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2018 RAYTOWN

POLICE DEPARTMENT ANNUAL REPORT

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TABLE OF CONTENTS MESSAGE FROM THE CHIEF 2 OATH OF OFFICE 3 KEY ACCOMPLISHMENTS 4-5 SIGNIFICANT NUMBERS 6-7 ORGANIZATIONAL CHART 8 40 YEARS OF RAYTOWN PD 9 PATROL DIVISION 10-11 INVESTIGATIONS12-13 COMMUNITY SERVICES 14-17 PUBLIC INFORMATION 18-19 ADMINISTRATION20-22 911: DIAL TO ARRIVAL 23 PROPERTY24 DETENTION25 INTERNAL AFFAIRS 26 USE OF FORCE 27 PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS 28 40 YEAR FLASHBACK 29 AWARDS30-31 CREDITS32


MESSAGE FROM THE CHIEF I want to thank each person that took time in 2018 to learn more about the Police Department that serves them. Community members took advantage of many opportunities to get to know, and interact with, the Department and our members this year, including Coffee with a Cop, Safety Fair, Citizen’s Police Academy, social media, and this report. Community partnership is more than a buzzword; it really is necessary for a safe and secure community. 2018 also brought many new faces to the Department. Each new officer and civilian brought varying experience and expertise with them. They also brought an eagerness to serve the citizens of Raytown. Each new member of our team truly made us better as a whole and we are glad they chose to make the Raytown Police Department their home. On behalf of our newest Raytown Police “family” members, our members who have called Raytown their home for some time, and myself, I’d like to thank the citizens of Raytown for their unwavering support and cooperation to continue making Raytown a great community. Before this publication went to print, Chief Lynch retired in February 2019 after 43 years of service.

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OATH OF OFFICE I DO SOLEMNLY SWEAR THAT I POSSESS ALL THE QUALIFICATIONS FOR THE OFFICE OF POLICE OFFICER, AS PRESCRIBED BY LAW; THAT I WILL SUPPORT THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES AND OF THE STATE OF MISSOURI, THE PROVISIONS OF ALL LAWS OF THIS STATE AFFECTING CITIES OF THIS CLASS, AND THE ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF RAYTOWN, MISSOURI AND FAITHFULLY DEMEAN MYSELF IN OFFICE.

Each new police officer who joins the ranks of the Raytown Police Department takes an oath of office, whether just beginning his or her career or having prior law enforcement experience. That oath includes a public affirmation to uphold the laws of the United States of America, the State of Missouri, and the City of Raytown. The oath is usually administered in a public forum, typically at a Board of Aldermen meeting, in front of the very public that the officer will serve throughout his or her career. Taking the oath of office is very meaningful to each officer.

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KEY ACCOMPLISHMENTS There were many successful events and achievements accomplished by the Raytown Police Department and Department members over the course of 2018. The Department’s mission is to serve the residents and businesses of Raytown. Events, programs, and initiatives to enhance communication and cooperation within our community, held in 2018, include: On February 12th, Raytown Police Department launched the Online Police Reporting system, providing a convenient option to report minor crimes. Total, 393 reports were made using the system, which is about 13% of the total reports made for the year. Online reporting is offered as a service to citizens and the business community, and its use was completely voluntary. The web-based reporting system allowed the public to file certain incident types (stealing, property damage, identity theft, harassment, forgery, and fraudulent use of a credit card, as well as adding additional information to a report such as a list of property stolen or damaged) over the internet, at their convenience. The webbased reporting option allowed officers more time to address community needs which required one or more officer’s presence. On April 9th, Chief Jim Lynch (retired) and the Raytown Police Department released the Department’s 2017 Annual Report and presented the report to Raytown Mayor Michael McDonough and the Board of Aldermen at the Raytown Board of Aldermen meeting. The report included overall police activity, crime statistics, community activities, and featured various divisions and special units within the Department. The Raytown Police Department felt that it was important for its residents to be informed about their Police Department and how taxpayer resources are used. Chief Lynch encouraged everyone to view the 2017 Annual Report at http://www.raytownpolice.org. A printed copy was retained, and made available to the public, at the Raytown Branch of the Mid-Continent Public Library. The Raytown Police Communications Unit joined public safety dispatch centers across the Kansas City Metro area in implementing RapidSOS, a tool that pinpoints the location of a 9-1-1 wireless caller. RapidSOS enhanced current call-location technology by using nearby Wi-Fi networks and data sources to more accurately locate the caller’s device. The device’s most precise location is displayed on mapping software in the Communications Unit. Before RapidSOS was implemented, call centers struggled with locating wireless callers and were often limited to the area around a nearby cell tower. On July 21st, the Raytown Police Department hosted their annual Safety Fair at The Point, 5600 Blue Ridge Cutoff. Exhibitors from various community resources were on hand, including police, fire, EMS vehicles, and the Jackson County Sheriff’s Mounted Posse. Participants attended a gun safety presentation and learned about crime prevention, DARE, SWAT equipment, and Hope House. Visitors could participate in a Drive of Your Life experience presented by LifeGuard Youth Development and paint rocks with 2018 ANNUAL REPORT | 4


KEY ACCOMPLISHMENTS Raytown Rocks! The event was unique in that it was held outdoors and indoors. The free Safety Fair brought Raytown community residents together for a family-friendly event. In August, Truman Medical Center Trauma Unit personnel trained officers on tourniquet use and initial trauma treatment. “Stop the Bleed,” a national grant-funded program, provided the training and a trauma kit, including a tourniquet, for each officer. From September 5th through November 7th, the Raytown Police Department held the Raytown Police Department’s Citizen’s Police Academy. The Raytown Citizen’s Police Academy offered 11 citizens the opportunity to learn more about the operations of the Raytown Police Department. Topics included the many special units and divisions within the Department, including patrol, search & seizure, communications, gun safety, crime scene investigation, field training program, and role-playing in traffic stop scenarios, which allowed academy attendees to engage in simulated traffic stops. The instructors for each session were the police officers and civilians who actually perform the work. On October 3rd, Raytown police officers and community members came together for Coffee with a Cop, in an informal, neutral space to discuss community issues, build relationships, and drink coffee. Coffee with a Cop provided a unique opportunity for community members to ask questions and learn more about the Department’s work in Raytown’s neighborhoods. Coffee with a Cop is a national initiative supported by The United States Department of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services. On October 27th, Raytown officers and volunteers, in cooperation with the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), conducted “National Drug Take-Back Day,” resulting in 230 pounds of prescription pharmaceuticals collected. The collection site in the parking lot of Raytown City Hall, allowed the public a safe way to dispose of expired, unused and unwanted prescription medication. On November 8th, Raytown Reserve Sergeant Gil Anderson was honored by the Mid-America Crisis Intervention Team (MACIT) as the Raytown Crisis Intervention Team Officer of the Year for 2018. The Coffee with a Cop, Safety Fair, Citizen’s Police Academy, and Drug Take Back events were planned, coordinated, and facilitated by the Raytown Police Volunteer Corps, preserving the community outreach efforts that might otherwise have been canceled. The men and women of the Raytown Police Department are committed to developing long-lasting community relationships for a safe community through 2019 and beyond.

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SIGNIFICANT NUMBERS OVERALL ACTIVITY ARRESTS INCIDENT REPORTS

531

ACCIDENT REPORTS

TICKETS ISSUED

CALLS FOR SERVICE

775

1550

17648

2949

HOMICIDES

There were eight homicides in seven incidents in Raytown in 2018: • Clifford King (60), was choked to death on January 19th, in the 9000 block of Richards Dr., after a disturbance with a neighbor. Michael Augustine (43), was charged with involuntary manslaughter and awaits trial. • Trevion Williams-Malone (22), was shot and killed on March 8th, in the 9000 block of 81st St., after attempting to commit a home invasion. There was a struggle over the gun before the homeowner drew his own weapon and shot Williams-Malone multiple times. The homeowner was acting in self-defense and will not be charged. • Sammy Holmes (30), was shot and killed on June 8th, while he was seated in a car parked at 9330 E 350 Hwy. No charges have been filed but the investigation is ongoing. • Kiera Cline (19), was shot and killed on July 5th, while entering a residence in the 10000 block of E 68th St during the early morning hours. All involved parties have been identified. This case is being investigated by the Missouri Highway Patrol. • Dale Villines (59), Christopher Bogert (57), and Mark Bogert (54), were shot and killed on September 30th, in the 11100 block of E 74th Terrace, in a double murder-suicide. This case was investigated by the Missouri Highway Patrol. • Makayla Brooks (17), was shot and killed on October 5th, in the 5500 block of Blue Ridge Blvd. Logan England (19) and Kaci Cox (17) were charged with first-degree murder and armed criminal action and await trial. This case was investigated by the Missouri Highway Patrol. • Jerrin Walter (26) was shot and killed on October 7th, in the 5700 block of Elm. Two other people in the house were wounded by gunfire. His step-brother Issac J. Fisher (35) also shot and killed two other people in Kansas City on the same day. Fisher was charged with 18 felonies relating to the spree, including three counts of second-degree murder.

SEX OFFENSES

Total Sex Crimes Reported 2016-2018

40

36

35

30

30

29

25 20 15 10 5 0

2016

2017

2018

As in previous years, instead of using the UCR (Uniform Crime Reporting) definition of rape (see DISCLAIMER on page 32), we’re reporting every crime of a sexual nature. 29 cases were reported this year; we normally have between 28 to 41 sex crimes reported a year. Many of these cases happened Total Agg Assaults Reported 2016-2018 months or years prior to the report. 80 71 73 In 93% of the cases, the victim knew 69 70 the suspect. Only one case involved 60 a stranger. 50 40

AGGRAVATED ASSAULTS

Aggravated assault is any assault in which serious bodily harm was caused or a deadly weapon was involved. There were 69 such

30 20 10 0

2016

2017

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2018


SIGNIFICANT NUMBERS assaults reported in 2018, and as in previous years, the bulk were either domestic violence (involving family members, spouses/significant others, or roommates) or between friends. There are normally between 47 to 73 aggravated assaults reported a year. For more information on shootings in 2018, please see page 13. Total Robberies Reported 2016-2018

60

ROBBERIES

Robbery is physically taking property from a person by force or threat of force. In 2018, there were 48 robberies reported, which is one more than 2017; normally we have 35 to 54 robberies reported each year. 38% of robberies in 2018 were at commercial locations

56

50

47

48

2017

2018

40 30 20 10

AUTO THEFTS

0

2016

In 2018, there were 183 vehicles stolen and another 36 attempts. The number of auto thefts has increased each year for several years in a row and is up all across the metro area. We normally have between 111 to 187 vehicles stolen a year. As in previous years, a Total Auto Thefts Reported 2016-2018 remarkably high number (87) were left running or with the keys 250 219 209 inside. We ask all vehicle owners to make sure their vehicle is locked 200 166 and secured before leaving it unattended. This simple step can make 150 a significant impact on crime in our area, since criminals often use stolen autos in the commission of other crimes. The average length 100 of time between theft and recovery was 13 days, and we were able to 50 recover 154 of the 183 that were actually stolen. Trucks were the most 0 common vehicle type stolen. 2016 2017 2018 Total Burglaries Reported 2016-2018

BURGLARIES

350

A burglary is when someone enters or attempts to enter a building unlawfully. In 2018, there were 195 total burglaries reported in Raytown, which is a significant decrease from 2017. The majority were residential burglaries, which typically occur during business hours on weekdays when most people are at work or school. We normally have between 211 to 296 burglaries a year.

300 250

305 249 195

200 150 100 50 0

2016

2017

2018

THEFTS

There were 823 reported thefts in Raytown in 2018, which is a slight decrease from 2017. Most were shoplifting; almost 33% took place at one retailer. Historically, we Total Thefts Reported 2016-2018 normally have between 778 to 928 thefts reported a year. We 1000 915 833 continue to be concerned about the number of firearms stolen; 823 800 in 2018 there were 56 incidents in which at least one firearm was 600 stolen. Many times these weapons end up on the street and are used in other crimes. We implore all firearm owners to use great care when 400 securing their weapons. 200 0

2016

2017

2018

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ORGANIZATIONAL CHART Chief James Lynch

Internal Affairs

Major Randy Hudspeth

Reserve Squad

Office Manager (1)

Captain Paul Beitling

Captain Dyon Harper

Captain Candice Schwarz

Captain Michelle Rogers

Patrol Division (23)

Investigations Division (7)

Communications Unit (7)

Records Unit (2)

Color Guard

Crime Analyst (1)

Information Technology Management

Property/Supply & Evidence Unit (1)

SWAT

Public Information Unit

Chaplains Corps

Detention Unit (3)

Crisis Negotiations

Professional Standards

Volunteer Corps

Fleet Management

Grant Management

CERT

Peer Support Unit

Budget Management

Awards, Standards, and Uniforms

Mobile Command Post

Field Training

• •

Numbers in parenthesis indicate the authorized personnel for that unit as of 12/31/18. Purple units are secondary duties that personnel do in addition to their primary assignment. Secondary duties are “as needed” and the primary assignment takes priority.

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40 YEARS OF RAYTOWN PD Producing an annual report is something we do to inform our citizens but also because it is required by city ordinance. Section 26-21 states in part: “Annual report. The Chief of Police shall file an annual report of all activities of the police department with the mayor and board of aldermen on or before such annual date as may be designated by the board of aldermen.” It’s an interesting endeavor to go back and look at some of the old annual reports from decades ago. Some things have changed drastically while others are the same but for an upgrade in technology. For example, here’s the organization chart from the 1978 annual report. The Chief of Police at the time was Marion Beeler. Throughout this year’s report, we’ll share some interesting pages from the 1978 issue.

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PATROL DIVISION PATROL

The Patrol Division provides around-the-clock service to the community, responding to non-emergency and emergency incidents. Patrol officers respond to calls for service and proactively patrol the city when time allows. Staffing shortages continued to be one of the biggest struggles for the Patrol Division. While diligent hiring efforts brought experienced officers from other agencies to Raytown, the Patrol Division still required the full-time assignment of the Patrol Division Commander to a patrol shift, as well as overtime assignments, to maintain minimum staffing levels.

COLOR GUARD

The Raytown Police Department has maintained a Color Guard Unit for many years to represent Raytown in formal settings and ceremonies. Those events included flag presentations, funerals, and parades. Color Guard members maintain their unique uniforms and equipment to a high standard. The Color Guard was not utilized in 2018 due to insufficient staffing.

TRAFFIC

Manpower was insufficient to staff the Traffic Unit in 2018. Patrol officers respond to traffic collisions and other details that were once completed by Traffic officers, including school zone enforcement, speeding complaints, abandoned vehicles, and traffic enforcement. Those duties are completed when time allows, between higher priority calls for service. A large number of Driving While Intoxicated (DWI) car stops are turned over to the Jackson County Sheriff’s Department at the scene of the stops, to pursue prosecution, freeing Raytown officers to respond to other calls for service. 2018 ANNUAL REPORT | 10


PATROL DIVISION TRAFFIC STATISTICS

In 2018, there were 775 traffic collisions investigated by Raytown officers, involving over 1,400 vehicles. There were two days that tied as the busiest day for traffic collisions: Monday, May 7th and Tuesday, July 3rd. Both had eight collisions and despite what you might expect, the weather both days was dry and sunny. The majority of collisions resulted in property damage only, but roughly a quarter of all collisions resulted in an injury. We remind everyone to always wear their seatbelt and that texting while driving is dangerous. Type

Total Total People Collisions Injured or Killed Property Damage 585 NA Injury 190 268 Fatality 0 0

COLLISIONS BY DAY OF WEEK/ HOUR OF DAY

HEATMAP OF COLLISION LOCATIONS

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INVESTIGATIONS In 2018, the Criminal Investigations Division authorized staffing level was five detectives (two of which were vacant), two sergeants, one crime analyst, and one captain, with recruiting/hiring and Internal Affairs responsibilities added to the Criminal Investigation Division workload. Due to the limited number of detectives available to investigate criminal cases, the detective sergeants continued to consider the nature and seriousness of the crime when determining whether a case was assigned. Some minor, non-violent, cases were not assigned, even though potential leads were present. Those cases were still reviewed by a detective sergeant and crime analyst and were tracked for potential future assignment if Photo from 1978 RPD Annual Report manpower allowed. Detectives in the Criminal Investigation Division are responsible for investigating violent crimes (assaults, shootings, sexual assaults, homicides), property crimes (thefts, burglaries, forgeries), and other crimes (narcotics, weapons). Every business day, detective sergeants review police reports to determine if a case will be assigned to a detective to investigate. The presence of known suspects, evidence, or witnesses helps determine whether a case is assigned for further investigation. Once a case is assigned to a detective, the detective is responsible for investigating the case from beginning to conviction, when possible. Detectives conduct crime scene investigations, collect and process evidence, and conduct interviews. When investigations are concluded, they may be presented to a prosecutor to file charges, referred to a different law enforcement agency for further investigation, or inactivated due to insufficient evidence to file a charge. If a charge is filed on a case, the detectives assist the prosecutors as the case moves through the criminal justice system, including testifying at trial. 2018 proved to be a record year in “bulletto-skin” shootings in Raytown. “Bulletto-skin” shootings were cases where someone was actually wounded or killed by being struck by a bullet. There were 23 incidents resulting in 25 victims.

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INVESTIGATIONS The number of bullet-to-skin shooting victims increased by 733% from 2015 to 2018. Analyzing non-fatal and fatal shootings together gives a more accurate depiction of overall shootings, as the difference between a non-fatal and fatal wound is often where the person was struck. This means that there could have been up to 25 homicide victims in 2018, if the bullet(s) had struck the victims somewhere else on their bodies. In some cases the difference between a fatal and non-fatal wound is mere inches. In several non-fatal bullet-to-skin shootings, the victims chose not to cooperate with or pursue the investigation, often within a couple hours of the shooting. Those cases often do not require significant follow-up investigation. However, those cases where someone dies as a result of a bullet-to-skin shooting require significant resources for an appropriate investigation, including both manpower and specialized equipment. Those cases place significant resource demands for weeks, months, or even years. Each unique, major incident was individually evaluated to determine if the incident could be properly investigated within the Raytown Police Department or if it would be more appropriate to refer the investigation to another agency, that had significantly more resources available, including personnel with specialized training and specialized equipment. In 2018, the Raytown Police Department received assistance in the following bullet-to-skin incident investigations: • 1 case (homicide) where the Metro Squad convened, investigated initially, then returned the case to the Raytown Police Department for subsequent investigative work. • 4 cases (3 homicides, 1 non-fatal shooting) where the Missouri State Highway Patrol assumed the investigation and a SWAT operation from the beginning.

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COMMUNITY SERVICES DRUG TAKE-BACK

On October 21st, the Raytown Police Department participated in National Drug Take Back Day. Officers along with members of the Volunteer Corps manned a site in the parking lot of Raytown City Hall. In total, 230 pounds of prescription and over-the-counter medications were collected. That was 230 pounds of drugs that did not end up in the wrong hands or contribute to water contamination. Due to a rise in media attention regarding the misuse and abuse of narcotics and prescription drugs, public awareness in the proper disposal of medication has increased. Many citizens who stopped by commented on how happy they were that the Police Department hosted this event. Officers and the Volunteer Corps reminded all who participated that there is a drop box in the lobby of the police station that was available 24/7, where unwanted medication can be properly disposed of.

To find out more about joining our Volunteer Corps, call Captain Schwarz at (816) 737-6105. VOLUNTEER CORPS AT DETENTION RECEPTION DESK

Due to the staffing shortages in 2018, there weren’t enough detention technicians to work the detention reception area of the police station at all times. When there was no detention technician on duty and citizens came into the police station, they would have to push an intercom button and speak through the microphone to the dispatch center to request information or to speak with someone. The Volunteer Corps stepped up to help. Over the course of the year, they worked over 437 hours at the reception desk, so that our citizens would be able to have face-to-face contact and to relieve some of the burdens of the dispatch center. The Volunteer Corps staffed the reception desk only and did not perform any jail duties, such as prisoner processing, monitoring, or interaction.

COFFEE WITH A COP

Coffee with a Cop is a program that builds and maintains communication between the Police Department and the community. By offering a cup of coffee to community members in a relaxed atmosphere, Coffee with a Cop encouraged interaction between community members and Raytown’s police officers. The free exchange of thoughts, concerns, and discussion was encouraged. Open communication benefits both the community and the police officers in understanding our community and police interactions. 2018 ANNUAL REPORT | 14


COMMUNITY SERVICES In 2018, the Volunteer Corps held two Coffee with a Cop events. The first was in April at McDonald’s, 8909 East 350 Highway. The second was in October at Hy-Vee, 9400 East 350 Highway. Both were well attended and fostered a good conversation between our police officers and the public. The officers enjoyed talking with our citizens, as well as listening and learning from them! We would like to thank Raytown for participating, because community participation makes the events worthwhile!

SAFETY FAIR

The Volunteer Corps entered into a new phase of community outreach with the 2018 Safety Fair as the volunteers were given the opportunity to develop the plan, location, and theme. Innovative planning by the Police Department and the Volunteer Corps allowed those community outreach opportunities to continue despite budgetary shortages. Members of the Volunteer Corps dedicated over 270 hours to the planning and execution of this successful event. The volunteers coordinated with various community-based groups in order to execute the new Safety Fair at minimal costs. The Fair was held at The Point (5600 Blue Ridge Cut Off) on July 21st and was hosted by Graceway Church. The Volunteer Corps were able to have both indoor and outdoor educational and fun activities that included ALL age groups. The Volunteer Corps had new and innovative experiential activities for youth and young adults, showcased by Drive of Your Life, presented by LifeGuard Youth Development. The experiential activities consisted of interactive scenarios depicting how youths’ choices today can affect the rest of their lives. The youth who went through the scenarios were visibly affected. Some of the other positive, informative groups who attended were Raytown Rocks!, DARE/GREAT from the Kansas City, Missouri Police Department, Operation Lifesaver Railroad Safety, Midwest Animal ResQ, American Association of Retired Persons (AARP), Raytown Emergency Assistance Program (REAP), Hope House, Jackson County Sheriff’s Department Mounted Patrol, and Disaster Animal Response Team (DART), who showcased a wonderful presentation regarding safety information for furry family members. It was a terrific Saturday of fun, with snow cones and cotton candy provided by Taking It to the Streets!, a non-profit organization that provides community outreach, emergency response, and disaster relief. All who attended had the opportunity to learn about personal safety, lifeRAYTOWN POLICE | 15


COMMUNITY SERVICES skills, and positive decision making, in order to “make a safer tomorrow” for our entire community. The collaboration between Raytown’s public safety officials (Raytown Police Department, Raytown Fire, and Raytown EMS) and area community outreach programs struck a positive chord with all. The 2018 Safety Fair theme was “Arming you with knowledge today, for a safer tomorrow.” The Volunteer Corps met that goal, working together to become a stronger community!

CITIZEN’S POLICE ACADEMY

From September 5th through November 7th, the Police Department and the Volunteer Corps conducted the Raytown Citizen’s Police Academy. The Citizen’s Academy was designed to be an educational experience to help build a better understanding of the day-to-day operations of the Police Department and to reinforce the partnership and relationship with the community. The Volunteer Corps was responsible for the planning which began in March 2018 by having monthly meetings, planning classes, setting dates, and assignments. The Volunteer Corps spent a total of 239 hours of their time to ensure a successful academy. Members of the Volunteer Corps hosted each session while the classes were taught by both sworn and civilian employees who perform the jobs on a day-to-day basis. Some of the classes consisted of patrol operations, communications center, crime scene investigation, crisis intervention, search and seizure, use of force, and crash scene investigation. Other sessions included Hope House, who discussed domestic violence, the Jackson County Drug Task Force, who discussed narcotics, and the Kansas City Police Department Regional Police Academy, who presented on the academy experience. The Citizen’s Academy was held at the Raytown Branch of the MidContinent Public Library. Two classes were held off-site, a class at Herndon Career Center on the Fire Arms Training Simulator (FATS); and one at the Kansas City Police Department Helicopter unit in Kansas City, Missouri. Class participants also toured the police station, rode along with officers, and participated in traffic stop role-playing exercises where they were the officer conducting the stop and had to make decisions on whether to use force or not, based on the training they received. At the conclusion of the class, a graduation ceremony was held and each of the 11 participants received a diploma and his/her picture taken with Chief Jim Lynch, as well as a reception with cake and punch donated by members of the Volunteer Corps. A great time was had by all!

COMMUNITY EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM (CERT)

Although there was no CERT class to train new members in 2018, the existing team remained active and available. Team members helped with traffic control at multiple community events throughout 2018 and has approximately 35 active members. 2018 ANNUAL REPORT | 16


COMMUNITY SERVICES A special thank you goes out to our volunteers for all the work they’ve done throughout 2018. Members of our Volunteer Corps worked tirelessly to foster understanding and promote open communication between the community and the Police Department. They planned and executed multiple successful events, helped to staff the front desk in order to greet and assist citizens when we were short staffed, and even prepared and served holiday meals to our on-duty Department members, which meant a great deal to us. This amazing group of people volunteer for our Department not for recognition but to make a difference in their community. Members of our Volunteer Corps selflessly donated over 1,160 hours of their own time in 2018, equivalent to approximately $28,000, to help our Department be successful. Many of these events would not have been held otherwise. We appreciate all of our volunteers and are grateful that they chose to be part of our family!

SOME OF OUR WONDERFUL VOLUNTEERS!

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PUBLIC INFORMATION The Public Information Unit (PIU) disseminates public safety information, including crime prevention tips, press releases on significant events, and severe weather alerts. In 2018, the Public Information Unit was comprised of a commander, four public information officers, two social media moderators, one website/annual report designer, and one photographer. The PIU was a voluntary assignment, secondary to each members’ primary duty assignment. The public information officers (PIO’s) take part in a rotating on-call status to respond to critical incidents. Those incidents may include significant crimes, active tactical incidents, and serious motor vehicle crashes. When providing incident information, PIO’s may respond to scenes, gather information, then inform the public by reporting the information to the media, including TV, radio, and print media. The Raytown Police Department also uses social media and online tools to deliver the information directly to the public without the content “filter” of commercial media. Those same tools allow the public to ask questions, address concerns, and give feedback. Incidents and events that Raytown PIO’s have reported on included homicide and other crimes, serious motor vehicle crashes, severe weather advisories, crime safety tips, and community events. In 2018, 56 press releases were posted for the community, which advised of many incidents, including the many shootings that year, the discovery of gas pump skimmer devices, arrests of serious crime suspects, arrests made regarding school threats, and community engagement events. Several other informational articles were shared from many sources to the community via social media.

1 UNIT COMMANDER 4 PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICERS 1 PHOTGRAPHER

ANNUAL REPORT

As in previous years, the Public Information Unit prepared an annual report to give Raytown residents, businesses, City leadership, and the greater community, an overall view of the Police Department’s activities, statistics, and other information that people may find interesting. The report outlined how taxpayers’ resources were being used in fulfilling the mission of the Department. The

2 SOCIAL MEDIA MODERATORS 1 WEBSITE/ANNUAL REPORT DEVELOPER 2018 ANNUAL REPORT | 18


PUBLIC INFORMATION comprehensive report included information on the programs, divisions, and units within the Department, not only statistics and other data. The Public Information Unit will produce a report annually, as required by city ordinance. Producing each annual report takes a great deal of time and work, but the end product is worth the effort. The cost of producing an annual report is greatly reduced since Department members themselves complete the work of writing, editing, photography, and document design.

WEBSITE

The Public Information Unit website working group maintained the Raytown Police Department’s website, http://www.raytownpolice.org. The website featured various divisions and special units within the Department, the latest news, community safety articles, and crime trends. Career and volunteer opportunities were also posted as they became available. A small group of PIU members developed the website to provide a means to quickly and easily exchange important information with Raytown citizens and improve service. They developed, built, and maintained the website themselves, thus saving money, and use it to meet the goals of the Department and to serve Raytown citizens. The website is also optimized for mobile devices.

SOCIAL MEDIA

The Public Information Unit continued to use social media resources, along with traditional media, to broadcast information to the community. Social media is integrated into Americans’ way of life and the Raytown Police Department use the media to better serve, inform, and communicate with the public. The Public Information Unit manages and moderates all Department social media resources. The social media resources used to reach the community include: • WordPress (blog)-“RPD News Room”-Formal press releases, daily summary of police reports http:// piorpd.wordpress.com • Facebook page-“Raytown Police Department”-News, information, events, photos https://www. facebook.com/RaytownPolice/ • Twitter-“@raytownpd”-Real-time information of the latest news and information https://twitter.com/@ raytownpd • Instagram-“raytownpd”-Interesting photos and videos https://www.instagram.com/raytownpd/ All of the above resources are free to the public and the Department. The Raytown Police Department encourages citizens who live and work in Raytown to use those resources to connect with the Raytown Police, ask questions, make suggestions, enhance communication, and stay informed of news, information, and events.

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ADMINISTRATION FLEET

With the reduced authorized staffing, the Department’s fleet was downsized in 2018. The fleet was downsized by three marked units, three unmarked units, and two motorcycles. The remaining fleet consisted of 29 vehicles, including marked units and unmarked units (Investigations, Command, SWAT, Command Post, etc.) Five police car radios and 21 portable radios were replaced in 2018. The new radios have the capability for AES and DSS encryption, 700-800 MHz, multi-key, OTAR (Over the Air Re-keying for encryption) and P-25 Phase Two interoperability. These features were necessary to remain on the Metropolitan Area Regional Radio System to easily communicate with the majority of metro area emergency services agencies. The Department continued to replace in-car mobile data terminals (computers) and in-car cameras to maintain the in-car camera and in-car computer replacement schedule.

RECORDS

The Records Unit is comprised of two full time employees: one records supervisor/ administrative assistant and one records clerk and is responsible for retaining police records and responding to records requests. In 2018, the Records Unit received 3,724 police reports; those reports were reviewed and retained by the Records Unit. The Records Unit processes report requests each day, which come from individuals, insurance companies, attorneys, media, and outside agencies. The Records Unit also provides support to other units within the Department. In February, the Records Unit began entering Online and Walk-in Police Reports. This system is more convenient for our citizens and helps keep officers in the field. In that first year the Records Unit entered 393 reports. Although the time to handle a call and write the report varies greatly depending on the type of report and complexity of the incident, it’s safe to say that each of those 393 online reports saved at least an hour of time or more for a patrol officer, freeing up that officer to handle other calls.

Photo from 1978 RPD Annual Report

2018 ANNUAL REPORT | 20


ADMINISTRATION ONLINE REPORTING SYSTEM

On February 12th, Raytown Police launched the Online Police Reporting system, providing a convenient option to report minor crimes. Online reporting is offered as a service to our citizens and business community and its use is completely voluntary. The online reporting portal can be found at http://www.raytownpolice.org/online-reporting. This web-based reporting system will allow the public to file certain incident types (stealing, property damage, identity theft, harassment, forgery and fraudulent use of a credit card, as well as adding additional information to a report such as a list of property stolen or damaged) over the internet, at their convenience. For all crime types, the following criteria must apply: 1. The incident must NOT be an emergency. 2. The incident must NOT be occurring right now. 3. There were NO injuries caused by the incident. 4. The incident has NO known suspects. “Known” means you know the person’s name or where to find them or have a license plate from the suspect vehicle. 5. There is NO physical evidence to be collected. If you have relevant photos or video, you can upload them to this system. 6. The incident must have occurred within the city limits of Raytown. Any incident that occurs outside the city limits must be reported to that jurisdiction. 7. The information you are providing must be truthful and accurate. 8. You must have a valid email address to submit an online report. The Raytown Police Department expects this internet based reporting service to be popular among citizens who expect an increased use of technology as part of the Department’s commitment to service. The service will allow the public to file a report at a time that is best for them. The report will be reviewed by police personnel and, once approved, the victim will receive an email with the report number. The report will transfer to the Raytown Police records management system and receive the same investigation and statistical analysis as if the report had been filed by a police officer. In many cases, reports of this nature are only filed for insurance claims or documentation purposes. This webbased reporting option will also allow officers more time to address community needs which require one or more officer’s presence. Full details about acceptable crime reports and criteria can be found at the Online Police Reporting system portal. Anyone who is unsure if their incident meets the online reporting criteria may call our non-emergency phone number at 816-737-6020 and speak with a dispatcher. RAYTOWN POLICE | 21


ADMINISTRATION COMMUNICATIONS

The Communications Unit is responsible for taking calls from the public and coordinating the appropriate response, whether it is police, fire, or emergency medical services. Some calls are directed to other units, city departments, or other jurisdictions altogether. The Communications Unit also supports other police staff by taking and returning information to officers on patrol, detectives in the field, and other duties as they occur. The Communications staff answers 9-1-1 calls and texts, activates tornado sirens for testing, 2018 Top Ten Calls for Count and enters stolen property into the police computer system. Service by Type Stolen items in the computer system make it possible for officers in other jurisdictions to identify and locate property that was Alarm 1,901 stolen in Raytown. Disturbance 1,675 Suspicious Activity 1,584 In July, the Communications Unit promoted a new supervisor, a 1,508 member who has been with the Department since 2016 and who Car Stop Larceny/Attempt 1,347 has nine years of experience prior to being hired at Raytown. Citizens Contact 929 The table at right shows the top ten calls for service types in Accident Non-Injury 791 2018. Calls for service (CFS) can be generated by a call from Welfare Check 433 the public, a police officer in the field, an outside agency, or a Follow-Up Investigation 416 city department. The initial call type is not always indicative of what truly happened, and less than 20% of all CFS result in the Burglary/Attempt 402 generation of an incident or accident report. The vast majority of calls that we receive are non-criminal in nature.

Photo from 1978 RPD Annual Report

Current view of Dispatch

2018 ANNUAL REPORT | 22


911: DIAL TO ARRIVAL Generally speaking, you should call 911 anytime there is a threat to life or property, such as a fire, a medical emergency, a car crash, or you witness a crime or possible crime. The first thing to do in an emergency is to call 911. Don’t assume that someone else has already called! If you need help but it’s not an emergency, you can call the non-emergency line which is 816-737-6020. The first thing the dispatcher will ask is your location, so they can get help started your way, even if you aren’t able to tell them anything else. If you call from a landline, your call should automatically connect to the correct 911 call center. But if you call from a cell phone, then the call will be routed depending on what cell tower your call hits. If your cell phone connects to a tower in Kansas City, you will be connected to KCPD first and they will transfer you to us. The dispatcher will ask you questions about what happened such as if there are injuries, any weapons involved, and your name and number. Then they can call back if you get disconnected. You may not understand why they are asking certain questions, but remember that dispatchers are trained to visualize the incident and think of all the ways that you or the responder may not be safe, and then give directions to make the situation as safe as possible. They also need to get important information in a specific order for the most effective response (e.g., catching the suspect, getting officers to the right location faster, etc.) While on the phone with you, the dispatcher is entering all the information into the Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) software, which logs all call responses for the Department. At the same time, the dispatcher is calling the officers over the radio to respond to the scene. Once they know the location of the emergency and the basic situation, the dispatchers will get the officers on the way. While officers are responding, the dispatcher may give them updates over the radio if the caller provides more information or someone else calls about the same situation. Once the officers arrive, the dispatcher may stay on the line to be the link between the caller and the officers if needed. As officers handle the situation, they will transmit updates back to the dispatcher and request things such as a tow truck, ambulance, check a person for warrants or run a vehicle to determine the registered owner is. Once the call is handled, the officers advise over the radio that they are back in service with a brief description of any notations that need to be entered into the call. During this entire time, the dispatcher is handling and dispatching other 911 and non-emergency calls, based on seriousness. Life threatening situations take priority. So if all of these steps must be completed with multiple calls, each will be at a different stage. Dispatchers are pros at multi-tasking for a reason! If you call the non-emergency line, the same dispatcher will answer, so if you’re put on hold, please be patient until they can get back to you. You never know what else the dispatcher is dealing with while you’re on hold. Don’t hang up and call back, because that can be detrimental to another person’s emergency. If you called 911 by mistake, don’t hangup! Tell the dispatcher that you misdialed. If you hang up, they have to call you back and confirm it was an accident and all is okay, which takes more time than it would to just stay on the line and explain what happened.

RAYTOWN POLICE | 23


PROPERTY The Property and Supply Unit is responsible for recovered property, evidence retention, and supplies for the Police Department. The Property and Supply Unit was staffed by one full-time employee for the majority of 2018 and occasionally, one part-time employee. The Supply Unit issues all office, general, and evidence processing supplies. The unit is also responsible for making sure all employees have the correct uniforms and equipment to perform their duties. Throughout 2018, officers and detectives collected a total of 1,764 new items of property and evidence. This includes the seizure of 89 firearms and 197 drug items (cocaine, heroin, K2, marijuana, meth, PCP, pills, or prescription medication). The Property & Supply Unit disposed of 1,197 items in 2018. “Disposing” recovered property or evidence when the case was concluded or when the statute of limitations had passed means returning the items to their owner, destroying certain items, or placing abandoned items in the city auction. The Property and Suppy Unit ended the year with nearly 12,214 items total in storage. In 2018, the Property & Supply Unit’s major accomplishment was an upgrade to the evidence management software and completing the necessary training for that upgrade. Unit personnel then imported the items of evidence that were already in inventory into the new software system. The software provides an all-inclusive package including greater search parameters and report generating capabilities and is based on a bar code system, which greatly increases efficiency in storing, processing, and locating each piece of recovered property and evidence. The Property & Supply Unit also began developing several new policies applicable to the unit, that will eventually be added to the Police Department’s Standard Operation Procedural Manual.

PROPERTY RELEASE PROCEDURE

Property that was collected as part of an investigation or because ownership couldn’t be determined is maintained by our Property and Evidence technician. In order to get your items returned, you must call 816-737-6120 to speak to the technician and make an appointment. Be prepared to provide the case number (if you have it) and the date of the offense. Please note that property can only be released when the investigation has reached a stage where the evidence/ property is no longer needed. Therefore, the release procedure is not quick. Additionally, the release of firearms requires extra time, up to 1 to 2 months, because firearms must go on a gun-court docket and can only be released with the judge’s authorization. We cannot release property to someone other than the owner without a notarized statement. Exceptions to this include when the owner is a juvenile or deceased.

2018 ANNUAL REPORT | 24


DETENTION The Raytown Police Department Detention Unit is a short-term holding facility with 12 beds in four regular cells and one padded cell. Inmates are held only long enough for them to post bond, or in the case of 24-hour investigative holds, until the investigator assigned to their case completes the investigation. At the end of 2018, the authorized staffing of Detention was one supervisor and two detention technicians (one vacancy.) Detention was not staffed on weekend days or half of the nights. If an arrest was made during those periods, a police officer was required to process in and monitor the arrestee until the arrestee was released or transferred. Whenever possible, if an arrest was made for an outside agency’s warrant(s), officers transported the subject directly to that agency for processing, bypassing the need for our Detention Unit entirely. In 2018, the detention unit processed 531 bookings and over 1,500 traffic citations and general ordinance summons.

Current view of Detention

Photo from 1978 RPD Annual Report

RAYTOWN POLICE | 25


INTERNAL AFFAIRS The Internal Affairs (IA) Unit is responsible for maintaining records of all the investigations conducted into complaints against the members of the Department, all vehicle pursuits conducted by officers, and all reports of incidents where officers had to apply force against another person. Many complaints are investigated by supervisory staff, but in the most serious cases, members of the Internal Affairs Unit can be assigned. Internal Affairs personnel include case officers and Computerized Voice Stress Analysis (CVSA) examiners. Case officers are recruited from the Criminal Investigations Unit and have shown proven skills in interview/interrogation and detailed case management. Special training is required of all Unit members, beginning with attendance at the Institute for Law Enforcement Administration at the Center for American and International Law. There, they are introduced to courses specific to internal affairs, ethics, and professional standards. The Internal Affairs Unit reports directly to the Chief of Police.

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Exonerated (5)

or Rudenesssy Discourte (7)

Chart displays both citizen generated complaints and internal investigations.

2018 ANNUAL REPORT | 26


USE OF FORCE Law enforcement agencies are under ever increasing public scrutiny. The public expects, and rightly so, an extremely high level of professionalism, honesty, and integrity with their police force. It is the practice of the Raytown Police Department to review many different types of incidents as they occur. It is imperative that the process to document, review, and retain that information is efficient, accurate, and complete. Starting in 2017, the Police Department implemented a new software solution aimed at improving internal investigation records management and statistical analysis of high-risk situations. This software provides greater support for reporting and reviewing of incidents including:

17,648 CALLS FOR SERVICE

After Action Reports Citizen Complaints City Vehicle Crashes Commendations Firearm Discharges Forced Entry Internal Investigations Show of Force Uses of Force Vehicle Pursuits Workplace Injuries

531 ARRESTS MADE 56 USE OF FORCE INCIDENTS (0.1% OF TOTAL CONTACTS)

PURSUITS

55

25

25

40

20

30

15

20

22

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Strikes

Taser

6

5

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9 OFFICERS WERE INJURED DURING USE OF FORCE INCIDENTS.

All pursuits must be documented, whether or not the suspect was apprehended. Since the city is only 10 square miles and surrounded by interstates, many pursuits move quickly outside our city limits as suspects try to flee. There were 45 total vehicular pursuits in 2018, down from 92 in 2017.

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Note that each officer’s use of force is counted, thus one incident can result in multiple counts of use of force.

TYPES OF RESISTANCE ENCOUNTERED

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60

FORCE METHODS USED BY OFFICERS

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Officers and supervisors are able to enter incidents into the software from “the field,” then they are routed through the chainof-command with review at each step. The data used in this year’s annual report was collected from that database.

1,593 CAR OR PEDESTRIAN CHECKS

Ag Ac gr tive es sio n

• • • • • • • • • • •

10 SUBJECTS WERE INJURED DURING USE OF FORCE INCIDENTS. Pursuits terminated by officer or supervisor Pursuits between 9 pm-6 am when most people are asleep Felony offenders

Stop Device deployments

43 4 14 0

Pursuits that were less than 10 miles long Accidents occurred during pursuits Suspects fleeing a crime scene

Officers or citizens injured

RAYTOWN POLICE | 27


PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS The Professional Standards Unit (PSU) is staffed by one Investigations sergeant, whose primary duty is to the Investigations Unit. That sergeant recruits and completes pre-employment background investigations on potential new police officers. Each commander of the Detention and Communications Units recruit and complete pre-employment investigations for their respective units. Our staff seeks new employees who exhibit courage, honesty, integrity, and accountability. The responsibility to ensure that all sworn personnel meet the continuing education training requirements set forth by the Department of Public Safety Peace Officer Standards and Training Program (POST) was transferred from PSU to the Department office manager. Sworn personnel must complete a minimum number of hours of training within a designated period, in categories including legal studies, technical studies, racial profiling, and firearms skill development. In 2018, all of our sworn personnel met or exceeded the training requirements set forth by POST.

All Department members, including sworn and civilian personnel, have cumulatively participated in over 1,380 hours of training in 2018. IN 2018, THE CHIEF HIRED 15 INDIVIDUALS 11 OFFICERS

(1 NO LONGER EMPLOYED WITH US)

1 DETENTION TECH

3 DISPATCHERS

(1 NO LONGER EMPLOYED WITH US)

To find out more about joining our Police Department, call Sergeant Hixon at (816) 737-6113. 2018 ANNUAL REPORT | 28


40 YEAR FLASHBACK

RPD Dive Team-Disbanded sometime in the 1980’s

RAYTOWN POLICE | 29


AWARDS The Awards, Uniform, and Standards Unit organized the Annual Awards Ceremony on February 17th, 2018 at The Emaline Ballroom in Lee’s Summit. This year’s ceremony, which was for actions that occurred in 2017, was attended by police officers, chaplains, volunteers, and their families. Volunteer Jennifer Singleton and Chief Jim Lynch acted as the emcees. Awards were given for tenure, good conduct, safe driving, military service, advanced education, and service in special units, among other things.

AWARD Commendatory Letter Education Good Conduct* Military Service Safe Driving* Special Unit

# OF RECIPIENTS 9 3 8 1 7 7

*AWARDED IN FIVE YEAR INCREMENTS

PROMOTIONS

During the Awards Ceremony, we recognized those who were recently promoted: • Tom Greer was hired on September 14th, 2012 by the Raytown Police Department and promoted to Corporal on February 18th, 2018. • Frank McDevitt was hired on July 12th, 2010 by the Raytown Police Department and promoted to Corporal on February 18th, 2018.

LIFESAVING

The lifesaving award, which is granted to any member for a successful effort in saving a human life, was awarded to multiple people for three separate incidents: Officers Ronnie Davis and Lonnie Wood responded to a stabbing on July 3rd and found that the victim had been wounded several times with a sword and was bleeding profusely from a significant wound to his neck. They immediately rendered first aid and were able to slow the bleeding until he could be transported to the hospital where he received medical treatment and survived the attack. Sergeant Rick Strack, Corporal Shawn Didde, Detective Larry Jackson, and civilian Joe Schneider responded to an apartment fire on June 10th. The entire top floor of the building was on fire, but all of them went into the building and worked together as a team to make sure everyone was evacuated safely. Corporal Shawn Didde responded to the bridge at 63rd and Raytown Trafficway on September 30th, because a teenager had climbed over the guard rail and was threatening to jump. Cpl. Didde calmly talked to the teenager for 45 minutes, showing great compassion and patience, until she eventually agreed to come back over the rail to safety. 2018 ANNUAL REPORT | 30


AWARDS

OFFICER OF THE YEAR EVAN HARTENSTEIN

CIVILIAN OF THE YEAR KRISTA RHODES

Ofc. Evan Hartenstein was selected by his peers as Officer of the Year for his hard work, dedication, and commitment to the Department over the course of his career.

Dispatcher Krista Rhodes was selected by her peers as Civilian of the Year for her professionalism and dedication to the Department and her role in revising the dispatch training manual.

VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR JENNIFER SINGLETON

RESERVE OFFICER OF THE YEAR JOHN GILLIGAN

Volunteer Jennifer Singleton was selected by Department members and volunteers as Volunteer of the Year for her dedication to the Volunteer Corps, her passion for the community, and her unwavering positive attitude.

Reserve Officer John Gilligan was selected by his peers as Reserve Officer of the Year. R/Ofc. Gilligan regularly worked Patrol shifts when we were short handed and could always be counted on to help out with shift coverage.

RAYTOWN POLICE | 31


CREDITS PHOTOGRAPHIC CREDITS TO:

RECORDS SUPERVISOR LOUTRECES THURMAN

WRITING CREDITS TO:

RPD DIVISION AND UNIT COMMANDERS

GRAPHIC DESIGN CREDITS TO: CRIME ANALYST KYLE STOKER

THANKS TO OUR EDITORS:

DEBORAH HARPER CAPTAIN DYON HARPER TODD HEMBREE LINDA STOKER OFFICE MANAGER JENNIFER WIESEMANN

DISCLAIMER

When many people think of crime statistics, they associate the term with media reports or “Top Ten Dangerous Cities”-type lists that are almost always based on the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) system. This system, which was originally established in 1930, has very complex rules about which crimes are reported and how they are counted. Although they recently expanded the definition of rape in 2013, overall the system hasn’t changed much in its almost 90-year lifespan. For a variety of reasons, we have decided not to use UCR “rules” for the crime statistics we’re reporting here. Instead, we’re simply reporting how many times each crime occurred. We’re also not reporting statistics for every crime type, as there are too many to list. We’ve chosen to highlight those crime types that most citizens are interested in when they contact us about crime in our city. The end result is a more accurate, simple, and comprehensive view of crime in our city. The reports included in this document were created using data from our records management system (RMS) and computer aided dispatch (CAD) systems. There were some limitations in gathering and analyzing data. Missing information (lack of data entry), miscoded information (wrong call types), and typographical mistakes all contribute to errors in information. The statistics in this report represent the best effort to report activity within the City of Raytown and the Raytown Police Department, with the understanding that there is a small margin of error.

2018 ANNUAL REPORT | 32


2018 RAYTOWN

POLICE DEPARTMENT ANNUAL REPORT

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10000 EAST 59TH STREET, RAYTOWN, MISSOURI 64133 | WWW.RAYTOWNPOLICE.ORG THE MISSION OF THE RAYTOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT IS TO PROVIDE AND MAINTAIN A SAFE COMMUNITY BY DEVELOPING STRONG COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS AND SERVING WITH PROFESSIONALISM, TRUST, AND INTEGRITY.

Profile for Raytown Police Department

Raytown Police 2018 Annual Report  

The Raytown Police Department have released the department’s 2018 Annual Report. The report describes overall police activity, crime statist...

Raytown Police 2018 Annual Report  

The Raytown Police Department have released the department’s 2018 Annual Report. The report describes overall police activity, crime statist...

Profile for raytownpd
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