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The Joy of Sharing The bright possibility of a moral economy ALSO

ARE YOU PREPARED FOR CLIMATE CHANGE?

TOWARD A SUSTAINABLE PHILADELPHIA NOVEMBER 2016 / ISSUE 91 GRIDPHILLY.COM

GRID’ S PICKS FOR A SEASONAL SIX-PACK, HOW TO BUILD A FIRE PIT AND MORE

Gift Guide

2016 Perfect holiday gifts for the urban gardener, culture geek, adventurer, animal lover and homebody on your list Politics: Katie McGinty for U.S. Senate Bill McKibben on Clinton and Trump


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CONTENTS DEPARTMENTS 08

To-Do List Chilly weather has set in, so close up the garden, stock up the pantry and get a start on holiday preparations

10

Comings & Goings Find out which doors are opening and closing, and who deserves kudos

12

Opinion The moral economy isn’t just an option. It’s an imperative

14

Endorsement Katie McGinty should be Pennsylvania’s next senator

16

The Big Picture Environmentalist Bill McKibben talks about why we can’t sit out this election

50

Shop Local Regional distillers continue to open and expand, and wineries offer great fall trips

56

Homestead Acts The satisfying backyard fire is one of fall’s simple pleasures

48

Market Watch Don’t miss our recipe for crunchy, tangy cabbage

58

Events What to see and where to go

64

Dispatch A family’s journey to soul-satisfying holiday minimalism

Our office mascot, Henry, wearing a Chilly Dog Sweater and Paratodo collar featured in the Grid Gift Guide starting on Page 25

November 2016

FEATURE STORY 19

The Impacts of Climate Change Stronger storms are coming. Are Philadelphians—or our government programs—ready for the new normal?

SPECIAL SECTION 25

Grid’s Holiday Gift Guide Gifts for the special people in your life, from the gardener to the urban adventurer. Pictured below, gifts for the animal lover (or animal) in your life.


ENDLESS ENDLESS SHOUT SHOUT SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER2016– 2016– MARCH MARCH 2017 2017 Raúl Raúl de de Nieves Nieves Danielle Danielle Goldman Goldman George George Lewis Lewis Fred Fred Moten Moten The The Otolith Otolith Group Group taisha taisha paggett paggett

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Major support for Endless Shout Major support forby Endless Shout has been provided The Pew has been by The Pew Center forprovided Arts & Heritage. Center for Arts & Heritage. Marketing is supported by Marketin g is Berkman supported Pamela Toub &by Pamela Toub Berkman David J. Berkman and by&Lisa A. J. Berkman and by Lisa A. &David Steven A. Tananbaum. & Steven A. Tananbaum. Endless Shout will occur in tandem Endless Shout willPrinciple: occur in tandem with The Freedom with The Freedom : Experiments in ArtPrinciple and Music, Experime ntson inview Art and Music, 1965 to Now, at ICA from 1965 to Now, viewtoatMarch ICA from September 14,on 2016, 19, 2017. September 14, 2016, to March 19, 2017. For more information: For more information: endlessshout.icaphila.org endlessshout.icaphila.org

Institute of Contemporary Art Institute of Contemp orary Art University of Pennsylvania Universi ty of Pennsylvania icaphila.org icaphila.org ICA is always Free. For All. ICAadmission Free is courtesy is always Free. For All.of Free admission Amanda and Glenn Fuhrman. is courtesy of Amanda and Glenn Fuhrman.

Seeing Stories: Visualizing Sustainable Citizenship A yearlong series engaging the tangible, aesthetic, design, and activist practices that impact our environment

A Conversation with Mel Chin Monday, November 7, 6:00 PM Temple Contemporary, 2001 North 13th Street

Fallen Fruit: Artists’ Talk Tuesday, November 15, 2:30 PM Paley Library Lecture Hall, 1210 Polett Walk

library.temple.edu/beyondthepage *Programs are free and open to all.* This series is co-curated by Temple Contemporary, Temple University’s Office of Sustainability, and Temple University Libraries’ Beyond the Page Public Programming Series, along with faculty and graduate students from the Tyler School of Art, the College of Liberal Arts, and the Center for the Cinematic and Performing Arts. Additional support has been provided by the General Education Program, the Department of Planning and Community Development, and the Feinstein Center for American Jewish History.


EDITOR’S NOTES

by

HEATHER SHAYNE BLAKESLEE

FACT CHECK Who is behind in the polls? Scientists

A

s we approach an historic American election that is high on drama and high on anxiety, many of us have become addicted to watching the polls and devouring the accompanying analysis. Nate Silver’s servers at FiveThirtyEight have been working overtime for months, as have our nervous systems and bartenders. Amid the posturing of campaigns and prognostications of statisticians, the Pew Research Center released a poll this month that looked at how party affiliation tracked with opinions on climate change. Some of the results are not surprising. Seventy-three percent of likely Clinton voters care, “some” to “a great deal,” about climate change. Of likely Trump voters, the number is 49 percent. Clinton supporters are also much more likely to believe in interventions such as restrictions on power plants, international agreements on emissions or fuel efficiency standards. It’s hopeful to note, however, an average of 35 percent of Trump supporters believe these approaches could make a difference: That’s about the percentage of Americans who supported gay marriage in 2001, and we know how quickly times have changed on that front. But another result should be incredibly disturbing, no matter your party affiliation. When asked whether scientists understood what causes climate change, only 41 percent of Clinton supporters and a mere 15 percent of Trump supporters had high confidence. The numbers are even lower when it comes to whether these same respondents have high confidence that scientists know what to do to stop it: 32 percent and 10 percent, respectively. How can so many of us have so little confidence in science? An article last year in The Atlantic titled, “Americans Believe in Science, Just Not Its Findings” provides some insight, using another Pew poll to help illustrate that there is a wide gap in what the American public thinks

on certain issues—climate change, vaccines and the safety of pesticide-laden food—and what scientists believe. Essentially, we like science as a concept, and we believe it makes our life better, but when it comes to specifics, our support declines dramatically. The article also explains that scientists don’t think much of us either: 84 percent of them think that the public “doesn’t know much about science” and 79 percent think the media is doing a bad job of helping with that understanding. Luckily for Philadelphians, our offices of sustainability and emergency management are listening hard to what science tells us about the future of our own region: We are in for hotter, wetter summers and more severe winter precipitation, as well as the increased likelihood that superstorms will land a direct hit on the city. They, as well as federal officials, are planning for the worst: mapping new flood zones that take into account rising sea-levels, running drills on how fast they can set up emergency shelters, and looking at placement of infrastructure and evacuation routes. Most of us? We can’t claim to have the bare minimum of food, water or flashlights on hand to get by in an emergency. To do so is to overcome the very human instinct to care only about what is in front of us; as a species, we are terribly nearsighted, and facts somehow don’t correct our vision. But the country is flirting with disaster right now, on many fronts. We should all be better prepared for our long emergency. Science, not politics, should be driving our national policy.

editor-in-chief Alex Mulcahy managing editor Heather Shayne Blakeslee heather@gridphilly.com 215.625.9850 ext. 107 copy editors Walter Foley Aaron Jollay Art Director Michael Wohlberg michael@redflagmedia.com 215.625.9850 ext. 113 Designer Marika Mirren marika@gridphilly.com 215.625.9850 ext. 112 writers Lina Blount Peggy Paul Casella Anna Herman Justin Klugh Emily Kovach Emily Livingston illustrators Bart Browne Corey Schumann Julia Tran photgraphers Gene Smirnov ___________ sales & marketing manager Alex Mulcahy alex@gridphilly.com 215.625.9850 ext. 102 ad sales Boston Gordon boston@gridphilly.com 215.625.9850 ext. 100 distribution Alex Yarde alex.yarde@redflagmedia.com 215.625.9850 ext. 106 published by Red Flag Media 1032 Arch Street, 3rd Floor Philadelphia, PA 19107 215.625.9850 G R I D P H I L LY. C O M

HEATHER SHAYNE BLAKESLEE Managing Editor

heather@gridphilly.com


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TO-DO LIST 1. break out

2. plant your

3. find a

Put an extra blanket or two on your bed, and keep one near the couch. You’ll save money and energy if you’re not defaulting to cranking up the heat when the chill sets in.

You still have a little time to get bulbs into the ground for a fantastic spring show. Take advantage of the fact that tulip, hyacinth and daffodil bulbs will likely be on sale right now.

Nothing says fall in the Northeast like a good hayride, mulled cider and a bonfire. Whether it’s a romantic couples’ night or a day out with the kids, many local farms oblige with public events.

the blankets

spring bulbs

4. close up

5. enjoy fall beauty at

Sadly, the gardening season is over. But a little time spent now preparing for the spring will help you be ready to put trowel to dirt when March rolls around. Pull any remaining pesky weeds or plants that are spent. Then get yourself some good compost and work it into the soil. You can also add shredded leaves to further boost the soil quality, and consider other soil amendments you think you might need.

The fall Chrysanthemum Festival and Autumn’s Colors tours run through Nov. 20.

the garden

longwood gardens

fall day trip

6. weatherize

your windows and doors You have been holding off on turning on the heat, but November is here. Make sure you’ve spent an hour with lowcost weather stripping to keep the cold air out and the heat in. If you’re finally ready to take the plunge, it isn’t too late to get an energy audit. That way you can make a plan for spring renovations that could make a big difference to the energy efficiency of your home.

7. check on

your snow boots and supplies Climate change will be causing more severe weather in Philadelphia, including more snowfall. Make sure your boots will make it another season, get the shovel out of the basement and stock up on nontoxic ice-melt so you don’t get stuck when the first snowfall arrives.

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IL LUSTRATIO N S BY J ULI A TRA N


Join the Grid Team

8. restock and

clean the pantry As the nights get darker, you’ll be happy not have to rely on GrubHub to get your meals if you’ve got the essentials on hand. Take a Sunday afternoon to take stock and stock up.

We’re hiring aN Advertising and Marketing Director

Grid will publish its 100th issue next fall, and big changes are coming. We’re looking for a talented and driven Advertising and Marketing Director to join our team. 9. vote! We can’t say it enough times. You’ve been protesting, you’ve been debating friends and family, and now is your chance to cast a ballot in both national and statewide elections. Get to those polls Nov. 8.

We seek a professional sales executive who has: •

Experience hiring and managing a sales team

An understanding of the national print advertising market, trends in native advertising and experiential engagement

Connections to the local market, from small businesses to large institutions and brands

10. get started

A minimum of three years experience in advertising sales and a proven track record of breaking through sales goals

If you plan things out now, you’ll be able to come through on that promise to yourself to buy local and support independent stores. For Grid’s picks on everything from Philly-made home goods to cultural experiences, check out Page 25.

Strong analytical skills and a long-term, relationshipbuilding approach to sales

A shared vision of a sustainable Philadelphia and world

on your holiday shopping

We offer generous benefits, and the chance to be a part of the next phase of Grid’s expansion. Salary is 50–75K depending on experience. Applicants should send a PDF cover letter (which will serve as a writing sample) and a resume to: jobs@gridphilly.com by November 30.

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NEWS streets, water, licensing and inspection departments, and zoning committees, while the city prepares a Vision Zero task force. A “vision zero” approach of no casualties— which has been championed by the Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia—generally includes bike barriers, tighter restrictions for traffic violations and other methods of preventing motor vehicle accidents.

HUNGRY HARVEST PARTNERS WITH PHILABUNDANCE AFTER ‘SHARK TANK’ DEBUT

PLASTIC BAG FEES MAY BE BANNED IN PENNSYLVANIA Pennsylvania legislators are trying to ban the state’s cities from passing laws that would institute a plastic bag fee. Representative Michael K. Hanna (D) from Centre and Clinton counties, co-sponsor of HB1280, states on his website, “Many of you are aware of states and cities around the country that have implemented bans and taxes on plastic bags to mitigate their waste and environmental impact. There have also been several attempts over the years to levy similar fees and taxes in Pennsylvania. My legislation would prohibit municipalities, state government agencies and retail establishments from charging consumers for plastic bags at the point of sale.” He cites a disproportionate impact on the poor, costs to local business and suppression of plastic bag recycling efforts as reasons for the ban.

SOCIAL IMPACT, ENERGY, SUSTAINABILITY AND MORAL ECONOMY CONFERENCES COME TO PHILADELPHIA Nov. 3 through 5, the national Net Impact Conference will be held at the Philadelphia Convention Center. Philadelphia B-Lab Founder Jay Coen Gilbert will be among many Philadelphia-based speakers. The conference is open to the public, and offers 10

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social-impact-focused career connections for professionals and students. The Philadelphia Energy Futures Summit will be held Nov. 15 and 16 at Drexel University. Free discussions will focus on the future of climate change, alternative energy, and the role of the public and private sectors. Nov. 17, the Energy Coordinating Agency is hosting Connecting the Dots Now for a Self-Sufficient Energy Future, at Temple University, which will focus on the intersection of policy, poverty and energy. Finally, from Dec. 1 through 4 Pendle Hill, a Quaker study, retreat and conference center, will host the Visioning and Creating a Moral Economy conference, which is open to the public and is co-sponsored by the Quaker Institute for the Future, New Economy Coalition and the Philadelphia Area Cooperative Alliance.

CITY HIRES SAFETY DIRECTOR FOR BIKES, CARS, PEDESTRIANS Kelley Yemen was hired in October to serve as Philadelphia’s Complete Streets director—a new position created to manage and integrate the many obstacles Philly faces while undergoing long-term construction projects and adopting modern bicycle-safety measures. Yemen will coordinate with Philly’s

Produce delivery startup Hungry Harvest began taking subscriptions in October to help curb the estimated 20 percent of produce that goes to waste in Philadelphia. The Maryland-based company received a $100,000 investment after CEO Evan Lutz appeared on the ABC reality show “Shark Tank” and plans to expand to other major cities. Subscriptions start at $15 per week to receive doorstep deliveries of discounted, freshly picked fruits and vegetables that farmers can’t otherwise sell. For every box purchased in the city and its suburbs, Hungry Harvest will donate one to two pounds of produce to Philabundance, which provides food to approximately 90,000 people in the area each week. Hungry Harvest plans to double donations for every new customer in the first month.

PHILADELPHIA GEEK AWARDS ANNOUNCES WINNERS The 2016 Philadelphia Geek Awards announced winners on Oct. 18. Community Future Labs, a resource library, community studio and gallery, workshop space, story recording booth, think tank and experimental space, was awarded Impact Org of the Year. South Fellini, soon to open a storefront on East Passyunk Avenue, was awarded Maker of the Year. Food Connect, which links homeless shelters to restaurants looking to donate their leftover food, won Development Project of the Year. Geek of the Year was awarded to software developer Kathryn Killebrew, a longtime member of Philadelphia’s cod-


ing community who works with the Geospatial Insights team at Azavea, serves as a volunteer for Girl Develop It and Code for Philly, and is the developer behind the CyclePhilly and TransitAnalyst apps.

PILOT PROGRAM LAUNCHED TO HELP UTILIZE LAWN AND GARDEN SPACE The Nature Conservancy and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology launched Habitat Network in October. The free online platform allows users to map their outdoor space, share it with others, and learn more about supporting wildlife habitat and other natural functions. “It’s a great way to get to know your yard better. You are really the expert about what’s going on around your house or neighborhood, and we want to tap into that expertise in a way that can benefit the scientific community,” said Rhiannon Crain, project leader for Habitat Network at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Habitat Network offers alternate solutions for yards, parks and other urban green spaces to support birds, pollinators and other wildlife, and can help manage water resources and reduce chemical use like pesticides and fertilizers. The mapping tool is available nationally, but is being piloted with local organizations in Philly, Boston and Washington D.C. Users’ self-reported information will provide data that the conservancy and the lab can use to understand a habitat’s role in benefiting wildlife and humans. So far, the website has mapped more than 20,000 yards, gardens and parks.

KENSINGTON CO-OP GRANTED $350,000 FOR NEW BUILDING Kensington Community Food Co-op received $350,000 from the Department of Commerce’s Cultural Corridor Fund, which will go toward renovations for a grocery store to be opened at 2666–72 Coral St. Previous recipients of the Cultural Corridor Fund include the Salvation Army Kroc Center and Taller Puertorriqueño—both in North Philly—and Franklin’s Paine Skate Park Fund. The co-op is currently trying to raise just over $130,000 by Nov. 15 to complete their fundraising. N OV E M B E R 20 16

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EDITOR IAL

The Case for a Moral Economy We must come together and create solutions at scale by lina blount

W

hen we face the overwhelming issues of economic inequality and injustice, oftentimes the available solutions seem either exclusively consumer-based or incredibly small scale. We buy local food and fair trade coffee. We join a local co-op with no vision for how to influence our city, region and nation. These choices may be good, but we must think bigger. How can we create wealth for more people by providing a living-wage economy? How can we keep wealth in communities? How can we create jobs that lift up the values we hold—like investing in schools and not prisons, and creating energy jobs that don’t endanger our future and our planet? In order to achieve this vision at scale, we can learn from Gandhi’s model of constructive programs and resistance programs— leveraging the power of nonviolent direct action and grassroots people power to challenge the existing system, while heading toward large-scale alternatives.

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We know that mass, nonviolent direct action movements can shift policy faster than advocacy alone. Consider that in the early 2000s, progressive advocates and politicians were fighting to raise the national minimum wage just a few quarters. Hardly a decade later, the grassroots “Fight for $15” movement changed entirely what we believe to be politically possible through a series of nonviolent, coordinated local campaigns. As a result, working people around the country are closer than ever to earning a living wage. The creation of co-op networks—from Mondragon in Spain, to Cleveland, to Philadelphia—demonstrates how we can find scalable ways to keep wealth in our neighborhoods. For example, the Philadelphia Area Cooperative Alliance (PACA) is working to support 20 study circles to start 20 new regional co-ops, businesses that are owned collectively by people who live in the community, not far away corporations. PACA is introducing a replicable

“co-op chamber of commerce” model that goes beyond a single neighborhood store and begins to get at the question of scale. But to truly implement our vision of a more moral economy at scale, we need to continue to resist and challenge the power of those invested in our current system. There are many corporate lobbies that are doing active harm, from big banking and the gun lobby to the fossil fuel lobby. Shaking their hold is critical to scaling up alternatives. Yes, the work of in-house advocacy plays a critical role in doing this, but as the fight for $15, the fight against the Keystone XL pipeline, and historical campaigns like the civil rights movement show, when the halls of politics and advocacy are stacked against you, grassroots movements can break the deadlock, capture public imagination, and build momentum toward making alternatives possible. This year, at the Democratic National Convention (DNC), we saw a glimpse of what could be when the Rev. Dr. William

IL LUSTRATIO N BY BART BROWNE


J. Barber of North Carolina took the stage. His message has become a clarion call for organizers and people of faith across the country, and he has inspired tens of thousands of people—over 1,000 of whom were arrested—to take part in “Moral Monday” protests, picketing the legislature in his home state for what they believe to be discriminatory public policies. Onstage at the DNC, he called for us to embrace “our deepest moral values and push for a revival of the heart of our democracy.” To heed Barber’s call is to first accept how fundamentally amoral our current economic system is. It was built on the back of slave labor and upon hundreds of years of exploitation and extraction around the world. We are scorching our planet, locked into a paradigm of short-term profit that passes on the cost of climate change to future generations. The top 0.1 percent of Americans are taking in over 184 times the income of the bottom 90 percent, and families of color have 16 times fewer assets than their white counterparts. We have gone so far as to criminalize poverty and to endure daily fearmongering about immigrants and refugees. All of these injustices are a threat to our common good and to true democracy. No matter what the outcome of our nation’s election, we must continue the work toward Barber’s vision. We cannot stand by and accept any political or economic system that fails to meet our basic human needs, profits off of inequality and racism, or invests in endless growth despite limited planetary resources. After we’ve acknowledged where we’ve come and the morass in which we currently stand, we must think—at scale—about how to implement a just, moral economy.

Lina Blount is the communications and outreach coordinator for Pendle Hill, a Quaker study, retreat and conference center. From Dec. 1 through 4, Pendle Hill will host the Visioning and Creating a Moral Economy conference, which is open to the public and is co-sponsored by the Quaker Institute for the Future, New Economy Coalition and the Philadelphia Area Cooperative Alliance.

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E NDOR S EM ENT

Katie McGinty for U.S. Senate The Senate, the Supreme Court and the soul of Pennsylvania are at stake by GRID editorial board

A

merica is suffering through an unprecedentedly debased presidential election, and many voters have vowed to stay home. While that is an understandable response, it is a dangerous proposition for progressive voters who live in Pennsylvania. As many commentators have noted, the road that leads to 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. cuts through Pennsylvania: Our state’s 20 electoral votes are a critical purse for presidential candidates. While those electoral votes have not been awarded to a Republican candidate since 1988, and Hillary Clinton is in the lead, no lead could be large enough for comfort. A Trump presidency— when it comes to the environment, economy and American dignity both at home and abroad—would be, to use one of his favorite words, a disaster. A Trump Supreme Court nominee is unthinkable. Second, the soul of our state is at stake as we choose a representative to the U.S. Senate, and every vote will count in this election. Incumbent Pat Toomey (R) and challenger Katie McGinty (D) have been locked in statistical dead heat since August, but while their polling has been close, their positions on the environment and energy policy—as well as civil rights—could not be more different. For the voter who cares about these issues, Katie McGinty is the only choice. Pennsylvania is one of a handful of states in a position to flip a Senate seat from a Republican to a Democrat. Control of the Senate is critical, in part because it gives (potential Speaker of the House) Bernie Sanders, who believes that climate change is the biggest threat to America’s future, a better chance to implement his vision. McGinty has proven for two decades that she will be an ally on that front. Her experience in Washington includes serving as Sen. Al Gore’s and President Bill Clinton’s top environmental aide, and as chair of the White House Council on Environmental Quality. She has also served in the Rendell administration as Pennsylvania’s secretary

of the Department of Environmental Protection, where she championed aggressive alternative energy portfolio standards, courted renewable energy companies, invested in the Growing Greener grant program and in innovative projects through the Pennsylvania Energy Development Authority. She worked for more stringent fuel standards in cars, and lower mercury emissions from power plants. Her degrees in chemistry and law make her uniquely qualified to employ science-based decisions on environmental policy. Her experience in the corporate sector working with the energy industry is a double-edged sword that gives her insight into the industry, but is also cause for concern and caution. Shortly after regulating these industries, McGinty held highly paid positions with energy companies whose portfolios include renewables but also coal, nuclear, oil and natural gas derived from fracking. Among other oil and gas contributions, she’s accepted money from Phil Rinaldi of Philadelphia Energy Solutions, Philadelphia’s biggest polluter. Frackers, however, are overwhelmingly supporting Toomey, while environmental groups have endorsed McGinty because she has gone on record with positions on natural gas that include closing the “Halliburton loophole” to ensure that liquid used during the fracking process is regulated by the Clean Water Act, imposing a severance tax on drilling, regulating the industry and banning drilling on public land. Grid agrees with former Senate candidate and Braddock, Pennsylvania, Mayor John Fetterman that McGinty should own up to her industry connections: Her overall environmental record is clear. And the environment is just one of the major issues at play here. On a host of other progressive bellwethers, McGinty lands solidly on the right side of history: stronger gun control measures, protecting the reproductive rights of women, keeping strong consumer protection measures in place and ensuring that LGBTQ Americans have the same rights as everyone else.

In contrast, incumbent Pat Toomey— whose banking-industry-funded campaign war chest vastly outstrips McGinty’s—has an environmental voting record in Congress that has earned him a zero percent rating in 2015 from the League of Conservation Voters. His lifetime score is a meager 7 percent. This year alone, Toomey has voted against closing the loophole that now excludes fracking wastewater from the Clean Water Act; voted for expediting permits for oil and natural gas drilling on public land (and to limit public input into the decision-making); against acknowledging the science of climate change; against extension of tax credits to incentivize renewable energy production; and for weakening protections for endangered habitat and wildlife. If given the chance, Toomey would also vote to repeal the Affordable Care Act, and he staunchly opposes same-sex marriage. Toomey’s support of Donald Trump—despite Trump’s clear disrespect of minorities, the disabled, Muslims, Gold Star families and women—is appalling. Even after the repulsive video of Donald Trump bragging about sexually assaulting women with impunity, Pat Toomey—while he denounced Trump’s behavior—finally confirmed on Oct. 18 in Erie, Pennsylvania, that he would vote for him. At best, his decision is cravenly opportunistic. It’s also a clear signal to Pennsylvania voters that Toomey does not respect the values that many of us hold dear. Finally, if you need another reason to elect Katie McGinty, Pennsylvania has never elected a female senator. McGinty is more than qualified to serve in the U.S. Senate based on her experience alone, but Pennsylvania would benefit from electing its first woman to the Senate, and providing a better example for its youth by demonstrating that one’s gender should not be a barrier to representing our state. Katie McGinty should be Pennsylvania’s next senator.

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the BIG PICTUR E

The War on Climate Change The country is about to choose a new commander-in-chief, but Bernie Sanders is already a war hero interview by heather shayne blakeslee

B

ill McKibben, environmental advocate, author and proud Vermonter, is still feeling the Bern—but he’s adamant about going to the polls this month to cast a vote nonetheless. In the lead up to one of the most contentious presidential contests in history, McKibben spoke with Grid about participating in the process for creating the Democratic National Committee platform, the obstructionism of the fossil-fuel lobby and why we need an all-out war on climate change.

In your recent article, “A World at War” in New Republic, you argue that the fight against climate change is an actual war— with territory lost, massive casualties, refugees and destabilized governments—and that we need to treat it as such. BM: Yeah, war is not a metaphor here. Half the sea ice in the summer Arctic is gone. We’re evacuating coastal villages and entire Pacific islands. We’ve lost some ungodly portion of the world’s coral in the last year alone. The question is not, “Are we in a war?” We are. The question is, “Are we going to fight?” And so it’s good news that a Stanford team led by Mark Jacobson has shown in detail that it’s possible for America to replace our fossil fuel infrastructure with renewable energy infrastructure. That would entail mobilizing and retooling our industrial sector in the same way we did during World War II. We’d need to be building factories on a massive scale, which would mean we’d need to be employing lots of people. We could replace Rosie the Riveter with Tracy the Turbine Maker. But what are the political prospects of that? BM: Well, that’s why we build movements— to try and create political will. If it was technologically impossible, there’d be no use in even trying. But since it’s possible—well, we’ll do our best. We’ve got hundreds of 16

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thousands of people in the streets already. What role does civil disobedience play in the war on climate change? BM: It’s good, too, but it’s not the only tool in our toolbelt. Any tool gets dull if you use it too much, and in this case, both literally and metaphorically. One major component of the war on climate change is energy efficiency. BM: It’s the easiest low-hanging fruit because we waste so much. It’s like if you were able to go on a diet and lose the first 10 pounds by getting a haircut. Aren’t we actually at war with the fossil fuel lobby? BM: We’ve learned in the last year that Exxon, for instance, knew all there was to know about climate change 30 years ago, and then systematically misled the entire country. We’ve wasted tons of time. That’s why fights like divestment from fossil fuel stocks are so important—we’ve got to weaken this obstructionist industry. Bernie Sanders appointed you to serve on the DNC platform committee. What went through your head when you got that call? BM: That it would be a lot of meetings and a lot of work for not a lot of benefit. Platforms usually get ignored. But, thanks to Bernie—

who did not endorse Clinton till this one was done—it’s a very progressive document with a lot of language we can try and hold her to, assuming she wins. If Trump wins, well.... What would a Trump presidency look like? BM: Hell, in many ways, including the temperature. You described the hour you were given to propose substantive changes, including a fracking ban and a carbon tax, as “one of the lowest points in my years of fighting climate change.” Why? BM: Because we lost everything on 7–6 votes, and it was so clear that, had Bernie won the primaries, we’d be making so much more progress. But a couple of weeks later, in the final platform negotiations, we got much, much further—because Bernie kept up the pressure. What a hero he was this year! Do you think that Clinton’s recent statement that America should build half a billion solar panels in the next four years is hopeful? BM: That may happen anyway, just from our current momentum. The price of solar panels is way down—80 percent in the last eight years. So we could do a lot more—we could really push to make this transition happen now. Does Clinton really have the commitment to climate change that we need? BM: No. We read in the newly released Wikileaks documents that she makes fun of climate activists—‘Get a life,’ she says of us. But she was forced to accept, in the platform, a call for a climate summit in the first 100 days of her administration. That means we’ll need to organize a truly mass mobilization outside that summit. You still have your “Feel the Bern” button on. How would a Sanders presidency have

IL LUSTRATIO N BY CO RE Y SC HUMA NN


differed from a Clinton presidency when it comes to fighting climate change? BM: Focus. In the first debate, when asked about what our greatest threat was, he answered, “Climate change.” He would have been laser-focused on this issue, and on equality, from day one. What do you say to the people who don’t care for either presidential candidate and plan to stay home this year in “protest.” Is staying home really a protest? BM: Trump is a uniquely bad guy. Letting him near the White House would be like handing your car keys to a toddler—a crazy toddler. But electing Hillary won’t solve anything—it will just give us someone we have some hope of being able to push to do the right thing. Millennials have gotten a bad rap for being part of a myopic selfie-culture. Do you agree? How would you characterize their commitment to the cause? BM: It’s them and it’s older people leading the charge—being willing to do the work and to be arrested. Young people are most of my colleagues—they’re a wonderful, creative, powerful generation. Republican donors are moving their money down ballot to Senate races across the country—including here in Pennsylvania—where Katie McGinty is neck-and-neck against incumbent Pat Toomey despite millions of dollars of outside money flooding the state. How important are the Senate races this year? BM: Taking back the Senate is really important, in part because it would mean that Bernie Sanders would have his pick of committees. If you control the Senate, you can call committee hearings—we’d have leaders who could grill Exxon, say, about their climate denial. You’ve been part of the protests by the Standing Rock Sioux and their allies, who are opposed to the Dakota pipeline. How would you describe the situation there? BM: I’ve been supporting as best I can, but they’re doing all the leading—and indeed that was often the case with Keystone and other such fights. This is a very important moment. Native wisdom, the oldest wisdom on the continent, is lining up with the newest climate science.

Trump is a uniquely bad guy. Letting him near the White House would be like handing your car keys to a toddler—a crazy toddler. But electing Hillary won’t solve anything—it will just give us someone we have some hope of being able to push to do the right thing.

You’re a longtime environmental advocate. Your advocacy runs the gamut from writing books to being arrested at protests. How do you keep yourself balanced, or hopeful or energized? BM: I’m not always hopeful. I’m not sure how this is going to turn out. But I take great energy from people in other parts of the world who are fighting the good fight.

T HIS IN - P ERSO N A ND EM A I L I N TE RV I E W H AS BE E N E D I TE D FO R CLARITY

Most of them did not cause the problem— and if they can nonetheless join hands to fight, what choice do the rest of us have?

Bill McKibben an environmentalist and author of several books, including “The End of Nature.” He is the winner of the Ghandi Peace Award and is the founder of 350.org.

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THE

COMING STORM

Climate change projections show a hotter, wetter Philadelphia in the future, and one more prone to major storm events. Are we ready? by justin klugh

N

estled between 42nd and 43rd streets in Sea Isle, within earshot of the Atlantic, there was a house built in an odd place. “We were in someone else’s backyard, basically,” explains Dan Gallagher, whose father owns the property. “We always said, ‘If there’s ever going to be anything bad, it’s gonna be the people in front of us who are gonna get hit first!’” Constructed in 1910, the house survived in its unique location for almost nine decades before Gallagher’s parents came upon it in 1999. On the hunt for a reasonably priced bungalow to share big family summers, they saw immediate appeal. With no driveway or street access, reaching the front door meant walking through the properties of the adjacent, more modernized, three- and four-story beach houses. Minus the addition put on by the previous

PHOTO BY M A R IKA M IR R EN

owners, the whole place took up about 650 square feet. But like any piece of real estate, especially one on a barrier island like Sea Isle, the investment came with a risk. “The particular part of the island where we lived was flood-prone,” Dan says forebodingly. “On every stop sign you can see the lateral posts that say, ‘Warning: Flood Zone,’ or ‘Flood Area.’ At high tide... that street would get some extra water.” In October 2012, the Gallaghers watched a tropical depression twist into existence off the coast of Nicaragua. By Oct. 29, Hurricane Sandy had New Jersey in its crosshairs. With a 115 mph maelstrom bearing down on their investment, Dan’s father made a call to an uncle who lived at the beach year-round to make the somewhat meager request that he secure the deck furniture. Sandy pounded the eastern seaboard, flooding, crippling and wiping out structures

and services that affected 50 million people. The U.S. death toll was reported at 109. Dan’s uncle headed over to the hundredyear-old house between 42nd and 43rd streets with a tape measure. “He waited until the water had subsided, because that street stayed flooded for a very, very long time, even after the storm had passed,” Dan says. His father received images of 2 feet of water sinking his house, which destroyed the flooring, outlets, appliances and furniture. After arriving on the scene in November, he found parts of the floor swallowed up by the ground and the structure stripped down to its bones. The surrounding homes on stilts, however, suffered only minimal damage. “It was pretty devastating.” The moment registered with Dan. “It was just… silence. How do you react to that? How do you respond to that?”

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The Philadelphia Times SUNDAY NOVEMBER 15, 2037

PHILADELPHIATIMES | CITY & SUBURBS | $6.50

NEWS FROM AROUND REGION NEWS AROUND THETHE region

ONLY IN PRINT ES.COM

Hurricane Katniss Hits Philadelphia, City Still Reeling from Tropical Storm Betty By Sam Waters

As county officials across the tri-state area assess damage from Tropical Storm Betty, Hurricane Katniss has now dealt a crushing blow. Mayor Rand has declared a state of emergency in Philadelphia, where floodwaters have shut down the Philadelphia airport, and downed trees have caused gridlock in city streets, complicating evacuation plans. Two hundred and fifty-three deaths have been reported, and damage to property will likely top $5.5 billion in Philadelphia alone.

The neighbors’ house in front of them— “If there’s ever going to be anything bad, it’s gonna be the people in front of us who are gonna get hit first!”—appeared untouched by Sandy’s fury, the lesson painfully obvious: Severe destruction is not something to which you can easily respond. It’s something you have to prepare to avoid. “There’s six grandkids in my family now, with no spot really to go,” Dan says. “That was probably the biggest hurdle, emotionally. My dad… this year, you could just see it. He says, ‘I worked my whole life for something like this, I never would have imagined it would be this difficult to get back up.’” Four years later, the house is unbuilt, and fallout from the devastation of Sandy remains.

THE WORST CASE SCENARIO Largely ignored by nature’s worst wraths, Philadelphia has some geographical advan-

Dan Gallagher

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tages. But being 90 miles inland won’t be enough to stop the uptick in heat, flooding and severe, Sandy-like weather scientists predict for the decades ahead. Philadelphia’s residents currently suffer through at times unpleasant, but rarely cataclysmic, weather. For Sarah Wu, deputy director for planning at Philadelphia’s Office of Sustainability in Center City, it’s part of her job to look at the data and imagine just these climate-change-related scenarios, all in an effort to avoid them. “If we continue to emit carbon the way we’re emitting, or decide we’re going to maniacally emit even more carbon than we’re currently emitting,” she explains, “it makes it hotter, it makes it wetter and it makes the sea level rise. We’re planning for the worst case scenario.” The Office of Sustainability commissioned four different companies to provide climate modeling for the city, three of which are the basis for the hotter, wetter scenario described by Wu. As for the overall carbon emissions, ICF International, a consulting firm that worked with the Office of Sustainability on an August 2014 report entitled “Useful Climate Information for Philadelphia: Past and Future,” reported that we’re on track for the kinds of global emissions that would affect us locally. “Philadelphia is expected to face a warmer and wetter future across all scenarios for the near-term and mid-century time periods compared to historical observations,” the report states. ICF ran four sets of numbers, factoring in climate models from 2007 and 2013 of both low and high projected emission scenarios. Wu and the Office of Sustainability cited the

ICF findings in their November 2015 GreenWorks report. “By the end of the century, we’re going to have way more days of 95-degrees and above,” Wu says. “Up to 56 days potentially, in high emission scenarios—21 of which could be in a row. Between 2000 and 2016, we’re seeing these projections are already coming true.” From 1950–1999, there was an average of zero annual days over 100 degrees in this area; from 2081–2099, ICF projects there being up to 16 a year. “Obviously, that’s not good,” she concludes. “That’s going to be unpleasant.” “Unpleasant” is a word you hear a lot in Wu’s office, though it is delivered with her trademark pleasantness. It seems to have become a blanket term for her description of what awaits us in a future after the effects of climate change are even more apparent in Philadelphia. “Extreme weather is going to get more extreme,” Wu continues. “So I do have more bad news.” Warmer summers aren’t the only thing that Philadelphians should expect as the overall temperature rises. The winters will be worse, too, due to increased precipitation. “It’s only a handful of inches of more precipitation,” Wu says, “but 3 to 4 of those inches are projected for the winter. One inch of winter precipitation can equal up to 14 inches of snow, depending on how it falls... so, ironically, global warming is in fact causing worse winters in Philadelphia.” The ambiguity of predicting weather can cause even further issues. What happens, for example, if the budget for snowplows is lowered based on the previous winter’s P HOTO BY G E N E SMI RNOV


THE GALLAGHER HOME IN SEA ISLE, N.J. scant snowfall, resulting in a depleted fleet facing what very well may be a monstrous cold season the following year? Wu assures us that the streets will always be plowed, but advanced planning could include reserves for extreme weather, so that reallocating budgets isn’t as difficult. An even more common threat will be flooding, with Philadelphia already experiencing 81 floods since 1996. Wu unfolds a map of the city included in her department’s 2015 report on preparing and adapting for the threats of climate change. The illustration shows the sections of Philadelphia most at risk from the rise of the Schuylkill and Delaware rivers, and unsurprisingly, it’s the waterfront neighborhoods that can expect to take the biggest hit as sea levels increase by 2 feet in 2050 and 4 feet in 2100. “This is what would be inundated in the worst, worst case scenario,” Wu says. “We’re not New York; we don’t need to wall ourselves off. But there’s significant portions of the city that are [in this case] permanently inundated, so you have to deal with that. The real issue for us with sea level rise is: If this is permanent inundation, and then a storm hits…” Wu flips the image over, and an ominous map on the other side has marked areas surrounding the Philadelphia International Airport, the Sports Complex, FDR Park and other landmarks as—at least temporary—swamps. “This is part of the city that doesn’t flood now—ever,” Wu says. “These people don’t think of themselves as being near the river. So that’s the worst case scenario: We have 6 feet of sea level rise, and then we have multiple big storms a year because the weather gets more extreme.” Wu leans back in her chair. “It’s not that it’s permanently uninhabitable,” she says. “It’s just that it’s... not as pleasant.”

A COMPLACENT PUBLIC A common trait among Philadelphia’s emergency management personnel is the delightful way in which they explain horrible things. But too few people are listening. On the third floor of the city library’s Fishtown branch in late September, two members of the city’s Office of Emergency Management (OEM), Laura Duff and Lynn Fisher, cheerfully hold court at a communi-

BEFORE THE HURRICANE

AFTER THE HURRICANE

ty meeting on disaster preparedness. Duff and Fisher’s job is to break down the sort of disasters commonly and uncommonly faced by Philadelphians, from earthquakes and extreme cold, to dam failure and hazardous train derailments. Their goal is also to instruct attendees on the best methods to prepare and react to such situations. According to an OEM survey, only 34 percent of city residents have three days’ worth of supplies on hand, and just under 49 percent have emergency plans for their homes. Unfortunately, with fewer than 10 people in the room, far fewer than 1 percent of Philadelphians were on hand to hear Duff and Fisher’s research. Hotter summers, more severe winters and increased flooding from storms will affect everyone in Philadelphia. But while the city can move power stations to higher ground and budget for more snowfall, when a disaster hits, what you have in your own home may be what saves you. Fisher had been hoping for a bigger turnout, as, presumably, she would prefer to deliver this information now, rather than through a bullhorn to a panicking crowd on doomsday. Regardless, Fisher explains staples of emergency management, such as having an evacuation plan for your home and what to keep in your “go bag”—bottled water, a flashlight with batteries, extra car and house keys, cash, a first aid kit, and important documents like a housing lease and medical information. “A will?” she’s asked. “Probably not,” she says. “We’re going to hope for the best.” At the back of the room lurks OEM’s

equally congenial deputy director for public affairs, Noelle Foizen. Even though she knows what she’s preparing the city for, Foizen isn’t put off by the sparse attendance of the meeting. “I don’t know if it’s the wonky title of these meetings that’s turning people off, or if they’re not really understanding how mitigation [works for] them,” she wonders. “That’s a word that many people don’t understand.” Mitigation, the term used to describe preparations in place for Philadelphia to withstand a natural disaster, could be a very lucrative word. According to the OEM, every dollar spent on mitigation efforts equals four dollars saved of recovery costs. Mitigation includes many facets, including families building stay-in-shelter kits in case of being kept in their homes for extended periods. The OEM advises people to maintain a gallon of drinking water per person per day, canned food, extra batteries, hygiene products, tools, a battery-powered AM/FM radio, a whistle to signal for help and iodine tablets with bleach—their website includes instructions on how to disinfect water with bleach. They encourage people to stay diligent about the viability of all of their supplies throughout the year. The scope of the disasters projected by Sarah Wu’s office could potentially lead to large scale evacuations, as well. That’s why OEM conducts exercises such as the 10-shelter drill they ran in September. “That was a fantastic drill that we did,” Foizen says. “We’re really confident in our ability to do one shelter, and we’re really confident in our ability to do three shelters, because we’ve done it recently for Sandy N OV E M B E R 20 16

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The Philadelphia Times MONDAY NOVEMBER 5, 2040 |

PHILADELPHIATIMES | CITY & SUBURBS | $6.50

NEWS AROUND THE CLOCK NEWS FROM AROUND THE REGION

PHILLYTIMES.COM ONLY IN PRINT

Elderly Woman Saved by Neighbor: ‘He was the only one who ever checked on me.’ By Frank Mills Maysie Evans, 84, says that her young neighbor, Jayson White, always checked in when a walk needed to be shoveled or the weather was unbearably hot. “My own kids live in Florida. Most of my friends are gone. I’m alone. Seeing Jayson always makes my day,” she said. “This time, he saved my life.” Evans had suffered through a recent round of medical ailments that consumed her day-to-day worry, and she did not know that an evacuation order had been issued for the city. “If he hadn’t come to find me, I’d be underneath the rubble of my home right now,” Evans said.

and Irene, and it’s just something that’s easily manageable.” A broader radius of affected areas is where things get trickier, Foizen says. “When you get to 10 shelters… our office is small. We’re only 30 people. If you think about all the moving pieces going on in an incident [for which] we’re setting up 10 shelters, there’s probably some sort of emergency that we’re managing, as well.” An emergency requiring 10 shelters is uncommon, for now, but a natural disaster of that caliber is within the realm of possibility, according to Fisher. “Large utility outages in extreme temperatures, or a hazardous materials incident, may also set our Mass Care and Sheltering Plan into motion, thus the possibility of 10 shelters,” she explains. A direct hit from Sandy would have certainly greenlit the operation. The exercise allowed OEM to fully test all the processes and systems in place; not just the people, but the equipment, logistics and transportation, as well as going through the process of registering the people in the shelters (all of which are schools) and making sure all of the services are available. “We learned a lot about things in our plan that will be addressed at our table talk in December,” Foizen says. “We’ll just talk through those issues and see how we can problem-solve as a city and move the plan forward.” Another of the OEM’s plans—which is up for revision in 2017—is the citywide evacuation blueprint. Eight years ago, all of Philadelphia was mapped out in case of a full withdrawal from the city. Through this process, the OEM determined the clearest routes for both people fleeing and for rescue workers coming in, as well as other aspects, such as which public transit lines will re-

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main open to aid with evacuation. “Philadelphia’s fortunate because there are very few incidents that would require the entire city to be evacuated,” Foizen explains. Plans are scalable to function as well for a city block as they would for the entire city, as developing neighborhood-by-neighborhood evacuations is far more manageable than trying to determine how to get 1.6 million people out of the area in a timely fashion. “That type of evacuation would be a multiday process,” Foizen notes. There are better turnouts for some of OEM’s other events, including a presentation on their READYHome Personal and Family Preparedness Workshops, which is important, as there is always more to learn about a city’s emergency management; for instance, bringing pets to shelters is not only permitted, but encouraged, and there exists a program called Red Paw to keep them safe. Foizen is adamant about residents filling out the hazard mitigation survey available on OEM’s website, as well as signing up for her office’s emergency alert system, ReadyPhiladelphia, to stay on the ball.

BECOMING A DISASTER AREA Should things get really out of hand, Philadelphia, like all regions, is supposed to be able to rely on federal aid from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) “The way federal disaster assistance works is extremely convoluted,” Wu laments. She says there are strict guidelines to the meticulous cataloging of resources used during funding for which a city is trying to be reimbursed in the aftermath, from destroyed structures to office supplies. According to FEMA’s Region III office (Region III covers Pennsylvania, Delaware,

Maryland, Washington D.C., Virginia and West Virginia), recovery funds for cities are split into to two categories: one for rebuilding structures exactly as they were, and another for rebuilding with future emergencies in mind. “FEMA has both Public Assistance (PA) and Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) programs to assist with disaster recovery,” a FEMA spokesperson said in an email. He explains that HMGP funds can be used to rebuild to specifications that might “mitigate the effects of future disasters.” It takes a governor of an affected state to request FEMA assistance from the president during a disaster, but in more obvious cases, a joint federal and state Preliminary Damage Assessment Team will be assigned. Their job is to determine the depth of the damage incurred by inhabitants and facilities in order to calculate the level of assistance required. Working in tandem with state personnel, FEMA would set up a phone line to serve as guidance for affected locals as well as disaster relief centers. In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, New York City was categorized as a major disaster area, the designation of which qualified businesses and citizens for disaster assistance. As the government explained at the time, funds included “home and property loans, help with finding and paying for temporary housing, and business loans.” FEMA, says the spokesperson, has its workers on their toes training alongside state and local programs for responses to hurricanes, floods and other disasters common to our region. The vigilance will be handy in the future, Wu says, as the effects of climate change potentially spread out the resources available to FEMA, as well as those at the disposal of her department.


Perhaps the threshold for federal assistance shifts in the wake of an influx of storms. “The projections show that extreme weather will be more frequent,” she says. “[If] extreme weather gets more common, are we going to get to this point where the federal government can’t intervene on all of them?” That could mean that cities, and their residents, would start to shoulder more of the costs of storms. Some people are already wondering why we use taxpayer money, for instance, to rebuild private homes that will be in another hurricane or flood’s path. Every city or location has different vulnerabilities. Having been pummeled during Hurricane Sandy, New York’s responses to further storm threats have been on a higher tier than those in Philadelphia, which was largely spared. An oceanography professor out of Stony Brook University on Long Island, Malcolm Bowman, has become a vocal advocate for a $35 billion sea barrier system that he says is “well worth” the cost, because they’ll be “saving New York City for another 100 years.” Philadelphia is a different city, with different issues. But we’re still looking to others for guidance and best practices. Wu explains, “By 2012, Sandy happened, Irene had happened; all of the cities were like, ‘We’re left holding the bag on this. We should probably think about it. We all at the same time sort of started to figure out how to adapt, but we don’t know what that means and it’s a new realm of work for us, so we all tried to figure it out together.” The collaborative efforts with New York and other cities have paid off. She credits her office’s “stealing and tweaking” of a system from Portland, Oregon, that more accurately projects carbon emissions based on a customizable input. Government departments are pillaged as well; Wu and her office got their hands on a tool that the Federal Highway Administration had developed to do downscaling of climate models that allowed the Office of Sustainability to get localized projections. The Urban Sustainability Directors Network, of which Philadelphia is a part, features a directory and a web portal for offices across the country to connect, allowing them to post questions and documents to

help each other out. Wu says the resource serves as the starting point for most projects: “Anytime we’re starting anything new, we’re like, ‘Who’s done this elsewhere?’ This is sort of a nascent community of practice.” OEM has a similar network called Big City Emergency Managers that has a quarterly meeting of program directors from major metropolitan areas—New York, Chicago, Houston, Dallas, Boston, D.C., Miami, San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Diego and Seattle all send representation. Here, strategies are picked apart based on training scenario results, and practices are shared to improve logistics nationwide.

THE NEIGHBOR FACTOR While we can look to other cities for best practices, part of the responsibility for emergency preparedness trickles down to where the situation is most dire: on the neighborhood level. “There’s very little that people outside of Philadelphia can do to help Philadelphia adapt,” says Wu. Wu cites a story that took place during a heat wave in Chicago, in which two bordering neighborhoods saw dramatic discrepancies in their death tolls despite similar populations and layouts. The difference was that in one neighborhood people were checking up on each other, making sure those who were more vulnerable were taken care of as the temperature climbed. Her point is a shared one—“checking on neighbors” was a bullet point in every one of the disaster scenarios presented by Duff and Fisher at the OEM meeting, as well. Generating plans for individual neighborhoods is more productive with the knowledge of what—and who—is there. “If there’s a bunch of elderly folks there, you’re going to have to be more sensitive. If you have a bunch of day cares or hospitals, you’re going to be more sensitive,” Wu explains. “I think the best neighborhood-level adaptation plans will be responsive to local conditions on the ground...Hyperlocal neighborhood conditions.” Poverty is an aspect to consider when designing a plan to assist or escape. The more that is known, recorded and consistently updated, the more informed decisions— during drills or the real thing—become.

“What we need is for everyone to understand that this is pressing enough to be a priority.” — Sarah Wu, Philadelphia Office of Sustainability

“The question is, A) How do you do fund all this work?; and B) How do you figure out if what you’re doing is actually effective?” Wu asks. “Because the best adaptation measure is a measure that you never notice that you did, because nothing happens.” To review: Mitigation and adaptation is a sequence with constant effort, no end and no real sign that it’s working. And still, “I would prefer to have a jillion dollars to do it faster,” Wu says. “We’re in a good place, knowledge-wise, but the phases of implementation could be faster. I think that’s partially because people don’t think it’s urgent—because it’s a long-term problem—and partially because of the world we live in, in which we don’t have much money. What we need is for everyone to understand that this is pressing enough to be a priority.” Our lack of urgency, she says, is a global issue. It’s a matter of “Humanity not wanting to look our own mortality in the eye.”

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Grid Holiday

T F I G E D I GU 2016 by emily kovach

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The Arts & Culture Aficionado Philadelphia Chamber Music Society BuildYour-Own-ConcertSubscription

Magdalena Kožená, mezzo-soprano, and Malcolm Martineau, piano, during a recital at the Perelman Theater at the Kimmel Center

Classical music devotees can choose from all the remaining concerts of the 2016–2017 season of the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society. All tickets are $25 or less. Next year, you can participate in the official "build your own subscription program"—a modern idea from a time-honored cultural institution.

$25 or less pcmsconcerts.org

PlayArts Membership A newer addition to Fishtown’s burgeoning family friendly scene, this beautiful, airy space provides plenty of ways for little ones to get out the winter wiggles, with coffee and Wi-Fi for the grownups.

$44.99 for one month, $119.01 for three months playartsphilly.com

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Mt. Airy Art Garage Membership Gift an artist or art lover a membership at the $50 level and give them a year’s worth of involvement—discounts on workshops and classes, the opportunity to rent studios and more—with this up-and-coming community hub in Northwest Philly.

Philadelphia Sketch Club Membership Whether it’s painting, animating or video editing, being an artist can make for a solitary life; open the door to an established artists’ community with an annual membership to this esteemed club, including use of their 18th century clubhouse on South Camac Street.

$50

$150

mtairyartgarage.org

sketchclub.org

PHIT Comedy Improv Classes for Kids Encourage goofballs to channel their energy and ideas into improvisational storytelling through these eight-week courses, offered for kids grades K–12.

$199 phitcomedy.com


WHEN THE RAIN STOPS FALLING by Andrew Bovell Bovel

directed by Blanka Zizka October 12 – November 6, 2016

“Best New Play of the Year” –Time Magazine

SUCCESS STORIES

Get your tickets today!

wilmaTheaTeR.oRg (215) 546 -7824

Taysha Canales and Brian Ratcliffe Photo by Matt Saunders

FINANTA has been there for us 100%. Our lender, and the technical assistance they have provided, has been essential to our business every step of the way!

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Outdoor seating by the river Free 2 hour parking Free wifi Music on weekends Breakfast served all day Healthy sandwiches, salads & wraps 1 Boathouse Row 215-978-0900 www.cosmicfoods.com Corporate & Private Events 7 days a week, 8AM til/- Dusk

Save the Date

GRID

December Issue Release Party December 8, 2016 Reading Terminal Market

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GR IDPH I L LY.CO M NOVE M BE R 20 1 6


We’re famous for our buns, but just wait until you try our meat.

NOW OFFERING CATERING BY CHEF CARL DRAKE!

Our divine baked goods & delectable catering: one-stop shopping for your next event. 7725 Germantown Ave

215.248.9235

NightKitchenBakery.com

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the gardener Three-Month Flower Delivery Subscription Combat the endless gray of winter with cheerful fresh cut blooms delivered monthly to your doorstep from Snap Dragon Flowers' charming West Philly shop.

From $145 snapdragonphilly.com

Potting Soil Until the frost lifts and the ground softens, keep gardeners content tending to healthy indoor plants, bolstered by Organic Mechanics' premium-blend potting soil, enriched with compost, pine bark, coir, worm castings and perlite.

$11.99 for 16 quarts organicmechanicsoil.com

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‘The Hidden Life of Trees’ by Peter Wohlleben

Nursery Gift Certificate

Cedar Planter Box Class

The forest is a magical place, and this best-selling book by Peter Wohlleben, a respected German forester, proves it with scientific discoveries of trees’ communication habits, family structures, mutual support systems and other amazing facts.

Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve offers more than 200 species of plants native to our region. It also prizes education: Knowledgeable staff is there to answer questions. They also offer copious amounts of online resources for gardeners who want to become better acquainted with native gardening.

Give plants lovingly raised from tiny seeds a home they deserve with a cedar planter box built by hand in this one-day class from Philadelphia Woodworks. It's great for beginners and seasoned woodworkers alike.

$15

Various pricing

peter-wohlleben.de

bhwp.org

$149 + materials ($49) philadelphiawoodworks.com


WALK-IN WEDNESDAY Tours available each week

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Organic flour with a taste of history!

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www.daisyflour.com 800-624-3279 N OV E M B E R 20 16 G R I DP HI L LY.COM

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The Adventurer IN THE FIELD

Camp Supply and Tent Rentals City apartments don’t usually offer storage, so instead of jamming up tiny closets with camping equipment, rent high-quality tents and other accessories such as sleeping pads and mess kits, delivered to your doorstep by bicycle from Fireside Camp Supply.

Various prices firesidecampsupply.com

Sidekick Utility Belt No pockets? No problem. Leave the bulky backpack at home and strap on one of Fabric Horse's sturdy waxed canvas belts, accented with a pocket just the right size for a phone, cash and keys.

$98 fabrichorse.com

Hammock

Alpaca Boot Socks

United by Blue and Yellow Leaf, two socially conscious companies, have teamed up to create a colorful, durable, handwo-

Nothing negates the fun of adventure faster than soggy, cold feet. These boot socks from Cuttalossa —made with alpaca fiber raised

ven hammock, perfect for an afternoon nap after a long day of exploration.

in New Jersey and manufactured in North Carolina—wick moisture, provide padding and keep toes dry.

Philadelphia Canoe Club offers classes and lessons for paddlers of every level—from novice kayakers to experienced whitewater rafters. Your outdoorsy bretheren will be able to move beyond the woods and enjoy the many waterways in and around Philadelphia.

$195

$35

Various prices

unitedbyblue.com

cuttalossa.us

philacanoe.org

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GRIDPH IL LY.CO M NOVE M BE R 201 6

Kayak or Canoe Lessons


ON THE STREET

Wagoneer Utility Tote

Burnside Bike Rack

For those perpetually on the go, a roomy tote keeps everything on hand. This handsome bag from Arden + James is big enough for a laptop, gym clothes and whatever else busy bodies might need, and it’s made from locally sourced materials.

Loma Living's simple, modern design in mahogany or maple wood declutters small spaces, and the no-frills geometric shape makes it extra easy to grab the bike off this rack and get going.

Field Pocket Raw Denim Vest

Premium Bike Tune-Up

This old-stock denim vest with vintage buttons and ticking from Forager Co. looks like the best thrift store score of all time, but is actually made on a farm in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, by Amish and Mennonite craftspeople.

Bikes need love to keep us out on the streets. Get a tune-up gift certificate for the cyclist in your life from your local shop. We love Bicycle Revolutions on Fabric Row in Philadelphia for its low-key sales and steller service, and their tuneups are top notch.

$160

$245

$60

ardenandjames.com

shop.foragerco.com

bicyclerevolutions.com

$110 lomaliving.com

1. Leather Camera Strap Soup up a DSLR with Cicada's buttery soft leather camera strap, comfortable across the neck and reinforced with double rivets to keep the camera close for those can’t-miss spontaneous shots.

$59.99 cicadaleathercompany.com

2. Philly Art T-shirts

2

1

Conrad Benner, the voice of the spirited street art blog Streets Department, collaborated with Philly-based TogTees to create fresh, distinctive designs that capture the essence of the city’s cultural underground.

$28 togtees.com

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Bicycle Club of Philadelphia (BCP) offers numerous FREE group recreational rides with Leaders throughout the year (weather & road conditions permitting). From mid-November to mid-March, we also offer Sunday morning HIKES (on foot) along the WISSAHICKON (Valley Green).

Visit our monthly Ride Calendar (phillybikeclub.org/newbcp/rides/calendar) to find a ride (or hike) that matches your ability/fitness level and your preference for distance and pace.

BCP members also enjoy: a monthly newsletter, an email list to share cycling-related topics, social & educational events throughout the year, as well as discounts on purchases at area bike shops.

If you and your partner ride a TANDEM, you’ll enjoy our tandem division, the PATS (Philly Area Tandem Society). If you’d like to connect with the PATS, please send an email to: tandems@phillybikeclub.org.

Please visit our website for more details on club events and benefits of membership (for only $15/year). Please send your questions to info@phillybikeclub.org. We’d love to meet you at one of our rides, hikes, or social events!

Bicycle Club of Philadelphia (BCP) is an all-volunteer, non-profit organization that promotes all types of bicycling in the Greater Philadelphia area, in the suburbs, as well as the city.

phillybikeclub.org RICH ACADEMIC CURRICULUM TAUGHT THROUGH THE PRISM OF

Pantone colors: blue = Pantone® 2736 red = Pantone® 711 gray = Pantone® 424

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black with percentage of gray: black = 100% black gray = 60% black

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Schedule a tour today! 610.933.3635 ext 108

Celebrating 75 years of joyful,inspired learning

admissions@Kimberton.org 410 W Seven Stars Rd Phoenixville, PA

Kimberton.org

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GOOD NIGHT MAKES A GREAT GIFT. $

9

FOR ONLY

95

AVAILABLE AT fow.org/good-night-wissahickon Good Night Wissahickon Valley Park is a children’s book sure to delight pre-schoolers and their parents. This brightly colored picture book takes children on a hike through Philadelphia’s Wissahickon Valley Park.

A Quaker study, retreat, and conference center welcoming all backgrounds and faiths.

SAVE THE DATE December 1- 4, 2016

Visioning and Creating a Moral Economy

A wonderland NOVEMBER 12, 2016

FALL SERVICE DAY Volunteer at your favorite Philly park!

loveyourpark.org

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the animal lover

3 Catnip Toys Ratherbee’s “super potent” catnip is ecologically grown and free from fillers.

Various prices ratherbeecatnip.com

1

2

1. Handknitted Sweater

2. Canvas Dog Collar

Keep your canine cozy—whatever its size—with these cute sweaters, handknit in South America according to fair trade specifications and sold through the website of Chilly Dog, a company based in Broomall, Pennsylvania.

Paratodo, a newly launched philanthropic menswear brand, is committing 25 percent of its profits to charity. Its first collaboration—including these classic duck canvas dog collars in navy, orange and yellow—is with PAWS, Philly’s largest no-kill animal shelter.

From $32.99 chillydogsweaters.com

$35 paratodo.co

3. Locally Made Treats The ingredients in Pennsylvania-based Paws Barkery's treats are all sourced and manufactured in the U.S. Its wire-cut biscuts are softer than many treats, which means even senior dogs should be able to enjoy them. Grid's resident canine, Henry, sure did!

$6.99 pawsbarkery.com

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Grooming Gift Card Arguably the worst part of pet ownership is bathing a water-hating dog or cat. Relieve that stress with a gift card to Chez Bow Wow in Northern Liberties, a pet grooming salon and spa staffed with patient animal lovers who use environmentally safe products.

Various prices chezbowwow.com


FALL 2016 KITCHEN CONVERSATIONS Fri., Nov. 4, 7:00pm at Cliveden Philip Scott, RA & Dr. Emily Cooperman THE 1767 KITCHEN DEPENDENCY Light Meal by Chef Valerie Erwin Suggested donation: $15 Reserve: 1767kitchen.eventbrite.com

Fri., Nov. 18, 7:00pm at Cliveden John Carr, Materials Conservation

$25 off your cat's first visit. NEW CLIENT SAVINGS!

THE 1959 MID-CENTURY MODERN KITCHEN Light meal by Chef Valerie Erwin Suggested Donation $15 Reserve: 1959kitchen.eventbrite.com 6401 Germantown Ave., Phila., PA (enter Cliveden St. near Morton St.) Questions? 215-848-1777 x223 Supported by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage

8220 Germantown Ave Philadelphia, PA 19118 (215) 247-9560 chestnuthillcatclinic.com

N OV E M B E R 20 16 G R I DP HI L LY.COM

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the self-care guru 1 3

4

2 1. Cacao-Satsuma Cane Sugar Scrub

2. Beard Balm

3. Face Mist

4. Vegan Soaps

Nourish and awaken skin with Zoet Bathlatier's deluxe scrub with cacao for antioxidant power, coffee for toning, cocoa butter for moisturizing and deliciously scented essential oils.

Facial hair should be just as pampered as the hair on your head, though it rarely is. Four Birds Beauty's mango, cocoa and organic shea butters condition and coif even the wildest beards and ’staches.

Winter can wreak havoc on the skin and the soul—these hydrating, balancing mists from Wilde Gatherings come in five different blends informed by ayurvedic principles, and are designed to revive from the inside out.

Replace chemical-laced bath products with these handmade vegan soap bars from Urban Cabin Soap Co. Scents such as activated charcoal and citrus geranium use salts, clays, oils and herbs to cleanse and exfoliate.

$28

$11

From $21

$8

etsy.com/shop/fourbirdsbeauty

wildegatherings.com

urbancabinsoapco.com

Herbal Face Steam

Fabric Yoga Strap

Mani-Pedi Package

Holistic Facial

Here’s our idea of a perfect winter evening: Fill a bowl with hot water, steep Bolted from the Blue's mixture of dried rosebuds and lavender, and breathe in the fragrant steam, dreaming of spring.

This colorful patchwork strap from Steel Pony makes toting your mat to class easy and comfortable, so you have less excuses standing between you and 90 blissful minutes of breathing and movement.

For toxin-free pampering, try the coconut mani/pedi and mango foot massage at Mi Cumbia Organica. Polishes are water-based and the space itself is built from VOCfree, sustainable materials.

Green City Beauty uses organic, wild-crafted ingredients like Indian herbs and Egyptian clay to purify, while a mini-massage de-stresses, combining to create a truly healing, rebalancing facial.

$10

$35

$100

$90

etsy.com/shop/boltedfromtheblue

steelpony.com

tierramiaorganicnailspa.com

greencitybeauty.com

zoetbathlatier.com

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We have the perfect gift for everyone on your list! (including you)

FAIR TRADE WINTER CHIC MITTS & PONCHOS VINTAGE BUTTON & GLASS JEWELERY VEGAN BAGS & CLUTCHES gr ee n sp a! or ga ni c! wo nd er fu l!

gift certiicates

all organic, award-winning facials, massage, waxing, wraps & Reiki

CELEBRATE, TRANSFORM, RE-MIND

get the app to book on your phone: “eviama life”

109 S 13th St

on the second oor & gorgeous

MIDTOWN PHILLY

215-545-3344 eviama.com

Mariposa Food Co op your source fo r

gro ceries

Open to the public daily, 8am - 10pm 4824 Baltimore Ave, Philadelphia mariposa.coop/connect | 215-729-2121

Book your holiday party with Birchtree today! birchtreecatering.com | (215) 744-9489

N OV E M B E R 20 16 G R I DP HI L LY.COM

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the fashion plate

Leather Kilim Boots

Pocket Squares

Bio-Design Scarves

Crocheted Hats

Souli and Souli co-owner Ali Souli (originally from Tunisia) designs these gorgeous boots in Philly, travels to Morocco to source the raw materials and works with artisans in Marrakech to construct the shoes, with a conscientious focus on fair wages and environmentally sound practices.

Sass up a suit or blazer with the Pink Lapel's colorful pocket square in peppy floral patterns, snappy seersucker or hip bow-and-arrows motif, all handmade by this small, indie accessories company.

Edgy fashion design company Supra Endura partnered with the Wistar Institute, an international biomedical research powerhouse located right here in Philadelphia, on a capsule collection of scarves in luxe fabrics, with patterns inspired by abstracted shapes of cells. From each purchase, $2 is donated to Wistar.

Soft, chunky yarn comes together in a rainbow of colors, with whimsical buttons and other finishing touches on the Sweet Mama Lew hat, created by Elissa Kara, the owner-operator of Nice Things Handmade boutique on East Passyunk Avenue.

$12–$25 thepinklapel.com

$100–$120

Various prices nicethingshandmade.com

$187–$198

etsy.com/shop/souliandsouli

supra-endura.myshopify.com

1. Handpicked Vintage

1

Founded by a small group of local vintage obsessives, Cactus Collective on Fabric Row presents well-curated racks of garments, accessories and jewelry from decades past, as well as goods from local artists.

Various prices instagram.com/cactus_collective

2. Lila Stuempfig Handmade Shoes When is a shoe a work of art? When it’s handmade by Germantown-based Lila Stuempfig, a third-generation Philadelphia artist and craftswoman who makes shoes, leather goods and jewelry, putting love and attention into every detail of her creations.

2

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$200 & up stuempfig.com


AT

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the homebody 1

2 4

3 1. Eco Print Pillows Textile artist Elizabeth McTear from Honest Alchemy uses the shapes of leaves and plants, and the natural pigments within them, to adorn raw silk pillows. Her methods produce a chic contrast, at once both wild and refined.

$90 honestalchemy.co

2. Philadelphia Trivia Playing Card Game Think you know Philadelphia? Put yourself to the test with a trivia game about landmarks, neighborhoods, events and other factors that make our city special. Pick up a few decks from Hidden City Philadelphia—the game requires one deck per player!

3. Duvet Covers The Japanese shibori hand-dying technique lends ethereal patterns and textures to these one-of-akind duvet covers from Riverside Tool & Die, perfect for the stylish sleepyhead.

$186–$357 riversidetoolanddye.com

4. Soy Candles and One-of-a-Kind Notebooks Pair a Craft Foundry soy candle in a relaxing scent (Forest Fir is divine) with a notebook made from handmade paper and upcycled materials for a year of introspective writing.

$8

Candles $10, journals $45–$95

hiddencitymercantile.com

craftfoundry.com

Green Cleaning Gift Certificate & Cleaner What could delight a homebody more than the guarantee of a clean abode? Philly Maid Green uses entirely made-from-scratch, nontoxic products, which drastically improve the quality of indoor air. At the very least, spring for a few bottles of the company's vinegar-based all-purpose cleaner, scented with lavender, lemon or eucalyptus oil.

Gift cards vary in price, cleaner $5.55 phillymaidgreen.com

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Aiver Co. Wreaths

Porcelain Berry Basket Set

Hand whittled branches—each one unique—are embellished with a combination of dried and fresh flowers, plants and herbs to create geometric wreaths with a cool, minimalist woodland aesthetic.

A clever illusion: These familiar berry baskets from Heirloom Home Studio are porcelain, not cardboard like the ones we usually see at the market, and are handmade by Glenside-based couple Gregg and Jackie Moore.

$25-$40

$46

aiverco.bigcartel.com

etsy.com/shop/ heirloomhomestudio


THIS YEAR, CHOOSE A MEMORABLE GIFT FROM OBJECTS OF DESIRE FOUND AT JANUS

1135 Pine St. Philadelphia, PA 19107

Experience the Simple Joys of the Holiday Season

Art Shop circleofhope.net @circleofhope.net #circleofhope #artshop

FFday, November 18 6PM-10PM Adults only, FREE admission Saturday, November 19 100-5PM Adults $5, children under 14 Free

6000 Wayne Avenue Rain or shine

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MA RKET WATCH

Crunchy Leaves for Fall Cilantro and lime add kick to cabbage by peggy paul casella

N

ot only is cabbage one of the most ancient vegetables available today, it’s also one of the most hardy and versatile. When temperatures plunge in late fall and the first frost wilts most other vegetables and leafy greens (like its cousin kale), this brassica only improves in flavor. It stores well, too, making it one of the few crunchy, leafy vegetables that are available all through winter. Cabbage is delicious in all sorts of applications: raw salads and slaws, sauerkrauts and pickles, soups and braises, sautés and roasts, rollups and casseroles. It contains especially high amounts of antioxidants, which help detoxify the body, protect against certain cancers and may decrease “bad” blood cholesterol levels. Plus, cabbage is also rich in vitamin K, which aids in bone and brain health, and vitamin C, which combats free radicals and protects the body from infection. Choose firm, compact heads of cabbage with glossy, unblemished leaves that appear crisp, not wilted. Whole and cut heads will keep in the fridge, tightly wrapped, for a few weeks or up to two months (though their nutrient content will decrease with age).

Cabbage-Kohlrabi-Carrot Slaw with Cilantro and Lime Dressing Serves 8 to 10 ■■ 1 medium head red (or green) cabbage, quartered, cored and shredded ■■ 1/2 pound carrots, peeled and shredded ■■ 1/2 pound kohlrabi, peeled and shredded ■■ 1 large bunch cilantro, leaves roughly chopped ■■ Juice of 3 limes ■■ 2/3 cup vegetable or safflower oil ■■ 1 ½ teaspoon granulated sugar ■■ Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper 1. In a very large bowl, toss together the shredded cabbage, carrots and kohlrabi.

Add the cilantro and toss to combine. 2. In a medium-size jar, combine the lime juice and oil and shake well until the

mixture looks milky. Add the sugar and shake well for a few seconds until the sugar is incorporated. (Alternatively, whisk the lime juice and oil in a bowl, then add the sugar and whisk again until combined.) 3. Pour the dressing over the slaw, toss well to combine, and season generously

with salt and pepper. (You’ll need more salt than you think: Just keep tasting the slaw and adding more until the seasoning is to your liking.) 4. Cover and refrigerate the slaw for at least an hour or two before serving.

It will keep for up to three days in the fridge.

Fun Fact According to the “Oxford Companion to Food,” ancient Greeks believed that cabbage first grew from the sweat of Zeus, which may have accounted for the vegetable’s dank aroma when cooked. Peggy Paul Casella is a cookbook editor, writer, urban vegetable gardener, produce peddler and author of the blog Thursday Night Pizza.

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Clean Laundry Clean Planet Clean Slates

Non-toxic bedding for a healthier sleep Luxury Organic Mattresses, Pillows, and Toppers Visit one of our showrooms today in Paoli or Doylestown 83 E. Lancaster Pk. Paoli, PA 610-647-4068 323 S. Main St. Doylestown, PA 215-345-5551 YourOrganicBedroom.com

Sustainable Laundry and Linen Solutions for Philly’s Laundry and Linen Residents and Solutions Businesses for

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Save 10% off your first order. Code: GRID10 WashCycleLaundry.com

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SHOP L OCAL

Where the Spirit Takes Us New and expanding regional distilleries by emily kovach

Then we perfected the recipe, and that took us a few years. During that time, there was planning, budgeting and acquiring permits. Why Kensington for your HQ? BF: Kensington is very friendly to startups and creatives. Plus, I’ve lived here for 11 years and my house is five minutes away. That makes things easier because I’m putting in 50 to 70 hours a week. We are off the beaten path, so we save money on rent. But we need more neighborhood traffic. We’re open on the weekends for tours and tasting and we get a lot of tourists… we’re a destination.

Brian Forrest at the whiskey distilling room of Red Brick Distillery

A Startup Turns 1 Red Brick Distillery builds their business out of barrels Red Brick Distillery opened in October 2015 in a 900-square-foot warehouse in Kensington. The tiny operation currently makes four products: single malt whiskey, barrel strength whiskey, sugar wash rum and pineapple rum. Grid chatted with founder and distiller Brian Forrest about Red Brick’s first year in the business.

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GRIDPH I L LY.CO M NOVEM BE R 201 6

How did you and co-founder Zach Cohen start up this company? BF: We met five years ago when I was a contractor working on his house. We realized we were both into homebrewing, so we hung out and made whiskey as a fun project, which turned out so well that we felt we could make a business out of it.

What’s your style? BF: Fresh and local—we make our whiskey from 85 percent Pennsylvania-grown barley. We do everything in house. The whole process is a million steps that affect the outcome, so it’s vital to have control. We play around with flavors. We have something new coming out called From the Woods. It’s similar to a birch beer recipe: fermented brown sugar and honey steeped in black birch twig, aged in once-used whiskey barrels. I’d love to do something with local apples and fresh cider. Once you start thinking about it, the ideas are endless! Find Red Brick products at their distillery at 2628 Martha St., the East Passyunk Fountain, Dickinson Square Park, Rittenhouse and Swarthmore farmers markets, and at local bars like Martha and Barcade.


S H OP L OCAL

Revival

New Gins from Brandywine Branch Distillers

Brandywine Branch Distillers’ century-old stone barn

About 50 miles northwest of Philadelphia, a small borough in Chester County is home to Brandywine Branch Distillers, a craft-driven company that’s pushing the envelope with its Revivalist Gins. These single-batch spirits run through hand-hammered copper stills, and are infused with an incredible range of herbs and botanicals to create five seasonal “expressions”: Equinox, Summertide, Harvest, Solstice and spicy DragonDance. This May, the distillery bottled its first run of Custom Cask Straight Bourbons, aged in custom charred new American white oak casks. The distillery doesn’t offer tours yet, but its bistro is open Thursday through Saturday, serving small plates and an extensive list of artistic cocktails.

Homegrown Homecoming Philadelphia Distilling Expands Since its founding in 2005, Philadelphia Distilling Company, perhaps best known for Bluecoat Gin, has been operating out of its headquarters in a nondescript industrial park in Northeast Philly. The company is on the cusp of a serious upgrade—this month, it will relocate to Fishtown, as part of the entertainment complex adjacent to the Fillmore Philadelphia concert venue on Delaware Avenue. “We wanted a place where people could come and have cocktails, learn about the distilling process and really feature the whole grain-to-glass process,” says co-founder Andrew Auwerda. The 15,000-square-foot former factory will more than triple the company’s capacity, allowing Philadelphia Distilling to add new products like aged whiskies, amaro, and extra small batch experiments and one-offs. The aesthetic merges the building’s industrial roots with a modern sensibility: atrium-like vaulted ceilings, exposed brick

Andrew Auwerda of Philadelphia Distilling

galore, and dramatic windows and light fixtures. In addition to the production facility, which will be on display behind a huge cocktail bar, the space will be home to an R&D lab, a retail space, a restaurant, complete with an outdoor patio by Groundswell De-

sign Group (of Spruce Street Harbor Park), and a fourth floor tasting room and party space with superb skyline views. The facility is slated to open this month, and the restaurant and courtyard components will evolve throughout the winter and spring.

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SHOP L OCAL

Day Sippers

Four nearby craft wineries and cideries worth the trip

Penns Woods Winery Drive time from Philadelphia: 35 minutes Situated on 30 verdant acres in Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, this 12-yearold winery is open year round for $10 wine flights and $15 artisan cheese plates in the tasting room or on the patio overlooking the vineyards. Penns Woods’ award-winning wines range from crisp, bright Grüner Veltliner to toasty, red, fruit-forward Cabernet Franc Reserve.

Another reason to visit: Robust event programming, including live music on Saturday afternoons, and seasonal activities like yoga in the vineyards during warmer months. Penns Woods’ vineyard in spring

Stone & Key Cellars Drive time from Philadelphia: 60 minutes Founded in 2013 by wine industry veterans Jason and Deb Harris, this Montgomeryville-based operation runs a unique hands-on, designyour-own wine program for budding vintners. Looking for less of a commitment? Stone & Key’s tasting room is open seven days a week for wine sampling and sales.

Another reason to visit: 64-ounce growler fills of their Apple Brandy Barrel Aged Cider, voted Cider of the Year at the 2016 Philadelphia Beer Scene awards. Specialty cocktails from Stone & Key Cellars

Rowan Asher Winery & Hard Cidery Drive time from Philadelphia: 90 minutes Inspired by their travels to California’s Napa Valley and backpacking through Europe, Misty and Matthew Stallard opened the Poconos’ first urban micro winery and hard cidery in Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, in October 2015. Rowan Asher sources all of the fruit for their products from farmers and craft raw wines and ciders, like Indian Head, a semi-dry cider infused with chamomile, and the silky 98 Malbec, oaked for 12 months.

Another reason to visit: The modern rustic taproom also features local beers on draft. The tasting room at Rowan Asher

Wyndridge Farm Drive time from Philadelphia: 2 hours You may recognize the name, as Wyndridge’s ciders and beers are on tap at many local bars. To visit the source, head to Dallastown (about 20 minutes from York, Pennsylvania), sometimes referred to as “the Napa Valley of Apples.” The farm features a full service restaurant with a well-rounded food menu. All of Wyndridge’s champagne-style ciders, craft beers and housemade sodas are on draft.

Another reason to visit: A working fireplace warms up the dining room in winter, and the outdoor patio offers picturesque views of the farm in spring and summer.

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Green apple hard cider from Wyndridge Farms


The Art of Fermentation

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Seasonal Six-Pack This winter, warm up with cold brews Selene Saison Farmhouse-style dark saison Victory Brewing Company Meant to be “celestial sister” to Victory’s popular Helios Ale, this dark, wild-fermented saison is brewed with a four-malt profile (pilsner, pale chocolate, rye and chocolate), and bottled in a pretty 750ml bottle. Selene pours a beautiful, hazy brown and tastes of leathery funk and dark chocolate.

Pata Negra Schwarzbier Sterling Pig Brewery This Media, Pennsylvania-based brewery makes Pata Negra, a smooth chocolatey German-style dark lager with pilsner, munich, chocolate wheat and carafa malts, as well as Mt. Hood hops—all known for their sweet, floral characteristics. The result is a deep black beer with notes of cocoa nibs, coffee and mild smokiness.

Heart in Hand Smoky German-style rauchbier Saint Benjamin Brewing Company Recreate fireside coziness with a smoke-tinged lager, big on malts and mild on hops. Not as heavy-handed as most American smoked beers, Heart in Hand (named after one of the original Philadelphia fire companies that Ben Franklin helped to found) is well balanced and sippable thanks to this nanobrewery’s experienced crew.

Salted Caramel Chocolate Stout Salted caramel chocolate stout Brewery ARS This eponymous holiday-ready 9% ABV brew is redolent of chocolate, the flavor of which comes from a blend of various chocolate malts, not actual cocoa. The caramel is handmade by brewer Sean Arsenault’s wife, and is added directly to the beer during the brewing process.

Punkless Dunkel Pumpkin wheat ale Neshaminy Creek Brewing Company Pumpkin beer is a divisive topic among craft beer enthusiasts, but the numbers don’t lie: This is one of Neshaminy Creek’s most popular seasonal offerings. Their creative take adds actual pumpkin to the mash, as well as brown sugar and pie spices to the boil, for a sweet and spicy dunkel.

Belgian Freeze Belgian-style winter ale River Horse Brewing Company This full-bodied amber ale pleases the palate with burnt sugar, vanilla and mild bitterness, and chases the chills away with a bolstering alcohol warmth. 54

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Look for St. Ben’s in cans: Wit or Witout & Inca

Now

TAP

ROOM Open

Open Tues-Fri at 4 pm & Sat-Sun at 11 am STBENJAMINBREWING.COM N.

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Cheers Relax with Paradocx wine this holiday season Paradocx wine makes a great gift and Paradocx Vineyard is an excellent choice for a holiday venue 1833 Flint Hill Road Landenberg, PA 610.255.5684 Visit our website for more information

paradocx.com Paradocx Vineyard #paradocxvineyard @pdxvineyard

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HOM E STEAD ACT S

Firepit Fun Stoking our primal instincts with fall flames by anna herman

A

few years back I read a book called “Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human,” which posits that learning to use fire was the essential factor in the evolution of mankind. Sitting around a fire does indeed feel like a quintessentially human experience— satisfying the primal desires for warmth and light in the darkness. We may be less concerned about protection from lurking wild beasts, but certainly appreciate the strength in numbers when friends and family gather round together. While summer may be the season for beach bonfires, fall is when a fire allows us to spend time outside even as the nights cool off.

Outdoor fires get tricky in urban environs. Barbecue grills are common in city parks, fire rings are not. Philly’s fire code prohibits open burning except by approval; the air quality code prohibits open fires except for home cooking, which—as someone old enough to remember the smoke from leaf and brush fires—is a good thing. So what should those of us do who want to sing around the campfire? Portable outdoor fireplaces used in compliance with city guidelines—outlined at phila.gov— are permitted. A range of clay, metal and stone “patio fireplaces” can be set up safely and legally in the city, and with some creativity you can build and use a fire pit

in your backyard or community garden. One of my neighbors found a capacious cup-shaped castoff industrial artifact made of heavy-gauge iron. Buried partway in a pit of sand, surrounded by pea gravel, it resulted in striking feature to the backyard, and a perfect spot to contain the flames of burning logs. I simply dug up a small section of lawn—20 feet from my house—spread sand, and arranged bricks and stones to create a semipermanent area for backyard cooking and occasional small bonfires. With a variety of camping style grates and various cast iron pans and Dutch ovens, I grill, rotisserie, bake beans and even make fruit cobbler in my backyard.

MAKING A FIRE PIT

ENJOYING YOUR FIRE PIT SAFELY

~ Clear grass and other flammable materials from the site. Spread a 3- to 5-inch layer of sand as the base. Dig out the grass around the perimeter for at least 10 inches as dry underground roots can spread fire. A “break” in vegetation will help prevent an escaped fire from spreading. ~ Pile dirt, sand, bricks or rocks around the pit to help prevent fire on the ground from escaping. ~ The fire pit should be at least 6 inches deep at the center and 2 feet across, to help keep the embers and flames contained.

Standard cautions apply here: Everyone knows that you shouldn’t leave a fire unattended, that pets and children should always be attended, and that wearing loose clothing or scarves is asking for trouble—as is building a bigger fire than necessary. Here are some other good measures to keep in mind. ~ Use a wire mesh cover to keep embers inside and help prevent children or pets from falling in. ~ Don’t burn garbage or paper products that can easily spark and throw off embers, and avoid soft woods like pine or cedar that are prone to “popping” and throwing sparks ~ Be prepared. Keep a container of water and a hose nearby in case of an emergency.

LIGHTING YOUR FIRE PIT First of all, if it’s extremely windy, it’s not safe to light your fire, and you should always check the wind direction before lighting a fire so that you can remove anything flammable downwind of your pit. Never use any flammable fluids (gasoline, lighter fluid, etc.) to light or relight fires. ~ If the ground is very dry, drench the perimeter of the pit an hour or two before building the fire ~ Use rolled newspapers under stacked kindling topped with small logs to get fire started. Add larger logs once the kindling is burning well. ~ Make a homemade fire starter by melting down candle stubs and pouring them over dryer lint in a clean and dry waxed milk carton. Cut into 2-inch slices when firm. One or two slices will light kindling.

EXTINGUISHING SAFELY Did you know that ashes can still be hot enough to cause a fire even after two or three days? Keep these practices in mind when it’s time to call it a night. ~ Have a shovel and dirt or sand nearby to cover any escaped flames. ~ Extinguish with water: Drown it and stir it with the shovel to make sure it’s fully extinguished. ~ Dispose of the ashes in a safe manner; keep a metal can that is used solely for ash storage. ~ Do not discard hot ashes in a compost pile, paper bag, cardboard box or anything that is combustible.

Anna Herman is a garden educator who raises chickens, ducks, bees, fruits and veggies in her Mount Airy backyard.

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EVENT S

A runner from the 5-mile Green Ribbon Trail Race, to be held this year Nov. 5

N ovember 1–6

N ovember 1–January 8

N ovember 3

‘When the Rain Stops Falling’ at Wilma Theater

Paint The Revolution: Mexican Modernism, 1910–1950

Visualizing Sustainability Series: The Sexual Politics of Meat

Directed by Wilma Theater’s Artistic Director Blanka Zizka, “When the Rain Stops Falling” follows four generations of a family from 1959 to 2039. It is a lyrical and theatrical meditation on humanity in the face of a changing climate.

This exhibition tells the story of an exhilarating period through masterpieces by Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco, David Alfaro Siqueiros, Frida Kahlo, Rufino Tamayo and their contemporaries. The exhibition takes its name from an essay by American novelist John Dos Passos.

Carol Adams analyzes images in popular culture through an ecofeminist approach, demonstrating the interconnected oppressions of sexism, racism and speciesism.

wilmatheater.org WHEN: Tuesday-Sundays. See website for times.. COST: $10 to $35 WHERE: Wilma Theater, 265 S. Broad St.

philamuseum.org WHEN: Ongoing through Jan. 8, 2017 COST: General admission $0–$20 WHERE: Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2600 Benjamin Franklin Parkway

N ovember 1–20 Autumn’s Colors and Chrysanthemum Festival More than 17,000 chrysanthemums were nurtured and trained, some for more than a year, by Longwood Gardens’ horticulturists to resemble balls, spirals, columns, pagodas and more. Chrysanthemum Festival is the largest display of exhibition chrysanthemums in the United States. longwoodgardens.org WHEN: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. COST: $20; discounts for kids, seniors and students WHERE: Longwood Gardens, 1001 Longwood Road, Kennett Square, Pa.

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N ovember 2 South Philly Green Drinks South Philadelphia Green Drinks is a chapter of Delaware Valley Green Drinks and part of a worldwide movement to bring sustainably minded individuals together to network, share ideas and strengthen communities. greenlimbs.com WHEN: 6 to 8 p.m. COST: Pay as you go WHERE: Bridget Foy’s, 200 South St.

library.temple.edu WHEN: 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. COST: Free WHERE: Paley Library Lecture Hall 1210 Polett Walk, Ground Floor

Nature Preschool Open House Learn about the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education’s nature-based preschool program, for ages 3 to 5. Explore the curriculum, philosophy and values of the school, meet the teachers and tour the classrooms. Children are welcome to attend—there will be activities to engage them. schuylkillcenter.org WHEN: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. COST: Free WHERE: The Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, 8480 Hagy’s Mill Road


EVENT S

N ovember 5, 12, 19 and 26 Winter Wellness Walks at Morris Arboretum Brisk walks led by experienced volunteer guides that stick to the paved paths around Morris Arboretum. Offered Saturdays, November through March. morrisarboretum.org WHEN: 10:30 to 11:30 p.m. COST: Free with admission, $0-$17 WHERE: Morris Arboretum, 100 E. Northwestern Ave.

N ovember 5

Boy Scout & Cub Scout Day At the National Constitution Center, scouts will enjoy an action-packed day of learning about American history and the importance of good citizenship—all while meeting badge, patch or journey requirements. constitutioncenter.org WHEN: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. COST: $14 WHERE: National Constitution Center, 525 Arch St.

Brawlerfest Join Yards Brewing Company in “fighting the good fight” at Brawlerfest: an oldschool beer ball celebrating Philly’s love for the underdog. brawlerfest.com WHEN: 2 to 7 p.m. COST: Early bird tickets $45; designated driver tickets $20 WHERE: 500 Spring Garden St.

Challenge yourself in this 5-mile race, ideal for both experienced and new trail runners. Runners will start at Parkside Place Park.

N ovember 5–6

wvwa.org

Philly Bike Expo

Aramingo Yard Tree Giveaway Philadelphia residents can register to plant up to two free trees in their yards this fall. Select from large and medium shade trees, small flowering trees and fruit trees. Please register online or over the phone: 215-683-0233. treephilly.org WHEN: 10 a.m. to noon COST: Free WHERE: Aramingo TD Bank Store, 2267 E. Butler St.

Winterizing Your Garden with Nicole Sugerman This workshop will discuss different methods and aspects of getting a garden winter-ready. Participants will learn strategies for continuing to grow food throughout the season, including lessons on which crops are most cold-hardy, and how to store crops for longevity. Nicole Sugerman is the co-manager of Guild House Farm, Greener Partners in North Philadelphia. jewishfarmschool.org WHEN: 1 to 3 p.m. COST: $10 suggested donation WHERE: Jewish Farm School, 5020 Cedar Ave.

Highlands Hunt Breakfast

Green Ribbon Trail Race

WHEN: 9 to 11 a.m. COST: $30 to $35 WHERE: 1 Parkside Place, North Wales, Pa.

N ovember 6

More than 150 exhibitors gather to promote “fun, function, fitness and freedom on two wheels” for Philly Bike Expo’s seventh year. A full list of seminars and activities are available online. phillybikeexpo.com WHEN: Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. COST: $0–$40 WHERE: Pennsylvania Convention Center, 12th and Arch streets

Apple Festival at Peddler’s Village Enjoy apple treats and take home a bushel fresh from the orchard. Both days feature artisans, live entertainment, food, children’s activities and apple pie-eating contests. peddlersvillage.com

The field of hounds and horses leaves the grounds of The Highlands at about 10:00 a.m. for an unusual holiday hunt that follows a pre-designed course. At 11:30 a.m., guests may watch hounds and horses take the last fence of the course. A traditional breakfast will be served in the mansion. highlandshistorical.org WHEN: Noon to 2 p.m. COST: $33 WHERE: The Highlands, 7001 Sheaff Lane, Ft. Washington, Pa.

N ovember 7 Visualizing Sustainability Series: A Conversation with Mel Chin For more than 40 years, the context of Mel Chin’s work has been consistently rooted in provoking social awareness and civic responsibility. Chin will deliver the keynote

WHEN: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. COST: Free WHERE: Peddler’s Village, Lahaska, Pa.

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EVENT S

A film screening at the University of the Arts

for Visualizing Sustainability, addressing his illustrious career and focusing on his most recent projects. tyler.temple.edu WHEN: 6 to 8 p.m. COST: Free WHERE: Temple Contemporary, 2001 N. 13th St.

N ovember 7–19 First Person Arts Festival Life becomes art each November in Philadelphia when renowned artists and everyday people take to stages across the city to tell their real life stories. Information for individual performances available at: firstpersonarts.org

N ovember 8 Election Day Celebration Come to the National Constitution Center dressed as a U.S. president and help set the record for the most presidential portrayers in one place at one time. constitutioncenter.org WHEN: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. COST: $14 WHERE: National Constitution Center, 525 Arch St.

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N ovember 9

N ovember 10

Connections Beyond the Garden Lecture—‘The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World’

Fulfill: A Microgranting Meal

Andrea Wulf brings the story of the visionary naturalist and explorer Alexander von Humboldt back to life, taking the audience on a voyage in his footsteps—and of his ideas—as they go on to revolutionize science, conservation and preservation, nature writing, politics, art and the theory of evolution. Wulf is the author of five books, including “The Brother Gardeners” and “Founding Gardeners.” morrisarboretum.org WHEN: 2 to 3 p.m. COST: Free WHERE: Ambler Theater, 108 E. Butler Ave., Ambler, Pa.

Selby Gardens Photo Tour Selby Gardens is the only botanical garden in the world dedicated to the display and study of epiphytes, especially orchids and bromeliads. hssj.org WHEN: 7:15 to 9 p.m. COST: Free WHERE: Carmen Tilelli Hall, 820 Mercer St. Cherry Hill, N.J.

This microgranting initiative was inspired by community-based organizations such as Sunday Soup and Philly Stake. Guests will be served a delicious, locally sourced meal served on dishes and napkins made by Tyler School of Art students. Money raised at the event will be evenly regranted to three nonprofit organizations. tyler.temple.edu WHEN: 6 to 8 p.m. COST: $15 to $25 WHERE: Temple Contemporary, 2001 N. 13th St.

Campfire Cocktails Class with Manatawny Still Works Stop by United By Blue after hours as Manatawny’s distiller explains his favorite recipes to make and enjoy outdoors. Brush up on your bartending skills and leave with a few new cocktail recipes up your sleeve. unitedbyblue.com WHEN: 7 to 8:30 p.m. COST: Free WHERE: United By Blue, 144 N. 2nd St.


N ovember 10–13 The Philadelphia Museum of Art Craft Show This premier show and sale of contemporary craft includes 195 artists, selected from more than 1,000 applicants. Funds raised are used to purchase works of art and craft for the permanent collections of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, to fund conservation and publication projects, and to support exhibitions and education programs. craftnowphila.org WHEN: Varies by day COST: Pay as you go WHERE:The Pennsylvania Convention Center, 12th and Arch streets

N ovember 10–20 Asian American Film Festival Since 2008, Philadelphia Asian American Film & Filmmakers has presented dozens of culturally relevant films and programming to broad and diverse audiences as a way of celebrating and elevating the Asian American experience. phillyasianfilmfest.org WHEN: Varies by day COST: All ticket prices are under $10 WHERE: Ibrahim Library at the International House, 3701 Chestnut St.

N ovember 12 Fall Foraging The first frosts may have hit, but there is abundant wild food in the landscape—nutritious greens, spicy barks, roots, fruits and nuts. Explore edible and medicinal wild plants and weeds, harvest and preparation techniques, and plant identification and ecology on a gentle hike. Email rachel@wildridgeplants.com. wildridgeplants.com WHEN: 9:30 a.m. to noon COST: $20 WHERE: Wild Ridge Farm, Pohatcong, N.J.

LOVE Your Park Fall Service Day Join Philadelphia Parks & Recreation and the Fairmount Park Conservancy as they clean, green and celebrate Philly’s parks. Volunteer at your favorite neighborhood park to plant trees, rake leaves, clean up trash and litter, and more. loveyourpark.org WHEN: 9 a.m. to noon COST: Free WHERE: Various locations

Girl Scout Day The National Constitution Center’s staff guides a journey back in time to learn more about the United States’ greatest women heroes, from suffragists to Supreme Court justices. constitutioncenter.org WHEN: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. COST: $14 WHERE: National Constitution Center, 525 Arch St.

Craft NOW Create Craft NOW offers a hands-on exploration of craft with activities presented by the Philadelphia Museum of Art, The Clay Studio, The Center for Art in Wood, University of the Arts, Stalder-Kahn Gallery and Wayne Art Center. A full listing of activities is online. craftnowphila.org WHEN: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. COST: Free WHERE: The Kimmel Center, 300 S. Broad St.

N ovember 13

and

19

‘Curious’: A Musical for Kids Children’s music duo Ants on a Log presents “Curious,” a “folky, feminist musical” that encourages kids and their families to get curious about energy alternatives beyond oil. Ants on a Log’s first album, “You Could Draw the Album Art,” has been featured on WXPN’s Kids’ Corner as well as several other kids’ music programs and blogs.

N ovember 15 Philadelphia Energy Futures Summit Learn how the past continues to shape Philadelphia’s future at “Mid-Atlantic Routes of Power: Energy Transitions Then and Now,” a lecture by Chris Jones, assistant professor of historical, philosophical and religious studies at Arizona State University. It will be followed by a daylong summit at Drexel University. drexel.edu WHEN: 6 to 7:30 p.m. COST: Free WHERE: ExCITe Center, 3401 Market St.

N ovember 16 Community Night at the Franklin Institute Join the Franklin Institute for a free night of tinkering. Try your hand at building scribble bots, bristle bots and more. Explore your favorite exhibits, including Electricity and Amazing Machines, for inspiration. fi.edu WHEN: 5 to 8 p.m. COST: Free WHERE: The Franklin Institute, 222 N. 20th St.

N ovember 17

antsonalogmusic.com WHEN: Nov. 13 at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m.; Nov. 19 at 11 a.m. COST: Suggested admission $5–$20 WHERE: The Rotunda, 4014 Walnut St.

N ovember 14 Exploring the Infrastructure that is People: Public Art and its Social Dimensions Exploring Public Art is a series of community programs developed in anticipation of a 2017 Public Art Project at the Glenside Train Station underpass—a collaboration of SEPTA, Cheltenham Township and Arcadia University. arcadia.edu WHEN: 6:30 to 9 p.m. COST: Free WHERE: Arcadia University, 450 S. Easton Road, Glenside, Pa.

Sustainability Conference: Connecting the Dots Now for a Self-Sufficient Energy Future The Energy Coordinating Agency presents a conference to navigate issues surrounding policy and action, climate change and poverty, and energy efficiency. ecasavesenergy.org WHEN: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. COST: $50 WHERE: Temple University Student Faculty Center, 3340 N. Broad St.

The Meigs Award Town Meeting: Environmental Education and Underserved Audiences The Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education will present the 2016 Henry Meigs Environmental Leadership Award to Carole Williams-Green, founder of Cobbs Creek Community Environmental Education Center. Join the awards and interactive town meeting on environmental education for underserved audiences. schuylkillcenter.org WHEN: 7:30 to 10 p.m. COST: Free WHERE: The Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, 8480 Hagy’s Mill Road

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EVENT S

Kenichiro Maemura running the Philadelphia Marathon

N ovember 18–20 Philadelphia Marathon This 26.2 mile race covers areas from Old City to Fairmount Park near the Schuylkill River and is attended by 30,000 runners and thousands of spectators. Half marathons and a “fun run” for kids are also available. philadelphiamarathon.com WHEN: Varies by day COST: $15 to $280 WHERE: 22nd Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway

N ovember 18 4th Annual Fair & Sustainable Gift Fair Local merchants at the Friends Center will sell fair trade apparel, jewelry, beauty care, coffee, accessories, food, handmade gifts and more. fairtradephiladelphia.org WHEN: 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. COST: Pay as you go WHERE: Cherry Street Room, Friends Center, 1501 Cherry St.

the air, dispel insects and create lovely aromas. Participants will learn to identify and harvest native and non-native plants and assemble a smudge stick. Register by emailing rachel@wildridgeplants.com wildridgeplants.com WHEN: 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. COST: $20 WHERE: Wild Ridge Farm, Pohatcong, N.J.

Make Your Own Smudge Stick Aromatic plants are used in smudge sticks for spiritual and medicinal means, to clear

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Gorgeous harvest season produce for your favorite Thanksgiving recipes at both of Greensgrow’s locations. If you would like to preorder from Greensgrow’s Thanksgiving menu, shop online here to pick up on Nov. 22. The deadline to preorder for Thanksgiving is Nov. 11. greensgrow.org

Kitchen Science: Cookie Lab Baking is a science, and every step is crucial—especially when making the classic chocolate chip cookie. Come and learn how one little recipe adjustment can make a big difference to the quality of a cookie. fi.edu WHEN: 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. COST: Free with general admission WHERE: The Franklin Institute, 222 N. 20th St.

Small Works: Fine Art and Craft Show & Sale Featuring the work of artists in jewelry, painting, ceramics, fiber and more. perkinsarts.org WHEN: 6 to 9 p.m. COST: Pay as you go WHERE: 30 Irvin Ave., Collingswood, N.J.

N ovember 19

Thanksgiving Farmstand

WHEN: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. COST: Pay as you go WHERE: Greensgrow Farms, 2501 E. Cumberland St.; and Greensgrow West, 5123 Baltimore Ave.

N ovember 20 Sustainable Tree Pruning Workshop Paul Schmelzer, arborist with Bartlett Tree Experts, will discuss and demonstrate sustainable practices for young trees including pruning, tools, mulching and soil care. Learn to identify and correct problems and develop a long-lasting, healthy tree. sustainablecherryhill.org WHEN: 2 to 4 p.m. COST: Free WHERE: Cherry Hill Library, 1100 N. Kings Highway, Cherry Hill, N.J.


EVENT S

N ovember 21

D ecember 1–4

D ecember 4

Is the Constitution Judeo-Christian?

Visioning and Creating a Moral Economy Conference

Visit With Santa

Professors Menachem Lorberbaum of Tel Aviv University, Mark Silk of Trinity College and Suzanne Last Stone of Cardozo School of Law discuss the development and context of the Constitution to explore its relationship to the Jewish and Christian traditions.

Join thought leaders, intellectuals, on-theground activists and others working to build a sustainable economy. This conference will include plenary sessions with speakers, open forum discussions, workshops and group sessions. pendlehill.org

constitutioncenter.org WHEN: Noon to 2 p.m. COST: Free WHERE: National Constitution Center, 525 Arch St.

N ovember 25–27 Wild Wizarding Weekend Explore the magical world of the Academy of Natural Science with a weekend of spellbinding, hands-on activities. Wear a costume and get a $2 discount at the door or through the website. ansp.org WHEN: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. COST: $13.95 and up WHERE: The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, 1900 Benjamin Franklin Parkway

N ovember 25

WHEN: Check-in starts at 4 p.m. Thursday COST: Sliding scale, $300–$600 WHERE: Pendle Hill, 338 Plush Mill Road, Wallingford, Pa.

D ecember 2, 3, 10 and 11 Greensgrow Farms Customer Appreciation Happy Hour Have a nosh and a tipple in the greenhouse and enjoy 20 percent off. Check out a selection of Pennsylvania-grown holiday trees, wreaths and greens—plus winter flowering plants, edible gifts and gear of all sorts. WHEN: 6 to 8 p.m. COST: Pay as you go WHERE: Greensgrow Farms, 2501 E. Cumberland St.

D ecember 2–30

Skip shopping this Black Friday and join The Land Conservancy for Southern Chester County for an outdoor hike. Bring your friends and family to make craft ornaments from natural items you find along the hike.

Friday Night Lights at Morris Arboretum

WHEN: 10 a.m. to noon COST: members $5; nonmembers $10 WHERE: Bucktoe Creek Preserve, 432 Sharp Road, Avondale, Pa.

D ecember 1

Start a new holiday tradition and come enjoy the Holiday Garden Rail all lit up and decorated for the season during special evening hours, Fridays till Dec. 30. White lights sparkle along the rails and miniature greens adorn the buildings. Advanced ticket purchase recommended. morrisarboretum.org WHEN: 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. COST: Adult members $9, child members $3; adult nonmembers $16, child nonmembers $8 WHERE: Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania, 100 E. Northwestern Ave.

D ecember 5 Black Lives Matter: The Next Civil Rights Movement? Harvard Law Professor Randall Kennedy and others explore the history of Black Lives Matter and its parallels with past civil rights movements. constitutioncenter.org WHEN: 6:30 to 8 p.m. COST: Members, teachers and students $10; nonmembers $15; free for 1787 members WHERE: National Constitution Center, 525 Arch St.

D ecember 10 Conifer Tour at Morris Arboretum Knowledgeable guides lead a walking tour of the arboretum’s conifers—an array of varying forms and foliage morrisarboretum.org WHEN: 2 to 3 p.m. COST: Free with admission WHERE: Morris Arboretum, Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania, 100 E. Northwestern Ave.

D ecember 18 Go West Craft Fest

December 3, 4, 10 and 11

Find unique, handmade holiday gifts by more than 80 creative makers and small businesses. Jewelry, home wares, ceramics, woodwork, art prints, stationery, ornaments, hand knits, candles, soaps, herbal preparations and more. gowestcraftfest.com

Greensgrow Holiday Bazaar

WHEN: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. COST: Free WHERE: The Rotunda, 4008 Walnut St.

The Random Tea Room Mug Show Open call for mug makers to sell their wares at this annual art show. Mugs with handles (for hanging) are preferred. A $20–$70 selling price is suggested, and artists receive a 60 percent cut. For a consignment form, contact curiositea@gmail.com.

WHEN: 2 to 4 p.m. COST: $8 WHERE: The Highlands, 7001 Sheaff Lane, Ft. Washington, Pa.

greensgrow.org

Black Friday Celebration

tlcforscc.org

Santa and Mrs. Claus visit The Highlands, and kids are invited to make craft projects, enjoy snacks and a reading “The Night Before Christmas.” Reservations are recommended, and each child must be accompanied by an adult. Please bring your own camera. highlandshistorical.org

therandomtearoom.com

Shop for local, handmade gifts from talented crafters and artists. greensgrow.org

WHEN: 10 to a.m. to 8 p.m. COST: Free WHERE: The Random Tea Room, 713 N. 4th St.

WHEN: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. COST: Pay as you go WHERE: Greensgrow Farms, 2501 E. Cumberland St.

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DIS PATCH

The Heart of the Holidays A family does away with gift giving to focus on spending time together by Emily Livingston

L

ast year walking my elderly, mixed-breed dog through the streets of Center City on a chilly morning following the holiday season, I noted a lot of holiday-related detritus all over the sidewalks. For blocks and blocks, the curbs were lined with broken and unwanted items, tons of ripped wrapping paper, packaging and single-use decorations. My dog and I passed the same discarded, dying Christmas tree on our route for several days. Seeing these items destined for the landfill strewn over the sidewalks made me incredibly sad: about the waste of the holiday season, about consumerism, about the state of the world. In my life, I have been drawn to simple living for environmental, ethical and financial reasons—as well as for increased mental clarity. Living with less creates less waste to harm the environment, less exploitation of human and animal resources in the creation and distribution of material goods, and less monetary waste on items that do not bring meaning to my daily life. In recent years, my family and I have been attempting to give more meaningful 64

GRIDPH I L LY.CO M NOVEM BE R 20 1 6

gifts, such as time spent together on experiences or practical items. Gifts exchanged last year included my mom and I attending a yoga class together and a gift card to the grocery store from my brother. But the exposure to the rampant holiday-related waste noted during that routine walk with my dog last year encouraged me and my family to simplify our holiday even further—we have decided to do away with most gift giving for 2016. There were many conversations that led to our decision. I shared my observations from the walk with my mom, dad and brother, who in turn told me about observations of waste they had experienced during the holiday season. We talked about our holiday experiences—both past and present—to determine what we most value about the season and how gift giving and receiving makes us feel. After many thoughtful conversations, we all determined that gift giving stresses us out and even depresses us: Knowing what we know, when we think about gifts, we think about human and animal rights, and environmental degradation. The so-

cial pressure of gift giving and the lack of sustainability related to consumerism aren’t fun for us—and we realized it was well within our power to not only eliminate that stress, but to turn it into something joyful. I personally realized my best memories of the holiday season growing up are drinking apple cider out of my grandmother’s crystal glasses during a candlelight dinner with my immediate family on Christmas Eve. I do not remember much or attribute meaning to the gift giving and receiving that occurred during my childhood. So, this holiday season, I do not plan to give or receive any gifts, except to make a contribution to my newborn nephew’s college fund. My family’s decision to have a simple holiday season has been a long time coming, and I’m looking forward to celebrating the holidays with them, cooking together, sitting by the fire and having apple cider out of my grandmother’s special glasses. Emily Livingston lives in Philadelphia. IL LUSTRATIO N BY BART BROWNE


A lesson always learned One Penn alumnus teaches through constant discovery

Natalie Howe Master of Environmental Studies ’06, University of Pennsylvania

PHOTOGRAPH BY DAVID CITRON

For more on Natalie’s discoveries in the great outdoors, visit www.upenn.edu/grid

“The more people appreciate their local environment, the easier it is for them to care about ones that are further away” shares Natalie Howe, PhD (Master of Environmental Studies ’06). “And the program at Penn focuses on getting people to appreciate the dynamics of Philadelphia in a profound way.” Natalie shares her infectious adoration for wildlife as a college-level biology instructor. “I took an ecology class as an undergrad, and I remember thinking it was impossible to have a job where you have that much fun,” she smiles, “Which

VIRTUAL CAFÉ

is why I love teaching in the college context and getting students excited about

Join the MES Program

Inspired by her field classes with Dr. Sally Willig in the Master of Environmental

doing this for their careers and the kinds of possibilities they have.”

Director on the first

Studies program, Natalie is keen to go exploring with her students, “I love to

Wednesday of every month

take people on adventures where they gain a new perspective on the natural

for an online chat about your

world—whether you are in a city, the suburbs or a rural area, what’s good for

interests and questions. Log in with us.

that ecology is good for you.”

WWW.UPENN.EDU/GRID

WWW.UPENN.EDU/GRID 66 GRIDPH I L LY.CO M NOVEM BE R 20 1 6

www.facebook.com/UPennEES

@Penn_MES_MSAG

Grid Magazine November 2016 [#91]  
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