Page 1

Breaking News: Lucid Motors. . . . . . 34

Winter Visitor Guide 2017. . . . . . . . . . 67

Home & Garden Special Section. . . 102

$4.95 Complimentary • Winter 2017

ARIZONA CIT Y • C A SA GR ANDE • COOLIDGE • ELOY • FLORENCE • MARICOPA


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Dr. Davis & his staff deliver friendly and personal service using the latest in dental technology.

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Breaking News: Lucid Motors . . . . . 34

Winter Visitor Guide 2017 . . . . . . . . . 65

Home & Garden Special Section . . 102

Contents

Winter 2017

THE HOME & GARDEN EDITION Features:

$4.95 Complimentary • Winter 2017

The LIVING Interview: Harlyn Griffiths

18

The Future of Pinal County

34

2017 Winter Visitor Guide

67

ARIZONA CIT Y • C A SA GR ANDE • COOLIDGE • ELOY • FLORENCE • MARICOPA

About the Cover: Lucid Motors prototype vehicle at Casa Grande City Hall. Photography by Tina Cates, Elegance N Images Photography.

Special Home & Garden Section

Economy & Local Business

Health, Wealth & Education

Travel, Dining & Entertainment

Economic Development, the Long Game. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Out & About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

Curry of Cultures. . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

Preventing Falls & Treating Orthopedic Injuries . . . . . . . . . . 46

Casa Grande Ranks Top 25 Most Giving Cities . . . . . . . . . . 122

Dying without a Will or Trust . . 26

Accident does not Damage the Spirit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

International Arts Comes to the Coolidge Performing Arts Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

Giving Starts at Home . . . . . . . 31

No Man is an Island. . . . . . . . . . 54

Dog is my Co-Pilot. . . . . . . . . . 126

Zonta Club to Celebrate 70 Years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

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HOME & GARDEN THE THE HOME HOME EDITION && GARDEN GARDEN • WINTER EDITION EDITION 2017


dedicated personal injury representation Free Consultation • Se Habla Español • No Recovery, No Fee

helping pinal county’s injured and their families

since 1972.

420 West Casa Grande Lakes Boulevard North Casa Grande, Arizona 85122

520.836.8002 www.coleandleal.com

“Why Cole & Leal?” • You'll talk to your lawyer, not a staffer • We're local, not an out-of-town storefront • We're not afraid of tough cases • Millions recovered on behalf of Pinal County residents • We're experienced trial lawyers and don't always "settle"


Letter from the Editor

PINAL COUNTY: THE NEW “MOTOR CAPITAL” OF ARIZONA?

I Bea Lueck

always write the letter from the editor last, after I've had a chance to read the rest of the editorial. While I was writing, I saw this meme on Facebook (Yes, I know. I was either multi-tasking or goofing off, depending on your definition of “writing!”) But I’m happy I found it, because I believe this is the perfect way to begin 2017 – and every day going forward.

7 Cardinal Rules for Life 1. Make peace with your past, so it won't disturb your present. 2. What other people think of you is none of your business. 3. Time heals almost everything. Give it time. 4. No one is in charge of your happiness – except you. 5. Don't compare your life to others and don't judge them. You have no idea what their journey is all about. 6. Stop thinking too much. It's alright not to know the answers. They will come to you when you least expect it. 7. Smile. You don't own all the problems in the world.

I love our special sections! They allow us to extend our coverage to areas not normally covered in the magazine. I learn something new each edition and I hope you do as well. If you have an idea for an article or section, please reach out to me and brainstorm! Have you checked out our Out & About pages? (42 - 45) These are photos that our readers and followers have submitted. We had over 600 submissions for Halloween, published in November. And the Electric Light Parade /Christmas decorations theme was just as popular for this edition. I wish we had room to print all of them! This edition has not one, not two, but THREE special sections. In this edition you will find a report on several new business ventures announced in Pinal County. Our cover image is the prototype car unveiled by Lucid Motors in Casa Grande last month. Lucid has announced a manufacturing facility to be built in Casa Grande. Earlier in the year, Apex Motors and Atessa announced ventures in Casa Grande and Maricopa. Just think, soon Pinal County could be the new “motor capital” of Arizona!

You will also find timely information and tips in our Home & Garden section. Raised bed gardening has become very popular. Check out what vegetables you should be planting right now in the article on page 108. The largest section is our 2017 Winter Visitor Guide, which is part of this edition and also a stand-alone 32page magazine. Winter Visitors make up a huge market segment in Pinal County each year. Their impact is significant, both financially and in many other ways, such as volunteerism. Winter Visitors provide thousands of volunteer man-hours each year to a number of nonprofits and other organizations that benefit the community at large. I'm sure they don't hear this enough, but Winter Visitors – we THANK YOU for coming to our region each year! Coming out in March is our Medical, Health & Wellness edition. You will find helpful articles on a variety of subjects ranging from diet and exercise to diabetes management and heart health. Until then - ENJOY!

–Bea

It’s the Year of the Rooster - so let’s crow!

6

OR LI GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR LIV VING ING • EDITOR L E T TER

HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


Horse Property

6505 W. Mare Avenue, Coolidge $495,000 3 BR 3.5 BA DEN/OFFICE | 3,216 SF | 1.02 ACRE HORSE PROPERTY | RV GARAGE • Spectacular custom home near Central Arizona College • Massive custom iron double entry doors • Open concept floor plan with 12 foot ceilings and fireplace in living room • Formal dining room with coffered ceiling • Gourmet kitchen with top of the line appliances and dry bar • Alder cabinets, doors and moldings throughout • Luxurious master suite has a two-way fireplace, coffered ceiling & separate exit • Pre-wired for surround sound, internet and satellite services • A whole house water filtration system • Over height three car garage with built-ins • 30’ by 45’ RV garage with a 16’ insulated door, 220, built-ins, a full bath, a/c and pre-wired for satellite

GEORGIA F. SCHAEFFER ASSOCIATE BROKER, REALTOR , GRI, ABR, CDPE, SRES, SFR ®

520.560.3333 | georgias@coldwellbanker.com

DAWN M. ZIMBELMAN REALTOR , CDPE, ABR, SRES ®

520.431.2875 | dawnz@coldwellbanker.com 520.423.8250 | ROXsells.com ©2016 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Coldwell Banker and the Coldwell Banker Logo are registered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.


VOICES PUBLISHER Elaine Earle, CPA EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Bea Lueck MANAGING EDITOR Katie Mayer CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Harold Kitching Donna McBride Jim Rhodes ADVERTISING EXECUTIVES Debbie Cortez Samantha Saldate CREATIVE DIRECTOR/GRAPHIC DESIGN Tim Clarke GRAPHIC DESIGN Jake Pagano Tad Smith CHIEF OF OPERATIONS & FINANCE Elaine Earle, CPA ADVERTISING INQUIRIES info@roxco.com COMMENTS & IDEAS editor@roxco.com CALENDAR INQUIRES calendar@roxco.com

Craig McFarland

Born and raised in California, Mayor McFarland has lived in Casa Grande since 2005. He is a graduate of California State University of Fresno, and retired from Golden Eagle Distributors in January 2015 as VP of Sales after a ten year run with the company, and 36 total years in beverage business sales management, marketing, and operations. McFarland began his first term as Mayor in December 2016.

Helen Neuharth

Helen was hired as the President/CEO of the Greater Casa Grande Chamber of Commerce in August 1991 and is a graduate of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Institute for Organizational Management from Boulder, Colorado. Helen is an active member of the Arizona Chamber Executives.

Donna McBride

Donna McBride is the Program Administrator/Public Information Officer and Supervisor for the CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocate) Unit for Pinal County Juvenile Court . McBride is actively involved as a Board Member for Casa Grande Alliance, Parks and Recreation Advisory Board, BlackBox Foundation, Mayor’s Reading Program, Pinal County Town Hall Vice-Chair, Parks and Block Watch Captain for the Casa Grande Police Department. A freelance writer and photographer, Donna and husband Mike enjoy white water rafting, kayaking and spending time with their 2 sons and 3 grandchildren who live in the valley.

(520) 426-2074 442 W. Kortsen Rd, Ste 101 Casa Grande, AZ 85122

Harold Kitching

Harold has worked for newspapers across the country. He was city government reporter for the Casa Grande Dispatch for 11 years until he resigned after the newspaper began downplaying local news.

Golden Corridor LIVING is published by Raxx Direct Marketing. Editorial content is provided by affiliates of Raxx Direct Marketing, community members and local organizations. The publishers of Golden Corridor LIVING assume no responsibility for errors or omissions of any advertisement beyond the actual cost of the advertisement. In no event shall the publishers be liable for any consequential damages in excess of the cost of the advertisement. Golden Corridor LIVING shall not be liable for inaccuracies, errors, omissions, or damages from the use of information contained herein. Submitted articles do not reflect the opinions of the owners or management of Golden Corridor LIVING Information contained within submitted articles had not been verified for accuracy and readers are responsible for forming their own opinions. Real CORRID OR ING and is subject to current availability and pricing. 8 GOLDEN estate information is asLIofV1-1-17

HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


of the

Community

Jon Thompson

Mayor Thompson graduated from NAU in 1979 with a Bachelor of Science degree. He was first elected to the Coolidge City Council in 2002 and served as Vice Mayor from 2006 to 2010. He gave up his council seat to run for Mayor and since being elected, has retired as Division Director for the Pinal County Adult Probation Department after 30 years.

Evelyn Casuga

Evelyn Casuga CEcD, serves as Economic/ Community Development Advisor for Access Arizona, the area’s regional economic development foundation. Evelyn works part time at CAC and consults with the Center for the Future of Arizona, and other non-profit/private entities. She volunteers with numerous organizations in economic and community development throughout Arizona.

Breanna Boland

Breanna is the Executive Director of the Casa Grande Alliance. She started working for the organization in 2012 as a Prevention Specialist. Breanna studied Public Health at Northern Arizona University and is a Arizona Certified Prevention Specialist.

Victoria “Tori” Ward

Victoria “Tori” Ward is a cruise and resort specialist with a master’s degree in political science. After leaving public service Tori returned to her first love, travel and has completed more than 30 certification courses with the cruise and tour industry including the most advanced certification, Commodore, from Princess Cruise Lines. In addition, they have awarded her “Alaska Expert” status. Tori is a member of the Cruise Line International Association.

WINTER 2017 • HOME & GARDEN EDITION

BUSINESS INDEX 132 23 3 65 2 56 47 11 59 105 53 117 101 63 53 30 51 28 123 49 125 7 29 111 5 65 129 99 109 57 121 39 26 115 27 17 10 117 129 129 61 110 31 107 58 54 55 27 113 115 128 55 24

Academy Mortgage - CG Access Arizona Agave Dentistry American Family Insurance - Hobbs Amy's Jewelry Annie-Mac Home Mortgage Banner / CGRMC Banner Foundation Blackbox Foundation Brutinel Caliche Senior Living Capital R Construction Casa Grande Alliance Casa Grande Elementary Casa Grande Family Dentistry Casa Grande Main St CCOBRA Rodeo Central Arizona College Coldwell Banker ROX Realty Coldwell Banker ROX Realty Coldwell Banker ROX Realty Coldwell Banker ROX Realty Coldwell Banker ROX Realty Coldwell Banker ROX Property Management Cole & Leal Cottonwood Medical Center Cowtown Tavern Desert Sky Dental Desert Sun Heating, Cooling Dick & Mitchell DDS DM Family Dentistry Emergency Road Service LLC Fitzgibbons Law Offices Five Star Carpet Cleaning Foothills Bank Garrett Motors Grande Bridal & Formal Expo Grande Innovation Academy Iron City Polaris Jenkins Chiropractic Linda Tawney Portrait Studio Mankel Mechanical O'Neil & Steiner, PLLC Phoenix Patio Systems Rox Travel CG Seeds of Hope Star Towing Sun Life Family Health Center TeePee Sand And Gravel Title Security Weather King Yang and Horsley Dentistry ZONTA Club GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

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Submit your events online at goldencorridorliving.com JANUARY

4

River Cooperative Gin Tours - 1:30 PM - Call Coolidge Chamber 520-723-3009 to RSVP

5

CANADIAN INVASION/SKYDIVE ARIZONA - 12:00 AM - Skydive Arizona - 4900 N. Taylor Road, Eloy - Call for times

5

The Legends - Country Music 6:00 PM - Paramount Theater - 420 N. Florence St., Casa Grande

6

Free Hearing Screenings - 10:00 AM - Herbalicious of Arizona 423 N Florence Street Casa Grande

7

Market on the move - 8:00 AM - Sun Life 1856 E. Florence Blvd. Casa Grande. Donation of $10

10

PIATIGORSKY FOUNDATION CONCERT - 6:30 PM Paramount Theater - 420 N. Florence St., Casa Grande Donation $10

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The Legends - Country Music - 6:00 PM Paramount Theater - 420 N. Florence St., Casa Grande

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HOME, HEALTH & GARDEN SHOW/CAR & MTRUCK SHOW - 10:00 AM - AZ Home Furnishing Outlets-2300 N. Tanger Dr, Casa Grande LAUGH WITH US FEATURING THE IMPROVVABLES - 3:00 PM - CAC 8470 N Overfield Rd., Coolidge $5 FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY ANNUAL BOOK SALEPREVIEW NIGHT - 4:00 PM Women’s Club-407 N. Sacaton St., Casa Grande

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FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY ANNUAL BOOK SALE - 9:00 AM - Women’s Club-407 N. Sacaton St., Casa Grande

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Concert in the Park - 6:00 PM - Peart Park

HISTORIC DOWNTOWN STREET FAIR-CAR & MOTORCYCLE SHOW - 10:00 AM Florence St. in Historic Downtown, Casa Grande

2017 Spring Bridal & Formal Expo BRIDAL - PROM - QUINCEANERA hosted by

sponsored by

DOMINGO DEGRAZIA AND HIS SPANISH GUITAR BAND - 2:00 PM - Paramount Theater 420 N. Florence St., Casa Grande $20 The Legends - Country Music - 6:00 PM Paramount Theater - 420 N. Florence St., Casa Grande

HYPNO PALOOZA - 7:00 PM - CAC - 8470 N Overfield Rd., Coolidge

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REX ALLEN JR. THE SUNRISE TO SUNSET TOUR - 6:00 PM - Paramount Theater 420 N. Florence St., Casa Grande $25

Casa Grande Family Fun Day - 9:00 AM - Sams Club 2425 E. Florence Blvd., Casa Grande Pinal County Genealogy Workshop - 8:00 AM Church of Jesus Christ - 1555 N. Colorado, Casa Grande POWWOW - 9:00 AM Herbalicious of Arizona 423 N Florence Street Casa Grande

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BLACKBOX FOUNDATION 3RD ANNUAL FUNDRAISING BASH - 5:30 PM Robson Ranch - 5687 Robson Blvd., Eloy $50 each or $450 table

25

NEW SHANGHAI CIRCUS - 7:00 PM - CAC - 8470 N Overfield Rd., Coolidge

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32ND ANNUAL AGRICOUNTRY BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL - 10:00 AM - Pinal Fairgrounds - 512 S. Eleven Mile Corner Rd, Casa Grande

MARK YOUR CALENDAR! Announcing the 2017 Spring Bridal & Formal Expo Bridal, Prom & Quinceanera

Sunday, April 2nd • 11am - 4pm FRANCISCO GRANDE HOTEL AND GOLF RESORT 12684 West Gila Bend Hwy, Casa Grande, AZ 85194

For more information on vendor space and sponsor opportunities, please call Samantha Saldate at 480-459-9475 or email Samantha@roxco.com

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JANUARY

FEBRUARY

January/February 2017 FEBRUARY

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BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB OF CG VALLEY-BUNCO NIGHT - 6:00 PM - Property-1251 W. Gila Bend Hwy, Casa Grande MARKET ON THE MOVE - 8:00 AM - Sun Life - 1856 E. Florence Blvd., Casa Grande $10 donation

4

HALF MOON BAY PRODUCTIONS TRIBUTE TO MOTOWN - 7:00 PM - Paramount Theater - 420 N. Florence St., Casa Grande $30 Coolidge Rotary Club Annual Auction & Dinner - 6:00 PM The Elks - 2241 N. Attaway Rd., Coolidge

CASA GRANDE COWBOY DAYS AND O’ODHAM TASH - 12:00 AM - CG Rodeo Grounds2525 N. Pinal Ave., Casa Grande Cool Town Music Festival 11:00 AM - Artisan Village of Coolidge GA:$10 VIP:$25 Kids free

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Hohokam Craft Show and Bake Sale - 9:00 AM - Ho Ho Kam Mobile Village 1925 S. Arizona Blvd Coolidge

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Todd Green - 7:00 PM Performing Arts Center,

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Concert in the Park - 6:00 PM - Peart Park

HALF MARATHON AND 5K - CG COMMUNITY HOSPITAL FOUNDATION - 7:30 AM - CAC 8470 N Overfield Rd., Coolidge,

-4TH ANNUAL WUERTZ GOURD FESTIVAL - 9:00 AM - Pinal Fairgrounds-512 S. Eleven Mile Corner Rd, Casa Grande

HISTORY SPEAKS! AFRICAN AMERICAN PIONEERS OF ARIZONA - 2:00 PM Museum-110 W. Florence Blvd, Casa Grande

32nd Historic Florence Home Tour - 10:00 AM - Jaques Square 291 N. Main St. $10 presale $15 day of Come Back Buddy - 7:00 PM - CAC - 8470 N Overfield Rd., Coolidge $20

Coolidge

4th Street Backyard Market - 9:00 AM - Herbalicious of Arizona 423 N Florence Street Casa Grande

The Legends - Country Music - 6:00 PM Paramount Theater-420 N. Florence St., Casa Grande

DAVE STAMEY COWBOY ENTERTAINER - 7:00 PM - CAC - 8470 N Overfield Rd., Coolidge $22

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MARTY HAGGARD IN CONCERT COUNTRY MUSIC HAGGARD STYLE - 6:30 PM Paramount Theater-420 N. Florence St., Casa Grande $25

MARTY HAGGARD IN CONCERT COUNTRY MUSIC HAGGARD STYLE - 6:30 PM Paramount Theater-420 N. Florence St., Casa Grande $25 POWWOW - 9:00 AM Herbalicious of Arizona 423 N Florence Street Casa Grande

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MARTY HAGGARD IN CONCERT COUNTRY MUSIC HAGGARD STYLE - 6:30 PM Paramount Theater-420 N. Florence St., Casa Grande $25

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Empty Bowls - 11:00 AM CAC - 8470 N Overfield Rd., Coolidge Donation $10

25

MARTY HAGGARD IN CONCERT COUNTRY MUSIC HAGGARD STYLE - 6:30 PM Paramount Theater-420 N. Florence St., Casa Grande $25

4th Annual Casa Grande Half Marathon & 5K Saturday, February 4, 2017

Register online at: www.casagrandehalfmarathon.com

8470 North Overfield Rd, Coolidge, AZ

• February 4 - 5:30 AM - 5:30-7am Race Day Packet Pick-up and Registration Opens

$65* - Half Marathon $40* - 5K

• February 4 - 7:30 AM - Half Marathon Begins

(Central Arizona College)

For more information, please call Kaitee Doll-Bell, 520-381-6541 All proceeds go toward the fight to eliminate breast cancer. The purpose of the event is to raise money to provide mammogram screening and follow up services to those that are uninsured/underinsured at the Banner Casa Grande Breast Center. *If registered by 2-2-17 WINTER 2017 • HOME & GARDEN EDITION

• February 4 - 7:45 AM - 5K Begins • February 4 - 8:30 AM - 5K Award Ceremony Begins (approx) • February 4 - 10:00 AM - Half Marathon Award Ceremony Begins (approx) GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

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The Casa Grande

• A RIZONA CIT Y • CASA GR ANDE • COOLIDGE • ELOY • FLORENCE • M A RICOPA • A RIZONA CIT Y • CASA GR ANDE • COOL

Treated water could mean less costly electricity for community

CG News by Harold Kitching

I cgnews-info.webs.com or www.haroldkitching.com

A new model for policing crime

I

t’s called DDACTS, short for Data Driven Approaches to Crime and Traffic Safety. The Casa Grande Police Department will be implementing it beginning in January. As the department sees it, “It is a policing crime model used to effectively and efficiently reduce crime, vehicle crashes and social harm in communities, with a strong emphasis on improving the quality of life in the city of Casa Grande. The goal is to achieve long-term change that encourages law enforcement leaders (and local leaders) to take a data-driven approach to the deployment of personnel and resources to reduce crime and crashes.” Police Chief Mark McCrory presented the program to the City Council during a Dec. 5

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study session. “Basically, what this program does is it innovates location-based traffic crash, crime and calls for services and enforcement data to establish a more efficient method to deploy our resources within the city,” McCrory said. “This is a nationally known model; it’s been incorporated in many cities.”

The Police Department analyzed four years of crime and traffic accident reports, overlaying the information on a city map. The targeted area was centered near Cottonwood Lane and Trekell Road. It runs from Trekell to Pinal Avenue on the west and from McMur-

continued on page 32...

f all goes as projected, Casa Grande will be sending treated sewage plant water to a greenhouse plants company in return for discounted electricity created by that operation. Final approval of the agreement was given during the Dec. 5 council meeting. It is not a one-for-one trade. Under the proposed agreement, the city would send 300 acre-feet a year (or 97,755,426 gallons) of purified reclaimed water to the future nFlux Energy Products operation on 40 acres near Burris and Rodeo roads in return for electricity for the sewage treatment plant at a cost of 5.25 cents per kilowatt-hour. According to the staff report, the present market rate for electricity is 10.5 cents per kWh. The report says the 10.5-cent rate is about $950,000 a year. Under the 5.25-cent rate it would be about $547,373 yearly, a savings of $402,627. Under the agreement, nFlux would pay for the electricity and sewer piping infrastructure. According to the staff report, nFlux “seeks to implement and operate energy­g reenhouse facilities that will produce low cost clean energy, increase food crop yields by up to 40 percent and with 10 percent of the water usage. They plan to use a CO2 fertilization process and heat from a generator, along with water from the city’s wastewater treatment plant to produce vegetables.”

HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


Herald

Visit GoldenCorridorLiving.com/news/cg-news for Up-to-date Local News from Golden Corridor Living Magazine

LIDGE • ELOY • FLORENCE • M A RICOPA • A RIZONA CIT Y • CASA GR ANDE • COOLIDGE • ELOY • FLORENCE • M A RICOPA •

Mayor’s Committee on Disability ends after 29 years

I

t was a case of lack of interest and lack of participation. The Casa Grande City Council decided Dec. 5 to end the Mayor’s Committee on Disability. “It’s been a committee we’ve had for a number of years, always had trouble staffing it and getting them to attend the meetings,” outgoing Mayor Bob Jackson told the council. “About a year-and-a-half ago, we invited them into a strategic planning retreat because we thought maybe that would help focus them a little bit, identify what items they wanted to do. We had less than half of them go to the strategic planning session, even though we tried to coordinate

that weekend for everybody to go to.” He added, “And since then, we continue to struggle having any kind of quorum. Sometimes we have nobody show up for the meetings. It’s been that way for probably six or seven years and so the feeling was, if we can’t get a quorum, we can’t get members, it’s a committee that has to be dissolved by a council action. So that’s where we are.” According to the staff report accompanying the agenda item, the committee was formed in 1987 to be a clearing house for groups working to end the unemployment and underemployment of handicapped persons.

Three years later, the federal Americans with Disabilities Act was passed, taking over the reasons the committee was formed. “Over the years, the scope of this committee has changed until the past several years when they met only to help coordinate two events — the Halloween Dance and Disability Awareness Day,” the staff report says. “The Halloween Dance is overseen by the Community Services Department and the school district has taken the lead on Disability Awareness Day.” The report continues, “The Mayor’s Committee on Disability Issues has not met in nearly a year and the few remaining

members can still be involved by working as a volunteer for the two events with which they have stayed active. Should the need arise, the committee could be formed again in the future.” The vote to dissolve the committee was unanimous, with Councilman Dick Powell on excused absence.

Treated water (cont.) The operation and how it produces electricity is described in the above chart. Once all permits are obtained, the company has said, it would take about a year to be into operation. City Manager Larry Rains told the council that the equipment to be paid for by nFlux will include a system allowing the treatment plant to switch back to electricity from Electrical District 2, the current provider, if nFlux is temporarily unable to deliver. The plant also has a backup generator system, he said. The 300 acre-feet is about 10 percent of the reclaimed water the plant has left over from present uses, such as for parks and for sale to an electric generating plant to cool turbines. WINTER 2017 • HOME & GARDEN EDITION

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CITY

SPEAK I The common thought is that for every $1 spent in local businesses, it will circulate/be spent eight times.

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THE MULTIPLIER! by Craig McFarland, Mayor of Casa Grande

want to thank Mayor Jackson and current and past City Council members for their vision, direction and dedication to our city! They did an amazing job guiding the City of Casa Grande through some difficult times. THANK YOU! In the last edition I talked about “THE PLAN.” I thought that over the next several months we should expand on the plan – a road map for success and growth for Casa Grande. But before we can expand on the plan we need to have a discussion regarding how money flows through a community – how where we spend our $1 can impact our overall community. It’s an economic term called the multiplier effect. Here is the definition from Wikipedia.org: “The local multiplier effect (sometimes called the local premium) refers to additional economic benefit accrued to an area from money being spent in the local economy.” It continues, “One perspective of the local multiplier effect focuses on the greater local economic return generated by money spent at locally-owned independent businesses, compared to corporate chains or other absentee-owned businesses. Localization advocates cite the multiplier effect as one reason, of many, for consumers to do more of their business locally.” The common thought is that for every $1 spent in local businesses, it will circulate/be spent eight times. It is also commonly felt that if the $1 is spent online, it is $1 with no multiplier effect. The same can be said if that $1 is spent at a national chain, the multiplier effect is one-to-two times, so that $1 might be $2 (more than online, because it does generate local sales tax). Let’s take the effect of something like Lucid Motors, which just announced that they will be building their

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Electric Car manufacturing plant here in Casa Grande. Just on the surface, 2,000 jobs with an average salary of $50,000 is a payroll of $100,000,000. Using the multiplier effect, If that payroll is spent all online, it is still $100,000,000 (a big number). Now use the Local multiplier effect and it is spent in local businesses times eight and that would be $800,000,000. What effect would that have on our Casa Grande’s economy and our community? OK, so I’m not suggesting that everyone stop buying online or going up to Phoenix to make your purchases. I am suggesting that you think next time, “Can I buy what I need here in Casa Grande?” “Can I go to dinner here in Casa Grande?” “And, can I buy what I need from a local business?” Think about it . . .$1 versus $8 . . . $100,000,000 versus $800,000,000? As I stated in last month’s City Speak, “THE PLAN” is a list of projects to work on, goals that if we can get them implemented, will make Casa Grande even a better place to live, play and raise a family. How we invest/spend our $1 is something we can all work on.

INVESTMENTS in our community, in local businesses, in things to do and investments for our children, our young people, our veterans, our homeless, our seniors, and ourselves… let’s work together to make it happen!

HOME & GARDEN THE HOME EDITION & GARDEN • WINTER EDITION 2017


RESOLVE TO SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL COMMUNITY by Helen Neuharth, President/CEO, Greater Casa Grande Chamber of Commerce

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appy New Year 2017! I hope that 2017 is getting off to a grand beginning for you. Most of us do and some of us don’t, but it is true that we “learn from the past”. It is so very important that we take what is learned from the past and make a better future for ourselves, family and community. The New Year is also a time when many of us make resolutions and promises to ourselves to do “something”. New Year’s Resolutions vary from person-to-person. It is good to have far-reaching resolutions and resolutions that may have a huge impact on yourself or others. However, let’s be practical and put whatever resolution you are making for 2017 in perspective. You know the old adage, “How do you eat an elephant?-one bite at a time!” How about a resolution to support your local community by shopping more in Casa Grande? This is a fairly easy resolution: buy your groceries at a Casa Grande store; go to a movie or out for breakfast, dinner or lunch in a local restaurant. Thinking of buying a new or used vehicle? Well, right here in Casa Grande, we have competitive automobile dealerships. The same goes for purchasing furniture, WINTER 2017 • HOME & GARDEN EDITION

appliances and just about anything you can think of – just make your purchases right here in Casa Grande. Advantages of shopping locally are: You don’t have to hassle with driving on I-10 or the congestion of the metropolitan areas, which means less wear and tear on you and your vehicle; you help create more jobs; you invest in your community. A percent of every dollar that is spent in Casa Grande stays in our community for public safety, streets, school and other services we sometimes take for granted. What is available in Casa Grande? Take a drive around Casa Grande. Discover the shopping and restaurants in historic downtown Casa Grande; venture out east to The Promenade, north on Pinal Avenue to the shopping at the intersection at McMurray and Pinal Avenue. Don’t just drive along Florence Boulevard, but actually stop and get out of your vehicle to see the variety of shopping and restaurants tucked in the various strip malls. If you are looking for any type of business or service, look no further than the Greater Casa Grande Chamber of Commerce Business Directory and Community Guide avail-

able at the chamber office, 575 N. Marshall St. or check out the business listings on the chamber’s website www.casagrandechamber.org. I encourage you to shop local first by checking out businesses located right here in Casa Grande. I invite you to venture out to the Arizona Home Furnishing Outlets at CityGate (formerly the Outlets at Casa Grande) located at I-10 and Jimmie Kerr Boulevard, Saturday, Jan. 14 to attend the Greater Casa Grande Chamber of Commerce’s Home, Health, and Garden Show and the Car and Truck Show from 10:00 am to 3:00 pm. We will have a beer and wine garden, food and music. At this popular Buy Local 1st event, you can visit more than 60 businesses and have an opportunity to win cash prizes! Attending this event on Saturday, Jan. 14 will provide you a great opportunity to meet many of Casa Grande’s local businesses and see what our community has to offer.

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COOLIDGE, ARIZONA Rick Miller, City Manager

A Jon Thompson, Mayor, Coolidge

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s Mayor of the City of Coolidge, it is my pleasure to welcome you to our city – home of the Casa Grande Ruins National Monument. Coolidge is located in the heart of Pinal County and one of Arizona’s key commerce corridors. This past couple of years has been exciting and we have accomplished a great deal. One of the top priorities expressed by residents in our community survey was the poor condition of city streets. In the last few years, several streets have been repaired or reconstructed including Coolidge Avenue and Central Avenue in the downtown area. These improvements demonstrate the city’s commitment to invest in the heart of the community, which is returning dividends as local businesses begin to invest in, and improve, their properties. Main Street will be under construction this year to complete the downtown historic loop. Several other local street improvements will also take place over the next few years. Economic development continues to be a top priority for the city to bring jobs into our area. The city annexed an important rail-served industrial corridor and is working with a landowner on plans to develop a regionally significant inland port and logistics park that could bring thousands of jobs to the area. Stinger Bridge and Iron has expanded exponentially and are building various bridges around the country and many here in Arizona. The city is becoming a center for the arts, with signature events at the beautiful Performing Arts Center and the Artisan Village of Coolidge, which recently added the Military Honor Park recognizing veterans and current military men and women. Coolidge has a bright future as we continue to work with state transportation officials on a few very important long-range planning projects including the north/south freeway and the passenger rail service connecting Tucson to Phoenix. These projects coupled with their proximity to the recently annexed and expanding Coolidge Municipal Airport will complete a transportation trifecta of highway, railway and airway service in the region. Our success depends on strong partnerships, which we continue to foster at a local, state and federal level. We appreciate our partners and look forward to great happenings in the coming years and hope you will come to see Coolidge for yourself and be part of our success.

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t is a pleasure to serve the Mayor and City Council as City Manager and to work with a dedicated team of city employees who understand the importance of public service. I meet so many incredible people who live in and near the City of Coolidge who also appreciate and understand the principle of service and how it can make a profound difference in our life and the lives of others. We see and read so much about negative news around the world so I think it would be nice to feature some wonderful news happening here in our community and will start this series with the spotlight on a fantastic program born in Coolidge: “United Dance Crew”. Recently, the Mayor and City Council approved a lease agreement with this Christ- centered dance ministry that will occupy 207 S. Main Street. Our city can be proud of the accomplishments of this group of young people and the positive influence they have on the youth in Coolidge and around the state. I attended a recent fundraiser and learned firsthand from young people who shared testimonies of the positive, life-changing experience they gained when they were having challenges that were often no fault of their own. Let’s face it – almost everyone can share an experience that was difficult to face on our own and we relied on some outlet to help us cope. Unfortunately, some outlets can lead down the wrong path and be destructive, but the United Dance Crew provides a positive outlet through dance instruction that is inclusive. The group has performed across the country and has won numerous awards and is proud to say it is from Coolidge, Arizona. They have presented great programs in our local schools on anti-bullying and other ways to avoid trouble and be a positive role model. We have some exceptional young people in this community and I feel good about the future leaders who are being developed through programs like this. The United Dance Crew needs help to establish a dance studio at 207 S. Main that they can call their home and allow them to continue this great work in our historic downtown. I have been working with a committee dedicated to helping with this effort and invite others to offer their services through donations of labor, equipment, resources, funding and any other means to make this happen. I am confident that this program will succeed because it is made up of individuals who put others first. Please visit the city website at www.coolidgeaz.com to hear more “Cool Town” news that will be featured in the months ahead.

HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


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HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


The LIVING Interview

Harlyn Griffiths:

Grand Growth: The man whose vision built our city Interview by Brett Eisele

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n the late 1950s, Casa Grande’s population was less than 10,000 and the northern boundary was somewhere near Cottonwood Lane. Beyond that, everything was raw desert. Around this time, a young man who worked for Garrett AiResearch in Phoenix had heard that buying land in Casa Grande might turn out to be a pretty good investment. So, as a result, that young man purchased 40 acres at what is now the northeast corner of Trekell and Rodeo roads. The rest, as they say, is history. That young man was Harlyn L. Griffiths, who developed his acreage into Rancho Grande under the name Mi Casa Builders. From the start of his company until the late 80s, Harlyn was instrumental in the growth of our city. One example of his many success stories was in the 1960s when he and a group of fellow businessmen decided the industrial base of the city needed to grow. So the group hit the streets and sold shares in what is now the Valley Industrial Park. Their first big buyer was the Hexel Corporation, which is still there and continues to be a major employer in Casa Grande. Later, Harlyn formed Griffiths Construction, which launched him into the commercial and industrial sides of development. The corporation’s first big job was the Wells Fargo (then 1st National Bank) building on Florence Boulevard. Of course, behind every good man is a good woman. And in Harlyn's case, it was wife Dorothy, who was a community leader in her own right – but that's another story for later. This edition’s interview is a great look into the history of the development of our fair city, and even you old timers might learn something....I sure did. - BRETT EISELE, DECEMBER 2016

GC LIVING: Harlyn, you came to Arizona originally to work at Garrett AiResearch at the airport, is that correct? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: That’s where I started, yes. GC LIVING: And then, what brought you to Casa Grande? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Weather and the beauty of it. We used the reason that my wife had asthma and I got a leave of absence from the job that I had back there and so when we moved here, I got a nice six-month leave of absence from there and just never went back. GC LIVING: What did you do at Garrett AiResearch? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Several things. I started out in quality control in the shop and then I went from quality control in the shop to WINTER 2017 • HOME & GARDEN EDITION

quality control in the lab, where they’re running the turbines, the gas turbines and pneumatic controls and all that kind of stuff. GC LIVING: It sounds like you had a good steady job. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: I had a few, yeah. I was working six and seven days a week and double time on Sunday. GC LIVING: And what in the world made you change your mind and pack up your bags and leave Casa Grande, and get in the construction business? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Well, I had started by purchasing land. I was at AiResearch for 11 years and then I ended up going into sales and I was responsible for military support and all the AiResearch equipment. Pneumatic controls, gas servings and so forth and I ran that department and the sales. I

was there for, I would say, eight years in the sales end of it. GC LIVING: So you were on the road. Is that how you found out about Casa Grande? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: That isn’t how I got to Casa Grande. No, we had purchased some land in Casa Grande while I was at AiResearch. GC LIVING: Where was that land? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Rancho Grande. GC LIVING: Do you know what you paid for it? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah, $50 an acre. GC LIVING: And how many acres? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: 160 GC LIVING: So you had a quarter section of land, basically out in the middle of nowhere? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Right. GC LIVING: Where did it go from there to get you in the construction business? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Well, I had a partner there, a minor partner that started and he helped me lots. I started Mi Casa Builders in 1960 and I moved to Casa Grande in 1963. But that was not the first property I purchased in Arizona. I had purchased a residential lot way out in the country for 625 dollars. We were at 42nd Street and Glenrosa, between Indian School and Camelback roads. GC LIVING: That was out in the middle of nowhere. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: It was, but I purchased, I think it was in ’54…80 acres west of Phoenix at White Tank Mountains. GC LIVING: Don’t you wish you still had that? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: No, because I did alright. The interstate took 47 of those acres and so they paid me something over $1,000 dollars an acre, and I paid $30. I still had a balance, and the last portion of that I sold for, I think it was, $18,000 an acre. GC LIVING: That’s a good return. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah, good return. OR LI V ING THE INTERV IE W • GOLDEN GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR VING

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The LIVING Interview (continued) GC LIVING: Well before you formed Mi Casa Builders, you actually had to get contractor’s license right? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: No. We had to have qualified parties, somebody with a license and I didn’t have one, but my superintendent had a license. That was Don Prince. But in those days, they didn’t have school for a contractor’s license, like they do now. So, you had to know what you were doing and I took my residential license test and passed it the first time. About six months later, I realized I needed the commercial and I had to go back to get another test and I passed that. So, I still have both my residential and commercial license. GC LIVING: So, this was good because you did a lot of commercial work in Casa Grande? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: I did a lot elsewhere too, but the biggest job that I had was roughly a 200,000 square-foot corporate headquarters for the City of Scottsdale. And then the second biggest job was a 125-cell detention center – five stories, plus 80,000 square feet of building in Yuma. GC LIVING: Now let’s back all the way back up to Rancho Grande. That subdivision is in the middle of nowhere – that’s way out on the north of Trekell Road, which I’m assuming was a dirt road. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah. GC LIVING: How did that come about? You had to have sewer and you had to have water. What did you do? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: We had to bring the water from Cottonwood Lane out there with the Arizona Water Company and the sewers were septic systems. GC LIVING: When did Mi Casa Builders sell its first house? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: I’m not absolutely sure, but I’m guessing it would have been maybe 1959. GC LIVING: So whoever bought that was living in the country? What was the price range? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yes. (Laughs) The price range would be, in those days, a three-bedroom, one- bath house was $10,800. A three-bedroom and two-bath and a family room was maybe $12,500. GC LIVING: Did sales boom at the beginning or was it slow? How did it work? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Well, it was more than slow. (Laughs) It was, I think, the first year that I was here, we sold 18 houses so. GC LIVING: Wow, well that is a lot for Casa

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Grande. What was the population? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: About 7,500 plus or minus. GC LIVING: So that was kind of a lot. Who was your competition? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Jack Johnson. GC LIVING: Jack Johnson, business relations, and he did commercial work as well? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah, some. I don’t think he ever left the [Casa Grande] valley. GC LIVING: All right now, when you moved to town and were establishing yourself, how old were you? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: When I moved to Casa Grande, I would have been 32. GC LIVING: At the same time were you getting involved in the community? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Very much so, yes… Chamber of Commerce, Knights of Columbus, industrial development, City Council. GC LIVING: You ran for City Council? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah, I was on City Council ’67 through ’71, I guess it was. GC LIVING: And how long did it take you to build out phase one and phase two of Rancho Grande? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Phase one was about 18 months, and then I went to phase two and I forget how many deep lots in phase two… somewhere in the neighborhood of 40. If you go through this, you’ll see where phase three started, but I don’t remember which what year I actually started. GC LIVING: But then you were rolling. I mean the houses were selling. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah, and then about that same time I developed Mi Casa Estates two. I purchased the land along McMurray east of Center, and developed Mi Casa Estates. I developed 17 lots. The typical lot there was roughly 15 to 18 thousand square feet, so they were pretty good-sized lots. GC LIVING: Once you were established, what was your first commercial job? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: My first commercial job was Armored Radio Communications. It was right next door to the south of Casa Grande Animal Clinic. My next job was an office building on Florence Boulevard for a title company next to Hooper’s Glass. GC LIVING: So that was your second job and by then you were rolling. Tell me who the other guys were. There’s a few of you that helped make this city grow. Who were they? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Well, Tom Irwin was one big one. Nate Coxon was by far one of the

most important ones, because he was everything that there is in the city. I thought it was Mayberry because nearly every department he was responsible for. Also, there was Tom Irwin, Bruce Cosseboom (the manager of First National Bank) and people like that. GC LIVING: Okay. So, this was the early days and had Lamar and Irwin become partners yet? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yes. GC LIVING: Okay. So it was Irwin and Lamar. Was Don Johnson here yet? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Don was here but he was not active in the chamber and that kind of stuff. He was doing something…I don’t know, real business. GC LIVING: OK. Who was the city manager? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Dave Kincannon. I think it was ’67 when he became city manager. He was doing county work at the time and then when they let the city manager go, then he became city manager. GC LIVING: Was Hugh Guinn involved at all in economic development? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Not yet. Not until after he became Mayor. GC LIVING: So, you were kind of on the ground floor? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Absolutely. GC LIVING: Where did you bank in those days? Just out of curiosity. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Well, I started out with Valley Bank, then they could not do what I needed, so Bruce Cosseboom approached me and said, “I would like to have your business.” And then First Federal approached me also. GC LIVING: Now, your lumber packages. You used to buy those… who did you get those from? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Quentin Coxon. We would buy by the carload for some of our bigger jobs. GC LIVING: So, when you say “carloads,” the railroad would pull into town, drop off a car on the side and that’s all your lumber? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah. GC LIVING: How many employees did you have? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: I would say, typically, 20. GC LIVING: So, you had these guys going nuts. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: I had my own framing crew. In fact, I had two that consisted of four or five guys. We did most of our own concrete at first and our painting. We had our painting and foreman and so the concrete, HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


framing and painting, would be our own people. GC LIVING: When you say concrete, in those days there was Tanner and there was Pinal Materials, who were you buying your concrete from? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: I was buying it from Ben Zink. GC LIVING: Wow. And Tanner was Jack Rowe. See, we remember some things. (Laughs) HARLYN GRIFFITHS: There’s too damn many names there. (Laughs) He was Mayor too, or a guy that took Jack Rowe’s place was Mayor for a term. GC LIVING: So, when did you feel you were at your peak in Casa Grande with, with commercial development? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: I would say starting in about 1969 through the ’80s. GC LIVING: Rancho Grande was really outside of town. Did you have it incorporated in the city limits? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yes, it came. The city approached us and Nate Coxon was the primary one to have it become part of the city. GC LIVING: So, how did you work the deal to run the sewer that far? Because that was a long haul. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Well, I think the city did. GC LIVING: So, they cut a deal with you to bring you in the city limits and they would help you with the sewer? Because that had to be two, three or four miles? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Three. GC LIVING: Then it had to be merged? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah. I have a feeling it might have topped out at Cottonwood. GC LIVING: That was a long run. So, that kind of changed everything, didn’t it? Did you see the writing on the wall and start buying other property along the sewer line? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: I purchased 40 acres at the corner of Kortsen and Trekell, where Tierra Palmas is. GC LIVING: And that was, eventually was when it became Tierra Palmas. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yes. GC LIVING: When did you develop that? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: In the early ’80s. GC LIVING: And whose concept was that? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: I had single families there too and condos and then they have the commercial corner, which is still vacant. Then I built those five offices where the realty was. [EDITORS NOTE: current location of Coldwell Banker ROX Realty] I had, I don’t know, five WINTER 2017 • HOME & GARDEN EDITION

of those buildings at one time. GC LIVING: And I was interested because one of those eventually was occupied by Discovery Builders. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Well, no, they built that after the fact. It was a piece of property that was ours and there’s still a vacant piece of property just north of the northwest building that I had set up to build apartments on, but I sold the property and people never put apartments on it. GC LIVING: But didn’t you turn your condominiums into apartments eventually? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yes. GC LIVING: That worked out well? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: It worked out well. That was during the crunch. GC LIVING: Those were rough times. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah. ’87, I think it was. GC LIVING: One of the businesses that was built there was Southwest Eye Care which is now our Coldwell Banker office. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah. I had all five of those. That building was the first one that I opened. That was part of the behavioral health. GC LIVING: Did you own that building? Or sell it to them? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: It was a lease purchase. I own it. GC LIVING: So by then you were established. You’ve got Rancho Grande, the Mi Casa Estates and you’ve built some commercial buildings in town. When did you start branching out and going to Scottsdale and other cities? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: I would guess it was in the late ’70s. For example, I built the vocational education building for the City of Mesa which was a…30,000 square-foot facility then remodeled the Valley Bank in Mesa. And I built two schools at Havasu City and built the Casa Grande City Library. That was one of the things that stood here around ’75.

GC LIVING: Was the architect Bud Johns? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yes. GC LIVING: Did you build City Hall as well? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: I did not build City Hall, but I built First National Bank, Arizona Bank and Southwest Gas complex. GC LIVING: Now that’s all owned by the Don Kramer family now? But that’s where Arizona Bank was and that’s on Florence Boulevard and Sacaton. You built that? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah. I’m the one that built that. I negotiated that with Southwest Gas, that whole complex. I built their building, Arizona Bank, and then about a 10,000 square-foot spec building. GC LIVING: Now before that, it was Central School. Did you have to tear down the school? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: No. The school was already gone. Then I built Sunstate Bank. [Editors Note: Originally called The Bank of Casa Grande] GC LIVING: So, you guys had a very positive impact on this community? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah, we did. I was one of the first eight or nine investors in The Bank of Casa Grande at that time. But also, like the hospital which was here way before we were the project coordinator on that hospital, I designed and built the two office buildings in the front of it. GC LIVING: And now that’s Banner Hospital out on East Florence Boulevard. GC LIVING: So, what would you consider your first really big job? I mean the one where you felt you had arrived. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: I would say the First National Bank. Because that was like in 1972, something like that. GC LIVING: And that’s still there. It’s in the Casa Grande Mall. Now it’s Wells Fargo. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yes. When, the new hos-

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Economy • Local Business

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, THE LONG GAME by Evelyn Casuga, 2nd VP, Access Arizona and Sr. Advisor, Community Relations, Office of the President, Central Arizona College The process of economic development, however, requires a very long-term commitment by many in the public, private and nonprofit sectors.

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conomic development continues to have top attention in our area. Although the announcement of Lucid Motors with the potential for 2000 jobs in Casa Grande made headlines in December, the need to accelerate economic development efforts and to diversify the economic base of Pinal County is more compelling than ever. Realistically, the region is still recovering from the Great Recession when the reliance on housing development and construction as an economic driver contributed to a very slow recovery in Pinal County. The process of economic development, however, requires a very long-term commitment by many in the public, private and nonprofit sectors. For a definition of economic development, the International Economic Development Council provides a useful perspective: “The main goal of economic development is improving the economic well being of a community through efforts that entail job creation, job retention, tax base enhancements and quality of life. As there is no single definition for economic development, there is no single strategy, policy, or program for achieving successful economic development. Communities differ in their geographic and political strengths and weaknesses. Each community, therefore, will

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have a unique set of challenges for economic development.” There are no overnight solutions and the many pieces that need to come together are broad and oftentimes costly in an era of scarce resources. Consider just a few of the following: Employees with the appropriate skills and training; land and buildings to accommodate companies that pay living wages; and foundational aspects, such as transportation, healthcare, telecommunications and educational institutions. Formally or informally, we all have a role to play and need to be mindful of the long game. Proudly, what seems to be working in our region is an inclusive and wide-ranging approach to economic development in collaboration with public, private, and nonprofit sectors. The following are a few areas that merit continued collective attention: 1. Education and training that prepares students and residents for the jobs of the future 2. Infrastructure strategies that consider immediate and long-term needs to support existing and emerging industries 3. Legislative advocacy in conjunction with statewide and regional economic development groups to support economic development in Arizona.

HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


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ZONTA CLUB OF CASA GRANDE VALLEY TO CELEBRATE 70 YEARS Summary by Anne Lewis, a current member of the Zonta Club of CGV The early history of Zonta was closely interwoven with the history of the tri-valley towns.

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he Zonta Club of Casa Grande Valley is an active and dynamic organization of business and professional women dedicated to advancing the status of women and children both locally and globally. We support our community through service, fundraising, and advocacy. We also support global initiatives through Zonta International. Zonta International is a global service organization formed as a confederation of Zonta Clubs. Zonta International was founded in Buffalo,

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New York in 1919, taking its name from the Lakota Sioux word meaning “honest and trustworthy.” Zonta International has 30,000 members in 66 countries. Zonta International has consultative status with international agencies: Category I Status with the United Nations Economic and Social Council, Consultative Status with the UN Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the International Labor Organization (ILO), and the Council of Europe. Zonta also maintains representatives at the UN in Geneva, New York City, Paris and Vienna. The Zonta Club of Casa Grande Valley was chartered Jan. 18, 1947 as a tri-city club consisting of Florence, Coolidge and Casa Grande. Seventeen public spirited women of the Valley were the charter members. The early history of Zonta was closely interwoven with the history of the tri-valley towns. The charter members were wellknown to the community. Bess Prather was Postmaster from 19381955, a member of Margaret Sanger’s pioneering birth control crusade, a newspaper correspondent for The Arizona Republic and Tucson Citizen for 12 years and in 1969 became Casa

Grande’s first stock broker. Sunshine Garrett owned, with her husband, the La Siesta Hotel. Lottie Devine was Justice of the Peace in Florence for 16 years and wrote a book about her life as a child at the turn of the century in Florence. Katherine Lavers owned the TeePee Gift Shop and was involved with the Air Drone Theatre. Betty Cates owned Betty’s Beauty Shop for 42 years. Esta Bayless was the County Recorder and operated the Sacaton Hotel. In 1949, Esta and other Zonta members embarked on a four-month world tour visiting other Zonta clubs around the world. They visited the Zonta Club in Hamburg, Germany and reported back on the missing Zonta members in post-war Germany, dined with the American Ambassador in London, and also visited Calcutta (Kolkata) three years after the Partition of India and the deadly riots in Calcutta. It appears the first Zontian to visit Casa Grande was Amelia Earhart. Her first visit was on Sept. 12-13, 1928 as part of her record first solo transcontinental roundtrip flight by a woman. Bess Prather and a small group of citizens accompanied Amelia to dinner at the San Carlos Grille for dinner. Just as the legacy of Amelia Earhart lives on, Zonta InternationHOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


We will have a special celebration on Jan. 28 at The Museum of Casa Grande to commemorate Zonta of Casa Grande Valley’s 70th birthday. Special displays will be through out The Museum depicting the impact Zonta members have contributed on the development of Casa Grande Valley in the past 70 years. The public is invited to visit The Museum from 12:00 - 4:00.

al continues to give scholarships in her name, a project which began in 1938. The Amelia Earhart Fellowship Program has awarded fellowships totaling more than $9.3 million dollars to 1,079 women from 70 countries. Women of any nationality pursuing a Ph.D. who demonstrate a superior academic record in the field of aerospace related sciences or engineering are eligible and encouraged to apply. The local service projects began in the early years of the club and continue today, reflecting the times as Zontians focused on helping women and children. The first two decades of the club saw many initiatives including some of the following: • Contributing to the Navajo milk drive • Contributing to the purchase of an Iron Lung for the use of Pinal residents • Contributing to the Polio Fund • Starting Revolving Bed Fund for patients who could not afford hospital care, • Beginning Red Cross first aid classes, including first aid for atomic bomb attack, • Sponsoring a music camp scholarship for a young woman. We continue in the path of our Zonta sisters by advancing the status

WINTER 2017 • HOME & GARDEN EDITION

of women and girls by supporting their health, welfare, education and development. Zonta’s actions also have demonstrated on a consistent and long-term basis how professional and business women in the Casa Grande Valley are acting as citizens involved in the process of making our community a better place to live. These professional women continue to serve as positive role models for the young women of the next generation thus ensuring a continuation of service to the local community. As we approach our 70th Anniversary as a club we have extended over 115,000 hours of community service and have contributed over $250,000 to individual and/or organizations throughout Western Pinal County. In addition, through annual dues, club members contribute money to various projects around the world. Current projects include: • Supporting Stanfield Free Medical Clinic through contributions and volunteering • Supporting and partnering with shelters for survivors of domestic abuse and substance abuse • Contributing financial assistance for CAC Promise for the Future Scholarship Program • Contributing to Teen Law School • Contributing to Home of Hope to help women conquer substance abuse issues • Adopting a grandmother and her grandchildren during the holidays through the Seeds of Hope Kinship Program • Participating in Back to School programs to secure school supplies for children in the Seeds of Hope program and children at Against Abuse • Awarding local YWPA - Young Women in Public Affairs Scholarship • Awarding local Jane M. Klausman - Women in Business Scholarship • Contributing to Gladys Asburn

Memorial Fund CG Food Bank Sponsoring, mentoring for and supporting Z Clubs, Young Women in Leadership at Vista Grande High School. Two additional Z Clubs are targeted for the 2017-18 year. Connecting with the community through innovative fundraising activities and events and collaboration with other organizations Donating to Zonta International to provide scholarships for young women pursuing education in public affairs, women in business, and women who aspire to overcome gender barriers to careers in traditionally male-dominated fields through our Amelia Earhart Fellowships Supporting Zonta International’s global service projects through funding and advocacy

Zonta’s actions also have demonstrated on a consistent and long-term basis how professional and business women in the Casa Grande Valley are acting as citizens involved in the process of making our community a better place to live.

As we look forward to the 70th Anniversary of Zonta of Casa Grande Valley and the 100th anniversary of Zonta International in 2019 we are proud to look forward to the next generation of individuals committed to gender equality and women’s human rights around the globe and locally within our Valley.

GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR OR LI V ING BIZ! • GOLDEN

25


LEGAL

DYING WITHOUT A WILL OR TRUST, AND THE LAWS OF INTESTATE SUCCESSION by Ann F. Schrooten, Fitzgibbons Law Offices

I

n Arizona, if you die without a Will, your estate assets will be distributed in accordance with the laws of “intestate succession.” Intestate succession applies only to assets that are not distributed pursuant to another method of transfer, such as beneficiary designation, “payable on death” or “transfer on death” accounts, joint tenancy with right of survivorship, community property with right of sur vivorship, and/or assets that are titled in the name of a Trust. If you die intestate, who gets your assets will generally depend on whether you are survived by a spouse, descendants, parents and/or siblings. For example: • If you are sur vived by a spouse and no descendants, your spouse will inherit all of your estate. • If you are sur vived by a spouse and descendants from the marriage, your spouse will inherit all of your estate. • If you are sur vived by a spouse and by descendants from you and someone other than your spouse, your spouse will inherit one-half of your separate property, and your descendants will inherit one-half of your separate property and the onehalf of the community property that belonged to you. • If you are survived by de-

26

GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR OR LI LIVVING ING • BIZ!

scendants but no spouse, your descendants will inherit all of your estate. • If you die with no surviving spouse or descendants, your parents will inherit all of your estate. • If you die with no surviving spouse, descendants or parents, your siblings will inherit all of your estate. • If you die with no sur viving spouse, descendants, parents or siblings, then your nieces and nephews will inherit all of your estate. Only if you die without a Will and are not survived by family will your assets go to the State. The succession priority described above is not a substitute for an estate plan tailored to your wishes. Vague instructions and incomplete Wills or Trusts are leading causes of messy probates and family lawsuits. The best way to make sure your assets will be distributed in accordance with your wishes is to have an estate plan in place, whether it be through a Will, beneficiary designation, survivorship designation, or a Trust, prepared by an experienced estate planning attorney. Ann Schrooten is an estate planning and probate attorney at the Fitzgibbons Law Offices in Casa Grande (520-426-3824).

HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


For the Love of Chocolate

Get Ready To Run. March 4, 2017

As a business owner, you want a bank with great resources, sophisticated solutions, and smart ideas. Youaalso want aowner, bank that genuinely values you as a As business you want a bank with great customer. Well, you’ll find all this at Foothills Bank. resources, sophisticated solutions, and smart ideas. You’llalso getwant the level of that expertise you’dvalues expect from You a bank genuinely you as aa big bank, with friendly, personalized attention from customer. Well, you’ll find all this at Foothills Bank. a localget business just yours.you’d Superior service You’ll the level of like expertise expect from a without a superior attitude? Consider it done. As abank, business youpersonalized want a bankattention with greatfrom big withowner, friendly, As a business owner, you want a bank with great sophisticated and smart ideas. aresources, local business just like solutions, yours. Superior service resources, sophisticated solutions, and smart ideas. 520.423.4900 foothillsbank.com You also awant a bank that genuinely values you as a without superior attitude? Consider it done. You also want a bank that genuinely valuesMember you asFDIC a customer. Well,Shea you’ll find all this at Foothills Bank. Nieto, customer. Well, you’ll find all thisCCIM at Foothills Bank. You’ll get the level of expertise you’d expect from a 520.423.4900 foothillsbank.com Regional President You’ll get the level of expertise you’d expect fromFDIC a Member big bank, with friendly, from (520)personalized 423-4910 attention big bank, with friendly, personalized attention from Shea.Nieto@foothillsbank.com a local business just like yours. Superior service a local business just like yours. Superior service without a superior attitude? Consider it done. without a superior attitude? Consider it done.

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EDUCATION

BECOME A PHARMACY TECHNICIAN by Angela Askey, Executive Director Public Relations and Marketing, Central Arizona College

A

s the demand for health care services continues to rise, pharmacies are becoming more and more of an integral part of the health care system. Advances in pharmaceutical research also are allowing for more prescription medications to be used to fight diseases. In response, the need for pharmacy technicians is projected to grow. Central Arizona College offers a 12-month Pharmacy Technician Certificate Program. Through completion of this program, entry-level pharmacy technicians obtain skills in medi-

pus. To complete the required practicum, students must complete 240 hours of practical experience at an approved site, including hospitals, long-term care facilities and compounding pharmacies. Upon completion of the program, graduates are required to take and pass the national certification exam prior to being hired.

cal and pharmaceutical terminology, calculations, record keeping, pharmaceutical techniques and law and ethics. A majority of the core

Did You Know?

requirements for this 32-credit certificate are offered as an online option while some specialty requirement courses are offered at the San Tan Cam-

To request additional information or an application packet for the Pharmacy Technician Certificate Program please contact Instructional Specialist, Danielle Lee, CPhT at 520-494-5226 or danielle.lee@centralaz.edu.

Pharmacy Tech Certificate

Employment of Pharmacy Technicians is projected to grow 9% from 2014-2024, faster than the average for all occupations. Advances in pharmaceutical research will allow for more prescription medications to be used to fight diseases. The AZ mean wage for Pharmacy Techs as of 2014 was $33,000. CAC offers a 32-credit certificate. Most core requirements are offered as an online option. Students will learn practical experience through internships at approved sites.

Find Out More! 28

GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR OR LI LIVVING ING • BIZ!

To request information or an application packet, contact: Danielle Lee, CPhT | (520) 494-5226 centralaz.edu/hoc HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


Horse Property

11378 N. Sombra del Monte, Casa Grande $460,000 3 BR 2 BA DEN/OFFICE | 2,604 SF | 2.67 ACRE HORSE PROPERTY • Gracious country living in this custom Dan Harris home! • 2.67 acres horse property with mountain views, sunrises, sunsets & city lights! • Completely fenced horse set-up with a 4-stall mare motel. • Newly painted inside and out, lovely hardwood flooring, carpet & plantation shutters. • A grand vaulted ceiling in the living room with a magnificent stone fireplace. • There is a family room is adjacent to the formal dining room plus a den/office. • The bright kitchen has a breakfast bar, pantry and includes all appliances. • The large master suite is split with separate garden tub and shower, and roomy walk-in closet. • A detached 2 car garage with storage for tack. • The breakfast room has mountain views. • This picturesque location has Ironwood, Mesquite and Palo Verde trees.

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520.431.2875 | dawnz@coldwellbanker.com 520.423.8250 | ROXsells.com ©2016 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Coldwell Banker and the Coldwell Banker Logo are registered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.

WINTER 2017 • HOME & GARDEN EDITION

GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

29


T H E

H E A R T

O F

H I S T O R I C

D O W N T O W N

17TH A NNUAL CASA G RANDE M AIN S TREET

Street Fair/Car & Bike Show STREET FAIR

Saturday, January 21 10 am - 5 pm Sunday, January 22 10 am - 4 pm

CAR & BIKE SHOW

Saturday, January 21 (only) 10 am - 3 pm

FREE SHOW & SHINE Sunday, January 22 (only) 10 am - 3 pm

Flo re nc M eS ar sh tre all et St re et

No Pets, Skateboards or Bicycles Allowed at the Show. No Solicitation Allowed at this Sanctioned Event.

Sa ca to n

St re et

Florence Boulevard

d 2n

• Budweiser Beer Garden • Food Courts • Children’s Area • Continuous Entertainment

t ree St

Call Main Street office for more information – (520) 836-8744.

Over 200 Exhibitors • Paintings • Jewelry • Sculptures • Pottery and more!

Sponsors

110 W. 2nd St. Casa Grande, AZ (520) 836-8744 cgmainstreet.org


GIVING STARTS AT HOME

O

ur community is blessed to have many people with a heart inclined toward giving. For those incredible people, here are a few ideas to get the most benefit from your generosity come tax time. All of these ideas have significant limitations and restrictions, so be sure to speak to your tax advisor or do your own research before you give. 1. Take advantage of Arizona Tax Credits for giving. Some things just sound too good to be true, but this one really is true. Imagine having your contribution reduce your Arizona tax liability dollarfor-dollar. It is like having the state of Arizona make the contribution for you, and it is not too late. Contributions for many of these credits can be made up until April 15th and still be claimed on your 2016 tax return. The Public School tax credit is for contributions made or fees paid to a public school. The Private School Tuition Credits consist of two separate credits for Private School Tuition Organizations and Certified Private School Tuition Organizations.

There are also separate tax credits available for contributions to qualifying charitable organizations and qualifying foster care charitable organizations. The receiving organization must be on the Arizona Department of Revenue’s list. Some notable Casa Grande organizations that qualify include: Against Abuse, Inc. Boys & Girls Club of Casa Grande Valley Horizon Human Services Pinal-Gila Council for Senior Citizens The Salvation Army-Casa Grande Seeds of Hope, Inc. St. Vincent de Paul Society, St. Anthony Conference Sun Life Family Health Center 2. Consider a charitable distribution directly from your IRA. If you are over 70 ½ you may qualify to exclude up to $100,000 in taxable distributions from your IRA if the distribution is made directly from the trustee of your IRA to a qualifying organization.

by Richard O’Neil, CPA, O’Neil & Steiner, PLLC 3. Consider donating appreciated longterm capital gain property. Donations of property that if sold, would generate long-term capital gain can often be deducted as a charitable contribution based on the property’s Fair Market Value. The advantage here is that you may be able to deduct the property’s full fair market value, without having to pay income tax on the gain. 4. Don’t lose you tax benefits because you did not keep the right records. A simple cancelled check is often not enough to document your contribution. If your contribution is noncash or if your contribution is $250 or more, additional documentation is required. Those who give make a tremendous difference in our community. If you are one of those people please visit your tax adviser because you deserve to receive every tax benefit available. For additional information visit www.ador.gov for Arizona tax credit information and www.irs.gov for federal information on charitable giving.

O'Neil & Steiner, PLLC

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GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR OR LI V ING BIZ! • GOLDEN

31


The Casa Grande Herald

CONTINUED…

A RIZONA CIT Y • CASA GR ANDE • COOLIDGE • ELOY • FLORENCE • M A RICOPA

A NEW MODEL...cont. from page 12 ray Boulevard north to the Viola and Vekol streets area. The four years of crime and traffic data consists of accidents, violent crimes, narcotics, weapons and shopliftings. “We’re not saying that this is a bad area to live,” McCrory told the council, “and we really want to make that known. We’re going to try to make more contacts with the people that live in that area.” He continued, “All we’re saying is that we feel that in a year’s time we can make that squaremile a better place for people to live, work or play, based on our efforts there. And the combination of the statistics that we pulled over the four years, it really highlighted that area as one that fit the criteria with various crimes, from some serious crimes to minor quality of life crimes, as well as our traffic collisions in that area. So, I really do need to stress to council and anybody else that we’re not saying this area is the worst area in Casa Grande. We’re just saying, by data, this is an area we feel we can improve the quality of life for people who live in that area in the next year.” McCrory said his full presentation “was a very dry academic presentation, but the nuts and bolts of this is just looking for traffic issues and crime issues overlap and you try to put as much high visibility in that area as you possibly can to combat both the accidents as well as the crime.” He added, “We don’t have to reinvent the wheel. It’s been done in other cities to where they found that if you take high crime areas, high accident areas, there’s a place where they overlap. And since all the traffic accidents, or most of them, are on the thoroughfares and most of the crimes take part in the

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GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

neighborhoods or the business areas, they found that there was a correlation there that if you put your resources in that area that you cannot only have an impact on the vehicle crashes but you can also have an impact on the crime in that area.” He continued, “And by upping

out for us and then we will move to another.” By moving to another area, McCrory added, “this is not looking to displace crime. This isn’t looking to chase a bad guy from your neighborhood to my neighborhood. What this is doing is it’s looking at problem

the enforcement effort for traffic, you run into a lot more of the people that have committed the crimes off the roadway.” As envisioned, the program will not add costs to the police department. “One of the things we’re hoping in the way the DDACTS program is set up,” McCrory said, “is that it really shouldn’t have an impact on increasing your budget or increasing your staff. It’s just really looking at ways to try to make what you have more efficient and more effective, strategically go after a problem in an area.” The plan is expected to fully roll out in January and will be evaluated after a year. What we’re hoping, and what our plan is, that at the end of the year if this is successful, then when we do our math again, this area should not be the one that stands

solving and long-term solutions to some of the crime and some of the problems that we have. So it’s not a crime displacement, as much as a problem-fixer. And at the end of that first year, we’ll reevaluate and do our surveys and hopefully the success in this area will show that this current area of DDACTS is no longer the one that the data tells us meets the problem and if it was that successful in that area, we’ll move it to another area and try to take place.” He added, “But at the same time, we’re smart enough to know that even though we leave an area after a year, and things go better, we can’t forget about that area. Hopefully through our increased contacts with apartment owners, apartment managers (and) business owners, that’ll just help us go back and stay in touch with individuals in

that area so it can grow.” At the end of that first year, the department will do a community survey to ask residents how they feel about it, McCrory said. Initially, there was also to be a survey at the beginning to act as a baseline, but that idea was discarded. Councilman Matt Herman, noted that the target area includes apartments and t wo schools, “which would be a good place to have meetings and get to the youth of the community to help them take that home with them,” asked how the community outreach will be handled. McCrory responded, “With the Police Advisory Board, we have already talked to one church in that area that has plenty of room for us to hold a meeting. That’s one of the concrete deals. We also have a flyer that we’re going to put out to give people information on the DDACTS program and we’ll have information put out on neighborhood meetings.” He added, “We’re going to welcome any kind of invitations we get from any of the business associations, business owners. And really when we’re getting this idea out, obviously it’s best for us to be in that area. What we’d like to do – and we’ll be talking about in any kind of community meeting that we have – we’d like to get this idea out no matter what section of the city it is, because the more people that know about it, then if we move our locations next year, we’ll already have that many more people educated.” A full report on the presentation, including the text, graphics and more quotes from the police chief, is posted at www.haroldkitching.com/ special Video of the chief’s presentation is at http://casagrandeaz.swagit.com/ play/12062016-1940

HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


The Casa Grande Herald

CONTINUED…

A RIZONA CIT Y • CASA GR ANDE • COOLIDGE • ELOY • FLORENCE • M A RICOPA

Feds give police money to fight border crime

T

he Casa Grande Police Department has received a $132,000 grant allowing officers to work with the U.S. Border Patrol to combat smuggling of narcotics and illegal immigrants. The department has received this type of grant for the past few years to participate in Operation Stonegarden, a part of the federal Department of Homeland Security. It covers overtime, police officer-related expenses and ve-

hicle mileage reimbursement. “What we do is we work with the Border Patrol in a certain area of town the Border Patrol picks for us, where we try to do some interdiction and some crime suppression as they come up,” Police Chief Mark McCrory told the City Council, which unanimously approved accepting the grant. “We use this money for an overtime grant that costs the city nothing. It’s fully reimbursed back to the city, all the costs associated

OPERATION STONEGARDEN with it.” He added, “It allows us to put extra bodies out onto patrol areas that are deemed high volume areas for narcotics and illegal immigration coming into our community. It increases our patrol capabilities and the time and the effort that we put out into those areas that really have

kind of a high impact on some of the crime problems in our community. We’ve had some success and some seizures of narcotics. We issue citations, we do our traffic enforcement and things out there. We don’t cover things that are unrelated to the idea of what Stonegarden was set up to do.”

Craig McFarland, right, was sworn in as Casa Grande mayor during the Dec. 5 City Council meeting, replacing Bob Jackson. (City of Casa Grande photos)

From left: Lisa Fitzgibbons, Mary Kortsen and Donna McBride were sworn in as council members. McBride replaces Karl Montoya, who was defeated for reelection. Councilman Ralph Varela was sworn in as mayor pro tem. WINTER 2017 • HOME & GARDEN EDITION

GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

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LUCID MOTORS TO GOLDEN CORRIDOR LIVING

SPECIAL REPORT

Move promises new jobs and opportunity for region Casa Grande has proven to be the ideal site for the future success of Lucid Motors.

34

L

ucid Motors, a California company that has transitioned itself from a battery maker to electric car manufacturer, announced on Nov. 29 that it will build a car manufacturing facility on 500 acres near Peters and Thornton roads on the west side of Casa Grande. The announcement was made at both the state Capitol in the morning and at Casa Grande City Hall in the afternoon. The facility, projected to cost $700 million, will break ground in the first half of 2017, company representatives said, with initial hiring of about 400 people. The company will start a training process involving Central Arizona College and technical and community colleges in Maricopa and Pinal counties. Lucid representatives said that by 2022 it hopes to have more than 2,000 full-time employees. The first cars should be in production toward the end of 2018. Casa Grande Mayor Bob Jackson was one of the speakers at both the Phoenix and Casa Grande announcements. “This is truly an exciting moment,” he said, “exciting for our state, exciting for the region, and particularly exciting for the City of Casa Grande. I feel enormously proud to

CORRID OR LI V ING • SPECI A L REP ORT GOLDEN CORRIDOR

stand here on behalf of Casa Grande and express how pleased we are welcome Lucid Motors to our community.” Jackson said the announcement “comes as a result of a strong, collaborative partnership among Lucid Motors, the office of Gov. Doug Ducey, Arizona’s federal delegation, the Arizona Commerce Authority, Pinal County and the city of Casa Grande.” He added, “Countless days and hours have been invested by our state, county and local stakeholders to see this exciting prospect come to fruition. Poised with vital infrastructure, talented workforce and key proximity to the regional supply chain, Casa Grande has proven to be the ideal site for the future success of Lucid Motors.” Jackson said the $700-million capital investment and eventual hiring of more than 2,000 workers will make a significant impact on Casa Grande, the region and the state. “In the past five years, Casa Grande has worked diligently to attract companies that can serve as economic drivers for our entire region,” he said. “This strategic investment to Lucid Motors continues to demonstrate the many attributes that define Casa Grande as a promising area for long-term continued on page 36...

HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


MANUFACTURE IN

CASA GRANDE by Harold Kitching

WHAT IS AIR?

O

by Staff Reports

ne of the four elements of earth is now the name of the newly announced vehicle from Lucid Motors. The 2018 Lucid Air combines luxury with technology. With sleek, aerodynamic European styling, the Air does not lack for performance. Performance specifications include: • 0-60mph in 2.5 seconds • Up to 1,000 horsepower • Up to 400 miles per charge • Full-size luxury in a mid-size footprint

Technology includes autonomous driving and active safety systems, voice commands, mobile connectivity and more. The well-optioned version will retail over $100,000 with future base models available from about $65,000. The four-door sedan will compete with Tesla Model S, Mercedes E Class and BMW Series 7 vehicles in the luxury car market. Right after the December announcement in Casa Grande, rumors of funding issues broke. Zach Edson, Lucid director of supply chain has stated the company has the funds to begin the construction. After the first year, another round of fundraising will provide the needed capital to complete phase 1. Construction on the 500,000 square- foot $700-million

WINTER 2017 • HOME & GARDEN EDITION

dollar facility in Casa Grande is set to begin in early 2017 with the first vehicles slated for 2018. Phase 1 of the assembly plant is expected to produce upwards of 20,000 vehicles in 2018 with up to 130,000 vehicles annually at full capacity. On Dec. 7, Samsung SDI announced a strategic partnership with Lucid Motors to provide lithium-ion battery cells for the Lucid Air. Samsung SDI and Lucid collaborated to develop next-generation cylindrical cells that are able to exceed current performance benchmarks in areas such as energy density, power, calendar life and safety. Significantly, this jointly-developed cell achieves breakthrough tolerance to repeated fast charging. “The breakthrough battery life demonstrated by the new cell from Samsung SDI will be of tangible benefit to our customers, particularly companies with ride-sharing services operating around the clock,” said Peter Rawlinson, CTO of Lucid. “I look forward to continued collaboration with Samsung SDI.” Lucid anticipates workforce hiring and training to begin mid-2017.

CORRID OR LI V ING SPECI A L REP ORT • GOLDEN CORRIDOR

35


GOLDEN CORRIDOR LIVING

SPECIAL REPORT

…continued from page 34 growth and success in economic development. I look forward to seeing the arrival of Lucid Motors impermeably change the landscape of Casa Grande and to see it propel us forward to the regional leader for technology and innovation and distinguish us as a premiere place for manufacturing and distribution. “On behalf of the Casa Grande City Council and our entire community, we welcome you and look forward to sharing in your success.” Central Arizona College issued an announcement, saying, “More than six months ago, discussions began between Central Arizona College president Jackie Elliott and the leadership team for Lucid Motors to develop pre-employment training curriculum. “We will ensure CAC is providing the training and courses that future Lucid Motors employees will need to be successful. CAC plans to begin offering classes in February related to the needed Lucid Motors training,” the announcement said. Lucid also announced that it has a partnership with Samsung SDI for that company to be the major supplier of lithium-ion cells for Lucid’s first vehicle. “Samsung SDI and Lucid have collaborated to develop next-generation cylindrical cells that are able to exceed current perfor-

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CORRID OR LI V ING • SPECI A L REP ORT GOLDEN CORRIDOR

mance benchmarks in areas such as energy density, power, calendar life and safety,” the announcement said. “Significantly, this jointly-developed cell achieves breakthrough tolerance to repeated fast charging.” The developers of the long-delayed PhoenixMart project issued an announcement saying that when that complex opens, “you will find a particular concentration and specialization in the auto industry and related product lines. We expect dozens of companies and brands to utilize PhoenixMart showrooms to present new automotive products for the world and to generate

new economic activity from Casa Grande. Our facility will draw auto buyers from throughout the globe and will host auto and transportation-specific programs and events each year, geared to innovation, education and collaboration.” Video of the announcement in Casa Grande is at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NSam6u5-fw&t=22s A video of the announcement ceremony at the state Capitol is at https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=FAhzUgHaLkI

HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


ATTESA: MORE THAN A FIELD OF DREAMS

GOLDEN CORRIDOR LIVING

SPECIAL REPORT

by Bill Tybur, Marketing Director of Attesa

I

f you drive west on Interstate 8 from Casa Grande and look south, between the Bianco and Montgomery Road exits, you’ll see about four square miles of land that’s been farmed for decades. This August, instead of corn fields, earth moving equipment on site will signal the beginning of Attesa, a new 2,360-acre motorsports technology community announced in June 2016. Attesa is being master planned to create a strong economic engine for Pinal County, serving as an educational partner with universities and community colleges conducting next generation automotive and energy research and development and providing fertile ground for automotive innovation. Its foundation is a Motorsports Technology Core featuring one road-racing track primarily dedicated to testing, another for members of a private club and a driver experience center, multi-use area and a karting facility. There will also be a 300-room hotel and 30,000 square-foot convention center, a nearby retail and entertainment district and a 1.2 million square-foot plaza with solar canopies to create both power and shade. As well, there will be industrial, commercial and residential areas. The rationale behind the total community philosophy of Attesa is to combine technology and entertainment uses. It can best be illustrated by Lucid Motors’ recent announcement that the electric car company is building a $700 million manufacturing plant in Casa Grande. Lucid will be building advanced engineered vehicles that will compete with Tesla and other carmakers. Long before the cars go into production, literally thousands of pieces, components and integrated systems have to be designed, developed and tested – both in a virtual or laboratory environment and on the road, in a real-world environment. Attesa will offer companies like Lucid the facilities necessary to complete many of those steps. Some of Attesa’s industrial parks will feature direct access to the track for real

WINTER 2017 • HOME & GARDEN EDITION

world testing on a 2.8-mile course built to FIA 2 (Federation Internationale de l’Automobile) safety standards. The FIA standard is important because the same track features that make for great racing also make for an ideal testing circuit; where everything from steering and handling and braking and accelerating to suspension calibration, battery life, controller efficiency and aerodynamics can be proven. Attesa will also include lodging, housing, food service and entertainment for visitors and employees of various hi-tech companies. The high-rise resort hotel and convention center will provide luxury accommodations for company guests and temporary workers. The nearby entertainment district will offer a wide variety of dining options, from gourmet restaurants and night clubs and sports bars to coffee shops and specialty comfort foods. Attesa is also planning to have arcades, a motorsports museum and boutique retail shops. And the solar-canopied plaza, almost a half-mile long and as wide as the length of a football field, is planned to host fairs, car shows, music events and more, providing year-round entertainment options. For those who want to live where they work or play, Attesa has 355 acres planned for residential use. There will be room for apartments, condominiums and single-family homes, including large luxury homes with airplane hangars or helipads with “through the gate” access to Attesa’s 6000-foot private air strip. Of particular interest to hard core car enthusiasts, whether they work at Attesa or not, will be its “Garage Majal” casitas. These two-story homes will feature car storage and garage space on the ground floor with living quarters upstairs. Uniquely, the Garage Majals at Attesa will be zoned to allow actual residency, meaning private club members can live, sleep, eat and entertain in the same space they park their performance cars. Car club members will have exclusive access to drive on Attesa’s private track.

Top: Attesa is being master planned to create a strong economic engine for Pinal County, serving as an educational partner with universities and community colleges conducting next generation automotive and energy research and development and providing fertile ground for automotive innovation. Above: Apex Circuit Design Ltd of England, which is designing the courses for Attesa in Pinal County, has conceived renowned race tracks throughout the world. The attached photo shows the completed Rallycross Circuit in Latvia (Northern Europe). Photo credit: Apex.

Like the test track, which will occasionally host major national and international racing events, the private track will be 2.8 miles in length, built to FIA safety standards, and immediately accessible from the Garage Majals. Attesa will attract two different audiences. First and foremost are the manufacturers, race teams, performance companies and others, including driverless car companies, who need a convenient, environmentally responsible place to research, develop, test and build. Second is the true performance enthusiast, the car freak who loves driving his or her Porsche, BMW, Ferrari or vintage race car at speed the way golfers are addicted to hitting the links every chance they get. The difference, of course, is the Private Club at Attesa offers a race circuit, garages and luxury clubhouse instead of a golf course. Attesa is a place car people dream about. With groundbreaking scheduled for fall 2017, that dream is about to come true.

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GOLDEN CORRIDOR LIVING

SPECIAL REPORT

High-end motor club to open in Maricopa by Harold Kitching

A

s envisioned, the Apex Motor Club will be a private club for well-todo car buffs. Private Motorsports Group, based in Scottsdale, announced that it is under contract to buy 280 acres near Highway 345 and State Route 238 in Maricopa for the project, expected to cost $25 million. According to the group’s press release, the end product will have “an up to four-mile multi-configuration asphalt road course; 12,000-square-foot clubhouse with indoor and outdoor dining rooms, lounges, meeting rooms, classrooms, locker rooms and a fitness center; a 12,000 square foot multi-purpose building for member and Apex-sponsored functions; a karting facility and multi-configuration kart track; a tuning

shop, vehicle concierge facility and fuel station; and approximately 200 automobile condominiums ranging in size from 600 square feet to over 1,800 square feet located from trackside to adjacent to the Apex clubhouse.” Development is scheduled to start in the second quarter of 2017, and be completed within a year-and-a-half. It gave these breakdowns of features: • The first phase would feature a multi-configurable 2.5-mile road course with increasing, decreasing and constant radius turns and a 3,800-foot straightaway. • Phase two would be a technically challenging 1.5-mile course connecting to the 2.5-mile course.

A 3/8-mile karting complex “where members can test their skills and introduce their entire family to the racing hobby.”

Karting, also known as kart racing is described as “a variant of open-wheel motorsport with small, open, four-wheeled vehicles called karts, go-karts, or gearbox/shifter karts depending on the design. They are usually raced on scaled-down circuits. Karting is commonly perceived as the stepping stone to the higher ranks of motorsports.” There would be different levels of memberships: •

PLATINUM $60,000 one-time initiation fee, $6,000 per year in dues.

GOLD $30,000 initiation fee, $6,000 in dues.

EXECUTIVE $18,000 initiation fee, $4,000 in dues.

CORPORATE $120,000 initiation fee, $12,000 in dues.

ART CREDIT: PRIVATE MOTORSPORTS GROUP

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HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


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GOLDEN CORRIDOR LIVING

SPECIAL REPORT

PINAL COUNTY ON A ROLL IN 2016 AND BEYOND by Joe Pyritz, Public Information Officer

P

inal County Economic Development Program Manager Tim Kanavel is a busy man these days. Between balancing the $3.3 billion in economic development projects in the county and many other future projects in the pipeline, Kanavel hasn’t had much time to sit down and assess what he has seen in the past year. But it wasn’t always like that for Kanavel. “When I first got here in 2009, I was given an office, phone and not much else,” Kanavel recalled. “The idea was for me to help bring businesses in, but there was not much consensus on how to do it.” During that time, Kanavel took some advice from then County Manager Terry Doolittle. “He told me, ‘If you are going to sell the county, you need to know the county,’” Kanavel said. “So I picked up a vehicle from our fleet management and started hitting every road inside this county.” Now keep in mind that Pinal County encompasses 5,376 square miles. That’s larger than the states of Connecticut, Rhode Island and Delaware. Each week, Kanavel put over a 1,000 miles on his vehicle.

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Doolittle’s advice paid off. Today, Kanavel can tell you where every acre of available land is located across the county. In the end, his knowledge of Pinal County has impressed prospective entrepreneurs from Denver to Dubai. “You try to wrap your head around all the projects that have come to Pinal County in 2016 and it seems improbable, if not impossible,” stated Board of Supervisors Chairman Todd House. “When we sat for the first time as a Board of Supervisors in 2013, we knew what we wanted to do. It took strategic planning to help bring that vision of more jobs to Pinal County in focus. We realized this county had the assets that businesses wanted, but we knew it was going to take a serious commitment on our part and dedication by our staff to make it happen.” Those assets the Supervisors saw are: Available land, two interstate highways, rail service, being located between two major international airports and an available workforce. “If you don’t have the workforce, then you really aren’t in the game,” said Vice-Chairman Anthony Smith. “One of the best moves we ever made was to create our own Workforce Investment Board and concentrate on mak-

ing sure we are finding these employers the right employees. We also want to find those who are looking for work the right job for them. As of November this year, our unemployment rate was low at 4.9 percent. It is up to us to keep those employers coming in and furthering our workforce’s education so we can keep on getting these jobs of the future.” Smith pointed to the five job development areas that the board agreed to pursue – aerospace and defense, manufacturing, health services, transportation logistics, along with natural and renewable resources. Under the Supervisors direction, Pinal County’s Public Works, Air Quality, Community Development and Economic Development departments started working together to further expedite the permitting process. They developed Priority Express Permitting for businesses that qualify for the streamlined process. “I’ve always believed that if government gets out of the way, businesses will be able to thrive,” said Supervisor Steve Miller. “Our philosophy is that we are here to facilitate not just regulate. The express permitting program has caught the eye of a lot of businesses who want to locate here. We’re not

HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


Pinal County in 2016: Capital investment amounts to over $3 Billion Jobs created: 8,000 Companies beginning operations this year: 5 Companies currently under construction or in planning stages: 9

skipping important steps in the permitting process, we’re just giving those who meet the criteria a chance to move forward faster than those who are beginning from the ground up and need extra help from our staff.” One of the challenges facing the county is its size. When you have a county that is larger than the state of Connecticut, you are going to have vastly different areas of need. The western and central portions of Pinal County are relatively flat with a reliance on agriculture. The northern section boasts its scenic Superstition Mountains and being near the East Valley of the Phoenix metropolitan area. The eastern section is mountainous and scenic with a reliance on mining. Supervisor Pete Rios, who represents the eastern side of Pinal County, has seen the area go from the king of copper production to a set of communities struggling to survive. “You had an area as little as 20 years ago that was known worldwide for the best copper production anywhere,” Rios said. “The downturn in copper prices during the late 90s was disastrous for this region. One of the largest copper mines in America closed its doors in June of 1999 and they put over 2,500 people out of a job overnight. While that could have been a knock-out blow for many areas, these people persevered. It’s just a matter of finding out what is the right fit for the region.” An answer to those residents’ search for the right fit came in January 2016. An enterprising group of local adventure-lovers bought a piece of property on the northern end of the Catalina Mountains just outside of the town of Oracle. Arizona Zipline Adventures began its five zipline operation using just a handful of employees. Today, they employ over 40 workers to help people experience the longest zipline in Arizona. “This has been a huge win, not only for the zipline people, but for the entire area,” Kana-

WINTER 2017 • HOME & GARDEN EDITION

vel exclaimed. “They are putting local people to work and they are using local vendors to provide a small restaurant for the patrons.” This “eco-tourism” has been a financial boon to the eastern side of Pinal County. “The area is beautiful,” said Supervisor Cheryl Chase, who used to work as a nurse at one of the local mines in the area. “You’re up in the high Sonoran Desert; you are surrounded by 10,000-foot mountains. It’s quiet, scenic and has everything for an outdoor-lover.” The supervisors are determined to help spread the word about the amenities Pinal County has to offer for those coming in from across the country and across the globe. Kanavel and other administrative staff have procured the services of an Arizona marketing and public relations firm to help spread the word about tourism and business opportunities nationally and internationally. “We were simply not able to produce everything we needed to do in-house,” Kanavel said. “It was decided that to augment our Public Information Officer’s efforts, we would enlist the help of an outside firm. We picked one with a national and international reputation for excellence. We really look forward to seeing what Moses, Incorporated, along with us, can come up with.” In 2016, Pinal County has taken the step from a rural, sleepy area into a business juggernaut. In the middle of the year, Attesa announced it was going to build a major motorsports complex just south of Interstate 8. While still in the planning stages, Attesa looks to have not only racing tracks, but research and development opportunities and

residential sites along with its own runway. In November, Lucid Motors formally announced its intention of building an auto production facility north of Interstate 8 on the corner of Selma Highway and Thornton Road. While those two announcements have garnered national and international press attention, County Manager Greg Stanley says the region has seen some other large companies start their operations in 2016. “We’ve had a very good year with companies like Tractor Supply, Sheffield Lubricants, Applegate Insulation, Arizona Zipline Adventures and New Holland Agriculture starting up,” Stanley said. “We can always point to the future and say this is in the planning stages, or that is in development. But we have started to see our efforts in the past few years come to reality when it comes to these five companies.” With a track record of success, it would be easy to just sit back and wait for businesses to start coming your way. “We can’t sit pat,” Kanavel said. “We were told that we don’t want to stop this economic freight train because it is almost impossible to start rolling again. It is our intention to keep getting the message out about who Pinal County is, what Pinal County has to offer and how you can be a part of Pinal County. It’s not that hard because, in reality, the county almost sells itself. We are no longer a best kept secret in Arizona.” To see where Pinal County is going and how to jump on this economic freight train go to: http:// www.pinalcountyaz.gov/ed/Pages/Home.aspx.

CORRID OR LI V ING SPECI A L REP ORT • GOLDEN CORRIDOR

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Out & About Happy Holidays!

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HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


Health • Wealth • Education

WINTER 2017 • HOME & GARDEN EDITION

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More...

Out & About Exciting events and striking scenery in Pinal County

If you would like to contribute images of area events, people, pets and scenery, please post on our Facebook page or email to: editor@roxco.com

KEN REINSTEIN - CGUHS AT SUNS GAME

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BEA LUECK

HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


MICHAEL BACA

JILLIAN MESSINA

BEA LUECK WINTER 2017 • HOME & GARDEN EDITION

JULIE MIKKELSEN

KIM RODRIGUEZ GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR OR LI V ING YOU! • GOLDEN

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HEALTH

PREVENTING FALLS AND TREATING ORTHOPEDIC INJURIES by David Lozano, Public Relations External Media

D

o you remember that one famous commercial that became so wellknown for that catchy “I’ve fallen and I can’t get up,” catch phrase? While that quick, five second spot of a woman on the floor yelling for help propelled that commercial into catch-phrase history with the help of television shows, movies and comedians, unfortunately it’s a reality many people have dealt with or will eventually have to deal with. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there are many risk factors that contribute to falling. Some of those include: • Advanced age • Previous falls • Muscle weakness • Poor vision

While it’s true that elderly individuals are at high risk for falling, it can also occur with younger people as well. Some risk factors like poor vision, problems with your feet or shoes, and home hazards can be modified to prevent falls amongst all age groups. Luckily for many of us, we live in Arizona with mild temperatures. Snow and ice are not a common problem we have to look out for in the Casa Grande area, although on particularly very cold days when the temperatures drop below freezing, there’s always the potential for ice, especially that dangerous black ice which is hard to see on outdoor surfaces like sidewalks and roads. Make no mistake that fall-related episodes can not only cause 46

GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR OR LI LIVVING ING • YOU!

severe injuries, but also potentially death. Should you require treatment for any fall-related injury, Banner Casa Grande Medical Center can help. Banner Casa Grande orthopedic surgeons and podiatrists are now part of the Banner CORE Center for Orthopedics – a joint venture between Banner Health and the CORE Institute. Orthopedic surgeons at Banner CORE Center for Orthopedics offer a full range of orthopedic services including: • Primary and Revision Joint Replacement of the Knee, Hip, Shoulder and Ankle • Orthopedic Sports Medicine • Orthopedic Trauma • Shoulder Arthroscopy and Joint Replacement • Knee Arthroscopy and Joint Replacement • Hand and Elbow Surgery • Foot and Ankle Reconstruction • Comprehensive Spine Care • Fracture Management • Complex Articular Cartilage Restoration • Musculoskeletal Oncology • Pain Management In addition to these services, the sports medicine program at Banner Casa Grande can help treat fall-related injuries, or any other orthopedic injury including: • Ankle sprains • Arthritis • Bursitis • Concussions • Knee injuries such as ligament tears or a dislocated kneecap • Cartilage damage

• “Stingers” and other nerve injuries • Overuse or traumatic sports injuries • Plantar fasciitis • Injuries to the rotator cuff • Shoulder dislocation, shoulder impingent syndrome and other shoulder-related issues • Sprains, strains and fractures • Stress fractures • Tendonitis “It’s amazing that we can offer this exceptional quality of service and care to our community,” said Mike Skowronek, director of Rehabilitation Services at Banner Casa Grande Medical Center. “When you consider the orthopedic experts that we have, our great staff of physical and occupational therapists, and what we’re doing to not only treat, but also prevent reoccurring injuries, it really is a benefit for our patients.” How should one stay safe? Prevention is the key to preventing fall-related injuries, and it’s even better if you can stay out of the hospital. To keep yourself from falling, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends some of the following: • Talk to your doctor – It’s important to consult with your primary care physician or health care provider so you can evaluate your risk for falling. • Review any medications you may be taking – Check and see if your medicine may make you dizzy or sleepy, including prescribed

and over-the-counter medicines. • Do strength and balance exercises – Do exercises that can strengthen your lower body and improve your balance. • Have your eyes checked – It’s important to see an eye doctor like an optometrist or an ophthalmologist at least once a year in case you need to update your prescription for eye glasses. • Make your home safer – This includes getting rid of things you could trip over, adding grab bars inside and outside of your tub or shower and putting railings on both sides of stairs if you have any. “We tend to treat more people during the winter months as our winter visitors return back to the area, many of them for a variety of fall-related injuries to the upper and lower body,” said Skowronek. “Now that we have Banner CORE Center for Orthopedics in Casa Grande, we can offer a host of services for those patients including education programs on what they can expect prior to surgery, a nurse navigator that will help coordinate care and assist the patient with their medical decisions, and extensive follow up to prevent readmission to the hospital.” For more information on the orthopedic services offered at Banner Casa Grande Medical Center including Banner CORE Center for Orthopedics, please visit www. bannercorecenter.com and www. BannerHealth.com/casagrande.

HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


BECAUSE

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Urgent Care GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

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CITY UPDATES PLANS FOR CARR MCNATT PARK by Harold Kitching

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s t h e C o m mu n it y Services Department continues to refine the master plan for improvements at Carr McNatt Park, changes have been made for a wider walking track, additional parking and two tennis courts rather than a pickleball area. Interim Director James Burke told the City Council during a study session Dec. 19 that the changes came after the council saw the original master plan and then requested more community outreach. The master plan is for impro vement s o ve r t i me a s funds allow, not for immediate changes. Recreation Superintendent Matt Jankowski gave a brief summation of the proposed changes. “The walking track was one of the big items that was discussed,” he said. “The original master plan had a 10-foot-wide walking path. This one is now 14 feet wide, so it’s able to accommodate more people.” He added, “In the southwest portion of the park there are two tennis courts there. Originally, we had four pickleball courts. Based on feedback from both pickleball players and tennis players, a new tennis court area was more desirable at this site, so we took that into consideration. Another item that has kind of changed the location, essentially, in the northern part of the park, next to the pool, there is a playground area there that was originally shifted a little bit more toward Desert Winds High School. That’s now right next to the pool area and that’s also where the splash pad will sit. So it’s a little bit closer to that water feature that we have

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there at the pool.” The walking track would be decomposed granite, the council was told – similar to the one at Grande Sports World, but not as wide. “On each side of it there is some area lighting,” Jankowski said. “One of the big items discussed was safety (and) making sure that when people are walking…they could do so safely and lighting is essentially the best way to do that.” Jankowski also said there will be an additional playground structure and 166 new parking spaces. “Anybody who has ever been to Carr McNatt Park on a weeknight in the fall or for a special event knows parking is absolutely a premium,” he said. “So by adding these parking spaces there we hope to alleviate some of the stress on that neighborhood area, as well, which we feel would be very beneficial.” Inside of the track area would be space for three sports fields. Burke said the three old signs on the property will be kept and eventually restored. Low-level bleachers are planned for various areas of the park, he added. When the walking track is extended to a third of a mile from the present quarter mile, the maintenance facility at the southeast corner of the park will be demolished and a smaller building will be built near the southwest corner. “It will be the maintenance for this park itself,” Burke said, “and then the larger operation we’re evaluating and working with Public Works on looking at the South Operations Center (south of Main Street).” Burke also outlined the reasons for two tennis courts rather

than a pickleball area. “Bringing tennis here actually has a twofold benefit for us,” he said. “It helps separate some of the activity that’s going on at Dave White Park, between tennis and pickleball. It will free up the facility out there so we can dedicate that to pickleball, where we can go in and make renovations, completely restripe and put in permanent posts so they don’t have to have the temporary (one) and I think that’s a better facility.”

Track renovation The walking track took up a major part of the presentation by Burke and Jankowski. “We had folks talk about wanting to keep the track,” Burke said. “I also worked with the Public Works Department and had their materials experts come out and look at that track. And the fact is, there’s two layers of track there – one that was originally built and a replacement that was put on top of that, and that’s creating some issues.” He added, “We also looked at it with the parks staff and the recreation staff and we really think it’s beyond its useful life;

it needs immediate attention.” The proposal is for the Public Works Department to use a pavement machine to do a test area for use of decomposed granite. But don’t put on your running or walking shoes just yet. “The reason I say a couple of years,” Burke continued, “is we have to do the phasing plan. We have some other things we’re going to do first and second, before we get to the southern zone of the park. We’re building a new recreation center, and as part of the recreation center, (there) is a commitment to have the indoor walking track. So our proposal would be not to remove this McNatt track until after that other (rec center) space is built and operational for the community, so we’d have a direct tradeoff.” Jankowski told the council that the next step for the master plan is to detail a phasing plan, cost estimate for the entire project and a schedule for moving forward. “What we’d like to do is go ahead this fiscal year and get the design going and try to get that implemented as soon as possible in the new year,” Burke said.

HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


Horse Property

11727 North Henness Road, Casa Grande $414,500 3 BR 2 BA DEN/OFFICE | 2,153 SF | 2.37 ACRE HORSE PROPERTY • 2.37 acre horse property in the beautiful Casa Grande foothills adjacent to State Land! • Incredible mountain views and city lights! • This custom home has an open concept perfect for entertaining! • 3 roomy bedrooms and an office/den which could easily convert to a 4th bedroom. • A grassy backyard is a haven with a sparkling pool with three waterfalls and a Ramada for outdoor dining. • A 28’ x 28’ detached garage/workshop has an air conditioning unit, fresh drywall, and interior wall and floor paint. • The south portion of the property is fenced with an RV gate and is roomy enough for your barn, stalls and corrals! • Easy access to I-10.

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Larry Patterson Outdoor Gallery Paintings Cindy Patterson – Tin Can Artisan www.cpattersonart.com

THE HAPPY HOME by Donna McBride

E

very house starts out with the basics: walls, roof and floor. Some are more expensive than others – but the basics are still the same. It’s what happens after that which truly creates a home. I’m not talking about furniture and fancy window treatments, or appliances. I’m talking about the warmth you feel just by walking through someone’s front door. Casa Grande residents Larry and Cindy Patterson recently welcomed me into their home and from the time the door opened, that warmth of friendship was in full bloom. I know now why people refer to their home as the “happy home.” The Pattersons did what many do upon retirement – sell almost everything, jump in the big motorhome and tour the country. They had a great time, met lots of good people and saw the beauty of the United States, from Florida all the way out west to Arizona. They settled in Casa Grande back in 1996 after visiting with friends who had made Arizona their final destination. Cindy is a retired system administrator from a Washington D.C. law firm. Larry retired from a Maryland fire department and then from a second career of building houses. Now considering themselves “settled,” both have found their passion in the art world by combining multiply levels of talent, creating a name for themselves and helping the environment through recycling. I’m not sure what is more colorful, Cindy’s bubbly personality or the cans she recycles into pieces of art. She creates flowers that seem to pop out at you. The playful flowers

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for garden, walls and table are made out of recycled tin cans. Each one has a story of its own and Cindy can tell it like nobody else. Cindy can take an old can and bring it to life. Just listening to her talk about her creations makes you happy. She is known around town as the “tin can artisan.” Larry, on the other hand, is a quiet kind of guy who seems to be a thinker. He has always enjoyed landscaping and when arriving in Casa Grande, signed up for a master gardener class to learn more about desert living. Embracing his talent for art and the outdoors, Larry has created a tranquil space in his own backyard that many would be envious of. His outdoor gallery paintings add exploding year-round color to sometimes flat desert landscapes. His work is often commissioned and never stays around too long. He had a blank slate in his own back yard that has transformed into a masterpiece. Both Cindy and Larry are involved with the local art scene, donating many hours to community events. You most likely have seen their pieces of work at a local charity auction or raffle as they are generous at sharing their talents to benefit others.

This spirited couple has made their home a canvas to showcase their unique talent. Over the past few years, there have been many budding artists lucky enough to study under them with the beautiful garden as inspiration. Cindy teaches a series of classes between now and April. She offers 12 different classes in her home and two up in the Valley. Classes fill up quickly and are kept at low numbers to ensure personalized attention. When they are not busy shipping their artwork to places like Holland, Washington, New York and California, you’ll find them helping organizations such as the Boys & Girls Club, Home of Home, Seeds of Hope and the local Casa Grande Art Association. Cindy and Larry have a passion for colorful creations, matching their own relationship, friendships and community involvement. Casa Grande is lucky to have “transplants” like the Pattersons. Coming from West Virginia over 35 years ago, I am still in awe of the beauty of Arizona. I never get tired of cactus and desert. Larry’s work of outdoor art has brought that beauty to a new level. Anyone who wants to “pop” their backyard into a true desert garden, Larry is the guy to make it happen. As a child, I remember playing the game of kick the can. I thought that was a creative way to spend a boring summer afternoon. After meeting Cindy, I don’t think I’ll ever look at a tin can the same again without thinking of the possibilities.

HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


ACCIDENT DOES NOT DAMAGE RODEO COMPETITOR’S SPIRIT

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mberley Snyder was born in Southern California and at three years old, began riding lessons. Growing up, Amberley’s family was competitive. Her siblings participated in other activities, but Amberley found her niche in rodeo. From a young age, she connected with horses. Amberley soon competed in barrel racing, pole bending, and breakaway roping. In 2009 she qualified for the National High School Finals in pole bending and won the National Little Britches Rodeo Association All-Around Cowgirl World Championship. With her sights set on college in 2010, Amberley prepared for her upcoming life changes. However, she was unaware of the magnitude of the change to come. On Jan. 10, 2010 Amberley was on her way to the Denver Stock Show and Rodeo when she looked down at her map. Suddenly, she looked up and realized she had faded into the other lane and was headed toward a metal beam. Amberley overcorrected and slid off the road and rolled. She was ejected from the vehicle and slammed into a fence post. After surgery the doctor said she would never regain feeling below her waist. He told her if she had worn her seatbelt, she would still have use of her legs. The mistake she made that day changed her life forever, but it has not defeated her spirit. The top priority for Amberley was to ride her horses again. Just 18 months after the accident, she was back on her horse. The challenges Amberley has faced haven’t stopped her from achieving her goals. In May 2015, she graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in Agriculture Education. She is now pursuing her Master’s Degree and continues to compete on the Utah State University rodeo team.

After the accident Amberley realized she had an opportunity to inspire people. Her first step was through her Wheel Chair Wednesdays video segments on social media. She would perform everyday tasks that have now become more challenging since

WINTER 2017 • HOME & GARDEN EDITION

her accident. Her short videos have become popular, resulting in nearly 200K fans on Facebook. Amberley is now inspiring thousands across America by telling her story and competing in rodeos. She was voted the fan exemption contestant at the

world’s richest one-day rodeo, comparable to the Super Bowl, RFD-TV’s The American. She competed with the best in the industry and received a standing ovation from over 40,000 fans in AT&T Stadium and won over the hearts of America.

CCOBRA PRESENTS #BECAUSEYOUCAN BARREL RACE MARCH 18, 2017 WENTZ ARENA, MARANA, ARIZONA 5 D OPEN Barrel Race 3 D YOUTH BUCKLES TO WINNER EACH D BENEFIT & EDUCATE ABOUT MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS THROUGH THE #BECAUSEYOUCAN FOUNDATION. www.BecauseYouCanMS.com Honoring Hal Lawson, Vicki Owen, Harley Carter and all who live with MS.

Amberly Snyder 9:00 @ ARENA Motivational speaker and wheelchair cowgirl will be there to encourage all who can come to hear her testimony. amberleysnyder.org

$2,000 Added Money T/Os $4.00 ea, 9:15 - 11:15 Entry fees: Pee Wee $15 Youth $40 Open $70 Pre-enter 3/12-3/16 6:00 pm Name, Horse, Class AZCCOBRA@aol.com RACE STARTS AT 11:30 AM PLENTY OF PARKING AND EASY ACCESS FROM I-10 CONTACT: TERI MURPHY 520-907-9549 GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR OR LI V ING YOU! • GOLDEN

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HEALTH

GETTING BACK ON TRACK AFTER THE HOLIDAYS by Tiffanie Grady-Gillespie CPT

Make your health a priority. Yes, it is as important as work. Without health you have nothing and you may not be able to work.

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e all indulge during the holidays – a few celebratory foods, maybe an extra drink or three. Some of us splurge a little and some of us a lot! No worries. We are all human. Start by forgiving yourself; deal with your indulgences and let’s move on. Let’s put this into perspective, shall we? One holiday binge, even if it goes on for several days, is not going to undo the work you put in prior. Chances are your bender did less damage than you think. Remember, it is not a failure; it’s a bump in the road. Start off by cutting out the sugary beverages and finding your way back to good old water. It’s easy to do, and it will help you eat less. It will also help with bloat and digestion. Do your best to get back to eating healthy ASAP. Please, DO NOT try to starve yourself as punishment—you can’t undo a weekend binge. If you tend to do this, you can fall into a dangerous binge/ starve pattern that may sabotage your goals. Avoid those refined flour

GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR OR LI LIVVING ING • YOU!

products, sugar and processed foods. Instead, focus on fresh vegetables and fruits, and of course lean proteins. Go to bed earlier. Good quality sleep will help recover not only your body but your mind as well. You’ll be better able to resist future indulgences and feel focused so you can make good, solid, healthy choices. Hide the scale. Wait and weigh yourself a few days after you get back on track. Holiday weight gain is real, but much of it is water weight, not just body fat, think of that when the initial freak out happens. Get off of the couch right away. Start slowly. Don’t try to get in two workouts a day or go nuts at the gym to “make up” for your feasting and loafing. Get back on track by taking a walk, riding your bike, maybe hike CG Mountain. Just start moving! Exercise even when you don’t think you feel like it. Stop the little voice inside your head yelling, “It’s cold, it’s hot, I’m tired, I’m too busy.” Often, in the time you’ve wasted deliberating

whether you have time to go exercise, you could have worked out and come back. Yes, Nike was right – JUST DO IT! You will never, ever wish you hadn’t done it, so remember that when you’re making excuses not to go. Make your health a priority. Yes, it is as important as work. Without health you have nothing and you may not be able to work. Research shows that people who exercised were far more productive at work than the ones who didn’t. Set a goal. I know it sounds cliché, but it really works. Maybe sign up for a 5K. Even better, sign up with some friends. Not only can you all go train together, it will make it that much harder for you to drop out. And finally, imagine yourself AMAZING. It’s really tough work staying healthy, getting fit or in shape, but just remember it’s the hard work that makes it great. Nothing worth fighting for is easy. I believe in you. Now go out there and have a happy and healthy New Year!

HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


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NO MAN IS AN ISLAND by Terri Durham, Office Coordinator It wasn’t long before he became a regular volunteer there – on the other side of the counter – offering a meal and a smile to someone who stood where he used to be.

J

ohn Donne penned, “No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent.” For the past 24 years Seeds of Hope has improved lives in our community through relationships. Daniel knows this firsthand. He was a life that was changed most recently. After being released from prison, he knew he needed a fresh start. He found his way to Seeds of Hope looking for a seed of hope. The hot lunch program provided more than just a warm meal to fill his stomach. He also found acceptance and motivation to make the changes in his life that were necessary for a better future. Daniel attended the daily devotions before lunch each day and received encouragement from spiritual leaders in our community. It wasn’t long before he became a regular volunteer there – on the other side of the counter – offering a meal and

a smile to someone who stood where he used to be. On the hot lunch bulletin board, Daniel learned about a new semester of Jobs for Life starting soon, and he eagerly signed up. For the next eight weeks, Daniel didn’t miss the twice-a-week classes where volunteer mentors and coaches applied biblically-based instruction to help him find dignity and purpose through meaningful work. Through his relationships at Jobs for Life, Daniel is now employed at a local restaurant. He’s making changes to improve his life with the help of Seeds of Hope. You have an opportunity to touch a life like Daniel’s and join the hundreds of Seeds of Hope community partners making a positive difference every day. Our annual dinner, No Man is an Island, will be held on Saturday, February 18 at the First Presbyterian Church Family Life Center in Casa

Grande. Pull out that Hawaiian shirt, grab a ukulele and limbo on over. Tickets are on sale now, $50 each or $350 for a table of eight. More information is available on our website at www.seedsofhopeaz.com. Your financial partnership furthers our mission to improve lives through relationships and community development.

Seeds of Hope Annual Dinner

No Man is an Island Saturday, February 18 First Presbyterian Church Family Life Center Tickets $50 / $350 table of 8 520-836-6335 www.seedsofhopeaz.com

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SENIORS

MARICOPA’S SENIOR TRANSIT SURVEY & SENIOR EXPO

The City of Maricopa has several initiatives and events aimed at serving seniors. For more information, visit maricopa-az.gov by Staff Reports

Senior Transit Survey

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The City of Maricopa Express Transit (COMET) has a new survey for senior citizens that seeks to go beyond questions of levels of satisfaction or dissatisfaction. The Senior Transit Survey asks questions in specific areas of concern, such as hours most desired to travel, most-frequented locations and reasons why seniors may not desire to use public transportation. This information will help the city modify its existing transit system to best serve Maricopa residents as well as provide a foundation for planning and designing the future city transit system. The Demand Response (known commonly as Dial-A-Ride) is the most popular transit service that Maricopa provides to seniors and disabled residents. It picks passengers up at the curb of their residence and delivers them to the curb of their destination. “Seniors and disabled residents love Demand Response,” said COMET Program Manager David Maestas. “However, Demand Response cannot carry as many riders in a given period of time as the Fixed-Route circulating bus. For this reason, it is important that we maximize the efficiency of the Demand Response schedule and this survey will help us do that.” To participate in the Senior Transit Survey, go to http://survey. constantcontact.com/survey/a07edhyq6csivtrdd9x/start or complete a paper survey at Copper Sky Multigenerational Center, the Copa Senior Center, the Maricopa Public Library or City Hall.

2nd Annual Senior Info/Expo

Thanks to last year’s overwhelming response, the City of Maricopa is hosting its 2nd Annual Senior Info/Expo from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 21 at City Hall. Once again, attendees will be able to access valuable information and resources about a variety of health, wellness, safety and legal topics. Also new this year, a variety of businesses will be participating to provide additional information and resources. The City of Maricopa is one of nine pilot sites throughout Arizona and the only city in Pinal County implementing a statewide initiative to help our cities become more “Age-Friendly.” Part of becoming more “Age-Friendly” is connecting people who are aging (or those caring for others who are aging) with information, resources and services. “The goal of the Senior Info/Expo is to create and increase public awareness of resources, services and initiatives for those 60 plus or those caring for aging parents,” said Arnold Jackson, the Age-Friendly Maricopa Coordinator. Exhibitors, workshops, resources, door prizes and some surprises are all part of the 2017 Senior Info/Expo. Watch local media and continue to visit the City of Maricopa website for more information on this year’s program. For more information, contact Arnold Jackson at Arnold.jackson@ maricopa-az.gov or call 520-316-6817. RSVP to the event by going to maricopa-az.gov and following the instructions to register. HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


New Trends in Travel

2017 TRAVEL SEMINARS Speak with industry experts on the benefits and options for ocean and river cruising. Discuss the world waterways and river cruising specially tailored to U.S. waters including Lake Powell.

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Two Dates to Attend: February 9, 2017 & March 9, 2017 5:30pm to 7pm The Casa Grande Lakes Clubhouse 515 W. Casa Grande Lakes Blvd South, Casa Grande, AZ (one block north of Kortsen on Pinal Ave)

Register to attend online at roxco.com/rsvp or by calling Tori at 928-254-9968 Doorprizes and discounts available for attendees. Space is limited.

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BLACKBOX FOUNDATION GEARS UP FOR EXCITING 2017

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hat do you do when you’re a local theatre arts organization that just had its busiest and most successful year ever? Well, if you’re the BlackBox Foundation, you go bigger! After a banner year that featured 13 mainstage youth and community theatre shows, vibrant fundraising campaigns to raise funds for student scholarships, and local partnerships that included a summer youth theatre camp among other community strengthening events, the BlackBox has hit the ground running in 2017! BlackBox teens have already begun rehearsals for their production of The Outsiders, to be performed on Feb. 3 and 4, and the youth are involved in a musical theatre audition class which is offered in preparation to help students audition for their spring production of the Disney musical The Lion King, Jr. For kids in 2nd grade through 9th grade, the show is offered in partnership with the Vista Grande High School Technical Theatre Department. The first rehearsal and auditions are on Saturday, Feb. 11. The production is on the weekend of April 21 and 22, and registration is open now! BlackBox volunteers are also deep into preparations for their annual BASH fundraising dinner, which will be held on Saturday, Jan. 28 at the Hermosa Ballroom at Robson Ranch. This year’s BASH includes a buffet-style dinner, silent auction, raffle, and entertainment from the circus troupe, House of Cirque. Like most BlackBox events, the BASH is family-friendly, and all ages are invited to attend. In addition to these exciting events, this spring, BlackBox is also planning a night of poetry and small scenes, the annual Ten-Minute Play Competition with the CG Arts and Humanities Commission, and involvement again in the Arizona Gives Day campaign. Tickets and information on all of these events and more can be found at www.blackboxaz. org, or by phoning 520-428-7050. WINTER 2017 • HOME & GARDEN EDITION

by Stacey Seaman

BLACKBOX 1/2 PAGE AD TO COME

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The LIVING Interview (continued) ...continued from page 21 pital was built, I did a new expansion on the old medical office building, which is now Central Arizona College. GC LIVING: That would be the southwest corner of Trekell on Florence Boulevard. Tom Cole was in there with his partner Bill O’Neil. [Editors Note: Now the Hon. William J. O’Neil] There was a MD Pharmacy on the corner. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yes. And, of course, Dr. Ford. GC LIVING: Was Dr. O’Neill in there as well? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: I can remember going in there with a sore throat or a cold, and this was after quite long. I go to Dr. O’Neil’s office and we talk on saying, “By the way, what am I gonna do about my cold?" And he was talking about everything else. (Laughs) But he was a great guy. GC LIVING: He was a great guy. But just for sake of location, across from which used to be Albertsons and is now CAL Ranch. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah. Another one of my first big buildings was Fry’s Food Store - the first one. It became Office Max and is now Mor Furniture. GC LIVING: The Great Western Bank is in the corner. Was that your building, or did you sell the land and build the building for them? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: I just had a contract to build the building for a price. GC LIVING: What about further down as the building continues. I know there were individual lots within the development. Did you build any of those as well? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: No. That was quite a negotiation too. Whenever we were doing

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commercial buildings, we were competing with others. This is before cel l phones and everything else. So, if we had a job, like this Mesa job, we were the last ones to get the price of supplies because we were in Casa Grande. Somebody would have to go to wherever the bid opening was going to be, get an open line, hang on to that open line. And sometimes two minutes before opening, we’d get prices and put the bid together. It was tough. GC LIVING: When did you build the project for City of Scottsdale. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: City of Scottsdale. It would have been in ’86, ’87, ’88. I did quite a lot of construction out in the Sells area too… medical facilities, office spaces and stuff like that. GC LIVING: Did you have a supervisor who would go oversee these jobs on a daily basis? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah, I called him an old salty dog contractor – somebody that had done everything. And he was really good. In those days, we didn’t have computers, so this guy would get the plans…he’d do all the takeoff, the lumber takeoff and he’d get all the other things and he would select a sub-contractor…like electrical, plumbing, HVAC, and that. He would say, “Look at it. Give me a number that you can live with," but actually did it the day of the bidding. But he had the breakdown completely filled in before the prices ever started coming in. He would do it all by hand. And he would work weekends. He was just terrific. He would find superintendents that would be on the job and then he would go up there occasionally to check things out. GC LIVING: So, what part did your wife Dorothy play in all this? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Dorothy was our interior decorator. She worked with the subcontractors on paint colors, flooring and all that good stuff. But she also was very involved in the community, maybe more than any of us. She was in Cotton Wives and was president of that. She was in the hospital auxiliary. She was in a sorority. Dorothy was extremely involved in the housing. When I quit housing, I said to her that I should have turned it over to her and let her run it, because she loved housing and I hated it. GC LIVING: Well, at the same time, you had what, four girls and one boy? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Three girls and one boy. GC LIVING: Three girls and one boy. And she

was running the household at the same time? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Oh yeah. She was busy, she was a busy girl. And she was very good. She was just a very pleasant person to be working. GC LIVING: Your right hand? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah. But anyway, to be real truthful, early on, she and another lady would do our construction cleaning…the house, windows, stuff like that. GC LIVING: You mean the final cleaning? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah. GC LIVING: Holy cow. That’s a horrible job. You paid her well, I hope. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Oh absolutely. Three meals, and uhGC LIVING: Yeah. (Laughs) GC LIVING: Tell us about Dorothy. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: We both are from poverty. During the Great Depression, there were eight of us kids. How in the hell mom and dad fed us, I don’t know. And we had lived on a little farm in the northern part of Minnesota. Dorothy is from an alcoholic family. Her mother was divorced when she was about 12. Dorothy basically put herself through high school. She was head cheerleader and majorette and she had her own radio station, when she was in high school and she was hell of a cook. GC LIVING: And you guys met in high school? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah, I’ll always say I went to a reform school and she went to Hopkins High School. I went to Edens Praire, which is now the largest school in the state of Minnesota. My class was 15 kids, but I had my girls fooled for a long time because I tricked them…you know they’d come home with grades of such and such and I’d say, “You know you could do better than that. I was seventh in my class.” (Laughs) GC LIVING: So, back to your work. You were really rolling in the ’70s, and you didn’t like housing. What made you bid on the subdivision for Magna Copper up in Superior? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: I didn’t have to bid on it. I just gave them a price. And they accepted the price and off you went. Hey, I’m not even going to tell you how, who got it for me. (Laughs) It was not a big one, but it was, I think, seven homes that were semi-custom that were, let’s say, 2,000 to 2,800 squarefoot homes for their supervisors. That was in 1970, ’71, and then I also did the remodel on the president, the president’s old house, HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


Specializing in Capturing Life's Precious Moments at the same time. GC LIVING: So it was a fat bid? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah, not necessarily fat, but it was a good one. At the same time I was doing that, I was building the service station for Russell out at Tabletop and the K1. GC LIVING: That’s where the Pullman Hotel is. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: So I had Casa Grande going. I had Superior going. I had the Gila River going…they call them community facilities out on the reservation. This is before cell phones and I was wearing my wheels off just trying to get around to those jobs, and I didn’t have that superintendent at that time. It was Bill Simmons, then it was also the designer and part-time superintendent on jobs. GC LIVING: So you were doing all this on your own. Today you’re in very good physical condition. Were you taking care of yourself when you were doing all that? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Pretty much. In fact, in those days I was eating healthier, because I didn’t drink in those days at all. GC LIVING: Wow. So, you took Mi Casa Builders to a certain point, and then what did you do? Did you sell it? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: I sold Mi Casa Builders and they immediately went broke – maybe a year here. GC LIVING: They went broke. But right after you sold Mi Casa Builders, you started ... HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Griffiths Construction. It had already been started, because, what was said is, “You know, you can’t be doing this kind of commercial stuff under the name Mi Casa Builders.” GC LIVING: So at this point, were you just all commercial? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah. I built apartments, for example the Hacienda Apartments on Cottonwood. GC LIVING: Was there more money in commercial than in residential, as far as profit margins? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: No. The best business I had was when I would build to suit. That’s the best build. For example, the Arizona Foundation for the Handicapped – those two buildings down on Main Street and First Ave. GC LIVING: Tell me about that. What was there and how did you go about doing that? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: I don’t remember…I would imagine it was Nate Coxon that was telling me those lots would have parts of the old building, the old bar, the old hotel, WINTER 2017 • HOME & GARDEN EDITION

and whatever it was, and they were 25-foot lots, so I think I purchased somewhere in the neighborhood of 15 lots. And then the first building I built was the 10,000 squarefoot building right next to the bakery, but then I had to tear all that stuff down in the middle of it. I think I told you yesterday I can remember having a tractor inside one of the buildings, and the building had the metal ceilings. We just crumpled it up and took it out to the dump. (Laughs) GC LIVING: And it was probably copper. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Probably copper, yeah. This is kind of a side bit. The guy that was running the tractor inside the building, trying to knock the walls down and so forth, he was my nephew and he came home and says, “I was in that building all day with that tractor going, and there was a drunk sleeping right next to where I was working." (Laughs) GC LIVING: So, needless to say, OSHA was not in check in those days. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah. GC LIVING: So what are your greatest memories? You had to have a lot of fun over the years. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Oh yeah, we did. I had some of the best mentors anybody could ever pick, like Nate Coxon, Hugh Guinn, Monsignor Ross. You know, I could go with Monsignor Ross and I don’t know what he’d do, but he’d bless me anyway. (Laughs) Before I even moved here, I had a great mentor at AiResearch. This guy’s name is Bill Orr, and Bill Orr was a couple notches ahead of me in sales, and he ended up being the president and the chief operator for all of their research which is now Honeywell. GC LIVING: So, you mentioned that Dorothy ran the Cotton Wives and ran the hospital auxiliary. That had to be a lot of fun for you at Christmastime and in the spring, when they would hold their annual galas. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Oh, it was. It was a lot of parties, a lot of fun. I think one of the neatest things that – I don’t remember whether it was Cotton Wives or what it was – but Gabe Kincannon was managing Francisco Grande, and Dorothy and Gabe got along, so he could say we used to get the penthouse for a party. Well, hell, we waited too long, and there wasn’t one available, so Dorothy calls Gabe and says, “Gabe, you got a pretty good-sized

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ZERO TOLERANCE NOW IN EFFECT ON I-10

I

f you’ve traveled between Casa Grande and the Valley, you should have noticed a new sign on the highway announcing the SAFETY CORRIDOR and ZERO TOLERANCE. This means there will be strict enforcement of laws, including exact speed limits, with zero tolerance for violations. As of mid-December, the speed limit on Interstate 10 between State Route 187 just north of Casa Grande and the Loop 202 will be enforced. This 23-mile corridor is part of phase one of a pilot program, funded by a grant from the Governor’s Office of Highway Safety. Safety corridors are highway segments that have more crashes, injuries and deaths than would ordinarily be expected. By the end of January 2017, the Arizona Department of Transportation, Arizona Department of Public Safety and Governor’s Office of Highway Safety will have implemented four safety corridors in Arizona, aiming to reduce crashes, severe injuries and traffic fatalities. As drivers traveling between Casa Grande and the Valley will attest, at least one or more major accidents happen in the stretch of highway each weekend. “These segments were selected because they have higher-than-average instances of speeding, aggressive driving, impaired driving and lack of seat belt use,” said Brent Cain, director of the Arizona Department of Transportation’s Systems Management and Operations Division. “Those are the leading factors in traffic deaths, and decreasing their occurrence makes the roads safer for everyone.” Motorists will see new signs signaling they are entering and leaving a Safety Corridor, as well as signs that alert drivers that there will be zero tolerance for violations in a corridor. “The safety corridors will make traveling safer for everyone,” said Alberto Gutier, director of the

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GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR OR LI LIVVING ING • YOU!

Governor’s Office of Highway Safety. “If you already obey driving laws, you have nothing to worry about and can enjoy safer travel. If you speed, drive aggressively or break other driving laws, you will face the consequences of zero tolerance enforcement.” DPS state troopers are going to look for aggressive drivers, speeders and other traffic law violators. This means that traveling 74mph in a 65mph zone will result in a ticket. Seat belt violations will also be enforced as part of other enforcement actions. “There will be strict enforcement of driving laws with zero tolerance for violations,” said DPS Lt. Col. Daniel Lugo. “If drivers obey the speed limit and other laws, there will be fewer crashes.” Safety Corridor segments were selected by reviewing historic crash data related to driver behavior and input from law enforcement. This is a pilot program that will remain in place for at least one to two years. After that, the partner agencies will review their effectiveness and consider whether to add safety corridors. HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


Casa Grande Elementary School District is

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The responsibility is Yours and Mine

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Success for Every One

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WINTER 2017 • HOME & GARDEN EDITION

continued on page 65...

The choice for families in Casa Grande

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lobby here, right down in that hotel. Can we have our Christmas party there?" (Laughs) He’s just thinking, “Are you crazy?" GC LIVING: So they shut off the lobby and that was a place everybody went. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Sure. I mean the guys that had the parties upstairs…I can remember one guy. He was from Coolidge. He came down and he said, “Nobody’s coming to our party, so we’re coming to yours." (Laughs) But also in the Francisco Grande, we did the remodeling, redecorating of the dining room and the remodel of the kitchen and Dorothy was the one that did the selection of colors in that, and then Mi Casa Builders actually built Duke’s Bar. GC LIVING: God, that’s a lot of history. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: I also built two houses for Red River Land, for Louis Johnson, near John Wayne’s. Well, actually I built three houses. I built one 5,000-square-foot house for Louis’ daughter and then I did a major remodel on Louis’ house. I met John Wayne, in fact. I knew John was going to be there. We were building an indoor swimming pool and a major remodel of the master bathroom, bedroom and so forth, and it was around Thanksgiving time and they always had that bull sale in the fall ... so I knew that Louis would be there around noon and we’d go there for lunch. Our daughter Linda was home from college and Dorothy, of course, was home. I said, “Well, let’s go check the John Wayne Ranch out," and sure enough, he comes in, and he sits and talks with my daughter, Linda. GC LIVING (Bea): So tell me about how you were on the Industrial Development Authority? You were a very powerful group, but there was no government involved at the time. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yes. APS has always been very involved in it. GC LIVING: Well tell me about that, because what prompted it? Was that after the mine closed? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: I don’t recall whether it was or not, but it was almost like a continuation because each chamber had an industrial development entity there and it was most likely after that. GC LIVING: You all were a very influential group. You went out and got Hexcel, and later on you went out and you got Abbott Labs and Frito Lay. What prompted you guys to

form that? If I’m not mistaken it’s when the mine down on the reservation closed and really devastated this community. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah it did. I don’t think I can recall exactly how it started. But I’ll go back to when Hexcel came here. I was already involved in the industrial development authority. In fact, Nate and I were partners until he threatened the shares in that thing. GC LIVING: That’s right. Now I remember Hugh Guinn telling me about how they would go out and sell shares to the Valley Industrial Park. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yup, he did. GC LIVING: How in the world did you land Hexcel? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: There’s a really a good story there. The chairman of the board was a very much of a people- person and he actually got involved here. I forget who would be, [EDITORS NOTE: William S. Powell] our main contact with him but, he came down here and one of the things he wanted to do was go through the high school. GC LIVING: And this is when the high school was what is now City Hall? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: The old high school. In fact Bob Brutinel’s son was a senior in high school. He was president of the class. So anyway, the school superintendent asked, “Are you wanting to meet with one of the faculty or one of these students?" He said, “student." So Mark Brutinel was the one that took him around. And during this tour, Powell asked Mark where he was going to go to school. And I forget where he asked him if he had been accepted, but he said, “I really wanted to go to Stanford" and he said, “Oh? I happen to be chairman of the alumni association." He went to Stanford. You know where Mark is now? He’s head of the Pulmonary Department for Mayo Clinic at Rochester. GC LIVING: You’re kidding me. Wow. And his uncle is on the Supreme Court. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah, they are important and Bob is still working every day. GC LIVING: So, how did you go talk to these guys? Did you write them a letter? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: I did not, but I would say that most likely the city manager maybe, I’m not sure, the APS will always be involved. The chamber would definitely be involved with this kind of a thing, but you know, we

ilie s

...continued from page 61

Fa m

Interview (continued)

Did You Know? • Casa Grande Elementary has more A+ Schools and A+ Programs than any other school district in Pinal County • The District has a proven, rigorous instructional program built upon “Success for Every One” • More than 8 out of 10 families in Casa Grande choose the Casa Grande Elementary School District. • For more than 10 years in a row, 96% of families rate their child’s school an A or a B.

Visit Your Child’s School Today! ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DISTRICT

WWW.CGESD.ORG

520.836.2111

OR LI V ING THE INTERV IE W • GOLDEN GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR VING

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NEW FISHING REGULATIONS IN EFFECT

S •

• •

ome new fishing regulations have taken effect as of Jan 1. A partial list of changes include: Reduce the daily trout bag limit to five at the Colorado River from Lake Mead to California-Nevada boundary (including Lake Mohave and Willow Beach). Reduce the daily bag limits to two bass, minimum size 13 inches; and four catfish in any combination at Whitehorse Lake. Close the Kino Environmental Restoration Project in Tucson to fishing. Create a year-round bow-and-arrow season for catfish at Apache, Canyon and Saguaro lakes, with a special regulation daily bag limit of five catfish in any combination.

Be sure to review the full 2017-18 Arizona Game and Fish Department fishing regulations online at www.azgfd.com/Fishing or in the new fishing regulations booklet available at all AZGFD offices and license dealers.

WHERE TO FISH Pinal County Area Community Lakes Catch and keep fishing with valid Arizona fishing license. No boating allowed. Open from Sunrise to 11 p.m. daily. Casa Grande - Dave White Pond 2121 N. Thornton Road, Casa Grande DAILY BAG & POSSESSION LIMITS 2 catfish, 2 trout, 1 bass (13" minimum), 5 sunfish, 1 white amur (30" minimum) Statewide limits apply to all other species Maricopa - Copper Sky Recreation Complex 45345 W. Martin Luther King Blvd., Maricopa DAILY BAG & POSSESSION LIMITS 4 catfish, 4 trout, 2 bass (13"minimum), 10 sunfish, 1 white amur (30" minimum) Statewide limits apply to all other species Maricopa - Pacana Park 19000 N. Porter Rd., Maricopa DAILY BAG & POSSESSION LIMITS 2 catfish, 2 trout, 1 bass (13" minimum), 5 sunfish, 1 white amur (30" minimum) Statewide limits apply to all other species 64

GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR OR LI LIVVING ING • YOU!

White Mountains This portion of the state is mostly pine or fir forests above 6,500 feet. Camping, hiking, and fishing are available up to 10,000 feet in quality alpine settings. While there are some bass and catfish in a few of these lakes, the majority of the fish found in these waters are trout with most provided through the Arizona Game and Fish Department's fish hatchery system. Most of these waters are stocked weekly from Memorial Day to Labor Day. North Central Region This area has the greatest variety of fishing in the state. Both cold and warm water lakes and streams are found from Flagstaff at 7,000 feet to Camp Verde at 2,500 feet. The Verde River offers smallmouth bass, channel catfish, flathead catfish and roundtail chub, while Lake Mary has wallee, largemouth bass and crappie. Small lakes around Williams and Flagstaff offer weekly stocking of trout, and Oak Creek has the best wild brown trout population in the area. Mogollon Rim Most of the fishing in this area is in small trout lakes constructed by the Arizona Game and Fish Department during the 50s and 60s. The Department stocks these lakes from April through September with the best trout fishing in the spring and fall. Colorado River Northwest This area includes waters of the Colorado from Lake Havasu to Lake Powell. There are four major reservoirs in this area which offer a wide variety of fishing from striped bass to trout and largemouth bass to catfish. This area also includes the Grand Canyon and Lake Mead. With the exception of the area

around the Grand Canyon, this area is desert and quite hostile in the summer. Carry plenty of water for yourself and extra gas for the car or boat. This is one of the most beautiful and exciting areas of the state, but also the most dangerous. Central Arizona More fishing activity takes place on these lakes than in any other area of the state. These waters provide the best largemouth bass, crappie and catfishing in the state. Lakes Pleasant and Roosevelt are best for largemouth bass and crappie, while Roosevelt and Bartlett are best for catfish. One of the most overlooked fishing experiences in this area is trout fishing the Salt River below Saguaro Lake. Take advantage of this year-round trout fishery in the summer when the air temperatures are 100° F and the water is 65° F. Southeastern Arizona Arizona's grasslands run from Tucson and Wilcox to the Mexico border. This corner of the state offers small bodies of water nestled in rolling hills dotted with oak trees. These lakes offer bass, bluegill, and catfish in the summer and trout in the winter. Southwestern Arizona This area covers that portion of the Colorado River south of Parker Dam to Yuma near the Mexico border. This stretch of river is excellent for flathead catfish from April through October. There are also trophy largemouth bass (over 12 lbs.) caught from backwater lakes along this section of river each year. The very best largemouth bass fishing in this area occurs at Alamo Reservoir located east of Parker on the bill Williams River. HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


Interview (continued) Associates in Internal Medicine, Family Practice & Pediatrics ...continued from page 63 purchased 160 acres where that industrial park is. I was involved in that. In the first year I was vice president. The second year I was president, following installing streets and water lines, and all that kind of stuff. GC LIVING: Because that was a major coup to bring that company into town. Because in thick and thin, all these years, they closed other plants but they’ve alw ays kept Casa Grande open. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah. It’s Casa Grande. It was a very comfortable, kind, down-to-earth kind of community. You know, there were a lot of hard workers there. They build a lot of businesses for people. But it paid off. I mean, my God, you know, I got people involved like Bud Johnson. I think I’ve bid every job that he designed over a period of over 10 years. I may not have gotten them all, but I got quite a few of them. And what we would do with him is do them well enough that we’d call Bud, and we said, “Bud, we could save this school a fair amount of money if you make these changes." He’d say, “Well, bid it in that way and you can find the design, but give me a list of the items to be changed." We got more of the jobs that way than we did anything. GC LIVING: So, you’re likely to see that in this community, most every major project from the ’70s through part of the ’90s has got your fingerprint on it. What in the world prompted you to start buying properties man? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: When I was in high school, I thought I was going to be a farmer. GC LIVING: It had nothing to do with profits; you just were just a farmer? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah, but no, I was not a gentleman. I was a poor boy – really poor as hell,

from a family of eight kids that were raised in The Great Depression. My God. GC LIVING: Did you ever go out though and kick dirt from your farms? Did you ever go out and get on a tractor? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: No, I didn’t do that, but I did build all the irrigation ditches, wells and that kind of stuff. GC LIVING: Well , if you were out on east Kortsen you were by Ben Zinks right, because you have a farm out there as well? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: He didn’t at that time. I bought in ’72, and sold. Bobby Burns sold it in ’77. GC LIVING: And he was Howard Wuertz’s protégé wasn’t he? Didn’t Howard have a lot to do with Bobby Burns becoming as successful as he was? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: I would imagine. Well, hell, in those two sales he made $225,000 in the commission. GC LIVING: That was a lot of money in those days HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah. You’ve got memory, he was driving a Lincoln, OK, and then he sold that place out there and he got himself a Mercedes sports car. And so one day he comes around and doesn’t have his Mercedes. I said, “Where’s your car?" And he said, “We were out shooting rabbits out in the fields," and he got stuck in the mud. (Laughs) GC LIVING: Is there anything in your mind that really affected you or changed the course of your life in the period of time that you were in the Casa Grande Valley that really stands out? You were really a self-made man and you and Dorothy had built an empire in this community. I’m just wondering if there is anything that changed the course of your life. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: No. Apparently I was just aggressive. For

WINTER 2017 • HOME & GARDEN EDITION

Associates in Pediatrics and Internal Medicine Founded in 1981 Michael P. Ridge, M.D.

Joel A. Braunstein, D.O.

Natalie A. Teng, M.D.

Craig W. Connor, PA-C Kevin G. Hall, PA-C C. Marlene Hoeft, FNP-C Derral E. Hawthorne, PA-C John D. Shull, PA-C

560 N Camino Mercado, Suite 7 Casa Grande, AZ 85122 www.cottonwoodmedical.com

(520) 836-5538 (800) 895-5538 Fax (520) 876-0878

Accepting New Patients

continued on page 99... GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

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HEALTH

AMERICAN HEART MONTH

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States, with 1 in 4 deaths caused by heart disease

W

hat Is a Heart Attack? A heart attack happens when the flow of oxygen-rich blood to a section of heart muscle suddenly becomes blocked and the heart can’t get oxygen. If blood flow isn’t restored quickly, the section of heart muscle begins to die. Heart attack treatment works best when it’s given right after symptoms occur. If you think you or someone else is having a heart attack, even if you’re not sure, call 9–1–1 right away.

Overview

Heart attacks most often occur as a result of coronary heart disease (CHD), also called coronary artery disease. CHD is a condition in which a waxy substance called plaque builds up inside the coronary arteries. These arteries supply oxygen-rich blood to your heart. When plaque builds up in the arteries, the condition is called atherosclerosis. The buildup of plaque occurs over many years. Eventually, an area of plaque can rupture (break open) inside of an artery. This causes a blood clot to form on the plaque’s surface. If the clot becomes large enough, it can mostly or completely block blood flow through a coronary artery. If the blockage isn’t treated quickly, the portion of heart muscle fed by the artery begins to die. Healthy heart tissue is replaced with scar tissue. This heart damage may not be obvious, or it may cause severe or long-lasting problems.

Heart With Muscle Damage and a Blocked Artery A less common cause of heart attack is a severe spasm (tightening) of a coronary artery. The spasm cuts off blood flow through the artery. Spasms can occur in coronary arteries that aren’t affected by atherosclerosis. Heart attacks can be associated with or lead to severe health problems, such as heart failure and life-threatening arrhythmias. Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can’t pump enough blood to meet the body’s needs. Arrhythmias are irregular heartbeats. Ventricular fibrillation is a life-threatening arrhythmia that can cause death if not treated right away. 66

GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR OR LI LIVVING ING • YOU!

Don’t Wait—Get Help Quickly Acting fast at the first sign of heart attack symptoms can save your life and limit damage to your heart. Treatment works best when it’s given right after symptoms occur. Many people aren’t sure what’s wrong when they are having symptoms of a heart attack. Some of the most common warning symptoms of a heart attack for both men and women are: • Chest pain or discomfort. Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center or left side of the chest. The discomfort usually lasts more than a few minutes or goes away and comes back. It can feel like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain. It also can feel like heartburn or indigestion. • Upper body discomfort. You may feel pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, shoulders, neck, jaw, or upper part of the stomach (above the belly button). • Shortness of breath. This may be your only symptom, or it may occur before or along with chest pain or discomfort. It can occur when you are resting or doing a little bit of physical activity. Other possible symptoms of a heart attack include: • Breaking out in a cold sweat • Feeling unusually tired for no reason, sometimes for days (especially if you are a woman) • Nausea (feeling sick to the stomach)

• •

and vomiting Light-headedness or sudden dizziness Any sudden, new symptom or a change in the pattern of symptoms you already have (for example, if your symptoms become stronger or last longer than usual)

Not all heart attacks begin with the sudden, crushing chest pain that often is shown on TV or in the movies, or other common symptoms such as chest discomfort. The symptoms of a heart attack can vary from person to person. Some people can have few symptoms and are surprised to learn they’ve had a heart attack. If you’ve already had a heart attack, your symptoms may not be the same for another one.

Quick Action Can Save Your Life: Call 9–1–1 If you think you or someone else may be having heart attack symptoms or a heart attack, don’t ignore it or feel embarrassed to call for help. Call 9–1–1 for emergency medical care. Acting fast can save your life. Do not drive to the hospital or let someone else drive you. Call an ambulance so that medical personnel can begin life-saving treatment on the way to the emergency room. Take a nitroglycerin pill if your doctor has prescribed this type of treatment. Source: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health. HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


TWOTHOUSANDSEVENTEEN

WINTER VISITORS

Guide

Sponsored by ROX Insurance ROX Insurance custom builds Snowbird Insurance Programs for Canadians that need protection down South and at home.

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GOLDE N COR R IDOR LI V ING 20 17 W IN T ER V ISI TOR S GUIDE


Experienced, Quality Care for the Entire Family Living & Serving in Casa Grande for over 60 Years After-hours Emergency Treatment Available Most Insurance Accepted

Services Provided by an Arizona Licensed General Dentist

We love the community in which we live. It is a wonderful town with wonderful people. That’s one of the reasons so many winter visitors come back every year to the beautiful Casa Grande valley. Also; superb climates (most of the year), lower cost of living, convenient location just outside of the major metropolitan areas. That’s why here at Dick and Mitchell DDS, all of our dentists and employees have always lived in the area, because we love it here.

40

$

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NEW PATIENT EXAM AND X-RAYS* * 4 bite wing X-Rays included in discount fee. If desiring a full mouth set of X-rays extra fees would apply. Not applicable with dental insurance. Expiration date 12/31/17.

Back when our office was founded in 1953 by Carl Tomkinson, people didn’t really have a choice which dental office they visited – there was only one. Over 60 years later, now that people have so many choices, we are glad they continue to choose us. We thank you for being such a valuable part of our community. Whether your family is looking for a dental office permanently or just need help while you are here, we’re here when you need us.

NO INSURANCE?

CASH

DISCOUNT AVAILABLE *

* Must present coupon at time of visit. Not valid with any other offer. Coupon good for new and existing clients. Expiration date 12/31/17.

(520) 836-7111 721 N Olive Ave. Casa Grande, AZ 85122

www.dickandmitchelldds.com

20 17 W IN T ER V ISI TOR S GUIDE GOLDE N COR R IDOR LI V ING

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CONTENTS 4 Important Phone Numbers 6 Drive Times 7 Weather 8 Events 9 Hiking 10 Automotive // Retail // Education // Fitness 11 Opportunities Abound at Central Arizona College 12 Services // Home Improvement // Church 13 2016 Spotlight - New Restaurants // Dining 14 Golden Corridor Map 16 Golf // Health & Beauty 17 Real Estate 18 10 Things To Do In Arizona 19 Casinos // Professional Services // Organizations 20 Simple Keys To Understanding Homeowner’s Insurance 22 Retire Like You Mean It 24 10 Things To Do in Arizona’s Golden Corridor 27 Attractions // Visitor Centers // Medical // Dental 28 Museums 30 Coolidge, AZ

GREATER CA SA GRANDE REGION

IMPORTANT PHONE NUMBERS Arizona Public Service (APS) (Electric) 520.421.8400

911

Arizona Water Company 520.836.8785

Casa Grande Fire Department (Non-Emergency)

AZ Dept. of Transportation

520.421.8777

888.411.7623

AZ Highway Road Conditions

511

AZ Pet Poison Control

GOLDE N COR R IDOR LI V ING 20 17 W IN T ER V ISI TOR S GUIDE

Information

Banner Casa Grande Medical Center

Motor Vehicle Department 520.836.0515

Banner Poison Control

Pinal County Sheriff Non-Emergency

520.381.6300

602.253.3334

520.866.5111

Better Business Bureau 602.264.1721

Pinal-Gila Council for Senior Citizens

Casa Grande Airport

520.836.2758

Casa Grande Public Library

Casa Grande Police Department (Non-Emergency)

520.426.3616 520.421.8710

520.421.8700

City Animal Care & Adoption

Social Security Admin.

520.426.9300

877.405.0403

City of Casa Grande

Valley Humane Society

520.421.8600

Visitor Media Group, an affiliated business of ROX Media, LLC | p.844.729.9769 Elaine Earle, Publisher | p. 520.840.1796 Elaine@roxco.com | roxmediagroup.net

4

520.836.2223

480.732.0018

Produced and Published in conjunction with:

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Casa Grande Historical Society

411

2017 Winter Visitors Guide

Published annually. Every effort is made to make this publication as accurate as possible. The Town of Gilbert, ROX Media, LLC and affiliated company / companies (collectively, the “Publishers”) will assume no responsibility for errors, changes or omissions. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in any way without the express written permission of the Publishers. The Publishers make no endorsement, representation or warranty regarding any goods or services advertised in this publication. Unless otherwise noted, all images are courtesy of the town of Gilbert. Advertisements are provided by the subject companies and the Publishers shall not be responsible or liable for any inaccuracy, omission or infringement of any third party’s rights therein, or for personal injury or any other damage or injury whatsoever. Copyright 2017. All rights reserved.

EMERGENCY: MEDICAL, POLICE & FIRE

PHOTO BY: Chris Jones

520.836.0904


2017 WINTER VARSITY SPORTS SCHEDULE Sponsored by Ochoa’s

1/17 1/18 1/19 1/24 1/25 1/26 1/31 2/2 2/22 2/23 2/24 2/28

Boys Basketball at Tempe H.S., 7 p.m. Girls Basketball vs. Tempe H.S., 7 p.m. Boys Soccer at Higley H.S., 6 p.m. Girls Soccer vs. Higley H.S., 6 p.m. Boys Wrestling American Leadership, Estrella Foothills, at American Leadership, 4 p.m. Boys Basketball at Marcos De Niza, 7 p.m. Girls Basketball vs. Marcos De Niza, 7 p.m. Boys Soccer vs. Maricopa H.S., 6 p.m. Girls Soccer at Maricopa H.S. , 6 p.m. Boys Basketball vs. Higley H.S., 7 p.m. Girls Basketball at Higley H.S., 7 p.m. Boys Soccer vs. Seton Catholic Prep, 6 p.m. Girls Soccer at Seton Catholic Prep, 6 p.m. Boys Wrestling Vista Grande H.S. at Vista Grande, 6 p.m. Boys Soccer at Tempe H.S., 6 p.m. Girls Soccer vs. Tempe H.S., 6 p.m. Boys Basketball vs. Seton Catholic Prep, 7 p.m. Girls Basketball at Seton Catholic Prep, 7 p.m. Boys Basketball vs. Tempe H.S., 7 p.m. Girls Basketball at Tempe H.S., 7 p.m. Boys Baseball vs. Flagstaff, 3:45 p.m. Girls Softball at Flagstaff, 3:45 p.m. Boys Tennis vs. North Canyon, 3:30 p.m. Girls Tennis at North Canyon, 3:30 p.m. Boys Baseball vs. Apache Junction, 3:45 p.m. Girls Softball at Apache Junction, 4 p.m. Boys Baseball at Cortez H.S., 4 p.m. Girls Softball vs. Cortez H.S., 4 p.m. Boys Tennis at Saguaro H.S., 3:30 p.m. Girls Tennis vs. Saguaro H.S., 3:30 p.m.

1/17

Boys Basketball vs. Campo Verde H.S., 7 p.m. Girls Basketball at Campo Verde H.S., 7 p.m. Boys Soccer vs. Mesquite H.S., 6 p.m. Girls Soccer at Mesquite H.S., 6 p.m. 1/18 Boys Wrestling Palo Verde Magnet, Catalina Magnet, Mountain View Marana at Vista Grande H.S. 1/20 Boys Basketball at Williams Field H.S., 7 p.m. Girls Basketball vs. Willaims Field H.S., 7 p.m. Boys Soccer vs. Queen Creek H.S., 6 p.m. Girls Soccer at Queen Creek H.S., 6 p.m. 1/24 Boys Basketball vs. Mesquite H.S., 7 p.m. Girls Basketball at Mesquite H.S., 7 p.m. Boys Soccer at Centennial H.S., 6 p.m. Girls Soccer vs. Centennial H.S., 6 p.m. 1/25 Boys Wrestling Marana, Sahuaro at Marana H.S., 3:30 p.m. 1/27 Boys Basketball at Queen Creek H.S., 7 p.m. Girls Basketball vs. Queen Creek H.S., 7 p.m. 2/7 Boys Basketball at Paradise Valley H.S., 7 p.m. Girls Basketball vs. Paradise Valley H.S., 7 p.m. 2/23 Girls Tennis at Mesa H.S., 3:30 p.m. 2/28 Boys Baseball at Paradise Valley H.S., 3:45 p.m. Girls Softball vs. Paradise Valley H.S., 3:45 p.m. 3/3 Boys Baseball vs. IRHS, 3:45 p.m. Girls Softball at IRHS, 3:45 p.m. 3/7 Boys Baseball at Maricopa H.S., 3:45 p.m. Girls Softball vs. Maricopa H.S., 3:45 p.m. 3/8 Girls Tennis at Desert Ridge H.S., 3:30 p.m. 3/10 Boys Baseball at Desert Edge H.S., 3:45 p.m. Girls Softball vs. Desert Edge H.S., 3:45 p.m.

YOUR HOSTS: Lucy Garcia & Jazzmyn Rutledge

512 E. COTTONWOOD LANE, CASA GRANDE • 520-836-9867

Casa Grande's Oldest and Finest Mexican Restaurant Serving the Valley since 1950

20 17 W IN T ER V ISI TOR S GUIDE GOLDE N COR R IDOR LI V ING

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DRIVE TIMES Moab, UT

515

Las Vegas, NV

Durango, CO

345

475

Grand Canyon Village, AZ

277

Los Angeles, CA

Flagstaff, AZ

420

193

Albuquerque, NM

455

Phoenix, AZ

48

San Diego, CA

347

Yuma, AZ 176

Casa Grande

Tucson, AZ 69

DEMOGRAPHICS P O PU L AT I O N

M E D I A N H O US E H O LD I N CO M E

FE M A LE

OW N E R OCC U PI E D H O US I N G

M A LE

R E NTE R OCC U PI E D H O US I N G

M E D I A N AG E

S TAT S : U . S . C E N S U S B U R E A U & C A S A G R A N D E A Z . G O V

51, 4 6 0 51. 5%

4 8 . 5%

33 Y R S

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$44,348 67.7%

32 . 3%


SOURCE: US Climate Data

WEATHER AVERAGE HIGH (F)

AVERAGE LOW (F)

PRECIPITATION (IN.)

JANUARY

67

37

0.79

FEBRUARY

72

40

0.83

MARCH

77

45

0.98

APRIL

86

50

0.28

MAY

95

59

0.20

JUNE

104

67

0.12

JULY

105

76

0.79

AUGUST

103

74

1.97

SEPTEMBER

98

68

0.83

OCTOBER

88

55

0.79

NOVEMBER

75

42

0.75

DECEMBER

67

37

0.94

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15548 W Jimmie Kerr Blvd Casa Grande, AZ 85122 ½ way between Trekell & Peart Roads

Just look for the Rock TeePee www.naturesnookflowers.com

Karen Henson

Diana Briano

520.423.8250 info@roxrents.com

1919 N Trekell Rd, Casa Grande

ROXrents.com

©2016 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Coldwell Banker and the Coldwell Banker Logo are registered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.

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2 0 17 E V E N T S January • Home, Health and Garden Show, Casa Grande • Agri-Country Bluegrass Festival, Casa Grande • Historical Presentation-Star Gazing over the Years, Florence • Historic Downtown Street Fair-Car & Motorcycle Show, Casa Grande • Blackbox Foundation 3rd Annual Fundraising Bash, Casa Grande • Casa Grande Chamber of Commerce Car and Truck Show, Casa Grande

February • 32nd Annual Historic Florence Home Tour, Florence • Cool Town Music Festival, Florence • 3rd Annual Dorothy Nolan No-Talent Show, Florence • 2nd Annual Florence Quick Draw Art Event, Florence • Senior Center Highway Clean-Up, Florence • Wuertz Gourd Festival, Casa Grande • Cowboy Days and O’odham Tash, Casa Grande • Arizona City Daze, Arizona City • Half Marathon and 5k – CG Community Hospital Foundation, Coolidge

March

Tournament, Casa Grande • Hot Spot Gymnastics Golf Tournament, Arizona City • 59th Annual Cactus Fly In, Casa Grande • Senior Follies, Casa Grande • Sun Life for the Love of Chocolate Fun Run, Maricopa • Sing Into Wellness Health Fair – CAC, Coolidge • 10th Annual Casa Grande Fine Art Explosion, Casa Grande • Pinal County Fair • Salsa Festival, Maricopa

April • Road to Country Thunder, Florence • City Wide Clean Up, Casa Grande • Easter Eggstravaganza, Florence • Country Thunder, Florence • Easter in the Park, Coolidge

• Second Chance Prom, Florence • Summer Programs Begin, Casa Grande

4 Man Golf Scramble February 4, 2017

7:00 a.m. Registration | 8:00 a.m. Shot Gun Start

Arizona City Golf Course

13939 S. Cleator Rd., Arizona City, AZ 85123

18 Holes, Cart and Lunch $75 Singles, $280.00 Teams

Raffle tickets, 50/50 drawing and Mulligans available for purchase

Hole in One provided by:

Registration or Info: dshomes1@msn.com

480-332-6916

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September • Cavit 9/11 Rememberance, Coolidge • Day of Play, Casa Grande • Doggie Dive-In, Casa Grande

October • 26th Annual Business Showcase, Casa Grande • Coolidge Days, Coolidge • Halloween Carnival, Coolidge • Stagecoach Days, Maricopa • Coolidge Aviation Fly-In, Coolidge • City Wide Clean Up, Casa Grande • Trunk or Treat, Casa Grande • Halloween Family Fright Night, Casa Grande

December

June

7th Annual Golf Tournament

• Fall Registration Begins, Casa Grande

• Day of Cowboy, Florence • Annual Fall Golf Tournament, Casa Grande

• Operation Graduation, Casa Grande • Pool Opens, Casa Grande

• Various July 4th Events, Casa Grande • Casino Night, Florence

August

November

May

July

• Cotton Day, Coolidge • Catfish Rodeo, Casa Grande • 2017 Duel in the Desert-Pickleball

• Various July 4th Events, Coolidge

• Electrict Light Parade, Casa Grande • Christmas On Main Street, Florence • Christmas in the Park & Parade, Coolidge • 2nd Annual Christmas in the Village, Coolidge

Mardi Gras Celebration

Featuring:

“Howard Schneider and his Dixieland All Star” Band When: Sunday, February 26, 2017 Time: 1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Location: Gold Canyon Golf Club 6100 S. Kings Ranch Rd, Gold Canyon, AZ

• Live Music • $5.00 Cover Charge • Great Food • Prize Drawings • 50/50 Drawing 100% of Proceeds go to the Pinal County Veterans Memorial Foundation, building fund. VFW Post 9768

Event Contact: Nancy Fassbender | 520-280-4715


Call Us Today!

Summer

Vol.

2.

2014

95

INJURY CLAIMS: HIKING

Common Misconceptions

PHOENIX SOUTH MOUNTAIN CATALINA STATE PARK 10919 S. Central Ave., Phoenix 11570 N. Oracle Rd., Tucson 602.262.7393 520.628.5798 5 Fallacy  You can’t be injured in a “fender bender.” www.phoenix.gov/parks/trails/ Fallacy  You have two years to bring a personal www.azstateparks.com/Parks/CATA 1 injury claim. locations/south-mountain FACT  Modern bumpers are designed to proDUTCHMAN STATE tect vehicles, not vehicle occupants. Significant injuFACT  If a public employee LOST or governmental enti-PARK GRANDE MOUNTAIN ry-causing forces can be transmitted to the occupants CASA ty caused your injury, you may (SUPERSTITION have only 180MTNS) days to 2090 E. Arica Rd., Casa Grande 6109 N. Apache Trl., even in the absence of extensive crush damage. serve a Notice of Claim to preserve your right to seek 520.421.8600 Apache Junction compensation. If you believe you may have a claim, 480.982.4485 Fallacy  You weren’t injured if you didn’t have pain www.casagrandeaz.gov/rec 6 seek prompt legal help. 2 /parks/cgmountain www.azstateparks.com/Parks/LODU at the scene of the collision. By Joe Leal, Attorney at Law

“Integrity, Excellence, Strong Work Ethic”

$20 OFF

FIRST HOUR OF SERVICE

FACT  After a collision, adrenalin surges and you may not immediately feel injured. Medical studies confirm that symptoms may not appear for hours or even days, depending on the injury.

If you or a loved one have been injured, please check

SAN REGIONAL PARK TABLE TOP MOUNTAIN - IRONus TAN outMOUNTAIN at www.coleandleal.com and give us a call, or 6533 W. Phillips Rd., Queen Creek WOOD NATIONAL MONUMENT stop by and see us. Since 1972, we’ve been dedicated 480.655.5554 3 I-8 @ Vekol Valley Rd., Maricopa to helping people who have been injured though the www.maricopa.gov/parks/santan 623.580.5500 negligence of others. It’s all wewww.blm.gov/az/st/en/prog/ do. This is our home, 7 (up to and including 1st hour). Fallacy  Ifthe you fall at a store or business, the busi- PICACHO our community, and we strive torecreation/hiking/table_top.html make it a safer place PEAK WINTER VISITOR GUIDE • Expires 1/31/17 ness is automatically responsible for any injuries. for@us all. We’ve got the experience necessary to help I-10 Picacho Peak Rd.,Eloy you through trying times.4 No recovery, no fee. FACT  The business is responsible for your inju- 520.466.3183 See Pins On Page 14-15 www.azstateparks.com/Parks/PIPE

520-836-5802

ries only if you fall because of a dangerous condition created by the establishment or its employees, or if the dangerous condition existed long enough that the establishment should have discovered and corrected the problem.

toll free: 1-800-839-5802

600 E. 1st St., Casa Grande, AZ 85122

helping pinal county's injured and their families

since 1972.

"Why Cole & Leal?" • You'll talk to your lawyer, not a staffer • We're local, not an out-of-town storefront dedicated personal injury representation

Free Consultation • Se Habla Español 420 West Casa Grande Lakes Boulevard North Casa Grande, Arizona 85122 Phone – 520.836.8002 www.coleandleal.com

• We're not afraid of tough cases • Millions recovered on behalf of Pinal County residents • We're experienced trial lawyers and don't always "settle"

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AUTOMOTIVE 123 MOTOR VEHICLE SERVICES 1609 E. Florence Blvd. Ste 7., Casa Grande 520.509.1618

New 2017 Park Models

In Stock

→ Any Trades Welcome → NO City Sales Tax → Turn Key Operation

ADRENALINE MOTORSPORTS 3151 N. Piper Ave., Casa Grande 520.836.0583 www.adrenalinmotorsportsaz.com CROSSROADS AUTOCENTER 1026 N. Pinal Ave., Casa Grande 520.836.2112 EMERGENCY ROAD SERVICE LLC 3192 N. Pearce St., Eloy 520.466.3524 www.emergencyroadserviceaz.com

HERITAGE MOTORS 1531 N. Pinal Ave., Casa Grande 520.836.4795 www.HeritageMotorsAZ.com IRONCITY POLARIS 3151 N. Piper Ave., Ste 119, Casa Grande 520.836.1971 www.icpolaris.com PERMIER AUTOCENTER 1648 N. Pinal Ave., Casa Grande 520.689.8144 www195rides.com RICH’S AUTO REPAIR 312 W. 2nd St., Casa Grande 520.836.6250

RETAIL

Units in stock or can be ordered with floor plan and colors of your choice!

Come Visit Us At 5944 N Pinal Ave Casa Grande, AZ 85122

CasaGrandeRV.com O: 520-423-0404 F: 520-423-2679

AMY’S JEWELRY 1649 E. Florence Blvd., Ste. 3, Casa Grande 520.836.2780 www.amysjewelrycasagrande.com

NATURE’S NOOK FLORIST 15548 W. Jimmie Kerr Blvd., Casa Grande 520.836.9736 www.naturesnookflowers.com”

CASA GRANDE RV SALES 5944 N. Pinal Ave., Casa Grande 520.423.0404 www.casagranderv.com

ON SIGHT SHOOTING SCHOOL 312 W. 10th St., Ste 6, Casa Grande 520.423.6945 www.onsightshooting.com

JONES FURNITURE 709 E. Florence Blvd., Casa Grande 520.836.8720 www.jonesfurnaturellc.com

EDUC ATION CASA GRANDE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DISTRICT 220 E. Kortsen Rd., Casa Grande 520.836.2111 www.cgesd.org CENTRAL ARIZONA COLLEGE 8470 N. Overfield Rd., Coolidge Campus: 520.494.5444 Box office: 520.477.SHOW www.centralaz.edu

FITNESS PLANET FITNESS 1325 E. Florence Blvd 520.788.6200 www.planetfitness.com

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GRANDE INNOVATION ACADEMY 950 N. Peart Rd., Casa Grande 520.381.2360 www.grandeinnovationacademy.com


OPPORTUNITIES ABOUND AT CENTRAL ARIZONA COLLEGE BY ANGELA ASKEY, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR PUBLIC RELATIONS AND MARKETING

Happy Hour M-F 3-6pm 16oz domestic drafts | $2.25 Longneck domestics | $2.25 Well drinks | $3.00 Margarita-On-The-Rocks | $3.50

HearTV

C

entral Arizona College has served Pinal County for more than 45 years. The college has five full-service campuses, each featuring a student center, library, state-of-the-art classrooms and labs, and administrative offices. Three centers also offer various learning opportunities for community members. The college offers a full array of academic degrees and certificates, career training, high school outreach, and personal enrichment classes. Online and university transfer courses, along with continuing education classes and workshops, provide multiple learning opportunities for community members. CAC prides itself for having one of the most innovative commitments to higher education in the nation by offering the Promise for the Future scholarship program. The program is designed to encourage students from Pinal County to stay in high school, graduate with a 2.75 grade point average and perform community service each year. Upon graduating from a Pinal County high school, students who have met the contract requirements will earn a scholarship that entitles them to free tuition to any CAC campus for up to four consecutive semesters. For additional information about the Promise for the Future scholarship visit www. centralaz.edu/promise. The College offers a variety of community events throughout the year at each of the college’s locations and at the Don P. Pence Center for the Performing and Visual Arts located on the Signal Peak Campus in Coolidge. For a listing of all CAC Community Events please visit www.EventsAtCAC.com. At this portal, you may RSVP to free events and purchase tickets for ticketed events.

Simply dowload the FREE app and listen to any game!

Great Food • Great Prices Friendly Service Your Hometown Sports Bar & Grill, Established 1989

DOMESTIC & CRAFT BEER ON DRAFT FULL BAR AVAILABLE KIDS MENU & KIDS GAME BOARDS CHARGE NO

www.McMashers.com

1355 E. Florence Blvd. Ste 139, Casa Grande, AZ • 520.426.1472

Arts • Entertainment • Theater • Music • Drama & More

Sat., Jan 14, 2017 Tue., Jan 24, 2017 Wed., Jan 25, 2017 Thurs., Feb 16, 2017

Fri., Feb 24, 2017 For a complete schedule or to purchase tickets, visit: www.EventsAtCAC.com For the 2016-2017 Season Brochure, call: 520-477-SHOW 20 17 W IN T ER V ISI TOR S GUIDE GOLDE N COR R IDOR LI V ING

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SERVICES 24-7 AUTOMATED STROAGE 1040 N. VIP Blvd., Casa Grande 520.836.8647 www.storage24x7.com A STORAGE PLACE 1688 N. Pinal Casa Grande 520.836.6080

COLE & LEAL, PA

Joseph M. Leal 420 W. Casa Grande Lakes Blvd., Casa Grande 520.836.8002 www.coleandleal.com E & J’S WI-FI WORK SPACE 304 E. 3rd St., Casa Grande 520.233.6261 FIVE STAR CARPET CLEANING 520.836.2152 www.fivestarcarpetcleaning.com GOOD TIMES ROLLIN’ Chauffeur: 520.251.8767 Reservations: 520.208.4445 www.goodtimesrollin.com HORSEPOWER CARPET CLEANING 520.426.1984 www.horsepowercarpetcleaning.com

We Take Trade-In’s! We Service ALL Makes and Models

Over 100 Used Bikes in Stock! www.AdrenalineAZ.com 3151 N. Piper Ave., Casa Grande

520.836.0583

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QUALITY FIRST DRY CLEANING AND LAUNDRY 2876 N. Pinal Ave., Ste C-1, Casa Grande 520.374.2472 RESCUE PLUMBING & RESTORATION LLC 520.560.1448 ROX TRAVEL 442 W. Kortsen Rd., Ste 101, Casa Grande 520.836.8517 www.roxtravel.com SERVICEMASTER RESTORE 520.421.0828 www.servicemasterrestore.com STAR TOWING 1201 N. VIP Blvd., Casa Grande 852.836.2500 www.startowingaz.com STEPHANI’S POOCH PARLOR 118 N. Sacaton St., Casa Grande 520.423.0305 THE LANDMARK EVENT CENTER 301 N. Picacho St., Casa Grande 520.705.7589 www.thelandmarkeventcenter.com

HOME IMPROVEM E N T A-1 SALVAGE 736 W. Cholla St., Casa Grande 520.421.1681 APEX HOME IMPROVEMENT 520.709.5895 ARIZONA LUXURY LAWNS & GREENS 407 E. Ft. Lowell Rd., Tucson 520.350.6125 www.azluxurylawnstucson.com BRUTINEL 600 E. 1st St., Casa Grande 520.836.5802 CAPITAL R CONSTRUCTION 3009 N. Rockwell Blvd #4, Casa Grande 520.858.6501 www.capitalrinc.com CHACON’S LANDSCAPING & IRRIGATION, INC 2498 S. Curry Rd., Eloy 520.421.3489 www.chaconslandscaping.com

CHURCH

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DESERT SUN HEATING & COOLING 520.466.1789 JUST PLUMBING 520.876.5878 www.JustPlumbingAZ.com MANKEL MECHANICAL 520.316.9120 PHOENIX PATIO SYSTEMS 520.836.9234 www.phxpatios.com TEE PEE SAND & GRAVEL 4970 S. Trekell Rd., Casa Grande 520.836.3879 www.teepeesand-gravel.com YARD SHARK 520.280.2565

COWBOY CHURCH 18171 W. Hopi Dr.,Casa Grande 520.560.2639 www.pinalcountycowboychurch.com


2016 YEAR-IN-REVIEW SPOTLIGHT

T

New Restaurants

he past year was an active one for the opening of new restaurants in our area. 2016 additions to the regional food scene ranges from sports bars and grills, pizzeria, sandwich shops, Japanese and Mexican restaurants and even Dunkin’ Donuts. Below is a sampling of new eateries that have opened up in western Pinal County during the past year.

BOSTON’S RESTAURANT & SPORTS BAR 804 N. Cacheris Ct., Casa Grande | 520.251.5196

One of two Arizona locations (Marana), Boston’s Restaurant & Sports Bar features gourmet pizzas and pastas, burgers and sandwiches, chicken/fish/ribs, a full bar and a sports arcade. Delivery and catering are available. BUBBAS BBQ PIT 235 W. Coolidge Ave., Coolidge | 480.820.7800 Looking for smoked chicken, ribs, brisket and pulled pork? Bubbas BBQ Pit serves these and all the fixins from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Monday through Friday. CARLITO’S AUTHENIC MEXICAN GRILL 1328 E. Florence Blvd., Casa Grande | 520.836.3185 Carlito’s Authenic Mexican Grill features a variety of burritos, tacos, tortas, quesadillas and combination plates

MODBOX BISTRO 973 Cottonwood Ln., Casa Grande | 520.233.6885 Open for breakfast and lunch, Modbox Bistro specializes in freshly brewed coffee, sandwiches, flatbreads, wraps and salads. Delivery available. SHO-GA JAPANESE RESTAURANT 1115 E. Florence Blvd., Casa Grande | 520.251.5405 Sho-Ga Japanese Restaurant features teriyaki, tempura, sushi and sashimi. Wine and beer available.

DUNKIN DONUTS 1306 E. Florence Blvd., Casa Grande | 520.836.1369 Dunkin Donuts is more than just “coffee and donuts.” They also serve up breakfast sandwiches, wraps and bakery sandwiches. EVA’S FINE MEXICAN FOOD 665 N. Pinal Ave., Casa Grande | 520.836.0016 Eva’s is back and now located across from the Holiday Inn (former location of the Native New Yorker). They serve cruzana, chimichangas, enchiladas, burritos, tacos and Mexican grill and offer “Bottomless (soft drink) beverages” and a full bar.

TOMMY’S BISTRO 913 E. 8th St., Casa Grande | 520.876.9028 Newly re-opened, Tommy’s Bistro serves a wide-array of pastas and pizzas. Home made soups, sauces, meatballs, lasagna and hand-cut steaks by Chef Tommy. Full service bar and Tiffani’s soon-tobe-famous Mai Tai’s.

GENO’S PIZZA 1649 E. Florence Blvd., Casa Grande 520.876.4646 Foot-long pizza slices, a 24-inch “Pizza Challenge”, toasted subs, wings, salads and gluten-free pizza are Geno’s Pizza’s specialties. Delivery available.

Catering for all occasions

MAMA CIMINO’S 13640 Sunland Gin, Arizona City | 520.466.6262 Need a Chicago deepdish or stuffed pizza fix? It’s now available in Pinal County - at Mama Cimino’s. Also serving Italian sandwiches, calzones, stromboli and pasta. Delivery available within Arizona City.

THIRSTY DONKEY TAP HOUSE AND SPORTS GRILL q 1601 E. Florence Blvd., Casa Grande | 520.788.6390 The Thirsty Donkey Tap House and Sports Grill features 40 ice cold self-serve beers, a full bar, east coast pub food and 28 TVs with table speakers. Food menu includes Philly cheesesteaks, gourmet subs, burgers, gyros and pierogies.

FREDDY’S FROZEN CUSTARD AND STEAKBURGERS 21467 N. John Wayne Pkwy., Maricopa | 520.568.5060 Vienna (Chicago-style) hotdogs are here in Pinal County – Freddy’s serves ‘em, along with steakburgers (original or California-style), chili cheese fries and custard.

Family owned & operated

913 E. 8th St. Casa Grande, AZ 85123

520-876-9028 HOURS

Tuesday - Saturday 4- 9pm Closed Sunday & Monday

❤ ❤

Make reservations early for

Valentine's Day!

Pizza Pasta Steaks Fish 20 17 W IN T ER V ISI TOR S GUIDE GOLDE N COR R IDOR LI V ING

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Apache Junction South Mountain Park

1

2

1

6

Supe

Chandler

1

1

9

60

Mesa Gilbert

Tempe

Queen Valley

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11

2

1

8

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87

79

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San Tan Valley 3

347

238

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Casa Grande 4

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Florence

Cactus Forest

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Arizona City

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Eloy

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Picacho Peak State Park

ks Rd

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Lin Park

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Ironwood Forest National Monument

Marana

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THERE ARE TREASURES IN...

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Saguaro National Park 16

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Globe

Miami

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Ray 177

GOLF

Kearny

HIK ING C A SINO 77

SHOPPING Mammoth

AT TR AC TION VISITOR CENTER

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Catalina 5

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Oracle

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San Manuel

MUSEUM

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In Arizona’s Golden Corridor - the area between Phoenix and Tucson - winter visitors and residents alike can find unlimited opportunities for for fulfilling whatever you enjoy! Physical activities, gaming, shopping, entertainment, exploration it’s all here. Check out the fine establishments shown on our handy Golden Corridor Treasure Map - and tell them you saw it here! This map should not be used for navigation or legal purposes. It is intended for general reference use only; any exact locations should be researched fully before setting out. Not all roads may be shown or named. Some roads may be private, incomplete or unimproved. Forest, park and reservation boundaries are generalized. The user of this map bears the full responsibility for his or her safety. © Copyright 2016 All Rights Reserved. Raxx Direct Marketing LLC.

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GOLF Dave White Golf Course

WHIRLWIND GOLF CLUB 5770 W. North Loop Rd., Chandler 520.796.4653 1 www.whirlwindgolf.com

SAN MIGUEL 1505 N. Toltec Rd., Eloy 520.466.7734 www.sanmiguelgolf.com

Bring in this coupon to receive a free bucket of range balls.

AK-CHIN SOUTHERN DUNES GOLF CLUB Hwy 238, Maricopa 480.367.8949 2 www.akchinsoutherndunes.com

ARIZONA CITY 13939 S. Cleator Rd., Arizona City 520.466.5327 www.myazcitygolf.com

THE DUKE AT RANCHO ELDORADO 42660 Rancho El Dorado Pkwy., Maricopa 480.844.1100 3 www.thedukegolf.com

DOVE MOUNTAIN 6501 Boulder Bridge Pass, Marana 520.572.3500 13 www.thegolfclubatdovemountain.com

2121 N. Thornton Rd | (520) 836-9216

Redeem by May 31, 2017

FRANCISCO GRANDE 12684 W. Gila Bend Hwy., Casa Grande 520.381.8200 www.franciscograndegolf.com

Need Storage?

DAVE WHITE MUNICIPAL 2121 N. Thornton Rd., Casa Grande 520.836.9216 www.casagrandeaz.gov/rec/golf-course

4

RANCHO VISTOSO 955 W. Vistoso Highlands Dr., Tucson 520.797.9900 www.vistosogc.com

5

SADDLEBROOKE 64500 E. SaddleBrooke Blvd., Tucson 520.825.3048 www.saddlebrooke.org

GOLF CLUB AT JOHNSON RANCH 30761 W. Golf Club Dr., San Tan Valley 480.987.9800 6 www.johnsonranchgc.com

 Air controlled Units Available  State-of-the-art Security  Open 7 days

A Storage Place of Casa Grande 1688 N. Pinal • 520-836-6080 (Next to the Post Office)

1551 Arizona Blvd, Coolidge • 520-723-6888 (next to Walmart)

Associates in Internal Medicine, Family Practice & Pediatrics Michael P. Ridge, M.D. Natalie A. Teng, M.D. Joel A. Braunstein, D.O. Craig W. Connor, PA-C Kevin G. Hall, PA-C C. Marlene Hoeft, FNP-C Derral E. Hawthorne, PA-C John D. Shull, PA-C 560 N Camino Mercado, Suite 7 Casa Grande, AZ 85122 www.cottonwoodmedical.com

(520) 836-5538 (800) 895-5538 Fax (520) 876-0878

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GOLF CLUB AT OASIS 5764 E. Hunt Hwy.,Florence 480.888.8890 www.clubatoasis.com

7

SADDLEBROOKE RANCH 59642 E. Robson Cir., Oracle 520.818.6403 www.saddlebrookeranchgolfclub.com PALM CREEK 1110 N. Henness Rd., Casa Grande 800.421.7004 www.palmcreekgolf.com

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POSTON BUTTE GOLF CLUB 6100 Merrill Ranch Pkwy., Florence 520.723.1880 8 www.postonbuttegc.com

APACHE STRONGHOLD GOLF CLUB Located 5 miles East of Globe on Highway 70, San Carlos 800.272.2438 18 www.apachestronghold.com

MISSION ROYALE GOLF COURSE 11 S. Mission Pkwy., Casa Grande 480.951.4444 9 www.missionroyalegolfclub.com

TIERRA GRANDE 813 W. Calle Rosa, Casa Grande 520.723.9717 19 www.tierragrandeaz.com

ROBSON RANCH GOLF CLUB 5750 W. Robson Blvd., Eloy 520.426.3333 www.arizonagolf.com/courses/eloy/ 10 robson-ranch-golf-club

See Pins On Page 14-15

H E A LT H/ BEAUTY BAY OF ISLANDS MASSAGE & SPA 992 E. Cottonwood Ln 520.836.7000 GREEN ORCHID SALON 177 W. Cottonwood Ln #14., Casa Grande 520.518.5335

IN - TOUCH CENTER FOR THE HEALING 121 W. Florence Blvd., Ste J, Casa Grande 520.836.2902 www.intouchhealth.usingessentialoils.com KELSIE PATE, FNP-C, AESTHETICIAN 119 E. 4th St., Casa Grande 520.836.6576 www.casagrandedayspa.com


R E A L E S T A T E LegendS reStaurant ACADEMY MORTGAGE 442 W. Kortsen Rd., Ste 104, Casa Grande 520.421.1171 academymortgage.com/branch/ casagrande ANNIEMAC HOME MORTGAGE RUDY BENITEZ 211 N. Florence St. Ste. 102-103, Casa Grande 520.836.7776 www.rudybenitez.annie-mac.com

COLDWELL BANKER ROX REALTY - JOYCE SOUTH 520.705.1272 joyce.south@coldwellbanker.com COLDWELL BANKER ROX REALTY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 1919 N. Trekell Rd., Casa Grande 520.423.8250 www.roxrents.com

CALICHE 1640 N. Peart Rd., Casa Grande 520.316.8041 www.calicheliving.com

HOMESTREET HOME LOANS LINDA BECHTEL 1620 S. Stapley Dr., Ste 100, Mesa 480.452.8815 www.Lindalovesloans.com

COLDWELL BANKER ROX REALTY 1919 N. Trekell Rd., Casa Grande 520.423.8250 www.roxsells.com

TITLE SECURITY AGENCY 421 E. Cottonwood Ln., Casa Grande 520.426.4600

Come enjoy great southwestern cuisine at Legends Restaurant at Francisco Grande Hotel and Golf Resort. Call 520-381-8110 to make reservations today and use this coupon for extra savings.

SWith econd entrée Purchase of First Entrée Must present original coupon to server. Valid until September 30, 2017 and second entrée must be of equal or lesser value than first entrée. Not valid on holidays or with any other offers.

7AM-5PM MON-FRI

Foreign & Domestic KEEP YOUR CAR READY FOR ALL SEASONS!

www.franciscogrande.com 12684 West Gila Bend Highway • Casa Grande, AZ 85193

10% OFF YOUR ENTIRE INVOICE

Never too busy for your referrals!

PARTS & LABOR INCLUDED, NO LIMIT ON DISCOUNT.

Cathy Taylor

520-836-6250

312 W 2nd Street, Casa Grande, AZ 85122

CRS, GRI, Associate Broker Email: cathyt@coldwellbanker.com Cell: 520-560-2083 • Efax: 866-650-4282

Over 30-years experience in Casa Grande Graduate of the Realtor Institute (GRI) Certified Residential Specialist (CRS) Personalized Buying or Selling Experience Customer and Client focused to meet your needs Iraq Veteran SDVOSB and OSHA certified

New landscape installation, landscape renovation, irrigation systemS and testing & Repairs, Landscape maintenance preventitive residential & commercial weed control, lot clearing/clean-ups, tree pruning/stabilization/removal

©2016 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Coldwell Banker and the Coldwell Banker Logo are registered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.

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Arizona

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BISBEE One of Arizona’s most colorfully eclectic historic communities, Bisbee began its life with traces of lead, copper and silver in the late 1800s. Through the ups and downs of the mining industry Bisbee has endured and blossomed into culturally rich community offering visitors a mix of art, music, history, architecture, outdoor activities, dining and nightlife. C A N YO N D E C H E L LY

The Canyon de Chelly National Monument is home to spectacular cliff dwellings found on and at the base of steep-sided canyons up to 1,000 feet deep. This is the best known of over a hundred cliff dwellings, mostly in inaccessible locations, which were occupied from around AD 350 to 1300.

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FO U R CO R N E R S You can stand in four states at one time at Four Corners Monument, situated on the Navajo Nation in Northern Arizona. Unique amongst Arizona’s many landmarks, Four Corners Monument is the only place in the United States where four states intersect at one point: Arizona, New Mexico, Utah and Colorado. G R A N D C A N YO N

The biggest attraction in Arizona is the Grand Canyon, carved out by the Colorado River over the centuries. Most visitors see the canyon from the South Rim, where there are numerous lookout areas all along the road and walkway running along the canyon’s edge. It is also possible to hike down into the Grand Canyon or take a helicopter flight over and through it.

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H O OV E R DA M Hoover Dam is a testimony to the ability to construct monolithic projects during adverse conditions. Built during the Depression; thousands of men and their families came to Black Canyon to tame the Colorado River. It is a National Historic Landmark and has been rated by the ASCE as one of America’s Seven Modern Civil Engineering Wonders.

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LONDON BRIDGE Created by Robert McCullough, in 1968 Lake Havasu City was the recipient of the world-famous London Bridge, disassembled in London and reassembled here. “Arizona’s Playground” can give you all the adventure you can handle, from boating and off-roading, to hiking and fishing, making this one of the most family-friendly Arizona vacation and recreation spots. M E T E O R C R AT E R

Meteor Crater is a meteorite impact crater approximately 37 miles east of Flagstaff and 18 miles west of Winslow in the northern Arizona desert. The crater is about one mile wide and 570 feet deep. Scientists say the impact was about 50,000 years ago and the explosion was equal to 2.5 megatons of TNT.

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M O N U M E N T VA L L E Y Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park straddles the border between Arizona and Utah. Wild West landscape includes jagged rock formations, dramatic buttes, and sand dunes. Visitors can do a self drive tour through the valley, take a guided tour or photography tour, or simply appreciate some of the views from the passing highway. PE T R I F I E D FO R E S T

Large pieces of petrified wood, along with fossilized plants, fish, and reptiles, have been revealed in great numbers in what is today Petrified National Forest in the Painted Desert. The park access road allows visitors to drive passed many of the highlights and short interpretive trails allow for close up looks at a variety of unique sights.

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TOMBSTONE Tombstone, a silver mining boomtown, quickly became notorious as a rough and tumble town, the best claim to fame was the famous Gunfight at the OK Corral (which actually took place in a vacant lot next to the corral), involving Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday. The OK Corral exhibit is there, as are many of the old saloons and the old courthouse, now a museum.


CASINOS WILD HORSE PASS 5040 Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Chandler 800.946.4452 1 www.wingilariver.com

HARRAH’S AK-CHIN 15406 N. Maricopa Rd.,Maricopa 480.802.5000 3 www.caesars.com/harrahs-ak-chin

LONE BUTTE 1077 S. Kyrene Rd., Chandler 800.946.4452 www.wingilariver.com

APACHE GOLD 5 US-70, San Carlos 928.475.7800 www.apache-gold-casino.com

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PR O F. S E R V I C E S AMERICAN FAMILY INSURANCE JAN HOBBS 275 E. Cottonwood Ln., Ste. 1 520.423.0122 www.janhobbsagency.com

MY GOLDEN ERA Office: 520.421.9302 Cell: 520.251.0878 www.mygoldenera.com

CGI COMMUNICATION 520.421.3333 www.cgi-communication.com

O’NEIL & STEINER, PLLC 318 E. Cottonwood Ln., Ste A, Casa Grande 520.836.7947 www.oneilsteiner.com

FITZGIBBONS LAW OFFICES 1115 E. Cottonwood Ln., Ste. 150, Casa Grande 520.426.3824 www.fitzgibbonslaw.com

ROX CASA GRANDE INSURANCE 442 W. Kortsen Rd Ste 101., Casa Grande 520.836.7660 www.roxinsurance.com

J WARREN FUNERAL SERVICES 525 N. Peart Rd., Casa Grande 520.836.8041 www.jwarrenfuneral.com

“We can’t explain it; You have to experience it”

Sunday | 8:00am 9:30am 11:00am Tuesday | 6:30pm www.pinalcountycowboychurch.com

Pastor Tim Pruit 520.560.2639 timothypruit@yahoo.com

Contemplating buying or selling a home in Arizona?

ORGANIZATIONS PINAL COUNTY VETERANS MEMORIAL FOUNDATION P.O. Box 11487, Casa Grande www.pcvmf.org

CASA GRANDE ALLIANCE 1460 N. Pinal Ave., Casa Grande 520.836.5022 www.casagrandealliance.org

BLACKBOX FOUNDATION 413 N. Florence St., Casa Grande 520.428.7050 www.blackboxaz.org

SEEDS OF HOPE 702 W Cottonwood Ln., Casa Grande 520.836.6335

We hope you will consider requesting Title Security Agency & the Casa Grande Team to handle your real estate needs!

Tish Sopha County Escrow Manager

FINANCIAL SERVICES $

EDWARD JONES - FRED TUCKER 422 W. Kortsen Rd Ste 103B., Casa Grande 520.836.0917 www.edwardjones.com

FOOTHILLS BANK 1433 N. Pinal Ave., Casa Grande 520.423.4900 www.foothillsbank.com/

Jan Sredanovich Senior Escrow Officer

Jessica McWherter Escrow Officer

Erica Ybarra Business Development

421 E. Cottonwood Lane • Casa Grande, AZ 85122 520-426-4600

www.titlesecurity.com

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SIMPLE KEYS TO UNDERSTANDING HOMEOWNER’S INSURANCE Winter visitors who own real estate in Arizona have unique insurance needs that should be discussed in detail with your insurance agent. Some items to discuss include: • Is your home vacant part of the year? • Do you store a vehicle either at your home or with a third-party storage facility? Do you suspend the registration while it is stored? • Do you rent out your home when you aren’t using it? This includes short-term rentals such as VRBO and AirBnB.

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o make sure you have the right type and right amount of homeowner’s insurance, you need to understand what it does and doesn’t cover. Regular homeowner’s insurance will cover damage from tornadoes, fires and burglary, but it will not cover the calamity of hurricanes, floods, terrorism or nuclear meltdowns.

BASIC PRINCIPLES

• Make sure to get enough coverage to re-build your home from bottom to top. • Choose “replacement cost” instead of “actual cash value.” • Regularly inventory your possessions and their replacement costs. Consider a special rider for valuables such as jewelry, furs and family heirlooms. • Understand “loss of use” provisions. These provisions will dictate how long your insurer will pay rent while your home is rebuilt or repaired.

WHAT ISN’T COVERED • • • • • •

Home office equipment Damage from neglect and poor maintenance practices Losses caused by pests such as insects, rodents and pets Sewer backups and mold In Case of Disaster Get in touch with your insurance company as soon as possible. • Begin checking for damage and take photos to document calamity. Make quick fixes and temporary repairs to mitigate further damage. • Be cautious of repairmen charging exorbitant rates and con artists impersonating insurance adjusters. • Read the fine print before signing anything! Be careful not to sign away future compensation upon receipt of the first check. • If a settlement offer is clearly unfair, don’t accept it. Learning a few simple principles in advance can save you a bundle, should disaster strike. Speak with your insurance agent to gain a better understanding of your homeowner’s insurance needs.

BEST OFFERINGS

• Look at on-line quotes and shop around, in general. Do some research to make sure the company is financially sound. • Consider the possibility of raising your deductible to keep rates low. • Get discounts by purchasing homeowner’s and auto insurance from the same company. • Consider an umbrella policy to protect against lawsuits. • Ask if special discounts are available. Some companies offer discounts to longtime customers, seniors, and non-smokers. • Monitor and maintain a good credit score • Unless you plan to file a claim, don’t report damages.

520.836.7660 ROXINSURANCE.COM

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We Specialize in Home and Auto Solutions for Winter Residents. Coverage available for Park Models and Golf Carts too!

520.836.7660 ROXINSURANCE.COM

We’ll give you a $ 10 gas/grocery card when you let us q uote your insurance!

HOME • AUTO • RV • PARK MODELS • GOLF CARTS • ATVS • MOTORCYCLES Offer #Shop17 and is limited to the first 25 respondents. Must provide coupon code at the time of quote to qualify. Offer subject to rules and regulations of the Arizona Department of Insurance. Offer valid for households that have not received a new quote for ROX Casa Grande Insurance in the past 9 months. Limit one gift card per household. Expires 12-31-17.

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RETIRE LIKE YOU MEAN IT WITH A GOLF COURSE LIFESTYLE AND SO MUCH MORE AT MISSION ROYALE An active adult community in Casa Grande. New homes from the upper $100s BY KATIE SMITH

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hese days, 55-plus can mean many things. Whether you’re spending your days perfecting your swing on the golf course, exploring new interests, dedicating time to giving back, enjoying time with family and friends or taking off on new adventures, this time is yours. And we’re here to help you make the most of it. Meritage Active Adult communities in southern Arizona offer resort-caliber amenities, clubs and social events to keep your days full with exciting opportunities. And with brand new floor plans, you’ll find the perfect home to go with your new lifestyle. If golf course living is right up your fairway, Mission Royale is the place for you. Thoughtfully interwoven throughout the greens of the Mission Royale Golf Club in Casa Grande, residents enjoy the serene environment and well-manicured landscape of this active adult paradise. If maintaining an active lifestyle is top of your list, you’ll find an abundance of social and recreational opportunities to keep you going day in and day out, like two outdoor swimming pools and spas, fully equipped fitness center, pickleball and tennis courts, bocce courts, and walking and biking trails, not to mention golf. Inside the resident-exclusive recreation center, you’ll find plenty of club and card rooms, a billiards room and multi-purpose room with kitchen. Enjoy health and fitness classes like Zumba,

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yoga, water volleyball, aquacise, line dancing and more. There’s also a dedicated staff at the ready to fill your days with as much or as little activity as you’re looking for – from resident clubs and interest groups to social events planned year-round. Mission Royale offers an ideal location, set away from the hustle and bustle of the big city, yet close enough to enjoy its conveniences. A short drive from both Phoenix and Tucson provides access to major shopping and restaurants, sports and concert venues, theaters, airports and top hospitals. Within Casa Grande, you’ll find excellent neighborhood shopping and dining, medical facilities, golf courses and more. Mission Royale features two series of homes and ten new single-story home designs ranging from 1,476 to 2,439 sq. ft., priced from the $190s. These thoughtfully designed homes offer spacious master suites, open great rooms, beautiful kitchens and impressive optional features designed with the homebuyer in mind, like master retreats and dual master suites, pet retreats with pet showers and doggie doors, multi-slide glass doors for indoor/outdoor entertaining, expansive covered back patios with outdoor kitchens, wine bars, areas for extra storage and golf cart garages. Mission Royale is just one of three Meritage Active Adult communities currently selling in Southern Arizona. We also offer two great communities

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in Maricopa – Villas at Province featuring duplex homes for lock-and-leave easy living from the $160s, and Province offering single-family homes from 1,690 to 2,553 sq. ft., priced from the low $200s. Both offer the privacy and security of a guard gated community, plus resort-worthy amenities in a desert oasis surrounded by lush landscaping and crystal blue lakes. All Meritage Active Adult communities benefit from Meritage’s commitment to energy efficiency, offering money-saving included features like spray-foam insulation, low-E vinyl-paned windows, 14-SEER air conditioning systems, ENERGY STAR® appliances, energy-efficient lighting, water-saving fixtures, low VOC paint and carpet, dual-flush toilets and water-smart irrigation systems. Optional remote home management systems and solar power systems are also available. Move-in ready and quick move-in homes are currently available at all Meritage Active Adult communities, allowing you to start enjoying your new lifestyle even sooner. For more information, visit www.meritagehomes.com/activeadult or call us at 877-291-8747. Ask about our Explore and More guest pass, where you can discover the community like a resident for a day. Better yet, come visit us and see firsthand all that’s waiting for you in your next stage in life. Sales offices and model homes are open daily at 9 a.m., seven days a week.


Today, 55-plus is whatever you make it. Here’s to making it your own. Kick back and relax with family and friends and your favorite activities. Or blaze new paths through community service and renewed interests. However you define retirement, we say, “go for it.” We’ll help you achieve it with affordable, energy-efficient homes in amenity-packed neighborhoods, including Mission Royale right here in Casa Grande. Ten brand new floor plans from the $190s to the $250s.

MISSION ROYALE

2611 E. Questa Trail, Casa Grande, AZ

meritagehomes.com/activeadult

1- 87 7-291- 8747

Home, features, and community information are subject to change, and homes to prior sale, at any time without notice or obligation. Additionally, deviations and variations may exist in any constructed home, including, without limitation: (i) substitution of materials and equipment of substantially equal or better quality; (ii) minor style, lot orientation, and color changes; (iii) minor variances in square footage and in room and space dimensions, and in window, door, utility outlet, and other improvement locations; (iv) changes as may be required by any state, federal, county, or local government authority in order to accommodate requested selections and/or options; and (v) value engineering and field changes. Pictures and other promotional materials are representative and may depict or contain floorplans, square footages, elevations, options, upgrades, decorations, window treatments (such as shutters, drapes, etc.), landscaping, pool, spa, furnishings, appliances, and other design/decorator features and amenities that are not included as part of the home and/or may not be available in all communities. All square footages are approximate. ©2016 Meritage Homes Corp. All Rights Reserved. AZ ROC Lic #B-166223 20 17 W IN T ER V ISI TOR S GUIDE GOLDE N COR R IDOR LI V ING

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TENTHINGSTODOIN

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Arizona’s Golden Corridor

C ASA GR ANDE RUINS Coolidge — An Ancient Sonoran Desert People’s farming community and Great House are preserved at Casa Grande Ruins. Whether the Casa Grande was a gathering place for the Desert People or simply a waypoint marker in an extensive system of canals and trading partners is but part of the mystique. The Casa Grande was abandoned around 1450 C.E. PI C AC H O PE A K

Picacho Peak’s most noted historic event occurred on April 15, 1862, when Confederate and Union scouting parties met in the Battle of Picacho Pass during the Civil War. Picacho Peak is not a volcanic cone, but is part of a volcanic flow that has been partially eroded away. It has long been known for its spring display of wildflowers.

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TOM MIX MONUMENT A roadside memorial to silent film cowboy Tom Mix is south of Florence. On Oct. 12, 1940, Mix was driving his 1937 Cord 812 Phaeton when he came upon construction barriers at a bridge washed away by a flash flood. He was unable to stop in time and died in the crash. Located south of Florence along Highway 79.

S T. ANTHON Y’S GREEK ORTHODOX MONA S TERY The monastery is dedicated to St. Anthony the Great, the father of monasticism, the renowned 3rd century anchorite. There are chapels dedicated to Saints Seraphim of Sarov, Demetrios of Thessalonica, John the Baptist, George the Great Martyr, Nicholas the Wonderworker, and Panteleimon the Healer. The main church is dedicated to Saints Anthony and Nectarios the Wonderworker. 4784 N. St. Joseph’s Way.

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M C FA R L A N D S TAT E H I S T O R I C PA R K

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The history of the park’s building provides visitors with a look into the past. The building represents a transition between Sonoran and Anglo-American architecture with its wood-shingled pitched roof surmounting traditional adobe brick walls. Soil from the area was used to make adobe bricks which were laid on a trench foundation filled with river rocks.

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G O L D F I E L D G H O S T T OW N

Apache Junction — A living-history experience with restored 1800s-era buildings from a former gold-rush community. Tourists can ride a narrow gauge train, pan for gold and experience life as it was during the busiest days of the Goldfield town. B I O S PH E R E 2

One of the world’s only scientific research facilities in which scientists work in a sealed environment to study earth’s ecosystems, such as oceans and coral reefs, mangrove wetlands and Savannah grasslands.

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BOYCE THOMPSON SOUTHWES TERN ARBORETUM Discover the intricate beauty and many faces of Arizona’s oldest and largest botanical garden. Featured are plants from the world’s deserts, towering trees, captivating cacti, sheer mountain cliffs, a streamside forest, panoramic vistas, many natural habitats with varied wildlife, a desert lake, a hidden canyon, specialty gardens and more.

T H E A PAC H E T R A I L (S TAT E RO U T E 8 8) This 40 mile trail winds along urban roadways and ends in the rugged desert mountains. Travelling past the deep reservoir lakes of Canyon and Apache Lakes the narrow, winding unpaved includes the town of Tortilla Flat and continues to Roosevelt Dam. With steep cliff drops and little in the way of safety barriers it is not recommended for large RVs, SUVs, or caravans.

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THE MATTHEW B. JUAN - IR A H. HAYES MEMORIAL PARK Located in Sacaton on the Gila River Indian Community, this is a memorial to the men and women who served in the Armed Forces, protecting our great nation. Ira Hayes was one of the men in the iconic photograph raising the US flag over Iwo Jima in WWII.


DINING EVA’S MEXICAN FOOD RESTAURANT 665 N. Pinal Ave, Casa Grande 520.836.0016

COWTOWN 36796 W. Hwy 84, Stanfield 520.424.3233

CULVER’S OF CASA GRANDE 2453 E. Florence Blvd., Casa Grande 520.426.4225 www.culvers.com

LEGENDS RESTAURANT Francisco Grande Hotel & Golf Resort 12684 W. Gila Bend Hwy., Casa Grande 520.381.8110 www.franciscogrande.com

MCMASHERS SPORTS BAR & GRILL 1355 E. Florence Blvd., Ste. 139, Casa Grande 520.426.1472 www.mcmashers.com

AIRPORT TAVERN 1801 N. Pinal Ave., Casa Grande 520.426.4266

your local full servicetravel agency your local full servicetravel agency your local full servicetravel agency

Cruises - Ocean and River

Guided Tours

Hotel Reservations

Cruises - Ocean and River

Airline Tickets

Foreign Independent Travel

Cruises - Ocean and River

Car Rental

Guided Tours

Guided Tours

Hotel Reservations

Hotel Reservations

Vacation Packages

Including Southern California & Hawaii

442 W. Kortsen Rd., Ste.101 • Casa Grande, AZ 85122

520.836.8517 • WWW.ROXTRAVEL.COM

Airline Tickets

Foreign Independent Travel

Car Rental

Peg@roxtravel.com • Jerry@roxtravel.com • Tori@roxtravel.com

Vacation Packages

Including Southern California & Hawaii

Airline Tickets

Foreign Independent Travel

Car Rental

442 W. Kortsen Rd., Ste.101 • Casa Grande, AZ 85122

520.836.8517 • WWW.ROXTRAVEL.COM Peg@roxtravel.com • Jerry@roxtravel.com • Tori@roxtravel.com

Vacation Packages

Including Southern California & Hawaii

442 W. Kortsen Rd., Ste.101 • Casa Grande, AZ 85122

520.836.8517 • WWW.ROXTRAVEL.COM Peg@roxtravel.com • Jerry@roxtravel.com • Tori@roxtravel.com

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Home of the $200 payment! Visit us online at: www.HeritageMotorsAZ.com 520-836-4795

Dreaming Up the Ideal Retirement Is Your Job. Helping You Get There Is Ours. To learn more about why Edward Jones makes sense for you, call or visit a financial advisor today.

Fred Tucker

Financial Advisor .

IRT-1848C-A

442 W Kortsen Rd Ste 103b Casa Grande, AZ 85122 520-836-0917

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www.edwardjones.com

Member SIPC


AT TR AC TIONS MEDIC AL RAWHIDE 5700 W. N. Loop Rd.,Chandler 480.502.5600 www.rawhide.com CASA GRANDE RUINS NATIONAL MONUMENT 1100 W. Ruins Dr., Coolidge 520.723.3172 www.nps.gov

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ARIZONA-SONORA DESERT MUSEUM 2021 N. Kinney Rd.,Tucson 520.883.1380 10 www.desertmuseum.org

BANNER URGENT CARE 1676 E. McMurray Blvd., Casa Grande 520.316.0688

SCHNEPF FARMS 24810 S. Rittenhouse Rd., Queen Creek 480.987.3100 11 www.schnepffarms.com

560 N. Camino Mercado Ste 7, Casa Grande 520.836.5536 www.cottonwoodmedical.com When you need a local provider, give us a call.

JENKINS CHIROPRACTIC 1891 N. Trekell Rd., Ste 2 520.836.2969 www.casagrandechiropractor.com

COTTONWOOD MEDICAL CENTER

SIRCLE PAIN CLINIC 820 W. Cottonwood Ln., Ste #6, Casa Grande 520.509.6380 SUN LIFE FAMILY HEALTH CENTER 865 N Arizola Rd., Casa Grande 520.381.0394 www.sunlifefamilyhealth.org

SHAMROCK FARMS 40034 W. Clayton Rd., Stanfield 602.477.2462 3 www.shamrockfarms.net

FLORENCE PIONEER MUSEUM 715 S. Main St., Florence 520.868.4382 12 www.pinalcountyhistoricalmuseum.org

SKYDIVE ARIZONA 4900 N. Taylor St., Eloy 520.466.3753 www.skydiveaz.com

CG HISTORY MUSEUM 110 W. Florence Blvd., Casa Grande 520.836.2223 13 www.tmocg.org

DENTAL

DICK & MITCHELL D.D.S 721 N. Olive Ave., Casa Grande 520.836.7111 www.dickandmitchelldds.com

QUEEN CREEK OLIVE MILL 25062 S. Meridian Rd., Queen Creek 480.888.9290 5 www.queencreekolivemill.com

ST ANTHONY’S GREEK MONASTERY 4784 N. St. Joseph’s Way, Florence 520.868.3188 14 www.stanthonysmonastery.org

AGAVE DENTAL 2028 N. Trekell Rd., #107 520.876.9955 www.agavedentistry.com

DM FAMILY DENTISTRY 1968 N. Peart Rd Ste 22 Bldg F Casa Grande 520.426.0404 www.dmfamilydentistry.com

THE WINDMILL WINERY 1140 W. Butte Ave., Florence 480.313.2303 www.thewindmillwinery.com

ARIZONA ZIPLINE ADVENTURES 35406 S. Mt. Lemmon Rd., Oracle 520.308.9350 15 www.ziparizona.com

CASA GRANDE FAMILY DENTISTRY 1355 E. Florence Blvd., Ste 107, Casa Grande 520.836.0100 www.casagrandefamilydentristy.com

PREMIER ORTHODONTICS 1969 N. Peart Rd., Ste 24, Casa Grande 520.428.1865 www.yourazbraces.com

OLD TUCSON 201 S. Kinney Rd., Tucson 520.883.0100 www.oldtucson.com

DESERT SKY DENTAL 1550 E. Florence Blvd., Ste 104, Casa Grande 520.423.0022 www.desertskydentalaz.com

YANG & HORSLEY DENTISTRY 325 E. Cottonwood Ln 520.836.9685 www.casagrandedental.com

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ROOSTER COGBURN’S OSTRICH FARM 17599 E. Peak Ln., Picacho 520.466.3658 7 www.roostercogburn.com BOYCE THOMPSON ARBORETUM 37615 E. US Highway 60, Superior 520.689.2811 8 www.ag.arizona.edu/bta ULTRASTAR MULTI-TAINMENT CENTER 16000 N. Maricopa Rd.,Maricopa 520.494.7827 9 www.ultrastarakchin.com

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CASA GRANDE MAIN STREET 110 W. 2nd St., Casa Grande 520.836.8744 www.cgmainstreet.org COOLIDGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER 684 W. Northern Ave., Cooldige 520.723.3009 www.coolidgeperformingartscenter.org See Pins On Page 14-15

VISITOR CENTERS GREATER CASA GRANDE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 575 N. Marshall St., Casa Grande 520.836.2125 1 www.casagrandechamber.org SUNLAND VISITOR CENTER 3725 N. Camelot St., Eloy 520.466.3007 www.sunlandvisitorcenter.org

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FLORENCE VISITOR CENTER 24 W. Ruggles St., Florence 3 520.868.9433 www.visitflorenceaz.com COOLIDGE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 351 N. Arizona Blvd., #5, Coolidge 520.723.3009 4 www.coolidgechamber.org See Pins On Page 14-15

DESERT CARE FAMILY & SPORT MEDICINE 1968 N. Peart Rd., Ste 3, Casa Grande 520.518.5889 www.desertcare.org

MARICOPA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 44480 W. Honeycutt Rd., #106, Maricopa 520.568.9573 5 www.maricopachamber.org TRI-COMMUNITY VISITOR CENTER 1470 W. American Ave., Oracle 520.241.1142 6 www.visittricommunity.org MARANA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 13881 N. Casa Grande Hwy., Marana 520.682.4314 7 www.maranachamber.com ARIZONA CITY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 13640 S. Sunland Gin Rd., Arizona City 520.466.5141 8 www.arizonacitychamber.com

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MUSEUMS

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his area has several museums, ranging from art to history to Native American to natural resources.

The Museum of Casa Grande Preserves and exhibits the history of the Casa Grande region and the early days of Arizona. Numerous indoor and outdoor exhibits, including old black schoolhouse. 110 W. Florence Blvd. 1 www.tmocg.org Santa Cruz Valley Historic Museum and Visitor Center Housed in the Old Toltec Elementary School and featuring multi-cultural history of the Santa Cruz Valley. 3725 N. Camelot St., Eloy. 2 www.scvhmuseum.org

Casa Grande Art Museum Shows and displays from various local artists. Located in the house built by Gus Kratzka in 1929 as the family residence and is on the National Register of Historic Places. 3 319 W. Third St. www.casagrandeartmuseum.org Artisan Village of Coolidge Numerous activities and home of the Pinal Geology & Mineral Museum and Copper State Heritage Museum. 351 N. Arizona Blvd., Coolidge (Arizona Blvd. 4 and Northern Ave). www.artisanvillageofcoolidge.org www.pinalgeologymuseum.org

See Pins On Page 14-15

Ak-Chin Him-Dak Eco-Museum and Archive Preserving the Ak-Chin way of life through the centuries and sharing values and 5 identities with visitors. 47685 N. Eco-Museum Rd., Maricopa. www.azcama.org/museums/akchin Pinal County Historical Society Museum Indian exhibits, extensive bullet and barbed wire collections, cactus furniture, quilts and antique clothing, prison artifacts including hanging nooses, two-seater gas chamber chair, and prison registers, outdoor display of antique farm machinery, a blacksmith shop, 1928 Pioneer Cabin, vintage 6 fire engines. 715 S. Main St., Florence. www.pinalcountyhistoricalmuseum.org

(520)

Huhugam Heritage Center The Gila River Indian Community’s tribal facility for the preservation and display of important cultural artifacts and art. A repository for prehistoric and historic artifacts, cultural materials and vital records, a museum to display the materials to the public. 4759 N. Maricopa Rd., 7 Chandler. www.gilariver.org/index.php/ enterprises/huhugam-heritage-center

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“LOVING THE ART IN YOURSELF” AT THE ARTISAN VILLAGE OF COOLIDGE by Corianna Lee

The vision of the Artisan Village of Coolidge is an interactive place where all people regardless of age can fulfill their desires to learn, express their talent, interact with artisans and experience the joy of making through the arts.

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“L

ove the art in yourself…” says Constantin Stanislavsky, and the Artisan Village of Coolidge offers many opportunities to do just that! Located at 351 N. Arizona Boulevard in Coolidge, the Artisan Village of Coolidge is also home to the Coolidge Chamber of Commerce, the Pinal Gem and Mineral Museum, The Artisan Village Children’s Theatre, a glass art lab, a lapidary and metal arts lab, a fibre arts lab, a military honor park and an art gallery coming soon – just to name a few! But how does an unused school become a gathering place for artists of all ages?

GOLDE N COR R IDOR LI V ING 20 17 W IN T ER V ISI TOR S GUIDE

Jan. 1, 2015 the “North School” of Coolidge officially became the Artisan Village of Coolidge with a mutual agreement between the Coolidge Performing Arts Center Foundation and the Coolidge Unified School District. North School hadn’t been occupied by students since 2009 and was used by the district as office and storage space for a few years. Members of a team from the Coolidge Unified School District, The City of Coolidge and members of the community began researching the best possible use of the facility. Inspiration was taken from a community in Ajo, the maker movement and input from local artists. The vision of the Artisan Village of Coolidge is an interactive place where all people regardless of age can fulfill their desires to learn, express their talent, interact with artisans and experience the joy of making through the arts. Since that point, many classes and events have taken place on the grounds of the village such as performances, facility rentals and community events. One upcoming performance event is

the “Cool Town Music Festival” on Feb. 18. The festival brings a variety of bluegrass, folk and country music bands, classes, food and all-day fun for all ages. Have an interest in the visual arts? There are so many opportunities to learn a new art or enhance your current skills. Artists are on-site on Saturday mornings to talk about their various art forms, and lab tours. The Artisan Village has spaces offering a wide variety of labs. Come explore the ceramics lab, or try your hand at painting or glass art. Visit the maker space with the 3D printer or learn to use that sewing machine you have in the closet in the fibre arts lab. Classes are available with the artists for a variety of prices and for all ages. Want more information? Visit the website at www.artisanvillageofcoolidge.org or visit the Coolidge Chamber of Commerce to discover and love the art in yourself!


Coolidge, Arizona POINTS OF INTEREST

UPCOMING EVENTS IN COOLIDGE COOL TOWN MUSIC FESTIVAL February 18th ,2017 at the Artisan Village of Coolidge GARDEN PARTY March 18th , 2017 at the Artisan Village of Coolidge COTTON DAYS March 3rd , 4th & 5th , 2017 at San Carlos Park COOLIDGE AIRPORT FLY-IN First Saturday of months October - May at Coolidge Airport WWW.COOLIDGECHAMBER.ORG

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TODD GREEN, INTERNATIONAL MUSICIAN Playing over 30 instruments from many cultures. February 16, 2017

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The LIVING Interview (continued) ...continued from page 65 example, in ’74 I bought some mountain land – 710 acres GC LIVING: But you put that in your retirement plan. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah. GC LIVING: I mean you thought of your employees. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah. GC LIVING: And the first part of it is now Las Montanas. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: And I still have 350 acres there, actually. I got real expensive stuff left. GC LIVING: So you learned real quick that real estate is worth money? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah. Well, I had 190 acres out there at a Jimmy Kerr & I-10 and sold it to Trammell Crow. GC LIVING: Yes. And most people don’t know who he is, but he is a mover. That organization is a mover and a shaker. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah, they’re national. GC LIVING: Out of Texas. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah. GC LIVING: They are big shots.

HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yes, that was a big deal to make. GC LIVING: Now that’s where that huge truck facility is, once you go under the underpass, under I-10 on the way to Eloy. It’s on the right-hand side. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah and they built that in conjunction with somebody else, but then they sold the balance of 104 acres to Ritchie brothers. GC LIVING: Yes. That’s when the economy went to hell. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah, they backed off. I know they still own it, but I don’t know if it’s for sale or not. I still have 50 acres there too. GC LIVING: Someday that’s going to come into its own. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Well, it already is really. GC LIVING: Well, you also are the major partner in Toltec Road and I-10 on the northeast corner? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yes. GC LIVING: Do you also still own property on Florence Boulevard? Because you built the Chevron station. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yes. The Griffith family

owns the Chevron. GC LIVING: And you also own the AM/PM convenience store/gas station on Florence. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: It’s Harlyn’s business. [Harlyn’s son Harlyn] GC LIVING (Bea): Let me ask a question. As you drive around town, is there a building that sticks out in your mind where you think, “Wow, yeah I built that?” HARLYN GRIFFITHS: I would have to say it would be the Wells Fargo Bank, because that was the first very visible building of some size, and the hospital. You know, that was a quite a fete. We were just a small company, and here we are, the watchdog for the community over the contract. We had a guy that was overseeing that end of it. He was also involved in reviewing the building and the pricing of it. The builder was a Kitchell, and he picked up enough changes to pay our whole fee. GC LIVING: Wow. And for people don’t know who Kitchell is, Kitchell is a major player worldwide. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Well they just built the

continued on page 110...

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NEW YEAR RESOLUTIONS THAT LAST A LIFETIME by Nicole Youcupicio, Casa Grande Alliance - Prevention Specialist, ACPP I

Teens whose parents talk to them regularly about the dangers of drugs and alcohol are 50 percent less likely to use drugs, yet less than 44 percent of Pinal County teens report having these conversations.

S

POILER ALERT: It is 2017. A new year means fireworks, resolutions and starting off on the right foot. Every January, despite determination to follow through, we seem to fall short on our resolutions. What if this year was different? What if you set goals that were not only reachable but could have a profound effect on the lives of children? By strengthening our relationships with the children in our lives, and by having frequent conversations about drugs and alcohol, we can accomplish this. Does it sound too good to be true? Let’s see what the data is telling us. • Goal 1: Strengthen the relationship between you and your child(ren) Teens that have good relationships with their parents, or a trusted adult, are two times less likely to use alcohol and three to four times less likely to use marijuana. Children look up to us as adults. They want to be with us and they want to be heard. Just “be” with them. One way to nourish these relationships is by having family dinners five to seven times a week, whether at home or at a restaurant. It is not about the food being eaten, but about the conversation and adult-child engagement that takes place at a dinner table.1

• Goal 2: Talk to your child(ren) regularly (regularly being the key word) about the dangers of drugs and alcohol. You might be thinking that these conversations will fall 100

GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR OR LI LIVVING ING • YOU!

on deaf ears. As adults we sometimes believe that once children become teenagers they don’t listen to us anymore and we don’t hold any influence over their decision to use drugs and alcohol. Parents are actually the greatest influence on a child’s decision to use drugs or not! Teens whose parents talk to them regularly about the dangers of drugs and alcohol are 50 percent less likely to use drugs, yet less than 44 percent of Pinal County teens report having these conversations.2,3 We need to correct this. We need to have these conversations and have them frequently. It could be the determining factor of whether or not a youth ever tries a drug. So, are you with me? These resolutions not only strengthen the relationships within your family but can also help prevent your child from ever using drugs and alcohol. As role models in youth’s lives we have the influence needed to make a difference. Let’s use these powers for good! Be the trusted adult your child needs. If you would like more information on how to talk with your child about drugs and alcohol, go to: www.CasaGrandeAlliance.org or call 520-836-5022. 1.

The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, The Importance of Family Dinners VIII. (Sept. 2012).

2.

Partnership for Drug-Free Kids, Parents: What You Say — and What You Do — Matters to Your Kids. (March 2011).

3.

Arizona Criminal Justice Commission, Arizona Youth Survey. (2014).

HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


1460 N. Pinal Avenue

WINTER 2017 • HOME & GARDEN EDITION

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Special Section:

2017 DESIGN TRENDS What’s hot and what’s not! by Staff Reports

Sherwin-Williams Poised Taupe

A

Paint

s 2016 comes to a close, that means the various DIY shows and magazines come out with the hot new trends for 2017. Here’s a roundup of what to consider incorporating into your home this year and what to think about replacing.

Check out the Sherwin Williams Color of the Year: Poised Taupe. Tans are old-school. Griege is the “in” color group. Not quite grey, not quite beige but a changeling blend of the two. Griege tones can be both warm and cool depending on lighting and accessories.

IN:

Cerused Wood

A colored wax is applied to the wood to create contrast between the grain and the rest of the surface. Oak is the go-to wood due to its characteristic open grain.

Nailhead Details

These familiar upholsterers nails are making a comeback and showing up in surprising places, including as decorative trim on wood tables.

Smart Home Features

Technology is quickly changing our homes. USB charging outlets are a welcome addition to kitchen islands, as well as den and bedroom outlets. No longer do you have to get up to adjust the thermostat, just use your smart phone. From seeing who is at the door to turning on/off lights, many home features can be controlled at a touch of a button on your phone.

Subway Tile

This classic rectangular tile comes in a variety of sizes and materials including ceramic, porcelain and glass. 102

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Matte-finish Appliances

While the finish has been around since 2012, a warm, metallic gray called “slate” is gaining ground over stainless steel.

Marble

While granite is still a popular counter material, marble is quickly gaining ground, not only for counters but for flooring. Even marble-patterned wallpapers are a hit this year!

Wood-look Tile

With the durability of tile and the look of hardwood, it’s no wonder more and more people are installing this tile instead of laminate.

HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


Farmhouse Decor

From barn doors to reclaimed wood, the elements of this style blend rustic with homey and inviting!

Indoor Plants

Herbs, flowers and greenery can make any room brighter.

OUT: Unused Furniture

The trend a few years back was a formal living room with family room for everyday use or a formal dining room and either an eat-in kitchen or breakfast nook. The formal living area is seeing more use as a media room, game room or even a children’s indoor playroom these days.

WINTER 2017 • HOME & GARDEN EDITION

Polished Concrete Counters and Flooring The ultimate in no-wax flooring. Skilled con-

tractors can finish in a variety of colors and designs. From mirror finish to a rustic patina, the choices are endless.

Oversized Furniture

Strictly Antiques

Brushed-metal Finish

Kitchen Islands

Designers now say to scale your furniture, especially your living room set, to the room. Two loveseats in a small room make the room appear larger whereas cramming a sectional into the corner feels crowded. Sleek and shiny is popular while the brushed versions are passé. Believe it or not - polished brass is starting to return.

Mix it up! Your prized family heirloom will stand out in a good way with more modern finishes. Avoid only using period furniture unless you want your room to appear as if it belonged in a museum. Islands in the middle of the room are being replaced by a peninsula, anchored by a wall.

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Special Section: Home & Garden

TOURS THROUGH HISTORY

Step into the sights and stories of the past at the 32nd Annual Florence Historic Home Tour by John Nixon, Florence Parks and Recreation Department

I

t is time once again for the 32nd Annual Historic Florence Home Tour! This year’s event, on Saturday Feb. 11, features diverse architectural styles in over 17 homes and historical structures. Visitors can soak in the sights on foot or utilize local transportation for the route, which begins in downtown Florence. The theme for this year’s home tour is “Florence: Born of Adobe Brick and the Frontier Spirit,” and this will be demonstrated in several accompanying events. Attendees can enjoy two re-enactments of Pearl Hart, female stagecoach robber, performed by the San Tan Foothills High School Drama Club at 11a.m. and 1 p.m. As well, members of the Buffalo Soldiers will present a camp re-enactment and presentation at 2 p.m. at the Pinal County Historical Museum. The Florence Arts and Culture Commission will present a Quick Draw Art Event beginning at 10:00 a.m. All events are open to attendees of the home tour. The William Clarke House is an excellent example of the Late Transitional Style of architecture; a blending of Sonoran adobe walls, elegantly detailed Anglo-Victorian entrance porch and louvered bay window. The interior was furnished with an impressive array of Eastlake Period furniture including a square grand piano used by Clarke’s wife who taught music lessons. The piano is now located in the Pinal County Historical Museum. The Clarke House was originally a wedding present for Ella Clarke and also served as a community cultural center with concerts, recitals, tea parties and ice cream socials. A crawlspace in the attic, accessible only be a ladder, provided a hiding place during Apache raids. William Clarke came to Arizona as a surveyor, and like so many new settlers, he turned to mining at the Silver King Mine where was an engineer. Arizona’s last territorial governor, Richard E. Sloan, lived here when he served as Pinal County District Attorney from 1885 to 1888. Now the house is the offices of the Florence Reminder and Blade Tribune newspaper. The building was renovated and restored by Donovan M. Kramer, Sr. of Casa Grande Valley Newspapers, Inc. The event runs 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and tickets are $15 for adults the day of the event or $10 in advance. Advance tickets are

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available at the Pinal County Historical Society and Museum, Greater Florence Chamber of Commerce and the Florence Library and Community Center.

For questions or more information, please contact John Nixon at the Florence Parks and Recreation Department at (520) 868-7699 or at www.florenceaz.gov/hometour.

HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


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Special Section: Home & Garden

DIY RAISED BED PLANTERS by Staff Reports

T

here is nothing as flavorful and good for you as homegrown fruits and vegetables. But the idea of planting a garden is daunting for many. An easier method is to install a raised bed planter or two in your backyard. If you have basic DIY skills, you can make the planters in just a couple of hours. A simple Google search yields many examples and instructions. A little time searching for what you have in mind will save you hours of wandering the home improvement stores looking lost! January is the perfect time in Arizona to plant many favorites such as beets, Swiss chard, carrots and radishes as seeds. Even more edible garden items such as cucumbers and melons can be planted from seed in February. Your local nursery or agriculture extension office can help you with ideas. You don't need a lot of space for a raised bed planter. Herbs make a great way to get started in a half-barrel. Just select three or four varieties and you are ready to go.

Starting your planter

The first step is to measure the area where you want to place the planter. Decide not only the length and width, but the height you want – the higher the bed, the less bending over later on. Take the measurements with you to your local home improvement store. Some stores will even cut

the larger pieces of lumber for you - just ask! What you’ll need • Lumber - Garden ties (aka railroad ties), 2x12 or 4x8 or other lumber cut to desired size • Screws – Two inches longer than the width of your lumber. Use 2 or 3 per corner • Hammer or mallet • Drill • Level

Building your planter

Many yards in Arizona feature desert landscaping or rock. Clear and level the area to place your planter. Save the rock – you'll need it in a few steps! If your yard is grass, you will need to remove the grass down to bare dirt. Place your wood timbers and check for level. Having your planter level will make watering much easier. Once level, secure the corners using screws. Drilling a pilot hole first will make this a much easier task. Have some-

one help hold the opposite corner square while you drill the first side and then move to the opposite corner. Your planter can be as high or as low as you want. Remember, the higher the planter, the less you have to bend over while you are working on your garden! Your planters can be any shape or size desired. They can even be set as a pattern to create a path. There is no right or wrong way! You are limited only by your imagination. Once you have achieved the desired height, place the rock or gravel you removed earlier, sparingly, back in your planter to improve drainage. Fill your planter with commercial topsoil, free from weeds. You can plant from seed or purchase starter plants at the same time you are getting your lumber. Plant climbing vegetables on one side where you can install a trellis. Don't forget to include colorful flowers to attract bees for pollination! Planting guide: http://extension.arizona.edu/sites/ extension.arizona.edu/files/pubs/az1005.pdf

JANUARY PLANTING GUIDE TRANSPLANTS: Artichokes Asparagus Broccoli Cabbage Cauliflower Chard Kohlrabi Lettuce

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FROM SEED: Beets Boy Choy Carrots Collard Greens Endive Leeks Green Onions Peas Potatoes Radish Rutabagas Spinach Turnips

HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


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The LIVING Interview (continued) ...continued from page 101 new Harkins Theatre and half the stuff up there. [HARLYN GRIFFITHS now looks at some old newspaper clippings during the interview and reflects on the past.] HARLYN GRIFFITHS: I’ll give you an example of how smart I was. I was involved with the superintendent of the high school when I was a senior and I don’t why I was with him, but I was in a car with him and I had gone to Minneapolis with him. We were outside of Minneapolis about 10 minutes or so and he says, “What are you going to do when you get out of high school?” I said, “I don’t know.” He says, “Why don’t you be a bum?”(Laughs) I think he meant travel a little bit before you get too tied down. (Laughs) Why would you want to be a bum? I’ll never forget that. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Well, here in this photo is when I was running for City Council. I think it says “1967” up there. GC LIVING: Good Lord, look at you! You’re a kid. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: I was 32 years old.

GC LIVING: That is really something. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: [Pointing at clipping] This is the first house in Mi Casa Estates. That was my home. It had a swimming pool and a tennis court. GC LIVING: That was the very first house? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah, then right next to me was Bill Stanfield’s house. GC LIVING: I know right where it is. And Coxon lived right across the street from you? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yes GC LIVING: And the fireplace that you built for Coxon was with bricks from the Central School, did you know that? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah, I most likely did. GC LIVING: Before you go, let me ask you one last question. Of the group, who do you miss? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: I do miss Monsignor Ross, of course. He retired and he moved into a house I had built, in Rancho Grande, and that’s another cute story, because he made one of the bedrooms in the house a little chapel. And for quite a period of time I would go and he and I would have Mass together. GC LIVING: I have to tell you last Sunday I was

in the Sistine Chapel and looking up and it’s amazing. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: We’ve been there. I’ve been to Rome at least three times, but when I go to Europe I like to get into the smaller towns and old churches. GC LIVING: That’s what we do. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: I look at that and wonder, “How in the hell did they get this big block up?” GC LIVING: Well, and having been in the construction business, you wonder how in the hell did these people do this? HARLYN GRIFFITHS: Yeah. Dorothy and I actually did travel a lot. GC LIVING: Well you owned a travel agency. You guys did a lot of traveling. HARLYN GRIFFITHS: And it was fun. We only had one trip major trip since 9/11. When we first started going to New York, we would go several times at Christmas and spend typically four or five days to go to the plays. But I was running in those days, and I was running in Central Park when it was supposedly not safe, you know. 

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Special Section: Home & Garden

10 COMMON POISONOUS PLANTS FOR DOGS AND CATS by Gigi McWherter

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aving to deal with a pet that has been poisoned by a plant is a very scary situation. Wondering who to call and what could have been done to prevent it is equally frightening. To answer the prevention question, here is a list of some of the most toxic plants:

For dogs 1. Autumn Crocus 2. Azalea 3. Daffodil 4. Dieffenbachia 5. Tulips 6. Kalanchoe "Mother-in-law Plant" 7. Sago Palm 8. Oleander 9. Cyclamen (Showbread) 10. Amaryllis

Oleander 112

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For cats 1. Autumn Crocus 2. Azalea 3. Daffodil 4. Dieffenbachia 5. Tulip 6. Kalanchoe (Mother-in-law plant) 7. Lily, especially Tiger, Day, Asiatic, Easter and Japanese lilies. The pollen from just one of these can be lethally poisonous to cats. 8. Sago Palm 9. Oleander 10. Cyclamen

Azalea

IMPORTANT CONTACTS: Poison Control Hotline: ASPCA Poison Control 888-426-4435 $65 consultation fee University of Arizona (limited information for animals) 800-222-1222 To answer the “What to Do” question, if you suspect your pet has consumed any of the above listed plants or if you are not sure if a plant consumed is toxic, contact your veterinarian immediately and, if possible, bring a piece of the plant to the vet's office. (EDITOR’S NOTE: Two other items to keep away from your pets - chocolate and rodent poison. Even a small amount of chocolate can be deadly for your pet, depending on the size of your dog. Rodenticides are not only poisonous to your pet; birds of prey are also affected if they eat a mouse, rat or gopher that has consumed the poison. If you believe your pet has consumed either, please seek immediate veterinary care.) HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


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Special Section: Home & Garden

TIPS FOR PREVENTING AND DEALING WITH WATER AND SEWAGE DAMAGE

W

ater is known for penetrating structural cavities and creating growing pockets of saturation without the knowledge of the homeowner. Unfortunately, it often requires sophisticated tools and technology to find the source of such water damage. If the moisture remains undetected, it causes damages that eventually lead to an expensive restoration process. IICRC-certified restoration specialists possess the skills, knowledge and equipment needed to dry a building and stop the source of the damage. They monitor conditions carefully to help prevent future issues and problematic mold.

Flood Cleanup Tips

Always be sure that it is safe to enter a building that was previously flooded. Look for structural damages that create falling dangers, electrical hazards and other issues. Wear rubber boots and gloves, and wear a safety hat that does not conduct electricity. Also, a respirator will help protect from airborne health hazards. If the building is known for containing asbestos, lead paint or other harmful substances, contact a qualified professional for help. These are some important cleanup tips to follow: • Act quickly to minimize the severity of the damage and prevent mold growth that may not be covered. • Ventilate the area well to help it dry faster. • Assess the damages to belongings 114

• • • • •

and the structure, and make a list of all damages. Take photos of specific damages if possible. If sewage is present, leave and have a professional conduct the inspection. Expose pockets of saturation such as layers between building materials to help them dry. Clean the area as much as possible when it is safe to do so. Confirm that all pockets of moisture have been thoroughly dried before starting reconstruction.

Sewage Backup Tips

Sewage can be one of the biggest dangers associated with water damage. The bacteria and pathogens commonly found in it can cause serious health problems for homeowners, their children and their pets. These are some important tips for dealing with sewage: • Anyone working on sewage should have current Hepatitis B and other important vaccinations. • Anyone who is on prescription

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• • • •

drugs or chemotherapy should not work around sewage. People with immune disorders, pregnant women, elderly adults and young children should not be near sewage. The affected building must be evacuated unless the sewage-damaged area is properly sealed off. Textiles, carpets and padding should be replaced and not washed. Sewage-saturated drywall must be discarded and replaced. Only trained professionals should perform sewage remediation tasks, and an environmental professional should inspect the property afterward.

Living in a home with mold and especially improperly treated sewage damage can have expensive and lasting effects on health.

Be sure that these tasks are completed before attempting to reoccupy the home. Living in a home with mold and especially improperly treated sewage damage can have expensive and lasting effects on health. To learn more about this topic, ask your agent about Water and Sewage Damage Coverage. HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


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Special Section: Home & Garden

THE DOMES: THEN & NOW “Then” by Bea Lueck

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LONNIE MIKKELSEN

ed on several websites including TripAdvisor. com, the privately-owned site remains popular with a variety of trespassers. In mid-2016, the Travel Channel show, Ghost Adventures, filmed an episode at The Domes using local actors. Shortly before going to press with this edition, it was reported that the ceiling structure of one of the domes had collapsed.

LONNIE MIKKELSEN

n Thornton Road, near Interstate 8 sit the buildings known collectively as The Domes. Built in 1982 as the headquarters of InnerConn Technology Inc, a circuit board manufacturing facility, each of the four dome-like structures cost about $150,000. The shells were constructed using a balloon, supported by a steel skeleton with three inches of polyurethane foam followed by three inches of concrete. One of the domes was used for a brief period of time as an office before Union Bank of California foreclosed on the property in 1983. The property deteriorated over the years due to weather and vandals. Listed as haunt-

“Now” by Sarah Diveley

T

he Domes have been a big part of Pinal County urban history. As a Casa Grande native, I can remember many parties in the 90s, as well as listening to horrifying stories of sacrifices and rituals. These stories always intrigued me, so I began to take photos of The Domes and the art that is displayed inside and out. If the walls could talk, they would have many stories to tell – stories of stoner kids trying to climb to the top of The Domes and not always making it, with some falling off and limping away with broken limbs. Or, the

bonfires and the tales of Hell hounds and demons that lurk inside. The stories, the truths and the myths abound. The Domes have been standing for decades and slowly falling apart. It's only a matter of time before they all collapse. The memories in the art will fade away, but the stories and images will remain for the people who have grown up around Casa Grande. If only The Domes could speak...

ALL PHOTOS BY SARAH DIVELEY, EXCEPT WHERE NOTED

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HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


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CURRY OF CULTURES by Tori Ward , ROX Travel, Cruise and Resort Specialist

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ast year, while preparing for an extended cruise that included India, I spent hours deciding on the perfect ensemble that would be comfortable as well as harmonious with our surroundings. I imagined my husband and myself gliding in and out of quaint spice, fabric and rug shops with the smell of incense wafting around us while gentle Hindu music played and we were greeted by the phrase “Namaste” everywhere we went. I finally settled on a pearl gray linen dress with long sleeves over which I would wear a saffron-colored pashmina. I selected a pair of linen colored espadrilles for my feet. The morning we began the slow idle into the harbor at Cochin Port I was up early, and through the mist I could see men in small fishing boats casting nets upon the water. Stepping out onto our balcony for a better look, I was smacked in the face with reality in the form of heat and sticky humidity. When we finally pulled into our berth and I saw the mad tangle of tuk-tuks

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and portside peddlers, and heard the constant honking of horns, I pulled out a sleeveless top, a scarf to keep the sun off my head and lightweight slacks. Cochin was loud, bright hot and crowded. Sticking my feet into black sneakers, I cast a sad glance at the pashmina and made my way outside. Cochin, or Kochi, is ranked the sixth best tourist destination in India and was the first European colony in what was to be known as Colonial India. The Portuguese, Dutch and British have all occupied Kochi and the influences of those cultures blend with the other pan-Indian communities within the region to create a diverse and harmonious population. We braved the crowds and waded into the mass of people looking for transportation into the city. We decided if we could find a driver with an air-conditioned taxi, we would negotiate a fee for the whole day. We were swarmed by drivers all clamoring for our business and trying to steer us toward tuk-tuks HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


Traveling • Dining • Entertainment

A colorful experience in India and cars parked without consideration of how they would ever be untangled. We finally found a driver that wasn’t as pushy as the rest and who spoke understandable English. He assured us that his taxi had an air conditioner. Well, it had air conditioning. But we didn’t ask if it worked. We told our driver, Shekhar, that we wanted to see the Cochin Thirumala Devaswom temple and the Chinese Fishing Nets. We were less interested in the more European structures such as the Bishop’s House, however, when I saw the beautiful Santa Cruz Basilica, I asked to stop. We walked around the perimeter, but I was drawn inside by the sound of a choir. I didn’t need to understand the words as all the honking and street noise faded and I realized I had stumbled into a wedding. The bride wore white, but her attendants were dressed in fuchsia silk saris. The church was packed with witnesses and family and I stood watching and listening for several minutes then wandered outside where a reception was being set up in a nearby marquee. WINTER 2017 • HOME & GARDEN EDITION

Photos by J Chinn: jerry@roxex.com As our driver dodged in and out of traffic, I noticed that there didn’t appear to be established lanes. The rule seemed to be if there is a space, some type of vehicle must fill it. What might have been designed for two lanes of traffic could suddenly accommodate five lanes, if the vehicles were small enough. At one point my husband wanted to go to the other side of a temple to get a better camera angle. Instead of driving around the block, we backed up the way we had come for a several hundred feet. Motorcycles dodged us – some with six or more people piled on board. Family motorcycles with dad driving, mom riding sidesaddle and children sitting on mom’s

lap and crammed between parents was a common sight. How the long scarves and saris didn’t get caught in the wheels was a mystery. The honking never stopped. After we left the church, Shekhar asked if we would like to see a traditional laundry. A few minutes later we arrived at Dhobi Khana where traditional laundry methods are still practiced. The laundry is divided into three areas. The first area is a covered ironing shed. There are bundles of laundry sorted into piles, such as linen from hospitals and hotels waiting to be collected. At the far end, a wrinkled and skin-thin, bare-chested man wearing only a short lungi presses shirts with an iron box GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

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When I entered the shop, the clerk put his hands together and said, “Namaste.” Finally, in time to go home, I had arrived.

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heated by pieces of burning coconut shell. He is 86 years old and has worked at the Dhobi Khana since age 18. The washing area is divided into 42 bays where men and women stand in water and pound and fling wet clothes against a flat stone. Water arches from the stone and tightly wound articles of clothing as they are flung and slapped over and over. After the clothes are beaten clean they are transferred to the courtyard where row after row of clotheslines dry the freshly laundered items. On the grass nearby large blue blankets lay drying in neat rows. Following lunch we visited the Cochin Thirumala Devaswom Temple in Mattancherry. I was struck by its golden serenity as it sat among flowering water lilies where palm trees were reflected from a pond’s surface. I marveled that it had survived the noise, attempts at destruction and pollution since 1599. It would be easy to focus on negative things in Cochin. Every structure that isn’t new looks decidedly down at heels and in desperate need of a fresh coat of paint. After three attempts at three different locations we finally gave up on the ATM machines. We saw many homeless people lying in areas shaded from the harsh sun and hordes of children trying to sell cheap items to unsuspecting tourists.

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However, there seemed a gentleness and warmth that I rarely see when I’m traveling abroad. While watching the men haul in fish from the Chinese Fishing Nets, I struck up a conversation with a young man selling beads at a stall. He was curious about American politics, Arizona weather and Southern fried chicken. I was charmed. In the midst of all this noise and crowding, people smiled and met your eye. They loved to have their pictures taken. They acted like they were happy to meet you. Their gesture of waving a hand down by their side meant everything from “I’m coming right now” to, “wait there” to, “roll down your window.” At the spice market the different types and colors of curry powder intrigued me. I loaded my bag with saffron, fresh nutmeg, vanilla powder, different curries and whole leaf green tea. The young woman who waited patiently while I asked question after question never seemed impatient. When I remarked that her outfit was lovely she asked me if I was interested in buying something similar and led me to a shop where I bought a beautiful red and gold salwar kameez. When I entered the shop, the clerk put his hands together and said, “Namaste.” Finally, in time to go home, I had arrived.

Expert Tips:

1. If you are planning a trip to India, you must have a visa. A travel agent can help you with this somewhat complicated task of selecting the most practical visa for your trip. 2. Late summer months are wet with monsoons that make the monsoons in Arizona look like a drizzle. Plan your visit accordingly. Travel may be less expensive in those months, but your visit may be quite unpleasant. 3. Recent changes in de-circulation and removal of all 500 and 1,000 rupee notes has resulted in 86 percent of the paper currency in India being useless. Removal of the larger bills is causing a shortage of smaller bills. Check currency conditions prior to arrival and determine if your travel plans will accommodate the use of credit cards or USD.

Victoria “Tori” Ward is a cruise and resort specialist with an interest in traveling and seeing the world since she first began to crawl. For more information on these trips and others, contact Tori at tori@roxtravel.com or 928-254-9968 HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


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GIVING

CASA GRANDE RANKS AMONG MOST GIVING CITIES IN THE U.S. Casa Grande has always been generous about helping those in need and supporting local charities.

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t’s official - Casa Grande has been named to the list of top 25 most giving cities in the United States by a recent release from Travelocity. According to the article, the list was compiled by analyzing thousands of social media postings, tracking such phrases as donate or volunteer to see which communities discussed charitable activities the most online. Described by Travelocity as “a small town with a big heart”, Casa Grande ranked 14th, behind both Washington D.C and Los Angeles. The only other community named in Arizona was Tucson, which came in at 23rd. Travelocity cited the Ride for the Warrior music festival and motorcycle rally which donated the proceeds to benefit the Pinal County Veterans

GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR OR LI LIVVING ING • FUN!

Memorial Foundation. This announcement comes as no surprise to those who call Casa Grande home. Casa Grande has always been generous about helping those in need and supporting local charities. Recent examples include last April’s Arizona Gives Day where Seeds of Hope raised over $63,000 in just 24 hours. Against Abuse has two annual events - the Taste of Casa Grande and the Seeds of Change Gala. Both events raise funds to support the organization’s domestic violence shelters. Dozens of additional organizations also raise funds to help those in need or to provide services. There is another side to the local generosity as well – the quiet and consistent efforts to help individuals.

On any given day, skim through the posts on two local Facebook groups CG Chat and Helping Others in Need. There, you will find someone seeking assistance with a food box, utilities, medical or funeral expenses. One name comes up frequently: Andy Salazar and Caring Hands of Pinal County. Andy helps in so many ways, from the back-to-school backpack drive to starting a secondary food bank for emergency food boxes, to delivering sandwiches to the homeless and helping them with clothing and toiletries. This year was the 10th Annual Christmas Toy Drive. Andy doesn’t do it alone. Hundreds of children have experienced the wonder of Christmas morning, thanks to the efforts of volunteers and sponsors, rallying together for the cause. And speaking of toy drives - this year was the 30th year for the Casa Grande Toy Parade and Auction, led by Dennis Beye, with the proceeds going to the Casa Grande Salvation Army. And let’s not forget another group that volunteers every year to ring the Salvation Army bells during the December Kettle Drive – the Western Pinal Association of Realtors. And if any organization needs a location to gather, assemble or drop-off items, Julie Mikkelsen at the Airport Tavern is the first to say, “I’ll help.” Also, if there is a dog in need, Julie is the proverbial stray magnet! From the physicians and nurses who volunteer at the free clinic, to the dentists who provide free services to area children and to the mechanic who fixes the single mom’s car so she can get to work and to the many people who slip a few bucks to the cashier for the person in front of them at the grocery store that was short of funds, to the winter visitors that volunteer thousands of hours at so many local organizations, the list is endless in the ways our local people help each other. As Dorothy said in the Wizard of Oz, “There’s no place like home.” There is no place like Casa Grande.

HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


60 Acre Ranch

16016 E. Cactus Forest Road, Florence $941,250 REDUCED - 3BR 2BA home on 60 acres of ranch land. This is the former England Cattle Company headquarters. Includes an equipped butcher shop, tack room, numerous corrals, squeeze chute and scales. Own a piece of the West - way too much to list!

JOYCE SOUTH

520.705.1272 | Joyce.South@coldwellbanker.com 520.423.8250 | ROXsells.com ©2016 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Coldwell Banker and the Coldwell Banker Logo are registered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.

WINTER 2017 • HOME & GARDEN EDITION

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INTERNATIONAL ARTS AT THE COOLIDGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER by Corianna Lee Green will perform with over 32 different instruments from around the world.

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D

uring the rush of the holidays, the Coolidge Performing Arts Center hosts many fantastic performances from local school and community groups, such as the Central Arizona Symphony and Desert Song Community Choir. After the holidays is when the performance season really ignites with international flare! Two upcoming concerts in particular are must- see performances this year – “Everything Fitz” and International Musician Todd Green. International Solo Artist Todd Green appears at the Coolidge Performing Arts Center on Thursday Feb. 16, 2017 at 7 p.m. Green has been writing and performing music since the age of 10. He now tours “as a multi-instrumental solo artist” performing for schools and communities and teaching master classes. Green will perform with over 32 different instruments from around the world. As part of his presentation, he educates audiences about different cultures and the importance of music in all cultures as a binding force for humanity. In addition to the evening performance, schools in the Coolidge community will benefit from an abbreviated school day performance, and a special lecture open to the public will be held at the Artisan Village of Coolidge during the same week. Dates and times for these events will be

GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR OR LI LIVVING ING • FUN!

announced. Advanced tickets for Todd Green are $10. Tickets will be available at the door for $12. “Everything Fitz” in an electric performance by Canada’s Fitzgerald family, three time Canadian Grand Master Fiddle Champions and Ontario Open Step Dancing Champions. “The band presents a program of music and dance which reflects their distinct Canadian culture, namely the rich tradition of Canadian old-time fiddling and Ottawa-Valley step dancing.” The Fitzgerald family features parents, Pam and Paddy and their children, Tom, Kerry and Julie, who have amazed audiences from a young age with their “precision and

musicality.” This high energy entertainment is new to the Coolidge Performing Arts Center and is the second of two stops for this group in Arizona. Performance for “Everything Fitz” is March 11 at 7 p.m. Advanced tickets for “Everything Fitz” are $15 and $17 at the door. Tickets for both shows are available in advance at www.coolidgeperformingartscenter.org. For more information on “Everything Fitz” visit theirwebsite at www.everythingfitz.ca. For more information on Todd Green visit www. toddgreen.com. Be sure to pick up your tickets in advance! Ages 12 and younger are free to all shows.

HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


Villago Beauty

Ask your lender about Pathways to Purchase down payment assistance program to see if you qualify for up to $20,000 towards your down payment and closing costs!

259 W. Caribbean Dr - Casa Grande $279,900 HIGHLY UPGRADED VILLAGO BEAUTY WITH LOADS OF STORAGE! • Taylor Morrison build with 8,125 sq.ft lot • 5 Bedrooms, 3.5 baths 3,519 sq. ft. • Bedroom and full bath downstairs for in-law suite or guests • Neutral paint, carpet and tile throughout • Upgraded, staggered cabinets w/granite counters • Stainless appliances (gas stove!) with extended cabinets • Wood blinds and shade screens • Ceiling fans in every room! • Spacious formal living, family room plus loft • 3-car split garages with built-in storage cabinets • Fenced swimming pool with pebble-tec finish • Landscaped backyard with extended paver patio

BEA LUECK REALTOR

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520.560.5671 | Bea.lueck@coldwellbanker.com 520.423.8250 | ROXsells.com ©2016 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Coldwell Banker and the Coldwell Banker Logo are registered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.


DOG IS MY COPILOT FLIES PINAL COUNTY ANIMALS TO SAFETY

by Judy Zimet

E

very few weeks, 30 to 50 dogs are loaded into a Cessna Grand Caravan at Casa Grande Airport. There is plenty of room in the back with all of the seats removed. Behind the wire doors of the crates, the dogs – a little nervous about the unknown – are still relieved to be given a new life. The dogs were at risk of euthanasia just hours earlier until Director Audra Michaels and her staff at Pinal County Animal Control prepared the dogs

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for their flight to freedom. Pilot Peter Rork flies this route and dozens like it several times a month. On the ground, Judy Zimet serves as ground control, planning and coordinating these life-saving flights. Together, they have saved thousands of dogs and cats. Dr. Peter Rork, a retired Wyoming orthopedic surgeon, pilot and dog lover, began donating his time and his Cessna 206 to animal rescue organizations in 2008. After the death of his wife in 2012, Dr. Rork contacted

Judy Zimet, a Scottsdale attorney, real estate agent and animal lover with many years of experience launching, boosting and operating small businesses. They created an organization that fed their passions – animals, flying and charity. Peter and Judy launched Dog Is My CoPilot, in June 2012, received 501(c)3 status in August 2012, and by the close of its first year in operation, flew over 700 abandoned cats and dogs to safety. Now, four years later,

HOME & GARDEN EDITION • WINTER 2017


they have a larger airplane that can fit over 100 animals per trip. The larger plane has allowed them to more than double the lives saved on each flight. Dog Is My CoPilot (DIMC) is a well-oiled machine that decreases the number of animals killed in shelters and increases shelter adoption by flying animals to areas where they are more adoptable. DIMC works with established nonprofit animal rescue organizations (AROs) to coordinate flights. AROs pull animals from open admission shelters and move them to safety in humane rescues, breed-specific rescues and foster/”furever” homes. When the distance the animals

WINTER 2017 • HOME & GARDEN EDITION

need to travel is too great for overthe-road transport, DIMC swoops in to fly them. DIMC flies as many animals on one flight as possible. Crates are packed in tightly, and when needed, Peter will leave his canine copilot Tia at home, so that one or two rescued animals can fly next to him in the right seat. DIMC flies 11 states in Rocky Mountain and Pacific regions. Recently, Texas dogs have been added to the list, as the Texas organizations drive their dogs to New Mexico for pick up. The benefits of animal rescue air transport are many. As DIMC widens the geographic circle of potential homes, AROs will find homes for more abandoned animals. Also, by providing rescues with the types of animals adopters want, DIMC ensures adopters choose abandoned animals rather than purchase from online sellers and puppy mills. Equally important is what the flights do for the rescuers, shelter workers, and fosters on the ground.

The first thing that one shelter worker, Heather, sees as she walks into the office each day is a line of dogs outside the euthanasia chamber. These dogs are stuck in an overcrowded shelter where life ends because of lack of space. Sometimes, the line is shorter or nonexistent because DIMC is flying a large group out of town, leaving empty cages and space for life. DIMC lifts rescuers’ spirits by giving the animals they love a second chance. Those rescuers who see their animals off at the airport are often brought to happy tears. There is no cost to the rescue groups. Everyone in animal rescue is slight on resources and great in need. Therefore, DIMC is solely supported by individual donations. Donors can make their gifts at www.dogcopilot.org and Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/ DogIsMyCoPilotInc. Information for rescue groups, stories of rescue flights, and opportunities to support the organization are available on both sites.

Those rescuers who see their animals off at the airport are often brought to happy tears.

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Yogurt-Marinated Chicken Kababs Ingredients • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

1/2 c. plain yogurt 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped 1 (1-inch) piece ginger, peeled and grated 1/2 tsp. curry powder 1/4 tsp. ground cloves 1 tbsp. grated lemon zest 3 tbsp. lemon juice kosher salt Pepper 1 lb. boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut into 1 1/2 inch pieces 1 c. couscous 2 red peppers, cut into 1 1/2 inch pieces 1 tbsp. oil, plus more for the grill 1/4 c. fresh mint, roughly chopped 2 oz. crumbled feta cheese (about 1/2 cup)

PER SERVING 401 CAL, 10 G FAT (3 G SAT FAT), 77 MG CHOL, 455 MG SOD, 33 G PRO, 42 G CAR, 4 G FIBER

Instructions

1. In a large bowl, combine the yogurt, garlic, ginger, curry powder, ground cloves, lemon zest, 2 tablespoons lemon juice, and 1/2 teaspoon each salt and pepper. Add the chicken and let sit for 15 minutes. 2. 2Place the couscous in a large bowl, add 1 1/4 cups hot water, cover and let sit for 15 minutes. 3. 3Heat grill to medium-high. Thread the chicken and peppers onto skewers. Lightly oil the grill and cook the kebabs, turning occasionally, until cooked through, 8 to 10 minutes. 4. Fluff the couscous with a fork and fold in the oil, the remaining tablespoon lemon juice, then the mint, and feta. Serve with the kebabs.

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LOCAL LIBRARIAN WINS BEST IN STATE

T

he Arizona Library Association has honored David Brown, the youth services librarian at the Vista Grande Public Library, with the 2016 Youth Services Librarian of the Year award for the State of Arizona. In the last year, Brown was awarded a $25,000 grant to build the Vista Grande Public Library Makerspace: an art, science, and technology center, which regularly holds art classes, 3D printing demonstrations, video game design classes and more for residents of Casa Grande. He has also developed a collection of circulating educational toys, telescopes and birdwatching kits for children in the community. He has also added Minecraft computers and iPads in the children’s area, as well as a creative writing station and Nook reading tablets. During October 2015, Brown was awarded the Horner Fellowship for the State of Arizona and had the privilege to study puppetry and library services for children during a three-week stay in Japan. Brown has a bachelor’s degree in television production from California State University Northridge and a master’s degree in the field of library and information science from San Jose State University. He has worked in both academic and public libraries over the course of his seven-year career in the field. He has also worked as a video editor for shows on the Food Network and HGTV and is a trained puppeteer, having worked with performers from Sesame Street and the Muppets. Brown is also an aspiring children’s author and member of the Society of Children’s Book Authors and Illustrators. When he is not busy writing or working to improve his community, Brown enjoys wrestling with his miniature dachshund Robocop, traveling and playing bocce ball. Come and say “hello” to David Brown at the Vista Grande Public Library to learn more about all of the great library programs for children, like Code Club, Maker Mondays, 3D Printing Classes, story times and more coming in spring 2017.

CONTACT INFORMATION: David Brown Youth Services Librarian Vista Grande Public Library (520) 421-8652 x5111 David_brown@casagrandeaz.gov

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Puzzles Sudoku

Word Search

Answers to puzzles on page 115 WINTER 2017 • HOME & GARDEN EDITION

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DaDa w nw nS vSov bo o boda da

Branch Manager #177235 Branch ManagerProducing Producing||NMLS NMLS #177235 (520) 421-1171 (520) 421-1171▲▲Cell: Cell:(480) (480)221-9826 221-9826

Da w n S v o bo da 442 W Kortsen Road, 104, Casa Grande, AZ 85122

442 W Kortsen Road, Producing 104, Casa Grande, AZ 85122 Branch Manager | NMLS #177235 dawn.svoboda@academymortgage.com dawn.svoboda@academymortgage.com https://academymortgage.com/dawnsvoboda (520) 421-1171 ▲ Cell: (480) 221-9826 https://academymortgage.com/dawnsvoboda AZ AZ 4420913936 W 0913936 Kortsen Road, 104, Casa Grande, AZ 85122 Co rCo p NMLS #3113 | Corp State r p NMLS #3113 | Corp StateLic LicAZ AZ#BK-0904081 #BK-0904081 dawn.svoboda@academymortgage.com

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Golden Corridor Living Magazine  

Winter 2017

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