__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

Raytown Police Department 2015 ANNUAL REPORT

10000 E 59TH STREET RAYTOWN, MISSOURI 64133 WWW.RAYTOWNPOLICE.ORG


TABLE OF CONTENTS MISSION STATEMENT—3 MESSAGE FROM THE CHIEF—4 OATH OF OFFICE—5 KEY ACCOMPLISHMENTS—6 RENOVATION—8 SIGNIFICANT NUMBERS—10 • • • • • • • •

OVERALL ACTIVITY HOMICIDE SEX CRIMES AGGRAVATED ASSAULT ROBBERIES AUTO THEFT BURGLARY CALLS FOR SERVICE

ORGANIZATIONAL CHART—14 PATROL—15 INVESTIGATIONS—16

COMMUNITY SERVICES—18 SPECIAL RESPONSE—20 TRAINING—21 CERT—22 PUBLIC INFORMATION—23 ADMINISTRATION—24 FLEET—25 PROF. STANDARDS—26 INTERNAL AFFAIRS—27 PROPERTY/DETENTION—29 AWARDS—30

• CIVILIAN OF THE YEAR • RESERVE OFFICER OF THE YEAR • OFFICER OF THE YEAR

CREDITS—32

• DISCLAIMER • SOCIAL MEDIA ACCOUNTS

RAYTOWN POLICE ARCHIVED PHOTO

MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of the Raytown Police Department is to provide and maintain a safe community by developing strong community partnerships and serving with professionalism, trust, and integrity.


F E I H C E ROM TH

F E G A S S ME

A great deal of attention was focused on law enforcement in the United States during 2015. I believe that shining through all of the media hype and drama is a promise for positive change. Better communication and more community engagement are at the core of those positive things to come, and I am proud to point out that the men and women of your Police Department were hard at work preparing for those changes even before the events that attracted so much attention. They already knew that it was important to get in front of changes in community expectations of the police and they have been making the necessary moves to adapt efficiently. I am proud of their efforts and believe that you have cause to be equally as proud.

4

RAYTOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT

This year twelve people have joined your Police Department; eight were sworn in as police officers, three filled much needed positions as dispatchers, an office manager, and a Community Services Director. We spent a great deal of time and effort searching for these folks because we wanted the best people to serve Raytown. I am excited about the promise that they represent. As we continue our efforts to improve service, we are grateful for all of the support our community has shown to all of the first responders serving Raytown. This year’s annual report is presented to you with gratitude and the hope that you will find it useful.


E C I F F O F OATH O Each new Police Officer that joins the ranks of the Raytown Police Department takes an oath of office, whether just beginning his or her career, or having prior law enforcement experience. That oath includes a public affirmation to uphold the laws of the United States of America, the State of Missouri, and the City of Raytown. The oath is usually administered in a public forum, typically at a Board of Aldermen meeting, in front of the very public that the officer will serve throughout their career. Taking the oath of office is very meaningful to each officer.

POLICE OFFICER OATH OF OFFICE

I do solemnly swear that I possess all the qualifications for the office of Police Officer, as prescribed by law; that I will support the Constitution of the United States and of the State of Missouri, the provisions of all laws of this State affecting Cities of this Class, and the Ordinances of the City of Raytown, Missouri and faithfully demean myself in office.

PROFESSIONALISM, TRUST, INTEGRITY | 2015 ANNUAL REPORT

5


TS N E M H S I L P M O C C KEY A Many successful events and achievements were accomplished by the Raytown Police Department, and Department members, over the course of 2015. Those accomplishments are the result of the Department’s mission to enhance its service to the residents and businesses of Raytown, and to enhance communication and cooperation within our community.

In February, Raytown detectives received training in, and began using, SAFETNet, the Secure Automated Fast Event Tracking Network, a way to enhance multijurisdictional communication, cooperation, and coordination when investigating crime. SAFETNet provided a secure method for investigators from varying law enforcement agencies to collaborate and share information. 325 Midwest law enforcement agencies, local, state and federal, participated in the initiative. SAFETNet was offered to law enforcement at no cost. In April, Capt. Paul Beitling and Capt. Randy Hudspeth graduated from the Northwestern University Center for Public Safety School

6

of Police Staff and Command. They were among 25 graduates of the intensive 10-week program, which was designed to prepare command officers for complex issues of police command and management in today’s environment. At the end of the program, the University awarded its Franklin M. Kreml Leadership award to Capt. Randy Hudspeth. The award was established by the University to recognize outstanding leadership demonstrated by one member of each class.

CAPT. BEITLING

report took a comprehensive look at overall police activity, crime statistics, community activities, and featured various divisions and special units within the department. The Department felt that it was important for its residents and businesses to be informed about their police department and how taxpayer resources are being used. A printed copy was retained, and made available to the public at the Raytown Branch of the MidContinent Public Library.

CAPT. HUDSPETH

On 04/21/15, Chief Lynch and the Raytown Police Department released the department’s 2014 Annual Report and presented the report to Raytown Mayor Michael McDonough and the Board of Aldermen. The RAYTOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT

On 06/27/15, the Raytown Police Department hosted its fourth annual Safety Fair, an afternoon dedicated to crime prevention and awareness within the


community. The event allowed the public to get an up close and personal look at police cars and equipment, fire trucks, ambulances, and public works equipment. There were activities and giveaways. The free, familyfriendly event was held at Kenagy Park. In September, the Raytown Police Community Services Unit collected 542 pounds of medications, both prescription and over-the-counter, during the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency’s National Drug TakeBack Day. Officers and volunteers manned two sites where the public was invited to bring old, unused, and excess medications to be disposed of safely. The service was free and anonymous. The collected medication was turned over to the DEA for safe destruction.

On 10/21/15, the Department’s Fall 2015 Citizen’s Police Academy graduated 16 participants, who learned about the Police Department and how it operates. Participants used the FATS (Fire Arms Training Simulator) system and participated in very active role-playing car stop scenarios, facilitated by department trainers. Other

topics included crime analysis, patrol operations, SWAT, and many other police functions, units, and divisions. The instructors were the police officers and civilians who actually perform the work.

In late Fall, the Kansas City Royals baseball team made a run to the 2015 World Series, Major League Baseball’s championship series. Chief Jim Lynch allowed on-duty patrol officers to wear Kansas City Royals

baseball caps during the series, to join the countless other Royals fans in supporting our hometown baseball club. The Kansas City Royals won the World Series on November 2nd, 30 years since winning their last World Series championship. Raytown’s police officers and staff, Royals fans themselves, celebrated the victory with the community. The Raytown Police Department hosted another “tweet-along,” on its Twitter account, @RaytownPD, in November. The tweet-along was a virtual ride -long, which allowed viewers to “patrol” with a Raytown Police Officer. Tweet-alongs offer an opportunity for everyone to get a glimpse into police work.

PROFESSIONALISM, TRUST, INTEGRITY | 2015 ANNUAL REPORT

7


ON I T A V O N RE

During the latter part of 2015, the Raytown Police Department facility underwent a major renovation. A sanitary sewer replacement was necessary. Other improvements included the reconfiguration of office space, new interview rooms, a kitchen overhaul, paint, and carpet. The heart of the space that housed the Police Department was demolished and reconfigured. The renovation cost was approximately $575,000. 25 years had passed since the last major renovation.

While the demolition and renovation was underway, from August to the end of December, the Criminal Investigations Unit and Administrative staff were temporarily relocated to an off-site office space. Since the Detectives conduct much of their work in the field, their investigative workflow was uninterrupted. The Communications Unit was temporarily displaced to the Kansas City, Missouri Police South Patrol regional back-up communications center for about six weeks. Switching the radio communications and 9-1-1 phone service between the two facilities were seamlessly accomplished.

Once the renovation was complete, the displaced staff returned to the newly remodeled building.

Before 8

RAYTOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT


After

PROFESSIONALISM, TRUST, INTEGRITY | 2015 ANNUAL REPORT

9


S

R E B M U N T N A C I F I SIGN OVERALL ACTIVITY Arrests 2437

Incident Reports 3386

Accident Reports

Tickets Issued

Calls for Service

755

4265

23103

HOMICIDE There were two homicides that occurred in Raytown in 2015. Danny L. Dean, 32, was shot and killed on September 10, 2015 during a botched drug deal in the parking lot of 6623 Raytown Rd. No charges have been filed but detectives have identified several suspects and the investigation is ongoing. On December 10, 2015, a Raytown teen gave birth to a 22 week old infant at a local hospital. The infant lived approximately 2 hours then died. It was discovered that the teen had intentionally taken medication to abort her pregnancy. The case is being reviewed by the Jackson County Prosecutor’s Office.

SEX CRIMES

Victim-Suspect Relationship

The Uniform Crime Report (UCR) definition of rape has recently been changed, and was previously very narrow. Refer to DISCLAIMER on page 32. Instead of using that definition, we’re reporting every crime of a sexual nature. This includes rape, other sexual assault, sexual misconduct, indecent exposure, and statutory rape. 39 cases were reported this year, but in many cases, the actual crime occurred months or years ago. Out of all 39 cases that were reported in 2015, only four cases involved a suspect who was a stranger to the victim. In all others, the suspect was a family member, neighbor, friend, or had some other relationship with the victim or victims. 10

RAYTOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT

Friend 18% Relative 59%

Other Known 13%

Stranger 10%


AGGRAVATED ASSAULT Aggravated assault is any assault in which serious bodily harm was caused or a deadly weapon was involved. There were 76 assaults that rose to that level in 2015. In those 76 cases, 62% involved people in a domestic situation (spouses, significant others, family members, or roommates). Another 21% involved people who knew each other in some other capacity: friends, acquaintances, neighbors, etc.

ONLY 10 AGGRAVATED ASSAULTS WERE SITUATIONS IN WHICH THE VICTIM CLAIMED THEY DID NOT KNOW THEIR ATTACKER.

Weapons Used/Threatened-Assaults

31.6% 30.3% 19.7% 10.5%

ROBBERIES 2015 saw a decrease to 32 robberies for the year, which is almost half the number reported in 2010 which was our highest year. Historically, in Raytown, robberies tend to be lowest in the winter months and higher during late summer/early fall.

7.9%

Common Items Stolen

5 CASES WERE TRANSACTIONAL, MEANING THE VICTIM THOUGHT THEY WERE THERE TO BUY/ SELL PROPERTY AFTER ONE PARTY POSTED AN AD ONLINE.

Strong Arm Robberies

28%

PROFESSIONALISM, TRUST, INTEGRITY | 2015 ANNUAL REPORT

11


AUTO THEFT

BURGLARY

In 2015, there were 103 vehicles stolen and another 38 attempts. Normally, we can expect to see between 118-130 thefts or attempted thefts, so this was a slight increase above what we usually have. One troubling statistic that holds true from year to year is that a large number of auto thefts, 58% for this year, were of vehicles that were either left running or had the keys inside. That’s 60 vehicles that may not have been stolen if they had been secured properly!

In 2015, there were 204 total burglaries reported in Raytown. The vast majority were residential burglaries, most of which occured during the daytime hours and targeted cash, jewelry, and small electronics. 35 vacant houses/buildings were also targeted for appliances and scrap metal. Burglary Targets

Detached Shed

IN 20 CASES, THE SUSPECTS ENTERED THROUGH A DOOR OR WINDOW THAT WAS UNLOCKED.

Commercial Vacant Residential 0

30

60

90

120

150

Where They Break In: Roof 1%

Left running unattended or with keys inside Did NOT have the keys inside when stolen

WE WERE ABLE TO RECOVER 84% OF ALL STOLEN VEHICLES, ON AVERAGE 7 DAYS AFTER THE ORIGINAL THEFT. 12

RAYTOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT

Unknown/ Other 5%

Rear/Side /Garage 25%

Door Glass 6%

Window 22%

Front Door 40%


CALLS FOR SERVICE The Communications Unit received a total of 73,744 telephone calls in 2015. Not every phone call results in an officer being dispatched; some are handled by dispatch, transferred to another agency, or were phone calls intended for other personnel. Less than 15% of calls result in a criminal incident report.

THERE ARE OVER 70 CALL TYPES THAT DISPATCHERS USE TO CLASSIFY SITUATIONS. HERE ARE SOME OF THE MOST COMMON:

23,103 Total Calls for Service Officer Initiated

Administrative

Public Initiated

Car Stops (3,924)

Prisoner Transfer (520)

Alarms (1,950)

Building Checks (530)

Station Detail (410)

Disturbances (1,764)

Open Door/Window (180)

Warrant Service (298)

Suspicious Activity (1,685)

PROFESSIONALISM, TRUST, INTEGRITY | 2015 ANNUAL REPORT

13


T R A H C AL N O I T A Z I ORGAN Chief James Lynch

Major Theodore Bowman (Operations)

Major Frank Stranimier (Admin)

Captain Michelle Rogers (Fleet)

Captain Doug Goode (Budget)

Records

Training/Prof Standards

Property/Supply & Evidence

Admin Assist.

Detention

Communications

14

RAYTOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT

Captain Paul Beitling (Patrol)

Captain Randy Hudspeth (Investigations)

Patrol

Investigations

Traffic

Crime Analyst

Reserve Squad


PATROL PATROL & TRAFFIC The Patrol Division provides continuous professional law enforcement service to residents, businesses, and everyone within the City of Raytown. Officers assigned to this division provide immediate law enforcement response to reported crimes and other emergencies, as well as proactive enforcement of criminal activity and traffic offenses.

For the year 2015, the Uniform Patrol Division was comprised of four Patrol squads and one Traffic Unit. There were 26 Patrol Officers that were assigned to the four Patrol squads. Each squad of Patrol Officers was led by one Sergeant and one Corporal. Patrol squad shifts were 12.5 hours in length, with two day squads and two overnight squads. The primary responsibilities of officers assigned to the Patrol squads

include responding to and investigating calls for law enforcement service and conducting proactive criminal and traffic law enforcement. The Traffic Unit was staffed by one Sergeant and two Traffic Officers. The primary responsibilities of the officers assigned to the Traffic Unit include the investigation of motor vehicle collisions and the proactive enforcement of traffic laws. Traffic Unit officers receive advanced training, including accident reconstruction and motorcycle operation.

Each member maintains a high level of selfdiscipline and personal appearance and fitness. Activities in which the Color Guard was utilized:

06/07/15 – Flag presentation for Raytown Night at the Royals-Kaufman Stadium 12/19/15 – Flag presentation for the Raytown Police Department Annual Awards Ceremony

COLOR GUARD The Color Guard Unit represents the Raytown Police Department during special formal events, including ceremonies with flag presentations, parades, civil ceremonies, and funerals. The Color Guard Unit was comprised of eight officers, most of who still serve, or have served, in the military. Color Guard Unit members’ training includes performing marching drills and ceremony protocol.

PROFESSIONALISM, TRUST, INTEGRITY | 2015 ANNUAL REPORT

15


S N O I T A G I INVEST The Criminal Investigations Unit has eight Detectives and two Sergeants. These Detectives are responsible for investigating “property” and “persons” crimes. Six Detectives are General Assignment Detectives, one Detective is assigned to Domestic Violence cases and the other is the Juvenile Detective. General Assignment Detectives are responsible for the investigation of a wide variety of crime ranging from larceny to homicide. The Domestic Violence Detective is responsible for investigating crimes against family members and acting as a liaison with domestic violence support groups. The Juvenile Detective is responsible for investigating all crimes involving juveniles, working with the Raytown School District, and conducting the Raytown Youth Court.

Detectives are responsible for investigating a case and following through to conviction, if possible. They are responsible for crime scene investigations, collecting and processing evidence, and conducting interviews and interrogations. Raytown Detectives complete the same crime scene training that Kansas City Police Crime Scene Technicians do. 16

A variety of factors determine when a case is assigned to an investigator, including the presence of significant physical evidence, witnesses, or a known offender.

RAYTOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT

WE WROTE A TOTAL OF 3,386 INCIDENT REPORTS IN 2015. NOT ALL REPORTS DOCUMENT CRIMINAL ACTIVITY; SOME ARE NON-CRIMINAL IN NATURE SUCH AS CIVIL ISSUES, MEDICAL, MENTAL HEALTH, OR JUVENILE ACTIVITY. ROUGHLY 1/3RD OF ALL INCIDENT REPORTS WERE ASSIGNED TO A DETECTIVE FOR FURTHER INVESTIGATION.


FINGERPRINT IDENTIFICATION One of the most recognized forms of positive identification available to law enforcement is the inked fingerprint. Fingerprints remain constant throughout a person’s life and are accepted by the courts throughout the country as positive identification. While a layman is unable to accurately identify an individual by a fingerprint impression, the identification can be made by a trained fingerprint examiner. We currently have one Certified Fingerprint Examiner and three additional employees who are in the certification process.

For the purpose of identification an unknown fingerprint must be compared with a known fingerprint. Latent lifts can be fingerprints, palm prints, and/or partials of either type that are recovered from a crime scene. In order to gain a positive ID from a finger, it cannot be smudged or distorted, which unfortunately means that many latent prints don’t meet the necessary quality requirements. Prints that do fit the standards can be compared through the Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) to obtain a match.

2015 Activity 150 latent lifts 6 comparison requests 10 people compared

information with surrounding agencies. Criminals don’t stop at the city limits, and with so many separate police departments and sheriff’s offices in the greater Kansas City metro area, cooperation between jurisdictions is incredibly important.

1 positive identification

CRIME ANALYSIS The Raytown Police Department has employed a full-time civilian Crime Analyst since 2010. The Crime Analyst is part of the Investigations Division, but provides support to all administrative and operational units within the department. The main goal of crime analysis is to help the department become more effective through better information. The Analyst’s duties include analyzing and summarizing data, disseminating crime and intelligence data, and identifying crime series and patterns. This can help other police units solve crimes, find and apprehend offenders, detect and solve community problems, educate the public, optimize internal operations, and plan for future resource needs. Another integral job of the Analyst is to share crime

The Crime Analyst is also responsible for maintaining departmental statistical information. This information is used to measure the effectiveness of policing efforts as well as allocate resources.

Lastly, the Crime Analyst is responsible for our public crime map, which is available at www.raidsonline.com. The department partnered with Bair Analytics, Inc. in 2010 to bring this public service to all Raytown residents. The map, which is a completely free service, is updated daily with new incident reports. Citizens can set up free email alerts for any address in Raytown to be automatically notified of any crimes reported within a set distance of that address. This is a great way for residents to keep up to date with what’s going on in their neighborhood.

PROFESSIONALISM, TRUST, INTEGRITY | 2015 ANNUAL REPORT

17


ES C I V R E S Y T I N U M OM

C

SAFETY FAIR The Raytown Police Department hosted the Raytown Police Safety Fair event on Saturday, June 27, 2015 at Kenagy Park. This event, held formerly under the name of National Night Out, was attended by approximately 250 people from the Raytown community. The Raytown Police Safety Fair generated support for, and participation in, local anti-crime efforts, as well as strengthened neighborhood spirit and police-community partnerships. The day was dedicated to crime prevention and awareness within the community. The Safety Fair allowed the public to get an up-close and personal look at Police Cars, Fire Trucks, Ambulances, the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) trailer, and Public Works trucks.

18

CITIZEN’S POLICE ACADEMY The Raytown Police Department hosted an eight-week Citizen’s Police Academy in Fall 2015, which had 16 citizens in attendance. This session of the Academy was planned by volunteers in the Volunteers in Police Service (VIPS) program. The Raytown Citizen’s Police Academy, offered since 2012, offers an indepth look into Raytown’s law enforcement operations. The Citizen’s Academy has proven to be very popular with area citizens, who have filled classes to capacity. Class subjects included, but were not limited to, Traffic Operations, Gangs and Narcotics, and the Fire Arms Training Simulator (FATS). A two-hour Traffic Stop role-playing module was added to the Raytown Citizen’s Academy in Fall 2015. Graduates of academies are encouraged to volunteer at the Department after the academies are over, helping with daily Department tasks, special events and other efforts by the Department to enhance public safety.

RAYTOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT

H.E.A.R. H.E.A.R. is the Health Emergency Assistance Registry, with the purpose of providing assistance to at-risk residents, who are registered in the program, during times of weather emergencies (including extreme temperatures, heat or cold, and storms.) The service is designed for the disabled, elderly and frail, or those relying on a health device powered by electricity.

51 RESIDENCES IN RAYTOWN PARTICIPATE IN THE H.E.A.R. PROGRAM. THE PROGRAM WAS ACTIVATED ONE TIME IN 2015 DUE TO SEVERE WEATHER.


CRIME FREE LIFESTYLES The Crime Free Lifestyles program is similar to a “block watch” or “neighborhood watch” program, but is tailored to individuals who want to make a commitment to keep themselves and their neighborhoods as crime free as possible. The program includes training on crime recognition and prevention as well as a security inspection of the home. The program also provides presentations to neighborhood groups, Homeowners Association groups, etc., who wish to make their area of the community safer. There are four officers qualified to administer the program.

THE PROGRAM INCLUDES TRAINING ON CRIME RECOGNITION AND PREVENTION... RIDE-ALONGS

The Ride-Along Program enables the general public to observe first-hand what officers encounter during a normal tour of duty. The Police Department encourages its citizens to participate in this program to enable them to

get a better feel for the services provided to the community. Ride-Alongs are available for both daytime and evening hours. To qualify for the program, the ride-along applicant must be at least 18 years of age or have the written approval of their legal guardian if 14 to 17 years of age.

THERE WERE 76 RIDEALONGS IN 2015.

churches, or other organizations. The topics requested range from general safety to recognizing and deterring financial crimes.

THERE WERE 57 TOURS AND SPEAKER EVENTS IN 2015.

TOURS AND SPEAKER REQUESTS The Raytown Police Department hosts many tours of the Department for various groups including youth groups, students, and Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts. The tours are usually led by an officer who discusses the various aspects of the Department while viewing the areas and equipment of the Department. The officer also answers a variety of questions along the way, including why we do things the way we do, and employment questions from someone that may have an interest in a law enforcement career. The Department accepts speaker requests for an officer to speak to a group at various locations, such as schools, businesses,

For more information, contact the Community Services Unit at csu@raytownpolice.org, or 816-737-6018, for availability and details.

PROFESSIONALISM, TRUST, INTEGRITY | 2015 ANNUAL REPORT

19


E S N O P S E R L A I C E P S Training included SWAT-specific firearms SWAT

The SWAT (Special Weapons and Tactics) team provides an advanced, tactical response to violent barricades, high risk warrant service, and hostage incidents. Such tactical responses are critical to the law enforcement goals of protecting innocent lives and securing property. The SWAT program trains its members in the use of special weapons, specialized equipment and tactics, which helps prepare them to resolve special situations.

The SWAT team was comprised of 13 volunteer members in 2015. The SWAT team assignment is a secondary assignment, with all members having a primary assignment elsewhere, including Patrol and Investigations. Prospective team members must undergo rigorous physical fitness testing and demonstrate superior firearms proficiency. All team members must maintain physical fitness and firearms proficiency standards while assigned to the SWAT team. SWAT team members are always subject to being “called out” to quickly respond to emergencies. SWAT Training generally occurred twice each month. 20

training days, during which the members conducted advanced level rifle and handgun training and qualifications. The team also conducted training at several venues in the region. The SWAT team was deployed on two barricades in 2015 and remains prepared to serve high-risk search warrants related to narcotics, wanted persons, and other crimes, with little notice.

CRISIS INTERVENTION The goal of the Crisis Intervention Team is to promptly respond to potentially dangerous emergencies involving people that are exhibiting serious psychiatric conditions or crises. All CIT officers complete a fortyhour basic CIT class, with some completing Advanced CIT, Youth CIT, or CIT in regard to Veterans.

RAYTOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT

The CIT officers strive to provide appropriate response and service referral, instead of criminal incarceration, which is often ineffective and does little to help the individual.

THERE ARE CURRENTLY 9 CIT OFFICERS, WHO ARE ALL ASSIGNED TO THE PATROL DIVISION. CRISIS NEGOTIATION

The Crisis Negotiations Team (CNT) is a volunteer program consisting of a Team Leader and 5 members. The team’s primary responsibility is providing negotiations for hostage or barricade situations. Such negotiation responses are critical to the law enforcement goal of resolving potentially lethal encounters peacefully without injury or death to hostages, bystanders, officers or the subject. Members of the CNT have been screened through a selection process, including successfully completing at least one vetted 40 hour training program. The CNT also conducts team training once a month and trains with other area teams.


G N I N I A R T FIELD TRAINING PROGRAM The Field Training Program is designed to train new recruit officers. Each recruit works side-by-side with a Field Training Officer (FTO) during the program. The training program consists of at least 14 weeks of intensive on-the-job training and daily performance evaluations. Recruit officers are required to meet specific performance standards in over 30 performance categories before being recommended for patrol duty. These categories include proficiency in policies, procedures, ordinances and statutes, report writing, emergency vehicle operation, and relationships with citizens they come into contact with. After successful completion of the training program, each recruit officer is assigned to a patrol squad. Training is conducted and staffed by Field Training Officers on all shifts of the Patrol Division. Field Training Officers have one of the most important jobs within the police department. Field Training Officers must be experienced and demonstrate

strong communication skills, a professional demeanor, and enthusiasm.

Four recruit officers successfully completed the Field Training Program in 2015. One patrol officer was added to the Field Training Officer staff, bringing the total number of Field Training Officers to seven.

everyone involved, including the attacker or resisting individual.

The Defensive Tactics Unit consists of five instructors who facilitate many training sessions throughout the year for police officers and some civilian employees. The training includes “empty hand” control and defensive tactics, techniques in which only the hands or feet are used. Other training included the use of a baton, handcuffs, electronic control weapons, Oleoresin Capsicum (“pepper”) spray, and Less than Lethal launchers. The discussion of applicable Department policy and case law, relevant to these tactics, is also included in the training. Many tactics and defensive weapon systems require annual recertification, which is accomplished during the training sessions.

PHYSICAL FITNESS UNIT

DEFENSIVE TACTICS The Defensive Tactics Unit trains employees in techniques to protect the public, and the employees themselves, from attack, and to prevent individuals from escaping custody, all while trying to minimizing the injury to

The Physical Fitness Unit promotes fitness and healthier living, which may also minimize work-related injuries and reduce the use of sick time. There are five specially trained members of the unit who administer the program. The unit offers instruction of physical training and nutrition, and other recommendations, tailored to meet the employees’ individual health and fitness goals.

PROFESSIONALISM, TRUST, INTEGRITY | 2015 ANNUAL REPORT

21


CERT COMMUNITY EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM The Raytown CERT Program teaches volunteer citizens disaster preparedness for hazards that may impact the area in which they live. The training includes basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations. In 2015, there were 25 CERT members in Raytown. Training classes included utility safety and cribbing (extraction techniques to free victims that may be pinned or trapped by objects). In the summer of 2015, some of the Raytown CERT members participated in the CERT Rodeo. The CERT Rodeo was a chance for teams across the metropolitan area to network, train, and practice their skills. Throughout 2015, Raytown CERT members assisted the Traffic Unit with traffic management at the Easter Parade, high school graduations, Pumpkins on Parade event, and the Mayor’s Christmas Tree Lighting. CERT team members manned a booth at the Raytown Safety Fair, Raytown Ham (Radio) Fest and the Raytown Health Fair to promote the team and its involvement in the community.

For more details, or if interested in joining CERT, contact Captain Rogers at rogersm@raytownpolice.org, or 816-737-6103. 22

RAYTOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT


N O I T A M R O F N I C I L B PU PIO The Public Information Unit (PIU) gathers, prepares, and disseminates timely and accurate information on matters of public safety and interest, in a way that does not hamper police operations or harm individual personal rights.

the public by reporting the information to the media, including TV, radio, and print media. The Raytown Police Department also uses social media and online tools to deliver the information directly to the public. Those same tools allow the public to ask questions, address concerns, and give feedback. Incidents and events that Raytown PIO’s have reported included Homicide and other crimes, motor vehicle crashes, traffic advisories, safety tips, community events, and other subjects of interest to our community.

ANNUAL REPORT

The Public Information Unit was comprised of a Commander, eight Public Information Officers, two website and annual report developers, and two photographers. The PIU was a voluntary assignment, secondary to each members’ primary duty assignment. The Public Information Officers (PIO) participate in a rotating callout schedule to respond to critical incident scenes, gather information, then inform

The Public Information Unit recognized the need to give Raytown community stakeholders, including residents, local businesses, and City leaders, an annual report, that gave an overall view of the Police Department’s activities and body of work. Instead of a report of only statistics and other data, the comprehensive report includes information on the many programs, divisions, and units within the Department. In the spring of 2015, the first Annual Report in some time was produced and presented by Chief James B. Lynch to City leaders.

SOCIAL MEDIA The Public Information Unit continues to evaluate emerging technology and social media resources, and uses those tools, along with traditional media, to broadcast information to the community. Social media has become a way of life for many Americans and the Raytown Police Department is using the media to better serve, inform, and communicate with the public. The Public Information Unit administers all department social media resources. The social media resources used to reach the community include:

Facebook

Twitter

Wordpress

The public, especially the citizens that live and work in Raytown, is invited to use these resources to connect with the Raytown Police, make suggestions, enhance communication and stay informed of news, information, and events, including in times of emergency.

PROFESSIONALISM, TRUST, INTEGRITY | 2015 ANNUAL REPORT

23


ON I T A R T S I ADMIN RECORDS The Records Unit is primarily responsible for receiving, processing and retaining a wide variety of police reports and department records, in accordance with applicable laws. The Records Unit, which is staffed by a Supervisor and a Records Clerk, receives and processes requests for police records. Those records include written, electronic, and digital media.

2015 RECORDS ACTIVITY

• DOCUMENTS FILED-4,960 • REPORTS TO MICROFILM-3,541 • INCIDENT REPORTS-3,386 • REPORT REQUESTS-1,200 • ACCIDENT REPORTS-814 • REPORT REQUESTS (LE AGENCIES)-700 • RECORDS CHECKS (RECRUITERS, FBI NICS, OTHER AGENCIES)-250 • NEW EMPLOYEE PERSONNEL FILES-14

24

COMMUNICATIONS

The Communications Unit had a busy 2015. Currently the unit is staffed by four fulltime employees with two in training. There are two open positions that will be filled during 2016. Communications lost two employees with a combined 21 years of experience during 2015 as they left to pursue other employment. The average length of employment for a dispatcher is between five to seven years. During 2015 Director of Communications James Brafford attended the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children’s Chief Executive Seminar in Washington, DC which provided information related to ensuring that when a child goes missing all of the necessary information is obtained, entered, and distributed so the child can be found quickly. Mr. Brafford was also elected to his second term as secretary of the Missouri Association of Public-Safety Communications Officials.

3 wireline 9-1-1 lines, 3 wireless 9-1-1 lines, and when a person walks into the lobby of the department.

More and more people are moving away from having a landline in their homes. The number of wireless and VOIP 9-1-1 calls are increasing every year. As more people use these innovations for contacting 9-1-1 it is very important that the citizens understand the location provided by cellular and VOIP is not reliable when trying to provide emergency assistance to the caller. Everyone should be prepared to provide their location, what the emergency is, and how to contact them when dialing 9-1-1 for assistance.

The Communications 911 Lines-Total Center is the public safety answering point for the City of 911-Wireless Raytown. The requests from 911-VOIP citizens are received through 3 911-Landline administrative telephone lines, Administrative

RAYTOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT

Call Source


FLEET The Raytown Police Department currently has 15 marked patrol units, two motorcycles, and 20 unmarked units. During the fiscal year of 2015, we purchased four Ford Police Interceptor Utilities to replace four Ford Crown Victoria Patrol Units that reached the end of their life cycle. The Police Department works with the Raytown Public Works Garage to ensure that our vehicles are upfitted, inspected, maintained, and repaired on a regular basis.

IN 2015, RAYTOWN OFFICERS DROVE APPROXIMATELY 490,025 MILES. THAT’S ENOUGH MILES TO CIRCLE THE GLOBE ALMOST TWENTY TIMES!

X 19.67

Over the course of the year, there were six police vehicles that were involved in crashes. Five were able to be repaired while one was totaled and replaced with a new Ford Police Interceptor.

Three of the accidents were not our fault – two officers were hit by drunk drivers and one officer was backed into by a citizen backing out of a driveway. Three accidents were our fault – two officers ran into each other responding to a shooting call (one report) and two officers ran their patrol car into a ditch on separate occasions.

ONLY THREE ATFAULT ACCIDENTS OCCURRED IN NEARLY 500,000 MILES DRIVEN.

RAYTOWN POLICE ARCHIVED PHOTO: 1965 PATROL CAR

RAYTOWN POLICE ARCHIVED PHOTO: 1974 PATROL CAR

RAYTOWN POLICE ARCHIVED PHOTO: 1998 PATROL CAR

RAYTOWN POLICE ARCHIVED PHOTO: 2015 PATROL CAR PROFESSIONALISM, TRUST, INTEGRITY | 2015 ANNUAL REPORT

25


S D R A D N A PROF. ST The Professional Standards Unit (PSU) is responsible for hiring highly motivated men and women who enjoy working with the public and delivering the highest level of professional service, investigating complaints against Department employees, and maintaining training records and standards to ensure the officers receive the proper training.

training instructors, curriculum, and training centers. All licensed peace officers and reserve officers must successfully complete continuing education requirements.

IN 2015, THE CHIEF HIRED A TOTAL OF 14 INDIVIDUALS:

Members of the Professional Standards Unit along with members of the Patrol Division have been actively recruiting for the positions of Police Officer, Dispatcher, and Detention Technician. Some of the recruiting efforts consist of conducting recruitment presentations at local colleges and attending career fairs, as well as attending minority recruitment opportunities.

The Professional Standards Unit ensures that all commissioned officers successfully meet the training requirements set forth by the Department of Public Safety’s Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) Program. The POST program is a regulatory agency that is responsible for the licensure of peace officers, reserve peace officers, basic 26

RAYTOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT

10 OFFICERS (2 NO LONGER WITH US) 2 DISPATCHERS

1 OFFICE MANAGER 1 COMMUNITY SERVICES DIRECTOR

AT THE CONCLUSION OF 2015, ALL OFFICERS MET OR EXCEEDED POST REQUIREMENTS.


S R I A F F A TERNAL

THE INNER RING DISPLAYS THE ALLEGATION CATEGORIES WHILE THE OUTER RING DISPLAYS THE INVESTIGATION RESULTS.

e

on Ex ne

rat ed

Still Ope n (1

)

Ha ra

ilure (1)

Malfe

Policy Failure (1)

ss me n

asan

(4)

Policy F a

ce (2

)

)

Negligence (1)

Un b Co ecom nd uct ing (2)

Civil Rights (1 ) Dere lictio n (1)

Unfounded (1)

Exon

Un

fou

nd ed

(1)

Exonerated (3)

ner Exo

PROFESSIONALISM, TRUST, INTEGRITY | 2015 ANNUAL REPORT

(3)

ate d

(1)

nd ed

ted e ra

fou

Sustained (2)

16 complaints encompassed 31 allegations against 20 individual members and one entire unit.

on Ex

Un

) (8

erat ed (1 )

(4)

4) d(

sa ea f n

e nc

ty es on

ate

) (6

sh Di

er

No

t (1

ry ct o ( 4 ) a f s e ti sa nc Un rma rfo Pe

on Ex

d te ra

(1)

Racial Bias (3)

Exo

ss ne de Ru

The Internal Affairs Special Unit reports directly to the Chief of Police.

(4)

Internal Affairs personnel include case officers and Computerized Voice Stress Analysis (CVSA) Examiners. Case officers are recruited from those members whose work in the Criminal Investigations Unit has shown proven skills in interview/interrogation and detailed case management. Special training is required of all Unit members, beginning with attendance at the Institute for Law Enforcement Administration at the Center for American and International Law where they are introduced to courses specific to internal affairs, ethics, and professional standards.

ted e ra

The Internal Affairs (IA) Unit is responsible for maintaining records of all of the investigations conducted into complaints against the members of the Department. Complaints ranging from minor to severe are all investigated either by supervisory staff, or in the most serious cases, by members of the Internal Affairs Unit.

on Ex

IN

27

(1)


VEHICLE PURSUITS All vehicle pursuits must be recorded in an Incident Report, whether or not the suspect was apprehended. 71 total vehicular pursuits were initiated in 2015:

99 53 24 19 3 0

23,103 CALLS FOR SERVICE

4,092 CAR OR PEDESTRIAN CHECKS

Top speed

2,437 ARRESTS MADE

Pursuits terminated by officer or supervisor Arrests made

45 SUBJECTS WHO RESISTED ARREST

Felony offenders

OF THESE 45 SUBJECTS, 22 WERE INTOXICATED AND 2 WERE EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED

Successful Stop Stick deployments Officers or Innocent Civilians injured

CONTROL METHODS USED BY OFFICERS

USE OF FORCE

Members that are required to apply force to another person in the execution of their duties complete separate reports describing the incident and the force used. These reports are used to improve training and performance. Each Use of Force incident is investigated by a supervisor. The Professional Standards Unit is responsible for training and thus also collects the data from these reports. 28

CONTROL HOLDS/TAKEDOWNS (32)

RAYTOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT

STRIKES TASER (6) (7)

FIVE OFFICERS WERE INJURED DURING USE OF FORCE INCIDENTS.

TYPES OF RESISTANCE ENCOUNTERED ACTIVE RESISTANCE (34)

ACTIVE AGGRESSION (11)

FIFTEEN SUBJECTS WERE INJURED DURING USE OF FORCE INCIDENTS.


N O I T N E T E D / Y T R E P PRO SUPPLY & EVIDENCE The Property and Supply Unit is responsible for both recovered property and evidence processing and retention, and supplies for the Police Department. The Property and Supply Unit is currently staffed by one fulltime employee and one part-time employee. The Unit is responsible for the safety and integrity of the property that is recovered daily by officers and detectives. Each piece of property that comes into the Unit must be checked in, entered into the computer system, packaged into the correct storage container, put away in its correct location, and then maintained while still needed for the case. The Unit maintains the “chain of custody” of recovered property and returns or disposes property once the case officer determines they can do so. The Property & Supply Unit also provides a centralized system for the purchasing and distribution of supplies for the Police Department in order to take advantage of collective purchasing power.

are transferred to our contracted holding facility, the Johnson County Missouri Jail.

Throughout 2015, officers and detectives collected a total of 2,080 new items of property and evidence. This included the seizure of 76 firearms, 268 drug items (cocaine, heroin, K2, marijuana, meth, PCP, pills, or prescription medication). The Property & Supply Unit was able to continue the goal in 2015 of disposing one item for each one item taken in, and had disposed of 5,814 items, ending the year with nearly 13,700 items total in storage. Seized Items

268 Drug Items

(cocaine, heroin, K2, marijuana, meth, PCP, pills, or Rx meds)

76 Firearms

DETENTION The Raytown Detention Unit is a short-term holding facility with 12 beds in five cells. The unit is staffed by seven full-time Detention Technicians and one Supervisor and is manned 24/7/365. Inmates are held only long enough for them to post bond or, in the case of 24-hour investigative holds, until the investigator assigned to their case completes the investigation. Inmates with Raytown charges, who are unable to post their bond,

The Unit’s primary assignment is the processing and security of inmates arrested by members of the Raytown Police Department. This involves completing all the necessary paperwork, obtaining photographs and fingerprints, and inventorying all property arriving with the inmate. They also process bonds and distribute the arrest information to the proper court jurisdictions. In addition to all this, detention staff also take criminal incident reports from citizens and investigate minor traffic crashes, provide fingerprint services for Raytown residents, and data entry for traffic citations and general ordinance summonses. In 2015, the Detention Unit staff processed 2,433 bookings without injury to Unit personnel and processed over 4,200 traffic citations and General Ordinance Summons for the Municipal Court.

Bookings by Residency

Raytown Residents 29% Non-Raytown Residents 71%

PROFESSIONALISM, TRUST, INTEGRITY | 2015 ANNUAL REPORT

29


AWARDS The Awards, Uniform, and Standards Unit organized the Annual Awards Ceremony on December 19, 2015, at the First Baptist Church in Raytown. This year’s ceremony was attended by Police Officers and their families, as well as community leaders. Crime Analyst Kyle Stoker and Chief Jim Lynch acted as the emcees. Awards are given for tenure, good conduct, safe driving, military service, advanced education, and service in special units, among other things.

This year, two certificates of merit were awarded. The first was awarded to Officer Joe Holt for his outstanding productivity in the area of drunk driving enforcement for the previous year. Ofc. Holt was also recognized by Mothers Against Drunk Driving for his performance. The second certificate of merit was awarded to the Annual Report Project Group: Major Theodore Bowman, Detention Technician Amber Bradley, Officer Brett Clear, Sergeant Dyon Harper, Crime Analyst Kyle Stoker, and Records Technician Loutreces Thurman.

AWARD

NUMBER OF RECIPIENTS

Education

1

Military Service

1

Good Conduct* Safe Driving* Special Unit

12 7

12

*AWARDED IN FIVE YEAR INCREMENTS

DEPARTMENT LENGTH OF SERVICE

Years

Chief

Major

0 to 4 5 to 9 10 to 14

15 to 19

20 to 24 25 to 30 30+ Total 30

Captain

Sergeant Corporal

2 1 1

2 2

1 1

4

RAYTOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT

4

2

1 2

9

Master Patrol Officer

3

3

2

2

Officer/ Reserve Officer

Detective

Civlians

Total

18 5 3

1 3 3

6 6 3

25 17 13

1

0 1 2 30

0

0 1 0 8

2

0 0 2 19

7

2 7 7 78


CIVILIAN OF THE YEAR Records Supervisor Debbie Pisciotta was awarded Civilian of the Year for 2015 in recognition of her almost 40 years of service to the city. Debbie started working parttime for the City of Raytown in April of 1976 as a Clerk for the Health Department. In July of 1976, Debbie stared working for the Police Department as a Typing Clerk. Debbie has performed various duties in the Department over the last 39 years and has seen many changes in the Department and Staff; she has worked for 5 Police Chiefs and 7 different Mayors. Debbie has continuously been an asset to the Department and the Administration Division, from typing police reports to transcribing recordings, completing personnel paper work to payroll, Debbie has done it all. Her knowledge and experience will be irreplaceable.

RESERVE OFFICER OF THE YEAR Over the course of 2015, Officer Melvin Norrington exerted himself above and beyond what would normally be expected of a Raytown Police Reserve Officer. He covered countless manpower shortages and, in fact, made a commitment to the department to provide shift coverage for patrol crews nearly every weekend. P.O. Norrington showed outstanding resolve in his commitment to the department and his fellow officers, all of this while balancing his full-time employment and his family life. Additionally, P.O. Norrington is a permanent fixture at all department mandated and optional training courses and he is extremely productive during the shifts he covers.

OFFICER OF THE YEAR Over the course of 2015, Corporal Nate Brand has distinguished himself in several areas.

Corporal Brand assisted in planning and executing the ambush force-on-force training which was attended by all patrol officers and conducted in-service training in numerous subjects in the defensive tactics discipline, including planning and conducting defensive tactics training for the security staff of the First Baptist Church at their request. Corporal Brand served as a field training officer for several recruits through various phases of the program and also assisted in the development of a training program for entrant officers which consisted of multiple tactics-based classes, including building search and high risk vehicle stops, intended to be taught to new officers before their entry into the field training program.

PROFESSIONALISM, TRUST, INTEGRITY | 2015 ANNUAL REPORT

31


CREDITS

DISCLAIMER

PHOTOGRAPH CREDITS TO: • DETENTION TECHNICIAN AMBER BRADLEY • RECORDS SUPERVISOR LOUTRECES THURMAN

WRITING CREDITS TO: • MAJOR THEODORE BOWMAN • SERGEANT DYON HARPER

GRAPHIC DESIGN CREDITS TO: • CRIME ANALYST KYLE STOKER

THANKS TO OUR EDITORS: • • • • •

DEBORAH HARPER TODD HEMBREE CHERI HENNIG LINDA STOKER MICHELLE WILLIAMS

CONNECT WITH US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: HTTPS://TWITTER.COM/RAYTOWNPD

32

When many people think of crime stats, they associate the term with media reports or “Top Ten Dangerous Cities” type-lists that are almost always based on the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) system. This system, which was originally established in 1930, has very complex rules about which crimes are reported and how they are counted. Although they recently expanded the definition of rape in 2013, overall the system hasn’t changed much in its 85-year lifespan.

For a variety of reasons, we have decided not to use UCR “rules” for the crime stats we’re reporting here. Instead, we’re simply reporting how many times each crime occurred. We’re also not reporting statistics for every crime type, as there are too many to list. We’ve chosen to highlight those crime types that most citizens are interested in when they contact us about crime in our city. The end result is a more accurate, simple, and comprehensive view of crime in our city. The reports were created using data from our records management (RMS) and computer aided dispatch (CAD) systems. There were some limitations in gathering and analyzing data. Missing information (lack of data entry), miscoded information (wrong call types), and typographical mistakes all contribute to errors in information. The statistics in this report represent the best effort to report activity within the Raytown Police Department, with the understanding that there is a small margin of error to the data.

HTTPS://PIORPD.WORDPRESS.COM/

RAYTOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT

HTTPS://WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/RAYTOWNPOLICE/


t n e m t r ice Depa

l o P n w o Rayt 2

T R O P E R L A U N N A 015

Profile for Raytown Police Department

Raytown Police 2015 Annual Report  

The 2015 Raytown Police Annual Report is out! The report provides an all-encompassing view of the department, including crime statistics, c...

Raytown Police 2015 Annual Report  

The 2015 Raytown Police Annual Report is out! The report provides an all-encompassing view of the department, including crime statistics, c...

Profile for raytownpd
Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded