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“IMPRESSION” A Brief Overview of French, Russian & American Impressionism By Vanessa Rothe


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French, Russian, & American, Impressionism and Realism

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This lecture aims to provide a brief overview of French, Russian and American art focusing on Realism and Impressionism. It spans two centuries and three continents. From the early days of the 1863 Paris Salon, to new styles and subjects in the late 1880s – early 1900s, ending with their influence on American artists of the past and of today.

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The lecture also aims to inspire the viewer to compare and contrast similarities and differences between historical and contemporary artists works and between similar works from two different countries.


+ French Impressionism A Brief Review 1870’s-1905 With such a grand history and only 1 hour to convey what would normally take days ‌ I will briefly touch on the roots of French Impressionism and its later influence on Russian and American artists.


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The Salon des Beaux Arts- Paris

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It all started in Paris at “The Salon de Beaux Arts originally held in the upper rooms of the Louvre Palace and later moved to the Palais L’Industrie.

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Curated and juried works of high Academic quality. Works coming often from the school de Beaux Arts with very strict painting rules, entry specifications and high academic standards.

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Hostile twords any bold new art

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“Beaux Arts” means ‘Fine Art’ in the French language.


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Paris Salon 1863. There were 988 Painters Represented Following the Academic Realist Manner. The Valpincon Bather By Jean-Auguste Dominique Ingres.

Academic Salon WorkCabanel


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But… Whistlers “The White Girl”, and Fatin Latour ‘’Homage’’ are refused in 1863 5,600 works were accepted, however 2,800 works were refused.


+ Salon de Refusés is Created in 1863 to show the refused works to the public May 17th, 1863 - Napolean 2nd, Emperor’s Salon as it was an election year so he wanted to please the artists & public. Salon de Refusés was held in the Palais de L’Industrie, in a nearby room to the regular Salon. n

70,000 visitors attended on the 1st day it opened.

Palais de L’Industrie


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Also in the Salon de Refusés was Edouard Manet’s “Dejeuner Sur L’Herbe” Inspired by an old Etching by Raimondi

Raimondi, The Judgement of Paris

Manet’s “New” Painting


Modern Painting Manet’s New Style • Subject inspired by an academic triangular composition, yet modern.

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• Subjects are REAL life people, looking at viewer. It becomes personal. He striped away ideology and make it real. Not quite “la vie quotidien” but the start of FRESH NEW STYLE and ideal. • Brushwork NEW broad flat areas, color patches. Less volume, simplified, stark contrast light to dark. • Instead of looking THROUGH a window, Manet asks the viewer to look AT the painting and AT the surface.


+ Manet’s Gang and Artist Group Refused artists join together, writers, art critics with same ideas and philosophies. Manet meets Monet who strongly admires Manet’s bold freedom and new style, and is quite inspired. It is Important to note that MANET never exhibited with the Impressionists. Manet held his own exhibitions of his refused work.

Manet at the Easel painting the writer Astruc (From the left-)Schroder standing behind Manet, Auguste Renoir, Emile Zola- Writer, Critic, Edmund Maitre, Frederic Bazille and Claude Monet Painting By Fatin Latour“L’Atelier des Batignolles”


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Claude Monet

Strong Believer in Plein Air Painting/ New Style & Subject

Started the first exhibitions where his loose work: “Impression: Sunrise” helped inspire the famous future name “The Impressionists” New subjects now painting “Everyday life” La vie Quotidien, & capturing life.

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Took friends outdoors to paint the landscape. Effects of light and color in order to realistically capture the transient effects of sunlight.

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Monet’s works are in fact, later accepted into Salon, such as “The Green Dress”


+ Pierre-Auguste Renoir & Alfred Sisley Monets friends from Paris art classes Note: Renoir is the Only One Accepted in 1863 Salon Auguste Renior

Alfred Sisley


+ Frederic Bazille Friend, Patron, Painter

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Studied medicine and art in Paris. Very proper gent, fro a fine family.

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Bazille met Monet, Renoir & Sisley at the Ateliers and became close friends.

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He helped the artists greatly with food, a place to stay and paint. Had a large studio where they met. Seen here.

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He Modeled for his artist friends in many works.

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Sadly died in the Franco Prussian War at age 28.


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Camille Pissarro

Father Figure of Group & Edgar Degas A Reluctant Impressionist Camille Pissaro

Edgar Degas


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Berthe Morisot A Talented Friend of Manet & Mary Cassatt, An American in Paris friends of Degas Berthe Morisot

Mary Cassatt


+ First Impressionist Exhibit,1874

Artists had Split in 1863 from the Salon, after FrancoPrussian War, Exhibited Together….without a Salon n

Concerned with the effects of color and light on subject. They Built on Leonardo’s observation …that a face lit with light while walking thru a filed can be green.

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Choppy brushwork, colored spots, strokes are energetic.

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Everyday subjects were shown from each of the artists. Normal everyday people and scenes.


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Important here to mention & honor Modern Sculpture In the later periods of 1890’s to 1920’s Auguste Rodin & Edgar Degas Created “real life” sculpture


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Auguste Rodin

The First Modern Sculptor

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Sculpture was only decorative monuments.

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Rejected from the Beaux Arts.

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Traveled to Italy and saw Michaelangelo’s bound slaves.

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He sculpted life, the imperfections of humans. Not idealized. Emotional, raw, flawed.

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Exhibited w Monet in 1889 successfully.


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Degas Sculpture Modern Sculptor

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Later in career, nearly blind. Sense of touch to create.

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Movement, not posed, move freely about the studio.

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regular life, flawed

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“The little 14 year Old Dancer� 187981 very different at the time.


+ At the same time in RUSSIA‌.

In 1863 the same year of the Salon de Refuses, and the start of a group on Impressionist, a group of rebel artists is also formed called the ARTEL.

A group of painters from the academy, led by Ivan Kramstoy, decided to quit the academy and form their own group


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“The Wanderers” Masters of 19th Century Russian Painting n

They protested against the prescribed mythological subjects, and obligatory handling of the paint.

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They remained traditional in style, yet their subjects changed to everyday life. Art for the people.

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Like the Impressionists, they had their own traveling exhibitions in 1871 and on.

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Due to the traveling exhibitions the group became known as: “The wanderers “

“Peredvizhhniki”


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St.Petersberg and Moscow join their art groups, two leaders emerge Ivan Kramskoy

Portrait of Tolstoy

Vasilii Perov

Portrayal of Russian Mankind


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Wanderers Becomes Synonymous with Russian Realism A new National Art, Subjects of Ordinary People (Narod)

Iliya Repin “Evening Gathering”


+ Iliya Repin- Examples of Paint Application Blended and Refined/Broad Strokes


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“Lyrical Landscapes� from Russia Levitan, one of the Wanderers. A Landscape becomes art in itself not merely a background.

Isaik Levitan most celebrated Russian Landscape artist


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Big Collectors, Support Both in France and Russia Durand Ruel, Exhibitions 1871

Pavel Tretiakov, Gallery 1874


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Art Critics, Art Historians, Writers Play a big role, Both France and Russia

Baudelaire, Zola, Malarmé n

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Baudelaire: author, critic, Poet. wrote reviews and was frank about his ideas.1845 on… Reviews from first Impressionist exhibit, bad, “no such thing as bad press”

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Zola, friends w Cezanne started to write reviews, helped create positive buzz

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Malarmé and others followed

Adrian Prakhov n

Started to relate them to the political ideals of the time.

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Many magazines, Russian Illustration periodicals.

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Became very nationalistic, a Symbol of Russia, Russian Realism.


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Repin is Asked to Return to the Academy n

Iliya Repin is asked to reorganize the outdated St.Petersberg Imperial Academy under Alexander the 3rd.

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Iliya Repin, Vasilli Polenov, and Ivan Shishkin go back.

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Traditional methods

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Now known as the REPIN ACADEMY


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Russia in the1890’s.

Art is non unified, artists held their own shows like the artists did in France. There is much change, the Wanderers slowly fade‌ France, Manet

Russia, Wanderers ending


+ Meanwhile, American Realists Travel to PARIS Starting in the 1860’s • John Singer Sargent • Mary Cassatt • William Merritt Chase • James McNeil Whistler • Guy Rose


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During the 1860’s Americans Study in Paris often Directly with the Impressionists. First Mary Cassatt with Degas then Whistler studies with Gleyre Atelier while in Paris‌ James Abbott McNeil Whistler

Mary Cassat


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At the Same time that Mary Cassatt is there with Degas, John Singer Sargent is with Monet. Later Guy Rose and friends arrive in Giverny Sargent

Guy Rose


+ Chase and Hassam are Influenced by Paris and it’s artists. Around 1883, 18 works are sent from Durand-Ruel and mix in with American shows and US artists begin to see the new style. William Merrit Chase

Childe Hassam


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The Art Dealer: Durand Ruel Père and son Paul n

Père Durand-Ruel and later his son Paul Durand-Ruel were art dealers at the time who bought and supported the Impressionist works from the beginning. First Manet, then Monet, then Renoir, Pissaro, Sisley, Caillbotte et all. Paul formed a collection and kept the artists alive.

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Around the same time as the second Impressionist exhibition in Paris DurandRuel who had his own art gallery, arranged his own exhibit and the works received this time, MIXED REVIEWS, rather than poor from both exhibtions.

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It is later Durand-Ruel who is bold enough to bring these works to AMERICA.


+ French Impressionism Comes to America Large Exhibit of 300 Works in New York- 1886

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23 years since the Salon of 1863. In 1886 Mr Durand Ruel- Art Dealer from Paris with his own collection of Impressionist works. An invitation from James Sutton, President of the American Art Association even paid the fees.

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300 works including Manet, Degas, Morissot, Monet, Pissaro, Sisley, & Renoir, Caillebotte, …but not Cezanne.

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Americans looked with more open minds and praised works of beauty, talent and passion. New York Tribune was positive, others mixed in their reviews.

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Alexander Cassatt and Henry Havemeyer lent paintings they had purchased.


+ American Impressionism Blossoms

American artists are influenced and 6 Regions, and Schools in America that adopted the style.


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John Singer Sargent n

An American, born in Florence Italy, Educated in Paris France, Looks like a German, paints like a Spaniard, retired in England.

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At the age of 25 already a sensation. Famous for high society portraits. Painted outdoors often in summer.

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Met and painted w MONET in Paris and Giverny.

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Painted Mme Pierre Gautreaux (Mademe X) near the end of his time in Paris.


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John Singer Sargent


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Similar to the ‘Salon’ in France, and the ‘Academy’ in Russia…Many US artists seceded from the Society of American Artists, after not being accepted! They Formed “The Ten” a group of American Impressionists. Twachtman

Hassam


+ Childe Hassam

Childe Hassam- most influenced and most celebrated American Impressionist. Painted scenes of New York, Flag series inspired by France. The weather changes and light. Urban street life. He Went to Paris to study at the AcadĂŠmie Julien to learn the figure. Kept his work Realist as well as Impressionist. n


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Childe Hassam

Childe Hassam- most influenced and most celebrated American Impressionist. Painted scenes of New York, Flag series inspired by France. The weather changes and light. Urban street life. He Went to Paris to study at the AcadĂŠmie Julien to learn the figure. Kept his work Realist as well as Impressionist. n


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Robert Reid

Primarily a figure painter but learned to love landscapes. High color and broken brushstrokes. Slightly decorative work with suggested luminosity.


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Edmund Tarbell Studied in Paris in 1880’ and turned to Impressionist style in 1890s under Sargent and Bunker. The purpose of art is to render beauty. Light and space as a painter sees combined with objects that one finds beautiful and the interaction of them. Part of the Boston group


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John H. Twachtman

Initially trained in Munich, Germany as were many from his time. Settled in Connecticut, friends with Wier. Limited range of colors and landscapes with foliage and rural home.


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Willard Metcalf

One of the original Giverny Colonists in 1887

Revered artist. Enjoyed painting in Glouchester Harbor and in Old Lyme with Childe Hassam


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Frank Benson

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Influenced by Tarbell, a close friend.

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Active brushwork and famed for dappled sunlight

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Studio painter but also painted outdoor in lit settings.

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Captured light and moments clearly not found in the studio.


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Joseph DeCamp

Earlier style more classical then influenced by Tarbell & Impressionism. Still academic skills applied.


+ DeCamp & Japanoise

Just as the French were interested in the Japanese and their arts, so were the American painters.


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James Abbott McNeil Whistler n

Art for Arts Sake- Before a work is a painting, it is line, form, canvas, color and patterns. Paint effects a scene produces.

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Parallels between art and music. Such as “Symphony in white No.1”

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He read “La Vie Bohéme” sailed for Europe and never came back. Lived lavish lifestyle. Mistress, wild artist, yet high society.

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His work took on a freedom inspired by the Impressionists and presenting the “FEEL” of a scene, as they belived as well.

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His work was controversial, possibly his ideas about are were a precursor to modern abstraction. Revered artist.


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Two Sides/Styles of Whistler Composition and Design play a major role


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Colin Campbell Cooper n

First studied realism under Thomas Eakins. More Barbizon style.

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Then travelled to Europe and he studied at the AcadĂŠmie Julien in Paris from 1886-90.

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Later moves to West to Santa Barbara

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Often paints New York scenes as well as figures and landscape.


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William Merritt Chase Studied realism in Munich then traveled thru Europe and collected influences. No doubt inspired by the Durand-Ruel exhibition in New York in 1886. Painted modern middle class leisure. Influenced also by Japanese


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William Merritt Chase


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John Ottis Adams

Studied in London,then Munich. With others from the Hooseirs school, He started the Heron school in Indiana


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Theodore Steele n

Studied Realism in Munich. Painted also en Plein Air and captured nature with light.

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Made the “Hoosier� group of artists.

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In addition to painting, Steele contributed to the art world with lectures and writing as well as helped organize exhibitions.

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Figures and landscape.


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Helen Turner

A Talented Force in the South, Student of Chase

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Studied at young age at local art schools, then accepted at the Art Students League where one of her teachers was CHASE.

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Received distinction from the National Academy of Design.

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Broken strokes & light effects.


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( Julius) Gari Melchers Won Many Honors

Attended AcadĂŠmie Julien and the Ecole des Beaux Arts Member of many prestigious art groups He and John Singer Sargent won Gold Medals at the Paris Universal Exposition in 1889. Named French Legion of Honor, as was MANET at last.


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William Forsyth

Also studied in Munich. Also with some of the teachers of CHASE, Barton Hays and Jacob Fox. Helped teach at the Heron art school teacher of drawing and painting.


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Frederick Carl Frieseke Freiske studied at the Art Institute of Chicago and the Art Students League of NY. In 1897 he went to Paris studied at the AcadĂŠmie Julien and a bit with James Whistler at his AcadĂŠmie Carmen. Exhibited in Paris Salon 1901, Watercolors, later Oils


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Frederick Carl Frieseke Influenced by Renoir, and The Nabis; Vuillard and Bonnard.


+ Styles change around the world 1900-1930 ________________ First we look at what changes took place in France Art World Changes Dramatically as the world changes. WW1 The Era of the “ISM’s”


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Paul Cezanne The Plane Truth

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A very different radical style and method with planes, values and forms, almost cubist geometric structure.

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Balanced design, flat color in tones. Color harmony or complimentary orange and blues. Simplified shapes.

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Known for still lifes w fruits, landscapes of Mont Ste-Victoire in Provence, over 60 of same mountain.. Some figures near 1900-1906.

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Critics did not like his wrok, harsh reviews. Was almost not included in the Impressionist shows.

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He was considered more POST Impressionist and helped inspire cubism.


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Industrial, Modern Era Monumental Changes, “Independent Art�


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“Ism’s” Cubism,Fauvism, Surrealism, Dadaism. Avant- Garde Cezanne, Picasso, Matisse, Dali


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Picasso: Early work and radical style change in later work


+ Similar change and styles occur in Russian Art 1900-1930 Artistic Freedom Monumental Change Revolution 1917


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Russians Travel to Paris Early, 1900’s. Russians Study with many artists, they experience Impressionism & other “Ism’s”

KONSTANTIN KOROVIN, DONE IN PARIS 1911

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Poll 40% of the artists in Montparnasse were not French. Americans and Russians came in numbers. Comfortable middle or upper class.

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Curator/Dealer Diaghilev – Brings Russian art to the International Salon D’Automne 1906 & 1909 The Interants, Along with Russian avant garde.

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Russian Ballet backgrounds, artists


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Early on…The Interents Serov, Nesterov, and Korovin, & later Fechin

Early 1900’s still traditional but with thicker loser strokes. Valentin Serov traveled to France and was influenced by what he saw. Serov is Repin’s student Well known work: “Girl with Peaches” Nikolai Fechin also exhibits with the Interants


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Revolution, Civil War, Revolt Against Tradition The Bolshevik Revolution, or Socialist Revolution or the October Revolution 1917 “Red October� Monarchy destroyed. Provisional Government overthrown power to the Soviets, the Bolshevicks. Civil War 1918-22

Alekandr Rodcenko

Revolts in the Academy, traditional art and sculptures ruined. Closed.


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Russian Avant-Garde, Cubism Borrowed ideas from French, German, but infused their own subjects, exaggerated. Goncharova 1910

Marc Chagall 1915


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The Jacks, The Futurists, Russians formed art groups, their own “Ism’s” with artists such as Kandinsky, Saryan, Sapunov, Burlyuk, Konchalovski, Mashkov Pavel Kuznetsov1913

Creativity is rewarded over realism

Robert Falk 1915


+ Russian Ism’s: Suprematism, Symbolism, Neoprimitivism, Industrial Constructivism Deineka 1920’s

Liubov Popova 1918


+ Meanwhile, in the West, California Impressionism Between 1900-1930 Impressionism makes its way to the West coast for a 30 year endless summer. Kleitsch


+ Northern and Southern California Excellent Subjects, Coastlines,Valleys, Mountains & Deserts. Perfect Light for painting outdoors. Many worked in High Key Colors ( lighter rage of values)

Northern CA- Percy Grey

Southern CA - Bischoff


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Guy Rose

One of the Giverny Luminists Recognized as a top American Impressionist. Studied at the AcadĂŠmie Julien in Paris. Lived and painted in Giverny with second wave of Americans, Giverny Luminists. Monet became his friend and mentor there. Strong Academic with first hand knowledge of the effects of light. Strong combination.


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Franz Bischoff First worked in New York then Studied in Paris and in Europe. Early on he was a porcelien painter, like Renoir. And time in Giverny with the second phase of Americans. Later Settled in California. Early member of the California Art Club, along with William Wendt. Diverse landscapes as well as the figure.

Grace of Steven Stern Fine Art


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Franz Bischoff

Available for purchase at “ IMPRESSION” Exhibit, Grace of George Stern Fine Arts “Cows in the Pasture” 14x20”


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Joseph Kleitsch Painter of California

Hungarian Born, studied in Paris and Munich. Came to Southern California in 1920. Co founder of Painters and Sculptors club opened Kleitsch Academy. Sold works at Stendahl Gallery. Colorful yet Academic, revered artist. Fell in love with Laguna Beach and its subjects


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Edgar Payne

An Illustrator with a Bold Brush

Studied briefly at the Chicago Institute of Art. Largely self taught. Scenes of Americas Grandeur & a significant Western Painter. Plein Air and studio works. Sierras pack trips. A leader in CA Arts As a teacher, book on composition.


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William Ritschel

Monterey The Dean of American Marine Painters Love of the Sea began early as a sailor. Attended the Royal Academy in Munich. Immigrated to Northern California after painting Brittany boats in France. Heavy Impasto of paint adds to the strong ocean feel


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Marion Wachtel Watercolors and Oils

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Trained at the Chicago Art Institute and under CHASE in New York.

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Duo artists team with husband Elmer Wachtel.

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Plein Air and studio painter of watercolors. She began painting oils after her husbands death.

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Involved in a number of Art organizations in CA


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William Wendt

Hero to CA Artists, Nature is the Best Inspiration

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Originally from Germany, worked as artist at Chicago art schools.

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Traveled and began to paint on location in Germany and France.

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Moved to Califronia around 1910 and became known as the Dean of Southern California Landscape painters

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He was involved in many art clubs. Sold his works successfully thru USA.


+ Socialist Realism and Soviet Impressionism 1935 – 1985 Back to Traditional Roots


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Socialist Realism under Stalin 1935 Utopian Idealized Art n

The purpose of socialist realism, was to limit popular culture to a specific, highly regulated type of creative expression that promoted Soviet ideals.

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There was a prevailing sense of optimism, socialist realism's function was to show the ideal Soviet society

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It elevated the common worker, whether factory or agricultural, by presenting his life, work, and recreation as admirable. Real life.

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Stalin and writer Gorkey created Soveit realism doctrine.


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Heroic, Readable, Inspirational Art

Many were Illiterate so this style helped educate them on what was expected. Appealed to the masses -ART serves a purpose. Common images used in socialist realism were flowers, sunlight, the body, youth, flight, industry, and new technology To inspire. Art was used to show how Soviet citizens should be acting.


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Sports figures were used to show success and fit healthy people. Soldiers too “Heroic Realism�

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Slightly illustrative, simple values used. Art for the masses, easy to understand.


+ Style: painterly Impressionist style develops

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Not only inspired by French Impressionist, but by French Naturalist’s. Infused with Russian Realism and subjects, it Became known as working class or Proletarian Impressionism, or Soviet Impressionism.


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Painterly application, visible brushwork, bold colors, but with realist lines, and firm roots.


+ Socialist Realism, also becomes known as Soviet Impressionism n

Subjects and some styles used are similar to Impressionists.

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Actually more inspired by the French Naturalists from 1880-1900.

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The aspect of it that shows EVERYDAY LIFE, makes us think of the Impressionists (and the Wanderers) how they depicted simple subjects.

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Not French Impressionism, Russian NaturalisticImpressionism. More realist than Impressionist, but took on its own unique look.


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Joy of everyday workers Art becomes painterly‌.Realist/Impressionist


+ Studies for Posters Character studies for larger works


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Boris Gladchenko, Everday still life 1950


+ Art Unions: AKhrr, USSR, OST, Mosskh, Losskh USA: AIS, PAPA, OPA, LPAPA, SCNY

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Important step to unify, Union is created. Being a member of the Union was very important to the artists. It allowed them a studio, gave them materials that would be very hard to get, and it also meant that he was professional and full time artist. An important job, paid by the government. They could focus, an ideal arrangement.

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Pressures, If you did not finish your commission or have work ready for a show, you were expelled. Paint subjects that were needed.

Soviet artist Gladchenko was not a member of the USSR, and therefore may have had more freedom to paint what he liked, how he liked. Available work.


+ Dachas: Paid art retreats More freedom and more creativity n

Each Summer the artits could go on paid retreats to focus on their work.

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Life, natural, focus on art, often plein air work, more creative.

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Away from government and city and less controlled. Russian countryside.


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Soviet Impressionism


+ Contemporary, International Realists & Impressionists Continuing the Tradition‌ Compare and Contrast Ray Roberts


+ Repin Academy: Figure work 1950 & 2010 Eric Rebane 1950

Iliya Mirochnik 2010


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Repin Academy: Class work 1949 & 2015 Eric Rebane 1949

Maria Vakruscheva 2015


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Historical Russian & Contemporary American Masters Compare brushwork, shapes, values, subjects Boris Gladchenko 1950’s

C.W Mundy 2015


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Left: Detail of Soviet Boris Gladchenko stil llife Upper Right: Detail of Contemporary Master CW Mundy, still life


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Pushnin and Borodin Character studies for larger propaganda works Alexander Pushnin 1950

Alexi Borodin 1950


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Common Themes

Eric Rebane 1949

Vadim Suvorov 2014

Olga Krimon 2016

A woman in red, a re-occurring subject for centuries, shown here from traditional academic study, to classical main subject and focus, to modern interpretation of a classic theme.


Drapery: Traditional roots in drawing and + handling of drapery, subjects differ Vadim Suvorov

Olga Krimon


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Franz Bischoff, California c.1915 Fine example of California Impressionism. Warm color palette. Thick strokes, bold visible brushwork. Atmospheric and linear perspective used. Most likely created en Plein air, on location. Vadim Suvorov Ukraine 2013 Combines realism with Impressionism, bold colors Pure viridian, cool color palette. Atmospheric and linear perspective used. Plein air studies used and larger work in studio


+ Bold visible brushwork

Peggi Kroll Roberts,2015

Alexi Borodin, 1950

Vanessa Rothe 2015


+ Ukrainian & American Contemporary. Similar Scenes, similar handling, different coasts Irina Kalyzhnaya, Ukraine

Ray Roberts, America


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California Sierra Mountains 100 years difference, same subject, similar handling Edgar Payne 1920’s

John Burton 2016


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Russian & American Contemporary Realism Alexander Kremer 2013

Jesse Powell 2015


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Russian Bold Colors Contrast with slightly muted contemporary California slightly more tonalist colors Soviet Impressionism 1950

CA Impressionism Vanessa Rothe, 2014


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Figure in the Landscape Common theme, Realism with Impressionism Vladimir Chernikov 1956

Renat Razmananov 2013


+ Atmospheric Perspective,

Rodolfo Rivadelmar

commonly used in landscapes and plein air works painted on location. Contemporary. Artem Rogovoi

Eric Bowman


+ West as Subject

Ray Roberts

Payne, Fechin (Taos), Roberts, Fehlman Edgar Payne

Mark Fehlman


+ Fechin – Example, artists were hired to design and paint backgrounds for the theatre

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Fechin from Kazan, where he later taught and painted.

He studied with Iliya Repin and showed with the Interants such as SEROV. Fechin later won the Prix de Rome and many gold medals in europe.

Showed in USA first in 1910. Moved to America in 1923 with his style became quite famous for Russian style but portraying Native Americans. Then settled in Southern California, Santa Monica where he is buried. Influenced US artists.


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Oleg Lomakin Soviet Impressionist Soviet Impressionism by Swanson

Lomakin work that appears in the Soviet Impressionism book, of his friends daughter at the summer house

Reading, at the Summer House

Available work of his friends daughter at the summer house.


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Suggested Reading: “The Wanderers” Dallas Museum of Art publication for exhibition “The Private Lives of the Impressionists” by Sue Roe “American Impressionism and Realism” by Weinburg, Bulgar and Curry “Russian and Soviet paintings 1900-1930” Hirshhorn Museum Publication “Soviet Impressionism” By Vern G. Swanson Fine Art Connoisseur Magazine Articles on Russian. For more information contact Vanessa Rothe at: 949 280 1555 • Special Thanks to Akhmed Salakhly for checking my facts for the lecture

“An Impressionists Lunch” 16x20, Tom Balderas Contemporary Impressionist inspired by Russian Impressionists, the French Nabis group and post impressionists. Tom is known for his loose unique style, based on color and light.


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Thank you

We hope the lecture has inspired you and helped you to better understand and enjoy the fine art work from two continents and two centuries here today.

Profile for Vanessa Rothe Fine Art

Lecture by Vanessa Rothe: French, Russian and American Impressionism  

This fine art visual lecture is part of an educational series created by Vanessa Rothe and includes a very informative, brief overview of Im...

Lecture by Vanessa Rothe: French, Russian and American Impressionism  

This fine art visual lecture is part of an educational series created by Vanessa Rothe and includes a very informative, brief overview of Im...

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