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SOCIAL IMPACT REPORT 2016/2017

WWW.RBLI.CO.UK


This product was printed by a team of armed forces veterans and those with disabilities

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2017 SOCIAL IMPACT REPORT


CONTENTS 04

INTRODUCTION

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OUR YEAR IN NUMBERS

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OUR MISSION

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HOW WE HELP

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ENSURING NO VETERAN IS LEFT BEHIND

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REDUCING THE DISABILITY GAP

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CREATING BRIGHT FUTURES FOR YOUNG PEOPLE

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PROVIDING EXEMPLARY CARE

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SUPPORTING LOCAL COMMUNITIES

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OUR FANTASTIC SUPPORTERS

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OUR PARTNERS

Royal British Legion Industries

@RBLI

Royal British Legion Industries

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INTRODUCTION 4

LETTER FROM OUR CHIEF EXECUTIVE I have been immensely proud to lead RBLI over the past year; one which I believe has undoubtedly been one of the best yet for the charity. We have significantly grown our reputation both as a provider of excellent support for veterans, as well as a champion in the disability space looking for new solutions to reduce the disability employment gap. For nearly 100 years we have been working to improve the lives of the Armed Forces Community across the UK – this year we have shown our intention to provide support for the next century. Our LifeWorks programme for veterans, running since 2011, was evaluated by the Learning and Work Institute and we were extremely proud to see results which showed that 83% of veterans who go through the intensive course move into employment, training or volunteering within the 12 months follow-up support. Additionally we have completed a build of 24 new apartments for wounded, injured and sick veterans, or those veterans at risk of homelessness. The apartments are specially adapted for veterans with disabilities, and they are already changing lives. This has been a year of ever increasing and much needed collaboration with and support from other charities, Government and local government. The theme for the future is ever increasing collaboration providing high impact and seamless support to our beneficiaries. The year was an exciting one for our teams working hard to support people with disabilities to find and stay in work. After submitting written evidence to the Work and Pensions Committee I was delighted to be asked, as RBLI’s representative, to give oral evidence in front of the committee in July 2016. Statistics show that at current

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levels, halving the gap would require over one million more disabled people to be in work. Whilst there are many organisations and charities doing good work to help solve this, it is not enough - many people with disabilities across the country are still not getting the support they need. We were proud this year to have visits from four ministers, including Penny Mordaunt, Minister for Disabled People, Health & Work, who visited in December 2016. She showed her appreciation for our work, and was especially impressed with Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Company (BBMC) as she seeks out the leading disability employers around the country. Over the past year BBMC has been exceptional – it has demonstrated its best financial performance in the last 20 years, has won new customers and new contracts, and has been involved with the #BuySocial campaign with government and Social Enterprise UK. All of which leads to more opportunities and better outcomes for Veterans and others with disabilities. The Minister was very much interested in our plans to replicate our social enterprise, BBMC, and the potential for LifeWorks to be expanded to the wider community of unemployed people across the UK. We have also been working with the local communities around our head office in Kent including developing our partnerships with schools, supporting young people to gain vital skills and helping improve the health and wellbeing of local residents. This report will help you gain a better understanding of RBLI’s work over the last year as well as an insight into what we are planning for the future. I hope you enjoy reading it!

STEVE SHERRY CMG OBE CHIEF EXECUTIVE

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OUR YEAR IN NUMBERS

Photograph courtesy of Andy Bate and Blesma

10,000+

£3.4 MILLION

RAISED BY OUR AMAZING SUPPORTERS AND FUNDERS 6

PEOPLE SUPPORTED OVER THE LAST YEAR

£2.9 MILLION

INVESTED IN NEW HOUSING AND DEVELOPMENT 2017 SOCIAL IMPACT REPORT


10,000+ HOURS GIVEN BY OUR FANTASTIC VOLUNTEERS

450

150

GUESTS ATTENDED OUR LIFEWORKS EVENT

YOUNG PEOPLE TRIALLED OUR GAME OF ZONES APP TO BETTER UNDERSTAND THEIR FUTURE CAREER OPTIONS 2017 SOCIAL IMPACT REPORT

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OUR MISSION Our mission is to improve lives every day, supporting the Armed Forces Community, people with disabilities and health conditions and people who are out of work to become more independent and create a more positive future. The past year has seen a variety of projects across the UK, including supporting veterans to find work on civvy street, helping disabled people find and stay in work, and training young people in vital skills that will help them in their future careers. Over the next few years we will invest where it matters most so we can improve even more lives and have a positive impact.

HOUSING

RESEARCH

Redevelopments, modernisations and new builds, to ensure we are prepared for the future

Pilots and trials of new innovative solutions to help those most in need

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SUPPORT

EQUIPMENT

Expanding and training our teams to ensure we can provide the best support

New technology and machinery to further modernise delivery and manufacturing

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HOW WE HELP

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EMPLOYMENT AND CAREERS

BACK-TO-WORK SUPPORT

We provide employment to Armed Forces veterans and people with disabilities through our amazing social enterprise, Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Company.

We are passionate about helping people into work, supporting them to create a brighter future for themselves. We provide support to people with disabilities and others who are out of work or need support to stay in work.

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SUPPORT FOR VETERANS We provide employment support to Veterans who are struggling to find work or want to change career. Our LifeWorks courses are delivered for free to Veterans across the UK, in locations from Newcastle to Bristol.

HOUSING & CARE From care facilities to housing for families and accommodation for single veterans, we have something for everyone. We offer a tailored service for each individual, providing each resident with the support they need to lead an independent life.

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ENSURING NO VETERAN IS LEFT BEHIND As a charity with a proud military heritage we are passionate about improving our services so we can do more and ensure no veteran is left unsupported and alone. Over the past year we have had a rapid expansion of our services and have been influencing government and others to raise awareness of key issues faced by veterans linked to employment, welfare and housing.

90%

OF LIFEWORKS PARTICIPANTS WHO FOUND FULL-TIME EMPLOYMENT, SUSTAINED IT FOR AT LEAST SIX MONTHS

lmost four in five delegates (79%) reported a health condition or disability.

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EMPLOYMENT SUPPORT

EVALUATION OF LIFEWORKS

LifeWorks is our programme which reaches out to our most vulnerable veterans - those who are long term unemployed and who have ongoing health needs or difficulties such as alcohol dependency. LifeWorks equips them with the tools to find and stay in sustainable employment.

In 2016, the Learning and Work Institute undertook an independent evaluation of the LifeWorks programme. The results were outstanding:

We deliver LifeWorks across the UK, in cities like Colchester, Liverpool and Manchester. Veterans get in-depth support to help them better understand appropriate career goals, and pathways to reach their goals. We supported over 200 veterans through LifeWorks over the past year.

74% of participants moved into employment, training or volunteering within six months. This rises to 83% within 12 months. This compares favourably with other welfare-to-work programmes, especially as the evaluation showed that four in five participants have a disability or health condition. The Learning and Work Institute recommends that we now look to increase the visibility of LifeWorks within the veteran community and consider developing the programme specifically for adults with health conditions, something which could revolutionise the welfare-towork sector. In October and November 2016, we held events at the House of Commons and the Welsh Assembly to celebrate the results of the evaluation and raise awareness of LifeWorks and how it changes lives. We are now in discussions with potential funders and supporters so we can deliver a pilot of LifeWorks for civilians with disabilities and health conditions. You can read more about our work with people with disabilities and health conditions on page 20.

THIS PROGRAMME IS A SHINING EXAMPLE – A BEACON OF WHAT GOOD WORK IN THE COMMUNITY IS.

Deputy Presiding Officer of the National Assembly for Wales Ann Jones said she wished to see LifeWorks expand across Wales.

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LIFEWORKS FAMILIES & LIFEWORKS PRISONS Our LifeWorks team also deliver support to the spouses and partners of serving personnel, under Lifeworks Families, and veterans in prisons, via LifeWorks prisons. We have supported 174 spouses and partners over the last year and delivered to over 50 veterans in prison.

83%

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OF LIFEWORKS DELEGATES MOVED INTO EMPLOYMENT, EDUCATION OR TRAINING WITHIN 12 MONTHS

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79%

OF LIFEWORKS DELEGATES REPORTED A HEALTH CONDITION OR DISABILITY

G 11 1 4 6 8 31 19 + 16

19% OTHER MENTAL HEALTH

31% MUSCOLOSKELETAL

16% ANXIETY/ DEPRESSION

REPORTED HEALTH CONDITIONS

11% OTHER

1% AUTISM, ADHD OR ASPBERGER’S

4% DYSLEXIA DYSPRAXIA

8% NEUROLOGICAL 6% HEARING/SIGHT

4% CARDIOVASCULAR

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PAUL’S LIFE TURNED AROUND BY LIFEWORKS LifeWorks graduate Paul Harding returned to civilian life in 1990 following a bomb explosion in Northern Ireland after 14-years of service in the Royal Corps of Signals. Paul, who was eventually diagnosed with PTSD in 2012, said he found adjusting to civilian life was extremely difficult. He added: “I just couldn’t find my feet in normal life – I thought that the people around me were crazy but little did I know that it was me who was struggling. I eventually tried to take my own life.”

However, Paul’s fortunes changed after being referred to RBLI’s LifeWorks team in 2013. He said they had helped him break through a difficult barrier, showing him that the skills he had acquired during his service were transferable to the civilian workforce. He is currently employed as a Maintenance Engineer and is also an instructor with the Cadet Force. He added: “LifeWorks gave me a huge CV and, honestly, when I first looked at it I thought it was someone else’s. I have to thank LifeWorks - if it wasn’t for them, I have no idea where I’d be right now.”

HAD TO BE LOOKED AFTER AT NIGHT “ IBECAUSE MY HEAD WAS IN SUCH A BAD PLACE. I JUST COULDN’T FIND MY FEET IN NORMAL LIFE.

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BE BRAVE WITH ME This year saw the launch of our campaign #BeBraveWithMe, which aims to challenge members of the public to take on a brave challenge to honour the bravery of our forces. We launched the campaign with Major Heather Stanning, Olympic Gold Medallist, who took on a brave challenge with a group of veterans, climbing to the top of the O2 in London! You can find out more about the campaign and how to get involved at bebravewithme.org.uk

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EMPLOYMENT As well as employment support, we also offer employment opportunities and jobs to veterans in our social enterprise, Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Company. We are proud to be able to provide sustainable employment and a great working environment for veterans. This year the veterans in our signs team have been working on some fantastic projects for companies around the UK, including working on road signs for the new M3 smart motorway development!

OVER 50% OF OUR SIGNS TEAM HAVE SERVED IN THE ARMED FORCES. 60% OF OUR TOTAL WORKFORCE ARE LIVING WITH A DISABILITY OR LEARNING DIFFICULTY.

I COME TO WORK WITH A SMILE – I NEVER DID THAT WHEN I WAS DOING ANY OTHER JOB, WHICH SAYS IT ALL REALLY.

Tim, team leader at Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Company

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FROM FORCES TO FULFILMENT: TIM’S STORY Former Royal Engineer Tim Brown was diagnosed with PTSD after serving in the Armed Forces for 23 years. His significant military career began in 1987 and included tours of Bosnia, the Gulf War, Northern Ireland and two tours of Iraq. However his extensive service eventually took its toll. “I had reached a point in my lorry driving job where I realised I couldn’t do it any longer because of my diagnosis of PTSD and other physical issues,” said Tim. “So I found RBLI at a really good time in my life.” Tim is now a team leader in Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Company and explains how the organisation has provided the stability and support he needed.

“I have done things and seen things in my life that most people wouldn’t dream of, and to come somewhere like this – it’s peaceful, calm and safe – it’s like a walled environment. It’s a lot like a military camp in a lot of ways and to be part of that is brilliant. “I do think there are people here who may find it difficult to sustain a mainstream job outside of RBLI, here disabilities are catered for and people are cared for. Without them I would be finding it difficult myself to find a job that I could hold down. It’s an amazing place to work because everybody looks after each other and cares about each other, from the very top to the bottom.” 2017 SOCIAL IMPACT REPORT

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HOUSING On the Royal British Legion village in Kent, we provide a wide variety of homes for single veterans, their dependents and veterans and their families. Our village is home to over 300 members of the Armed Forces community, many of whom are experiencing physical or mental difficulties including PTSD or depression.

CAME DOWN TO HAVE A LOOK AND IT WAS “ IPERFECT FOR ME. PLUS BEING ABLE TO GET OUT AND ABOUT WITH THE KIDS, IT WAS A NO-BRAINER.

Alex, RBLI Resident. Read his full story on page 22

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OUR NEW APARTMENTS In 2014 we were awarded £2M LIBOR funds to build 24 new apartments for wounded, injured and sick veterans, as well as those veterans with other support needs. The past year saw the development and completion of the two blocks, Invictus Games House and Victory House, and we are very proud that in May 2017 the first veterans moved in. The apartments are specially designed and adapted for veterans with physical disabilities and health conditions, with wide corridors, spacious living areas and specially adapted lifts. We are really grateful to all our partners and funders who have helped make this project a reality, including ABF The Soldiers’ Charity, the Chelsea Barracks Foundation, the Garfield Weston Foundation, the Morrisons Foundation and the Chancellor using the LIBOR Covenant Fund.

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ONE OF THE THINGS THAT REALLY APPEALED TO ME ABOUT THIS PLACE WAS THAT THE LITTLE THINGS HAD BEEN CONSIDERED IN REGARDS TO DISABILITY.

ALEX GETS A NEW START Alex sustained life-changing injuries after stepping on an IED during a tour of Afghanistan in 2013 as part of the Royal Logistics Corps. He was aged just 22. After working together with BLESMA, we supported him to move into Victory House after his marriage began to break down in 2016. Alex says the opportunity has provided him with a fresh start and he now has a new-found sense of independence: “I ended up moving out of the family home and into a place which wasn’t fully adapted for me.”

opportunity in Aylesford for a new build of a property that is properly adapted and suitable for my needs.” “I came down to have a look and it was perfect for me, and with being able to get out and about with the kids, it was a no brainer really from that point onwards. One of the things that really appealed to me about this place was that the little things had been considered in regards to disability: Most places you go to everything is at a certain height for people who walk around, but here it’s all been considered.”

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Photograph courtesy of Andy Bate and Blesma 2017 SOCIAL IMPACT REPORT


THE FUTURE We’ve now been providing housing for veterans and their families for nearly 100 years and are proud to have a vibrant Armed Forces community. We want this legacy to continue, and over the next few years plan to build even more homes for veterans in need. Our centenary village, developed as part of our centenary celebrations in 2019, will provide more family housing as well as assisted living for those veterans who need a little more support. From 2017, our new STEP-IN programme will also provide wrap-around, holistic support for all new residents, ensuring they get all the help they need to become more independent, whether that’s employment/financial support, or support to help them overcome mental or physical health difficulties.

SUPPORT Immediate and tailored support

TRAINING Formal and informal, new skills, volunteering, and employment

EVALUATION Initial and regular assessment of progress

PERSONALISED A bespoke approach for every individual

INDEPENDENCE Greater independence no matter how small

NEXT STEPS From moving off the village to more support

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REDUCING THE DISABILITY GAP “

EVERY TIME I COME TO VISIT RBLI I HEAR MORE ABOUT THE FANTASTIC WORK THEY ARE DOING TO SUPPORT PEOPLE AND THEIR PLANS FOR THE FUTURE. IT IS SO INSPIRING TO SEE A CHARITY WITH SUCH A DRIVE TO EXPAND, AND TO MEET THE BRAVE PEOPLE THEY SUPPORT INTO WORK. Tracey Crouch MP

Whilst RBLI has a heritage as a military charity, we have for the last 50 years also been supporting those in the wider community who have disabilities and health conditions. We believe it is unacceptable that disabled people are more than twice as likely to be unemployed than non-disabled people, and have been campaigning and working hard over the last year to make a difference. 2016 saw the Government’s Work & Pensions Committee begin work on a Disability Employment Gap Report to focus on solutions to the gap and look at best practice already occurring across the country. After submitting written evidence, RBLI were invited to give oral evidence to the committee at a session in July. At the session, Steve Sherry, Chief Executive of Royal British Legion Industries, said that a wider experimental approach was needed: "You should have some ambitious, radical and different programmes out there and see what really does work. Otherwise we will just be doing more of the same. If we do more of the same, we will get more of the same, which is not good enough." 24

If you would like to access the report, please visit: https://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201617/ cmselect/cmworpen/56/56.pdf The year also saw us frequently engage with key ministers and MPs to discuss the disability employment gap and social value. Penny Mordaunt, Minister for Disabled People, Health and Work, visited us in December alongside Tracey Crouch, Minister for Sport and local MP for our head office in Aylesford, Kent. After seeing the fantastic results of LifeWorks and meeting staff in Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Company, Penny said: “The number of disabled people in work has increased by almost 600,000 over the past three years. But much more needs to be done to create equal opportunities in the workplace.That’s why schemes like this are so important. We owe our Armed Forces a huge debt and it’s great to see the work of RBLI supporting them and others to reach their full potential.”

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Penny Mordaunt MP, Minister for Disabled People, and Tracey Crouch , MP for Chatham and Aylesford, with staff on a visit to RBLI's social enterprise, Britain's Bravest Manufacturing Company

In March 2017 we also held an Influential Women’s Lunch, attended by Penny Mordaunt MP, at the House of Lords. The event was hosted by Baroness Sal Brinton, member of the House of Lords and disability rights advocate, and attended by key women from public, private and third sectors. The focus of the event was the disability employment gap and how we could work together to influence employers and government to do more.

Rob Wilson MP, then Minister for Civil Society, also visited Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Company, commenting: "It is great to see a social enterprise flourishing, winning contracts and delivering them to a high standard.” “There’s a range of disabilities here. I’ve seen people today who have limbs missing, who suffer from physical and mental disabilities, but what’s great is these kind of social enterprises know how to cope with that, and they find ways of putting facilities in place.”

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ELIZABETH’S ENTREPRENEURIAL SUCCESS AFTER SUPPORT FROM RBLI Elizabeth struggled to read or write until the age of 15 due to severe dyslexia. She received workplace support from RBLI as part of the Access to Work programme, and now heads up her own charitable organisation helping others with dyslexia into work - Aspire2inspire Dyslexia. Elizabeth said: “I have always had a great ambition to help people with dyslexia although ironically it is the condition which held me back from putting those ideas in practice. “However the RBLI assessor assigned to me was an inspiration. He knew immediately what support I could receive which would allow me to develop my organisation. “Within days I received a full report outlining all the help that was available to me and how to access it, I now have one-to-one support and speech recognition equipment which has helped me tremendously. “Without RBLI and the Access to Work programme there is no way this could have been possible.”

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WITHOUT RBLI AND THE ACCESS TO WORK PROGRAMME THERE IS NO WAY THIS COULD HAVE BEEN POSSIBLE.

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LIFEW

OUR KEY GOALS IN HELPING REDUCE THE DISABILITY GAP

RK

Encourage more businesses to #buysocial and purchase through social enterprises like Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Company, where over 70% of staff or have a disability.

Pilot new innovative solutions to support people with disabilities into work – for example trialling our LifeWorks programme, which has been so successful with veterans, in the wider community.

Support as many people as possible via the Access to Work programme, which we deliver on behalf of DWP, and promote the service wherever we can.

Provide more training opportunities in Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Company to people with disabilities and health conditions.

Continue to deliver exceptional support to people with disabilities from our community offices, including providing advice and support to employers who are unsure or not confident about employing more people with disabilities.

Showcase the work of Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Company as a successful employer of people with disabilities, especially the Leatherhead factory, where over 90% of staff have a disability or health condition.

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When Anthony first came to RBLI for support, he had been out of employment for 26 years.

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ANTHONY TURNS HIS LIFE AROUND When he first came to RBLI for support, Anthony had been out of employment for 26 years. He had suddenly been moved to Jobseeker’s Allowance, but his health had not changed, so the concept of being told he was now fit for work, he described as “terrifying”.

Anthony had fantastic news in March 2017 - he had secured a job at Sainsburys. Anthony says finding work “had allowed him to make new friends, given him a sense of purpose and made him feel part of the world again”. He really enjoys being at Sainsbury’s, and that they are a “great employer”, the staff are “all When Anthony arrived on RBLI’s ‘Preparing for the amazing”, and he feels “a part of the team”. Future’ course, he was very quiet and shy. He soon highlighted his extreme anxiety at being out of his Even better, working has also allowed him to reduce comfort zone, and reported that usually he rarely left his medication. After Anthony told his doctor he felt the house. Despite the way Anthony was feeling, (he he no longer needed it, levels were slowly reduced told one of the advisors that he wanted to run and and has now stopped taking it all together. He reports hide), he stuck with the initial session and engaged he has had no adverse affects - “if anything it is much where he could. better”. Often people who feel his way do not return for the next session, however, true to his determination to change, Anthony did. He had ups and downs throughout the course, but never let this stop him participating.

RBLI had often said “the right work is good for most people”, and Anthony said although he had tried, he found it hard to truly believe. However he did use this thinking to keep moving forward, and now he is in work, he completely agrees! He also realised it was On an early down day Anthony: “No-one will employ not his gap in employment that was stopping him get me when they look at my gap in work history […] what work, it was his confidence, self-esteem and negative if no one every employs me”. Anthony admitted he self-belief. felt like this a fair amount and it was really getting him down, however through his own determination to “RBLI injected a boost in my confidence that has change and RBLI’s support, he never gave up. This led allowed me to do stuff I never thought I could before.... to him becoming more confident he started to take for the first time in years I have started to feel happy ownership of his future, asking for additional support again”. so he could achieve his goals.

RBLI INJECTED A BOOST IN MY CONFIDENCE THAT HAS ALLOWED ME TO DO STUFF I NEVER THOUGHT I COULD BEFORE.... FOR THE FIRST TIME IN YEARS I HAVE STARTED TO FEEL HAPPY AGAIN.

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CREATING BRIGHTER FUTURES FOR YOUNG PEOPLE We know young people are the future, so we’re passionate about creating brighter futures for them too. Across the South East we’re providing support to 100s of young people who are out of work, ensuring they gain the skills and work experience they need to reach their potential. We were very proud in early 2017 to win funding from the Skills Funding Agency and the European Social Fund to deliver skills support to young people across the South East. We are supporting them to gain functional skills in Maths and English, meaning they can go onto further training, including Apprenticeships. We are also delivering vocational training in areas such as retail, business administration and construction. This training will ensure that the young people we support can find sustainable employment and go on to have the career they want.

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SUPPORTING STUDENTS WITH AUTISM TO IMPROVE THEIR SKILLS As part of an initiative to prepare young autistic students for the world of work, we have been working with the Helen Allison School, an autism specific school governed by the National Autistic Society (NAS). Pupils from the Helen Allison School were offered volunteering opportunities on RBLI’s village in Kent to help build their skills, confidence and sense of independence.

Principal of NAS Helen Allison School, Susan Conway, said: “The transition from school life to working life is incredibly difficult for all children but this can be particularly challenging for children on the autism spectrum. “The National Autistic Society is delighted to be able to work with RBLI and thank them for the opportunities they continue to provide to our students.”

The students, aged between 15 and 17, are volunteering their time, and gaining skills, in RBLI’s on-site café Base Camp and in the charity’s social enterprise, Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Company, providing invaluable support in both areas.

THE NATIONAL AUTISTIC SOCIETY IS DELIGHTED TO BE ABLE TO WORK WITH RBLI AND THANK THEM FOR THE OPPORTUNITIES THEY CONTINUE TO PROVIDE TO OUR STUDENTS.

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FINDING EMPLOYMENT

GAME OF ZONES

Since 2011, RBLI have been supporting a variety of people through the Work Programme. This includes a large number of young people who are not in work, education or training.

Last year our career development app, Game of Zones, was developed to provide young people with a simple way to find out appropriate career goals.

We are delighted to have supported over 2,000 young jobseekers to move closer to their career goals through the Work Programme, including supporting nearly 1,500 into employment. We also have a number of other programmes across the South East which provide support to young people, amongst others.

The last year has seen the programme go from strength to strength, and we were delighted to test the app with our teams. Funding from UFI Trust means we have been able to invest in the app, and showcase it at various job fairs around Kent, as well allowing hundreds of school students to trial it and find out their career path. Over the next year we plan to invest further and explore ways we can use Game of Zones to help even more young people.

OVER 1000 YOUNG PEOPLE USED GAME OF ZONES TO BETTER UNDERSTAND THEIR FUTURE CAREER CHOICES 2017 SOCIAL IMPACT REPORT

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SKILLS TEAM SUPPORT DEREK TO SUCCESS Derek came to RBLI on the Work Programme in November 2016. Due to his location he was struggling to apply for jobs, he managed to get a trial in a local kitchen, but this didn’t work out. His mum told us that it would really help Derek if he was able to gain his functional skills in Maths and English, and his advisor agreed, so he was registered on one of our new skills courses. This was an entry level retail course which included functional skills. Derek was one of a group of 18-24 year olds and the interaction helped him to build his

confidence. Tanya, Derek’s RBLI advisor said “I could see a change in Derek which was very positive.” Following the course, Derek was supported to look for retail and warehousing jobs that he was able to travel to. Derek gained an interview with The Range as a Warehouse Assistant and was successful! He says “RBLI has helped me in many ways to get me into a job… they helped me gain a lot of confidence over the time of working with them. I have to thank RBLI for all the support they have given me.”

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PROVIDING EXEMPLARY CARE On our village in Kent we are proud to provide highquality care to veterans, disabled and elderly people. Our 52 bed nursing home, Gavin Astor House, provides nursing care to those with severe disabilities and needs, including those who need palliative care. We also provide a domiciliary care service to the local community ensuring that people retain their independence for as long as possible. Our team of nurses and carers are passionate about improving lives and ensuring residents and families get the support they need.

Over the next few years we will be investing in our care facilities, building a 12 bed extra home and day care centre adjacent to Gavin Astor House. This will ensure we can provide the best care possible to those who need and support the growing care needs of an aging population.

OUR VILLAGE PROVIDES HOMES FOR OVER 300 PEOPLE OF ALL AGES AND BACKGROUNDS

AGE BREAKDOWN OF RBLI VILLAGE RESIDENTS 16%

15% 9%

14%

14%

61-70

71-80

17%

9%

6%

0-20

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21-30 31-40

41-50

51-60

81+

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PROVIDING A HOME FOR JEAN Jean has multiple sclerosis and has lived in Gavin Astor House since its opening. Her husband served in both the British Army and Royal Navy.

“It’s very welcoming and accommodating… the setting is beautiful; I’m an outdoor person really, I’ve been lucky. I have MS and just need help when it flairs up.”

“I was the second person who ever came here, I came with the furniture!”

“We’ve got a good bunch of staff and it is a very secure feeling – I know there is someone there who can help.”

As Jean explains, the Village provides everything she needs in surroundings that she enjoys.

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SUPPORTING LOCAL COMMUNITIES Community is at the heart of everything we do, whether that’s supporting the Armed Forces Community, the disabled community or the local community around our head office in Kent. Our community hub Base Camp has now been open for nearly two years and is well used by the local community around our head office. We are proud that

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it is used regularly by clubs and organisations, including a veterans’ peer support group for local residents. Our Health and Wellbeing programme continues to run successfully and has achieved over 12,000 attendances over the last year. Trips out for residents included attending the Not Forgotten Association’s Annual Garden party at Buckingham Palace!

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TIME I VISIT I’M STRUCK BY WHAT A “ EACH SPECIAL PLACE THE VILLAGE IS. “ RBLI Fundraiser

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OUR FANTASTIC SUPPORTERS We are so proud to have a community of fantastic supporters across the UK who raise vital funds to help us support Britain’s Bravest. This year we raised an amazing £3.4M and we couldn’t have done it on our own. Here are some of their amazing fundraising achievements.

£3.4 MILLION RAISED BY OUR SUPPORTERS

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CLIMBING BRAVE NEW HEIGHTS

In September we launched Be Brave With Me on top of the O2 in London. Using the hashtag, #BeBraveWithMe, the campaign challenges members of the public to take on a brave challenge to raise money and honour the bravery of our forces. We were delighted to have Heather Stanning join us at the event and later in the year, she took on her own #BeBraveWithMe challenge – the London Marathon!

HEATHER STANNING’S LONDON MARATHON Heather, two-time Olympic gold medallist, proudly completed the gruelling 26 mile challenge, raising over £7000 for Britain’s Bravest. She finished the race in just 3 hours and 32 minutes – getting over the line well under her target of 4 hours. “Having been an endurance athlete, my cardiovascular system is in pretty good shape but running for that length of time certainly takes its toll on the body. At mile 20 I realised how gruelling the next 6 miles were going to be, however seeing the supporters from RBLI and the rest of the crowd cheer me on definitely helped me to push on. “On a personal level, I’m incredibly proud to have completed my first marathon but I’m also so pleased to know that I have raised money for a charity which has become very close to my heart. To know that the money I helped raise will go directly to helping veterans and those with disabilities find rewarding employment or vital housing care is a very special feeling.”

2017 SOCIAL IMPACT REPORT

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OUR PARTNERS THANK YOU TO THE MANY ORGANISATIONS WHO HAVE WORKED WITH US THROUGHOUT 2016/17

AGGREGATES

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2017 SOCIAL IMPACT REPORT


2017 SOCIAL IMPACT REPORT

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RBLI CHARITY NUMBER 210063

Profile for RBLI

RBLI Social Impact Report 2017  

RBLI Social Impact Report 2017  

Profile for rbli
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