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NEWS+VIEWS | MINING | AGRIBUSINESS | INFRASTRUCTURE

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05 P.5 renovating the image of mining P.10 mental health organisations P.16 infrastructure: war on waste P.22 hr in the modern age P.28 business: pecans and macadamias P.34 australian distilleries


Business News+Views

Business News+Views Bringing you the latest insights and analysis.

WORDS: Sarah Hinder

AERIAL DUST SUPPRESSION A P P L I C AT I O N .

Australia-wide Environmental Solutions Erizon, Australia's leading environmental specialist, delivers safe, sustainable, long-term and environmentally friendly solutions, that guarantee results, using Australian product and innovative technology. How eco-friendly are Erizon’s large-scale dust-suppression and rehabilitation projects? All of Erizon’s products are 100 per cent eco-friendly. We understand the importance of preserving our native ecosystems for future generations. We are committed to being as environmentally friendly as possible. Rehabilitating damaged and depleted soil is a difficult, but vital, task in Australia. Successfully reviving landscapes through soil remediation creates spaces where wildlife and humans can thrive together. Implementing good environmental practices during major projects results

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in benefits for communities, companies and government organisations alike. How effective is Erizon's large-scale environmental rehabilitation after mining? Put simply, extremely effective. Mines have a legal responsibility to rehabilitate their mines. We partner with many clients on their large-scale projects, using the latest techniques to ensure full site revegetation is achieved with a tailored solution that uses native plant seeds while continually monitoring results post-application to ensure positive outcomes. Erizon’s tailored approach to environmental site rehabilitation takes into consideration the climate, site size, soil and chemical properties in order to prepare an appropriate remediation plan aimed at erosion control, dust suppression and successful revegetation of even the most damaged and degraded soils.

What are the effects and advantages of introducing drone technology? Erizon utilises the latest in drone and imaging technology. Drones are used to provide 3D modelling, area monitoring and image mapping which, along with soil testing, allows us to map the rehabilitation area in a high degree of detail. This ensures that solutions are applied with precision and accuracy, and that all areas are covered uniformly, while also increasing site safety and granting us the ability to provide accurate quotes for revegetating large-scale areas. Post-application Erizon utilises some of the latest industrial drones. We can take advantage of multispectral and thermal imaging cameras and sensors in order to gain a deeper understanding of how our plants are performing. Visit erizon.com.au, Contact info@erizon.com.au, 1300 182 182. Environment ISO 14001

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Business News+Views

Grow our own: it’s time to wake up and smell the coffee In response to predictions of a global coffee shortage, non-profit institute World Coffee Research is undertaking international coffeegrowing trials, testing 35 vareities of coffee across 23 countries, including Australia. While Australia has a limited association with coffee production, parts of the country have potentially favourable conditions for successfully growing the coffee plant. Extreme weather events and a rise in attacks by crop pests and diseases are expected to damage the world’s current major coffee-growing regions. Meanwhile, “demand for coffee is expected to double by the year 2050,” according to partnership director at the institute, Greg Meenahan. “If nothing is done, more than half the world’s suitable coffee land will be pushed into unsuitability due to climate change.” For more information visit worldcoffeeresearch.org

Global oil and gas conference in Perth to focus on renewables This March, Perth will host the 38th Australasian Oil and Gas (AOG) Conference and Exhibition, a leading global event – and the region’s biggest annual outlook event – in the oil and gas sector. The three-day conference will cover topics highlighting changing trends in the industry, including the rising confidence of the oil and gas market, new uses for liquefied natural gas (LNG) and new energy. This year’s theme is ‘an energy shift’, with a focus on investigating how major oil and gas firms can add renewables to their production portfolios and supply chains. “Renewables are reliable, plentiful, and will continue to decrease in cost as technology and infrastructure improve, so it’s easy to see why some of the biggest companies in the world are embracing

them into their business as they aim to lower emissions, reduce costs and enhance social licence,” said AOG event director Bill Hare. “In a recent survey of AOG attendees 90 per cent said they wanted to meet new energy exhibitors in 2019, and 83 per cent had plans to incorporate new energy into their business.” The exhibition provides a unique environment for industry policymakers, experts and educators to network, last year attracting more than 8000 oil and gas leaders from 45 countries, including Norway, Scotland, Belgium, Malaysia and the UK. In 2019 AOG will host more than 250 global companies. The 2019 AOG Conference and Exhibition will be held at Perth Convention and Exhibition Centre, March 13–15. For more information visit aogexpo.com.au FEB/MARCH 2019

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Mining

Darren Baguley Darren specialises in the fields of technology, mining, agriculture, energy and business.

Renovating the image of mining MINING HAS AN IMAGE PROBLEM, BUT LEADING COMPANIES ARE TAKING UNPRECEDENTED STEPS TO REJUVENATE THEIR CULTURES AND REPUTATION. When most people think of mining, they think of destructive environmental practices, accidents, toxic chemical spills and the fractious community relations that result. When investors think of mining, they think of stock price underperformance relative to other sectors and question marks as to whether mining’s historic lack of workforce diversity is impacting on the sector’s productivity. Despite mining’s significant contribution to the economy – according to Deloitte Access Economics, the mining and METS industries contribute 15 per cent to Australia’s GDP – the industry’s reputation has become increasingly tarnished

in recent years. The toxic legacy of old mines had blanket media coverage all over the country, but less attention is paid to mining companies that buy old mine sites to clean them up. Similarly, vast open-cut mines are highly visible, but a properly rehabilitated former mine site can be indistinguishable from surrounding bushland or pasture. The Australian mining industry is highly regulated, but when a disaster such as the 2015 Fundão tailings dam collapse in Brazil occurs, the casual observer doesn’t make the distinction – or worse, thinks that companies which  FEB/MARCH 2019

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Mining

One measure many leading companies are implementing is taking a decisive stance on corporate social responsibility. operate in Australia have laxer standards overseas. Such negative perceptions can also lead to implacable community opposition and the loss of a social licence to operate. In the world of 24/7 news cycles and opinions aired in the court of social media, this type of backlash is bound to spiral. Mining companies are taking proactive steps to address – and change – their cultures and reputations, but there is still a long way to go. All these factors damage reputations and impact stock prices, but they also influence recruitment and employee engagement. Mining’s tarnished reputation makes it an unattractive industry to work in – the best and the brightest university graduates do not have mining at the top of their list – and many existing employees are attracted by the high wages and nothing more. While the challenge is considerable, some of Australia and the world’s leading mining companies are up for it. Most critically, they are starting to realise that addressing these issues needs to go beyond PR exercises. To rebuild trust with investors, employees, communities, government and the public, mining companies cannot engage in mere spin. Communication is vital – few people will know of the good you do if you don’t tell them – but must be backed up with behavioural changes. One measure many leading companies are implementing is taking a decisive stance on corporate social responsibility (CSR). While Nobel Prize-winning economist Milton Friedman may have dismissed CSR initiatives as socialism, more and more companies are seeing that the pursuit of profit above all else risks alienating everyone except shareholders. CSR is, however, a broad term, and the measures companies are taking vary considerably. Some are choosing to be more transparent about their tax disclosures. For example, in 2010 Rio Tinto began voluntarily disclosing details of the taxes and royalties it pays on an annual basis. BHP followed suit in 2015, committing to detailed taxes-paid reports. Other measures mining companies are taking to demonstrate their CSR values include increasing disclosure on climate change. For example, in 2016 Anglo American, Glencore and Rio Tinto shareholders passed resolutions 

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Mining

Fast Facts

$236.8 billion

In 2015-16 the Mining and METS sector contributed $236.8 billion to GDP, around 15 per cent of the Australian economy.

1,139,768

The Mining and METS sector provides 1,139,768 FTE jobs across Australia.

16.1%

Mining is the most maledominated industry in Australia. Women comprise just 16.1 per cent of sector employees.

calling for increased disclosure on climate change. The following year, The Guardian reported that BHP shareholders urged the company to “terminate membership of bodies that demonstrate a pattern of advocacy on policy issues at odds with the company’s positions since 2012”. The shareholders backing the resolution were concerned that BHP risked reputational damage by being a member of bodies such as the Minerals Council of Australia that “hold policy and advocacy positions out of step with community expectations” on issues such as climate change and energy policy. In a similar vein, several mining companies have started reporting against voluntary sustainability standards such as the Carbon Disclosure Project, the Global Reporting Initiative and the Task Force on Climaterelated Financial Disclosures. Others are taking more direct action. Sandfire Resources’ DeGrussa Copper-Gold Mine in Western Australia boasts the largest integrated off-grid solar and battery storage facility of any mine in Australia (and quite possibly the world). The $40 million ARENA-funded project supplies around 20 per cent of the DeGrussa mine’s annual power requirements and cuts its emissions by 12,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide per year. Other examples of direct action include empowering local communities to monitor water quality using a variety of platforms, including video, apps that access online data

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or the ability for community members to conduct their own tests. In all cases, this level of radical transparency helps keep companies honest. However, while some mining companies are tackling the long, hard task of shifting perceptions and driving behaviour change, there is little doubt that those companies remain in the minority. As an industry, there is still much work to be done, but the alternative is unsustainable. Coal mining, especially thermal coal, is on the verge of losing its social licence to operate, and this trend is having a broader impact. The mining industry cannot rest on its laurels, relying on reserves of goodwill built up in earlier decades. What worked in the past no longer works in today’s hyperconnected world. To sustain its licence to operate in the shadow of climate change, cultivate employee loyalty and win over key stakeholders, the mining industry must engage in a concerted, and multi-year, effort to repair its reputation and regain public trust. According to Deloitte UK’s Global Mining Tax Leader, James Ferguson, “If mining companies truly hope to repair their image, they must do more than change their messaging. They must also fundamentally change their behaviours around the way they mine, how they engage with communities, attract talent and deliver on their promises.”


Mental Health Support

Support when you’re struggling STATISTICS SHOW THAT MORE THAN 3000 AUSTRALIANS DIE FROM SUICIDE EACH YEAR. WE SPOKE WITH OUTSTANDING NOT-FOR-PROFIT ORGANISATIONS R U OK? AND LIFELINE ABOUT THEIR WORK IN PROVIDING ESSENTIAL LIFE-SAVING SUPPORT FOR PEOPLE IN CRISIS, AS WELL AS PRACTICAL ASSISTANCE FOR THEIR LOVED ONES. Sarah Hinder Sarah is a Sydneybased journalist who enjoys writing about Australian social and environmental causes.


Res tota Mental Health Support

R E G U L A R LY C H E C K I N G I N W I T H FA M I LY A N D F R I E N D S I S O N E V I TA L W AY T H AT W E C A N K E E P OUR LOVED ONES SAFE.

For many Australians caught in a cycle of struggling with their mental health and battling tough circumstances, life’s ups and downs can become overwhelming. According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, 3128 people committed suicide in 2017, making it the leading cause of death for Australians aged between 15 and 44. Meanwhile, the suicide rate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is roughly twice that of non-Indigenous Australians. Around Australia we have incredible resources available to support ourselves and those we love when we need it most. R U OK? is a suicide prevention charity encouraging people to look out for the signs that someone they care about is struggling, and empowering them to have a conversation that could change a life. R U OK?’s goal is to inspire people to take the time to ask: “Are you ok?” and to listen to the response. “We can help people struggling with life feel connected long before they even think about suicide. It all comes down to regular, face-to-face, meaningful conversations about life. And asking, 'Are you ok?' is a great place to start.” Meanwhile, Lifeline is dedicated to providing 24-hour support for people in times of crisis. The not-for-profit has more than 10,000 volunteers working around the country to help Australians doing it tough. Every year they receive almost a million contacts from people reaching out. In 2018 the organisation partnered with Twitter to offer support via the social media network, and they are currently trialling a

text service that they hope will be a gamechanger in making their vital work accessible to all. What’s the number one thing family and friends can do for someone who is struggling with depression, anxiety or thoughts of suicide? R U OK? Use our four steps to start a conversation: ask, listen, encourage action and check in. Make sure you’ve chosen a time they can sit down and talk, and create a safe space for them. If you suspect someone is considering suicide, ask them directly in a calm, non-judgemental way. Listen to what they say and allow them to talk about what is going on for them. Take what they say seriously. Help them find pathways to professional support, such as calling Lifeline or booking an appointment with their GP. If you are worried for their immediate safety, call Triple Zero (000) or take them to the local Emergency Department. LIFELINE Be open to connecting with them. Family and friends have an important role to play in reducing the isolation that can be experienced by people struggling with thoughts of suicide. At Lifeline we believe that no person should ever have to face their darkest moments alone. That’s why our crisis support line 13 11 14 is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, to offer support to anyone who is struggling. DEC 2018/JAN 2019

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Mental Health Support

R U O K ? ' S A N N U A L C O N V E R S AT I O N CONVOY VISITS TOWNS AROUND RURAL AND REGIONAL AUSTRALIA TO RAISE AWARENESS FOR SUICIDE PREVENTION.

When dealing with depression or anxiety, what support is on offer and how can it be accessed? R U OK? Our website provides a comprehensive list of help-seeking avenues for a variety of issues that people face. We all go through life’s challenges: grief, relationship breakdown, job loss, etc. When our relationships are strong, we are best placed to notice the signs that someone is struggling. You can find professional support for yourself or the person you are worried about online at ruok.org.au/findhelp. LIFELINE Our service is available to anyone experiencing emotional distress at any time. You can call our telephone line on 13 11 14 (24/7), or chat to a crisis supporter through webchat at lifeline.org.au (7pm to midnight Sydney time). What support is available to people living in regional and rural areas? R U OK? We are committed to reaching everyone, no matter their location. With reduced mental health services, isolation and climate issues impacting those in regional areas, looking out for the signs that someone you know might be struggling with life is critical. R U OK? has created a 'Mateship Manual' – a short, simple guide designed specifically to address issues regional Aussies face. Find it at ruok.org.au/everyday-resources. We also provide a set of resources specifically targeting fly-in/fly-out (FIFO) employees who are at risk of isolation and disconnection from friends and loved ones. Tailored guides can be found at ruok.org.au/work.

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LIFELINE We have 40 centres around Australia and 20 of them are in rural and regional areas. The message we want to get to people in the country is, when you call Lifeline your contact is kept confidential. Calls are not answered by your local centre, they can be answered by a volunteer anywhere around the nation. What about young people who are struggling with mental health? LIFELINE In 2017, twice as many young Australians died of suicide than on our roads. We have to get the message to young people that they can reach out to Lifeline for help. Our trained crisis supporters are highly skilled listeners who will talk or chat online to any person who is experiencing emotional distress at any time.


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Mental Health Support

And migrants to Australia? LIFELINE Anyone in Australia can contact Lifeline. There is a free interpreting service provided by the government for people who do not speak English. To access it call the Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS) on 131 450 and explain that you want to speak to Lifeline in the language required. The operator will call 13 11 14 on your behalf. Find out more at tisnational.gov.au Sometimes the most important thing we can do to support ourselves is simply to start today. What is one thing I can do today to support my own wellbeing? R U OK? Meaningfully connect with people in your life who really matter to you. When our connections are strong, we are more likely to feel supported and able to face the challenges that arise in all our lives. LIFELINE Allow yourself the time to do something you enjoy. And what is one thing I can do today to support other people in my life? R U OK? Visit them, phone them, check in with them, ask them how things are really going in their life. Have

a meaningful conversation that allows them to open up and tell you what’s going on with them. It’s often said that the things that keep us up at night aren’t as bad when you’ve shared them with a friend, and that heartfelt conversation can be a great starting point to supporting someone. LIFELINE Look out for each other. When you notice a change in behaviour, check it out. Ask your friend or family member if they are ok. If they’re not, you can call Lifeline for advice on how best to help them, or ask them to call Lifeline for themselves, or suggest taking them to a GP. If life is in danger always call 000. How can I get involved with and support your work? R U OK? Familiarise yourself with the free resources on our website to help navigate the conversation when someone says: “No, I’m not ok.” You can host community, school or workplace events that integrate the R U OK? message, participate in challenges such as fun runs and walks to increase awareness, share our message on social media and inspire others to look out for those in your world, become workplace champions or become community ambassadors. Our website is a great starting point for

APPS

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BEYONDNOW Beyond Blue’s app to help create a suicide safety plan when experiencing crisis or distress.

HEADGEAR An engaging and anonymous way to assess and monitor your mental health.

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WELL MAN Practical information and skills for men’s mental health and resources for men considering suicide.

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LIFELINE EXISTS BECAUSE OF ITS TRAINED VOLUNTEERS, WHO ANSWER CALLS FROM AUSTRALIANS I N N E E D 2 4 / 7.


Mental Health Support

people wanting to get involved: ruok.org.au/join-r-u-ok-day. LIFELINE Lifeline exists because of our volunteers – and we always need more! We want to answer every call that comes in, but sometimes in peak service periods callers hang up before we can get to them. Our challenge is to encourage people to hold on until we can answer their call. We are always looking for volunteers to help with this. Head to our website for more information about volunteering: lifeline. org.au/support-lifeline/volunteer.

SUPPORT SERVICES R U OK? Support for friends and family of people at risk of suicide, plus resources to access a variety of organisations that can help with mental health and suicide prevention. ruok.org.au/findhelp LIFELINE 24/7 phone service and online chat (7pm to midnight Sydney time) for people at risk of suicide. 13 11 14 lifeline.org.au SUICIDE CALL BACK SERVICE 24/7 call service for people at risk of suicide. 1300 659 467 suicidecallbackservice.org.au GRIEFLINE Counselling for people experiencing grief. 1300 845 745 griefline.org.au KIDS HELPLINE Counselling for young people aged five to 25. 1800 55 1800 kidshelpline.com.au MENSLINE AUSTRALIA 24/7 support for men with family and relationship issues. 1300 78 99 78 mensline.org.au 1800 RESPECT 24/7 counselling about domestic violence. 1800 737 732 1800respect.org.au

MHIMA Multicultural mental health resources. 02 6285 3100 mhima.org.au SUPPORT AFTER SUICIDE Support for the bereaved. 03 9421 7640 supportaftersuicide.org.au BEYOND BLUE Support and resources for anxiety, depression and suicide prevention. 1300 22 4636 beyondblue.org.au REACHOUT Online resource for young people and their parents. reachout.com APS Find a local psychologist. 1800 333 497 psychology.org.au VIRTUAL PSYCHOLOGIST 24/7 online chat, phone, text, email psychologist service for farmers and rural Australians. Call 0404 032 249 Text 0488 807 266 virtualpsychologist.com.au/ home LIFELINE SERVICE FINDER Online map directory of health and community services. lifeline.serviceseeker.com.au MYCOMPASS Proven techniques to help manage depression, anxiety and stress. mycompass.org.au

R U OK'S C O N V E R S AT I O N CONVOY IN OUTBACK AUSTRALIA.

FEB/MARCH 2019

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Infrastructure

PLASTIC STRAWS AND COFFEE CUPS GET A LOT OF AIR TIME WHEN IT COMES TO AUSTRALIA’S “WAR ON WASTE”, BUT OUR FOCUS NEEDS TO SHIFT FROM MANAGEMENT TO PREVENTION IF WE ARE EVER GOING TO THE CLOSE THE LOOP.

Lisa Smyth Business and travel writer Lisa Smyth is a non-stop nomad, living everywhere from Myanmar and Germany to PNG.

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Infrastructure

Earlier this year Coles and Woolworths enraged customers and created a viral Twitterstorm when they announced they would no longer be providing plastic bags free of charge. Following in the footsteps of similar successful initiatives in the UK and Europe, Australia’s two largest supermarket chains were endeavouring to reduce plastic waste. But is Australia’s waste problem as simple as cutting down on plastic bags, straws and bottles? “Plastic represents only 6 per cent of waste to landfill in Australia,” explains Mike Ritchie, Managing Director of waste experts MRA Consulting Group. “If you want to make a difference to waste to landfill, you start with organics and you fix that problem before you even look at anything else.” According to the most recent National Waste Report from 2016, Australians produced 64 million tonnes, or 2.7 tonnes per person of waste in 2014-15. According to Ritchie, 20 million of those tonnes goes to landfill, and the rest is recycled… which is positive, right? Ritchie passionately disagrees. “Our recycling rates have stagnated at about 56 per cent for almost 20 years. Australia is currently ranked about 17th in the world for recycling and nothing is changing. Organics – food and green waste, garden waste, cardboard and pallets, and timber – represent 10.5 million tonnes of that 20 million. To improve our recycling rate we must get organics, which mostly come from commercial sources, out of landfill.”

No roads to China

Eighteen months ago China imposed a ban on accepting any more foreign recycling, and even though Australia only sent 3.5 per cent of its recycling to China, it created a lot of talk about a recycling “crisis”. Experts are concerned that recyclers who are unable to ship their waste to China will be forced into more expensive solutions, and recycling will become a less viable waste management option. But not everyone sees the China ban as a problem. “I think it was too easy to ship our waste to China,” says Nicole Boyd, GM Infrastructure Innovation for the Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia (ISCA). “Now we have to actually start thinking about how we can deal with our waste in a sustainable and economic manner.” What often gets lost in all the talk of the “war on waste” is that recycling is not a priority solution. According to the waste hierarchy, we should prioritise avoiding, reducing and reusing waste (prevention) long before we consider recycling, recovering energy from waste and, as a last resort, sending waste to landfill (management). “There is no such thing as waste; it’s all just resources,” enthuses Boyd. “We need to change our thinking. For example, when you build a tunnel you’ve got all this waste soil, but for somebody who needs to fill in a big space, that’s not waste. It’s about creating a circular economy – we have certainly encouraged infrastructure projects to think

Fast Fact

2025

The World Economic Forum estimates circular economy activities could be worth $26 billion each year in Australia by 2025. FEB/MARCH 2019

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Infrastructure

"There is no such thing as waste; it’s all just resources."

IMAGES: IBIS STYLES HOBART HOTEL.

about waste management and how they can reuse waste or actually avoid waste altogether.” According to Circular Economy Australia, their name refers to “an alternative model that anticipates and designs for resources to be either safely returned to nature or back into systems where they can be reused or renewed”. Ultimately, Australian businesses need to be thinking about what they can do at the top of the waste hierarchy instead of focusing on managing waste once it is already produced.

A green stay

Fast Fact

Perth

Parts of Perth are trialling clear wheelie bins to encourage homeowners to reflect on what they’re putting in them.

One company that has taken this to heart is the Fragrance Group, owner of the ibis Styles Hobart Hotel. Last year the hotel was named Australia’s first and only 5-Star Green Starcertified hotel. The certification is awarded by the Green Building Council of Australia (GBCA). Project architect Peter Scott of Tasmanian firm Xsquared Architects explains the development aimed to address holistic sustainability across a range of measures, including construction stage waste management, and reduced volumes

of construction and demolition waste sent to landfill. “We were committed to minimising end-oflife waste. That included the potential waste from the demolition of the building in 50 years, but also minimising the waste from regular fit-outs of the hotel. We selected more durable materials, fittings and finishings so the average fit-out cycle of seven years could be increased to 10 years. In this way two cycles of renewal in the 50-year life of the hotel are eliminated from the waste stream.” The hotel also meets commitments for energy efficiency, thermal insulation and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions – though guests will hardly notice the sustainability measures in place during their stay. “Our client wanted to provide a good hotel experience, not necessarily a good sustainability experience, for guests. But they also have operational commitments as part of their certification, with a waste target of no more than one kilogram per guest per night, which is about seven times less than the Australian average. It’s all about avoiding waste in the first place.”  FEB/MARCH 2019

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Infrastructure

“I’d say 95 per cent of our products are now compostable." IMAGE AND QUOTE: RICHARD FINE, F O U N D E R A N D S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y D I R E C T O R AT B I O PA K .

Completing the circle

The circular economy is as much about returning materials safely to nature as it is about avoiding and reducing waste, and this is where composting has a huge role to play. Food contaminates conventional recycling streams, and is one big reason why 10.5 million tonnes of our landfill is made up of organics. “Since we started in 2006, we have been trying to close the loop and find a viable end-oflife option, which of course is composting,” says Richard Fine, founder and Sustainability Director of food services packaging supplier BioPak. “I’d say 95 per cent of our products are now compostable, and we will be phasing out the remaining plastic items in the next two years.” BioPak doesn’t just create compostable coffee cups, lids, takeaway containers and cutlery; the company provides a compost collection service to make it easier for cafés, restaurants and hotels across metro areas to “close the loop”. Some groups, like the Taronga Conservation Society Australia, already have separate streams for food and packaging waste that, once composted, creates electricity and produces fertiliser. The organisation diverts 84 per cent of its waste from landfill, and is on track for 90 per cent by 2020. So if Australia is to meet its waste reduction targets, companies need to take a little advice from their local GP – prevention is always better than cure.

HAVE A PLASTIC free

summer!

FEB/MARCH 2019

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Technology

Is technology a help or hindrance to HR? ONCE SEEN AS PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATORS AND COMPLIANCE WARDENS, THE HR PRACTITIONER HAS EVOLVED TO BECOME ONE OF THE MOST POWERFUL PEOPLE IN ANY BUSINESS – AS LONG AS THEY CAN KEEP UP THE PACE. HR professionals have had a bad rap for a while now. For some people, a call to the HR office is akin to the long walk to the principal’s office, or a trip to the dreaded dentist. But, with the rapid speed of change in business caused by digital disruption, the HR function has expanded beyond simple support and is now a critical part of a company’s leadership team.

Stepping up

“HR professionals used to be the custodians of personnel guidelines, the rule book of an organisation, and administered people processes,” explains Peter Wilson, President and Chair of the Australian Human Resources Institute (AHRI). “Now the expectation is that the HR person will be a professional expert in that organisation and be able to deliver HR practice against that. They’re experts and they have a leadership pathway available to them.” According to a July 2018 report from Deloitte Access Economics, the HR sector will grow from 218,000 people in 2016-17 to 245,000 in 2021-22 – an annual average growth of 2.3 per cent. HR professionals with postgraduate qualifications are projected to be earning $160,000+ per annum by 2021-22. “HR is now a valuable contributor to a business’s success,” says Jennifer Gale, General Manager of Human Resources and Corporate Planning at Renault Australia. “Today, HR is just as much a business partner as finance, sales or marketing, and contributes to commercial objectives.”

The need for speed

There is no doubt that technological and digital disruption across all industries has played a large part in the expanded scope of the HR role. A 2017 Deloitte report entitled 'Rewriting the rules for the digital age' revealed that 85 per cent of Australian HR professionals believe fostering a better employee experience was their most important 

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Lisa Smyth Business and travel writer Lisa Smyth is a non-stop nomad, living everywhere from Myanmar and Germany to PNG.


Technology

FEB/MARCH 2019

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Technology

priority, closely followed by building the organisation of the future (84 per cent). However, alarmingly, only 9 per cent of companies said they understand how to build a "future-ready" organisation. “The greatest disruption to HR has been the speed at which business is changing. HR people need to be able to adapt to change a lot quicker than they ever did before, especially if they want to retain employees,” says Gale. “Social media has provided a lot more channels for employees to network and research job opportunities – turnover is much higher.” Technology is constantly changing how the HR function is performed. Digital tools and platforms can now help improve and manage the employee experience, support employee upskilling and self-directed learning, and provide data to help improve employee engagement and retention. On a global level, the 2017 report from Deloitte stated that 33 per cent of HR professionals are already using some form of artificial intelligence (AI) to deliver HR solutions, and 41 per cent are building mobile apps to deliver HR services. Wilson names the Australian Taxation Office, CSIRO and Cochlear as organisations that have embraced technology in HR: “These are the guys that understand all that

technology, and they’ve applied it in spades to how they manage their people.” Ivan Pierce, Chief People Officer at insurance company Youi, and his team recently won Best HR Technology Strategy at the Australian HR Awards 2019. “Over the past 10 years, there has been an increased need to understand data and apply a scientific methodology to people initiatives to provide evidence of their value,” explains Pierce. The Youi HR strategy includes a gamified recognition platform that reinforces positive employee behaviours that align with company values. “As our people go about their day, they earn points, badges and prizes for the myriad of different ways they contribute to our culture and success. The platform helps our people track their own achievements and celebrate important milestones,” he explains. “But it’s important to remember that even though technology provides opportunities for innovation in HR, it doesn’t replace the richness of human contact and personal recognition.”

Rise of the machines

While technology is impacting HR operations, it is also disrupting every other business area. With AI and machine

Fast Fact

51%

Only half of Australian and New Zealand HR leaders (51 per cent) say they are successful at retaining talent.

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Technology learning paving the way for automation of processes – and even entire jobs – managing that transition for employees and businesses has fallen heavily on the shoulders of HR professionals. “Technology has impacted the conduct of work overall, and the work of the profession – it puts a double obligation on the HR professional,” laments Wilson. For instance, a 2017 report forecasts that the global mining automation market will grow in value by almost 50 per cent by 2023, and APAC is estimated to be the largest market. This will have positive impacts on worker safety and mining productivity, but automation is already causing alarm among employees about job security. While numbers vary widely, a September 2018 report from the Regional Australia Institute estimates 22 per cent

of jobs nationally are highly vulnerable to automation. However, while types of jobs may be vulnerable, that doesn’t necessarily mean people will lose their jobs. “One of the most important ways businesses can be ‘future ready’ is to invest in developing their people’s skills and capabilities. Having a strong learning and development focus, supported by the right technology, is a critical foundation for any successful business,” suggests Pierce. With Australian HR professionals closely focused on retention, automation can present an opportunity to develop upskilling programs within organisations. A recent survey by recruitment company Hays showed that 59 per cent of Australian workers want a job offering ongoing learning and development opportunities.

Back to basics

Technology will continue to force businesses, and HR practitioners, to evolve and adapt at a swift pace. However, Pierce insists that technology alone is not where the HR function begins and ends. “Get your foundations right. Embed your company values well, and even in a fast-changing world your people will make good decisions based on having the right mindset. Invest heavily in showing your people how much you care. No business should underestimate the importance and value in providing their people with a positive employee experience.”

Fast Fact

16%

One in six (16 per cent) HR leaders in Australia and New Zealand say they do not use technology to improve HR outcomes.

FEB/MARCH 2019

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AusBiz. Promotion

Position Partners awarded Topcon Dealer of the Year 2017-2018 Topcon Positioning Systems’ exclusive Australian distributor, Position Partners, was awarded top prize for Construction at the recent Topcon Xperience dealer conference held in San Antonio, Texas. Topcon Positioning Systems’ annual dealer conference brings together more than 500 distributors from around the world to network and learn about new technology for the construction, geospatial and mining industries. At the recent event, held in December 2018, Position Partners was awarded ‘Dealer of the Year 2017-2018’ for construction, along with awards for ‘Top 5 Year on Year Sales Growth’ and ‘Top 5 Excavator Sales’. “We are privileged to receive Topcon’s Dealer of the Year award amongst all of Topcon’s successful distributors,” said Martin Nix, Position Partners CEO. “It’s a great reflection of the support our customers give us as they strive to increase productivity

and safety by pushing the boundaries with intelligent positioning systems in the construction industry. “These awards are accepted as a recognition of the combined efforts of our teams and employees, who continually do their utmost to deliver exceptional customer service at all times,” Nix added. Jamie Williamson, Topcon executive VP and general manager of the construction and retail groups, said, “The Position Partners team has always exhibited strength and dedication in providing the most innovative technology and service to their customers. That spirit has been notably evident in their performance, which makes Position Partners a superb choice for 'Dealer of the Year'.” For more information, please contact Position Partners on 1300 867 266 or visit positionpartners.com.au

About Position Partners With around 270 people in offices Australia-wide, in SouthEast Asia and New Zealand, Position Partners is the largest Australian-owned company focussing entirely on the distribution and support of intelligent positioning solutions for geospatial, construction and mining projects. At Position Partners, we are committed to increasing productivity for our customers and building lasting business relationships around high calibre positioning activities. Position Partners is privileged to be the exclusive Australian distributor for Topcon machine control and positioning systems, with complementary solutions from other technology innovators. Advanced hardware systems are powered by sophisticated software platforms including MAGNET cloud computing, with integration to Autodesk and Bentley for endto-end workflow solutions. FEB/MARCH 2019

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SPECIAL PROMOTION

Jac Taylor Jac Taylor is a travel photographer, writer and TV producer who has captured the far corners of Australia.

NUTS for

NUTS

We go behind the scenes at Stahmann Farms to see what makes this Australian operation, that has been in business for 50 years, such an ongoing success story. In the USA, in certain circles at least, the Australian town of Moree is spoken of with great reverence. On all conference charts, and on every industry paper, it is a compulsory inclusion – if you’re an American nut farmer that is. Same for the South Africans. For many of us, it may exist as a mid-sized dot on a map in the northern plains of New South Wales, in the heart of the wheatbelt, but for the global nut industry, it is nothing less than a benchmark of nearperfection. It wasn’t always this way, explains Ross Burling, CEO and director of the Stahmann Farms nut company in Australia, and a man who is obviously, passionately nuts about nuts. “After a first planting in Gatton in Queensland, Deane Stahmann Jnr founded the very first pecan farm in Moree in 1967, and had 68,000 pecan trees planted in 1971, because he knew that Moree is actually possibly the best spot in the world to grow a pecan – except maybe one place in South Africa,” Burling concedes. “But yes, when you go to a conference in the US, you’ll see Moree up there on the screen next to Texas, et cetera, as a positive benchmark. And everyone knows Stahmann because of that.” It’s this savvy dedication to ideally matching crop to location that has stood Stahmann in a strong position to diversify, which is exactly what it has done now, as it branches out – so to speak – into macadamias.

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“We bought our first macadamia farm this time a year ago, after we looked at all the areas you could possibly grow them globally, and considered Bundaberg [in Queensland] to be the best location. The climate looks ideal for macadamias, but it’s also well supported by people, by industry – everything is right there,” says Burling. “Our pecan trees are now 47 years old, and we’ve learned that the first thing you need to get right is this: you only plant a tree once in its life, so you need to plant as well as you can. You have to get the climate right and the varietal right, so we put a lot of work into that.” So why macadamias? After all, pecans have been wonderfully successful for Stahmann Farms over the years. There are 660 hectares planted at the Moree farm right now, according to Burling, and that number is set to double to more than 1400 hectares by the end of August. The Moree crops provide Australia with 80 per cent of its pecans. Once expansion is complete, this looks to increase to 96 per cent. “Interestingly enough, our factory in Toowoomba started processing macadamias in 1994. We had this great, big processing facility to process pecans six months of the year, and then we used to stop work for six months,” explains Burling. "We were looking for another product to fill those six months.”


MAIN IMAGE: K ATHY SMITH AT STAHMANN FARMS FACTORY IN TOOWOOMBA, QLD. RIGHT IMAGE: RIVERSIDE ALL AUSTR ALIAN FL AVOURED R ANGE.

Of course, it never quite works like that, as Burling knew. “Easter and Christmas are still on the same days, peak selling time for the two nuts is the same, so it isn’t quite as simple as that. “But look at almonds and walnuts – they’re the behemoths, the glamorous ones,” he explains. “Pecans and macadamias are the honest nuts. They work together synergistically, since they’re both the least known nuts on the global market.” That’s changing rapidly though. In the 20-something years that Stahmann Farms have been involved with macadamias particularly, its people have seen the stereotype of macadamias evolve well beyond the once comparatively ‘unknown’ nut. It’s a comfortable expansion for a company that only numbers perhaps 220 people on the payroll in its busiest times. “We’ve grown the business for security, not just for our stakeholders, but for our people,” says Burling. “A number of our staff reached their 35th anniversary working for us last year – that’s most of their life spent with us.  FEB/MARCH 2019

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SPECIAL PROMOTION

TOP TO BOT TOM: SORTING PECANS AT STAHMANN FARMS FACTORY IN TOOWOOMBA,QLD; ROSS BURLING, CEO STAHMANN FARMS ENTERPRISES; PECAN TREES AT PALLAMALLAWA IN MOREE, NSW.

We all have a stakeholding in this business, it’s just that for some, it’s more personal than others.” Although Deane Stahmann Jnr passed away in 2013, there is a clear continuing thread in the company culture, that is based on his philosophies as he steered the business through earlier decades. “He was always a very strategic thinker,” Burling says. “He had a wonderful vision, and that’s why we look so good on paper. He always said you should maximise your unfair advantage, your point of difference. And that’s what we try to do.” For Stahmann Farms, that may well describe their early adoption of vertical integration, or as Burling prefers to call it, "value streams": simply put, performing all stages of the process, from farming through to processing and packaging. “We know from pecan farming that sometimes you make more money being the farmer, sometimes more as the processor or seller,” explains Burling. "Being fully vertically integrated means you can maximise production at every step of the stream, so you can build a more confident supply chain and schedule with retailers with more confidence, as a result. The marketer can talk to the farmer, meaning every step of the process is in touch with every other one – and that maximises consumer satisfaction. “Everyone is getting excited about ‘paddock to plate’,” Burling says, “but you’ve got to live it and practise it. Otherwise it’s no different from going to a farmer, getting his product and putting it in a packet. And most of the people that work here still get excited about nuts – so that’s not a bad recipe for success either.”

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AusBiz.

"you should maximise your unfair advantage, your point of difference. "


niche programs, big hearts

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FEB/MARCH 2019

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Australian Distilleries

THAT'S THE SPIRIT A BUREAUCRATIC TWIST OF FATE IN COLONIAL TIMES STALLED THE AUSTRALIAN SPIRITS INDUSTRY FOR 150 YEARS. NOW, HOMEGROWN DISTILLERIES ARE TAKING THEIR RIGHTFUL PLACE AS SOME OF THE WORLD’S BEST.

Lisa Smyth Business and travel writer Lisa Smyth is a non-stop nomad, living everywhere from Myanmar and Germany to PNG.

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AusBiz.

Z E S T Y L I M O N C E L L O , M A N LY S P I R I T S C O . I N S Y D N E Y, N S W.


Australian Distilleries

M A N LY S P I R I T S C O . I N S Y D N E Y, N S W.

“I would prefer barley be fed to pigs than it be used to turn men into swine.” So said, reportedly, Lady Jane Franklin in 1838. Jane was the wife of the Governor of Tasmania at the time, John Franklin, and her disdain for whisky led him to outlaw small pot stills on the island. Unfortunately for Australia’s many small batch distilleries, John Franklin’s ban was written into national law when Australia was federated in 1901. From that point on only large distilleries, such as Bundaberg Rum, would be able to keep their doors open. But, 90 years later, Bill Lark, the ‘grandfather of Australian spirits’, had the law overturned in Tasmania (with other states soon doing the same), and the Australian spirits industry finally began to recover from Lady Jane’s history-defining horror. “Tasmania has a beautiful community of distilleries. Bill Lark was very open with helping everyone out each time a new distillery opened,” says Sebastian Costello, Owner and Director of Melbourne’s Bad Frankie, until recently Australia’s only bar exclusively serving Australian spirits. The bar’s name is a cheeky nod to Franklin, and it is as well-known for its gins and whiskies as its extensive jaffle menu. “In the USA you get bourbon and burgers, and in Mexico they have tequila and tacos. I wanted to do something very authentic, very Australian, and in 2014 there were just enough Australian spirits around to fill a bar, and it felt right to pair them with the quintessential Aussie toasted sandwich.” When Costello opened Bad Frankie he had 80 Australian spirits on the back bar – today he has 500. That phenomenal growth has mostly come from Australian craft spirits, which according to research released in November 2018, is growing at 110 per cent in contrast to the total spirits market. The category is now worth $17.1 million, up from $10.8 million

S U L L I VA N S C O V E D I S T I L L E R Y I N H O B A R T, TA S .

in 2017, though craft spirits are still just a drop in the large barrel that is the $1.8 billion local spirits industry.

Entering the world stage

There are an estimated 120 distilleries in Australia today, located everywhere from city industrial districts to rural farmhouses and ocean-fronted cellar doors. Back in 2013 there were fewer than 50. If you ask many in the industry the turning point came in 2014, when Tasmania’s Sullivans Cove Distillery won the World's Best Single Malt for its French Oak at the World Whiskies Awards. “We were the first non-Scottish or non-Japanese brand to win that award – it was absolutely huge for a small distillery from Hobart,” explains Adam Sable, Managing Director of Sullivans Cove. “That win helped establish Australian spirits internationally and entrench Australia in conversations about the world’s best spirits.” Using only 100 per cent Tasmanian ingredients, Sullivans Cove is the second oldest whisky distillery in Tasmania, having opened a few years after Lark Distillery. In 2018 it again won big when its American Oak was declared World's Best Single Cask Single Malt. “Our customers are after a very high-quality whisky that has been matured for long periods of time. Some Australian whiskies appeal to a broader market, but our consumers are generally pretty discerning,” notes Sable. “Global demand is far outweighing what we have available – it’s very difficult to allocate stock.” On the more affordable end of the Australian craft whisky scale is Starward, a Melbourne distillery that opened its doors in 2007. Matured in Australian wine barrels for three ‘Melbourne years’, this crowd-pleaser now turns over $2 million a year.  FEB/MARCH 2019

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Australian Distilleries STONE PINE DISTILLERY IN B AT H U R S T, N S W.

Fast Facts

Cheese

Tasmania’s Hartshorn Distillery uses cheese by-products to make its gin and vodka, the latter of which won World’s Best Vodka in 2018.

2015

Kristy Booth, daughter of Bill Lark, opened Killara Distillery in 2015. It is one of very few distilleries in the world to be owned and operated by a woman.

A splash of lemon myrtle

Despite the international accolades that have rolled in for Sullivans Cove, it is gin, not whisky, that is currently dominating the Australian spirits scene. At last year’s Australian Distilled Spirits Awards there were 31 entries in the whisky division, 29 vodkas, 23 rums, 10 brandies and a whopping 130 gin entries. In Australia a spirit must spend two years in a barrel before it can be called whisky, but gin can be distilled, bottled and sold all on the same day – an ideal scenario for cash-starved craft distilleries. “In Australia we have a background in high-quality wine and craft beer, so there was no reason we wouldn’t be good at distilling spirits. It was simply the legislation holding us back,” rationalises Vanessa Wilton, Co-owner of Manly Spirits Co. Having only launched in April 2017 on Sydney’s northern beaches, the distillery’s Australian Dry Gin has already won Double Gold medals at the 2018 San Francisco Spirits Awards, one of the key annual global competitions. “Australian spirits are really punching above their weight on the global scene in terms of quality,” says Wilton. “All of our products have won silver or gold medals in the big competitions.” Rather than place all its eggs in one basket, Manly Spirits, like numerous other distilleries around the country, has a

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diverse portfolio, distilling gin, vodka, whisky and liqueurs. Costello, Sable and Wilton all agree that what sets Australian spirits apart from their global competitors is the use of native Australian botanicals. “Australia has this amazing botanical library that sort of got lost for a while but has been rediscovered,” notes Wilton. “We work with Elijah Holland who was Head Forager for the NOMA pop-up in Sydney in 2016. He introduced us to ingredients like sea parsley, finger lime and anise myrtle, so our white spirits have a distinctly Australian and marine botanical profile.”

A level playing field

Sydney’s pop-up of the world’s best restaurant, NOMA, also had a hand in raising the profile of Bathurst’s Stone Pine Distillery, when its Orange Blossom Gin was selected to be the first pour on site. “The fact that we are small, regional, seasonal and produce limited editions fitted really well with what NOMA was trying to do,” says owner Ian Glen. “It really helped my distributor to open more doors for us.” Ian and his wife Bev were looking for a lifestyle change when they moved to rural Australia in 2006. With a long family history in the Scottish distilling industry, Ian saw how cocktail culture and craft spirits had taken off in the UK and


Australian Distilleries

the USA, and knowing that Australia tends to come up a few years behind those two main markets, figured he should get in early. “There wasn’t such a thing as an Aussie gin when we started – it was a hard sell,” recalls Glen. “But in the last two to three years there has been a marked change driven by the small bar movement, and it has become a whole lot more viable as a business model, especially as we are finally getting a rebate on the excise.” Despite small rebates, Australian spirits are still taxed at a much higher rate than wine or beer, with the excise increased every six months in line with inflation. Yarra Valley’s wildly popular Four Pillars exports gin to 23 countries, but most distilleries claim the ‘spirits super tax’ stops them from achieving anything close to that scale. “It’s just plain common sense,” exclaims Glen. “All alcohol in Australia should be taxed the same so we have equal opportunities. It should be a level playing field.”

New frontiers

Despite some barriers to entry there are still plenty of people who see the vast potential in Australian spirits, such as Margaret River winemaker Greg Garnish who in 2018

GREG GARNISH, H A R M A N ' S E S TAT E I N MARGARET RIVER, WA.

launched Australia’s first pisco. “We started selling our version of pisco, a white brandy usually made in Peru from Muscat grapes, at our cellar door, and it exploded,“ says Garnish. “Wine has happened. Craft beer has happened. There is just such massive growth to be had in spirits.” Garnish is so convinced, he is leaving winemaking behind to open his own distillery in 2019. That’s not to say that Australia’s alcohol industries can’t work together. “My personal view is that we will see a bit of a revival of brandy in years to come,” remarks Sable. “It’s traditionally been seen as an older person’s drink, but given that we have such a fantastic wine industry, it’s a real point of difference for Australian brandies.” While Sullivans Cove released their own limited-edition brandy in 2018, other distilleries, such as South Australia’s award-winning St Agnes, have been handcrafting Australian brandy for decades. Costello agrees with Sable’s prediction. “There is a renaissance coming in brandy and rum, and vermouths are having a moment. But the mentality of Australian spirits is that we are competing with overseas producers and not amongst ourselves. So, no matter what you drink, just make sure it's Australian.”

SUGAR SHED RUM IN SARINA, QLD.

FEB/MARCH 2019

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The second most important thing The most important in�uence on your son’s development is you. The second most important is the school you choose. Choose St Joseph’s Nudgee College in Brisbane for an outstanding academic, cultural, and sporting education that will ensure your son develops his unique strengths and is given every opportunity to excel.

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AusBiz. Promotion

A Class Above St Joseph’s Nudgee College was established in 1891 and is one of the oldest continuing Catholic boys’ boarding schools in Australia. More than 1,590 young men from Years 5 to 12, including more than 260 boarders, call Nudgee College their school. Amongst the student cohort you will find writers, athletes, artists, performers, science enthusiasts, maths fanatics, leaders, builders, dreamers, all-rounders, and everything in between. On a daily basis students are taught, cared for, and challenged by teachers who want to bring out the best in all of their students – they want to help them find their strengths. The holistic education, personal development, and wellbeing of each student is a key focus of the College. As 2018 College Captain Angus McDonald said, the College’s real success lies in the relationships that the boys build while they are at school. “Nudgee College is a place where every student can find somewhere to belong,” he said, “and where every one of our talents and skills have the opportunity to grow and develop. “We create a bond, not only with our beloved school, but with each other, laying the foundation for a community and a brotherhood that will remain a central part of all of our lives long after we leave this College.” The support of staff for the boys’ interests and strengths is complimented by world-class facilities across the 136 hectare campus that are available to the students. From 15 playing fields, to an Olympic-standard athletics track, two heated swimming pools, state-of-the-art music and art studios, a 400-seat auditorium, and an onsite agricultural centre, students are always able to access

high-quality facilities to help them nurture and develop their talents and strengths. Nudgee College is offering Academic Scholarships for students entering the College from Years 7 to 11 in 2020, who demonstrate outstanding academic achievement based on the results of the ACER Scholarship Examination, and exhibit qualities commensurate with the College's motto: Signum Fidei – a Sign of Faith. Academic Scholarships are awarded to students who are considered to have exceptional academic ability and potential. Parents can register their child to sit the ACER Scholarship Examination at scholarships.acer.edu.au. Bush Boarding Bursaries are also available for new students entering Years 7 to 10 in 2019. For further information about scholarships and bursaries, please visit nudgee.com/scholarships-and-bursaries. FEB/MARCH 2019

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Puzzles

CROSSWORD

A A R S Y N T S R O E O M

M R O W T J H R L E T L K

G C N S U O R C O G G E E

N P G A W H O E I P S I J

I I M S U Y W B D V E R T

R H A F I R E E A T E R H

G W N D P S R E L B M U T

E Z E P A R T G N I Y L F

SOLUTIONS:

S C T N E H E S E P W T P

T K S O G K F T H D A N H A A R S Y N T S R O E O M

M R O W T J H R L E T L K

E E R I W L I A F M I W S G C N S U O R C O G G E E

N P G A W H O E I P S I J

I I M S U Y W B D V E R T

R H A F I R E E A T E R H

G W N D P S R E L B M U T

R R T L M O N K E Y S S T

S C T N E H E S E P W T P

E Z E P A R T G N I Y L F

B S E W A T K R H O R S E

T K S O G K F T H D A N H

AusBiz.

TAMER TENTS TIGERS TIGHT-ROPE TUMBLERS WHIP CRACKERS

Find all the words listed hidden in the grid of letters. They can be found in straight lines up, down, forwards, backwards or even diagonally. Theme: CIRCUS

E E R I W L I A F M I W S

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KNIFE THROWER LIONS MONKEYS RINGMASTER SIDE SHOWS STRONGMAN

WORD SEARCH

R R T L M O N K E Y S S T

BIG TOP CLOWNS ELEPHANT FIRE EATER FLYING TRAPEZE HORSE

DOWN 1. Repeatable (of speech) 2. Witness 3. Inscribe 4. Manner 5. Gum sore 6. Teen hero 10. Italian fashion & design hub 11. Spiral pin 13. Task-completion date 14. Verve 16. Comprehend (4,2) 18. Small rugs 19. Indecent material 20. Auld ... Syne

B S E W A T K R H O R S E

ACROSS 1. Raise petty objections 4. Florida city 7. Happened (upon) 8. Surpass 9. Sanctuary 12. Made angry 15. Assess 17. Took (baby) off bottle 18. Lunches or suppers 21. Childhood disease 22. Watery hail 23. Fine particle

Profile for publishingbychelle

AusBiz Magazine - Feb/March 2019  

The new Australian business magazine — AusBiz. — is a highly engaging read covering news and features related to mining, agribusiness, finan...

AusBiz Magazine - Feb/March 2019  

The new Australian business magazine — AusBiz. — is a highly engaging read covering news and features related to mining, agribusiness, finan...

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