Tuesday’s Illinois primary election ballot —473 No votes to 472 Yes votes, or 50.05 percent to 49.95 percent. Those are unofficial vote tallies reported on election night by the Cook County Clerk’s Office. The official canvas of vote totals is conducted at a later date. Palos Township Supervisor Colleen Schumann, who had supported passage of the referendum, agreed that it was stunning that it should be defeated by only one vote. “It’s so surprising, too, because it was predicted to result in savings of 8 to 9 percent” on residents’ electricity bills, she said when reached for comment on election night. After a poorly attended public forum the township held to explain the pros and cons of electrical aggregation held on March 10, Schumann added her endorsement of aggregation. “I definitely support it,” she said. Anything we can do to save money for our residents is a good thing. I encourage township residents to vote ‘yes’ on the referendum.”

The measure lost despite the holding of two public forums on the issue. Not one voter, however, attended the first forum, and only two came to the second. The result was very different when Orland Township asked voters in unincorporated areas there in a referendum last April whether to grant the township board the authority to arrange for the supply of electricity for its residential and small business customers who have not opted out of such a program. That referendum passed by a large majority. And voters in Palos Park, Palos Heights and Orland Park handily passed municipal electrical aggregation referendums that appeared on the ballots in those suburbs in the 2012 March primary election two years ago. Officials of those towns have all reported savings on residents’ utility bills since making the switch from ComEd to other power suppliers. “I’m disappointed,” Schumann said of the different result in Palos Township in this election. “We could have saved them money.” Turnout on the ballot question was only 14.23 percent of voters, and Schumann pointed to that as a possible reason for the referendum’s narrow defeat.

“If people are not educated on an issue they automatically vote no.” She said the language legally required in the wording of the referendum may have also been confusing to voters, who would not readily see that it was an opportunity to save money on their utility bills. Even if the referendum passed, voters who would not want to make the switch from ComEd would retain the ability to opt out of the switch. Aggregation uses the group purchasing power of residents to help municipalities, townships and other jurisdictions to negotiate lower wholesale prices on electricity bills, and potentially cleaner energy sources. Several hundred Illinois communities— including Palos Heights, Palos Park and Orland Park— have already used aggregation successfully to negotiate savings for residents and small businesses. Nobody’s electric bill will increase because of aggregation, the township’s aggregation consultant James Seay emphasized at the second forum, covered by The Regional News. “Absolutely not. You can write it in my blood,” he said. “There’s no way that anyone will ever pay a higher [wholesale] rate than what ComEd charges…no one will lose money.”

Submitted photo

Members of the Orland Park Knights champion pee wee football team pose for a photo with Mayor Daniel McLaughlin in the lobby of village hall Monday night, minutes before they and their coaches filed into the board room to receive awards for their 11-0 season.

Village Board panel tackles Old Orland parking crunch by Tim Hadac staff reporter

parking at the Metra commuter lots north of 143rd Street. While Trustee Patricia Gira There is a “creeping” parking expressed concern that the vilproblem in the Old Orland his- lage recommendation was made toric area, a village official said in response to specific complaints Monday night, and village trustees from residents and did not include took action designed to stop it in a proactive outreach to get a larger its tracks. sample of opinion, the new park“Residents in the area adjacent ing recommendation passed the to some of the [Old Orland] busi- committee on a 3-0 vote. nesses have been coming to us The measure is expected to be and sayin g they’re getting a considered at the next Village lot of creeping of the commer- Board meeting, set for 7 p.m. cial parking into the residential Monday, April 7 at village hall, area,” Karie Friling, village de- 14700 S. Ravinia Ave., Orland velopment services director, told Park. members of the Village Board’s In other matters Monday night, Development Services, Planning committee members and village and Engineering Committee. “So staff discussed options relating to what we wanted to do is monitor the costs of putting existing overthe situation and come back with head utility wires underground recommendations on how we can along 159th Street, from La address it.” Grange Road west to Will-Cook While there are some residential Road. parking limitations currently in The discussion was requested place, they were initiated years by village staff to coincide with By Bob Rakow The term limits take effect ing,” she said. “People have ago to prevent commuters from the Illinois Department of Transstaff reporter after the April 2015 municipal to get it out of the mindset parking south of 143rd Street and portation (IDOT) reconstruction election and limit to three the that you’re in political office then boarding Metra trains. The of the street, from Ravinia Avenue Oak Lawn voters spoke loud number of consecutive terms the for life.” new and expanded parking lots to Cedar Road. The engineering and clear Tuesday overwhelm- mayor, village clerk and trustees She added that three terms near the station have mostly elimi- design study of the project is exingly approving a binding ref- can serve in a single position. is sufficient time for an elected nated that concern, officials said, pected to start later this year. erendum that limits the terms A trustee could run for clerk official to make a difference. but new concerns have arisen, as Putting the wires underground a village board member can or mayor, for example, after “This is a reasonable way to customers of the small businesses is expected to cost about $5.8 milserve. serving three terms on the vil- proceed,” Bury said. “It’s set near 143rd and Union Avenue lion, although Friling cautioned The referendum won by a lage board. The term limits do up to be forward-thinking. It’s park in front of nearby homes. that the numbers are early, “back landslide. With all of the vil- not apply to school districts or a beautiful thing.” Friling said that in response of the envelope” estimates. The lage’s 41 precincts reporting, the park board. Trustee Mike Carberry, a to neighbors’ complaints, vil- numbers include costs associated 4,691 voters, or 85 percent, supVeteran trustees Bob Streit, proponent of term limits, said lage staff monitored parking in with acquisition of easements. ported the question, while 804 Alex Olejniczak and Carol Quin- the referendum’s success in the area on three weekends in To make the price tag more voters, 15 percent, voted against lan as well as Village Clerk Jane Oak Lawn will serve a model January, between 8:30 and 9:30 palatable, staff broke the stretch the measure. Only 16 percent Quinlan are still eligible to serve for other communities. p.m. each night. Their findings of 159th into five segments and of registered voters turned out another three terms if they run “It’s good. It gets more people confirmed what residents had listed individual prices ranging but Mayor Sandra Bury wasn’t for office again. involved in the process,” said reported, she added. from $566,000 to $1.55 million. complaining. Opponents of terms limits Carberry, a first-term trustee. In response, village officials recNo action was taken, although “Aren’t the numbers beauti- argue that incumbents can be The village board voted 4-2 to ommended establishing “residen- Gira and Trustees Kathleen Fenful?” Bury said Tuesday night. removed from office on Election place the referendum on the bal- tial parking only” designations ton and Dan Calandriello indi“I’m thrilled. Oak Lawn resi- Day. But Bury said defeating lot. Trustees Carol Quinlan and for sections of 143rd Place, Brook cated they were not in favor of dents are awesome.” an entrenched incumbent is Bob Streit, political opponents Avenue and 144th Street. spending nearly $6 million in tax Bury campaigned on term lim- not easily accomplished at the of the mayor, voted against the While the move will limit op- dollars on the effort. its and said they will ensure that local level where voter turnout referendum. Streit was elected tions for customers of nearby busiCommittee members also disfresh faces assume positions in is typically low. to the board in 1991 and is the nesses, village officials said that cussed possibly adding electronic village leadership. “Not enough people are vot- longest serving trustee. customers do have access to free cigarette use to the village’s ‘no

Oak Lawn voters say big Yes to term limits referendum

smoking” ordinance. Fenton and Gira appeared to favor the prohibition for several reasons, including protecting children from nicotine addiction. Calandriello suggested that the committee wait until guidance is issued by federal health authorities before any local action is taken. Finally, committee members briefly discussed the idea of village signage and branding. Picking up on comments made earlier this month by Trustee James V. Dodge Jr. that the village’s slogan (“World’s Golf Center”) is outdated to the point of being embarrassing, Fenton made a light-hearted suggestion that an image of a woman carrying a shopping bag be painted onto village water towers, to underscore Orland Park’s image as a major retail destination.

Photo by Tim Hadac

Orland Park Mayor Daniel McLaughlin wears the green on Monday night with Orland Park resident Erin Mulcahy (left), and Lauren Catinella. Both received awards from the mayor for their service to Chicago’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade. This year, Catinella was queen of the parade, and Mulcahy was a member of her court.


The Regional News Thursday, March 20, 2014

Police follow snow tracks to make arrest in Heights Palos Heights police followed footprints in the snow to chase and apprehend Richard T. Finger, 20, of Palos Park, on a charge of illegal consumption of alcohol by a minor. Police said they initially spotted Finger hiding behind a vehicle parked in the 12000 block of South 73rd Court at 2:25 a.m. March 12. Police said Finger admitted drinking, although they did not elaborate on what kind of alcohol was allegedly consumed. He is due in court on April 4. In other Palos Heights police news, Samantha D. Lakie, 19, of Orland Hills, was charged with illegal consumption of alcohol by a minor, no proof of insurance, and having illegally tinted windows. Police curbed her vehicle in the 12400 block of South Ridgeland Avenue at 2:06 a.m. March11 after they spotted her tinted windows. She is due in court on April 18. Katie McMeekin, 20, of Oak Lawn, was charged with illegal consumption of alcohol by a minor, speeding and improper lane usage. Police stopped her vehicle in the 13100 block of South Harlem Avenue at 2:52 a.m. last Friday, after they reportedly observed her vehicle traveling at 50 miles per hour, 15 miles per hour over the posted speed limit. McMeekin’s court date is April 4. Police charged Tamera C. Walker, 49, of Hammond, Ind., with DUI and texting while driving.

driving without a license, no proof of insurance, improper lane usage and failure to wear a seatbelt. His Her vehicle was curbed by po- vehicle was curbed by police in the lice in the 12200 block of South 13500 block of South Ridgeland Harlem Avenue at 11:27 p.m. last Avenue at 4:45 p.m. last Sunday. Saturday. Bond was set at $3,000, Bond was set at $3,000, and Genand Walker is scheduled to appear tile is scheduled to appear in court in court on April 4. on April 18. Joe Mazzarella, 24, of Western Hasan K. Albarbarawi, 26, of Springs, was charged with posses- Lockport, was charged with drivsion of cannabis and texting while ing on a suspended license and driving. Police stopped his vehicle failure to dim headlights. Police in the 12400 block of South Har- stopped his vehicle in the 6400 lem Avenue at 8:28 p.m. March block of West College Drive at 12. Mazzarella’s court date is 12:55 a.m. last Monday. Bond was March 27. set at $1,500, and his court date Police charged Paul R. Melone, is April 4. 21, of Chicago, with possession Police charged Darryl M. Clayof cannabis, possession of drug ton, 25, of Alsip, with driving on paraphernalia and failure to dim a suspended license, no proof of headlights. His vehicle was curbed insurance, and speeding. His veby police in the 6300 block of hicle was curbed by police in the West 127th Street at 12:59 a.m. 6300 block of West College Drive last Saturday. Melone is scheduled at 2:15 a.m. last Friday after poto appear in court on May 2. lice reportedly spotted his vehicle Jose J. Gomez, 35, of Blue Is- traveling at 61 miles per hour, 16 land, was charged with driving on miles per hour over the posted a suspended license and driving limit. Clayton is scheduled to apa vehicle with expired registra- pear in court on May 2. tion. Police stopped his vehicle in Derek C. Austin, 39, of Chithe 12700 block of South Harlem cago, was charged with driving Avenue at 10:05 a.m. last Sunday. on a suspended license, no proof Additionally, police said, Gomez of insurance and failure to dim was wanted on a warrant from headlights. Police stopped his the DuPage County Sheriff’s Of- vehicle in the 12100 block of fice. Bond was set at $1,500, and South Harlem Avenue at 3:20 her court date is April 18. a.m. last Saturday. Bond was set Police charged Charles P. Gen- at $2,000, and his court date is tile, 51, of Crestwood, with DUI, April 18.

PALOS HEIGHTS POLICE

Man charged with battery An Orland Park man was charged with battery March 1 following a disturbance at Bonefish Grill, police said. Timothy L. Mineau, 49, was allegedly intoxicated and refused to pay his bar tab, according to the police report. He was asked to leave the restaurant, 15537 S. LaGrange Road, and told the manager he was waiting for his mother to give him a ride. When she did not show up, police were called. When his mother eventually arrived, she apologized for her son’s behavior and paid his bar tab, police said. Police told Mineau that his mother had arrived and again asked him to leave. He reprtedly became agitated and asked why she was being harassed, police said. Police told him that neither he nor his mother was in trouble. He was again asked to leave, but refused, forcing police to usher him to the front door, where he continued to resist, police said. He then faced one of the officers and clenched his fists, police said. Police continued to lead Mineau to the door, and he again allegedly clenched his fists and raised his arms. An officer attempted to grab his arm, leading Mineau to hit the officer, according to the police report. He continued to resist as police tried to cuff him and grabbed the

drunken driving, improper lane use and following too closely Feb. 8 after she was stopped at 159th handle of an officer’s Taser during Street and 88th Avenue, police the scuffle, police said. His fingers said. She has a March 25 court had to be pried of the weapon, ac- date. cording to the police report. He’ll Brigette A. Rubas, 31, of Orappear in court on April 15. land Park, was charged with In other Orland Park police drunken driving and failure to news, Victor C. Radcliffe, 41, of reduce speed to avoid an accident Orland Park, was charged with Feb. 27 after a crash in the 9100 driving on a suspended license block of Yorktown Drive, police Feb. 25 after a stop in the 15400 said. She appeared in court on block of Devonshire Lane, police March 19. said. He’ll appear in court on Michael R. Dina, 54, of Crest April 15. Hill, was charged with retail theft Kandace Ware, 21, of Oak For- March 1 after stealing goods from est, was charged with retail theft a store at Orland Square. He’ll Feb. 14 after stealing merchandise appear in court on April 7. from a store at Orland Square, Nicholas B. Zona, 18, of Tinley police said. She was in court on Park, was charged with retail theft March 11. Feb. 26 after stealing merchandise Randel E. Hoyt, 35, of Tinley from a store at Orland Square, Park, was charged with drunken police said. He has a court date driving and improper lane use Feb. of April 7. 14 following a stop in the 8800 Richard D. Murphy, 45, of block of 159th Street, police said. Orland Hills, was charged with He appeared in court on March drunken driving, failure to reduce 10. speed to avoid an accident and Matthew M. Gill, 24, of Down- failure to yield Feb. 26 following a ers Grove, was charged with DUI, crash at 157th Street and Harlem speeding, improper lane use and Avenue, police said. He’ll make a making an improper turn Feb. court appearance on April 9. 14 after he was stopped at 156th Dipakkumar M. Patel, 46, of Street and Wolf Road, police said. Orland Park, was charged with He’ll appear in court on March retail theft Feb. 27 after steal25. ing merchandise from a store at Christina M. Knapczyk, 23, of Orland Square, police said. He Homer Glen, was charged with has an April 8 court date.

ORLAND PARK POLICE

Orland makes magazine’s list of ‘Best Places to Live Orland Park has joined an elite list, having been named one of Chicago Magazine’s best places to live. “This is a great honor for Orland Park,” said Mayor Dan McLaughlin. “The village’s low crime rate, our exceptional amenities and access to downtown Chicago were all important parts of Orland Park being named,” the mayor said. The magazine used statistics from Midwest Real Estate Data, the U.S. Census Bureau, the Illinois State Board of Education and the police departments for Chicago and every town in Cook, DuPage, Kane, Lane, McHenry and Will Counties. “It’s especially gratifying when a well respected source like Chi-



cago Magazine makes an unsolicited finding that recognizes our community’s value,” the mayor added. “We eliminated suburbs with violent crime rates above their county’s average,” author Ian Spula wrote in the magazine. Orland Park’s crime index decreased 2.38 percent from 2013 to 2012. “We are very proud of Orland Park being named and in particular for the village’s low crime rate being noted,” said Trustee Dan Calandriello, chair of the village’s Public Safety Committee. “This was a big part of the mayor’s State of the Village Address last month --- what a safe community Orland Park is,” he added. Cook County suburbs making the list with Orland Park include Barrington, Northbrook, LaGrange and Wilmette. Those from DuPage County include Hinsdale and Wheaton. Lake County is represented by Highland Park and Lake Bluff with the sole winner from Kane County being Geneva. Woodstock, in McHenry County, made the cut as did the only other south suburb on the list — Frankfort in Will County. The magazine studied how home prices

have fared in recent years compared with prices in neighboring areas as well as whether buyers can get good value for their money. Orland Park’s median home sale price for 2013 was $275,000, an increase of three percent since 2012. The number of home sales in Orland Park for 2013 was listed at 442. Winning communities included those with schools that scored above average on standardized tests and offered ease of transportation downtown. Communities with several el stops and at least one Metra stop earned extra points. Describing the selection process, Spula wrote, “Finally, I hit the pavement to assess which spots possess those hard-to-define qualities that matter hugely when you’re looking for somewhere to live. Things like vibrancy (are there lots of bustling restaurants and shops?). Beauty (are there architecturally interesting buildings or just cookie-cutter developments?). Friendliness (does the community have a natural center that brings people together?). Is it, quite simply, a great place to call home?” “They studied everything that makes Orland Park great — a variety of housing options, our low crime rate, great schools, outstanding parks, transportation, shopping for everyone and Downtown Orland Park,” McLaughlin said. “We were very excited to see that they mentioned the Old Orland Historic District and its link to Ninety7Fifty on the Park.” The online version of the article appears at www.chicagomag.com/ Chicago-Magazine/April-2014/ chicago-neighborhoods.

Photo by Wehmeier Portraits

Orland Chamber scholarship deadline nears The Orland Park Area Chamber of Commerce is now accepting applications for three $1,000 Scholarships that will be awarded in a ceremony in June at the chamber’s office, at 8799 W. 151st St. To be considered for the scholarships, the applicants must be a current high school senior and college bound in fall 2014. Applicants must be the child of an employee who works for a current chamber member or the child of the owner of a business that is a current chamber member. Applications can be found on the home page of the chamber’s website at www.orlandparkchamber.org. All completed applications and supporting documents must be received by the chamber office no later than Friday, April 4. Winners will be notified by mail. “We encourage all of our members to let their employees know about this great opportunity. This is one of the fun ways we give back to our community,” Chamber Executive Director Keloryn Putnam said. Here, 2013 Orland Park Area Chamber of Commerce Scholarship winners pose with the scholarship committee members at last year’s award ceremony. Shown are Scholarship Committee Chairwoman Heather Warthen (from left), scholarship recipient Kevin Sicher; Orland Park Trustee Ed Schussler; Scholarship Committee member Dana Anderson; 2013 scholarship recipients and Marisa Garoufalis and Melanie Adams and 2013 Chamber President Marc Lochow.

Beware ‘Mystery Shopper’ scam From Palos Park Police Chief Joe Miller Palos Park police last Friday responded to a call from a victim who wired transferred almost $2,000 to secure a so-called “Mystery Shopper” job. Be alert, while mystery shopping is a legitimate way to earn money, there are people out there who will try to take advantage of your lack of knowledge with how mystery shopping works. That is why it is important to learn how to go about finding legitimate mystery shopping work, which in turn

will help you avoid the scammers out there. No real mystery shopping company will ever require you to pay a fee to work for them. Even if they say it’s for training, it’s likely not, and you will lose your money to these scammers. No legitimate mystery shopping company will ever send you a check, ask you to deposit it, and then hope you wire them the money. Most common Mystery Shopping scam: A piece of mail from what appeared to be a company looking for mystery shoppers

appears. In it is a check for a fairly large sum of money, maybe $1,000. As part of your first assignment of checking out a money transfer service, you will be cajoled to deposit it into your checking account, withdraw the money in cash, and then wire a portion of that money to a third party. Please do some sleuthing on the Internet. Scammers will actually use the name of a legitimate mystery shopping company. They know that a lot of people will do their due diligence and research them online. But don’t fall for this.

Shorn begorrah, locks are lost at Advocate’s St. Baldrick’s Day

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Palos Heights’ Mary Butler shows off a hunk of hair that was cut off in the middle of her haircut during the St. Baldrick fundraising event at Advocate Children’s Hospital. At right, she shows some of the hair she lost after the haircut was over. by Jeff Vorva There were more than 60 people who were scheduled to get more than just a haircut on Saturday morning in Oak Lawn. Men, women and children lined up for Advocate Children’s Hospital’s St. Baldrick’s Day fundraiser with money going to the St. Baldrick’s Foundation. The fundraiser shows solidarity with children who lose their hair while undergoing treatment for cancer. Participants on Saturday had already raised more than $27,000 in support of St. Baldrick’s. Since the St. Baldrick’s Foundation was formed in 2005, the annual program has raised

Nine-year-old Connor Kidd of Plainfield has a grimace during his haircut, but all was well once the cutting was done. more than $100 million in childhood cancer research grants nationwide, according to a news release.

For 2 ½ hours people from all over the Chicago area came to the event with hair and left bald and it was all for a good cause.

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Alsip’s Frank Butler videotapes the St. Baldrick’s haircuts while Oak Lawn’s Annie Boland watches him.

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The Regional News Thursday, March 20, 2014

Moraine opens fitness center to the community by Tim Hadac staff reporter

with a fresh coat of sealant and its space filled with people playing basketball and volleyball. More than a thousand men, Others offered similar expreswomen and children walked, sions of acclaim for the 113,000jogged, ran, swam, pedaled, square-foot facility, two days dribbled and danced their way before it officially opened on through Moraine Valley Commu- Monday. nity College’s new Health Fitness “There aren’t a lot of pools & Recreation Center, 9000 W. Col- around—good pools, at least—so I lege Pkwy., Palos Hills, at an open think I’m really going to like and house last Saturday. use this pool,” said Palos Park “This gym is awesome!” ex- resident Marlene Schmidt, as she claimed a wide-eyed Zack Bakutis, relaxed in a hot tub next to the 9, of Palos Heights, as he and his four-lane, 25-yard-long pool. A mother, Doreen, stepped out of a senior citizen who said she has hallways and into the three-court benefitted from aquatic exercise gymnasium, its floor gleaming classes over the years, Schmidt

called the pool “clean and conveniently located, and I like that it has a ramp for people who use wheelchairs, so I’m going to let my neighbor know about it.” Joseph Shaughnessy of Orland Park said the new facility offers him a good opportunity to get cardiovascular workouts. “Here I can run a few laps [on the 1/10 mile indoor track], hit the bikes or the treadmills, lift weights and even play a little ball---all before or after work,” he said. “It’s good for me because it’s not far from home and on my way to work [in La Grange].” The new facility, open seven

Submitted photo

Classes demonstrating the services offered at the new center were held throughout the five-hour open house. More than 50 drop-in classes are available to people of all ages and abilities.

Submitted photo

Visitors make use of treadmills and other equipment on the second floor of Moraine Valley Community College’s new Health Fitness & Recreation Center at an open house last Saturday, while others on the first floor review registration information and enjoy healthy snacks at The Bean café.

days a week, “will support the needs of our students, serve the college’s athletics, and be a home for the entire community,” said Mike Schneider, director of campus recreation. “If you look at the wide range of amenities we offer—things you often won’t get at a smaller place—you’ll see that our membership rates are competitive and affordable, and it’s free for full-time students. The facility can accommodate as many as 2,500 members, Schneider said, depending on how frequently MVCC students utilize it. A number of people signed up at the open house, and others took registration information home with them. In addition to offering simple use of its facility and equipment, the new center boasts a schedule of more than 50 drop-in fitness

classes of varying intensity, including Zumba, pilates springboard, cardio kick boxing, yoga, dance, aquacise, weight lifting and more, according to Palos Hills resident Melanie Herman, who is in charge of all group fitness and mind/body programming and serves as assistant to the MVCC fitness and wellness director. “I love it,” said Herman, as she took a visitor on a tour of the center’s second floor. As a teacher at the college for 27 years, she had “always hoped that a center like this would be built and opened before I retired from Moraine, but I didn’t expect it would happen. So I’m really excited about this.” Schneider added that the new center provides employment opportunities that would not have existed otherwise. The center employs about 100 people, 70 percent

of whom are current students. In addition to welcoming individuals from the communities served by the college, the new center is available for local youth sports teams for training, Schneider said. Coaches should contact the center for more details. Membership is $49 per month for community residents, $34 for senior citizens, members of military and MVCC retirees, $26 for recent MVCC graduates (up to a year), and free for full-time students. Part-time students pay $24 for spring 2014 and $48 per semester thereafter. For more information, visit www.morainevalley.edu/hfrc or contact Pam Lawrence, HFRC membership representative, at 608-4015 or Lawrence@morainevalley.edu.

School Notes Stagg arts and crafts festival

Start Button Sponsorship:$100. coached and taught. Contact Juliaobrienzwa@comcast. It begins with a tour at 5 p.m., net for sponsorship information. followed by a reception 6 to 8:30 p.m. Stagg High School Music Booster in the hall featuring hors d’oeuvres, will present Art for the Season, an cash bar and desserts made by Stagg Stagg 50th arts and crafts festival, this Saturculinary students. anniversary day, March 22, from 9 a.m. to 4 The Stagg Madrigal Singers and p.m. and Sunday, March 23, from Stagg High School celebrates its Stagg Jazz Band perform. Tickets, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 50th anniversary with a namesake which cost $40 per adult, will be The two-day festival includes event on Saturday, April 12, at the sold until April 1. Shuttle bus from 100 art and craft booths and ven- University of Chicago’s Bartlett Stagg costs $5. Email StaggSCO@ dor booths. Also featured is lunch, Hall, where Amos Alonzo Stagg gmail.com for information. food sampling, and KHITS radio, 104.3, on Sunday. Admission is $2 for adults. All proceeds benefit Stagg High School’s music programs. Stagg High School is located on the corner of 111th Street and Roberts Road in Palos Hills. Submitted photo

Family Trivia Night at Palos South Do you know the four railroads in the classic Monopoly game? If you answered Short Line, Pennsylvania, B&O, and Reading, that would have come in handy last Thursday at Palos South Middle School for Family Trivia Night, sponsored by Palos South’s Student Council. The event, open to students and parents of all District 118 schools, drew more than 230 participants. Teams of 10 participated in six rounds of trivia with 10 questions each. Some teams showed their unity by donning spirit wear such as matching T-shirts, crazy hats, or colorful bandanas. The winning team was the “Bumpy Potatoes,” comprised of the Jackiw and Vasil families. Proceeds are being donated to the Muliganeers, Camps Count for Kids, and the Student Council State Convention Fund.

St. Alexander extends registration for 5K run/walk St. Alexander School in Palos Heights will hold its inaugural 5K Raider Run/Walk on Saturday, April 5. It will start from St. Alexander’s parking lot at 126th Street and 71st Avenue at 9 a.m. for runners and 9:05 a.m. for walkers. All ages are welcome to participate. The cost to register is $25; signups have been extended to March 23. Registration can be completed online at www.stalexanderschool. com (a $2.25 online processing fee will apply). The registration fee includes race entry, participant bib, Dri-Fit T-shirt and post race snacks. The 5K Raider Run/Walk route will continue through the streets of Palos Heights and finish back at St. Alexander. A post race rally will be held at 10:30 a.m. and awards will be presented to the race winners. The theme of the 5K is “Power Up For Technology” and all proceeds will benefit the school’s computer and and technology program. Sponsorship opportunities are available and include Gold Sponsorship: $1000, Silver Sponsorship: $500, Bronze Sponsorship: $250 and

Photo and text courtesy Beth Munro

Open house on Wed. will probe St. Alexander science, tech labs St. Alexander School 8th-graders explored the anatomy of a starfish in the school’s state-of-the art Science lab last week. First, the pupils did an external observation of the starfish. Then the they carefully dissected a ray (or arm) and used special instruments to probe and identify the internal components. The students also studied diagrams of the starfish’s anatomy as part of the school’s science curriculum. Parents of prospective students may experience St. Alexander School at Welcome Wednesday Open House on March 26 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Visit the school and see why St. Alexander students rank in the top 10 percent nationwide. School tours featuring the Science and Technology Labs will be conducted. For more information, call 448-0408 or visit www.stalexanderschool.com.

Student News Submitted photo

St. Alexander 5K Run/Walk will boost technology program St. Alexander School is powering up for the 5K Raider Run/Walk on Saturday, April 5. Registration has been extended through March 23 and can be completed online at www.stalexanderschool.com. All ages are welcome to participate. The registration fee is $25. Registration the day of the race will be $30. All proceeds will benefit the St. Alexander technology program. St. Alexander’s state-of-the-art computer lab is furnished with iMac computers and provides 1:1 technology for students. The school provides additional iPads for daily classroom use. Students attend class in the Computer Lab and Applied Technology Lab four times a week and have access to iPads in the classroom. St. Alexander School is the only school in the Archdiocese of Chicago to offer a cutting-edge Applied Technology lab that provides a variety of modules exploring different subjects and topics including Science, Math and critical thinking. In effort to enhance the school’s technology program, the 5K event proceeds will be used purchase additional iPads, computers and applied technology modules, as well as to supply the funds necessary to keep the required wiring, applications and programs updated. St. Alexander students and families invite the community to run or walk for a good cause. St. Alexander recognizes the importance technology plays in preparing students for high school, college and tomorrow’s workplace. St. Alexander students rank in the top 10 percent of students nation-wide based on their Terra Nova test scores. St. Alexander is a Nationally Recognized Blue Ribbon School committed to the enrichment of God’s children. Power Up For Technology and register today at www.stalexanderschool.com. Sponsorship opportunities are also available contact Juliaobrienzwa@comcast.net.

Submitted photo

The Chicago Christian High School Mock Trial team competed earlier this month at the state competition in Springfield, where they finished in third place. Three students were given the distinction of Outstanding Lawyer: seniors Jamie Hiskes, Jacob Bruinius, and Dan Venhuizen. Two students were recognized as Outstanding Witnesses: junior Eddie Hood and sophomore Madi DeJager. Pictured are Coach Jori Kuda (front row), Abby Haan, of Palos Heights, Madi DeJager, Jamie Hiskes, Megan Trentz, Mattie Mikitka, of Orland Park, Eddie Hood, of Oak Lawn, Jimmy Brady, of Palos Park, and (back row) Coach Jack Haan, Kassie Satterly of Orland Park, Jacob Bruinius, Dan Venhuizen, and Head Coach Neil Okuley


The Regional News Thursday, March 20, 2014



Community Notes Meet local author Will Martin at Heights library Author Will Martin, of Palos Park, will discuss his book, “So I Bought an Air Force,� his wild, but true story of how he bought a Nicaraguan Air Force fleet in 1963, six months after the Cuban Missile Crisis. He will appear this Sunday, March 23, at 2 p.m., at the Palos Heights Public Library, 12501 S. 71st Ave. Copies of his book will be available for purchase and a book signing will follow the event.

Southwest Symphony golden pops concert British vocalist Helen Welch will headline the Southwest Symphony Orchestra’s golden anniversary pops concert, Got Rhythm?, on Sunday, March 30, at 4 p.m., in the Ozinga Auditorium of Trinity Christian College, 6601 W. College

Drive in Palos Heights. A musical theater and big band singer, Welch will join the Southwest Symphony in performing some of America’s most beloved songs, including Misty, The Trolley Song, and At Last. Welch’s Broadway credits include Hello Dolly and 42nd Street. She also sang with some of the UK’s finest big bands. Welch, now an American citizen, lives with her husband Doug in Ohio. Tickets, $5 to $25, can be purchased in advance at 8020686 and on line at www. southwestsymphony.com, or at the door. Seniors pay $15. Students 12 and under are free. Instrumentalists wishing to audition for the Symphony should call the number above.

at the Palos Heights Public Library, 12501 S. 71st Ave. The event is planned in honor of the Palos Heights resident who played as a member of the U.S. women’s hockey team in the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. Coyne will be presented by Mayor Bob Straz with a gift on behalf of the city and will meet with residents and sign autographs. Light refreshments will be served.

Heights Woman’s Club flower sale

Palos Heights Woman’s Club annual flower sale order forms are due by March 21. Order forms are available at City Hall, the Palos Heights PubMeet and greet lic Library, the Recreation CenKendall Coyne ter and at Lake Katherine. Order O l y m p i c forms are also available on the silver medal- club’s Facebook page. The club ist Kendall needs the pre-order forms comSubmitted photo Coyne will pleted by March 21 so that Ted’s meet fans at Greenhouse can supply it with all an open house the needed flowers and herbs. reception today There will be some items avail( T h u r s d a y ) , able at the flower sale pickup day Band Director Chuck Martin’s Indigo Quintet, famous for playing timeless melodies for entertainment from 4 to 6 p.m., to be held on Saturday, May 17. and dancing, will headline the Southwest Symphony Orchestra’s golden anniversary and silent auction party on Sunday, April 13, from 3 to 7 p.m., at the Palos Country Club, 13100 Southwest Highway, Orland Park. In addition to music by Indigo, the gala afternoon includes appetizers, dinner, and silent auction treasures. Proceeds will benefit this area’s own not-for-profit symphony “in our own backyardâ€? whose mission is to bring the power and beauty of classical music to the South Side region. Tickets cost $60 per person, $400 for a table of eight, and can be purchased by calling 802-0686 or on line at www.southwestsymphony.com. held on Thursday, April 10, from luncheon will also feature shopping 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., at Silver at vendor tables. Lake Country Club, 14700 S. Registration forms to attend the 82nd Ave. luncheon are available on the home The OWN luncheon speakers page of the Chamber’s website will be Priscilla Steinmetz, found- at www.orlandparkchamber.org er and executive director of The or by calling the Chamber office Shepard arts, crafts Bridge Teen Center and Erin Dubi- at 349-2972. The cost to attend door No. 12. Admission is $2; free lunch, food sampling, raffles, and ch, a nutritionist who educates her the luncheon is $26 for chamber parking. an appearance by KHITS radio, and vendors show clients using grocery store tours members that pre-register and $36 104.3. The show runs this Saturand cooking demonstrations. The for non-members and walk-ins. Shepard High School will hold day, March 22, from 9 a.m. to 4 Stagg arts and its spring arts, crafts and vendors p.m., and Sunday, March 23, from crafts festival show on Saturday, April 5, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., in the school’s Stagg High School Music BoostAdmission is $2 for adults. All gym, 13049 S. Ridgeland Ave. in ers organization presents Art for proceeds from this event directly Palos Heights. the Season, an arts and crafts benefit the music students at Stagg Sponsored by the Band Boost- festival this weekend. High School. The school is located ers; concessions available all day. The two-day event features on the corner of 111th Street and at the Library at 1 p.m. and 6:30 Friday Fun Enter in the back of the building, arts, crafts, and vendor booths, Roberts Road in Palos Hills. p.m. Drop in at the library for sto• Take the AARP Driver Safety ries, music, treats, and fun! This Program designed for the older month’s theme is And Then it’s driver on Saturday, March 22, Spring. The fun begins on Friday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Complete March 21, at 10 a.m., for children the course and earn a certificate ages 2-6. that may lead to a discount on Teen Gaming Palos Newcomers Club your auto insurance. Payment is Unwind at the end of the week required in advance at the library with gaming in the Young Adult when registering: $15 for AARP Section. Games begin at 2:30 p.m. The Palos Newcomers Club’s members and $20 for non-mem- until 4:30 p.m. every Friday for next luncheon meeting will be bers. grades 6 and up. held on Thursday, March 27, at • Afraid of Windows 8? For- Spring Break Movie the Doubletree hotel, 5000 W. get what you think you know! Watch Despicable Me 2 Monday, 127th St. in Alsip. Come to this introduction of the March 24, at 2 p.m. All ages are Cocktails at 11 a.m. will prenewest version of Windows from invited to attend. cede lunch at noon. After a brief Microsoft on Tuesday, March 25, Crafty Kids business meeting, the members at 6:30 p.m. Let’s create some crafty rab- and guests will be entertained by • On Thursday, March 27, at bits on Tuesday, March 25, at 4 Nick Willett, a vocalist performing 7 p.m., author Dr. Phyllis Ko- p.m. Children in grades K-4 can a variety show, with songs from zlowski will present The Sky is join the fun. the 1950s to the 1970s. the Limit, a visually engaging Messy Art For reservations, call Mickey lecture about one of the architecChildren ages 3 and up can get at 448-0309. tural capitals of the world—Chi- creative using paint and other One need not be a newcomer cago. This program will go back messy materials on Wednesday, to enjoy this social club; members to when the city gave birth to the March 26, at 10 a.m. Registra- meet and enjoy bridge or canasta, skyscraper up to today including tion is required, and please dress needlepoint and book groups. For new and proposed additions to appropriately. membership information, call its beautiful skyline. Magnet Magic Terry at 448-6598. Program registration is always Find out about the science of appreciated. Register online at magnets with hands-on experiSouthtown Dahlia palosheightslibrary.org, by phone ments on Wednesday, March 26, Club: cloning at 448-1473, or in person. All pro- at 2 p.m. Registration is required grams are free and open to the for children ages 5 and up. The Southtown Dahlia Club will public unless otherwise noted. present “Cloning Dahliasâ€? this Sunday, March 23, from 1 p.m. to Flower vase craft 3:30 p.m., at the Crestwood Civic Heights library Children ages 4 and up are inCenter, 14025 S. Kostner Ave. youth programs vited to make a vase filled with Guest speaker and SDC memTween Time handmade flowers of petals and ber Frank Campise will demonToday (Thursday), at 7 p.m., candy on Saturday, March 29, at strate his own proven method children in grades 4-5 can have 11 a.m., at the Palos Park Public of taking multiple stem cuttings fun with friends and enjoy a snack Library, 12330 Forest Glen Blvd. from the previous year’s dahlia while learning about Manicure Register for this craft by calling tubers. Campise has been growing Art. the library at 448-1530. dahlias for more than 30 years Photo courtesy Patt Bailey and has perfected his propagation method, enabling him to clone his prize-winning dahlias, thereby increasing plant stock by as many as eight plants per tuber. The program is free of charge and is open to the general public. Refreshments and snacks will be The Palos Height Garden Club will meet Monday, March 24, at served. For more, visit the website: Lake Katherine Nature Center, 7402 W. Lake Katherine Drive in www.southtowndahliaclub.com Palos Heights. Fellowship with light refreshments at 6:30 p.m. will precede the meeting at 7. VFW bingo Guest fee to attend is $5. Orland Palos VFW Post 2604 The topic: is Behind Springtime: What’s Going on as the Garden Bingo Raffle has moved to Palos Comes Alive by Beth Botts. Understand more about how your plants, Heights Park and Recreation your soil and the weather interact to make it through winter and Center at 6601 W. 127th Street, explode into spring. Palos Heights. Join them each Pictured with Garden Club officer Jim Agnos, Botts has written Thursday at 9 a.m. Caller starts hundreds of articles about gardens and nature for the Chicago Early Bird at 10:15. More tha Tribune and magazines, including Organic Gardening, Country $2,000 in prizes every week. In Gardens and Chicagoland Gardening. A Master Gardener and an addition to a variety of games Openlands TreeKeeper, Botts is now a senior writer at The Morton there is also a snack bar. Arboretum in Lisle. Her website is thegardenbeat.com.

Dinner gala will benefit Southwest Symphony

Chamber Corner Orland Chamber luncheon open to professional women The Orland Park Area Chamber of Commerce invites you to reserve a spot at their Orland Women’s Networking (OWN) Luncheon and learn how to Embrace Your Challenge. The OWN Luncheon will be

Crafts and Bazaars

Library Notes Heights library upcoming events The following will take place at the Palos Heights Public Library, 12501 S. 71st Ave. • Attend a meet and greet with Olympic silver medalist Kendall Coyne today (Thursday), from 4 to 6 p.m. This open house is being held in honor of Kendall, a member of the U.S. Women’s Hockey team, who will be presented a gift by Mayor Straz and will be available to meet residents and sign autographs. • Bring your projects to the Needle Club and enjoy the company of others while working on March 25, from 10 a.m. to noon. New members always welcome. • The Library is looking for both experienced and novice American Mah Jongg players. Meet at the library on Tuesday, March 25, at 1 p.m. to play with and learn from those who are experienced players. Bring your game with you. Also, the Library is looking for donations of gently used American Mah Jongg games. Space is limited, so call Adult Services to register at 448-1473. • Thursdays at the Movies on March 27 will show the film “Captain Phillipsâ€?. There will be three showings: 10 a.m. (with subtitles), 1 p.m. (note start time change) and 6:30 p.m. • Palos Fine Arts will be showing the film, “The Debt,â€? on Friday, March 28, as part of its 13th annual adult foreign film series. The final movie of the series, “Amour,â€? will be shown on Friday, April 25. All films will be shown

Club Activities

Heights Garden Club offers early spring tips

Submitted photo

Older men desired at speed dating for seniors The odds to make connections are looking good for men ages 60 and over who are single and ready to mingle at Orland Township’s Senior Speed Dating event. The speed dating fun will at 94 West Restaurant in Orland Park next Thursday, March 27. Registration is closed for women, but there are still numerous spots available for men. The night entails various mini “dates� in which participants have several minutes to get to know the person on the other side of the table. When the music plays, people rotate to the next table where they have an allotted amount of time to get to know someone new. After the “dates� there will be socializing and refreshments. To register, call the township at 403-4222 to register today.

  

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The Regional News Thursday, March 20, 2014

Photo Memories from

Crossword Puzzle “Juniors”

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7. Helper: abbr. 8. “___ the One” (Bruce Springsteen song) 9. ___ no. 10. Joins the military 11. Bakery buys 12. One of the Great Lakes 13. Schlitz or Heineken 18. Baseball strike callers, for short 23. One-seventh of a week 24. Gas station feature 25. Bothers 26. Microscopic units 27. Saying 28. Alcohol from the Caribbean 29. Comfy blanket 30. ___ coffee 31. Wonderland girl 32. Lion ___ 34. Facts 37. Handfuls of cash 38. Hearts or spades 40. Find work 41. Most police officers carry one

43. Young fellow 44. Oven for potters 46. Names mentioned in a will 47. ___ steep price 48. Civil disturbance 49. Gym type 50. Apple tablet 51. Short letter 52. Mimicked 53. His and ___ 56. “What’s the ___?” 57. Highway: abbr.

From March 21, 1974

40 Years Ago This Week Rainy and snowy weather on Monday night did little to dampen the spirits of Chicago Christian students, their families and friends, as they staged an impromptu parade through the city to celebrate the Knights’ third place finish in Illinois Class A high school basketball finals. The Knights, the only Chicago area basketball team to qualify for Class A final competition in Champaign, went down to Lawrenceville, the eventual champion, in the semi-finals competition on Saturday afternoon. However, the cagers posted a victory over Quincy Catholic to come home to Palos Heights with a third place trophy.

(Answers on page 10)

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The object of the game is to fill all the blank squares with the correct numbers. Each row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9.

From March 21, 1974

40 Years Ago This Week Knows her jelly beans: Lauri Pietro of Palos Heights was a recent winner of Ray Rayner’s sixth annual jelly bean contest and appeared on the show with Ray to receive her prize, one of Ray’s “Do-It-Yourself” projects. Lauri correctly guessed the number of jelly beans as 225. Ray Rayner and His Friends is colorcast weekdays from 7 to 8 a.m. on Channel 9.

(Answers on page 10)

(Heart) breaking news – I am older than this paper

Photo by Jeff Vorva

WHATIZIT? Very good, boys and girls. Some of the people here at the Reporter/Regional have an opportunity to guess the photos of WHATIZIT? before it hits the streets and none of our sharpies were able to get that this “something that needs to be cleared” was a hurdle. Here, we had people guessing tables and desks. No one guessed a hurdle and this particular one was found at an indoor track meet. But 100 percent of the WHATIZIT? players got it right. Chicago Ridge’s Dana Oswald was the first out of the blocks to get it right. Others who crossed the finish line without tripping were Palos Heights’ Crystine Busch, Oak Lawn’s Justin Antos and Jane Foley, Hickory Hills’ Jack and Griffin Burke Faddis, Worth’s Darrel Hardin, Jerry and Carol Janicki, Theresa and George Rebersky and Russ Martin, Willow Springs’ Harrison Debre and Evergreen Park’s Henrietta Mysliwiec and Vince Vizza. There were no incorrect guesses (except for those within the walls of our building). This week, we know it’s a brush, but what kind of brush? The clue is that guys named Buddy or Keith or Neil may have used this kind. Extra credit will go to those who can tell me who Buddy, Keith and Neil’s last names. Send those guesses to thereporter@comcast.net. Don’t forget to put WHATIZIT? in the subject line and give us your name and hometown by Monday night.

NOOOOOOOOOO!!! Say it ain’t so! Short of a loved one dying or getting sick, it doesn’t get much worse to hear news like this. It was such a surprise – a depressing surprise. I noticed that last week’s Reporter’s front page said Volume LV No. 1 on it. Hmmm. No. 1? The genius reporter in me figured out that it must mean the paper may have celebrated a birthday. So I used all of my investigative skills and resources (I asked around in the office) and publisher Amy Richards informed me that indeed the Reporter is now in its 55th year and just turned 54. Upon deeper and more thorough investigation (Amy gave me a couple of special sections from 2005 and 2010 to look over) I discovered that the first Reporter came out March 16, 1960. NOOOOOOOOOO!!! I was born in December, 1959. That means I’m older than this newspaper. I’m older than a newspaper that some people have said “has been around a long time’’ and some people have said, gulp, “has been around forever.” I knew I was older than some high schools. I knew I was older than a handful of towns. But older than a newspaper that’s “been around forever’’ is a true shock to my system. There were two other times in my professional life when the ol’ time-is-speeding-by-too-fast realization hit me. The first time was when I covered a high school softball game and asked the coach for a roster. This particular roster happened to have the birthdates of all the players on it. They were all born after I graduated high school. The second time came when Lincoln-Way football coach Rob

paper. Hey, the Internet wasn’t around to double check and I thought it was “Gliemi.’’ Anyway, back then he was a young defensive player for Lincoln-Way and I’m sure more than one dopey writer forgot to drop by Jeff that second L into his name. Vorva Now I find out I am older than a long established newspaper. Wow. Glielmi retired in 2007. This is a Most papers I worked for were coach who won an Illinois High born around the time my grandSchool Association Class 6A state fathers, great grandfathers, notchampionship in 1997 and played so-great grandfathers and great, football at Illinois. great grandfathers were walking I remember him for messing up the earth. his name when he was a kid. Oh, well. Time to put away I was just starting my newspa- the self-pity and to try to make per career as a sportswriter in the issue Volume LV No. 2 – and late 1970s and, to my knowledge, future issues – of the Reporter might have been the first person’s as compelling and fun as we can whose name I botched up in the around here.

Notes north of the Cal-Sag

Happy birthday, Reporter, and may we all live on for many, many years.

Wisdom from the past

The guy who first ran the Reporter, Edward E. Roelofs, wrote his Publisher’s Statement of Policy 54 years ago about his brand-spankin’ new paper. Among his comments were: “The publisher and his staff present it with hope that you, the reader, will find it meets for needs for an unbiased, scrupulously accurate, friendly and complete newspaper covering local people, organizations and events.” He also said: “We want you to LIKE our paper – and to be proud it is circulated in your area.’’ Those thoughts ring true for us today.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

A look at the cover of the first Reporter on March 16, 1960. The paper is heading into its 55th year but it is still a few months younger than its current editor.


The Regional News Thursday, March 20, 2014



Healthy Answers for Life by Carolyn Johnson

Help to lower high triglycerides Q: I recently had a blood test done, and it showed I had high triglycerides. I consider myself a reasonably healthy person, so I was kind of surprised. What kind of things can I do naturally to lower them? A: Usually a cholesterol test requires you to fast beforehand, though foods eaten the night before the test can sometimes impact the results, particularly foods high in sugar or fat. Also, if you’ve always had normal cholesterol readings, it would probably be a good idea to have another blood test in a few months to see if one high reading is an anomaly. Usually when we think of cholesterol levels, the first thing we think of is fat, and certainly saturated fats and animal fats can be damaging to cholesterol levels; when it comes to triglycerides however, excess sugar in the diet is a large factor as well. Changing the diet is one thing, which can make a huge difference to triglyceride levels, and limiting sugar and fat can make a big difference. Limit-

ing (or eliminating) refined flour and processed grains can really help as well, since white flours are converted quickly into sugar in the body. Try to eat grains as close to their natural state as possible. Look for stone ground wheat flours instead of white, or brown rice instead of white rice. The extra fiber those grains contain can help with lowering cholesterol levels too, since most Americans don’t get even close to the recommended fiber intake of 25 grams for women and 38 for men. There are supplements which can help as well. The first I’d recommend is Sytrinol, a potent antioxidant which has been proven in studies to lower cholesterol, particularly triglycerides. I’d recommend the Sytrinol by NOW Foods since it also contains policosinol, an extract from sugar cane which has also been shown to lower cholesterol levels. The recommended dose is two pills per day, and results are usually seen within the first month. Another supplement that can

be beneficial for lowering triglycerides is fish oil. When looking for a fish oil supplement, choose a fish oil concentrate which has been formulated to be high in EPA and DHA (the beneficial parts of omega 3 fatty acids). The best and most potent fish oil we’ve found is Omega 950 by Solgar. It’s actually of a similar potency as Lovaza, a prescription fish oil frequently prescribed for triglycerides. Omega 3 fish oil can also be beneficial for overall cardiovascular health, reducing inflammation in the body, and for brain function. Stress can also make a difference. Research has even found that stress can make heart damaging fats stay in the bloodstream longer. There are many ways to deal with stress: exercise, meditation, stretching, journaling, in addition to many relaxing herbs which can help. Exercise is especially important, since excess weight strongly influences triglyceride levels. Losing even just 5 to 10 pounds can make a huge difference in triglyceride levels.

Healthy Answers for Life is a column that seeks to answer health questions and concerns from a natural perspective. To submit a question to be answered in a future column send an email to healthyanswersforlife@gmail.com or mail to Healthy Answers for Life c/o Pass Health Foods at 7228 W. College Drive, Palos Heights, IL 60463 Carolyn Johnson is one of the knowledgeable associates at Pass Health Foods at 7228 W. College Drive. Feel free to stop by the store for more information or advice. www.passhealthfoods.com. This column makes no claims to diagnose, treat, prevent, mitigate, or cure diseases with any advice or products. Any health related information in this article is for educational purposes only. The ultimate responsibility for your choices and their effect on your health are yours and before applying any therapy or use of herbs, supplements, etc., you should consult your health care provider.

Pick of the Litter By John R. Fleming, DVM • PrairieStateVet.com Dear Dr. Fleming, My 7-year-old golden retriever, Hoover, has a bad smell around his mouth. His teeth look good but the area on both sides of his face below his lips stinks. What can I do to stop the smell? Mike, Oak Forest Dear Mike, I’d have to see Hoover to be sure, but it sounds like he has what is called lip-fold pyoderma (infection in the fold of the lip). This is a common problem where bacteria grow in the lip fold. It’s dark, warm and moist with saliva in the fold and you couldn’t design a better incubator for infection. You can wash the fold out with soap and water or hydrogen peroxide and/or apply antibacterial creams. Some people apply something like Gold-Bond powder into the fold(s). If the smell persists, or when you get tired of cleaning the folds all the time, ask your veterinarian to remove the fold. The procedure is a simple plastic surgical procedure where the fold is excised and the wound sutured closed to heal for two weeks. After healing is completed there is no more pocket for the bacteria to grow in. Dear Dr. Fleming, Are paintballs toxic to dogs? My dog always acts real interested in

them.

gressive treatment.

Tim, Willow Springs

Dear Tim, They can be. Paintballs are marble-sized balls filled with paint that are used in war-like games. They are generally labeled as nontoxic. Dogs commonly chew on the balls and have been known to eat several hundred. As I always say, you’ll never see a cat do this. A lot of dogs are just stupid. As many as 1,000 paintballs may come in one container. The paint solution in the balls contains substances that can draw water out of the bloodstream into the gut. As a result, blood components, particularly sodium, can become elevated. In some cases smaller osmotically active substances can be absorbed from the paint into the body and cause depression of the central nervous system. Clinical signs can occur in as little as one hour after ingestion and include vomiting, diarrhea, and weakness. Tremors and seizures may also develop. If you see your dog eating paintballs the first thing to do is to induce vomiting. For ingestion of very large numbers of paintballs the dogs stomach may need to be pumped. Pets may require hospitalization and some lab tests. I.v. fluids and enemas may be given to lower the serum sodium con-

Fleming family photo

It was 1 degree on Sentinel Trail last Sunday morning and Angelina and BB are anxious for springtime. A special thanks to whoever donated the dog boots to the clinic. My wife took them to see if they would help BB. They worked great. They stayed on and he kept going forward much longer than normal. He doesn’t tolerate the bitter cold as well as Angelina. centration. The prognosis is good for dogs that receive prompt ag-

Dear Dr. Fleming, I stopped giving heartworm pills in December. Should I start them back up now? Kathy, Palos Park Dear Kathy, To meet the “standard of care,” I have to tell you that you should give heartworm preventative year round. However, many people still follow the old May 1 to Dec. 1 rule, and I have no problem with this. That is the schedule I follow with my dogs. Any mosquito that survived this brutal winter is unlikely to be phased by a heartworm pill anyway! If you start the monthly preventative May 1 you protect your dog back to April 1. If anyone sees any mosquitoes in April please let me know. I’d be surprised if there are any in April. If you start the pills June 1 you protect your dog for the month of May. Remember, the medication does not stay in your dog for 30 days. It simply kills any heartworm larvae that were deposited by the mosquito under your dog’s skin for the past 30 days. Works backwards, not forwards.

Submitted photo, sponsored by Joy’s Best Friends, Ltd. Best Bites.

Dog of the Week This is Titus. He is a fun, lovable and goofy 6 year old pit bull. He enjoys going on walks with his best dog friend and car rides with his Mommy. Even though he only has three legs, he can run as fast as any dog, but only for short distances. Titus lives with the Marfongella family in Palos Park. Best Bites is located at 13034 S. LaGrange Road in Palos Park. 708-448-1515. Visit us online at www.joysbestfriends.com. Follow US on Facebook.com/JoysBestFriendsBestBites. Best Bites March Sale—Fromm Pet Foods $5 Off Large Bag; $3 Off Med. Bag & $2 Off Small Bags Not valid with other offers. *some exclusions apply **while supplies last.

Considering a hysterectomy? Get answers from an expert

Faced with the possibility of a hysterectomy? You are not alone. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services estimates one in three women have a hysterectomy by age 60. “Hysterectomy is a very common surgery,” says Obstetrician/ Gynecologist John McInerney, D.O. “With the technology available at Palos, many times you can even avoid a hysterectomy by having a minor procedure to alleviate your symptoms.” Join Dr. McInerney and get the expert answers you deserve. He will discuss women’s health issues and treatments available, including non-surgical options and minimally-invasive options using the da Vinci Surgical System. “There are better ways and new It is certainly desirable to be well ways of doing what we’ve always descended, but the glory belongs done,” Dr. McInerney says. to our ancestors. The da Vinci provides surgeons —Plutarch with enhanced capabilities, includ-

ing high-definition vision and a magnified view. The surgeon controls the da Vinci System, which translates hand movements into smaller, more precise movement. Surgery using the da Vinci offers important potential advantages for patients, including faster recovery with reduced scarring and discomfort. Following Dr. McInerney’s talk, participants will get the chance to test drive the da Vinci Robotic Surgical System, view patient education videos and take a brief hospital tour. All participants will be entered in a drawing for one of two $50 gift certificates to The Spa at Palos Health & Fitness Center. Winners must be present. Dr. McInerney’s presentation will take place at 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, April 24, at Palos Community Hospital Auditorium, 12251 S. 80th Ave., Palos Heights. Registration is required; call 226-2300.

SXU’s annual health fair offers free screenings, fun Free health screenings, assessments, and information are available at Saint Xavier University’s 11th annual Health Fair on this Friday, March 21. The fair, which is free and open to the public, is scheduled from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Shannon Center at the University’s Chicago campus, 3700 W. 103rd St. The fair is a “one-stop shop” of free health services. It includes free screenings and assessments for the following: blood pressure, blood glucose, bone density, hearing and vision, spinal cord, inju-

ries, cholesterol, stress, body mass index and more. The fair also includes a wide variety of other activities, including: • Free flu shots from the SXU Health Center. • Free chair massages. • Healthy cooking demonstrations at 9:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. • 15-Minute Exercise Classes featuring Chair Yoga (9 a.m. and 10 a.m.), and Chair Strength Training (11 a.m.). • Free comprehensive kidney

screening for the first 50 people (includes analysis of blood pressure, sodium, calcium, glucose, liver functioning, and more). • Self-breast exam demonstrations and information about mammograms. • A blood drive hosted by Heartland Blood Centers. If you are interested in donating blood, please pre-register by calling (773) 298-3586 or email kallen@sxu. edu. • Demonstrations about child and adult CPR, first aid, pilates, spinning, boxing, and more.

• A raffle, a scavenger hunt, a children’s activity corner, and face painting. Neighborhood vendors will be at the fair to share health information with the community, including: Abbvie LLC; Accelerated Rehab Physical Therapy; Advocate Christ Center for Breast Care; Advocate Trinity Hospital; American Kidney Fund; Athletico; Blue Cross Blue Shield/Mid American Group; Blue Cross Blue Shield of Illinois; Chartwells Energy Zone; Chiro One Wellness Center; Christ Hospital Cardiac and Stroke Pre-

vention; Cook County Department of Public Health; Core Fitness and Physical Therapy/Beverly Spinning; Curves; Devine Nutrition; Dr. Pandit Foot and Ankle Clinic; Elder Life Professionals; Exactcare Pharmacy; Family Eye Physicians; Five Start CPR and First Aid; Greenwood Chiropractic Wellness Center; Health4Chicago/ CDPH; Heartland Blood Centers; Home Instead Senior Care; Illinois Secretary of State: Organ and Tissue Donor Registration; Life Alarm; MetroSouth Medical Center; Morgan Park Junior Women’s Club; Overeaters Anonymous; Running for Kicks; Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center; Sam’s Club;

Skaklee; Tricoci University; UFC Gym; and Walgreens. SXU representatives also will be at the fair, including the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, the Ludden Speech and Language Clinic, the Health Center, the School of Nursing, SXU Nutrition classes, SXU Health Communications classes, and Shannon Center trainers. Free samples and refreshments will be served from the following vendors: Chartwells; Gatorade; Great American Bagel; Muscle Milk; and Vita COCO. For more information, call (773) 298-3592 or visit www.sxu.edu, keyword: health fair.

Health Beat Drug awareness workshop for parents Orland Township’s Youth and Family Services department will hold the workshop for parents of teens on Tuesday, March 25, at 7 p.m., at Orland Township, 14807 S. Ravinia Ave. in Orland Park. What can parents do if their teen has started using drugs is the topic to be presented by David Lee of Intervention Services and Technologies Inc. and the Rev. Jim Swarthout of Rosecrance Health Network. Offered for famSubmitted photo ilies of teens who are experimenting or in a pattern of use with alcohol or drugs, this workshop intends to educate parents about Smith Village will present its annual fashion show and luncheon on Thursday, April 24, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., at 2320 W. 113th Place teens and drug use and provide in Chicago’s Beverly neighborhood, in the continuing-care retirement community’s Community Hall. answers to what steps parents Smith Village residents will model brands—Sympli, Tribal, Color Me Cotton, Erin London, BKG, Adrianna Papell and Habit—carried by can take to get their child on Annie’s, a clothing and gift shop in Oak Lawn. the right path. Cost is $10 per person and includes lunch. All proceeds benefit Emilie’s Fund, which provides for Smith Village residents who have This workshop is free, but outlived their means. To make reservations, call (773) 474-7300. registration is required. Call

Smith Villagers will model fashions in annual show

403-4111.

Mental health group for families and friends NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) of the South Suburbs of Chicago will be having their next Family to Family session starting on Wednesday, April 2, in Tinley Park. This is a 12-week course meeting on Wednesday evenings for families and friends of individuals with brain disorders called mental illness. Course topics include various types, biology behind, medications, treatments of mental disorders. Also included is information for families and friends with communication, self-care, problem solving with their loved ones. These classes are free but must register in advance. Contact Len at 3102038 or Marianne at 335-4008.


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The Regional News Thursday, March 20, 2014

Death Notices John David Cheever

Submitted photo

Waltz into spring in a formal gown from Together We Cope dress sale Dozens of formal gowns from prom dresses to bridal wear are offered for sale during a special event today through March 29 at Together We Cope’s resale shop, Nu2u. Many of the gowns are new and others are sample dresses. They were donated to the nonprofit agency by an area bridal shop or individual donors. The gowns will be available at the shop during regular store hours. Nu2u is located at 17010 S. Oak Park Ave., in downtown Tinley Park. Store hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday; 2 to 7 p.m. Thursday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Here, Amy James, a Nu2u staff member, sorts through some of the ladies and girls formal dresses available during the special sale Dresses available are suitable for weddings, prom or other school dances, formal events, or mothers of the bride/groom. There are a limited number of girls’ party dresses available also. Prices for all gowns are $25 per dress or two for $40. Together We Cope is a nonprofit agency that assists families in crisis. For more, visit www.togetherwecope.org., or call Nu2u at 633-9180.

Houses of Worship Christ Lutheran Church Orland Park

Palos Park Presbyterian Community Church

The church will offer Thursday Lenten communion services at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. on March 27, April 3 and 10. The liturgies and sermons at these services will follow the theme “Restored in Christ.” A luncheon sponsored by the O.W.L.S. Seniors Group will follow each Thursday morning service. The church is at 14700 S. 94th Ave. (349-0431)

New education classes have begun at the church on Sundays. Ben Austin teaches a class on Old Testament worship at 9:45 a.m. and “Son of God” is being taught by Jim Mladic Jr. in the Original Sanctuary, also at 9:45 a.m. Lenten services continue at the Contemporary worship service at 8:30 a.m. and the regular worship service at 11

John David Cheever, age 50, passed away at his home after a brave three year battle with primary brain cancer. John was a director at SRAM Corporation for 25 years. He held many titles there and had an incredible, unique career with his SRAM Family. He is either directly responsible for or has contributed significantly to a long list of SRAM patents. John loved to fish, boat, ride vintage motorcycles, work in his machine shop, play guitar, and watch the sunsets disappear. John is preceded in death by Dorothy (Blume) Cheever, Fred Cheever, Roman Sendera, Mary Jinkinson, and his beloved dog Winston. He is survived by his wife Janice (Sendera)

Kathryn A. Erdmann

Services and interment are private at this time. The memorial visitation scheduled in Mrs. Erdmann’s death notice published in The Regional last week has been cancelled.

Geraldine Koren

Geraldine “Geri” Koren, nee Schreihans, 75, of Palos Park, died on March 13 at Palos Community Hospital. Loving sister of Genevieve Urbaniak. Also survived by many nieces and nephews, great and great- great nieces and nephews, relatives and friends. Longtime friend of Donald Grajek. Many years of service with Honig-Bell

a.m. The Children Choirs will sing at both services and the Handbell Choir will play at the 11a.m. service. Children’s ministry during worship at 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Wee Church throughout Pet food needed worship for children ages 2 and 3 in the Sonrise Room. Children’s for Orland Township worship time dismissed during pet pantry the worship service for pre-K through 5th grade for children Orland Township’s pet pantry, in Primary Hall. provides food and supplies for loThe church is at 12312 S. 88th cal pets and families in need. The Ave. (448-5220.) pantry relies on the generosity of the community and is in need of donations. Support the pet pantry by donating dry or canned dog or cat food, kitty litter, leashes, collars, shampoo, treats, toys and other miscellaneous pet items. All donations can be dropped off at Orland Township, 14807 S. Ravinia Ave., Orland Park, Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The pet pantry, in conjunction with the Food Pantry, is available for residents Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information and guidelines, call Orland Township at 403-4222.

Child-safety seats for eligible households in Orland Township

Photo and text courtesy Dolores Barnes

Blessed to reach 101 The Palos Park Presbyterian Community Church celebrated the 101st birthday of member Frances Watson at a reception following the 11 a.m. worship service on March 9. Many members of the church, family members and friends of Frances attended this joyous occasion. Frances is shown with her daughters Margaret Dehne (left) and MaryFrances Watson.

Applications for child-safety car seats are now available for low-income families in Orland Township. Applications will be available at the Orland Township office, at 14807 S. Ravinia Ave., Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and Tuesdays, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. To receive a car seat, families must fill out a brief application, provide proof of residency, a birth certificate of the child needing the car seat and proof of income. Child car seats are available in three sizes: infant (1-20 lbs.), convertible (20-40

Cheever, parents Thomas and Carol Cheever, and his siblings Thomas, Caryn, and Carey (Udziela) Cheever. I would like to extend my sincere appreciation to Dr. Jeffery J.

Raizer, Dr. James P. Chandler, Dr. MaryAnne H. Marymont, and all the faculty and staff at the Northwestern Brain Tumor Institute for the care they had given John. I will also be forever grateful to the Cancer Support Center for the help they have given John and I throughout this journey. A celebration of John’s life will be held in Illinois sometime in the spring. Memorial contributions may be made to The Cancer Support Center www. cancersupportcenter.org (708) 798-9171, Northwestern Brain Tumor Institute www. braintumorinstitute.org, or Bicycle Relief Fund www. worldbicyclerelief.org/donate in John’s memory.

Winifred J. Gilbert Winifred J. Gilbert nee Watt, age 94, of Palos Park. Beloved husband of Thomas. Loving mother of Diana (John) Dewey, Margory A. Gilbert and Thomas James Gilbert. Dear grandmother of John Thomas Dewey, Gilbert Dewey, Daniel Dewey, Real Estate. Geri was also active in many senior groups and had an active social life with her many cherished friends. Visitation was held March 19 until time of Mass at Our Lady of

Charlotte Rich, Joel Dewey, Ross Dewey, Peter Gerdes and Ryan Gilbert. Great-grandmother of 11. Devoted sister of Dorothy Fredenburg. Active member of Palos Park Presbyterian Community Church. Services were private. the Woods Church in Orland Park. Entombment was held at Resurrection Cemetery in Justice. Mrs. Koren was born in Chicago. She worked as a Realtor.

Simple Gifts lbs.) and booster (over 40 lbs.). Child car seats are provided through Orland Park Fire Protection, IDOT and OrlandTownship Food Pantry. Visit the Orland Township website, www.orlandtownship. org, or call 403-4222 for more information.

be granted. Students may donate up to five baskets total. Baskets considered for community service must include the following: Easter grass, a stuffed animal, one book (coloring, reading, activity, etc.), one box of crayons ormagic markers, one small new toy and five or more pieces of wrapped candy. Baskets may be dropped off at Orland Township Orland Township, 14807 S. RaEaster basket program vinia Ave. The last day to donate Orland Township’s annual Eas- baskets is Saturday, April 12; baster Basket Program encourages kets will be distributed starting residents to donate pre-made Eas- the week of April 14. ter baskets for families in need For guidelines and more in Orland Township. information on, call Marianne Each basket must be labeled Hill at 403-4222. To learn more “boy” or “girl” along with the age about Orland Township events it is intended for. The program and programs follow Supervisor provides a way for students to get O’Grady and the township on involved in the community. For Facebook, www.facebook.com/ every basket a student makes, one supervisorogrady, and on Twitter, hour of community service will @OrlandTownship.

LEGAL NOTICE

Answer

(Puzzle on page 8)

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING TOWN OF PALOS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to the electors, residents of the Town of Palos, Cook County, Illinois, that the Annual Town Meeting of said Town will take place on April 8th, 2014, being the second Tuesday of the said month, at the hour of 7:00 P.M. at the Palos Township Hall, 10802 South Roberts Road, Palos Hills, Illinois, for the transaction of the business of the Town, and the moderator having been elected will proceed to hear for consideration, reports of the officers of said Town and decide on such measures as may, in pursuance of law, come before the meeting. GIVEN under my hand at Palos Township this 14th day of March, 2014. Jane A. Nolan, Clerk Town of Palos, Cook County, Illinois

D E J A

E R A S

C E L L S

A X I O M

P A Y A

R I O T

N I M B I K A A N E R U S A O M I P O P S J U N S A M S D M P W A A G A T I L E D A C A T S A D A Y R J U M U O S C M B E A

A S S T D U V E T I P A D

S T E H E N E L L S I D I S A I R T Y C K S E S S D H U K A I H I N T E L D I N G R R U T S N E

J E L L Y R O L L S

E R I E

B E E R

A L I C E

T A M E R

N O T E

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H E R S

Sudoku

(Puzzle on page 8)

6 1 7 2 9 5 9 3 6 8 4 2 8 3 7 1 5 4

8 2 5 3 6 1

7 4 6 5 8 9

1 3 9 4 2 7

2 5 3 8 1 4 7 6 9

4 9 8 6 7 3 1 5 2

3 7 4 9 5 6 2 1 8

9 6 2 1 4 8 5 7 3

© 2009 Hometown Content

Engaged? Getting Married?

Share the Happy News!

The Regional News invites couples or their parents to submit for publication engagement or wedding announcements. There is no charge for this service offered to community residents. Submitted photo

Park Women fill Easter baskets for needy kids Members of the Palos Park Woman’s Club put together 31 Easter baskets for children at their March meeting. Each member purchases $15 worth of clothing and toys for their selected basket baskets. The woman’s club provides the baskets, grass, candy, cellophane covers and bows, along with other assorted items to put into the baskets. The completed baskets were taken to the Palos Township Office by club members Helga Fuller and Pat Burger for Easter distribution to area children in need.

The announcements must be typed, double-spaced and sent with a photograph of the couple. JPEGs or high quality photographs are preferred. (Sorry, photographs cannot be returned)

E-mail announcements to: TheRegional@Comcast.net Mail announcements to: The Regional News 12243 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463

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The Regional News Thursday, March 20, 2014

11

Photos by Tim Hadac

Anticipation making Heights wait to take a number Workmen hoist one of two signs installed last Thursday outside Bella’s Bakery & Breakfast, 12246-8 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights (photos from left). After installing new fluorescent light bulbs, the men carefully guided the bakery sign into place. The two storefronts had been home to the popular Baumann’s Bakery, as well as Gourmet Coffees Etc. With both signs in place, workers descend the scaffold. Co-owner Elvis Hall had predicted that the bakery and breakfast eatery would be open last fall, then

by Christmas, then by Mardi Gras, with the multiple delays making the establishment into one of the most highly anticipated local businesses in years. Hall has said that the bakery portion of Bella’s will be open traditional bakery hours, roughly 6 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily. The breakfast area will be open from about 6 a.m. to noon and will offer a variety of meals prepared from scratch, such as omelets, bacon and sausage, biscuits and gravy, french toast, raisin bread, and more.

Take steps to protect your family business There’s nothing more important in the world to you than your family. However, your family-owned business probably helps support your family. So, when it comes to protecting both your family and your business, you need to carefully consider your moves. As you know, you face plenty of challenges to keep your business running smoothly — but it can be even more difficult to pass the family business on to your children or other relatives. In fact, according to the Small Business Administration, only 33 percent of family owned businesses survive the transition from first generation ownership to the next generation. Why is it so hard to keep a family business intact? Sometimes, it’s because no one in the family is interested in running the business — but family businesses frequently disintegrate because of the lack of a succession plan. To create a succession plan, your first step — and possibly the most important one — is to collect the thoughts and preferences of family members on their future involvement with your business. It’s essential that you know who wants to really do the day-to-day work and who is capable. During these conversations, you’ll also want to discuss other key business-succession issues, such as the retirement goals and cash flow needs of retiring family owners and the personal and financial

Jim Van Howe

goals of the next generation of management. In developing a plan for the future of your business, you will need to determine who will control and manage the business, and who will eventually own it. These decisions will depend on a variety of factors, such as the time horizon, goals and financial needs of the family members involved. Your succession plan could be based on a family limited partnership. Under this arrangement, you, as general partner, would maintain control over the dayto-day operation of your business, but, over time, you could gift or sell limited partnership shares to your family members. And eventually, you would also relinquish control of the business to whoever is going to run it. Another component of your succession plan might be a “buysell” agreement, which allows you to name the buyer for your business — such as one of your children — and establish methods to determine the sale price. Your child could then purchase a life insurance policy on your life

and eventually use the proceeds to buy the business, according to the terms established in the buysell agreement. We’ve just skimmed the surface of techniques that might be used alone or in combination to carry out your business succession. The transfer can be complex, so you will certainly need to consult with your legal and financial professionals. It’s important that you fully understand the business and tax implications of any succession plan, as well as the financial effects of a plan on all your family members. In any case, once you’ve created your succession plan, you’ll need to work with your legal advisor to put it in writing and communicate it clearly to all family members. Surprises are welcome in many parts of life — but not when it comes to transferring a family business. You want to leave your family a legacy. And if that legacy is the family business, do whatever it takes to pass it on in a manner that benefits everyone involved. This will take time and planning — but it can be well worth the effort. Jim Van Howe is a financial advisor with Edward Jones Investments, in Palos Heights. His office is at 7001 W. 127th St. He can be reached at 361-3400. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Verizon Wireless customers are the targets of new scam Scammers are now using Caller ID spoofing technology and a look-alike website to scam Verizon Wireless users. The Better Business Bureau (BBB) urges consumers to avoid sharing personal information with callers who claim to be from Verizon. Consumers report receiving calls allegedly from Verizon’s “Technical Support.” The call is a recorded message saying you are eligible to receive a voucher for your account and you need to visit a website to claim it. The web address contains the word “Verizon” in the URL name and the value of the voucher. As an example, one version of the scam uses “verizon54.com.” “Since Verizon Wireless is one of the nation’s largest cell phone providers, they and their customers are an easy target for scammers,” says Steve J. Bernas, president & CEO of the Better Business Bureau serving Chicago and Northern Illinois. “Consumers need to be aware of suspicious phone calls and fake websites in order to keep their personal in-

formation safe.” When you go to the website, it looks very similar to the official Verizon site, with the same Verizon logo and colors. The site asks you to “Verify My Account” by entering your cellphone number, Verizon ID and social security number. After entering this information, you don’t get the voucher in return, instead, the scammer has stolen your social security number. Here are ways to spot and avoid this phishing scam: • Watch for look-alike URLs. Be wary of sites that have Verizon as a subdomain of another URL (i.e. “verizon.scamwebsite. com” or part of a longer URL (i.e. “verizonvoucher105.com”). • Consider how the business normally reaches you. Beware of a departure from the normal routine. Verizon Wireless typically sends its customers text messages, so be wary of a phone call. • Be extremely suspicious of any site wanting complete personal information. Most services

Job Search Job and internship fair at Moraine Students, alumni and community members who are looking for hourly or salary jobs or paid or non-paid internships can network with quality employers that have job openings at Moraine Valley Community College’s spring Job and Internship Fair next Thursday, March 27, from 2 to 5 p.m. The free

fair will be in the Moraine Business and Conference Center, on campus, 9000 W. College Pkwy., Palos Hills. Professional business attire and resumés are required for entry. Registration is not required. A complete list of companies expected to attend the fair and additional information can be found at morainevalley.edu/jrc/fair or by calling the Job Resource Center at 974-5737.

and businesses that require personal identification already have the information from when you originally signed up, especially if the business is sending the message to you. They should not need your entire social security number or entire credit card number again. • Contact the business: Always call the business's customer support line to check the legitimacy of the offer. Be sure to find the phone number on your bill or by a web search, not the website the scammers gave you. • Don't believe what you see. The website that scammers created for this scam looks amazingly similar to the real Verizon Wireless site. Ripping off logos, colors and graphics online is easy for scammers. Just because it looks real, does not mean it is. For more advice on scams, visit bbb.org —Better Business Bureau

Photo by Wehmeier Portraits

Current and potential members of the Orland Park Area Chamber of Commerce find out more about the benefits of Chamber membership during member orientation sessions. The next will be held at 7:45 a.m. on Thursday, April 3, at Parkway Bank & Trust Company, 14345 S. LaGrange Road. All who are interested in Chamber membership are encouraged to attend.

Orland Chamber offers orientation The Orland Park Area Chamber of Commerce invites all current and prospective members to a member orientation on Thursday, April 3, from 7:45 a.m. to 9 a.m., at Parkway Bank & Trust Company, 14345 S. La Grange Road. There is no cost for this event and light refreshments will be served. “An annual investment in Chamber membership is one of the best local marketing tools a

encourages all who are interested in learning more about membership to attend the learning session. Chamber Board of Directors and Committee Chairmen will be on hand to answer questions and provide feedback as to the value of their membership. For more information or to RSVP, call the Chamber at 3492972 or RSVP through the Chamber’s website calendar at www. orlandparkchamber.org.

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business can have,” says Chamber Executive Director, Keloryn Putnam. “A Chamber of Commerce is a great way for a business to become involved in their community.” Member orientations are held throughout the year to acquaint all members and prospective members with the benefits of a chamber membership. The meeting is not limited to current Chamber members and the Chamber

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The Regional News Thursday, March 20, 2014

Outpatient ServiceS

BuiLDinG On eXceLLence. Outpatient ServiceS

Our new Outpatient Pavilion offers an array of services in one comfortable, modern facility. Opening in early 2014, the Outpatient Pavilion will provide the Southland with a wide range of specialists and services under one roof. Featuring state-of-the-art imaging, surgical suites and the Heart and Vascular, Cancer and Neurosciences Institutes, the new Outpatient Pavilion will offer superior care, along with added privacy and comfort.

For more information, call 1.800.3.ADVOCATE or visit advocatehealth.com/christoutpatient


Sports S

The Regional News - The Reporter

outhwest

Ken Karrson, Sports Editor sports@regionalpublishing.com

Thursday, March 20, 2014

Section 2

Page 1

2013-14 All-Area Basketball Teams First Team MAX STRUS, Stagg, G/F, Sr.    • The 2013-14 Player of the Year — who was mentioned by more than one opposing coach this season as the second-best player in the south suburbs behind Marian Catholic and future University of Kentucky guard Tyler Ulis — finished his prep career as the greatest basketball player in Stagg history. That’s the tag applied to Strus by veteran Chargers coach John Daniels, and it’s certainly difficult to debate the claim. After all, Strus was the top performer on Stagg’s finest single-season hoops squad, one that garnered 22 wins and came within two points of defeating four-time defending state champion Simeon for the Class 4A Shepard Regional crown. In his three full varsity campaigns, the Chargers piled up a total of 56 victories. Already a two-time all-area second-team selection, the 6-foot-6 Strus became a first-teamer by accruing per-game averages of 19.0 points, 8.0 rebounds and 3.2 assists while connecting on 82 percent of his free throws and sinking 68 3-pointers. He recorded 10 double-doubles and led Stagg in every major statistical category except assists, where he was second to Kevin White, and Strus departs the program as its No. 1 man in made foul shots (241) and charges taken (31). His 1,140 career points are only 16 off Jeff Miller’s pacesetting mark and put him third overall in team scoring annals. Other notable career stats include 180 assists and 165 3s. Strus’ college destination has yet to be determined, but Illinois State, Nevada and Missouri-Kansas City universities are among his suitors. NIKO CAHUE, Sandburg, F, Sr.    • Like Stagg’s Max Strus, Cahue elevated his status as a senior, earning a first-team allarea berth after being a member of the second unit in 2012-13. When Malek Harris was removed from the Eagles’ roster prior to the start of the 2013-14 campaign, Cahue had no one else to draw inside attention away from him. But even with oppos-

First Team

Max Strus ing defenses geared to stop him around the basket, Cahue still improved on his numbers from the year before. He averaged 15.8 points and 7.6 rebounds per contest, which bettered his previous figures by nearly five and two, respectively. He also rejected 31 shots, connected on 50 percent of his own attempts from the field and nailed 73 percent of his free throws. Cahue registered nine double-double outings this past season, with a scoring high of 32 points against De La Salle included among the production. The All-SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue pick has drawn interest from several colleges — among his favorites at the moment are Illinois Wesleyan University, North Central College, Elmhurst College, Wisconsin-Oshkosh and the University of St. Francis. JEREMIAH FERGUSON, Marist, G, Jr.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

   • Ferguson’s statistics were not of the eye-popping variety, but his value to a youthful RedHawks contingent was evident enough to make him one of just four underclassmen named to the 13-player All-East Suburban Catholic Conference team for 2013-14. He stepped forward in a measurable way while Marist’s one proven veteran, forward Nic Weishar, was in and out of the lineup because of a nagging ankle injury. Ferguson finished as the RedHawks’ top assist man with his per-game average of 3.0 distributions, a number that equaled the average amount of rebounds the 511 point guard pulled down in each contest. Of note, too, was the fact that Ferguson’s scoring jumped nearly three full points, to 11.0, whenever Marist was tangling with a conference foe. That latter figure led all Red(Continued on page 3)

LATONDRA BROOKS, Oak Lawn, G, Sr.    • Not only is Brooks repeating as an all-area first-team selection, but this time she moves to the head of the class. Although the Lady Spartans’ 2013-14 roster featured plenty of talent, Brooks was the linchpin as she could hurt foes in a variety of ways. She almost single-handedly extended Oak Lawn’s season in the Class 4A Bloom Township Sectional final, where her seven straight points in a span of just 43 seconds wiped out a late Marian Catholic lead and forced the defending state champs into playing an overtime period. The other group of Lady Spartans ultimately prevailed, but Oak Lawn still put together its best girls’ basketball season ever. Statistically, Player of the Year Brooks delivered pergame averages of 14.2 points, 6.7 steals, 5.6 assists and 3.7 rebounds on the Lady Spartans’ behalf, and she departs the scene as Oak Lawn’s record holder in the following categories: most points (34), assists (14) and steals (14) in a single game; most assists (167) and steals (200) in one season; and most points (1,448), assists (427) and steals (572) for a career. Brooks was the South Suburban Conference Red Player of the Year and tournament MVP at Oak Lawn’s Christmas event. BROOKE ANNERINO, Oak Lawn, G, Sr.    • Annerino’s ball-handling skills were an important component for the Lady Spartans’ success, as she was usually able to break defensive presses and run whatever offensive play Oak Lawn coach Janet Meyers had drawn up. The All-South Suburban Conference Red pick averaged 7.7 points, 3.0 assists and 2.1 steals per contest and shot an impressive 78 percent from the foul line. Annerino earned alltournament honors at the Lady Spartans’ own holiday event in December. MIA DIGIACOMO, Stagg, F, Jr.    • Possessing a great work ethic, and in the opinion of Lady Chargers coach Bill Turner

LaTondra Brooks also serving as an excellent role model for younger players to follow, DiGiacomo evolved into one of Stagg’s steadiest performers. Her interior presence meant opponents couldn’t solely concentrate on shutting down the Lady Chargers’ vaunted perimeter attack, and DiaGiacomo handled her chores well enough to become Stagg’s leader in rebounding (227, or 8.4 per game) and blocks (31). The All-SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue choice averaged 9.2 points per contest on 47 percent shooting and supplied a half-dozen double-doubles, a few of which came against highly regarded foes. HANNAH HENDERSON, Stagg, G, Sr.    • The Lady Chargers’ cocaptain was effective on both ends of the floor, as evidenced by her team-leading figures of

Photo by Jeff Vorva

3.3 assists and 2.9 steals per game. Henderson, an All-SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue selection and named her own team’s top defender, also averaged 9.5 points and 4.2 rebounds per outing and connected on 81 percent of her free throws. She will continue her academic and athletic careers at Elmhurst College next fall. JANNAH MAHMOUD, Oak Lawn, C, Sr.    • One of the area’s most dominating inside forces, Mahmoud came within .9 rebounds of averaging a season-long doubledouble as she posted per-game averages of 13.1 points and 9.1 boards for the Lady Spartans. The All-South Suburban Conference Red performer also contributed 50 blocks, 47 steals and 44 assists while seeing action in all 30 of Oak Lawn’s contests. (Continued on page 3)

SXU sports summary

National knockouts administered to Cougars While there was room for St. Xavier University in both the men’s and women’s NAIA Division II basketball tournaments, neither Cougars squad will need to free up additional space in the school’s athletic trophy case. SXU’s men did advance into the second round of play in Point Lookout, Mo., last week but No. 10-ranked Midland (Neb.) University halted the Cougars’ progress on Friday. Despite a combined 35 points from senior Brad Karp and junior Jack Krieger, the Cougars dropped a 64-61 decision to the Warriors. The fate of SXU’s women was a little worse, seeing as how that group of Cougars was knocked out on Day 1 of their tourney. Escorting SXU off the national stage was the College of the Ozarks, which handed down a surprisingly lopsided 68-43 defeat on Thursday at the Tyson Events center in Sioux City, Iowa. SXU’s men opened play last Wednesday versus Cincinnati Christian University and fared quite well, as they jumped out to a 19-4 advantage and eventually pocketed an 87-71 triumph at the College of the Ozarks’ Keeter Gymnasium. “We came out playing really aggressive,” said Krieger, who tallied a game-high 22 points for the No. 6-ranked Cougars. “Everyone on our team played hard, even the guys off the bench. We had some key rebounds and forced some big turnovers, and those are the little things that helped us get such a big lead early.” The Eagles, who were making their initial appearance in the national tournament, slipped behind 24-8 before reeling off eight unanswered markers. SXU (305) countered with a 20-9 burst that carried it into intermission and regained momentum for the locals. Freshman Kyle Tackett’s buzzer-beating basket capped the run.

Cincinnati Christian recovered from that latest assault, though, to get back within 10 points of the Cougars midway through the second half. Following a timeout, SXU scored twice in a row, but the Eagles refused to fold; instead, they netted 12 of the game’s next 13 points to narrow their deficit to just four points. Nearly six minutes still remained, but Cincinnati Christian could not complete its comeback. The Cougars sealed the deal for themselves at the charity stripe, with Michael Simpson’s 15-of-15 display leading the way. Simpson’s 15 made free throws were the ninth-most for an individual in tourney history, while SXU’s total of 34 rated as the sixth-highest team amount. “I’m proud of our team for keeping it together and finishing the game strong,” Cougars coach Tom O’Malley said immediately after the contest. “I thought Cincinnati Christian was really aggressive down low and on the offensive glass, and [they] definitely showed why they are down here at the national championship.” In addition to Krieger’s output, SXU also received double-figure scoring from Simpson (19 points) and Karp (15) in the win. Michael Hill had 19 points in a losing cause for the Eagles (19-14), who actually outshot the Cougars 51 percent to 42 from the field. *** On Friday, it was SXU having to play catch-up after falling into an early hole against Midland. The Warriors staked themselves to a 14-point halftime edge and then held on as the Cougars made a few second-half surges. A sizable portion of the opening session was a back-and-forth affair, with SXU scoring seven of the first 10 points, then falling behind by as many as six points before pulling even at 21-all on two Krieger charity tosses. But with less than five minutes remaining

prior to the break, Midland went on a 16-2 tear to seize command. Five different players contributed to the Warriors’ blitz. “It was a complete turnaround [from the game before],” O’Malley said. The margin grew as large as 16 before the Cougars used a series of 3-balls to fight their way back into contention. Karp’s beyondthe-arc basket drew SXU within 55-48, then Krieger connected from downtown to make it just a two-point contest with 4:38 left. A couple misses at the freethrow line kept the Cougars from moving in front, but Karp’s jumper reduced SXU’s deficit to 57-56 with just over two minutes to go. In the remaining time, however, Midland sank a clutch 3-pointer and registered a block on the Cougars with 11 seconds remaining. Some foul shots created the final score. “I thought Midland would be a tough team to meet,” O’Malley said. “They had a good inside game and good outside game, [but] we did almost win the game without shooting anywhere near what we usually do.” SXU nipped at the Warriors’ heels despite connecting on only 35 percent of its field-goal tries, compared to Midland’s 47 percent success rate. The latter also went 13-of-19 at the foul line, while the Cougars misfired a total of 11 times from the stripe. Krieger tallied 18 points for SXU, while Karp concluded his stellar collegiate career with 17, which gave him a total of 2,889 and made him the fourth-highest scorer in Illinois college basketball history. Karp also grabbed seven rebounds. His 1,053 career boards rank second in Cougars annals. “Every year, the kid got better,” O’Malley said of Karp. “We’ll have a hard time finding a replacement for him.” Josh Mawhorr added 10 points and eight rebounds for SXU,

which earned praise from Midland coach Todd Eisner. “St. Xavier is unbelievable offensively, and they really made us battle,” he said. “Credit them with how poorly we played offensively in the second half, as they made a run and gave us all we could handle.” Alex Starkel (14 points), Marcus Franklin (12), Galen Gullie (12) and Brandon Williams (nine points, seven rebounds) were the Warriors’ headliners. “Anytime you win 30 games, you can’t cry about it,” O’Malley said. “The hardest thing to do is talk to the team after they’ve lost that last game, but we had a great year.” That didn’t prevent the veteran leader from considering a few what-ifs. “You get that far in a year, it’s disappointing when you don’t win it all,” O’Malley said. “I think we had the right mixture of people to do that, but it just didn’t work out. We do have quite a few kids coming back [in 2014-15], so I hope they look at this and decide they don’t want to go through [the losing] again.”  — Ken Karrson • Editor’s note: Some quotes were provided by the NAIA offices. WOMEN’S BASKETBALL In their previous 32 games, the Cougars rarely experienced a time when at least one player didn’t step up and carry the load in the midst of a team-wide shooting slump. SXU finally did last Thursday, and at the worst possible moment. A disastrous 24 percent success rate doomed the No. 2-seeded Cougars against seventh-seeded College of the Ozarks, which rolled over SXU in the opening round of the national tournament. The Cougars (27-6) finished with just 17 baskets. Junior forward Morgan Stuut did post her 25th double-double of the campaign with 14 points and 13

rebounds, but her scoring total was below average for her. “When you get to this level, you just can’t have a bad game,” SXU coach Bob Hallberg said. “We were just out of sync. It’s bad when the whole team goes cold — that’s what happened. “I liked our draw going into the tournament, and I thought we could have went a long way, [but] the whole game boiled down to shooting. You can’t win when you shoot the way we shot. When we shot like that in the past, somebody was able to step up for us and have a good game, and that just didn’t happen for us [here].” College of the Ozarks entered the tourney as one of NAIA Division II’s most battle-tested programs, with 20 national trips in the 23-year history of the event. Freshman guard Alice Heinzler led all scorers with 18 points. Joining her in double figures for the Bobcats was senior Emily Walker, who tallied 13. College of the Ozarks opened the contest with a 10-4 run and never looked back, eventually getting its lead up to 20 points following Walker’s layup off a Heinzler assist with two seconds remaining in the first half. The Cougars couldn’t get their offense going in the opening 20 minutes, as they converted only 8-of-33 attempts from the floor, a mark that included a 1-of-6 showing from 3-point range. The Bobcats kept their foot on the gas in the second half, never allowing SXU to draw closer than 14 points. As a team, College of the Ozarks shot 39 percent from the field and was 16-of-20 at the foul line. “We have to now reflect that we finished the season at 27-6,” Hallberg said. “It’s some consolation that a lot of coaches would love to have that kind of record. We got into the tournament with a lot of potential to go a long way,

but we just didn’t shoot well. You don’t have time to recover, [so] the season is unfortunately over. “When it ends like that, it’s not like a two- or three-point loss. I have no answer why we all went cold on the same night together. You don’t have to go much farther than the shooting percentage to find out the reason why we lost. “It doesn’t do you any good to vent [about] what we could have done [differently]. We have to move on to next season.” — Anthony Nasella WOMEN’S TRACK Highlighted by 19th-place finishes from senior Ashley Shares in the 5,000-meter run and the 3,200-relay team, the Cougars concluded their indoor season at the NAIA Indoor Track & Field National Championships in Geneva, Ohio. Shares posted her fastest time of the season in her race as she completed it in 18 minutes, 13.56 seconds. Meanwhile, the relay quartet of junior Leslie Rosario, senior Anna Galvez, senior Jordan Wallace and freshman Nicole Watkins established an SXU record in their event by clocking a 9:33.19, which eclipsed the previous standard by 18 seconds. “I’m so proud of these women and what they were able to accomplish at the national meet,” Cougars coach Lisa Ebel said. “Breaking a record is always exciting, but doing it at nationals makes it extra special. I’m glad these young ladies were able to achieve that. “This is great momentum for our team heading into the outdoor season.” SXU begins the outdoor portion of its schedule on Saturday, March 29, at Goshen (Ind.) College’s Maple Leaf Invitational. MEN’S TRACK Some Cougars men also took part in the NAIA meet, and ju(Continued on page 4)


2

Section 2 Thursday, March 20, 2014  

The Regional News - The Reporter

‘V’ means more than ‘victory’ during March Madness

Bartosh (Reprinted from March 17, 2011)    In the 1940s, making the “V” sign with one’s index and middle fingers meant victory, as in the winning of World War II.    In the 1960s, longhaired hippies flashed that same sign in resistance to another military conflict. That group said they wanted peace, but what they really meant was that they wanted no piece of the armedforces action.    Now, in 2011, when men hold up their two fingers, they’re telling their spouses or significant others that the action they desire is a vasectomy.    At least it’s true when March Madness is on the horizon. In a report presented last week on a variety of media outlets, the number of men scheduling that particular surgery escalates right before TV coverage of the NCAA men’s basketball tournament begins in earnest.    (This story, by the way, perfectly illustrates what is referred to as a “slow news day” in our business. But let’s forge on anyway).    Having recovery time coincide with tourney time is, I have to admit, pretty cagey. Doctors have done their part to prod prospective clients into making a snip decision by incorporating tacky slogans and promising consolation prizes to replace the children those men will no longer be fathering in the future.    One Oregon urologist, for example, uses an ad that urges men to “take care of the equipment and lower your seed for the tourney,” while another in Wisconsin encourages would-be patients to “let our boys take care of your boys.”    It’s a good thing these individuals make a living as physicians and not funny men. An even better thing is that, thanks to

the dumbness of the jokes, they probably won’t be giggling while they’re cutting, so shaky hands shouldn’t victimize clients.    As far as the giveaways to compensate for the one big takeaway, some doctors are offering March Madness deals that include such things as mugs, T-shirts and pizzas. Somehow, my own appetite has suddenly been lost.    For guys to whom the NCAA Tournament is the sporting equivalent of nonstop sex, this is a surefire way to get the best of all worlds that don’t include carnal relations, which will be put on hiatus for a while. Not only does surgical recovery mean lots of time spent in a recliner or other suitably comfortable piece of furniture, but patients also will be doted on by their females, each of whom will see her man’s willingness to undergo the procedure as an indication of his love for her.    I’m not going to even try and connect all the dots on that, but everyone knows it’s so.    And maybe there is some sacrificial truth to such an act because, as every male can attest, we all tend to wince at anything that involves our nether regions, or anyone else’s, for that matter. Heck, simply watching some of those rubber-limbed types do the splits is enough to immediately make me check my own condition.    Frankly, I think there are easier ways to arrange tournament-viewing time. For instance, take your mate out to dinner at a nice restaurant, one that has big-screen TVs strategically stationed around the room. Just be sure you’re facing one of them at tip-off.    Sure, you won’t have uninterrupted access because, somewhere along the line, you’ll have to engage in a bit of small talk. But it’s a night out for your lady, and the setting might put her

in a romantic mood.    Since tournament coverage eventually concludes each night — and, more importantly, you’ve spared yourself the pain of a vasectomy and, thus, are still in complete operational mode — that could lead to something much more satisfying than a first- or second-round victory by your favorite school.    If you’re a cheapskate, suggest that your mate invite over a few couples for a visit. Or better yet, try and wrangle an invitation from one of them so you’ll be spared prep time and won’t have to help clean the house. Either way, the women can enjoy a lengthy girl-talk session while the guys congregate in whichever room contains the biggest TV and debate the merits of the shot clock.    You could also try and get your mate interested in watching basketball with you. This has undoubtedly been made more difficult by the fact players no longer wear short shorts, but try anyway.    A possible downside to this strategy is that you’ll likely be asked to watch some romantic movie with her at a future date, but at least you’ll know that your basketball viewing will proceed unimpeded. If you’re really lucky, hoops will become the most important thing in her life for several hours, too, although it’s hard to imagine any woman being as shallow as we men are in that regard.    But if you still insist on going through with the big “V,” remember to follow doctor’s orders: lots of rest, lots of basketball, and lots of moaning and groaning to gain added sympathy.    And try not to cringe every time a certain college basketball announcer gets referred to as “Dickie V.”

Female hockey players still waiting for equal treatment By Kevin Coyne Correspondent Prior to the Sochi Olympics, the public’s attention was rightfully directed toward living conditions in that city, security issues and potential terrorist threats. Once the Games began, however, people started focusing on the competition itself. And a popular sport among American television viewers was women’s ice hockey. Millions of people tuned in to follow the U.S. team’s journey to a hoped-for gold medal, which was ultimately denied by Canada. Despite that unfavorable outcome, hockeyplaying women finally started gaining the respect they desired and deserved. The rise in popularity of women’s hockey at the international level also created something else: questions about the officiating of it. As faster, more skillful players fill team rosters, women’s hockey

is in need of officials who can keep pace — and a much greater number of them. Many athletes and fans are pushing for two referees to be on the ice rather than just one, which is what women’s hockey is dealing with at the moment. NHL analyst and NBC commentator Pierre McGuire, in a Feb. 21 interview with Toronto Sports Network Radio, referred to a play in the U.S.-Canada encounter that gave American Kelli Stack an empty-net opportunity. It resulted from an official interfering with Canadian player Catherine Ward. “There were some terrible calls, and not [only] against Canada or the U.S. — there were terrible calls going both ways,” McGuire said in the interview. “There were a ton of terrible calls … when the Americans almost iced the game because the linesman from the Czech Republic got in the way of Catherine Ward, that was a

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Not waiting to exhale    Stagg’s Nick Harres lets out a breath while running in a frosh-soph race at Saturday’s SouthWest Suburban Conference track meet.

terrible call.” During an earlier Canada-U.S. encounter, a questionable goal was erased by an out-of-position referee. “They’ve struggled when the better teams are playing because it’s a bigger ice surface and she couldn’t keep up,” McGuire said about the Feb. 12 game. “The ref was nowhere near the goal line and she eventually called the goal back, which I don’t know how she saw it because she was in the neutral zone.” It’s a grim reality how poorly women’s games are officiated. This has nothing to do with the sex of the official, however, but overall skating ability. “They need to put two officials on the ice, not one, just like the men’s game,” McGuire said. “And they need to put the best officials on, whether it is a male or female.” Also problematic for women’s hockey is a shortage of coaches with experience in the professional men’s game. One argument for keeping nonNHL coaches behind the bench is the difference in the rules of play, but professional coaches are capable of dealing with the no-checking rule that was implemented in 2005. That rule completely eliminated clutching, grabbing and stick work, and forced teams to go to a European style of play that emphasizes skill, speed and playmaking, which are primary features of the women’s game. McGuire praised Canada coach Kevin Dineen, former boss of the Florida Panthers, for introducing systems implemented in the NHL game to help the Canadian women retool their strategy. “Kevin brought a lot of the NHL ideology to the ladies program, and it worked really well,” said McGuire, who pointed specifically to Dineen’s amount of poise behind the bench at pivotal moments. “That’s what a lot of NHL coaches and professional coaches do, since you coach so many games and you get so many reps,” McGuire said. “You understand the ebb and flow of emotion during a game.” There are very few coaches like Dineen in the women’s game; in most cases, the coaches are former women’s players who competed when the sport was in its infancy. While the current female coaches were outstanding players, the game has evolved, and people like Dineen need to become the new faces of international women’s hockey.

Community sports news Marist alums in latest ESCC Hall of Fame class Marist alumni Gary Kostrubala and Tony Evensen will be among the 12 newest inductees into the East Suburban Catholic Conference Hall of Fame. The induction ceremony will take place on Thursday, April 10, at Crystal Sky Banquet Hall in McCook. Nine individuals will enter the Hall, along with Joliet Catholic Academy’s 1994 baseball and 2004 football state championship squads and Notre Dame’s 2004 baseball titlist team. Kostrubala brought a pair of gold medals back to Mount Greenwood in the spring of 1982, when he returned from the state track meet as a champion in both the shot put and discus events. Less than a full year later, it was Evensen’s turn, as he became Illinois’ best wrestler at 138 pounds in February of 1983. Former Carmel football players Jack Simmons and Mark Venegoni, former Marian Catholic basketball player Adam Savick, Benet Academy boys’ golf coach

Dan Nagis, Benet girls’ basketball coach Peter Paul, St. Viator boys’ golf coach Jack Halpin and ESCC girls’ basketball officials assignor John Dacey round out the list of Hall of Fame newcomers. Tickets to the event are $50 and may be purchased through any ESCC member school’s athletic department. For more information, visit www.eastsuburbancc. com or contact Mike Hennessey at (847) 779-8652.

mel, Alex Cabrera, Jordan Inquez and Muhened Ali. Bill Lammel was the team’s head coach and Mike Rizzo was his assistant.

Brother Rice wins water polo opener

Brother Rice began its 2014 water polo season in mighty impressive fashion. The Crusaders debuted against MCAC rival Mt. Carmel and asserted their superiority, as they pocketed a 15-3 victory. Leading Worth Warriors complete un- the charge for Rice was the tandem of Dan Birmingham and Luke defeated hoops season The Worth Warriors, whose Healy, who accounted for nearly roster was made up of players half of its goals. Birmingham from both Worth and Chicago tallied four times, while Healy Ridge, completed a 9-0 basket- notched three scores. ball season last Saturday at the Palos Park Recreation Center. The Illinois Hoopla tryouts run Warriors were members of the through March Illinois Hoopla will conduct Palos Heights-Palos Park-Worth spring basketball tryouts for Basketball League. Comprising Worth’s roster players in grades 3-12 through were Carlos Zavala, Vincent the month of March. (Continued on page 4) Rizzo, Alex Gamboa, Will Lam-

The Worth Warriors recently completed an unbeaten basketball season.

Submitted photo

Trinity sports report

Trolls’ bats lead the way By Tim Cronin Trinity Christian College baseball coach Justin Huisman said it best. “It was fun to be outside,” he said of last week’s trip to Florida. The Trolls took advantage of the great outdoors. After a twoweek layoff caused by bad weather back home, Trinity exhibited no signs of rustiness as it belted 18 hits in its Sunshine State opener and thumped Aquinas (Mich.) College 19-1. Oddly, it was actually a comefrom-behind affair, as Aquinas scored in its initial at-bat. The Trolls tallied in each frame thereafter. That victory also set the tone for a week in which Trinity went 5-4 to improve its season ledger to 5-8. The Trolls amassed 52 runs and gave up 34, a dozen of the latter being surrendered in a high-scoring loss to St. Ambrose. Otherwise, Trinity’s pitching and defense was more solid than it perhaps had a right to be, given the inability to do anything but work out in the gym for two weeks. “I fully expect our pitching to be the backbone of the team,” Huisman said. His problem now, one shared by every manager north of the Mason-Dixon Line, is getting his rotation set and in a rhythm. March weather typically creates a sporadic schedule, which sidelines pitchers and gives managers gray hairs. “Northern teams are always at a disadvantage,” Huisman said. “Last year, as the season went on, we got better and better.” Huisman has a base off which to work, both at the plate and on the mound. Offensively, he has three regulars batting .383 or better, a trio led by Mark Munizzi’s .429 average. Danny Britt is at .395 and Joe McCaw’s hitting at a .383 clip. Huisman also has three pitchers sporting an earned-run average under 3.00. Drew Chibe owns the lowest ERA at 2.31 and also paces the staff with 14 strikeouts in 11 2/3 innings. What Huisman wants is more of the same on the hill and more overall at the plate, specifically from the bottom half of the batting order. “The first half of the lineup has done most of the damage,” Huisman said. “We’re definitely an offense that needs to execute. But we’re improving.” The offense has been there. Trinity pounded out 11 hits in a 2-1 win over Clarke University a couple of hours after knocking Aquinas around, and had six more in a 5-0 loss to Clarke the next day. The Trolls then beat Clarke 3-2 in the final game of the three-game set, Steve Brewer’s three-run homer providing all of

their scoring. Thirteen hits helped create nine runs in the 12-9 loss to St. Ambrose. In all, Trinity has 96 hits in 13 games. Of course, Husiman doesn’t like that 86 Trolls have been left on base, but 66 opposition runners have also been stranded. Considering everything, Trinity is off to a good start. Now, the Trolls need the weather to cooperate so they can play on a regular basis. *** • Statistics: 5-8 overall, 0-4 road, 5-4 neutral. Leaders: Mark Munizzi, .429 average, 18 hits; Danny Britt, 14 RBI; Joe McCaw, .574 slugging percentage, 2 steals; Steve Brewer, 1 HR; Lance Lammers, 2 steals; four pitchers with 1 win; Vince Flores, Taylor Boice, 0.00 ERA; Drew Chibe, 14 strikeouts. • Schedule: Saturday, vs. St. Xavier University (2), 1 p.m.; Wednesday, vs. Roosevelt University, 3:30 p.m.; March 28, at Holy Cross, 3:30 p.m. CT; March 29, vs. Holy Cross (2), 1 p.m.; April 1, at Roosevelt (2), 1 p.m.; April 2, vs. Purdue University Calumet, 3:30 p.m.; April 4, at University of St. Francis (2), 3 p.m. SOFTBALL After smacking a ball around in a gym to get ready for the season, the Trolls’ excursion to Florida seemed like a trip to Disney World. Trinity didn’t actually reach Orlando, but its visit to Clemont, Fla. — complete with a dry diamond — was close enough to wonderland to suffice. And the Trolls made the best of their situation, opening with five victories in 10 games, likely as much as could be expected while playing against clubs that had already seen sunshine rather than a gym roof during practice. Trinity was triumphant in four of its last six contests, two of which came by 1-0 scores over Spring Arbor and Bloomfield universities, respectively. The Trolls also included a 5-3 victory over Mount Vernon among their accomplishments. That latter success last Thursday couldn’t be followed up satisfactorily, though, as Mount Vernon gained revenge in the nightcap by a 4-1 count. Two other setbacks — 8-7 to Marian University and 7-4 to Ave Maria — might have tilted Trinity’s way, too, had its pitching and defense been a bit more solid on those occasions. Overall, however, there were more plusses than minuses for the Trolls on their trip. One example was their ability to shake off the negative effects of the loss to Ave Maria and handle Bloomfield in a game that didn’t get underway until 10:30 p.m. The contest was scoreless through seven innings, although Trinity was not without a couple of prime chances. The Trolls failed to take advantage of a bases-

loaded circumstance in the fourth frame and left two runners aboard in their half of the seventh. Making sure those misfires didn’t prove costly was Trinity pitcher Brianna Brugioni, who worked the corners of the plate perfectly and racked up 10 strikeouts. After Bailain Reynolds’ twoout hit drove in Jayme Love from third with the game’s lone run in the top of the eighth, Brugioni pitched her way out of a two-on, one-out jam by coaxing a popout and ringing up the last of her strikeouts. Now, the question is when the Trolls will play again. This past Tuesday’s slated game with Cardinal Stritch University was moved into April, and given the weather and field conditions, the schedule is best written in pencil. *** • Statistics: 5-5 overall, 5-5 neutral. Leaders: Emily Phillips, Michelle Interrante, .500 batting average, .500 slugging percentage; Jayme Love, Anna Phillips, 10 hits, 1 steal; Brianna Brugioni, 5 RBI, 1 HR, 3 wins, 25 strikeouts; Mattie McGuire, 0.50 ERA. • Schedule: Today, at Calumet College of St. Joseph, 3 p.m.; Friday, vs. Purdue University Calumet, 3 p.m.; Tuesday, vs. Judson University, 3 p.m.; March 27, vs. University of St. Francis, 2 p.m.; March 29, at Wheaton College, 10 a.m.; March 31, vs. Calvin College, 3:30 p.m.; April 1, at Trinity International University, 3 p.m.; April 3, vs. Wheaton, 3 p.m. GOLF As with the baseball and softball teams, Trolls golfers went south to start the spring season with no outdoor practice under their belts. Despite having that hurdle to clear, Trinity’s leaders still managed to finish in the middle of the pack at the Battle at the Beach in Myrtle Beach, S.C. As a team, the Trolls were last in a field of six. Spencer TenHaken’s 79-84 combination, good for a two-round total of 163 and 32nd place, led the way for Trinity at Myrtlewood and Pine Hills. Alex Svabek’s 164 (86-78) put him in a tie for 33rd, while Brian Deckinga fired a 167 (88-79) and was 38th in a 52golfer field. None of the other five Trolls broke 80 in either round. *** • Leaders: Logan Vos, 75, Aug. 30, Sept. 20; Jonathan Zandstra, 76, Sept. 21; Scott Ebbeling, 78, Aug. 31; Alex Svabek, 78, March 15; Tim Hoeksema, 79, Aug. 31; Spencer TenHaken, 79, Aug. 27, Oct. 3, March 14; Brian Deckinga, 79, March 15. • Schedule: March 31: Purdue-North Central Shootout, Briar Leaf GC, Laporte, Ind.; April 8: University of St. Francis Invitational, Wedgewood, Plainfield; April 11-12: Pilot Invitational, Blackthorn, South Bend, Ind.


The Regional News - The Reporter  

Thursday, March 20, 2014 Section 2

All-area boys Hawks in ESCC action. What made Ferguson’s breakthrough particularly remarkable is that, due to a knee injury, he was coming off a sophomore season consisting of only four games. MATT GURGONE, St. Laurence, F, Jr.    • Though somewhat undersized for his position, the 6-1 Gurgone unquestionably ranked as a big man importance-wise to the Vikings, whose sharper performances in the second half of the schedule coincided with Gurgone’s return to full health. For an early chunk of the season, he was coping with the healing process required for a broken collarbone, which he suffered in October during St. Laurence’s football loss to Mt. Carmel. Upon recovery, Gurgone gave the Vikings the perimeterscoring weapon they sorely needed. Highlighting his output was a 31-point explosion versus Fenwick that was largely made possible by seven 3-point baskets, but there were other memorable moments as well, such as a 26-point showing opposite Bishop McNamara. He finished with 48 3-balls and had a success rate of 43 percent from long distance. Gurgone shot 48 percent from the floor overall (96-of-197) and averaged team bests of 10.2 and 4.0 rebounds per contest, to go along with 2.0 assists and 1.0 steals. BRIAN HOLLAND, Marist, G, Sr.    • Every year, RedHawks coach Gene Nolan seems to find someone to develop into Marist’s designated sharpshooter — in 201314, that person was Holland, who had the unenviable task of filling one of the backcourt spots left vacant by the graduation of history-making individuals Lexus Williams and LJ McIntosh. All Holland did in their absence was to post the second-best 3-pointshooting percentage for a season in school annals with his success rate of 51. He made 64 3s in all, including 22 in the RedHawks’ eight East Suburban Catholic Conference games, which ranked second among all league players this winter. Holland, who sports a gaudy 5.38 grade-point average in the classroom, wasn’t one-dimensional on the court — Nolan referred to him as “the defensive leader” for a team that allowed the fewest points in league play. That nine-team conference, by the way, boasts Class 4A sectional champion Marian Catholic as one of its members, as well as five other schools that captured regional crowns. JACOB LITTLETON, Shepard, G, Sr.    • The Astros rated as something of an overachiever this past season, and much of the thanks for that occurrence had to be forwarded to Littleton, who took over for former all-area player Londell Lee as Shepard’s team leader. The All-South Suburban Conference Red selection, who was a member of the all-area second team as a junior, made his presence felt in several ways. Not only was Littleton the Astros’ top scorer (17.5 ppg.) and an 83 percent foul shooter (152-of-184 during the regular campaign), but he was a better-than-average defender, as evidenced by his team-best figures of 55 steals and 11 charges taken. Littleton, who played in every game for the second straight year, averaged nearly 4 ½ rebounds per contest and buried a total of 39 3-pointers. Among the colleges that have given him more than a casual glance are Benedictine, Monmouth, North Central and Wisconsin-Washington County. ISSAC MATTHEWS, Evergreen Park, G, Jr.    • Even by Mustangs coach Pat Flannigan’s admission, Jacquet McClendon is one of the premier athletes currently attending Evergreen Park High School. But while McClendon was indeed a key component in the Mustangs’ oncourt operation this past season, he had nothing on Matthews, who emerged as a true leader for Evergreen. His per-game scoring average of 14.3 points doesn’t appear all that special, but Matthews was fully capable of tallying at a much higher clip, as demonstrated in matchups with Lincoln-Way West and Kankakee, where he tossed in 28 and 24 points, respectively. Perhaps not coincidentally, those contests also ranked as two of the Mustangs’ most impressive triumphs of the season. Matthews

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was solid at the foul line (76 percent accuracy) and a surprisingly good rebounder at 6-1— he pulled down 121 in all, or 4.7 per outing, and had single-game highs of nine and eight. The All-South Suburban Conference Red pick also made 64 steals, dished out 50 assists and had 39 deflections while on defense. JOSH MEIER, Richards, C, Sr.    • There were a few rocky moments during the Chicago State University-bound center’s senior campaign, but he still was able to demonstrate often the traits that attracted the Cougars to him in the first place. The 6-8 Meier, who received South Suburban Conference Red Player of the Year honors for the second season in a row and was chosen as a fourth-team all-stater by the Illinois Basketball Coaches Association, departs Richards as its all-time leader in rebounds (798) and blocked shots (158), and No. 4 in career points with 1,190. Four-hundred ninety-eight of those points were delivered this past winter on 63 percent shooting (178-of-283), and Meier also drilled his lone 3-point try. He canned 69 percent of his free throws, included 66 offensive rebounds among his total of 182 and blocked 52 shots by opponents. In Richards’ regularseason finale against Eisenhower, Meier helped the Bulldogs make their ninth consecutive conference title an outright one by scoring 47 points — the second-highest single-game individual effort in program history — and collecting a school-record 27 rebounds. Over half of Meier’s points in that encounter resulted from dunks. He is making his third appearance on the all-area squad, his second as a first-team pick. QUINN NIEGO, Brother Rice, G, Sr.    • More of a role player for the Crusaders as a junior after transferring from St. Rita, Niego moved front and center upon the graduation of 2012-13 Player of the Year Alex Majewski, firstteam all-area guard Jim Barista and second-teamer Cal Kennedy. Niego quickly paired with fellow returnee Ray Rubio to provide Brother Rice with one of the Chicagoland area’s most reliable 1-2 offensive punches. Niego topped the Crusaders in per-game scoring (18.6 ppg.), 3-point buckets (61), free-throw accuracy (85 percent) and total rebounds (136). An undeniable memory was when he scored 19 points in one quarter against Bishop McNamara, which established a single-period record for Rice. The All-Chicago Catholic League pick’s other numbers included 47 percent field-goal shooting — including 40 percent from 3-point territory — 34 assists and 25 steals. RAY RUBIO, Brother Rice, G, Sr.    • The other half of the Crusaders’ dynamic duo, Rubio was Robin to Quinn Niego’s Batman — or vice-versa. Either way, they were a handful for opposition defenses, which essentially were left to pick their poison. Rubio, whose calling card as a junior was his own defensive play, flexed plenty of offensive muscle this time around as he poured in 16.1 points per contest, shot 49 percent from the floor, nailed 38 3-point baskets while hitting 36 percent of his long-range attempts and connected on 72 percent of his free throws. The All-Chicago Catholic League player didn’t forgo his defensive responsibilities, however, as he paced Brother Rice with 46 steals, eight more than he managed in 2012-13, when he was selected to this paper’s all-area second team. Rubio also passed out more assists (57) than any other Crusader this past season and was second on the team with 123 rebounds. DEDRICK SHANNON, Richards, G, Jr.    • The son of former Moraine Valley College men’s basketball coach Dedrick Shannon Sr. completed his third varsity season as the Bulldogs’ second-best player behind Josh Meier. However, Rich-

(Continued from page 1) ards coach John Chappetto cited a parallel between Shannon’s performance and that of the team, saying, “Every big win we did have, he played great.” For the year, the All-South Suburban Conference Red guard averaged 12.0 points, 5.4 assists and 1.8 steals per contest, which represented an increase in each category over his 2012-13 efforts that had been good enough to net him second-team all-area honors. His single-game highs as a junior were 27 points on 50 percent shooting versus Oak Lawn, nine assists against Eisenhower and seven steals opposite Lincoln-Way North. DAVID STACY, Oak Lawn, G, Sr.    • After sitting out his junior season, Stacy returned to basketball as a senior and then, about midway through the 2013-14 campaign, found out he was going to become the Spartans’ point guard. While having to learn his new position on the fly, Stacy took to the assignment well enough to guide Oak Lawn to wins in seven of its last 10 regular-season games, a span that included victories over South Suburban Conference Red champ Richards and co-runner-up Shepard. In the words of Spartans coach Jason Rhodes, Stacy’s “game really kind of came together late in the year. Game by game, his improvement is pretty obvious.” Stacy dropped 30 points on Shepard and 25 on Fenton, and he wound up as Oak Lawn’s leader in scoring (12.5 ppg.), assists (2.5) and steals (1.7) while finishing second on the team in per-game rebounding with an average of six. Stacy buried 41 3-pointers while shooting a credible 34 percent from behind the arc. ERIC STRAKA, Sandburg, F, Sr.    •Unlike David Stacy, Straka did not willingly opt out of basketball a year ago. Nevertheless, he didn’t see the floor until the Eagles began summer-league play, at which time Straka impressed Sandburg coach Todd Allen enough to where the latter pegged Straka as a player to watch this winter. And sure enough he was, as he “really filled up the stat sheet,” according to Allen. The 6-4 Straka was the Eagles’ blocks leader with 32, and he was also their top shooter percentage-wise (60) and No. 1 in steals with 38. He ranked second in both rebounds (6.5 per game) and assists (3.2), and produced a scoring average of 9.0. Straka, whose GPA is nearly 4.0, scored high on his ACT and plans to attend the University of Illinois. TONY WEATHERSBY, Evergreen Park, F, Sr.    • Somewhat overlooked by the casual fan, Weathersby was an integral part of the Mustangs’ most successful club since 2008-09, when Evergreen Park challenged for South Suburban Conference Red supremacy that year. Weathersby was a steadying influence for the Mustangs, as he was reliable in several areas. His 12.4 points-per-game average trailed teammate Issac Matthews’ output, but Weathersby tallied in double digits 17 times, including dropping a season-best 25 points on Oak Lawn. He also scored 21 in another game and twice pulled down at least 11 rebounds. Weathersby clicked on 49 percent of his two-point shots and 68 percent of his free throws, made 40 steals and doled out 22 assists. KEVIN WHITE, Stagg, G, Sr.    • Making his second straight appearance on the all-area first team, White’s ball-handling abilities played a large role in the Chargers’ team success, as it enabled them to easily cope with any kind of defensive pressure without committing a rash of errors. White, an All-SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue choice and all-tournament player at Stagg’s Thanksgiving event, averaged 13.9 points and 4.0 assists per contest, figures that were almost identical to the ones he amassed as a junior, his first year playing for the Chargers. With White running the show on the court, Stagg went 42-17 the past two seasons.

All-area girls Mahmoud saved some of her best performances for the postseason, as she registered double-doubles against both Marist (14 points, 12 rebounds) and Marian Catholic (16 points, 10 rebounds) in the Lady Spartans’ two games at the Class 4A Bloom Township Sectional. She was named to all-tournament squads at both Thanksgiving and Christmas. BRIANNA MARKUSIC, Oak Lawn, F, Jr.    • A nice complement to Jannah Mahmoud on the inside, Markusic did plenty to aid the Lady Spartans in their recordsetting campaign as she averaged 13.3 points and 7.7 rebounds per contest. Other notable season stats for the All-South Suburban Conference Red performer and tourney MVP at Glenbard East were 50 steals, 32 blocks and 20 assists. Markusic’s 25 points, 13 rebounds and three steals loomed large in Oak Lawn’s securing of a regional win over Lincoln-Way Central, and she also supplied 10 points and seven boards versus Marian Catholic in a sectional final. With graduation removing other key members of the roster, Markusic will be the Lady Spartans’ undisputed ringleader during the 2014-15 season. CASEY MCMAHON, Stagg, G, Sr.    • It may be a while before anyone duplicates McMahon’s long-distance-shooting feats. The Lady Chargers’ other co-captain and repeat member of the allarea first team finished her prep career with 222 3-point buckets, the most by any Stagg athlete of either gender. Eighty-seven of those long balls were hit during the 2013-14 campaign, which represented another school mark. In all, McMahon averaged 13 points per game, to go along with 118 total rebounds (4.4 per contest), 61 steals and 50 assists. She shot a crisp 78 percent at the freethrow stripe. McMahon, who’ll attend St. Xavier University in the fall, was chosen as a specialmention member of the Illinois Basketball Coaches Association All-State squad after garnering All-SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue honors. JESS MORIARTY, Mt. Assisi, G, Jr.    • A transfer player, Moriarty’s scoring prowess and energy spearheaded the Screeching Eagles’ state tournament run, which took them all the way to the championship game of the Class 2A Harper Sectional. Her 13 points — which included five late free throws — and 11 rebounds were pivotal in Mt. Assisi’s 52-42 victory over Lisle that clinched its second consecutive regional championship. Moriarty then dropped in 14 points, including a pair of critical 3-point baskets down the stretch, to lift the Eagles to their first-ever sectional triumph (3730 over Westmont) and tallied 10 more opposite Seton Academy in the sectional final. For the season, she averaged 12 points and five rebounds per game while sinking 37 percent of her 3-point attempts. ELIZABETH NYE, Mother McAuley, G, Sr.    • An explosive impact player for the Mighty Macs, Nye aver-

aged 17.9 points, 6.6 assists, 3.2 rebounds and 2.2 assists per game as a senior for a 20-win club. The All-Girls Catholic Athletic Conference pick sank 58 3-pointers and wound up with more than 1,000 points in her Mother McAuley career. Her 21 points and six assists helped the Macs defeat Stagg in a regional semifinal contest, and she tossed in 16 more points in McAuley’s ensuing loss to Oak Lawn. In addition to her offensive input, Nye was a defensive whiz who typically guarded the opposition’s biggest scoring threat. MEGAN PFISTER, Evergreen Park, G, Jr.    • Named to the All-South Suburban Conference Red team for the second straight year, Pfister paced the Lady Mustangs in scoring (12.8 ppg.) and assists (4.3) while also providing them with averages of 6.5 rebounds and 2.4 steals per game. A two-year captain at Evergreen Park, Pfister helped the Lady Mustangs claim a regional title for the second season in a row and then scored 10 point sin a losing cause against Phillips in a Class 3A sectional semifinal. Pfister was a state qualifier in the IHSA-sponsored 3-point contest. KAYCEE PITTMAN, Chicago Christian, G, Sr.    • A standout for the Lady Knights in both basketball and softball, Pittman put together a solid senior campaign on the court and earned All-Suburban Christian Conference recognition in the process. In her second varsity campaign, Pittman, the daughter of Chicago Christian boys’ basketball and softball coach Kevin Pittman, averaged 11.2 points per game and shot 34 percent from 3-point territory. She scored 18 points in a late-season victory over Marian Central Catholic. Pittman was selected to the all-tournament team at Lisle during Christmas. SYDNI TEARS, Richards, G, So.    • A two-time All-South Suburban Conference Red selection, Tears was the Lady Bulldogs’ top offensive performer as she averaged 16.5 points and 9.7 rebounds per contest. Among Tears’ more notable outings were two against District 218 rival Shepa-

(Continued from page 1) rd (13 points, 14 rebounds in a regular-season matchup; 18 points, five rebounds in a Class 4A regional semifinal win), one opposite Eisenhower (14 points, six rebounds) and another versus Marian Catholic (10 points, nine rebounds) in a regional loss. Tears’ brother, Spencer, plays football and basketball at Richards. MARY KATE WETZEL, Mt. Assisi, F, Sr.    • The versatile Wetzel played a major role in the Screeching Eagles’ postseason accomplishments, which included a second consecutive regional championship and first-ever win in the sectional round. She was at her best in the playoffs, totaling 17 points and seven rebounds in a regional-clinching triumph over Lisle, nine points and nine boards against Westmont in the sectional semis, and 14 points and five rebounds versus Seton Academy in the sectional final. Wetzel averaged a double-double for the year, as she produced 10.5 points and 10 rebounds per game. BROOKE WYDERSKI, Marist, G, Sr.    • A two-sport star for the Lady RedHawks in basketball and softball, Wyderski’s hoops exploits were important for a squad that endured some growing pains through the winter. Like Marist itself, Wyderski did some of her best work at crunch time, as she totaled 61 points in three playoff games, including a 31-point outburst against TF North. A regular-season highlight came against Morgan Park, where Wyderski torched the Lady Mustangs with five 3-point buckets en route to an 18-point performance. SAM YOUNGWIRTH, Sandburg, G, Jr.    • An All-SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue choice, Youngwirth averaged 12 points and three steals per game for the Lady Eagles. She netted 23 points in a 53-49 regional victory over CreteMonee and tossed in 13 against Marian Catholic the next time out. Youngwirth, who was tabbed for all-tournament teams at both Hinsdale South and Hillcrest, included 59 3-pointers among her scoring numbers.

HONORABLE MENTION ANNA PERSONAIRE, Chicago Christian, F, Sr. NICOLE LARKIN, Evergreen Park, F/G, Jr. JELYN CHUA, Queen of Peace, G, Sr. ALLIE HERMAN, Queen of Peace, F/C, Jr. TAYLOR SONICHSEN, Richards, G, Sr. JULIA RUZEVICH, Sandburg, F, Fr. VICTORIA STAVROPLOUS, Sandburg, F, So. MYRISSHA MITCHELL, Shepard, G, Jr.

COACH OF THE YEAR JANET MEYERS, Oak Lawn    • Meyers would probably be the first to say her 2013-14 team was blessed with talent, but don’t ignore the coach’s role in the Lady Spartans’ fashioning of the best girls’ basketball season in school history. Meyers did a masterful job of keeping her athletes both happy and focused, the result of which was an outstanding 28-2 ledger. Three of those triumphs came in the state tournament, as Oak Lawn captured its first regional title in seven years and pushed defending Class 4A champ Marian Catholic to overtime before falling in the sectional final. Along the way, the Lady Spartans beat both Marist and Mother McAuley for the first time. Oak Lawn has now won at least 20 games each of the past three seasons.

HONORABLE MENTION TREVOR WOLTERINK, Chicago Christian, F, So. JACQUET MCCLENDON, Evergreen Park, F, Sr. NIC WEISHAR, Marist, F, Sr. JOSH PRINCE, Oak Lawn, F, Jr. MITCH SWATEK, Oak Lawn, G/F, Sr. NIKO KOGIONIS, Sandburg, G, Jr. DARREN COHEN, Shepard, G, Sr. KYLE LONGFIELD, Shepard, F, Sr. JEFF GORAL, Stagg, F, Jr. NICK SIMS, Stagg, G, Sr.

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COACH OF THE YEAR JOHN DANIELS, Stagg    • Daniels is a repeat winner of this paper’s Coach of the Year designation, thanks to the school-record 22 wins the Chargers garnered in 2013-14, as well as the battle they gave heavily favored Simeon in the Class 4A Shepard Regional final. A year ago, Stagg won just its third regional title in school history and also eclipsed the 20-victory plateau. Five of the six 20-win seasons the Chargers have compiled in basketball have come during Daniels’ 11-year coaching tenure at the school.

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Section 2

Thursday, March 20, 2014    The Regional News - The Reporter

Community sports news

SXU (Continued from page 1) nior Janis Pastars provided SXU with the best individual effort as he placed ninth in the mile run after finishing the race in 4:13.11. That time was over four seconds faster than the one Pastars posted in the prelims that qualified him for the finals. Seniors Brian Corcoran and Shane Kenney both represented the Cougars in the 1,000-run, where they wound up 17th and 18th with respective clockings of 2:32.62 and 2:34.66. “I am very proud of all of our guys’ performances, but especially Pastars’,” SXU coach Ed McAllister said. “He missed AllAmerican status by just one spot, ran a personal-record time and showed that he will be even better outdoors.” The Cougars are slated to begin their outdoor season on Saturday, April 5, at the University of Chicago’s Ted Haydon Invitational. The meet will get underway at 11 a.m.

MEN’S GOLF Junior Kyle Bahnick shot a two-round score of 148 to finish in a tie for ninth place as the Submitted photo Cougars opened the spring portion St. Alexander’s 8th-grade boys’ basketball team won the inaugural Incarnation Tournament. of their 2013-14 golf season at the Embry-Riddle Spring Invitational spectively, in that same division. ing, the Lemont Coyotes slipped in Prescott, Ariz. (Continued from page 2) The Indians routed Sutherland past the Orland Magic 14-12. Bahnick’s 72 paced SXU on Day For complete details, visit www. 61-29 as Michael Yario tallied a Ethan Gallagher and Owen 1 at Antelope Hills South Golf illinoishoopla.com, or contact team-high 14 points for the win- Moran both notched four points Course. The Cougars recorded a Coach Rick at 460-6513 or Coach ners. Dazari Duhart tossed in nine to lead the Coyotes, while Trevor team score of 601 at the event, Mike at (815) 212-3558. Jennings contributed five for the which placed them third behind points to pace Sutherland. The Jr. T-Bolts were fourth de- Magic. the host school (577) and Arizona OLHMS places first in spite dropping a 47-43 verdict to Christian University (598). the Southside Shooters in their Senior James Kerr (150; 73volleyball St. Al’s boys win basketball 77) was 11th individually, senior Oak Lawn-Hometown Middle final outing. Joe O’Gorman had Brandon Ryan (151; 79-72) occuSchool wasn’t perfect on the vol- 16 points for the Shooters, a total tournament St. Alexander’s 8th-grade boys’ pied the No. 14 position and senior leyball court this past season, but that was equaled by the T-Bolts’ Johnny Dieck. basketball team emerged as cham- Kirby Brown (152; 74-78) tied for it came pretty darned close. Other divisional champions pion of the inaugural Incarnation the 15th spot to complete SXU’s OLHMS’s 8th-grade girls’ team finished with a sparkling 18-1 reg- were the Jr. Phoenix (8th grade), Tournament, which was held re- scoring. Also taking part in the tournament for the Cougars were ular-season record. Palos South Jr. Knights (5th grade) and Riv- cently. erside-Brookfield Bulldogs Blue St. Al’s team members included freshman Robert Lively (157; 81threatened to ruin OLHMS’s Justin Hobart, Cade O’Neill, Co- 76, 23rd place), sophomore Zach campaign when it captured the squad (4th grade). Brendan Gallagher tallied 12 lin Dwyer, Jack Bibbiano, Danny Trent (161; 82-79, tied for 26th), opening set of the championship match on March 8 at Orland Ju- points to lead the Jr. Phoenix Zeiler, Paul Streipling, Mitchell freshman Kyle Yaeger (167; 80-87, nior High, but the latter rallied to a 40-29 victory over the Jr. Sachs and Michael Walsh. Charles 33rd) and freshman Mark Kluk to win each of the next two sets T-Bolts. Troy Murphy supplied Hobart and Pat Bibbiano coached (174; 86-88, 35th).    SXU will compete in the Ashthe losing club with a game-high the squad. and grab the title. ford University Invitational at “The girls did a great job of 15 markers. The LAC Indians, encouraging one another and com- meanwhile, were runners-up to More NAYS tournaments headed Blue Top Ridge Golf Course in Riverside, Iowa, April 4 and 5. municating with one another dur- the Jr. Phoenix after riding JorMEN’S VOLLEYBALL ing the games,” OLHMS principal dan Devitt’s 16-point effort to a to south suburbs 46-44 triumph over the Burbank Behind big nights from senior Joliet, Romeoville and HomeNicole Leggett said. Fusion, who were paced by Nic wood will be the sites of three outside hitter Justin Cousin and Bowe’s 18 points. more National American Youth sophomore middle blocker Sam Champions crowned in Chicago In the 5th-grade division, Nick Sports basketball tournaments Kull, the Cougars wrapped up Ridge basketball Tingley’s 14 points propelled the this spring. their home schedule on a high Champions in four grade divi- Jr. Knights to a 36-23 win over the The events, which will feature note by downing Siena Heights sions were recently crowned as Orland Magic. Justin Egan topped competition for both boys and (Mich.) University 25-20, 25-27, the Chicago Ridge Park District the Magic with eight points. The girls in six brackets apiece, will 25-19, 25-11 in a Great Lakes boys’ basketball season reached other playoff encounter featured run as follows: April 25-27 at the Division match Friday at the its conclusion. Johnny Dieck’s 13 points leading Joliet Park District Multipurpose Shannon Center. The 7th-grade Lemont Coyotes the Jr. T-Bolts past the Jaguars 25- Center; May 2-4 at Romeoville Cousin put down 16 kills to were the only undefeated titlist as 16. Matthew Somerville finished High School; and May 23-25 at lead the SXU charge, while Kull they completed a 12-0 campaign with a team-best eight points for the Homewood Park District. The backed him with 11 kills and by defeating the Oak Lawn Deer the Jags. respective deadlines for entry are 10 total blocks, which included 44-39 behind 12 points apiece Riverside-Brookfield was the April 4, April 11 and May 2. two solo efforts. As a team, the from Gerard Quimque and Nate 4th-grade champion after blowing The cost for each tourney is Cougars (5-12, 5-4) recorded 49 Ferguson. Demarcus Williams and past the R-B Bulldogs White squad $160, and every team is guaran- kills and made 19 hitting errors, Jalin Richardson both scored 10 31-19. Miles Casey had 10 points teed a minimum of three games. which translated into a .263 atpoints for the Deer. for the winning team, while Jack For more information, call 1-866- tack percentage. The LAC Indians and Jr. T- Cronin scored eight in a losing 352-9215 or visit www.northamerFreshman Moises Lopez also Bolts were third and fourth, re- cause. In the other playoff meet- icanyouthsports.org. pitched in with a solid exhibition, as he totaled a team-best 42 assists and nine digs. Others making their presences felt on SXU’s behalf were senior middle blocker J.T. O’Connell (10 kills, .353 attack percentage) and freshman Dan O’Keefe, who equaled O’Connell’s digs amount. The Cougars meet Cardinal Stritch in a Great Lakes Division encounter tonight in Milwaukee before closing out their regular season next Wednesday at Lakeland (Wis.) College in a makeup of a match originally slated for Feb. 4. *** Cousin (12 kills) and Kull (seven kills, nine service aces, two assisted blocks) were at it again last Tuesday, and their combined handiwork sent a “Senior & Parent Night” crowd away from the Shannon Center happy. That’s because SXU used the duo’s production as the foundation for a 25-14, Submitted photo 25-18, 25-15 conference victory Oak Lawn-Hometown Middle School’s 8th-grade girls’ volleyball team went 18-1 this past sea- over Cincinnati Christian. son. A big plus for the Cougars was their overall hitting efficiency. Their 37 kills and six errors added up to a glossy attack percentage of .508. Lopez and fellow Oak Lawn alumnus Jacob Siska shared the setting duties, and each athlete distributed 15 assists to keep SXU’s offense humming. O’Connell chipped in eight kills and two assisted blocks.

crossing the plate on sophomore Kasey Kanaga’s sacrifice fly in the bottom of the sixth inning. Junior Megan James (three hits), Kanaga (two hits, two runs) and Hainlen (two RBI) were the ringleaders on Thursday. Nonnemacher aided her own cause with an RBI single, part of a three-run first inning generated by the Cougars. Thursday wasn’t all glory for No. 5-ranked SXU, though, as it also dropped a 4-3 verdict to Marian University. Senior Megan Nonnemacher took the pitching loss as she offset eight strikeouts with seven walks and eight hits allowed. Kanaga went 4-for-4 and scored once, Hainlen had an RBI and senior Katie Houlihan also tallied for the Cougars, who watched Marian break a 3-all tie in the bottom of the seventh on a throwing error. *** Last Wednesday also featured SXU dealing with a doubleheader split. After being blanked 1-0 by Ave Maria (Fla.) University, the Cougars roared back to defeat Bloomfield (NJ) College 8-0 in six innings behind big days from freshman pitcher Callie Brown (three-hitter, five strikeouts), James (two hits) and junior Katie Sears (two hits). Also delivering a big blow was Anderson, whose bases-clearing triple was the key hit in SXU’s six-run fourth frame. Nicole Nonnemacher got tagged with her first defeat by Ave Maria, which plated its lone run on a wild pitch in the fourth. Nonnemacher whiffed six and gave up only four hits, but the Cougars managed just four well-scattered hits themselves as they left the sacks jammed in the fifth inning and stranded two more runners in the seventh. *** In last Monday’s other outing, SXU sneaked past Spring Arbor (Mich.) University 3-2 as Megan Nonnemacher, Brown and Nicole Nonnemahcer combined to scatter nine hits and strike out six. The elder Nonnemacher logged the win, while her sibling earned her second save. Nicole Nonnemacher also provided two hits to the Cougars’ attack, as did Houlihan, who notched one of SXU’s runs. Tallying the others were Sears and Lauret. One day earlier, the Cougars slipped past Ave Maria 4-3 and blasted NCAA Division II Alderson-Broaddus (WV) College 9-0. Sears and James both poked two-RBI singles to propel SXU to its opening-game win, which was finalized when Nicole Nonnemacher stopped Ave Maria on one hit and fanned three over the last two stanzas. Nonnemacher saved a victory for Brown, who surrendered five hits and a walk while whiffing five through the first five innings. The rout of Alderson-Broaddus was spearheaded by Megan Nonnemacher (three-hitter, five strikeouts, no walks), Hainlen (hit, two RBI, one run) and Kanaga (two RBI, one run). For the four games that spanned Sunday and Monday, Sears went 5-for-13 with two RBI, two runs scored and two stolen bases. *** SXU wrapped up its Florida trip by defeating Marian 10-0 and St. Thomas (Fla.) University 4-2 on Saturday. Nicole Nonnemacher silenced Marian on two hits while fanning eight and walking no one. The shutout was her fifth of the young season. Nonnemacher also produced at the plate, where she went 2-for-3 and scored twice. Carrying an even larger share of the offensive load were the trio of Lauret (3-for-4 with a double, two runs, one RBI), freshman Savannah Kinsella (three RBI) and Hainlen (two hits — including a double — two runs, one RBI). The Cougars went ahead 3-0 in the first inning and cruised from there.

Game 2 was much tighter, but SXU again struck right away with a three-spot. That first-inning uprising was triggered by Kinsella’s two-run single and Hainlen’s RBI double. After St. Thomas capitalized on a Cougars miscue in the top of the third, SXU did the same in the fifth to set the final score. Hainlen slammed a pair of twobaggers in support of pitcher Megan Nonnemacher, who went the distance. She allowed only four hits and struck out five. BASEBALL An offense that had been struggling to find its groove suddenly did so last week, as the Cougars piled up 48 runs in four games during its annual spring-break trip. SXU split a twinbill with Clarke (Iowa) University last Thursday, losing Game 1 7-4 before rebounding to post a convincing 12-2 triumph in the nightcap. Friday featured another split, with the Cougars getting the better of Aquinas College (12-7) shortly after suffering a 10-6 setback against St. Ambrose University. Senior outfielder Chris Klein and freshman Bryan Polak swung SXU’s biggest sticks over those four contests. Klein totaled seven hits, four runs and two RBI, while Polak generated six hits, six RBI and four runs. Polak’s two hits and two RBI weren’t enough to save pitcher Scott Vachon from a tough-luck loss versus Clarke. He was nicked for 11 hits, but did not issue any free passes while striking out five. Sophomore Alec Barnhart was the Game 2 hitting hero as he went 4-for-5 with a pair of doubles, five RBI and two runs scored. Behind Barnhart and Bryan Villanova (three hits, one double, two RBI, two runs), the Cougars (4-10) constructed an 8-1 lead over Clarke and were never threatened. Dan Wetzel collected the pitching win. *** Friday’s opener was a virtual toss-up until St. Ambrose erupted for six runs over the last two frames. That tagged Klein with a defeat and rendered somewhat meaningless solid batting efforts by Polak (three RBI), senior Tom Keating (two hits, one RBI) and junior Damon Softcheck (two hits, one RBI). SXU played a role reversal in Game 2, as it amassed six runs in the top of the seventh to sew up its victory over Aquinas. Klein (four hits, two runs), freshman Jim Augle (three hits, two runs) and Keating (two hits, three RBI) were the Cougars’ offensive mainstays in back of freshman pitchers Jeremy Dryier and Adrian Luna, who yielded eight hits between them. Luna got the win. *** Klein was also a batting force earlier in the week, as he teamed with Softcheck to smack nine of SXU’s 20 hits on Tuesday and Wednesday. Klein’s 4-for-5 display triggered the Cougars’ 11-0 romp past No. 25-ranked Ave Maria on Tuesday. He drove in four of SXU’s runs and scored two others in support of freshman pitcher Jesse Lopez, who tossed a five-hitter with six strikeouts. Also lending a hand were Augle (two-run triple in the fourth), Softcheck (two-run double in the sixth) and senior Brad Myjak (RBI single in the third). The Cougars came up short against Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference mate PurdueNorth Central by a 4-1 count on Wednesday. The Panthers went ahead to stay by snapping a 1-all tie in the bottom of the fifth. SXU finished with six hits, four of which were evenly divvied up between Softcheck and Augle. Casey Papp scored the Cougars’ lone marker. Junior Terrance Southern was the losing pitcher, due in part to four SXU errors committed behind him.

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SOFTBALL If Lourdes University softball players see Nicole Nonnemacher anytime in the future, it’ll be too soon, regardless of how much actual time has passed by. Those players got their fill of the Cougars sophomore hurler last week as she no-hit them twice. After striking out 15 batters and allowing just one runner to reach base in SXU’s 1-0 whitewash last Monday, Nonnemacher continued her dominance three days later. In the rematch, she fanned 13 as the Cougars (14-2) rolled to Photo by Jeff Vorva a 7-0 triumph. Juniors Shannon Lauret and Amanda Hainlen offered Nonnemacher batting support in her first gem as each player stroked    Sandburg’s Jordan Woods stays in front of a pursuer during one a pair of hits. Sophomore Denise of Saturday’s races at the SouthWest Suburban Conference track Anderson supplied SXU’s run by meet, hosted by Lockport.

Meeting the challenge


The Regional News - The Reporter  

Thursday, March 20, 2014

Section 2

5

Sports wrap By Anthony Nasella Despite losing a large group of seniors to graduation last spring, Shepard’s boys’ track team is showing signs of promise in the early weeks of the 2014 season, as evidenced by a pair of first-place finishes in its two most recent meets. On March 6, the Astros were the top team at the Argo Invitational, which featured Richards and Oak Lawn in addition to Shepard and the host school. Last Friday, the Astros also set the pace at the Morton West Invitational, a meet that included six squads in all. Besides the home team and Shepard, the field contained Addison Trail, Fenwick, Ridgewood and Riverside-Brookfield. “We competed in three meets before Argo, [including a 28team meet at Illinois Wesleyan University], but the kids really competed well in the past two,” Astros coach Scott Wilkins said. “We graduated a lot of talented kids [from] last year, but we’re a very deep team this year and will be strong in our area. “We cover all the events really well, and we have a lot of kids who are very versatile. With that said, we don’t have many really bigtime studs, [but] there definitely is some potential for some of the kids to qualify for the [upcoming] indoor Top Times meet.” At Argo, high jumper Denzel Callion gave Shepard a first place and Josh Maier did likewise in the 3,200-meter run. Mike Evancich followed Maier across the finish line in the latter race, then the two teammates switched positions in the 1,600. Victories were also produced by the Astros’ 400- and 1,600-relay units. Demarcos Anderson, Chanel Dotson, Kyle Dye and Callion comprised the winning lineup in the shorter event. Shepard made a clean sweep of the jumps at Morton, with Sean Finley taking first in the long jump, Marlon Perkins leading the field in the triple and Corey Williams winning the high jump. Williams was also the fastest finisher in the 55-high hurdles. Other triumphs came from Dye in the 55-dash, Sean Johnson in the 200, Maier in the 1,600, and the 1,600- and 400-relay teams. Maier, a state qualifier in cross country last fall, joined Williams, Andrew Miller and Nick Zuiker in the longer relay, while the 400 quartet was made up of Johnson, Anderson, Dye and Callion. Among the many athletes in the program — a total of 95 are currently active at three levels — Wilkins anticipates numerous individuals being able to accomplish a great deal. “Josh Maier is definitely one of our best talents,” he said. “I also have a sophomore, E.J. Rueck, who I’m keeping right now on the frosh-soph team, but who I think will definitely contend in the 55-hurdles. Potentially, Sean Finley could qualify in the long jump, and maybe our 4-by-200 relay team has a chance.” And while Wilkins doesn’t believe his current squad will win the South Suburban Conference

Red meet by 75 points, as was the case last year, he does think a repeat of qualifying athletes in at least four state events is entirely possible. “I think we’re going to have a lot of success this season,” Wilkins said. “In the 4-by-4, we’ve had five different groupings already, [so] we have a lot of versatility. We’re still figuring things out being so early in the season, but we have a lot of potential. We’re still trying to figure out talent we haven’t even discovered yet. “It was a great feeling winning at Morton West. We’ve had success in the immediate area, but we seem to be also doing well outside of the area. We’ve started out pretty strong.” BOYS’ WATER POLO Andrew edged Stagg 15-14 in sudden-death triple overtime last Monday despite a seven-goal performance from the Chargers’ Zack Amendola. Also playing well for Stagg in the SouthWest Suburban Conference crossover match were Connor Kaufmann and Nick Amendola, who scored three and two goals, respectively. The Chargers squandered an 11-9 lead with less than a minute to play in regulation. The Thunderbolts notched the equalizer with 47 seconds to go, then held a 13-12 advantage after the first of two mandatory overtime periods. However, Zack Amendola scored twice in the second extra session — including the tying goal with just 19 seconds left — to force sudden death. Amendola collected five more goals on Saturday to help Stagg beat Bradley-Bourbonnais 12-5 and take fifth in its own invitational. The Chargers dropped a 9-4 verdict to Oak Park-River Forest in an earlier match that same day. *** Shepard earned a split last week, with its win coming by a 10-5 score over Chicago Agricultural School on Wednesday. That victory was preceded by a 15-4 loss to Lincoln-Way North on Tuesday. Christian Reyes and Jerry Zachary paced the Astros in their win by tallying four goals apiece. Lucas Souza and Andrew Choragwicki supplied the others. Also contributing to the success was solid work on the defensive end from netminder Julio Martinez and Zach Segina. GIRLS’ WATER POLO After opening its 2014 season with a victory, Stagg dropped a 20-1 decision to SouthWest Suburban Conference powerhouse Andrew last Monday and then fell 16-1 to Hinsdale Central on Wednesday.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Jerry Zachary, shown here winding up for a shot, scored four goals for Shepard co-op in the team’s 10-5 conquest of Chicago Agricultural School last Wednesday.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Shepard co-op’s Sanders Yu (right) reaches for the ball during his team’s 10-5 victory over Chicago Agricultural School last Wednesday.

GIRLS’ TRACK Grace Cain, Miranda Scarlata, Elsa Erling and Isabella Khan were responsible for Chicago Christian’s win in the 3,200-relay at Saturday’s University High Invitational. The foursome completed the race in 10 minutes, 34.32 seconds. The Lady Knights (16 points) finished seventh in the eight-team meet, which was won by Grayslake Central (113).

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Shepard co-op’s Christian Reyes gets his hand on the ball during last Wednesday’s water polo match versus Chicago Agricultural School.

Our Midwestern huMility prevents us frOM bragging. Otherwise, we’d be the first to tell you that we’ve been named a Best Midwestern College by Princeton Review. Instead, we’ll tell you how proud we are of our faculty who are experts in their fields and mentors to their students, our staff who consistently go above and beyond to connect people to the resources they need, and our students who amaze and impress us all the time. To all these people who make our university one of the best places in the Midwest to learn, we say: go ahead and brag.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Sandburg’s Tamonte Brown (left) hands off to Jovani Jones in the 800-meter relay at last Saturday’s SouthWest Suburban Conference indoor track meet at Lockport. The Eagles wound up second to Homewood-Flossmoor.

siu.edu


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Section 2 Thursday, March 20, 2014

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, SERVICING L.P. P l a i n t i f f , � v . � JOHN F. BRENNAN A/K/A JOHN F. BRENNANN, CARROLL A. BRENNAN D e f e n d a n t s � 08 CH 027392 7455 W. UTE LANE PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on January 20, 2009, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 31, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 7455 W. UTE LANE, PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 Property Index No. 23-36-218-009. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-08-19142. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-08-19142 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 08 CH 027392 TJSC#: 34-3514 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I593782

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N � JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL A S S O C I A T I O N � P l a i n t i f f , � v . � TERESA M. WOLLEK, HICKORY HILLS COURTS CONDOMINIUM A S S O C I A T I O N � D e f e n d a n t s � 13 CH 18433 8650 S. 84th Ct., Unit 3B Hickory Hills, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on January 10, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on April 24, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8650 S. 84th Ct., Unit 3B, Hickory Hills, IL 60457 Property Index No. 18-35-308-039-019. The real estate is improved with a residential condominium. The judgment amount was $112,007.13. Sale terms: The bid amount, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, shall be paid in certified funds immediately by the highest and best bidder at the conclusion of the sale. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff's attorney: HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Attorney Code. 40387 Case Number: 13 CH 18433 TJSC#: 34-1038 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I587333

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION CITIMORTGAGE, INC., P l a i n t i f f , � v . � PAIL ALTES, CITIBANK, N.A. F/K/A CITIBANK, FSB, RIVERA REGAL - PHASE II ASSOCIATION, RIVERA REGAL CONDOMINIUM UMBRELLA ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 2013 CH 09317 11104 S. 84TH AVE., UNIT 3B Palos Hills, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on January 14, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on April 15, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 11104 S. 84TH AVE., UNIT 3B, Palos Hills, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-23-101-116-1018. The real estate is improved with a condo/townhouse. The judgment amount was $113,689.46. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff's attorney: HAUSELMAN, RAPPIN & OLSWANG, LTD., 39 South LaSalle Street - Suite 1105, CHICAGO, IL 60603, (312) 372-2020. Please refer to file number 13-2222-21075. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HAUSELMAN, RAPPIN & OLSWANG, LTD. 39 South LaSalle Street - Suite 1105 CHICAGO, IL 60603 (312) 372-2020 Attorney File No. 13-2222-21075 Attorney Code. 4452 Case Number: 2013 CH 09317 TJSC#: 34-3245 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I594741

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For Sale

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For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC P l a i n t i f f , � v . � CORA M. KERNATS, THE RIVIERA IN PALOS IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION D e f e n d a n t s � 13 CH 002163 29 COUR MASSON PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on January 24, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on April 28, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 29 COUR MASSON, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-23-112-058. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-13-00734. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-13-00734 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 13 CH 002163 TJSC#: 34-1866 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I596148

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For Notice Sale

For Notice Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, -v.ELIZABETH M. MILLER A/K/A ELIZABETH M. HEPHURN, STEPHEN P. MILLER, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 11 CH 31243 12023 SOUTH 70TH COURT Palos Heights, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on June 6, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on April 15, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 12023 SOUTH 70TH COURT, Palos Heights, IL 60463 Property Index No. 2430-112-003-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $304,010.13. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, or a unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). In accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(h-1) and (h-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the property, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subsections (g)(1) and (g)(4) of section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Anthony Porto, FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC, 1807 W. DIEHL ROAD, SUITE 333, NAPERVILLE, IL 60563, (866) 402-8661 For bidding instructions, visit www.fal-illinois.com.. Please refer to file number F11050137. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC 1807 W. DIEHL ROAD, SUITE 333 NAPERVILLE, IL 60563 (866) 402-8661 E-Mail: foreclosurenotice@fal-illinois.com Attorney File No. F11050137 Attorney ARDC No. 3126232 Attorney Code. 26122 Case Number: 11 CH 31243 TJSC#: 34-2723 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I594985

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JP MORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC Plaintiff, -v.DORIS KRENZELAK, AS TRUSTEE OF THE DORIS KRENZELAK TRUST U/T/A DATED 11/04/96, DORIS KRENZELAK A/K/A DORIS I. KRENZELAK, UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE DORIS KRENZELAK TRUST U/T/A DATED 11/04/96, LAKE KATHERINE TOWNHOME ASSOCIATION, INC., LAKE KATHERINE HARBOR TOWNHOME ASSOCIATION, DISCOVER BANK, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 10 CH 022676 28 LAKE KATHERINE WAY PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on January 17, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on April 21, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 28 LAKE KATHERINE WAY, PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 Property Index No. 23-24-300-309; (23-24-300-141, 142 U/P). The real estate is improved with a condo/townhouse. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-10-15003. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-10-15003 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 10 CH 022676 TJSC#: 34-1519 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I595322

For Sale

For Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY A S � TRUSTEE FOR HSI ASSET SECURITIZATION C O R P � TRUST 2007-NC1; P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � WOJCIECH KOPEC AKA WOJCIECH MAREK K O P E C ; � DOROTA KOPEC; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON R E C O R D � C L A I M A N T S ; � D e f e n d a n t s , � 12 CH 23202 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on January 10, 2014 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, April 11, 2014 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � P.I.N. 23-14-219-047-0000. Commonly known as 10343 South 84th Avenue, Palos Hills, IL 60465. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled at most only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's a t t o r n e y . � Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call Mr. Anthony Porto at Plaintiff's Attorney, Freedman Anselmo, Lindberg LLC, 1807 West Diehl Road, Naperville, Illinois 60563-1890. (866) 402-8661. For Bidding instructions visit www.fal-illinois.com 24 hours prior to sale. F12050317 INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I593153

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT, CHANCERY DIVISION OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC, P l a i n t i f f � V . � MARIA GOLASIEWICZ A/K/A MARIA MILISZEWSKA; MAREK GOLASIEWICZ A/K/A MARKEK GOLASIEWICZ; PNC BANK, N.A., SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO MIDAMERICA BANK, FSB, D e f e n d a n t s � 11 CH 37439 Property Address: 8741 SOUTH 82ND COURT HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Fisher and Shapiro file # 11-054375 (It is advised that interested parties consult with their own attorneys before bidding at mortgage foreclosure s a l e s . ) � PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered on January 15, 2014, Kallen Realty Services, Inc., as Selling Official will at 12:30 p.m. on April 16, 2014, at 205 W. Randolph Street, Suite 1020, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real property: Commonly known as 8741 South 82nd Court, Hickory Hills, IL 60457 Permanent Index No.: 23-02-214-018-0000 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a dwelling. The property will NOT be open for inspection. The judgment amount was $ 213,532.48. Sale terms for non-parties: 10% of successful bid immediately at conclusion of auction, balance by 12:30 p.m. the next business day, both by cashier's checks; and no refunds. The sale shall be subject to general real estate taxes, special taxes, special assessments, special taxes levied, and superior liens, if any. The property is offered "as is," with no express or implied warranties and without any representation as to the quality of title or recourse to Plaintiff. Prospective bidders are admonished to review the court file to verify all information and to view auction rules at w w w . k a l l e n r s . c o m . � For information: Sale Clerk, Fisher and Shapiro, Attorney # 42168, 2121 Waukegan Road, Suite 301, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015, (847) 291-1717, between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. weekdays only. I589092

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2 x 1-1/2 Cell: 708-212-1342 For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE OF PROF-2012-S1 HOLDING TRUST I; Plaintiff, v s . � MAHMOUD ABDALLAH; TAGHRID M. ABDALLAH A N D � EMERALD COURT OF PALOS HILLS TOWNHOME ASSOCIATION; Defendants, 13 CH 13682 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on January 23, 2014, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, April 25, 2014, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described mortgaged real estate: Commonly known as 10000 South Roberts Road, Unit B, Palos Hills, IL 60465. P.I.N. 23-11-401-103. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The judgment amount was $140,776.71. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information call Mr. Ira T. Nevel at Plaintiff's Attorney, Law Offices of Ira T. Nevel, 175 North Franklin Street, Chicago, Illinois 60606. (312) 357-1125. Ref. No. 13-02195 INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I595837

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34

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TWO DAY ESTATE AUCTION

Auction to be held at the Tumbleson Auction Center, 1635 North Main Street, Princeton, IL, Located 100 miles West of Chicago, Il just off INT 80, Exit 56, South on Rt. 26. (Behind the Sherwood Antique Mall) on: SATURDAY, MARCH 29 & SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2014 Ð TIME: 10:00 A.M. (Preview: 8:00 A.M.) Each Day **SPECIAL PREVIEW OF BOTH DAYS: FRIDAY, MARCH 28 TIME: 4:00-6:00 P.M.** View Full Listing, Photos & Absentee Bid on website: www.tumblesonauction.com SATURDAY, MARCH 29 Ð OVER 75 FIREARMS & RELATED ITEMS: (Long Guns & Handguns) Including Winchester, Remington, Mossberg, Hi-Point, Marlin, Lorcin & Others; Ammo and Gun Related KNIVES, GUN PRINTS, ADV. TINS & COINS: Pocket & Hunting Knives, Belt Buckle Collection, Many Nice Framed Gun Ad Prints, Adv Signs, Tins and Wood Boxes including Ammo Boxes; Western DVDÕs/ Blu Ray, Collection of Coins (Paper and Coin Currency) 10% BuyerÕs Premium & Proxibid Available for this Auction Day Only! SUNDAY, MARCH 30 Ð AUTOMOBILES & SCOOTER: 1949 2-Door Chrysler Windsor w/ Approx. 40,000 Miles, 1977 Buick 2 Door Regal w/ Approx. 39800 Miles, 2001 Lincoln LS (Loaded) w/ 77,000 Miles & 2009 CFMOTO Fa-Shion CF 250T Scooter (Purchased New) ANTIQUES and Collectibles: Antique, Primitive, Heywood Wakefield & Modern Furniture, Lamps, Clocks, RS Prussia, Tiffany, Art glass, Pottery, China, Sterling Silver Flatware Set & Misc. Flatware Pcs; Ladies Jewelry Including Diamond, Fine, Costume & Sterling; Linens, Hankies, Buttons, Purses; Stoneware; Lamps; Framed Pictures & Frames; Primitive Items & Adv. Tins, Stoneware, Guardian Service & Much More! Large Collection of LONGABERGER Baskets (Most w/ Liners & Protectors), Wrought Iron & Pottery Pieces TT TUMBLESON AUCTION COMPANY, PRINCETON, IL E-mail: ttauction@yahoo.com PHONE: 815-872-1852 AUCTIONEERS: TOM AND MARY TUMBLESON LIC # 040000396-397 & TIFFANY FOES LIC #041.001601

Publisher’s Notice    All Real Estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18.    This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are herby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1 (800) 669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is: 1 (800) 927-9275.

®

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Bike Trails, Antiques, Parks, Museums, Golf and More in Northwest Illinois Request a FREE 2014 FREEPORT/STEPHENSON COUNTY, IL Visitors Guide Call 800-369-2955 or email stephcvb@aeroinc.net

Name ________________________________________________ Address_______________________________________________ City, State, Zip__________________________________________ Mail to: Freeport/Stephenson County CVB, 4596 U.S. Rt. 20 East, Freeport, IL 61032 MT204421

www.stephenson-county-il.org


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ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES CIVIL WAR COLLECTORS’ SHOW & SALE! SAT. MARCH 29 9 am-4 pm $9. DUPAGE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS WHEATON, IL 715-526-9769 www.zurkopromotions.com $1.00 OFF with this ad. Treasures!

AUCTIONS ESTATE AUCTION MAR 23rd 9AM - MATTOON, IL HD MOTORCYCLES! (2001, 1976,1955) COLLECTIBLES, PARTS, ADVERTISING, MORE! ABSENTEE BIDS WELCOME! BAUER AUCTION SERVICE (217) 459-2806 www.bauerauction.com

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ILLINOIS CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING NETWORK ADVERTISING SERVICES

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CAMPERS/RVS Colman’s RV - We Buy And Consign Used RV’s And Campers 217-787-8653 www.colmansrv.com

CAREER/EDUCATION AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE BECOME AN AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECH. FAA APPROVED TRAINING. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL AIM 800-481-8312.

EVENTS/SHOWS KNIFE SHOW March 28th - 29th - 30th Holiday Inn Express & Conference Center Janesville, WI - I-90 and East U.S. Hwy 14 For info: Badger Knife Club, Inc. Phone/Fax: (414) 479-9765 or (414) 379-6819

HELP WANTED Heating And Air Conditioning Technician Training! Fast Track, Hands On, National Certification Program. Lifetime Job Placement. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-877-994-9904

HELP WANTED DRIVERS

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Daily Express needs Contractors for Stepdeck & Lowboy hauls! FREE TRAILERS! “New� Daily Expedited Fleet! Also Heavy Haul and Specialized Division available. www.dailyrecruiting.com or 800-669-6414

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY CONTRACT SALESPERSONS sell aerial photography of farms, commission basis, $1,000-$2,000 weekly depending on sales experience. Travel required. More info at msphotosd.com or 877/882-3566

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New Pay-For-Experience program pays up to $0.41/mile. Class A Professional Drivers Call 877-294-2777 for more details or visit SuperServiceLLC.com

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Tanker & Flatbed Company Drivers/Independent Contractors! Immediate Placement Available Best Opportunities in the Trucking Business CALL TODAY 800-277-0212 or www.driveforprime.com

REGIONAL CDL-A DRIVERS Great Career w/weekly hometime! 888-362-8608. For paid training apply online at AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer Females, minorities, protected veterans and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

Driver ATTENTION TEAM DRIVERS Terminal to Terminal Runs $5000 SIGN-ON Bonus Home Every Week Great Pay Full Benefits Stable Freight CDL-A required EEOE/AAP 866-323-7875 www.driveFFE.com DRIVE THE BEST. DRIVE MAVERICK! MAVERICK NOW HIRING IN YOUR AREA! OTR, regional & dedicated. Exp drivers or students with Class A-CDL for training. New student spots just opened. Great pay & home time. Flatbed, glass and reefer. Must be 21yrs old & hold Class A-CDL. 1-800-289-1100. www.drivemaverick.com Owner Operator DEDICATED HOME WEEKLY! Solos up to $175,000/year, $2500 Sign-on Bonus! Teams up to $350,000/year, $5000 Sign-on Bonus! Forward Air 888-6525611

LAKE PROPERTY Tennessee Log Home Bargain! 5 Acres, FREE boat slip, Only $74,900. 1,200SF ready-tofinish log home with boat slip on 160,000 acre lake. Huge hardwood setting, near 150 acre nature preserve. Perc approved, new survey. Excellent financing. Only one, call now 877-888-0267 x52

SWIMMING POOLS / MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE HOMEOWNERS WANTED!!! Kayak Pools is looking for demo homesites to display our maintenance-free Kayak pools. Save thousands of $$$ with our pre-season sale! CALL NOW! 800.315.2925 kayakpoolsmidwest.com Discount Code: 521L314

For Sale ALL NEW FACTORY SALE WHY PAY MORE? Mattresses $ 78.00 Pillow Top 118.00 Daybeds/Futons 98.00 Bunk Beds 178.00 Dinette Sets 188.00 Bedroom Sets 395.00 Sofa, Loveseats  595.00 Bars, Barstools, Rugs, Lamps FREE LAYAWAY E.Z. Credit/No Credit Checks 708.371.3737

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For Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION EVERBANK Plaintiff, -v.MICHAEL F. COYLE A/K/A MICHAEL COYLE, CAROLINE COYLE, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 11 CH 044828 12737 S. AUSTIN AVENUE PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on January 13, 2014, Auction.com, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 1:00 PM on April 16, 2014, at the Holiday Inn Chicago Mart Plaza, 350 West Mart Center Drive (in the Auction.com room), CHICAGO, IL, 60654, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 12737 S. AUSTIN AVENUE, PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 Property Index No. 24-32-203-022. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS� condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-35170. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. AUCTION.COM LLC For Additional Information regarding Auction.com, please visit www.Auction.com or call (800-280-2832) CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-11-35170 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 11 CH 044828 TJSC#: 34-2542 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I594797

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-AR13 P l a i n t i f f , ďż˝ v . ďż˝ JOANNE ASSENATO, CHESTERFIELD PLACE HOMEOWNERS' ASSOCIATION D e f e n d a n t s ďż˝ 12 CH 023841 8622 KENDALL LANE ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on September 12, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on April 21, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8622 KENDALL LANE, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-14-303-023. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-15947. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-11-15947 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 12 CH 023841 TJSC#: 34-3949 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I595983

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N ďż˝ PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION P l a i n t i f f , ďż˝ v . ďż˝ JOHN CHRISTOPHER O'CARROLL A/K/A JOHN O'CARROLL, KATHLEEN O'CARROLL A/K/A KATHLEEN M. O'CARROLL D e f e n d a n t s ďż˝ 11 CH 040864 12023 S. 72ND COURT PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 12, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on April 10, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 12023 S. 72ND COURT, PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 Property Index No. 23-25-213-013. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-32700. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-11-32700 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 11 CH 040864 TJSC#: 34-3900 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I595972



 

Older Chevy Astro van in reasonably good running condition. Must have 2 rear doors (not 3). Call Tim or Pat B. at (708) 448-4000

    

           

40 years experience -Lic. #SL574

708.952.1833

Blue Ocean Home Improvement, Inc. Wesley Brzezniak, Owner FREE ESTIMATES

Kitchens • Bathrooms • Basements Attics • Tiles • Decks • Windows 708-385-2583 Office 708-927-1094 Cell

ACCREDITED BUSINESS

Snowblower Repair

  

Snow Blowers Lawn Mowers

         Caregiver looking to Care     

Schneider has freight to move right now! for elderly person.          Intermodal | Dedicated

 | Tanker — Male or female —      

Available Tues-Wed-Fri. UP TO $7,500 SIGN-ON BONUS MAY APPLY Experienced drivers and recent driving school grads should apply ($6,000 tuition reimbursement) Mon. after 1 pm (Thurs. not avail.) Paid CDL training for OTR tanker drivers | Home Daily or Weekly

      

Hot water tanks • Bathroom installations Toilets, Tubs, Sinks & Faucets Sewers rodded • Sump pumps Sewers inspected by camera Foundation leaks repaired Battery back-up systems

blueoceanremodelinginc@comcast.net

Nurse’s Assistant

Excellent references. Rates vary     

Apply: schneiderjobs.com/newjobs | Info: 800-44-PRIDE

      

Repair/Tune-Up Will fix at your house

Reasonable Rates

Call: (815) 468-7819 Call today to place your ad!

     

    

INTERNS WANTED — — INTERNS INTERNS WANTED WANTED — — Plumbing & Sewer

Get ca$h

Get some cash for your unused or unwanted items...sell them in The Classifieds!

  

 

Wanted to Buy

• • • • • •

Remodeling

  

Call (815) 468-7819

Flood Control Specialists All Types of Plumbing Repairs

FREE ESTIMATES (most cases) Quality Work - Reasonable Prices

           

Reasonably priced or free.

GEORGE’S PLUMBING & SEWER

EOE M/F/D/V

For Sale

Call today to place your ad!

Cleaning Services



For Notice Sale

Lic./Bonded/Ins.

Spring Special

      

Small engines, snowblowers, regular and riding lawnmowers, bicycles.

Free Estimates

Book NOW and receive

       

Wanted

Driveways • Patios Walkways • Retaining Walls NO JOB TOO SMALL

(708) 932-2262

MISCELLANEOUS

for immediate start. Must be SAWMILLS from only $4897.00 licensed driver dependable MAKE & with SAVE MONEY with Cut lumber vehicle. Good pay.

Real Estate

7

GEORGE’S

PLUMBING & SEWER Flood Control Specialists

The Regional News is seeking summer interns for the following: All Types of Plumbing Repairs The Regional News is seeking summer interns for the following: • Hot water tanks • Bathroom installations sales representatives • Advertising • Toilets, Tubs, Sinks & Faucets sales representatives • Advertising • Sewers rodded • Sump pumps • Reporters/Editorial staff • Sewers inspected by camera • Reporters/Editorial staff • Foundation leaks repaired • Battery systems APPLICANTS MUST BEback-up COLLEGE STUDENTS WHO ARE: APPLICANTS MUST BEESTIMATES COLLEGE STUDENTS WHO ARE: FREE (most cases) • Self-motivated and Quality Workorganized - Reasonable Prices • Self-motivated and organized 40 years experience -Lic. #SL574 • Competitive and have the ability to multi-task 708.952.1833 • Competitive and have the ability to multi-task • Energetic and outgoing • Energetic and outgoing • Punctual and have a reliable vehicle • Punctual and have a reliable vehicle

If you have the ability to work in a fast-paced, deadline oriented If you have the ability to work in a fast-paced, deadline oriented environment, please fax or email your resume to Amy Richards. environment, please fax or email your resume to Amy Richards.

Fax: (708) 448-4160 Fax: (708) 448-4160 email: arichards@regionalpublishing.com email: arichards@regionalpublishing.com

REGIONAL REGIONAL PUBLISHING PUBLISHING CORPORATION CORPORATION 12243 S. Harlem Ave. 12243 S. Harlem Ave. Palos Heights, IL 60463 Palos Heights, IL 60463 Phone: (708) 448-4000 Phone: (708) 448-4000

Run both paper Run both paper


8

Section 2 Thursday, March 20, 2014

The Regional News - The Reporter

Your Wedding Day plans begin with your invitations... Select your invitations from the Fine Collection of Wedding Invitations by Carlson Craft in books you can take home, allowing ample time for you to make the perfect selection.

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The Regional News - The Reporter

7

Out & About

Thursday, March 20, 2014 Section 2

9

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond The Regional News - The Reporter

Section 2

Thursday, March 20, 2014

Broaden Your Horizons This Week Dynamic Folds and Wrinkles Workshop McCord Gallery & Cultural Center will present a workshop for artists who want to hone their skills this Saturday, March 22, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Instructor Beth Leahy will help you discover how to create beautiful drapery in your artwork as clothing, backdrops, and more. Look at examples of drapery from the past and present as you learn the seven types of folds. Folds tell the story of weight and tension to produce a wonderful landscape of form, color and value. Handouts and exercises in charcoal will be included in the workshop. Supply list will be available at registration. Price is $90/$80 for members of McCord. McCord Gallery & Cultural Center is located at 9602 W. Creek Rd. (129th and LaGrange Road), Palos Park. For more information, call 671-0648 or visit www.mccordgallery.org.

Spring classes at McCord The spring series of classes at the McCord Gallery & Cultural Center begin the week of March 24. Beginning Watercolor with Carmelo Schifano, Watercolor with John Howard, Byzantine Iconography with Arlene Tilghman, Figure in the Landscape with Liz Wall, Colored Pencil Technique with Tony Crnkovich and Art Clay Silver with Jeanne Krapauskas are just some of the offerings this session. McCord Gallery & Cultural Center is located at 9602 W. Creek Road (129th and La Grange Road), Palos Park. For more information, call 671-0648 or visit www.mccordgallery.org.

Eldercare luncheon Eldercare and the New Health Care System will be discussed at a luncheon program on Tuesday, March 25, from noon to 2 p.m., at The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park. Dr. Cheryl Woodson will discuss how people can give excellent eldercare without destroying their own physical, financial, emotional, and spiritual health. She’ll also give specific strategies for negotiating the new health care system: What to do? What to bring? What not to believe? Since healthcare professionals, administrators, and communication systems are far from ready to meet the care coordination goals of the new system, Dr. Woodson believes families will have to stand in the gap. Dr. Woodson has spent more than 30 years teaching and practicing Geriatric Medicine and has navigated her own mother’s 10year journey with Alzheimer’s disease. She teaches and consults about eldercare around the country and has served on the White House Council on Aging. The luncheon begins at noon, costs $17 and requires reservations. For more information, call The Center at 361-3650.

tivity Center of The Children’s Farm, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park. Instructor Valerie Lindstrom will lead the yoga sessions, which will include discussion and practice on breathing, relaxation, and centering, as well as movement and poses. Yoga newcomers are welcome. Students should dress in comfortable clothing and bring a yoga mat. The five-week class costs $50. Registration is required. Call The Center at 3613650.

Womantalk discussion The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park, will host its monthly Womantalk coffee hour and discussion on Tuesday, March 25, from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Led by MaryAnn Grzych, ladies are invited to join the discussion of Simple Abundance by Sarah Breathnach or other inspirational readings that participants wish to bring. There is no cost, but advance reservations are required. Call The Center at 361-3650.

Submitted photos

Christian music tour at Trinity Experience amazing Christian music at the Change a Life Tour, featuring Grammy Award-winning Audio Adrenaline (top photo) and Dove Award-nominated Kutless, on Saturday, April 12, at 7 p.m., in the Ozinga Chapel at Trinity Christian College in Palos Heights. Also performing are Finding Favour and Shine Bright Baby. General admission tickets are $18, advance purchase; $20, day of show; $15 each, group rate for 10 or more; $25, Gold Circle priority seats. A VIP Pre-Show Experience Pass may be purchased with any ticket at an additional $25 each. The VIP add-on includes early entry at 5:30 p.m., exclusive VIP laminate and tour collectible artwork item for autographs, one copy of Kings & Queens CD, and an exclusive Q&A with the band followed by a photo opportunity and autographs. Visit itickets.com to purchase online. Tickets can also be purchased at Trinity’s switchboard located on the second floor of the Jennie Huizenga Memorial Library. (Additional fees by iTickets.com apply to all orders.) For more information, call 597-3000.

Design your perennial garden

Now is the time to plan for your garden for years to come. McCord Gallery & Cultural Center will present a workshop McCord Gallery & Cultural on Wednesday, March 26, 9:30 Center will offer T’ai Chi Chih® a.m. to 11:30 a.m. with instrucwith Dee Burton on Thurstor MaryAnn Nowak. In this days, March 24 – May 22, (eight workshop you will learn how to weeks), 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. create a garden with the amount (No class May 1.). of maintenance you prefer. With Explore the possibility of reproper placement you can creducing stress, balancing blood ate a floral display throughout pressure and improving balance, the growing season. Proper excoordination, concentration and posure and conditions will help memory. T’ai Chi Chih® offers your garden flourish. Bring a the opportunity to experience photo and measurements of these and many more potential your outdoor space and receive benefits by learning 20 simple excellent advice from an expert. movements which, after this Price is $35 or $30 for members eight-week session, will take only of McCord. 35 minutes to perform. T’ai Chi McCord Gallery & Cultural Chih® is not a martial art or a Story jewelry class Center is located at 9602 W. religion but is “Joy Thru MoveThe Log Cabin Center for the ment”. Seated as well as stand- Creek Rd. (129th and LaGrange), Arts, 12700 Southwest Highway ing T’ai Chi Chih will be taught. Palos Park. For more informa-     (NOTICE: Ratings for each tion call 671-0648 or visit www. film begin with a ‘star’ rating in Palos Park, will offer a Story Instructor Dee Burton is an — one star meaning ‘poor,’ four Jewelry Workshop on March 24 accredited instructor who has mccordgallery.org. meaning ‘excellent’ — followed by from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in honor been a practitioner of this form the Motion Picture Association of of the Spring Equinox. for over 7 years. Class is limited America rating, and then by a Storyteller jewelry instruc- to 10 students and costs $95; family-viewing guide, the key for tor Catherine Myers will help $85 for members of McCord. Junior Farmers which appears below.) participants create beaded McCord Gallery & Cultural New seven-week sessions of    STARTING THIS WEEK: necklaces which tell a story Center is located at 9602 W. according to which beads are Creek Rd. (129th and LaGrange Junior Farmer Classes will be- “THE WOLF OF WALL selected to represent personal Road), Palos Park. For more in- gin at The Children’s Farm at STREET’’: Leonardo DiCaprio milestones, goals, or dreams. formation call 671-0648 or visit The Center on Monday, Tuesday, and director Martin Scorsese Wednesday, and Saturday, April earned much praise — and a The class fee is $14 plus a $15 www.mccordgallery.org. 5 through April 9. The farm is public rebuke from the daughter materials fee, which covers all at 12700 Southwest Highway in of one of the real-life subject’s materials, although students Yoga class financial victims — in their fifth Palos Park. are also welcome to bring old Junior Farmers is an opportu- screen teaming, a lengthy and colA new five-week series of beads from broken jewelry to help tell a story through their Gentle Yoga classes will be of- nity for children, age 3 to 12, to orfully edgy portrait of Jordan fered at The Center on Tuesday learn about and enjoy the life of Belfort, a financial wizard who necklaces. Advance registration is re- evenings beginning March 25, the farm. The highlight of the satisfied his many vices to excess quired. Call The Center at 361- from 6:30 to 8 p.m. The class spring season for Junior Farmer while convincing others to put their monetary faith in him. Jonah (Continued on page 10) will meet at the Anderson Ac3650. Hill is excellent as Belfort’s principal partner in scheming; Matthew McConaughey, Kyle Chandler, Rob Reiner, Margot Robbie, Jon Favreau, Jean Dujardin (“The Artist’’) and Cristin Milioti (“How I Met Your Mother’’) also are featured. *** (R: AS, N, P, V) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand)    “DELIVERY MAN’’: The title works two ways for Vince Vaughn’s character in this moderately entertaining seriocomic tale of an ex-sperm donor, many of whose progeny want to know who their father is. He has quite a few of them, too ... more than 500, making him panicked when about one-third of them take legal steps to determine his identity. Eventually, though, the fact he’s having a child with his girlfriend (Cobie Smulders, “How I Met Your Mother’’) prompts him to look into the lives of some of those he already has sired. Chris Pratt (“Parks and Recreation’’) and Britt Robertson (“Life Unexpected’’) also appear in the film, a remake by director Ken Scott of his own movie “Starbuck.’’ DVD extras: deleted scene; outtakes. *** (PG-13: AS, P, V) (Also on Bluray and On Demand)    “WALKING WITH DINOSAURS’’: Though the title is a brand name thanks to the longpopular BBC-made documentary series, this family-friendly film goes its own way, putting a story to its visuals of computer-generated creatures set against real backdrops. Justin Long voices a young dinosaur who struggles to Submitted photo make his way through an often harsh prehistoric world, with a bird (voiced by John Leguizamo) as his principal companion. The picture still strives to be educaTake a break from the winter blues and head over to the McCord Gallery & Cultural Center for a night tional by identifying the species of of tangle making. Tangles are structured patterns which can be repeated and combined in different different characters, which interrupts the narrative flow though ways to create unique pieces of art. (See photo.) Instructor Beth Leahy will demonstrate patterns which you will use to decorate your own travel mug. it’s well-intentioned. Karl Urban (“Star Trek’’) is featured in liveNo art experience needed. All supplies are provided. Cost for the workshop is $22. McCord Gallery & Cultural Center is located at 9602 W. Creek Road (129th and La Grange Road), action sequences. *** (PG: AS) (Also on Blu-ray) Palos Park. For more information, call 671-0648 or visit www.mccordgallery.org.

T’ai Chi Chih® at McCord

Upcoming

Spring break Tangle workshop at McCord

Videoview by Jay Bobbin    “SCOOBY-DOO! WRESTLEMANIA MYSTERY’’: What a way to appeal to two audiences at once ... inject the sleuthing animated canine into the WWE world. That’s just what happens in this tale, as Scooby, Shaggy and their usual cohorts venture to a wrestling event that appears to be plagued by the ghost of a bear. The amateur detectives get help from cartoon versions of stars of the ring — including John Cena, Kane, AJ Lee and World Wrestling Entertainment chief Vince McMahon — in determining and solving what’s going on. *** (Not rated) (Also on Blu-ray)    “CAMILLE CLAUDEL, 1915’’: Juliette Binoche (“The English Patient’’) reaffirms her magical quality as a performer in the title role of this drama, particularly given the challenge of making the film in an actual psychiatric institu-

tion with writer-director Bruno Dumont. Claudel was under such confinement while continuing to try to prove herself as an artist, correspondence with her poet brother Paul (Jean-Luc Vincent) being her main link to the outside world. *** (Not rated: AS, P)    “ODD THOMAS’’: A Dean Koontz suspense novel is the source of this melodrama with Anton Yelchin (“Star Trek’’) as the title character, a short-order cook who has the “Sixth Sense’’ gift — or curse, depending on your view — of being able to see dead people. They’re a malevolent bunch with sinister intentions, so he enlists his girlfriend (Addison Timlin, “Zero Hour’’) and the local sheriff (Willem Dafoe) to help him save their town. Patton Oswalt and 50 Cent also appear for director-screenwriter Stephen (Continued on page 10 )

Oregon GFWC Woman’s Club Presents

64th Annual Oregon, IL Antique Show

Rendered by Toni Cacciatore

Over 50 Dealers from the Midwest

March 29 & 30, 2014

Saturday 9am-5pm & Sunday 10am-4pm Blackhawk Center 1101 W. Jefferson St. One block south of Rt. 64 Oregon, Illinois Entry: $6.00

Crystal & China Repair Appraisals SUN. ($5 per item) Plenty of Parking Door Prizes & Concessions Handicap Accessible

Welcomes

Helen

WelcH

in...

Got Rhythm? Broadway & Big Band singer Helen Welch sings America’s most beloved songs —

Misty The Trolley Song Fascinating Rhythm The Way You Look Tonight

— a few among the afternoon’s treasure!

Sunday, March 30, 2014 - 4:00 p.m. Trinity Christian College, Ozinga Auditorium 6601 West College Drive, Palos Heights, IL 60463 Students $5 | Adults $20 - $25 | Seniors $15 - $20 Children 12 and under free Tickets may be purchased at the door or in advance by calling 708.802.0686 or online at www.southwestsymphony.com This program is also partially supported by a grant from the Illinois Arts Council Agency


10 Section 2

Thursday, March 20, 2014

The Regional News - The Reporter

Out & About

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

Broaden Your Horizons (Continued from page 9) program is the opportunity to see the new baby animals arrive in the spring. The Junior Farmer program is led by veteran Children’s Farm program coordinator Kay Ardizzone, who claims that she learns as much or more from the children as she teaches them. Junior Farmer classes meet one hour each week for seven weeks. Classes are available for children age three to six, on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, at 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., and on Saturday at 10 a.m. and 11:30 a.m.; for children age six to eight on Saturday at 2 p.m.; for children age six to twelve on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday at 4 p.m., and for children age nine to twelve on Saturday at 3:30 p.m. The cost of the seven-week program is $91. Advance registration is required.

Call The Center at 361-3650.

Spirituality Book Club The Center’s spirituality book club is meeting on Monday, April 14, from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., at 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park. Led by Pastoral Director Chris Hopkins, the group will discuss the novel, Joshua, by Joseph Grizone. Joshua is the tale of a quiet, simple carpenter who mystifies all he meets with his transforming warmth and love. Registration is requested. Call The Center at 361-3650.

Dine out tonight and support your local restaurants!

Beverly Environmental, LLC Landscape Architects & Contractors Submitted photo

Gardening 101 at the Children’s Farm A Gardening 101 class will be held at the Children’s Farm on Sunday, March 30, from 2 to 4 p.m. The farm is across from The Center, at 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park. Shown are Children’s Farm summer campers with onions they pulled from the farm garden last summer. Lois Lauer will guide students through the basics of herb and vegetable gardening: what can be grown and how it can be grown effectively, enjoyably, and sustainably. Topics will include space needs of each plant, which plants are helpful companions to each other and which are enemies, which pants to start indoors, which to sow directly to the garden, and which to buy at a greenhouse. Lauer tends a large vegetable and herb garden at the Children’s Farm, and even a new fruit garden, and wants to share some of the joys and lessons she’s learned. Folks can keep updated on what’s happening in the farm garden on Lauer’s garden blog, http://childrensfarmgarden. blogspot.com/. The class fee of $24 includes the cost of one tray of tomato, pepper, basil, and parsley seedlings, which each student will plant in class. Reservations are required. Call The Center at 361-3650.

• Snow & Ice Removal • Custom Hardscapes • Property Master Planning/ Phasing • Ponds & Water Features • Retaining Walls & Natural Stone • Landscapes Design • Garden Design & Lawn Maintenance • Free Estimates

Videoview (Continued from page 9) Sommers (“The Mummy’’). ** (Not rated: AS, P, V) (Also on Blu-ray)

Submitted photo

Papercraft workshop at Log Cabin Center The Log Cabin Center for the Arts, 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park, will offer a papercraft workshop on Tuesday, March 25 from 9:30 a.m. to 12 noon. Ann Fowler will teach students to make cards with circular Spirelli designs made with notched shapes and colorful thread. Shown is one of Fowler’s Spirelli designs. The workshop cost of $18 plus a $6 materials fee. Advance registration is required. For more information, call The Center at 361-3650.

   COMING SOON: “47 RONIN’’ (April 1): Keanu Reeves plays one of the warriors battling mystical forces in the course of avenging the death of their master. (PG-13: AS, V)    “ANCHORMAN 2: THE LEGEND CONTINUES’’ (April 1): Ron Burgundy (Will Ferrell) leaves San Diego to join a 24hour news network in New York; Christina Applegate, Steve Carell and Paul Rudd also return. (PG13: AS, P)    “I LOVE LUCY: THE ULTIMATE SEASON 1’’ (April 8): If you’ve been waiting for Vitameatavegamin in hi-def, here’s your chance, as Lucille Ball’s classic sitcom comes to Blu-ray. (Not rated)    “SORCERER’’ (April 22): On Blu-ray for the first time, director William Friedkin’s take on “The Wages of Fear’’ casts Roy Scheider as one of several drivers transporting very dangerous cargo. (PG: P, V)    “HILL STREET BLUES: THE COMPLETE SERIES’’ (April 29): The classic Steven Bochco-produced police drama stars Daniel J. Travanti, Veronica Hamel and Dennis Franz. (Not

rated: AS, P, V) “SOPHIE’S CHOICE’’ (April 29): Meryl Streep earned her second Oscar for the shattering drama, coming to Blu-ray in a “Collector’s Edition’’; Kevin Kline also stars. (R: AS, P)

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