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ANNUAL ACCOUNTS

2017/2018

WWW.RBLI.CO.UK


FRONT COVER: Veterans who live on the RBLI village during the Garden of Honour Remembrance Service.


CONTENTS 05

HOW WE HELP

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WHERE THE MONEY GOES

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CHAIRMAN AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE’S REVIEW

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OUR BOARD OF TRUSTEES

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OUR SENIOR MANAGEMENT TEAM

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TRUSTEES REPORT

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STRATEGIC REPORT

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INDEPENDENT AUDITORS REPORT

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FINANCIALS

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LEGAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION

Royal British Legion Industries

@RBLI

Royal British Legion Industries


Lord King being interviewed by Evan Davis at our ‘In Conversation With Lord King’ event at the Tower of London in March 2018.

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2017/2018 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS


HOW WE HELP With an aim of improving lives every day, RBLI works across the UK to help members of the Armed Forces community, people with disabilities and people who are unemployed. Whether it is providing a homeless veteran with emergency accommodation, helping someone into work after 20 years of unemployment or ensuring someone has the support they need to stay in a role when their health condition deteriorates, our teams are making a difference. All this support is provided by our core divisions detailed below, assisted by our corporate services and strategic development teams.

RBLI Employment Solutions supports people with disabilities across Great Britain, ensuring they are not disadvantaged when doing their job. It also provides employment support for veterans who are struggling on civvy street. In Kent and Sussex, the teams work to support local people gain the skills they need for work, as well as helping them find sustainable, relevant employment or volunteering opportunities.

Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Company (BBMC) is RBLI’s social enterprise providing vital employment to Armed Forces veterans and people with disabilities. The employment we provide gives them the necessary skills and support they need to regain their independence. Their skills and work ethic mean we can manufacture high quality products and deliver exceptional services, including signs, wooden products and print, mail and fulfilment.

RBLI Living focuses on providing homes to Armed Forces veterans and their families. In addition to emergency accommodation, we also provide family housing, specially adapted homes for wounded veterans, an assisted living scheme and a high-dependency nursing home. Residents are supported by our welfare team. Via our holistic health and social care model, they can access help to improve their independence, with benefits support, advice on managing health conditions and more.

Scotland’s Bravest Manufacturing Company (SBMC) is our new social enterprise currently being developed near Glasgow in Scotland. A project supported by fellow military charity, Erskine, it will work in a similar way to BBMC but all manufacturing staff will be Armed Forces veterans. The teams will provide a variety of services and manufacture a number of different products, enabling them to gain new skills in a civilian working environment.

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WHERE THE MONEY GOES

RBLI Chief Executive, Steve Sherry, presents plans for our Centenary Village, which will create purpose-built homes for future generations of Veterans and their families.

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2017/2018 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS


35%

26%

Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Co.

Employment Solutions

OPERATIONAL COSTS

£18.3M 5%

34% RBLI Living

Raising funds

2%

52%

Office equipment

4%

Base Camp playground (The Summit)

CAPITAL COSTS

Veterans’ apartments

£1.5M

21%

4%

New care facility

7%

Fixtures & fittings

10%

Other building work

Plant & machinery

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WE WERE HONOURED TO BE AWARDED THE DELIVERY OF THE DEPARTMENT FOR WORK AND PENSIONS PRESTIGIOUS NATIONAL DISABILITY PROGRAMME, ACCESS TO WORK.

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CHAIRMAN AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE’S REVIEW “Improving Lives Every Day”, our ten-year strategic plan, continues in year three to reach more beneficiaries through a mix of new programmes, greater national reach and an increased provision of services within our dynamic community in Kent. We are delighted to report that this year our charity reached over 13,000 people who needed extra help finding work, coping with health conditions, or overcoming barriers to social inclusion.

THE RBLI VILLAGE Our dynamic community on our Village in Aylesford had a real boost when 24 high quality and specially adapted homes for veterans were opened in September 2017 by the then Secretary of State for Defence, the Right Honourable Sir Michael Fallon MP.

With almost 100 years’ experience under our belt, we are a leading charity that is able to provide the right services, and environment, to help even the most vulnerable people help themselves.

Coupled with STEP-IN, RBLI’s unique programme to ensure residents have access to personal development, social support networks, and individual health, care and wellbeing strategies, this new provision is already achieving positive outcomes for disadvantaged and disabled veterans.

Maintaining our clear focus on supporting veterans and those from the wider community with disabilities, RBLI is achieving such strong outcomes through increased collaboration and is winning greater recognition for the way we successfully integrate health and social care, supported and adapted homes, with first class employment support.

We are well into the build of our much needed new 14-bed extra care home and day care centre with a completion date of spring 2019. We have also provided funding for a complete refurbishment of our high-dependency care home, Gavin Astor House, which will convert into a new dual offering of 24 dementia care and 26 high-dependency care places.

Replication of this successful model was the challenge posed in late 2016 by the Minister for Disabled People, Health and Work.

Once complete, the Village will be able to offer veterans the complete care pathway from low to high dependency care. This means we will have the right facilities to support any veteran of any age, with any disability, and help them all maximise their independence.

SCOTLAND’S BRAVEST MANUFACTURING COMPANY (SMBC) We are pleased to report that just 18 months after being set the challenge, saw the opening of our brand new social enterprise, Scotland’s Bravest Manufacturing Company, on the outskirts of Glasgow; working alongside fellow military charity, Erskine. This exciting development will see employment opportunities for veterans fully integrated with the provision of welfare support, 24 new apartments and an activities centre. This expansion of welfare services, facilities, work opportunities and homes for veterans has been well received in Scotland and is an exemplar of successful collaboration within the charitable sector.

CENTENARY VILLAGE PHASE TWO Another important achievement during the year has been the granting of planning consent for phase two of our exciting new Centenary Village vision which will provide homes for nearly 100 veterans and their dependents for the next 100 years. Our campaign to raise £14m to fund this vital new development is underway and we are grateful to each and every member of our Development Board, plus our Campaign Patron, General Sir Gordon Messenger KCB DSO* OBE ADC, Vice Chief of the Defence Staff, for voluntarily giving their time and energy.

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ACCESS TO WORK We were honoured to be awarded the Department of Work and Pensions prestigious national disability programme, Access to Work, last June. Our purposeful team delivers over 1,000 workplace assessments every month and is helping people with health conditions and disabilities not only sustain employment but also improve productivity and personal opportunity.

LIFEWORKS Our veterans employment programme, LifeWorks, continues to deliver nationally, and internationally, focusing on unemployed veterans in areas of social deprivation and also families of serving personnel, achieving phenomenal results.These employability courses, which help veterans identify and achieve realistic work goals in just one week, are another example of RBLI’s successful collaboration with charities and other specialists to deliver outstanding personalised support that helps people turn their lives around.

Fundraisers ready to take on the UK three peaks to support Britain’s Bravest.

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STRATEGIC GOALS 1

Further develop thriving communities for those veterans who are most in need from across the UK with integrated services of social care, health care, employment support and accommodation. Be the catalyst for replication of effective integration across the UK.

2

Build a resilient work, health and training services business, “best in class� at working with people with disabilities, health conditions and those furthest from the workplace.

3

Continue developing and delivering first class pre-employment support for the Armed Forces community, centred on sustainable and relevant variants of LifeWorks programmes across the whole of the UK.

4

Build a 21st century social enterprise and employment academy.

5

Secure funding, sponsorship, awareness, and profile, to maximise the opportunities for our beneficiarie

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PLANNING CONSENT HAS NOW BEEN GRANTED FOR PHASE 2 OF OUR EXCITING NEW CENTENARY VILLAGE VISION WHICH WILL PROVIDE HOMES FOR 100 VETERANS AND THEIR FAMILIES FOR THE NEXT 100 YEARS. 12

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LOOKING BACK ON THE FINANCIAL YEAR 2017/2018 RBLI has not been fundraising for long, so we are delighted to have secured so many exciting grants and donations this year, totalling £2.5m towards our vital work with vulnerable and disadvantaged people. We are especially grateful to all the charitable foundations and companies that supported the completion of the new adapted apartments for veterans including the Garfield Weston Foundation, The Royal British Legion, the Chancellor using LIBOR funds and the Lloyds Patriotic Fund who supported the development of STEP-IN. The apartment buildings surround a former gold-medal winning Chelsea Flower Show Garden, created by renowned designer Jo Thompson, which was kindly donated by the Chelsea Barracks Foundation. We would also like to draw attention to the generosity of the Morrisons Foundation who, as well as supporting the new veterans’ apartments, began funding LifeWorks courses to reach unemployed exservice men and women in the most deprived areas of Wales. We are also hugely grateful to ABF The Soldiers’ Charity who have not only supported our LifeWorks programme since its inception, but recently launched a new skills project for our residents, and made a major contribution to our Centenary Village vision.

THANK YOU to all the charitable foundations and companies who have supported our Centenary Village campaign so far, including the Chancellor using LIBOR funds.

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SCOTLAND’S BRAVEST MANUFACTURING COMPANY

THE WIDER EMPLOYMENT SERVICES MARKET

Scotland’s Bravest Manufacturing Co. joins Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Co. in leading the change towards a 21st century social enterprise.

The record high levels of employment across the UK have happily depressed the demand and therefore the potential for growth in the welfare-to-work sector.

Our charitable purpose has remained focussed and beneficiary numbers in our social enterprise have remained strong at 63% compared to 60% the year before. However, commercially 2017/2018 has been tough for BBMC, in the main caused by a degree of slowdown in the external market particularly in road and rail infrastructure projects. This seems to be a short-term challenge; as we finished the final month of the financial year it was clear that signs, print and fulfilment were already showing a marked uplift. Our feasibility study, in partnership with PA Consulting, recommended we set up a new RBLI division and social enterprise at Erskine in greater Glasgow.

However our track record on delivery remains strong as we have seen impactful results on the National Access to Work programme with well over 7,000 individual assessments across the UK this year with a total revenue of £3.9m. We are pleased also to have been selected to deliver on the Government’s adult education contract although it’s too early to be able to assess our impact. The work programme has now moved into its final year of eight and we continue to support individuals who for health reasons are still some considerable distance from the labour market.

This decision was taken in September 2017 and the newly appointed Director of Scotland’s Bravest Manufacturing Co. received the keys to the leased factory in February 2018 and has begun implementation of the new social enterprise and work opportunities for Scotland’s veterans. We are in the process of registering the division with the Scottish Charity Commission (OSCR).

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Graeme Dey, Minster for Parliamentary Business and Veterans, Scottish Parliament on his visit to Scotland’s Bravest Manufacturing Company. 2017/2018 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS

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THE VILLAGE Our Village continues to change dramatically with the creation of new facilities and services for veterans of all ages. More than 250 veterans and dependents are residents on our village with householders ranging in age from 28 to 104. Additionally, our hugely impactful outreach programme with older and isolated veterans has now reached over 1,000 individuals, bringing many veterans onto the Village for concerts, health and wellbeing, activities, and regular peer support groups. With the consolidation of our health and welfare services, into our structured person-centred programme called STEP IN, RBLI’s effective approach has won increasing recognition. General Sir Gordon Messenger, VCDS, on visiting and touring the Village, commented on the powerful ethos of self-reliance. Lord King, former Governor of the Bank of England was also impressed saying “This is one of the most valuable projects I have come across. This is a real

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community. Veterans will need this support not just now, or when they come back, they are going to need this support for the rest of their lives.” Now is a critical time for this unique village as we seek to raise £14m to develop it further creating homes and holistic welfare services to ensure we can support more veterans for the next 100 years. With an effective and person-centred model that is able to help veterans with any disadvantage grow in independence, and homes to meet the critical need for affordable and supported, RBLI’s Centenary Village expansion is truly a project of national significance. As our Campaign Patron, General Sir Gordon Messenger says; “This new development will bring much more than quality homes, and with employability at its heart, the Centenary Village is a true legacy to brighter futures. This is precisely the kind of forward-looking culture and community that our veterans need, and only through collaboration and commitment can we make this happen.”

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THE ROYAL BRITISH LEGION

LIFEWORKS

Delivering more through collaboration:

Our LifeWorks employability programme continues to go from strength to strength, and has expanded its national reach even further over the past year. This could not happen without the support of partners.

We are proud to have an ongoing, positive, working relationship with our sister charity The Royal British Legion, who have continued to support us over the last year. During 2017/18 we worked on four strategic projects in partnership with The Royal British Legion, including the exciting roll out of dementia care training to our entire village care team and evolution of our acclaimed integrated support model STEP IN, which is helping the most vulnerable veterans overcome mental health issues, substance abuse, long-term health problems, severe disability, homelessness and social isolation.

We continue to work closely and have fantastic support from Poppy Scotland and ABF The Soldiers’ Charity and have supported hundreds of unemployed veterans, including those based in Scotland, with their help. The Morrisons Foundation’s powerful strategic donation has enabled us to commit to more courses for veterans in the most deprived areas of Wales and we began delivery in the final weeks of the financial year. As we established last year, LifeWorks’ success rates are exceptional – 83% of those veterans who undertake the programme move into employment, training or volunteering within 12 months. This is incredible when compared to other back-towork programmes, especially as 4 out of 5 veterans who attend have a disability or health condition. This year has also seen further development of our LifeWorks Families programme for the spouses and partners of serving personnel with courses abroad in Belgium, Cyprus, Germany and the Netherlands. Generous funding from the Annington Trust has allowed us to continue this vital work helping partners to cope with relocation and life changes. Further developments include the introduction of an online Lifeworks Families course which has enabled the programme to be further accessible to those who struggle to attend a course. 2017/18 also saw the continuation of our pioneering Covenant Funded programme helping veterans in custody consolidate their skills and traits towards their future employment. We are proud that we were able to deliver this service as an outreach programme, supporting veterans after they were released from the criminal justice system to plan a constructive future and achieve their new goals.

In September 2017, we officially opened Victory House and Invictus Games House, providing 24 high quality and specially adapted homes for veterans 2017/2018 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS

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LOOKING AHEAD Our strategic goals established, as part of an ambitious ten-year plan in May 2015, remain (bar a few minor tweaks) very much intact. Our desire for a 21st century social enterprise is becoming a reality and we expect Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Company to have a record year in 2018/2019 alongside the creation of Scotland’s Bravest Manufacturing Company. As we move into our milestone Centenary Year in 2019, RBLI will complete its full suite of care and accommodation services and our STEP-IN personal development programme will be further refined to deliver greater independence and social participation for any veteran, of any age, and any disadvantage. We will be further integrating our LifeWorks programme with work for the wider community; fully utilising our core delivery experience and our incredible expertise in assessment, development and support for people with disabilities or health conditions seeking employment. Our immediate priority is to secure £14 million in donations in order to complete Phase Two of our Centenary Village, building on a successful Phase

Stephen Kingsman DL CHAIRMAN

One which is an exemplar of successful collaborative work between the Government, commercial and charitable sectors. We want the Village, which has already supported our nation’s veterans for 99 years, to offer this wonderful community long into the future. The planned purpose-built homes are urgently needed. As our Patron General Sir Gordon Messenger, VCDS, explains “I am very conscious that our veterans from Afghanistan and Iraq, many of whom were young when they experienced life-changing injuries, will need our support for decades to come. We need to be there for them”. The Centenary Village will enable the most deserving and disadvantaged veterans from anywhere in the UK to access integrated health and social care, outstanding employment support and purpose-built accommodation, so they can begin building a new life in this unique community. We must pull together now to ensure the services and facilities are in place for those who will certainly need more help, not less, as they get older. We hope we can count on your continued support.

Steve Sherry CMG OBE CHIEF EXECUTIVE

28th June 2018

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Tracey Crouch, MP for Chatham and Aylesford and Minister for Sport and Civil Society, opening the new Invictus Games House with (from left to right) Frank Martin DL, Vice-Chairman of RBLI Trustee Board, Sir Keith Mills GBE DL, Chairman of the Invictus Games Foundation, Anil Gurung, BBMC veteran and Dave Henson MBE, Trustee of the Invictus Games Foundation.

“THIS NEW DEVELOPMENT WILL BRING MUCH MORE THAN QUALITY HOMES, AND WITH EMPLOYABILITY AT ITS HEART, THE CENTENARY VILLAGE IS A TRUE LEGACY TO BRIGHTER FUTURES.” General Sir Gordon Messenger, Vice Chief of Defence Staff,

KCB DSO* OBE ADC, Centenary Village Campaign Patron

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OUR BOARD OF TRUSTEES STEPHEN KINGSMAN DL CHAIRMAN Stephen is a former Chairman of the Denne Construction Group, which specialises in delivering affordable housing, regeneration schemes and care facilities, much like those offered by RBLI. His extensive history in charitable service has seen him in the role of Chairman of Canterbury Further Education College, Chairman of Kent Training and Enterprise Council and as an RBLI trustee for four years preceding his election to Chair.

FRANK MARTIN DL VICE CHAIRMAN Frank is a Deputy Lieutenant for Kent and was formerly Chief Executive of Hornby Plc. He is currently Deputy Chairman of the Dover Harbour Board and Chairman of Governors/Pro Chancellor of Canterbury Christ Church University.

BRIGADIER TONY KERR OBE Tony rose to the ranks of Brigadier in the British Army. Now retired, he has spent many years as a trustee of RBLI. He is also currently President of The Royal British Legion Village Branch at Aylesford.

KATE BOSLEY Kate’s extensive experience in the care industry has been gained through her time working for the Heart of Kent Hospice. In 1991 Kate was a clinical manager and then progressed to Chief Executive in 2007. Kate joined the Board of Trustees at RBLI in 2010 and also volunteers for the charity.

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NADRA AHMED OBE DL Nadra is a Deputy Lieutenant for Kent and is Chairman of the National Care Association. In 2006, she gained an OBE for her work in social care over 30 years. She is also Vice President of Hi Kent and Vice President of the Kent Care Homes Association.

BLAIR GULLAND Blair is Chairman and Partner at Gulland Solicitors and has been a practicing solicitor for over 40 years. He is also a Trustee of many other charities including Benenden Almhouse Charities, the Michael Yoakley Charity and the Kent Community Foundation.

KATHRYN CEARNS OBE FCA FCCA Kathryn is a chartered accountant and non-executive director, mainly in the public sector or for public interest entities. Among other appointments, she is on the board of Companies House, the UK Supreme Court and Highways England. She is also on the External Audit Committee of the IMF.

DAVID MONTGOMERY David rose to the ranks of Brigadier in the British Army before becoming COO of international Executive Search firm, Hanover Matrix. He then founded the Benchmark Search Group in 2002, which helps senior Service personnel transition into successful civilian careers.

DESMOND CRAMPTON DL Desmond is a Deputy Lieutenant for Kent and a Vice President of Demelza Hospice Care for Children, where he served as a trustee for more than a decade. He also founded Lorenden Preparatory School and helped establish the Isle of Sheppey Academy.

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SENIOR MANAGEMENT TEAM

STEVE SHERRY CMG OBE CHIEF EXECUTIVE

Brigadier Steve Sherry has been Chief Executive of RBLI since April 2010. With a MBA and MSc in Strategic Studies as well as a wealth of experience in implementing change in many differing environments, including Pakistan and the Czech Republic, Steve is enjoying leading RBLI at a time of significant growth, innovation and modernisation.

STEVE WOODWARD

DIRECTOR OF EMPLOYMENT SOLUTIONS Steve joined RBLI in February 2017 having previously worked for Twin Group International where he held the role of Group Chief Operating Officer. Steve has an MBA and has also held director roles with Working Links and Lifeline projects. Prior to this Steve had a retail career spanning in excess of 25 years with ASDA, Sainsburys, B&Q and latterly Dixons Stores Group where he held various senior operational and commercial roles.

JAMES RUDONI

DIRECTOR OF RBLI LIVING James Rudoni has 25 years of operational and commercial management experience in the charity and heritage sector. Prior to joining RBLI in 2014 as Director of RBLI Living, James was the Director of Gardens for the Royal Horticultural Society. His other senior management roles include The Science Museum, the British Film Institute and being a founder member of international start-up business Science and Media LLP. 22

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PHIL DEFRAINE

DIRECTOR OF CORPORATE SERVICES Phil Defraine is a CIMA qualified accountant. Having originally worked as a trainee accountant at the Burton Group, Phil spent 20 years in a number of senior management roles including UBS, Warburgs, Deutsche Bank and LloydsTSB. Phil joined RBLI as Head of Business Services within the Employment Solutions Division in 2005. Phil was appointed Director of Finance and Company Secretary in July 2010.

LISA FARMER

DIRECTOR OF STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENT Lisa Farmer joined RBLI in October 2015 as Director of Strategic Development with over 20 years of experience in fundraising, marketing and business development. Lisa spent 8 years at Young Epilepsy as Fundraising Director before becoming Director of Development and has been involved in major commercial developments including Loughborough University’s £40m fundraising campaign and two capital fundraising campaigns at Young Epilepsy.

GEOFF STREETLEY

DIRECTOR OF BRITAIN’S BRAVEST MANUFACTURING COMPANY Geoff Streetley joined RBLI in November 2012 as Head of Commercial and is now responsible for RBLI’s social enterprise, Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Company. Geoff was previously the Chief Commercial Officer for a UK listed plc in the business services industry. Prior to this role, Geoff held senior commercial roles based both the UK and internationally and has significant experience of dealing with both public and private sector organisations globally.

MICHELLE FERGUSON

DIRECTOR OF SCOTLAND’S BRAVEST MANUFACTURING COMPANY Michelle has held senior management positions within the media industry, television press and magazines and was a director for Scottish Sports Futures Charity. Before joining RBLI in 2018, she was Managing Director of successful social enterprise St Andrew’s First Aid Training and Supplies Ltd., leading the team as they gained Highly Commended at the UK National Business Awards. Michelle was also a Guest Lecturer at the University of Glasgow Business School in 2017. 2017/2018 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS

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REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018

The trustees are pleased to present their annual directors' report together with the consolidated financial statements of the charity for the year ending 31 March 2018 which are also prepared to meet the requirements for a directors' report and accounts for Companies Act purposes. The charity registration number is 0210063. The charity is also a limited company registration number 0158479. The financial statements comply with the Charities Act 2011, the Companies Act 2006, the Memorandum and Articles of Association, and Accounting and Reporting by Charities: Statement of Recommended Practice applicable to charities preparing their accounts in accordance with the Financial Reporting Standard applicable in the UK and Republic of Ireland (FRS 102) (effective 1 January 2015). 24

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Gavin Astor House residents enjoying a Christmas trip, organised by the RBLI Living team. 2017/2018 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS

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Members of the Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Company team, including veterans Steve and Anil, at the opening of the new apartments in September 2017.

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OBJECTIVES AND ACTIVITIES The primary objectives of the charity are to support people with disabilities, health conditions or other social disadvantages to develop independence through the following main activities:

1

THE PROVISION OF WELFARE, HEALTHCARE AND HOUSING MAINLY TO MEMBERS OF THE EX-SERVICE COMMUNITY

2

THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT AND DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES THROUGH SOCIAL ENTERPRISE AND LIFEWORKS EMPLOYMENT SUPPORT OUTREACH PROGRAMMES

3

SUPPORTING UNEMPLOYED, DISABLED, DISADVANTAGED AND OTHER UNEMPLOYED PEOPLE TO INCREASE THEIR INDEPENDENCE, AND PARTICIPATION, THROUGH MEANINGFUL EMPLOYMENT

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One of many social and activity days held at Basecamp; our vibrant cafe and a central hub for residents, families and visitors to enjoy.

THE CHARITY ACHIEVES ITS PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES VIA THE FOLLOWING ACTIVITIES AND SERVICES: PROVIDING CARE Delivering an integrated and comprehensive suite of care, accommodation and employment services and facilities on our Village in Aylesford, with a clear focus on supporting veterans and their families.

CHAMPIONING DISABILITY

EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

Delivery of the Government Delivering supported employment funded Work Programme and a for individuals with disabilities and number of other back-to-work health conditions from the Armed programmes across a large part of Kent and Sussex (currently Forces and wider community through our manufacturing social delivered by RBLI as a subcontractor to G4S on behalf of enterprise, Britain’s Bravest the Department of Work and Manufacturing Company. Pensions).

The Board of Trustees review the charity’s strategic goals, activities and performance throughout the year and have considered the Charity Commission’s guidance on public benefit and are confident that the broad range of services and support that the charity provides demonstrable public benefit to a very large number of beneficiaries. This report highlights some of the core work and achievements of the charity during the year.

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ACCESS TO WORK

CAREER DEVELOPMENT

The provision of disability assessment services via our Access to Work Programme is delivered for the Department of Work and Pensions.

The design, development and ongoing delivery of RBLI’s innovative vocational assessment and development activities for the serving and veteran service community (via our LifeWorks courses for veterans, spouses of serving personnel, and now veterans in custody as well as vocational assessments for wounded, injured and sick serving personnel as part of the Right Management Career Transition Partnership with the MOD).

CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT Creating innovative new projects, products and outreach services to meet our objectives, and meet the needs of our beneficiaries more effectively and efficiently.

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ACHIEVEMENTS AND PERFOMANCE

“I’D RECOMMEND LIFEWORKS TO ANY PERSON THAT’S BEEN IN THE FORCES AND PEOPLE THAT HAVE COME OUT THE FORCES, TO HELP WITH EMPLOYMENT , IT’S FANTASTIC.” Neil, British Army Veteran

ACCOMMODATION During the year the charity provided accommodation and care to more than 300 veterans and their families on our village at Aylesford. In addition to accommodation provided, the charity provides a full range of welfare, health and wellbeing services on the village. We are experiencing more and more demand for accommodation and care from the veteran community so with a generous Libor grant and RBLI match funding plus donations we have developed 24 new apartments for veterans in need. The first residents were given their keys in June 2017. We have also received Libor funding from the Treasury to begin a much-needed new 15 bed extra-care and day-care facility that will be complete in 2019.

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TRAINING AND VOCATIONAL ASSESSMENT SERVICES Our training and vocational assessment services to the veteran and serving Armed Forces continue to excel. LifeWorks, our flagship programme, was recognised in an independent study by the Learning and Work Institute to be highly effective at helping more than 80% of all participants move onto work or further education. During the year the programme was delivered nationally across the country and internationally at armed forces garrisons. In addition to LifeWorks we continue to deliver our Vocation Assessment Course for the MOD at garrison facilities across the UK.

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BRITAIN’S BRAVEST MANUFACTURING COMPANY

SCOTLAN’D BRAVEST MANUFACTURING COMPANY

Our Kent and Surrey based manufacturing division Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Company continues to provide employment opportunities for a range of veterans, disabled and able bodied staff.

Finally at the end of 2017, RBLI are proud to have launched a new manufacturing operation. Scotland’s Bravest Manufacturing Co.

During the year the division won the contract to supply and deliver British Tommy models as part of the 2018 commemoration project “There But Not There”. We are proud to be part of this project that commemorates the end of the 1914 -1918 war and all the brave men and women who lost their lives.

This initiative is a collaboration with the Erskine Charity in Scotland and will provide employment for up to 100 veterans at the Erskine facility, 14 miles west of Glasgow. The project is well advanced and we expect to start manufacturing a range of products mid way through the next financial year.

EMPLOYMENT SOLUTIONS The Charity continues to operate a range of Welfare to Work Programmes via our Employment Solutions Division. We deliver Work Programme across a large part of Kent and Sussex along with a number of Big Lottery and European Social Fund funded projects designed to help the long term unemployed.

SCOTLAND’S

In the summer of 2017 we secured the Department of Work and Pensions Access to Work Assessment Contract, delivering nearly 7,500 workplace assessments to disabled employees throughout the UK. During the year the division also won contracts to deliver skills and training on behalf of the Skills and Training Agency as part of the government funded Adult Education Budget Programme.

BRITAIN’S BRAVEST MANUFACTURING COMPANY WON THE CONTRACT TO SUPPLY AND DELIVER BRITISH TOMMY MODELS AS PART OF THE 2018 “THERE BUT NOT THERE” PROJECT, COMMEMORATING THE END OF THE 1914-1918 WAR.

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FINANCIAL REVIEW AT THE END OF THE YEAR OUR CASH BALANCE IS STRONG AND REFLECTS THE FUNDS SET ASIDE FOR THE NEW CARE FACILITY BEING DEVELOPED THROUGH 2018 CALENDAR YEAR. INCOME

EXPENDITURE

During the year the Charity generated income of £17.7m (2017 £17.2m). Donations at £2.5m reflect a highly successful year for our fundraising activity.

Total expenditure for the year was £18.3m (2017 £16.7m). Fundraising costs increased by £94k reflecting the improved funds raised position.

Employment Solutions improved by £587k, year on year reflecting growth into new contract areas in the welfare to work sector.

Employment Solutions costs increased by £1.4m as the division expanded into skills and training.

RBLI Living, our care and accommodation division, generated £5.5m income, marginally down on the prior year. Manufacturing at £5.5m was £334k lower than 2017, with the wooden products and signs business experiencing a downturn in demand.

Manufacturing costs were down in year reflecting the lower demand in the area. Living costs increase by £380k as we invest in more welfare on the village at Aylesford and as we improve our estates management infrastructure in preparation for a major re-development and expansion of our housing for veterans. Overall our operating divisions produced a net expenditure of £642k, a result that is consistent with our planned deficit as we continue to invest into our exciting new 10 year strategy. Our investment fund reduced in value by £184k in year and therefore the net expenditure for the year was £826k ( 2017 : Net income for the year £1.7m) . In addition to the above, the 2018 financial statements include a £2.5m actuarial gain on the defined pension benefit scheme and therefore the net movement in funds for the year equates to £1.7m and the charity ends the year with funds of £22.8m; an increase of just under 8% year on year. The charity’s balance sheet has strengthened over the year reflecting the reduction in the FRS102 pension deficit provision. At the end of the year our cash balance is strong and reflects the funds set aside for the new care facility being developed through 2018 calendar year.

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INVESTMENT POWERS AND POLICY

RESERVE POLICY

Investment powers are governed by the Memorandum and Articles of Association and permit the charity’s fund to be invested in a wide range of assets. No ethical investment restrictions are placed on the investment fund managers’ remit.

The reserve policy, reviewed annually by trustees, is to hold a sum of money as a designated fund in two parts as follows:

The charity’s investments are held to achieve balanced long term growth and a level of investment income each year. Performance is measured against a long term target of CPI+3% per annum. Performance is also measured against a bespoke benchmark that reflects the fund asset allocation. During the year the fund performed better than target and benchmark.

An operating reserve equating to approximately four months working cash flow, which equates to £5m A reserve equating to the forecast cost to RBLI for planned future projects and developments, primarily accommodation and care facilities at Aylesford. This also equates to £5m.

The Board reviews fund performance at every board meeting. Management meet with our investment managers quarterly and the investment managers present and report to the board on an annual basis.

DONATIONS AT £2.5M REFLECT A HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL YEAR FOR OUR FUNDRAISING ACTIVITY.

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RESERVES

GOING CONCERN

Unrestricted funds totalled £17.1m (2017: £16.6m).

The Trustees have reviewed the future plans for the Charity and this combined with the strength of the balance sheet and future funds already secured are confident that the Charity will remain a going concern for many years to come.

The operating reserve in a designated fund equates to £5m. The development reserve in a designated fund stands at £5m, of which £3m is for the New Care Facility and the refurbishment of our care home Gavin Astor House. The fund also includes £2m designated for the 2019 Centenary Village Development. The pension deficit reserve calculated as per FRS102 is £1.5m. The general fund of £8.2m reflects the infrastructure and tangible fixed assets used by the charity to support our beneficiaries in Aylesford and Leatherhead. Restricted Funds totalled £5.7m (2017: £4.6m). In addition to the above, the unrestricted fund also includes a sum covering the investment fair value reserve which equates to the difference between the original cost of the investments and their market value. Land and buildings shown on the balance sheet are shown at historical costs less depreciation and have not been restated at market value. Although a professional valuation of land has not been done, the trustees believe that the market value is significantly higher than the book value which is negligible as it was transferred to the charity in 1919.

PENSION LIABILITY The charity is a member of a multi-employer pension scheme with the Royal British Legion and the Poppy Factory. The scheme is a defined benefit scheme. This scheme was closed to new entrants in 2002, but members are still accruing benefits. The scheme has a pension deficit, largely due to historic funding not achieving predicted returns required to ensure the scheme assets fully cover the liability. RBLI’s share of the deficit is £1.5m or approximately 16% of the total deficit as determined by our actuaries as part of the FRS102 Pension Liability Report We have an agreed recovery plan with the Pension Scheme Trustees to fund the deficit over a five-year period. The plan allows for a scrutinised charge over the charity’s assets rather than a cash recovery plan. However, the recovery plan allows for a revision to the methodology subject to the future size of the scheme assets versus liabilities.

“I CANNOT RECOMMEND LIFEWORKS HIGHLY ENOUGH TO ANY SPOUSE LOOKING FOR A POSITIVE CHANGE IN JOB, PROMOTION, CAREER CHANGE ETC.”

Coretta, military spouse, supported by the Lifeworks Families team

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FUNDRAISING

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

The Charity has invested in a fundraising division (Supporting Britain’s Bravest ). The division has specific teams that focus on corporate, community and grant based fundraising.

The Board of Trustees are responsible for the overall governance, policy and work of the Charity. The Members of Royal British Legion Industries (RBLI) can appoint up to a maximum of 12 trustees for the year from one Annual General Meeting to the next. If a vacancy arises, the trustees can co-opt a Member to fill a vacancy at any time.

Each team has a target that generates a level of both restricted and unrestricted funds. A major focus of the division is the centenary village campaign raising funds for the future development of the village at Aylesford. Our fundraising activity has performed well against target and we are very grateful for the support of donors and supporters in helping raise much needed funds for many good causes. During the year we have not received any complaints regarding our fundraising activities.

PLANS FOR THE FUTURE Plans for the future are covered in the Strategic Report

STRUCTURE, GOVERNANCE AND MANAGEMENT Governing Document Royal British Legion Industries is a charitable company limited by guarantee and was set up on 3 September 1919 and known as Industrial Settlements (Incorporated). It is governed by Articles of Association which were last amended in September 2016.

REFERENCE AND ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION The trustees in office during the year and at the date of this report, senior executives of the charity, its principal places of business and its professional advisers are set out on page 69.

Newly elected trustees are given induction training on their duties as Members of the Board and on their responsibilities as trustees. In addition, they receive a copy of the Charity’s Articles of Association, a copy of its latest reports and financial statements, details of the Senior Executives and their respective roles and details of future board meetings. The Board governs the Charity within its Articles of Association and in line with its mission, charitable objectives and values. The Board provides overall policy direction and the management of the Charity is delegated to the Chief Executive and through him to the senior management team. The Board meets quarterly and papers are made available prior to board meetings including business plans and budgets. Summary management accounts are reviewed by the trustees at each Board meeting. The trustees confirm that reference has been made to the guidance contained in the Charity Commission’s guidance on public benefit of the Charities Act 2011, when reviewing the Charity’s aims and objectives and in planning future activities. The trustees and senior executives are involved in the strategic planning and their recommendations are then considered by the Board. In addition to the quarterly board meetings the trustees also meet annually for a strategic review and planning day. The Board review existing operations of the charity and consider strategic options for the future. In addition to this the Board also consider their own effectiveness and practices. At this time the Board have not conducted a full charity governance code review. Estates Development matters are considered and reviewed by the Estates Development Committee which is chaired by a trustee and its recommendations are submitted to the Board of Trustees for its approval. Care and Welfare matters are considered and reviewed by the Care and Welfare Committee which is chaired by a trustee and its recommendations are submitted to the Board of Trustees for its approval.

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IMAGE NEEDED

Steve Hammond, former Welsh Guard, working in the signs department for Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Company.

At the House of Lords for RBLI’s Ladies’ Lunch in March discussing the disability employment gap.

STATEMENT OF TRUSTEES RESPONSIBILITIES The trustees (who are also directors of Royal British Legion Industries for the purposes of company law) are responsible for preparing the trustees’ report and the financial statements in accordance with applicable law and regulation. Company law requires the trustees to prepare financial statements for each financial year. Under that law the trustees have prepared the financial statements in accordance with United Kingdom Accounting Standards, comprising FRS 102 “The Financial Reporting Standard applicable in the UK and Republic of Ireland”, and applicable law (United Kingdom Generally Accepted Accounting Practice). Under company law the trustees must not approve the financial statements unless they are satisfied that they give a true and fair view of the state of the affairs of the charitable company and of the incoming resources and application of resources, including the income and expenditure, of the charitable company for that period. In preparing these financial statements, the trustees are required to: • select suitable accounting policies and then apply them consistently; • observe the methods and principles in the Statement of Recommended Practice: Accounting and Reporting by Charities (2015); 36

• make judgements and estimates that are reasonable and prudent; • state whether applicable UK accounting standards, comprising FRS 102 have been followed, subject to any material departures disclosed and explained in the financial statements; and • prepare the financial statements on the going concern basis unless it is inappropriate to presume that the charitable company will continue in business. The trustees are responsible for keeping adequate accounting records that are sufficient to show and explain the charitable company’s transactions and disclose with reasonable accuracy at any time the financial position of the charitable company and enable them to ensure that the financial statements comply with the Companies Act 2006. They are also responsible for safeguarding the assets of the charitable company and hence for taking reasonable steps for the prevention and detection of fraud and other irregularities. The trustees are responsible for the maintenance and integrity of the charitable company’s website. Legislation in the United Kingdom governing the preparation and dissemination of financial statements may differ from legislation in other jurisdictions. 2017/2018 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS


Alex Stringer, who sustained life-changing injuries after stepping on an IED during a tour of Afghanistan whilst serving in the Royal Logistic Corps, now a resident in Victory House. Photo by Andy Bate, Blesma

PAY POLICY

RISK MANAGEMENT

The Board of Trustees approve any relevant annual pay rise to all employees with the Senior Management Team receiving the same annual increase as all other employees.

The charity operates a risk reporting matrix that is reviewed by the Board of Trustees at every Board meeting.

When new members join the Senior Management Team, the Chairman or Vice-Chairman of the Board of Trustees are asked to approve relevant salaries and other compensation/rewards.

The matrix is updated in real time as events or issues emerge, and wherever possible alternative scenarios are evaluated and relevant action plans or strategies are developed to help plan through and mitigate any possible material risk that may emerge.

Out-of-cycle pay rises not covered by the annual process, require the approval of the Chief Executive and the Director of Finance and typically reflect a change of roles and responsibilities, or a market change in a specific division or area of the charity. Where appropriate, staff with revenue targets benefit from a bonus system that rewards good performance. All staff are encouraged to join the current pension scheme which is a defined contribution scheme. The charity contributes to the scheme and the contribution is determined by the individual employee contribution level.

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PRINCIPLE RISKS AND UNCERTAINTIES The major risks that could negatively and materially impact the charity in the medium and long term are as follows: • The Government removes the Supported Factory Grant used to support disabled employees in Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Company. The grant provides help and support for those employees with the most profound disabilities at both Aylesford and Leatherhead. • The majority vote for the leave campaign for the UK to leave the European Union may have an adverse effect on the charity at some time in the future. At this stage it is impossible to quantify any likely effect in either the charity’s investments or those programmes that we deliver that are ESF funded.

STATEMENT OF DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION TO AUDITORS Insofar as the trustees are aware: • there is no relevant audit information of which the charitable company’s auditors are unaware; and • the trustees have taken all steps that they ought to have taken to make themselves aware of any relevant audit information and to establish that the auditors are aware of that information. The trustees are responsible for the maintenance and integrity of the corporate and financial information included on the charitable company’s website. Legislation in the United Kingdom governing the preparation and dissemination of financial statements may differ from legislation in other jurisdictions.

DIRECTORS’ INDEMNITIES

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS

As permitted by the Articles of Association, the directors/trustees have the benefit of an indemnity which is a qualifying third party indemnity provision as defined by Section 234 of the Companies Act 2006. The indemnity was in force throughout the last financial year and is currently in force.

A resolution proposing that PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP be reappointed as auditors of the Charity will be put to the Board at the Annual General Meeting.

The charity also purchased and maintained throughout the financial year directors’ and officers’ liabilities insurance in respect of itself and its directors/trustees.

Approved by the Board and signed by its order by

Stephen Kingsman CHAIRMAN 28th June 2018

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Base Camp team member, Julia, on her way to take on a skydive for the charity. Julia has been an incredible supporter over the last year, taking on numerous challenges to help rasie funds so we can continue to support Britain’s Bravest.

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STRATEGIC REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018

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2017/2018 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS


Volunteers from Tudor Marriot Hotel in Maidstone get involved at Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Company.

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STRATEGIC REPORT BUSINESS REVIEW During the year, many programmes within the charity performed relatively well with significant planned growth in both the Employment Solutions and RBLI Living divisions being achieved. Overall the charity performed below it’s in-year financial operating target, with net expenditure in the year of £826k overall and just under £2m net expenditure in unrestricted funds. However the charity increased net funds over the year by nearly 8%, benefiting from a material reduction in the charity’s FRS102 pension deficit provision.

FUTURE PLANS The Charity has successfully delivered on its first two years of our ten-year strategy ‘Improving Lives Every Day’. The new structure is effectively embedded and is over achieving on our four themes:

42

INVESTMENT

INNOVATION

INFLUENCE

INSPIRE

2017/2018 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS


THE VILLAGE

SUPPORTING SCOTLAND’S BRAVEST

Our Village development plans progress very well. During the year we opened 24 new apartments on the Village at Aylesford. This exciting new development part funded by the MOD LIBOR Fund was opened by the Secretary of State for Defence in September 2017 and is now fully occupied housing a number of disadvantaged veterans and their families.

We are well progressed in our new manufacturing project “Scotland’s Bravest Manufacturing Company” ( SBMC). This project is a joint venture with the Erskine Charity in Scotland.

During 2018 we are developing a New Care Facility at Aylesford. This much needed facility will provide high quality care for 14 beneficiaries and a Day Care Facility for up to 40 participants daily. The Centenary Village Development Programme progresses well and in April 2018 we received our first major donation, from the ABF The Soldiers’ Charity for this exciting long term project that will see the charity develop a significant range of additional accommodation and care services including new homes an assisted living unit and welfare facilities for more veterans at the Royal British Legion Village at Aylesford. The Village expansion planned aims to support 100 veterans a year for the next 100 years and will prioritise those in greatest need, offering our unique community and life-changing health, welfare and employability opportunities to veterans from right across the UK.

Our new social enterprise will develop in parallel with new purpose homes and a new activities centre which is ensure the Erskine Village will be able to support veterans of all ages. SBMC went live in April 2018 and will result in the development of a manufacturing operation at Erskine that will provide employment for veterans in the Glasgow area. Our strategic intent remains one of reaching more beneficiaries through growth, national reach, innovation, investment, inspirational leadership and influence. This is being achieved by our wonderful staff and through open and collaborative working with other charities, Government and commercial organisations. As we approach our exciting Centenary year, 2019, we hope that many more partners will choose to get involved with RBLI, to help us develop our inspirational services and facilities and deliver even more for those who have served and sacrificed.

OUR SOCIAL ENTERPRISE Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Co, plans to build on its successful growth by continuing to offer more employment opportunities to veterans and people from the wider community with disabilities. We are proud to have won the contract to source, pack and fulfil ‘Tommy’ figures for There But Not There, an exciting new national charitable project is already helping us to employ more beneficiaries in our manufacturing operation.

Stephen Kingsman CHAIRMAN 28th June 2018

We are also very grateful for the help we’ve had from a large number of volunteers who are keen to help support this fantastic initiative

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INDEPENDENT AUDITORS REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018

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Aerial view of the Erskine village near Glasgow, now the site of Scotland’s Bravest Manufacturing Company. 2017/2018 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS

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INDEPENDENT AUDITORS REPORT REPORT ON AUDIT OF THE THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS OPINION In our opinion, Royal British Legion Industries Limited’s financial statements (“the financial statements”): • give a true and fair view of the state of the charitable company’s affairs as at 31 March 2018 and of its incoming resources and application of resources, including its income and expenditure and cash flows for the year then ended; • have been properly prepared in accordance with United Kingdom Generally Accepted Accounting Practice (United Kingdom Generally Accepted Accounting Standards, comprising FRS102, the Financial Reporting Standards applicable in the UK and Republic of Ireland, and applicable law, and • have been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Companies Act 2006. We have audited the financial statements, included within the Trustees’ Report and Financial Statements (the “Annual Report”), which comprise: the balance sheet as at 31 March 2018; the statements of financial activities (incorporating the summary income and expenditure account), and the statement of cash flows for the year then ended; the accounting policies; and the notes to the financial statements.

BASIS FOR OPINION We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing (UK) (“ISAs (UK)”) and applicable law. Our responsibilities under ISAs (UK) are further described in the Auditors’ responsibilities for the audit of the financial statements section of our report. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion. Independence We remained independent of the charitable company in accordance with the ethical requirements that are relevant to our audit of the financial statements in the UK, which includes the FRC’s Ethical Standard and we have fulfilled our 46

other ethical responsibilities in accordance with these requirements.

CONCLUSIONS RELATING TO GOING CONCERN We have nothing to report in respect of the following matters in relation to which ISAs (UK) require us to report to you when: • the trustees’ use of the going concern basis of accounting in the preparation of the financial statements is not appropriate; or • the trustees have not disclosed in the financial statements any identified material uncertainties that may cast significant doubt about the charitable company’s ability to continue to adopt the going concern basis of accounting for a period of at least twelve months from the date when the financial statements are authorised for issue. However, because not all future events or conditions can be predicted, this statement is not a guarantee as to the charitable company’s ability to continue as a going concern.

REPORTING ON OTHER INFORMATION The other information comprises all of the information in the Annual Report other than the financial statements and our auditors’ report thereon. The trustees are responsible for the other information. Our opinion on the financial statements does not cover the other information and, accordingly, we do not express an audit opinion or, except to the extent otherwise explicitly stated in this report, any form of assurance thereon. In connection with our audit of the financial statements, our responsibility is to read the other information and, in doing so, consider whether the other information is materially inconsistent with the financial statements or our knowledge obtained in the audit, or otherwise appears to be materially misstated. If we identify an apparent material inconsistency or material misstatement, we are required to perform procedures to conclude 2017/2018 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS


whether there is a material misstatement of the financial statements or a material misstatement of the other information. If, based on the work we have performed, we conclude that there is a material misstatement of this other information, we are required to report that fact. We have nothing to report based on these responsibilities. Based on the responsibilities described above and our work undertaken in the course of the audit, ISAs (UK) require us also to report certain opinions and matters as described below. Report of the Trustees and the Strategic Report In our opinion, based on the work undertaken in the course of the audit the information given in the Report of the Trustees and the Strategic Report for the financial year for which the financial statements are prepared is consistent with the financial statements; and the Report of the Trustees and the Strategic Report have been prepared in accordance with applicable legal requirements. In addition, in light of the knowledge and understanding of the charitable company and its environment obtained in the course of the audit, we are required to report if we have identified any material misstatements in the Report of the Trustees and the Strategic Report. We have nothing to report in this respect.

RESPONSIBILITIES FOR THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND THE AUDIT

Responsibilities of the trustees for the financial statements As explained more fully in the Statement of Trustees Responsibilities, the trustees are responsible for the preparation of the financial statements in accordance with the applicable framework and for being satisfied that they give a true and fair view. The trustees are also responsible for such internal control as they determine is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. In preparing the financial statements, the trustees are responsible for assessing the charitable company’s ability to continue as a going concern, disclosing as applicable, matters related to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting unless the trustees either intend to liquidate the charitable company or to cease operations, or have no realistic alternative but to do so.

to fraud or error, and to issue an auditors’ report that includes our opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with ISAs (UK) will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of these financial statements. A further description of our responsibilities for the audit of the financial statements is located on the Financial Reporting Council’s website at: www.frc. org.uk/auditorsresponsibilities. This description forms part of our auditors’ report. Use of this report This report, including the opinions, has been prepared for and only for the charity’s members and trustees as a body in accordance with Chapter 3 of Part 16 of the Companies Act 2006 and for no other purpose. We do not, in giving these opinions accept or assume responsibility for any other purpose to any other person to whom this report is shown or into whose hands it may come save where expressly agreed by our prior consent in writing.

OTHER REQUIRED REPORTING Companies Act 2006 exception reporting Under the Companies Act 2006 we are required to report to you if, in our opinion: • we have not received all the information and explanations we require for our audit; or • adequate accounting records have not been kept or returns adequate for our audit have not been received from branches not visited by us; or • certain disclosures of trustees’ remuneration specified by law are not made; or • the financial statements are not in agreement with the accounting records and returns. We have no exceptions to report arising from this responsibility

Jill Halford SENIOR STATUTORY AUDITOR for and on behalf of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP Chartered Accountants and Statutory Auditors London

Auditors’ responsibilities for the audit of the financial statements Our objectives are to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements as a whole are free from material misstatement, whether due 2017/2018 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS

47


STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018

Mike Angell, Vice-Chairman Kent County Council, and children at the opening of the new Base Camp playground – the Summit, in August 2017.

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2017/2018 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS

49


FINANCIALS STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES (INCORPORATING THE SUMMARY INCOME AND EXPENDITURE ACCOUNT) FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 INCOME & EXPENDITURE

2018 Unrestricted Funds

2018 Restricted Funds

2018 Total Funds

2017 Restricted Funds

2017 Total Funds (reclassified)

£000’s

2017 Unrestricted Funds (reclassified) £000’s

£000’s

£000’s

£000’s

268

2,256

2,524

68

2,291

2,359

Employment Solutions

3,339

581

3,920

3,150

183

3,333

Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing

5,117

366

5,483

5,512

305

5,817

RBLI Living

4,669

868

5,537

4,577

895

5,472

Total Charitable Activities

13,125

1,815

14,940

13,239

1,383

14,622

209

-

209

264

-

264

13,602

4,071

17,673

13,571

3,674

17,245

764

149

913

684

135

819

Note

£000 ‘s

INCOME FROM Donations Charitable Activities:

Investments Income

2

Total

EXPENDITURE ON: Raising Funds

3

Charitable Activities:

-

Employment Solutions

3

4,064

637

4,701

3,216

128

3,344

Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing

3

6,148

376

6,524

6,426

316

6,742

RBLI Living

3

4,404

1,773

6,177

4,403

1,394

5,797

Total Expenditure

3

15,380

2,935

18,315

14,729

1,973

16,702

Net (Expenditure)/Income before Investment (Losses)/Gains

3

( 1,778 )

1,136

( 642 )

( 1,158 )

1,701

543

(Losses)/Gains on investments assets

6

( 184 )

-

( 184 )

1,123

-

1,123

( 1,962 )

1,136

(826)

( 35 )

1,701

1,666

2,510

-

2,510

( 1,070)

-

( 1,070)

548

1,136

1,684

( 1,105 )

1,701

596

16,581

4,579

21,160

17,686

2,878

20,564

17,129

5,715

22,844

16,581

4,579

21,160

Net (Expenditure)/Income

OTHER RECOGNISED GAINS AND LOSSES Actuarial Gain/(Loss) on defined benefit pension scheme

14

Net movement in funds

Fund balances brought forward at 1st April Fund balances carried forward at 31st March

12

The reclassification of prior year reflects the change in analysis of support costs - see note 3. All of the current year above results are derived from continuing activities. The notes on pages 53 to 65 form part of these financial statements.

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BALANCE SHEET AT 31 MARCH 2018 BALANCE SHEET

2018

2017

Note

£000s

£000s

Tangible assets

5

13,827

12,904

Investments

6

6,834

7,085

Investment in subsidiary

7

-

-

20,661

19,989

FIXED ASSETS

Total Fixed Assets

CURRENT ASSETS Stocks and work in progress

8

382

315

Debtors

9

2,371

2,059

Cash at bank and in hand

4,165

5,796

Total Current Assets

6,918

8,170

( 3,229 )

( 3,143 )

( 3,229 )

( 3,143 )

Net current assets

3,689

5,027

Total assets less current liabilities

24,350

25,016

Net assets (excluding pension scheme liability)

24,350

25,016

14

( 1,506 )

( 3,856 )

12,13

22,844

21,160

Unrestricted - Designated

13

10,000

10,000

Unrestricted - General

13

8,155

9,676

Fair Value Reserve

13

480

761

18,635

20,437

( 1,506 )

( 3,856 )

17,129

16,581

5,715

4,579

22,844

21,160

CURRENT LIABILITIES Creditors – amounts falling due within one year

Defined benefit pension scheme liability Net assets (including pension scheme liability)

10

THE FUNDS OF THE CHARITY

Pension Reserve

13

Total Unrestricted Income Funds Restricted Income Funds TOTAL CHARITY FUNDS

12,13

The notes on pages 53 to 65 form an integral part of these financial statements. The Financial Statements which comprise the Statement of Financial Activities, the Balance Sheet, the Statement of Cash Flows and the related notes were approved by the Board of Trustees on 28th June 2018 and were signed on its behalf by:-

Mr Stephen Kingsman Mr A B Gulland 2017/2018 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS

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FINANCIALS STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 CASH FLOWS

2018 Note

Net cash (outflow)/inflow from operating activities

£000s

2017 £000s

£000s

( 442 )

20

£000s 1,093

INVESTMENTS Investment income

209

Net cash inflow from investments

264 209

264

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE AND FINANCIAL INVESTMENT Payments to acquire tangible fixed assets Receipts from the sale of Investments

( 1, 398)

( 3,310 )

-

2,000

Net cash outflow from capital expenditure & financial investment

( 1,398 )

( 1,310 )

(Reduction)/increase in net cash

( 1,631 )

47

Balance brought Forward

5,796

5,749

Balance Carried Forward at 31 March

4,165

5,796

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NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 1. ACCOUNTING POLICIES Going Concern

The Trustees have reviewed the future plans for the charity and this combined with the strength of the balance sheet and future funds already secured are confident that the Charity will remain a going concern for many years to come.

Basis of Accounting

The Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with the charities SORP, FRS102 The Financial Reporting Standard applicable in the UK and Republic of Ireland, and applicable UK charity and company law. The principal accounting policies applied in the preparation of these financial statements are set out below. These policies have been consistently applied to all the years presented unless otherwise stated. These financial statements are prepared on a going concern basis under the historical cost convention, as modified by the recognition of certain financial assets and liabilities measured at fair value. Consolidation The company has a wholly-owned subsidiary company, RBLI Contracts Limited. Consolidated financial statements have not been prepared as it has been dormant for several years and the activities of the subsidiary are not material to the group. Information concerning the subsidiary is set out in note 7.

Funds

The charity maintains the following funds:• Restricted - where the purpose to which the funds may be used has been restricted by the donors • Unrestricted - where the fund is not restricted as to its use • Designated - where the funds are unrestricted but the Trustees have designated them for a specific purpose Funds have been set up and designated by the Board of Trustees and transfers between funds are agreed by the trustees.

Income Recognition

Charitable activity income is measured at the fair value of the consideration received or receivable and represents the amount receivable for goods supplied or services rendered, net of returns, discounts and rebates allowed and value added taxes. Donations are

recognised as income when received or when entitlement to receive has been established, receipt is probable, and the amount can be quantified with reasonable accuracy. Gift Aid receivable is included when claimable.

Grants Received Grants are recognised in the Statement of Financial Activities when the conditions for entitlement have been met. Grants received before the conditions for entitlement have been met are deferred and included in creditors at year-end. Subsidies Receivable

A subsidy is made to host companies who employ a disabled person under the terms of the Work Choice Programme. The subsidy arises on the employment of the disabled person and remains for the term of the employment contract. It is accounted for on an accruals basis.

Pensions

The Charity operates two pension schemes, the Defined Benefit Scheme which was closed to new entrants in 2002 and the Group Personal Pension Scheme. The Defined Benefits scheme, the assets of which are held and managed separately, is a multi-employer scheme. The actuaries have attributed scheme assets and liabilities to RBLI for the requirements of FRS102. The impact on the current year SOFA was an actuarial gain of £2.5m and a deficit on the balance sheet of £1.5m. For the defined benefit section the amounts charged in expenditure are the current service costs and gains and losses on settlements and curtailments. They are included as part of staff costs. Past service costs are recognised immediately in the Statement of Financial Activities if the benefits have vested. If the benefits have not vested immediately, the costs are recognised over the period until vesting occurs. The interest cost and the expected return on assets are shown as a net amount of other finance costs or credits adjacent to interest. Actuarial gains and losses are recognised immediately in ‘Other recognised gains and losses’. The Defined Benefit scheme is funded, with the assets of the scheme held separately from those of the underlying employers, in separate trustee administered funds. Pension scheme assets are measured at fair value and liabilities are measured on an actuarial basis using the projected unit method and discounted at a rate equivalent to the current rate of return on

a high quality corporate bond of equivalent currency and term to the scheme liabilities. The actuarial valuations are obtained at least triennially and are updated at each balance sheet date. The resulting defined benefit asset or liability, net of the related deferred tax is presented separately after other net assets on the face of the balance sheet. In addition the amount charged to the Statement of Financial activities includes contributions payable to the Group Personal Pension Scheme in the year.

Short-term benefits

Short term benefits, including holiday pay, termination payments and other similar non-monetary benefits, are recognised as an expense in the period in which the service is incurred.

Taxation

The company is a registered charity, and as such is entitled to certain tax exemptions on income and profits from investments, and surpluses on any trading activities carried on in furtherance of the charity’s primary objectives, if these profits and surpluses are applied solely for charitable purposes.

Cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents includes cash in hand, deposits held at call with banks, other short term highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less and bank overdrafts. Bank overdrafts, when applicable, are shown within borrowings in current liabilities.

Investments

Investments are stated at fair value and the value of both realised and unrealised gains are included in the Statement of Financial Activities within the relevant Funds. Investments are subject to review for impairment when there is an indication of a reduction in their carrying value. Any impairment is recognised in the year in which it occurs.

2017/2018 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS

53


FINANCIALS 1. ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued) Charitable Expenditure Assets Under Construction Costs are recognised on an accruals basis Assets under construction represents in the period in which they are incurred. expenditure incurred in creating assets. Expenditure on raising funds includes the Depreciation takes place only after completion costs incurred in raising donation income and and capitalisation. grant income, including apportioned support costs. Expenditure on charitable activities Limitation of Capitalisation comprises the costs incurred on charitable Expenditure below £1,000 per item does not activities including apportioned support costs. qualify for capitalisation as a fixed asset as it is Where support costs cover more than one not considered to be material. area of activity the costs are allocated to each activity based on revenue. Costs of expenditure on raising funds includes Financial Risk Management the fees incurred in managing the charity’s investments. The charity’s operations expose it to some financial risks that include the effects of changes in market interest rates and its Operating Leases liquidity position. The charity has in place a risk management programme that seeks to limit Annual rentals under operating leases are adverse effects on the financial performance of charged against income on a straight line basis the charity. over the lease term. Stock and Work-in-Progress

Raw materials, work-in-progress and finished goods are valued at the lower of cost or estimated selling price less cost to complete and sell. Cost comprises the direct cost of production and the net attributable proportion of works overheads appropriate to each department. Cost is determined on an average cost method. Cost includes the purchase price including transport and handling directly attributable to bringing the stock to its present location and condition.

Fixed Assets

Tangible assets are stated at cost (or deemed cost) less accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Cost includes the original purchase price, costs directly attributable to bringing the asset to its working condition for its intended use, dismantling and restoration costs. Land is not depreciated. Depreciation on other assets is calculated, using the straight-line method, to allocate the depreciable amount to their residual values over their estimated useful lives, as follows: • Freehold buildings - 2% straight-line • Buildings plant - 7% straight-line • Plant, Machinery, Fixtures and Fittings 15% straight-line • Motor vehicles - 25% straight-line • Office equipment - 33% straight-line An annual impairment review is undertaken and adjustments are made where the adjustment is material.

54

Critical accounting estimates and assumptions

The charity makes estimates and assumptions concerning the future. The resulting accounting estimates will by definition seldom equal actual results. The estimates and assumptions that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next financial year are addressed below. Stock provisioning At each balance sheet date the charity considers the recoverability of the cost of stock and the associated provisioning required. When calculating the stock provision, management considers the nature and condition of the stock, as well as applying assumptions around anticipated saleability of finished goods and future usage of raw materials. Impairment of debtors The charity makes an estimate of the recoverable value of trade and other debtors. When assessing impairment of trade and other debtors, management considers factors including the current credit rating of the debtor, the ageing profile of debtors and historical experience. Defined benefit pension scheme The charity has an obligation to pay pension benefits to certain employees. The cost of these benefits and the present value of the obligation depend on a number of factors, including; life expectancy, salary increases, asset valuations and the discount rate on corporate bonds. Management estimates these factors in determining the net pension obligation in the balance sheet. The assumptions reflect historical experience and current trends.

Financial Instruments

The company has chosen to adopt Sections 11 and 12 of FRS 102 in respect of financial instruments. (i) Financial assets Basic financial assets, including trade and other receivables, cash and bank balances are initially recognised at transaction price. At the end of each reporting period financial assets are assessed for objective evidence of impairment. If an asset is impaired the impairment loss is the difference between the carrying amount and the estimated cash flows. The impairment loss is recognised in profit or loss. If there is a decrease in the impairment loss arising from an event occurring after the impairment was recognised, the impairment is reversed. The reversal is such that the current carrying amount does not exceed what the carrying amount would have been had the impairment not previously been recognised. The impairment reversal is recognised in profit or loss. Investments which are not subsidiaries are initially measured at fair value, which is normally the transaction price. Such assets are subsequently carried at fair value and the changes in fair value are recognised in fair value reserve. Financial assets are derecognised when (a) the contractual rights to the cash flows from the asset expire or are settled, or (b) substantially all the risks and rewards of the ownership of the asset are transferred to another party. (ii) Financial liabilities Basic financial liabilities include trade and other payables, and loans. They are initially recognised at transaction price. Trade payables are obligations to pay for goods or services that have been acquired in the ordinary course of business from suppliers. Accounts payable are classified as current liabilities if payment is due within one year or less. If not, they are presented as non-current liabilities. Trade payables are recognised initially and subsequently measured at transaction price as all of them are current. Financial liabilities are derecognised when the liability is extinguished, that is when the contractual obligation is discharged, cancelled or expires. (iii) Offsetting Financial assets and liabilities are offset and the net amounts presented in the financial statements when there is a legally enforceable right to set off the recognised amounts and there is an intention to settle on a net basis or to realise the asset and settle the liability simultaneously.

2017/2018 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS


2. INVESTMENTS 2018 £000s

2017 £000s

Investment dividends

199

238

Interest receivable

10

26

209

264

2017 Support costs (reclassified)

2017 Total (reclassified)

£000s

£000s

3. TOTAL EXPENDITURE 2018 Activities undertaken directly £000s

2018 Support costs

561

352

913

543

276

819

Employment Solutions

4,173

528

4,701

2,953

391

3,344

Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing

5,788

736

6,524

6,058

684

6,742

RBLI Living

5,446

731

6,177

5,155

642

5,797

15,968

2,347

18,315

14,709

1,993

16,702

Raising Funds

2018 Total

2017 Activities undertaken directly

£000s

Support Costs are detailed in the schedule below. The comparative analysis for the prior year has been reclassified so that the allocation of support costs is on the same basis as the current year. Auditors’ remuneration was £46,000 for the 2018 audit (2017 : £44,670). In addition other advice was provided by PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP relating to taxation services - £3,900 (2017:£6,320) Operating lease payments included in Resources Expended totalled £333,723 (2017 : £290,445). The loss on disposal of fixed assets was £21,322 (2017 : £Nil) SUPPORT COSTS 2018

Employment Solutions

RBLI Living

Fundraising

2018 Total

£000s

Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing £000s

£000s

£000s

£000s

Executive

52

73

73

36

234

Finance

131

183

182

89

585

Business Systems

84

117

117

57

375

Human Resources

99

138

138

67

442

Marketing

54

76

76

37

243

Other Costs

69

96

96

47

308

Pension Deficit

39

53

49

19

160

528

736

731

352

2,347

Support costs are allocated, where practicable, to the charitable activities on a directly attributable basis. The remainder is apportioned to each activity based on revenue. SUPPORT COSTS 2017 Comparatives (Reclassified)

Employment Solutions

RBLI Living

Fundraising

2017 Total

£000s

Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing £000s

£000s

£000s

£000s

Executive

47

82

78

33

240

Finance

103

181

170

73

527

Business Systems

71

124

116

50

361

Human Resources

68

119

111

48

346

Marketing

62

108

102

44

316

Other Costs

19

32

30

13

94

Pension Deficit

21

38

35

15

109

391

684

642

276

1,993

2017/2018 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS

55


FINANCIALS 4. DIRECTORS, EMPLOYEES AND VOLUNTEERS THE AVERAGE MONTHLY NUMBER OF PERSONS EMPLOYED BY THE

2018

2018

2017

2017

Number

FTE

Number

FTE

Employment Solutions

89

83

75

69

RBLI Living

156

107

153

120

Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing

119

86

111

92

Fundraising and Marketing

10

9

10

10

Executive & Corporate Services

26

24

22

21

400

309

371

312

STAFF COSTS

2018 £000s

2017 £000s

Wages and salaries

8,081

7,086

Social Security costs

700

601

Other Pension costs

596

591

Other costs

17

17

FRS 102 adjustment in SOFA

205

163

9,599

8,458

COMPANY DURING THE YEAR WAS:

During the year a total of 265 volunteers (2017: 208) worked for a total of 14,563 hours (2017: 9,946 hours)

During the year £51,590 expenditure was incurred on recruitment fees (2017: £46,929). The total number of employees whose emoluments, excluding pension contributions, were in excess of £60,000 per annum fell within the following bands: EMPLOYEE EMOLUMENTS IN EXCESS OF £60,000 Emolument band £

2018 Employees

2017 Employees

60,001 - 70,000

4

4

70,001 - 80,000

2

2

80,001 - 90,000

1

-

90,001 - 100,000

-

2

100,001 - 110,000

3

2

110,001 -120,000

1

1

130,001 -140,000

2

1

13

12

All the thirteen employees earning over £60,000 p.a. participated in the company pension scheme, and pension contributions of £89,560 were made by RBLI in the year to 31 March 2018. (2017 : £89,119) The total remuneration of the above thirteen key ( 2017 : 12 ) management personnel was £1,185,098 (2017: £1,069,873). This includes redundancy pay of £48,940 (2017 : £53,000) No remuneration is paid to the Trustees as they act on an honorary basis. Travel expenses were reimbursed to one Trustee (2017 : 1) and amounted to £57 in the year (2017 : £253). The charity is grateful for the large number of volunteers who have helped support the charity over the last 12 months. All areas of the charity have benefited from this support ranging from admin support, job coaching, care etc. Governance costs for the year were £100,797 (2017: £101,422)

56

2017/2018 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS


5. TANGIBLE ASSETS Freehold Land and Buildings £000s

Buildings Plant

Fixtures and Fittings £000s

Motor Vehicles

Office Equipment

£000s

Plant and Machinery £000s

£000s

Assets Under Construction £000s

£000s

12,366

1,486

1,130

1,286

Additions

22

3

12

Disposals

-

-

Transfers

4,094

Total

£000s

90

471

3,573

20,402

13

-

21

1,509

1,580

( 104 )

( 13 )

(5)

( 15 )

-

( 137 )

47

138

374

-

7

( 4,660 )

-

16,482

1,536

1,176

1,660

85

484

422

21,845

At 1st April 2017

4,247

1,003

881

938

90

339

-

7,498

Charge for year

292

101

72

105

-

66

-

636

-

-

( 83 )

( 13 )

(5)

( 15 )

-

( 116 )

At 31st March 2018

4,539

1,104

870

1,030

85

390

-

8,018

Net book value at 31st March 2018

11,943

432

306

630

-

94

422

13,827

Net book value at 31st March 2017

8,119

483

249

348

-

132

3,573

12,904

COST At 1st April 2017

At 31st March 2018 ACCUMULATED DEPRECIATION

Disposals

The Trustees believe that the market value of land is significantly higher than the book value, which is negligible as it was transferred to the Charity in 1919, although a professional valuation was not performed.

6. INVESTMENTS AT FAIR VALUE MANAGED INVESTMENT PORTFOLIO

2018

2017

£000s

£000s

Listed on UK Stock Exchange

1,734

1,847

UK Fixed Interest

1,873

1,784

Overseas Equities

2,096

2,301

Overseas Fixed Interest

130

413

Alternative Investments

243

280

Cash Reserve

758

460

Fair Value at 31 March 2018

6,834

7,085

Cost of Managed Investments at 31 March 2018

6,354

6,324

The difference between the fair value and the cost of investments is £480,000 (2017: £761,000) and represents the fair value reserve as required by the Companies Act 2006.

2017/2018 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS

57


FINANCIALS 6. INVESTMENTS (continued) ANALYSIS OF MOVEMENTS OF INVESTMENTS

2018 £000s

2017 £000s

Valuation at 1 April 2017/2016

7,085

8,031

96

476

( 280 )

647

-

( 2,000 )

less: Management Costs

( 67 )

( 69 )

Valuation at 31 March 2018/2017

6,834

7,085

Realised Gains Unrealised (Losses)/Gains Withdrawals

The directors believe the carrying value of the investments is supported by their underlying net assets.

7.

INVESTMENT IN SUBSIDIARY

The Company owns 100% of the issued share capital (being 2 shares of £1 each) of RBLI Contracts Ltd, a dormant company. There has been no income or expenditure in the subsidiary in the year (2017: none) and there are no capital and reserves at the year end (2017: none).

8.

STOCKS AND WORK IN PROGRESS 2018 £000s

2017 £000s

374

264

8

51

382

315

2018 £000s

2017 £000s

Trade debtors

1,516

1,314

Other debtors

50

206

Prepayments and accrued income

805

539

2,371

2,059

Raw materials Finished goods

The replacement cost of raw materials does not differ materially from the value stated in the balance sheet. The cost of raw materials recognised as an expense in the year was £ 2,594,990 (2017: £2,660,363).

9.

58

DEBTORS

2017/2018 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS


10.

CREDITORS - AMOUNTS FALLING DUE WITHIN ONE YEAR

AMOUNTS FALLING DUE WITHIN ONE YEAR:

2018

2017

£000s

£000s

Trade creditors

862

900

Other taxation and social security

500

334

Other creditors

47

69

1,820

1,762

-

78

3,229

3,143

Accruals Deferred Income

11.

LOAN FINANCE

A charge over the Churchill Centre and the factory buildings at Aylesford has been granted to The Royal British Legion Pension Fund Trustees as security for the pension deficit liability and to support the Employers Covenant.

12.

FUND BALANCES CARRIED FORWARD AT 31ST MARCH 2018

2018

2018

2017

2017

2017

Unrestricted Funds £000s

Restricted Funds £000s

Total Funds £000s

Unrestricted Funds £000s

Restricted Funds £000s

Total Funds £000s

Tangible assets

8,871

4,956

13,827

8,325

4,579

12,904

Investments

6,834

-

6,834

7,085

-

7,085

15,705

4,956

20,661

15,410

4,579

19,989

2,930

759

3,689

5,027

-

5,027

NET ASSETS (excl. pension scheme liability)

18,635

5,715

24,350

20,437

4,579

25,016

Defined benefit pension scheme (liability)

( 1,506 )

-

( 1,506 )

( 3,856 )

-

( 3,856 )

NET ASSETS (inc. pension scheme liability/asset)

17,129

5,715

22,844

16,581

4,579

21,160

Net current assets

13.

ANALYSIS OF FUNDS

UNRESTRICTED FUNDS There are five unrestricted funds, two of which are designated: The designated Future Projects and Developments Fund holds reserves of £5m (2017: £5m) for the development of the RBLI Village. The designated Operating Cost Reserve provides a reserve covering four months of operating cost. The General Funds reflects the tangible fixed assets used by the charity to provide services and support to beneficiaries. The Pension Reserve reflects the balance of surplus or deficit on the defined benefit pension scheme and moves in line with annual valuations as per note 14. The Fair Value Reserve reflects the balance of surplus or deficit on the revaluation of the investments as per note 6.

2017/2018 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS

59


FINANCIALS 13.

ANALYSIS OF FUNDS (CONTINUED) Balance 1st April 2017 £000s

Income

Expenditure

Gains and losses

£000s

£000s

£000s

Balance 31st Mar 2018 £000s

Future Projects and Developments

5,000

-

-

-

5,000

Operating Cost Reserve

5,000

-

-

-

5,000

10,000

-

-

-

10,000

9,676

13,557

( 15,175 )

97

8,155

( 3,856 )

45

( 205 )

( 2,510 )

( 1,506 )

761

-

-

( 281 )

480

16,581

13,602

( 15,380 )

2,326

17,129

DESIGNATED FUNDS SET ASIDE BY THE TRUSTEES

General Fund Pension Reserve Fair Value Reserve Total Unrestricted Funds

RESTRICTED FUNDS There are two restricted funds: Capital and Revenue Grants hold restricted grants received for the development of property, plant and equipment and the provision of services to disabled people and Armed Forces veterans. There have been no transfers between any of the unrestricted or restricted funds.

RESTRICTED FUNDS

Balance 1st April 2017 £000s

Income

Expenditure

£000s

£000s

Balance 31st March 2018 £000s

Capital and Revenue Grants

1,514

2,592

( 2,288 )

1,818

Libor MOD Grants

3,065

1,479

( 647 )

3,897

Total Restricted Funds

4,579

4,701

( 2,935 )

5,715

EXPLANATION The £1,479k Libor Grant is contributing £1m to help fund the development of a new 15 bedroom care facility and day care centre, and the balance of £479k is to support the delivery of the Lifeworks Programme.

60

2017/2018 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS


14.

PENSION SCHEME

Royal British Legion Industries participates in two staff pension funds. The Defined Benefit Scheme (the Fund), and the Group Personal Pension Plan ( the GPPP), both operated in conjunction with The Royal British Legion. Contributions to the Group Personal Pension Plan in the year were £401,000 (2017 : £379,000). Contributions are limited to twice the level of the employees’ contribution. There were 351 employees participating in the scheme at 31 March 2018 ( 2017 : 310) The Defined Benefit Scheme was closed to new entrants in 2002. During the year no contributions were made by RBLI (2017 : £NIL). The most recent formal scheme published actuarial valuation was carried out by First Actuarial LLP as at 1 April 2017. The major financial assumptions used by the actuary for FRS102 purposes were: ACTUARIAL ASSUMPTIONS

2018

2017

Discount rate (%p.a.)

2.60%

2.70%

Retail Price Inflation (%p.a.)

3.10%

3.30%

Consumer Price Inflation (%p.a.)

2.10%

2.30%

Salary increase rate (%p.a.)

3.10%

3.30%

5%p.a. or retail price inflation if less

3.00%

3.20%

3%p.a. or retail price inflation if less

1.90%

2.00%

Rate of increase for deferred pensioners

2.10%

2.30%

Current pensioners Men

87.7

88.8

Current pensioners Women

89.6

91.1

Future pensioners now aged 45 Men

89.1

90.2

Future pensioners now aged 45 Women

91.2

92.6

RATE OF INCREASES OF PENSIONS IN PAYMENT

LIFE EXPECTANCY AT AGE 65:

FAIR VALUE OF FUND ASSETS

2018

2017

£000s

£000s

Equities

3,656

3,291

Bonds

4,702

4,168

Gilts

2,308

2,898

Other Growth Seeking assets

2,797

3,393

Cash

614

190

Total

14,077

13,940

In addition, the Trustees hold insured annuity policies. The value of these annuities has been excluded from both the assets and the liabilities since the liability is matched directly by an asset value of equal value. This is consistent with previous disclosures. The Fund does not invest in the sponsor’s own financial instruments, including property or other assets owned by the sponsor.

2017/2018 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS

61


FINANCIALS 14.

PENSION SCHEME (CONTINUED)

TOTAL COST RECOGNISED AS AN EXPENSE:

2018 £000s

2017 £000s

Administration expenses

100

72

Net interest

105

91

Total cost recognised as an expense:

205

163

RECONCILIATION OF SCHEME ASSETS AND LIABILITIES

£000s Assets

£000s Liabilities

£000s Total

At 1 April 2017

13,940

( 17,796 )

( 3,856 )

( 475 )

475

-

Employer contributions

45

-

45

Administration expenses

( 100 )

-

( 100 )

369

( 474 )

( 105 )

-

2,212

2,212

298

-

298

14,077

( 15,583 )

( 1,506 )

Benefits paid

Past service cost Interest income/(expense) remeasurement gains - Actuarial gains - Return on plan assets excluding interest income At 31 March 2018

62

2017/2018 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS


15.

TAXATION

The Company is exempt from liability to corporation tax on its charitable activities due to its status as a registered charity.

16.

CAPITAL COMMITMENTS

Capital Commitments contracted for at year end but not provided for.

17.

2018 £000s

2017 £000s

2,259

3,162

OPERATING LEASE COMMITMENTS

The Company had the following future minimum lease payments under non-cancellable operating leases for each of the following periods: OPERATING LEASES

2018 £000s

2017 £000s

Payments due not later than one year

201

241

Payments due later than one year and not later than five years

185

306

Total operating leases

386

547

18.

RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

A donation of £12,252 was received in 2018 from Kent Community Foundation (2017: Nil). Blair Gulland, a trustee of RBLI, is also a trustee of Kent Community Foundation. In 2017 payments of £1,500 were made to ERSA UK Ltd and £3,052 to the Institute of Employability Professionals. Richard Brooks a former member of RBLI senior management team was on the board of these organisations but he is no longer an employee of RBLI in 2018.

2017/2018 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS

63


FINANCIALS 19.

GRANTS AND DONATIONS

Donations and Grants of £5,000 or more, received in either curent or prior year, are shown below. These are reported in the Statement of Financial Activites either under Charitable activities or under income from donations. 2018 £

2017 £

1,479,000

1,479,000

BBO Grant

580,883

177,780

ABF The Soldiers' Charity

420,200

229,400

MOD Armed Forces Covenant

339,750

281,000

MOD Aged Veterans Fund

305,880

39,200

Workchoice employee support grant

273,667

323,673

Lloyds Patriotic Fund

100,000

-

The Morrisons Foundation

96,600

293,360

Erskine Hospital

75,000

-

The Royal British Legion

67,400

134,750

Greenwich Hospital

34,271

67,422

Annington Trust

31,416

-

Queen Mary's Roehampton Trust

20,000

20,000

The Army Central Fund

15,000

15,000

Poppy Scotland

14,472

10,899

Kent Community Foundation

12,252

-

MOD acting on behalf of Her Majesty's Treasury

Next PLC

12,000

-

UFI Charitable Trust

11,305

20,997

Aylesford Parish Council

10,000

-

BAE Systems

10,000

5,000

Sainsbury's Tonbridge Charity

5,234

-

We Work

5,060

-

The Edith Murphy Foundation

5,000

-

Golding Homes

5,000

-

The Eveson Charitable Trust

5,000

-

The Officers Association

3,175

1,525

Tesco(Groundwork UK)

3,000

9,000

Garfield Weston Foundation

-

75,000

The Chelsea Barracks Foundation

-

50,000

Walking With The Wounded

-

50,000

The Swire Charitable Trust

-

20,000

Forces In Mind Trust

-

18,350

Centor

-

14,050

Blind Veterans

-

10,100

The Barbour Foundation

-

10,000

CHK Charities

-

5,000

The Forces Trust

-

5,000

Santander Community Scheme

-

5,000

The Liz & Terry Bramall Foundation

-

5,000

Parachute Regiment

-

1,525

3,940,565

3,377,031


20.

NET CASH (OUTFLOW)/INFLOW FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES 2018 £000s

2017 £000s

( 826 )

1,666

Losses/ (Gains) on investment assets

183

( 1,123 )

Investment management fees deducted from fund

68

69

Difference between pension charge and cash contributions

160

118

( 209 )

( 264 )

Depreciation on tangible fixed assets

636

569

Loss on disposal of fixed assets

21

-

(Increase) in stocks

( 67 )

-

(Increase) in debtors

( 312 )

( 353 )

(Decrease)/Increase in creditors

( 96 )

411

( 442 )

1,093

2018

2017

Note

£000s

£000s

Trade debtors

9

1,516

1,314

Others debtors

9

50

206

1,566

1,520

4,165

5,796

Net (expense)/income

Investment income

Net cash (outflow)/inflow from operating activities

21

FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

Financial assets: Financial assets measured at amortised costs

Cash at bank and in hand Financial liabilities measured at amortised costs: Trade creditors

10

862

900

Other creditors

10

47

69

909

969

2017/2018 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS

65


RBLI staff promoting Armed Forces Day in June 2017.


LEGAL & ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION TRUSTEES Chairman Mr S W Kingsman DL Vice Chairman Mr F Martin DL Brigadier H H Kerr OBE Ms Kate Bosley MSc RGN RSCN Dip of Nursing Mrs N Ahmed OBE DL Mr A B Gulland Kathryn Cearns OBE FCA FCCA Mr D Montgomery Mr D Crampton DL

SENIOR OFFICERS Chief Executive Mr S F Sherry CMG, OBE Director of Corporate Services & Co.Secretary Mr P Defraine ACMA Director of Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Co. Mr G Streetley Director of Operational Delivery Mr J Rudoni (Resigned April 2018) Director of Strategic Development Mrs L Farmer Director of Scotland’s Bravest Manufacturing Co. Miss M Ferguson Director of Employment Solutions Mr S Woodward (Resigned April 2018)

HEAD OFFICE AND REGISTERED OFFICE

Royal British Legion Industries Limited Hall Road Aylesford ME20 7NL Tel: 01622 795900 Fax: 01622 882195 Company Number 0158479 Incorporated in England and Wales Regsitered Charity Number 0210063 The charity is a public benefit entity

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP 1 Embankment Place London WC2N 6R H

BANKERS

Barclays Bank Plc Corporate Banking Kent Team, 2nd Floor, 30 Tower View Kings Hill West Malling ME19 4UY

INVESTMENT ADVISORS Julius Baer Portfolio Managers Ltd 1 St Martin’s Le Grand London EC1A 1HQ

SOLICITORS

Thomson Snell & Passmore LLP 3 Lonsdale Gardens Tunbridge Wells TN1 1NX Brachers LLP 59 London Road Maidstone ME16 8JH

2017/2018 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS

67


This product was printed by:

www.britainsbravestmanufacturing.org.uk

Royal British Legion Industries (RBLI), Hall Road, Aylesford, Kent, ME20 7NL. Charity No. 210063. W www.rbli.co.uk E enquiries@rbli.co.uk

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Royal British Legion Industries - Annual Accounts 2017/18  

Royal British Legion Industries - Annual Accounts 2017/18  

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