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The art of the swimsuit since 1971 www.vilebrequin.com ZU RICH - WEINPLATZ 8 8001 ZURICH - TEL:+41 44 22 19 922


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Dear Reader, S

Publisher Project Luxury Ltd., Bergstrasse 25, 8702 Zollikon, Switzerland www.projectluxury.com

Art: Samuel Spencer Fashion: Natalie Trevis Lifestyle: Chloe Crockford (Beauty), Scott Preston (Yachts), David Layzelle (Cars, Technology) Travel: Kelly Dunning Business: Tom Cropper Graphic Designer: Liz Krivitsky, Marika Adorna Photo Editor: Ludovica Bastianini General Advertising Enquiries +41 79 380 84 23 info@projectluxury.com The Project Luxury & Art Magazine is published quarterly in English. Project Luxury & Art is a brand of Project Luxury Ltd. and the entire content is copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine, including text, photographs, illustration, advertising layouts or other graphics may be reproduced in any way without prior written consent of Project Luxury & Art Magazine. The Publisher and Editor are not responsible for unsolicited material and it will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication subject to Project Luxury & Art Magazine’s right to edit. Copyright 2016, Project Luxury Ltd.

Ina Dederer CEO and Publisher Project Luxury & Art

Photo by Ani Wehrli; Cover: Norbert Kniat / www.kniat.de

Editorial Editor in Chief: Ina Dederer Managing Editor: Natalie Trevis, Karin Mugnaini

pring is a time for new beginnings, and as the excesses of the festive party season fade in the memory, we find a renewed focus on wellbeing, travel and cultural experiences that will inform the year ahead. In this issue, we remind ourselves of the unique appeal of events worthy of diarising now, from the luxury and innovation of the world of jewellery and watches courtesy of Baselworld in Switzerland, to the artistic highs of the latest iteration of Art Basel in Hong Kong. Sometimes a destination captures our imagination like nowhere we’ve ever been before, and that’s certainly true for intrepid photographer David Heath. He fell in love with the mysterious Myanmar, returning time and again to capture its unique beauty and the traditional culture and beauty of its people. We take a look at his inspiring images, from young monks at play to fishermen in traditional boats on Inle Lake. It’s time to contemplate your next adventure. We also travel through the work of award-winning artist Oliver ‘Bubu’ Schibli, whose iconic screenprints, graffiti-like abstract faces and love of gold leaf have catapulted the Swiss artist into the limelight. Ever wondered who is responsible for the beautiful ergonomics of the seats and interiors aboard luxury aircraft? We find out just what’s involved in taking great design into the skies in our interview with Christopher Mbanefo, CEO of design firm YASAVA. And what better way to mark time on our journey into 2017 than with Zenith, the luxury watchmaker making an impact on a new generation of watch connoisseurs. We find out how the brand has capitalised on the power of digital influencers and why its collaboration with renowned tattoo artist, Luke Wessman, has caused a buzz. In this era of rapid change we wish you a spring full of promise and hope. It’s a time to find a new way of doing things, a new year, a new you: so travel, explore and dream along with us in this issue of Project Luxury & Art.


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18

Art

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ARTIST PROFILES 18

OLIVER ‘BUBU’ SCHIBLI Cartoon abstractions and commerce

24 MAXIMILIAN WIEDEMANN

Fashion

GOOD TO KNOW

DESIGNER PROFILES

22 ROLAND MOSER

Photography ‘nature moments’ Art and fashion collide

26 ART BASEL IN HONG KONG 2017

Asia’s premier art fair

30 PEARL OF THE ART WORLD

Hong Kong’s artistic role in Asia

10 useful tips to remember

Alessandro Michele’s vision of S/S17

RUNWAY 46 RUNWAY TRENDS, MEN

Armani and Etro, Spring/Summer 2017

36 A DECADE OF VOLTA NY 10 years of the show ‘by galleries, for galleries’

48 RUNWAY TRENDS, WOMEN

38 A FIGHT BETWEEN FORM AND FUNCTION

50 MUST HAVES

Is it fine art or decorative art?

39 ART FAIR CALENDAR

Spring’s premier art fairs

Paule Ka and Oscar de la Renta, Spring/Summer 2017

Covetable pieces for men and women

56 FASHION CALENDAR

Fashion weeks you can’t miss

© All photo credits are mentioned in the articles

32 BUYING ART

42 GUCCI


CONTENT

Lifestyle They’re the new girl’s best friend

60 BRIDAL HAUTE JEWELLERY

The must have jewellery for the big day

© All photo credits are mentioned in the articles

62 MILANESE WATCHSTRAPS

Timeless elegance

Capturing today’s digital natives

68 THE UNIQUE APPEAL OF BASELWORLD

What to expect in 2017

76 NATURAL APPEAL

The key to strong, beautiful hair

78 TIPS FOR STAYING HEALTHY WHILE TRAVELLING Top tips for wellness

80 HERITAGE AND HERMITAGE

Top notch Rhône valley wines

82 UISCE BEATHA

The connoisseur’s guide to Irish whiskey

84 CHARCOAL COCKTAILS

70 JEWELLERY INSURANCE

Your new season look

DINING

64 ZENITH

The Michelangelo Foundation

BEAUTY

58 BLACK DIAMONDS

74 TOP BEAUTY TRENDS

LUXURY TRENDS

72 ANGEL IN THE MARBLE

Things to know

Move over Martinis

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Lifestyle

IN THE AIR 100 FIRST CLASS ACT

A guide to first class cabins

106 FOUR SEASONS PRIVATE JET

DESIGN 86 HOW TO CHOOSE THE RIGHT

ARCHITECT Create your dream home the right way

88 INTERNATIONAL INTERIOR

DESIGN TRENDS Freshen up your home décor this year

90 AQUIJO

The sailor’s dream A futuristic luxury yacht

Glimpse the future with Lexus

112 FERRARI

Explore the high-performance Laferrari Aperta

114 GADGETS & MORE

96 AN OCEAN MIRROR

110 LEXUS UX CONCEPT CAR

TECHNOLOGY

94 DISCOVER THE NEXT BLACK SWAN

The Dreamjet

AUTOMOBILES

YACHTS

108 CUSTOM VVIP BOEING 787-8

Discover the mega-yacht Symmetry

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The season’s latest technology

116 CES 2017: THE FUTURE IS NOW

Get ready for a high-tech home

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© All photo credits are mentioned in the articles

Travel made luxurious


unique and inspiring www.hato-restaurants.com Zurich & St.Moritz


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Business 132 THE LUXURY MARKET IN ASIA

Exceptional growth in China

134 VIRTUAL REALITY

Travel

It’s big business in 2017

136 LUXURY AND HAPPINESS

Friends or foes?

138 STAYING SAFE IN THE CLOUD

The future of business in the cloud

140 YASAVA: NO COMPROMISE

124 LAUCALA ISLAND

BUSINESS PROFILES

128 ROVOS RAIL

142 ANDREA BUCCELLATI Chairman and Creative Director of Buccellati

A photographer’s guide to the beautiful country

A private paradise

Journey through Africa in style

130 PLACE VENDÔME

A touch of Parisian luxury in Qatar

Exquisite design: an interview with Christopher Mbanefo

144 SIR JAMES DYSON

Chief Engineer and Chairman of Dyson

© All photo credits are mentioned in the articles

118 MYANMAR


Speedback GT by David Brown Automotive


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OLIVER BUBU

SCHIBLI

CARTOON ABSTRACTIONS AND COMMERCE


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"A LOT OF MY CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS TOLD ME HOW BEAUTIFUL MY WORK WOULD LOOK ON SCARVES AND CLOTHES, SO WHEN I FIRST MADE SOME MONEY FROM MY ART I INVESTED IT IN THE COLLECTION."

roject Luxury & Art speaks with Swiss artist Oliver ‘Bubu’ Schibli to find out more about his art, business and love of all things golden. Born in Switzerland, Schibli is the man behind the Bubu Collection, which puts the distinctively patterned semi-abstract faces from his paintings and sculptures onto clothes, accessories and even homeware. For Schibli, art and commerce have been linked since his earliest training as an artist. He began as an apprentice signmaker, where he learned both his distinctive graphic style, full of bold eye-catching patterns and colours, and an understanding of how design and business can work together. Studying in Bern, he mastered the processes that would become major parts of his creative practice: working with gold leaf and screenprinting. These two processes find their expression in very different areas of the artist’s work. Although his screenprints are often overlaid with gold leaf detailing, in his paintings it creates a different mood entirely. In works such as The Believer and Gangee, the artist covers the entire background of the image in leaf, giving the works an opulence that suggests luxury, but also lending the works a tribal quality, like something from a forgotten Aztec tribe. For the artist, it has a spiritual power “linked to masculine energy and the power of the sun”, as well as being an “optimistic and positive” material to match the whimsical figures that often feature in Schibli’s work.


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The Believer

some of which feature faces in gold with slogans like ‘No rules’ and ‘Just love’, taken from his screenprints. WHERE DID THE NICKNAME ‘BUBU’ COME FROM? Actually, it was my brother’s boy scout name and I was always hanging out with his friends. So it was a kind of a tradition and my friends start calling me Bubu, too. YOUR STYLE IS VERY DISTINCTIVE. WHAT IS YOUR PROCESS WHEN STARTING A WORK? The process always starts with a moment of inspiration, that moment when an idea is born and you start to create something. After that, I start to sketch the idea on paper and when I know the composition of an art work, the actual work on canvas begins. WHAT LED YOU TO START THE BUBU COLLECTION? A lot of my customers and friends told me how beautiful my work would look on scarves and clothes, so when I first made some money from my art I invested it in the collection.

© Oliver Schibli

The screenprints, meanwhile, speak more of Schibli’s business mind, inspired as they are by the master of art business, Andy Warhol. In his 2016 print series Kings & Queens, Schibli seems particularly inspired by Warhol’s collaborations with Jean-Michel Basquiat, who even features in one of the works in the series. Over a repeated pattern of crowns printed in colours contrasting with their backgrounds, the artist has printed black images of famous faces from the arts and culture past and present: Basquiat, Rihanna, Salvador Dali, Dieter Meier of Swiss band Yelle, Muhammed Ali, Leonardo DiCaprio, Karl Lagerfeld and fashion icon Iris Apfel. These are finished with gold leaf crowns. Where his paintings are tribal and unpredictable, these prints are all about solidity and celebrity, suggesting a more modern version of the tribal graffiti marking. These two sides of his work come together in his pieces for the Bubu Collection. Printed on clothes, the faces and features of his paintings look like street art markings with a bold, cartoonish sensibility. He even finds a place for his trademark gold in his streetwear collection,

Strange Harmony


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Color Doesn't Matter - Tears Does!

HOW DID YOU CHOOSE WHO TO INCLUDE IN YOUR KINGS & QUEENS SERIES? These are actually people I really love, either for what they do or how they became successful. I’ve already started working on the second edition of the series.

Queen Rihanna

MANY OF YOUR WORKS USE GOLD OR METAL LEAF. WHAT IS IT YOU LIKE SO MUCH ABOUT THIS MATERIAL? I guess you could say that I am creating in my Golden Age. I’ve always been obsessed with ancient symbols and, of course, gold, one of the most scarce yet indestructible metals that exists on earth. Since I practise ancient techniques and work with precious metals— both of which are steeped in historical significance for civilisation and culture—there is an intrinsic value placed into the work whether or not one appreciates the piece aesthetically. Beyond symbolizing opulence and wealth, it manifests a feeling of refinement that is often lost in today’s disposable culture. www.oliverschibli.com www.bubucollection.com


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ROLAND MOSER EXCLUSIVE NATURE WE SPEAK WITH SWISS PHOTOGRAPHER ROLAND MOSER, TO EXPLORE HIS ‘NATURE MOMENTS’.

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hether he is photographing manmade structures in his native Switzerland or showcasing the outback of Australia, Roland Moser has an eye for the atmospheric instant, the grand sweep of the natural world. These are Moser’s ‘nature moments’. “Photography to me is far more than only taking Australia - The Territory, Muirella Camp, Kakadu National Park

pictures of beautiful places and epic light. My photographs show nature through my eyes,” says Moser. It’s those eyes that have been lucky enough to see some of the most stunning locations in the world. After completing a degree in English in California, he and a friend set off on a trip across the American southwest.


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Australia - The Territory

© Roland Moser

Armed with “a small pocket camera”, he captured images of the mountains and plains of the region that would influence the rest of his life. It was not until 2007 that Moser had the equipment to match his ambitions. Following a trip to Australia where he became enamoured with its vast expanses, he was determined to buy his first digital camera. “Though I love a lot of different landscapes, I really love the Australian outback. It’s kind of the last adventure,” says Moser. Returning often with his DSLR, travelling by Land Cruiser and sleeping in a tent under the stars with his Australian-born girlfriend, he surrounds himself with the subjects of his photographs: Australia’s natural landmarks, cliffs and wildlife. As a result of this close relationship between the photographer, the landscape and the photographs, Moser protects the exclusivity of his work. He will, however, begin to offer limited editions of his prints in 2017. And for those inspired by his work, Moser offers workshop sessions, teaching students to capture their own ‘nature moments’ alongside fellow Swiss photographer Adrian Wirz. WHICH PLACE HAVE YOU VISITED THAT HAS MOST SURPRISED YOU? I don’t have any expectations when I arrive at a location for the first time. I’m more surprised that you don’t have to travel far and wide to photograph breathtaking landscapes. It’s all about the light and weather conditions and, if those conditions are perfect, you can take gorgeous images in your neighbourhood.

Switzerland, Fribourg Alps

TELL US ABOUT ONE OF YOUR MOST MEMORABLE LOCATION SHOOTS. There’s a remote place in Kakadu National Park in the Northern Territory in Australia that I had seen in a travel magazine. I fell in love with it. It’s a real wilderness—a croc-infested billabong—and you have a great view over the water to the bush and Nourlangie Rock in the background, which glows red at sunset. WHAT WAS BEHIND THE DECISION TO START OFFERING LIMITED EDITION PRINTS OF YOUR WORK? A photographer friend from Australia asked me if I sold limited edition fine art prints. He said he’d buy one if I did and told me that there are two kinds of print buyers: the ones that just want to have a nice image hanging in their living room and the collectors who want to invest in something. For me, I want to have some separation between my best images and the others. I will offer only the best of the best as limited editions. www.nature-moments.com


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MAXIMILIAN WIEDEMANN

INSPIRING HUMANITY AN EXCITING NEW DIRECTION BECKONS FOR INTERNATIONAL ARTIST MAXIMILIAN WIEDEMANN AND BRITISH FASHION BRAND COLLIER BRISTOW. WE INTERVIEW THE MINDFUL CREATIVE WHO IS INSPIRED TO FIND THE BEST IN HUMANITY.

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iedemann’s artworks feature just as much visual and graphic punch as the sharp, witty slogans he often integrates into his works. Now, Wiedemann has teamed up with the contemporary international fashion label Collier Bristow, based in London, known for infusing effortless class into its collections through daring prints, bold colours and luxury fabrics. Often launching limited editions, Collier Bristow is both a lifestyle and a brand experience. The fashion line has met its match in Wiedemann and the result is a brand new collection of art-meets-apparel t-shirts with a distinctly street art touch. HOW WAS YOUR CREATIVE COLLABORATION AND UPCOMING COLLECTION WITH COLLIER BRISTOW BORN? I met with Collier Bristow and felt we immediately had a mutual understanding. The brand needed a different kind of collaboration, and so did I. I wanted to combine irony with art culture, so we created a t-shirt line that is both decorative and transmits a strong message. The apparel will have that little touch or hint of challenge. This line, with its roots in urban arts and graffiti, will be both edgy and impactful, something quite different, actually.

Max at work in his studio

WHEN WILL THE LINE BE AVAILABLE? The first collection will come out in February, and will only be available at Collier Bristow in London. Afterwards, other models will roll out under the Wiedemann brand, available for purchase worldwide.

Money Talks But Has Nothing To Say


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A t-shirt from the Collier Bristow collaboration

Golddigger

© Maximilian Wiedemann

YOUR WORK RAISES QUESTIONS ABOUT SOCIETY, MATERIALISM AND SUPERFICIALITY. HOW DO YOU TIE TOGETHER THESE ARTISTIC, GRAPHIC AND LINGUISTIC CONCEPTS? I focus first on good values and my desire to create awareness. I believe that what we will all need in the next few years is interaction between those who need help and those who have power. My art exposes money and status versus decency and integrity: it promotes humanitarianism. The banking system, for example, which I exposed in some of my past works, embraces sheer manipulation, a kind of scam. In my work, there is an ambivalence between love and money, nature and opulence. For example, the recycling of ancient oil paintings is a great new way to depict old traditions and the way of life of our modern and fast living society. DOES THE WORLD TODAY SCARE YOU? I am not scared. I feel empowered as an artist. Communicating is an artist’s key job. Artists document the zeitgeist. The next few years will be fierce, considering the uncertainties ahead. I feel that there has to be a rebalance between money, power and sensitivity for the less fortunate. I feel grateful that I have the opportunity to be an artist, giving me a tool to create awareness. WHAT’S NEXT? I will focus a lot on sculptures: LED and neon works. The sculptures will be sort of like window-front dis-

Forget Love Buy Me Diamonds

play boxes for emergencies, saying “please break the glass”. These emergency boxes showcase ironic everyday items with a twist and a message. YOU SAY THAT YOUR ART IS COMMUNICATION. DO YOU THINK OTHER ARTISTS ALSO TRY TO CREATE AWARENESS? There are a lot of artists who create awareness. But in my domain, I am known for wit, sharp humour and challenge. I think I’ve found the balance between being funny and inspiring, and also creating a mindfulness behind this. WOULD YOU SAY YOU HAVE A MINDFUL LIFESTYLE? Yes, I am mindful every day in everything I do. It is daily life that inspires me, such as situations with family, friends, shopkeepers, clients. I am inspired daily by interactions with those close to me, being responsible for my environment every day. ARE THERE ANY CLOSING THOUGHTS YOU WISH TO SHARE WITH US? I am grateful to be an artist. It’s a beautiful time to be one. Our world is facing interesting but difficult times. I don’t want our next generation to grow up in fear and instability, but rather with the right values, and to have a stable and inspiring future. Offer empathy, compassion and kindness to others. Money talks, but has nothing to say. Studio Manager & Sales Director: katherine@maximilianwiedemann.com www.maximilianwiedemann.com


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ART BASEL

IN HONG KONG 2017 “ASIA’S PREMIER ART FAIR EXCELS IN SCALE, THE NUMBER OF EXHIBITORS AND MANY SEDUCTIVE ATTRACTIONS FOR CURIOUS LOCALS, INTERNATIONAL ART LOVERS AND COLLECTORS, DEALERS AND ARTISTS. ART BASEL IS A RARE OPPORTUNITY TO… ENCOURAGE SPECTATORS TO COMPARE THE BEST ART FROM THE WEST AND THE EAST UNDER ONE VAST ROOF.” BONNIE ENGEL, SOUTH CHINA MORNING POST by Amy Armstrong

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Art Basel in Hong Kong 2017 is one of the largest international art fairs and is at the centre of Asia’s art scene. It attracts leading international galleries and collectors, offering them a premier platform to show works from across the globe. Underlining its commitment to the region, half of the participating galleries have exhibition spaces in Asia and Asia-Pacific and the show provides an in-depth overview of the region’s diversity through both historical material and cutting-edge works by established and emerging artists. Introducing visitors from all corners of the globe to some of the industry’s most important art, Art Basel has been connecting the world’s premier galleries and their patrons since 1970. “We are very certain that Art Basel is the biggest platform for the primary art market in Asia and the show attracts the most exciting artists, collectors, and visitors every year,” says Emily Chao, Director of Eslite Gallery in Taipei. Staged annually in Basel, Hong Kong and Miami Beach, Art Basel has become an important focus for some of


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the world’s most influential modern and contemporary artists. But that’s not all: the annual show in Hong Kong, which is now in its fifth year, has been responsible for nurturing the careers of some of the industry’s most successful artists, and as a result it is often the first port of call for emerging talents to develop their knowledge of an industry that knows no boundaries. “We are thrilled about the fair this year as all the works on the booth have been sold,” notes Tina Keng, Executive Director of the Tina Keng Gallery in Taipei and Beijing, referring to the 2016 event. “We brought younger artists like Peng Wei for the first time, which also received a great response. Apart from collectors from mainland China, Europe and Taiwan, buyers from the Philippines and Indonesia are particularly strong this year as well.” Art Basel has been a driving force in supporting the role that galleries play in nurturing artists and the development and promotion of the visual arts. Every Art Basel show is defined by its host city and incorporates a diverse range of private collections, art galleries, non-profit spaces and cultural events.


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HIGHLIGHTS FROM 2016 Every year, the team at Art Basel in Hong Kong goes above and beyond to deliver an outstanding exhibition that has been designed not only to showcase the work of established artists, but also to highlight the work of an emerging generation of artists. It’s a unique presentation of the art scenes that are progressing throughout Asia and Asia-Pacific, showcasing their diversity and rapid development. The event in 2016 attracted over 70,000 visitors, among them directors, curators, trustees and patrons from over 100 leading international museums and institutions. “Art Basel’s reputation as the world’s greatest art fair and Hong Kong’s fast-growing reputation as the cultural hub of the Asia-Pacific region gives Art Basel in Hong Kong the power and multi-faceted edge we look for on the circuit,” says John McCormack, Co-Director of Starkwhite, Auckland. “It performs perfectly as an art fair, but also opens up a space between the art museum and the art market where galleries can present exhibitions and projects that are aimed at curators and exhibition-makers as well as collectors. Under the new directorship of Adeline Ooi, Art Basel's Hong Kong show has lifted its game.” The Discoveries sector provides an excellent global platform for emerging contemporary artists from all over the world, showcasing works by the next gener-

ation of talent at an early stage in their career. “We've sold works by both emerging artists of the gallery and historical material,” notes Trina Gordon, Director of Andrea Rosen Gallery in New York. “We are excited to have forged so many new relationships with important collectors in this region and look forward to continuing to focus on developing our presence here.” Of course, the medium itself is without boundaries, too, and visitors can also enjoy a number of film screenings at the event, adding to Art Basel’s broader appeal. Last year, visitors viewed The Chinese Lives of Uli Sigg (2016), a


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© Art Basel

art fair stand. Whether protest banners condemning environmental destruction or intense tapestries and chandeliers, last year’s Encounters, by artists such as Charles Avery, Hans Berg, Isa Genzken and Chen Zhen, received outstanding recommendations and reviews. Finally, Time Waterfall added to what was already an amazing Art Basel event. This large-scale light installation was the brilliant work of internationally acclaimed Japanese artist Tatsuo Miyajima. The spectacular installation of cascading numbers was shown at the city’s iconic 490 metre high International Commerce Centre on the Kowloon harbour front.

film telling the unique story of how the life of a Swiss man, through chance circumstances, became entwined in the history of China after Mao’s death. Other highlights at last year’s event included the Encounters sector, curated by Alexie Glass-Kantor, Executive Director of Artspace in Sydney, dedicated to presenting 16 large-scale sculpture and installation works by leading artists from around the world. Found in prominent locations throughout the exhibition halls, Encounters provided visitors with the opportunity to see works that transcended the traditional

ART BASEL HONG KONG 2017 This year’s Art Basel in Hong Kong is scheduled to take place between 23 and 25 March. The vast range of exhibition spaces will feature 242 premier galleries from 34 countries and territories, as well as a new curatorial sector, Kabinett, and will again attract some of the world’s most successful emerging and established artists. Revealing the region’s diversity through art, visitors can expect to gain a true insight into Asia’s historical and cultural background. Whether you’re a buyer, an art aficionado, or simply art-curious, Art Basel in Hong Kong is the mega-exhibition that will not disappoint.


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PEARL OF THE

ART WORLD I

dentity and politics, two infamous buzzwords of late, together describe much of the cultural anxiety surrounding globalisation and art in the past decade. Hong Kong, a relatively young city just twenty years off the heels of British colonisation, has been at the centre of the creation of identity politics. This city, country, or special administrative region if we’re being technical, may not be able to decide what it is just yet, but is headstrong about what it is not, much like any twenty-something handling an existential crisis. Except Hong Kong has developed its crisis into its mantra, its platform and a safe haven for those looking to create and express artistic thought. The vague boundaries of this city’s identity make it a welcome playground for contradictory conversation: a battle between Eastern tradition and Western outlook, a stage for enacting the tensions of its past, present and future. Art organisations and the cultural sector as a whole play a crucial role in facilitating these debates, very much in tune with what Para Site strives to do as an independent, non-profit art space. Para Site’s own

twenty-year history in this city follows along the tramlines of Hong Kong’s transitory art scene. Founded by a group of seven artists looking to provide a space for artistic freedom in the midst of the handover to China, Para Site remains an institution that the city needs. Art and culture continue to be defining factors of a nation’s historical identity, and while Hong Kong continues to solidify its own, Para Site will be there, suggesting all the alternatives. In the past decade, Hong Kong has seen the introduction of major contemporary art fairs and non-profit art organisations, and a surge of international and local art galleries. Investment in the arts has peaked in both the private and government sectors and doesn’t seem to be regressing any time soon. Alongside all this is the ever-present argument over nationalism, perhaps reflected best by the recent Umbrella Movement initiated by student activists in 2014 for the democracy and independence of Hong Kong. This city’s younger generation is hyper-aware of its volatile position at the forefront of a foggy future, including many of the artists

© Images courtesy of Para Site

HONG KONG SERVES AS BEACON AND PLATFORM FOR THE ASIAN ART SCENE, THE VANGUARD OF CONTEMPORARY ART FOR A REGION IN WHICH IT IS STRIVING TO FIND ITS IDENTITY. HONG KONG’S LEADING CONTEMPORARY ART CENTRE, PARA SITE, HAS PLAYED ITS PART IN THE PROCESS, FORGING CRITICAL UNDERSTANDING OF LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL PHENOMENA IN ART AND SOCIETY FOR TWO DECADES. AS HONG KONG EMERGES FROM THE CHRYSALIS, WHAT DOES ITS ART WORLD LOOK LIKE NOW, AND WHAT DOES THE FUTURE HOLD?


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Ng Ka Chun, Dogvane, flags, metallic structure, blower, live broadcasting CCTV, 2015

Elvis Yip Kin Bon, Speech from Qiáo xiao yang on 24th March, 2013 [details], 260 pieces of newspaper clippings, 2013-2015

Lam Hoi Sin, We are all Internet Americans, inkjet on fabric, 2015

expressly focused on highlighting popular anxieties, recognising the fine print in China’s looming and encroaching presence and noticing the lingering scent of a western coloniser. Para Site has played host to these ideas, as have many in this region, to encourage the voicing of worries and the backing of history’s lessons. In 2015, Para Site staged a group exhibition of young Hong Kong artists titled Imagine there’s no country, Above us only our cities, curated by Jims Lam Chi Hang. Artists were invited to dissolve the idea of nationhood and look back at their personal history through the lens of contemporary society, resulting in a set of stories free from the limitations of contracted nationality. Elvis Yip Kin Bon hand crafted and recomposed news articles using the words of appointed officials in contrast with his own humorous headlines. Lam Hoi Sin used a dating app to go beyond relationships enclosed by geographic boundaries. Ng Ka Chun presented a dialogue between the flags of Hong Kong and the People’s Republic of China. These reflections are at the forefront of Hong Kong and of art in the region. A constant struggle to determine one’s identity in relation to something or someone else perhaps describes the basics of human existence, but in an era when identity is becoming more fluid, maybe it is time to consider a systematic change in thinking. Para Site continues to explore the jet trails of art and political thought and the ephemeral landscapes of society, joining a wider discussion regarding the identity politics of Hong Kong as an international trading port, both literal and figurative.


PROJECT LUXURY & ART 34

BUYING

ART

10 USEFUL TIPS TO REMEMBER by Dr. Claudia Steinfels

Kagge's book gives 24 tips, from which I have distilled the 10 most useful pearls of wisdom for the burgeoning collector and added some recommendations and suggestions from my own experiences. BEFORE DOING SO, LET ME GIVE YOU MY ANSWER TO WHAT IS ART? Art is a very personal translation of observations, ideas and feelings into a concrete shape. It expresses the nature of the artist’s personality and, at the same time, is witness to the epoch in which it was produced. A work of art records the burning questions of existence facing a creative individual and reflects, often in a coded form, socially urgent issues that have often yet to find entry into the public discussion at the time it was made. Art is a catalyst that gains the attention of its viewing numbers by means of sensory stimuli and unsettling content, encouraging a very individual involvement. The confrontation with highly expressive, moving, disturbing art is fascinating and touching: it inspires a very particular way of thinking about life, in general.

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© Claudia Steinfels

hat are the ingredients for a great art collection? An educated eye, money, sheer luck? Norwegian explorer, mountaineer, publisher, lawyer and art collector Erling Kagge has gained fame not only for being the first person to walk to the South Pole alone and for having climbed Mount Everest, but most recently for the release of his book, A Poor Collector's Guide to Buying Great Art. In it, Kagge narrates how he built his impressive art collection, which includes works by Tauba Auerbach, Urs Fischer, Raymond Pettibon, Richard Prince and Wolfgang Tillmans, despite having a limited budget.

There are basically two reasons to buy art. The first is pure love and deep passion. If you don’t have strong feelings when looking at art, then don’t continue to read. The second reason to buy art is because you see it as a potentially lucrative investment. If you fall into this category only, then I strongly advise you to work with an art consultant. Either way, you will find endless possibilities before you: there is so much art out there from which to choose that before you look at how to buy art, you must be honest with yourself about what it is you’re really looking for. Photography or painting, still life or landscape, figurative or abstract? Contemporary Art versus Old Masters? Outdoor or domestic sizes?


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Endless questions, so let’s dig into the matter. Is there right or wrong art and is there a right or wrong way to buy or collect art? Basically, anyone can collect. If you want to buy intelligently, I recommend you follow a few rules, as suggested by Kagge.

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BE IN LOVE, BE IMPASSIONED, BE OBSESSED Kagge says that, to get the best value from your budget, you must have an obsessive drive to research, source and capture the object of your desire. He cites the legendary art dealer, Lord Duveen, who standing in front of JMW Turner's Bridge and Tower famously proclaimed: “If I owned that picture, I should want nothing else in the world." Ideally, every single acquisition should be approached in such a mood.

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© zhudifeng

CULTIVATE THE PERFECT EYE, NOSE AND EAR Sometimes, it can be difficult to differentiate between bad and great art. Kagge recommends to not only train your eye but also your nose and ear, meaning that you must listen to what people around you are saying. However, buying with ears alone and leaving your eyes behind is not good advice either. Famous are the words of the legendary art dealer Irving Blum, who said that whenever he heard an artist's name mentioned by two or more people whose opinion he respected, he

went to see the artist’s work. Having mentioned this, never forget to ask yourself: who is the artist, how significant is the art, what is the art's provenance, is the asking price fair?

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HANG OUT WITH PEOPLE IN THE ART WORLD To get the most value for your money, it can be very helpful to cultivate relationships with the movers and shakers of the art world. Personal friendships with advisors, artists, curators, collectors, dealers and gallerists offer invaluable perspectives on contemporary art and insider information to which others may not have access. Equally, train and educate your eye by going to galleries, visiting museums, attending art fairs, following auctions, talking to artists and dealers. Read a lot, check online, do your own research or get advice from a professional.

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THE GALLERIST HOLDS THE KEY Galleries have a critical role in introducing artists to collectors. Kagge says that it is crucial to get to know several good gallerists who represent the artists you are trying to collect. He also mentions that it helps to buy regularly from a handful of galleries, as they will repay your loyalty by giving you their best works or offering discounts.


PROJECT LUXURY & ART 36

The pricing of objects of desire and beauty is a delicate matter and the values ascribed to those are dependent on many factors; some more tangible than others.

PARAMETERS TO CHECK: • Quality • Rarity • Condition • Provenance • Cultural impact • Art Loss Register • Restitution issues

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BE AN EARLY BIRD Being the first person to see the art (ideally before the opening) gives you the unique chance of accessing the best works. The same goes for buying works from artists early in their careers. Today, an artist's career and price trajectory can be steep. Kagge admits that he likes to buy an artist early because he may not be able to afford the works later.

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ACCEPT THAT THE BEST PRICE MIGHT NOT BE THE LOWEST PRICE Often, collectors have to pay top prices to get the best pieces. It's better to buy one fantastic artwork than to buy five or ten mediocre ones. Don't be afraid to invest in the right piece.

© Photo: Zhong Han, Courtesy Timothy Taylor; Evgeniy Zakharov

• Authenticity

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DON'T EXPECT TO MAKE MONEY Collecting art with the intention of making money is the biggest mistake a collector can make. Kagge points out that art was not made to be an object of speculation. The real value of buying and collecting art comes from the enjoyment of having a great piece in your home. However, if you succeed in collecting great art, you will most likely not lose money in the long run.


ART

8

BUY OPPORTUNISTICALLY AT AUCTION Auctions offer fantastic opportunities to buy high quality works from mid-career artists who may not be highly touted or who may have fallen behind. However, be aware that the auction houses put as much as 30 per cent commission on the achieved hammer-price.

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BE NICE ABOUT MONEY It’s important not to be discouraged from pursuing an artwork that you can't afford. Many galleries are prepared to negotiate the terms of a sale and payment of sums in instalments is common practice. Set your target high: even though you might sometimes go beyond your financial limits, it will level out in a short time. Time is usually a great friend when you’re buying amazing works.

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© Photo: Prudence Cumming Associates, Courtesy Timothy Taylor

ASK FOR ADVICE Would you buy a £50,000 car from a showroom floor, no questions asked? Would you buy a £1,000,000 house by standing in the front garden, simply by looking at it and deciding it's exactly what you want? Of course not. You read about the car, ask people who own it how they like it, compare prices from dealer to dealer. You tour the house, carefully inspect every

room, find out comparable house values and have the property inspected by a contractor. In both cases, you want to know what you're getting before you spend your money and the same holds true for art. In other words: if you are unsure, get a second opinion from a trusted art adviser. As long as you remember a few basic rules, buying art should be an enjoyable experience. Try to invest some time in becoming acquainted with the art world and the way it works. But more than anything trust your instincts – we all have an opinion of our own. Best of luck!

Art historian and expert Dr. Claudia Steinfels is a renowned authority on the art market. She founded Steinfels Art Consulting in Zurich and London in 2012. A former manager at Christie’s and senior director and auctioneer at Sotheby’s, she and her team possess a unique expertise and overview on today’s art world. Steinfels Art Consulting offers highly professional, discreet and tailor-made assistance for all art-related businesses with a comprehensive portfolio of services in the areas of collecting and mediation, selling, donating and the inheritance of art. The company handles complex assignments and places personalised client solutions as its top priority.


PROJECT LUXURY & ART 38

A DECADE OF

VOLTA NY

PROJECT LUXURY & ART SPEAKS WITH ARTISTIC DIRECTOR AMANDA COULSON TO DISCOVER HER THOUGHTS ON A DECADE OF VOLTA NY.

V

OLTA NY is the invitational fair of solo artist projects and it is the American incarnation of the original Basel VOLTA show, which was founded in 2005 by three art dealers as a fair "by galleries, for galleries". Since its debut in New York in 2008, Artistic Director Amanda Coulson has re-conceived the format as a rigorously curated, boutique event. Since then, VOLTA NY has showcased relevant contemporary art positions from emerging international artists. By spotlighting artists through primarily solo projects, Amanda tells us how VOLTA NY refocuses the art fair experience back to its most fundamental point: the artists and their works.

HOW DO THE NEW YORK AND BASEL SHOWS DIFFER? The atmosphere in Switzerland is different to the vibe in New York and this lends different qualities to the two fairs. Basel is older, more steady and sedate, and it has not reached the party fever pitch of its Miami sister. Many of the base collectors are old-school, serious and well-researched, though it is still very much focused on the market because they are definitely there to buy. The rest of the year, Basel is not a city with a massive resident population, like New York, which has a broader reach in terms of audience and diversity. New York has such a critical mass of artists, journalists, critics, museums and curators. The Basel fair is also smaller: just 68 exhibitors versus approximately 90 in New York. WHAT IS THE EFFECT OF THE SOLO PROJECT FOCUS OF THE NEW YORK SHOW? New York’s solo project focus balances its larger number of exhibitors, so that the experience isn’t too over-

© David Willems Photography, Images courtesy of VOLTA

AS CO-FOUNDER OF VOLTA, WHAT DOES IT FEEL LIKE TO BE CELEBRATING VOLTA NY'S DECADE EDITION THIS YEAR? I can barely believe that it has been going for 10 years! I still remember opening the original VOLTA show in Basel in June 2005, alongside the dealers and VOLTA founders Ulrich Voges, Friedrich Loock, and Kavi Gupta. In fact, I still remember the Cologne “biergarten" where this infamous group, together with collectors and curators, first conceived of the slightly crazy notion to open an emerging contemporary art fair during Art Basel Week. Our aim then was to identify and embrace the enormous gulf of talented galleries and artists that existed at that time between ultra blue-chip Art Basel and ultra-trendy and young Liste. When we brought

the fair to New York, my goal was to refocus the art fair experience on the artists’ works themselves—like a series of intense studio visits versus a typical crowded hall of overhung and mix-matched booths. To have existed and persisted through America’s Wall Street crash of 2008 and now, heading into 2017, remain fortified and confident in our objective as a solo project fair is laudable indeed.


ART

VOLTA Artistic Director Amanda Coulson and artist/curator Derrick Adams

Hugh Hayden’s new Fossil Fashion series

whelming for visitors. While Basel does not feature this solo mandate, I’ve noticed that more and more exhibitors (certainly since our first New York venue change to SoHo in 2013) in Basel are opting for solo projects as a way to fully promote their selected artist. Perhaps this proves that solo is really the way to do it effectively, particularly with the sort of emerging and regional galleries that we tend to attract. HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE THE MAIN DIFFERENCES IN THE SWISS AND AMERICAN ART MARKETS? Switzerland has a certain brand—it’s about luxury but also discretion, and this lends itself to the market there. The collectors are more low-key, they do not announce themselves in quite the same manner or publicise their purchases widely, as American collectors might. In the United States there is more openness and a willingness to share, open their apartments, speak about their new additions to the collections. Both come with different pros and cons, you just have to learn how to negotiate each one and approach it from a slightly different angle. WHAT IS YOUR BIGGEST ACHIEVEMENT AS ARTISTIC DIRECTOR OF VOLTA? That is a difficult question. There have been a lot of obstacles to overcome in different ways, like being the upstart fair and constantly being challenged by new locations. A lot of artists and galleries that we have premiered on our platform have gone on to do amazing things but by the time they get there, everybody for-

gets they were once at VOLTA! I suppose really that the biggest achievement is simply to have survived a difficult series of economic challenges. I think that to climb our way back up to a place where we are in some phenomenal locations, with really excellent production value and a great selection of galleries has been a major achievement. WHAT HAS BEEN THE MOST DIFFICULT PERSONAL CHALLENGE DURING YOUR TIME AT VOLTA? In the last few years I moved back to my home country of the Bahamas, where I am also the Director of the National Art Gallery. The Caribbean, in general, is so disconnected from the rest of the world, logistically and otherwise, that I felt it was very necessary to stay involved with VOLTA, to stay connected with the “First World” art world, and to be able to leverage my connections for the benefit of my region. Juggling the two quite demanding jobs has definitely proved very challenging and stressful, but has ultimately been worthwhile, and to remain functioning on an international level while living in a fairly simple place, where electricity is not a given every day of the week, where people in government still use carbon paper, is also quite an achievement. For VOLTA’s continued standards I really have to thank my team. Because we have worked together for so long, they knew precisely how to maintain the project—even if I was un-contactable! VOLTA NY March 1-5, 2017. Pier 90, New York www.voltashow.com


PROJECT LUXURY & ART 40

A FIGHT BETWEEN

FORM AND FUNCTION

WE EXPLORE THE INCREASINGLY COMPLEX DIFFERENCES BETWEEN FINE ART AND DECORATIVE ART.

A

little magic on the part of the artist. Just as Marcel Duchamp turned a urinal into a fountain by calling it such, the artist can turn something that is traditionally from the decorative arts into fine art simply by naming it so. For those unwilling to assign mystical powers to artists, it is a question of context. If an object falls into the traditional categories of decorative art—that is, it serves a purpose—and it is in a location where it serves that purpose, or could do so imminently, then it is decorative art. If that object has been removed from that context, put in an artist’s installation or a gallery, then it becomes fine art. This will do for a start, but this definition has its own problems. For example, what about decorative art objects that have been put into a museum dedicated to the decorative arts, like London’s Victoria and Albert or Vienna’s Museum of Applied Arts? Consequently, you also have to consider intent. If the craftsperson was creating a vase to be used as a vase—sold as a vessel to contain flowers—then they are creating a piece of decorative art. If, however, an identical vase is being made for an Ai Weiwei installation, then it is fine art. A Han dynasty potter creates an urn meant for use within an Imperial Palace—decorative art. Ai Weiwei takes that urn, writes ‘Coca-Cola’ on it and displays it in a gallery—fine art.

© Ruslan Gilmanshin, khunaspix/123RF

t first, the differences between fine and decorative arts might seem to be obvious. Fine art is something with no function other than to be admired as an object, such as paintings, sculptures, and video-installations. Decorative art is something that may be beautiful but which also serves a purpose, such as carpets, chairs, vases. However, what does this say about the work of Marc Camille Chaimowicz, who creates installations (i.e. fine art) from pieces of artist-designed furniture, textiles, and wallpapers (i.e. decorative art)? And what does this say about Britain’s Grayson Perry, who is a fine artist who works mostly in decorative arts, creating ceramics and tapestries? Although these objects technically have a function, they are displayed as fine art objects, on walls and on top of that defining symbol of fine art— the white plinth. The differences can break down in even more absurd ways. Say I take a painting off the wall and use it as a coaster. Does it become decorative art? This is of course a ridiculous example, but it highlights some of the problems encountered when trying to find the differences between fine and decorative arts. Despite this blurring of boundaries, which is a very postmodern problem, the solution comes straight out of the medieval era. The difference has to include a


ART

RT FAIR CALENDAR

New York Taipei

Beijing

VOLTA NY

ART REVOLUTION TAIPEI

ART BEIJING

March 1st to 5th, 2017

April 14th to 17th, 2017

April 30th to May 3rd, 2017

Paris

London

URBAN ART FAIR

PHOTO LONDON

April 20th to 23rd, 2017

May 18th to 21st, 2017

Brussels

Buenos Aires

ART NEW YORK May 3th to 7th, 2017

Hong Kong ART BASEL HONG KONG March 23rd to 25th, 2017

Sao Paulo SP ARTE April 6th to 9th, 2017

Dubai WORLD ART DUBAI 2017 © Art Basel

April 12th to 15th, 2017

ART BRUSSELS April 21st to 23rd, 2017

Cologne ART COLOGNE April 26th to 29th, 2017

Monte Carlo ART MONTE CARLO April 28th to 30th, 2017

ARTEBA May 24th to 27th, 2017

Helsinki ART FAIR SUOMI May 25th to 28th, 2017

Tokyo TOKYO INTERNATIONAL ART FAIR May 26th to 27th, 2017


MARCH 23 – 30, 2017 BASEL – SWITZERLAND

Witness the

DAWN OF TRENDS Baselworld is the single-most important trendsetting

market and witness the start of a new trendsetting cycle

show for the world’s watch and jewellery industry.

for the year.

What makes it unmissable is the fact that only here will you find all the key players representing every sector

Seize the unique opportunity to experience the interplay

of the industry together under one roof. Baselworld is

of passion and precision to create perfection. We

where the most prestigious international brands

invite you to join us at Baselworld, where you will be

unveil their innovations, creations and new collections

awe-struck by the spectacular pavilions, amazed at the

in the presence of world-class buyers and the global

new collections, and be amongst those who are a part of

press, all of whom unite here to take the pulse of the

history in the making!

See you at Baselworld 2017

BASELWORLD.COM


BASELWORLD.COM

The one unmissable trendsetting show for the entire watch and jewellery industry, where all key players unite to unveil their latest creations and innovations. Be a part of this premier event and experience passion, precision and perfection in action.

MARCH 23 – 30, 2017


PROJECT LUXURY & ART 44

GUCCI

FOUNDED IN 1921, GUCCI IS A HIGH PROFILE FASHION BRAND THAT HAS SHAPED AND DEFINED THE WORLD OF HIGH-END FASHION FOR MANY YEARS. by Amy Armstrong


FASHION

Spring/Summer 2017 Collection

G

ucci creates timeless, ready to wear collections that push the boundaries of innovative design and are no stranger to fashion walkways in all corners of the world. The company is famous for consistently exploring the endless possibilities that come hand in hand with fashion design and it produces an extensive range of menswear, womenswear, accessories, footwear, travel accessories, and jewellery. One of the most recognisable designer brands in the fashion industry, Gucci is renowned for integrating their signature branding into their designs. As a result, they now have a number of house signatures, including iconic designs such as their interlocking Gs and red stripes, and horsebit loafers. Worn by celebrities and the fashion elite around the world, Gucci has an unmistakable Italian feel, which is reflected in the brand’s choice of prints, designs and luxurious materials that are found throughout their collections. GUCCI’S NEW CREATIVE DIRECTOR Alessandro Michele recently became Gucci’s new creative director. Michele may be relatively unknown but he is not

under-qualified. When he was appointed to his new role as the director of one of the world’s biggest premium fashion brands this year, many fashion insiders were surprised and bewildered that a relatively unknown figure could take over the reigns of an international fashion brand that is worth billions of pounds. But after much scepticism, it would already seem that this luxurious, Italian brand is in very good hands! Known for his eccentric style and streak of infectious mystery, Michele is all set to take the brand into the future. Armed with his love of quirky, non-conventional design, Gucci’s newest recruit is already working tirelessly on creating new and exciting collections that embrace a number of unique prints, fabrics, designs and antique textiles. Working alongside 70 other designers, Alessandro Michele even uses his own favourite pieces of clothing as inspirational starting points. This allows him to explore new possibilities and create pieces that excite the often hard to crack world of fashion. A perfectionist by nature, Michele has admitted

Alessandro Michele


PROJECT LUXURY & ART 46

© Andrea Martiradon

Gucci Hub Milan

that he regularly obsesses over all of his collections, every single minute of every single day. It is this level of dedication that has already earned him much respect from fashion critics, as well as the team that he works with. Dedicated to creating a catalogue of individual looks, Gucci’s new collections are not necessarily what you would expect from a brand that has previously remained loyal to many of their signature prints. From crepe-de-Chine blouses that come complete with intriguing pussycat bows, through to duffle coats with sleeves that have been cut to bracelet length, Gucci’s new creative director has been keen to completely re-define the brand, injecting elements of quirky, vintage flavour and mismatched prints into its collections.

© Gucci

COLLECTIONS: SPRING/SUMMER 2017 Although warm, sunny days seem to be a lifetime away, the world’s fashion walkways are already walking on

sunshine! And Gucci’s spring/summer 2017 collection certainly won’t let you down when it comes to injecting life, eccentric design, and unpredictable style into your wardrobe. The brand’s inspiration for this collection comes from the work of V. Nabokov: “Literature was not born the day when a boy crying ‘wolf, wolf ’ came running out of the Neanderthal valley with a big gray wolf at his heels; literature was born on the day when a boy came crying ‘wolf, wolf ’ and there was no wolf behind him.” Steeped in wonder, the S/S17 collection will open your eyes to an eccentric style that knows no boundaries. The show’s notes aimed to shed some light on Gucci’s newest collection, stating: "The narrative principle is non-linear; it is made of ruptures, digs, leaps, cross-references and unpredictable connections. An archipelagic and metamorphic approach in which the thought overflows undisciplined and doesn't follow in the wake


FASHION

of tradition." As wildly poetic as that sounds, the collection certainly impressed the fashion elite. Featuring all things magical and pink, the collection revealed plenty of Elton John inspired sunglasses ready for the return of the sunshine, wonderful prints, as well as lots of bold knitwear that is ideal for chillier days.

Spring/Summer 2017 Collection


PROJECT LUXURY & ART 48

RUNWAY TRENDS Spring/Summer 2017

ARMANI

© Armani

Stylish and elegant as always, the new collection is also casual, bringing metropolitan leisure in a new light. Extra-wide trousers worn with narrow and waisted jackets and casual t-shirts blend harmoniously with a soft colour concept. Dominated by beige, cream, gray and washed blue – with flashing red accents scattered here and there, the collection does show a few exotic patterns. The textiles are comfortable and natural, in linen and cotton. The long-haired models as well as those with slightly tufted hair, wore their outfits casually, donning sunglasses to enhance Armani’s leisure look this season.


FASHION

Š Etro

ETRO Italian fashion house Etro, which was founded in 1968, is world famous for its stylish textile designs and its signature exotic paisley patterns. Its menswear collection for spring/summer 2017 has a touch of this passion, which can be seen in its relaxed, comfortable cuts and lightweight materials. Called warm and beguiling, this Etro collection was presented by non-professional models who were allowed to choose their own pieces to wear, creating a good vibe throughout the show and bringing a real sense of authenticity to the entire collection.


PROJECT LUXURY & ART 50

RUNWAY TRENDS Spring/Summer 2017

PAULE KA

© Paule Ka

Alithia Spuri-Zampetti’s latest dream-like and summery collection for Paule Ka was hosted in the grand greenhouse in the Jardin des Plantes. This was a perfect venue to present her vibrant outfits with a special touch of fluidity. Raw-edged floral jacquard with delicate hand-cut petals and gradient hand-dyed draped gowns with watery hues captivated the guests. Inspired by Japan, the artistic director turned sleeves, wraparound waists and engineered striped pleating into feminine silhouettes. Streamlined suits with a judo belt and the beloved Paule Ka bow hit the runway with Spuri-Zampetti’s dresses featuring sporty knitwear tops and fluid or bell skirts. Silk, fine cotton blends and jacquards were combined in sophisticated pieces that move effortlessly from daytime to evening. Not to be forgotten were the tropical colors with appliqués, strings, ribbons and feather embellishments.


FASHION

© Oscar de la Renta

OSCAR DE LA RENTA Laura Kim and Fernando Garcia are Oscar de la Renta’s new creative directors, but they have not yet launched their own collection. Instead, they watched the spring line designed by the ten member studio team that showed lovely pieces, such as a knit skirt suit, safari jacket, peasant dress as well as cocktail frocks and evening dresses. The flat sandals and the minimal accessories worn by the models gave the show a breezy, juvenile and light feel. The white, long-sleeved peasant dresses, long skirts and caftans were crafted with organza, lace and silk. Then came a red tank dress with a tiered skirt, cotton safari jacket over matching shorts, a crop top with skirt, a black cocktail number with sequin and feather touches, gold thread and also silk taffeta gowns. We saw de la Renta’s familiar shapes and are curious to see what Kim and Garcia will do in early 2017.


PROJECT LUXURY & ART 52

MUST HAVES

LET SPRING BREATHE NEW LIFE INTO YOUR WARDROBE WITH FRESH TONES, SUBLIME ACCESSORIES AND FABRICS THAT COME TO LIFE IN THE BREEZE.

Rolex

Cellini Dual Time Enter the new season with stylish punctuality courtesy of the 39mm Cellini Dual Time in 18ct Everose gold, the unique alloy developed by Rolex. The traditional lines of this classic dress watch make it a fitting ode to the life of Benvenuto Cellini, an Italian goldsmith and musician of the 1500s. Watch the sun rise before your eyes in the aperture at the bottom of the dial.

PHD Men's Calf Leather Backpack If 2017 is your year of travel, this luxurious Italian calf leather backpack will ensure you arrive in hands-free style. With modern hand-painted edges and in a subtle grey that supersedes traditional black, it’s a backpack that can take you to the streets and beyond.

Shinola

The Runwell White Oak Wood Turntable As sales of vinyl records continue to grow, get back to basics, not to mention old-school sound, with this turntable by Detroit-based company Shinola. With a two-speed beltdriven table, low-friction tone arm and Shinola-designed phono preamplifier, your favourite tunes have never sounded so good.

© Rolex. Buscemi and Shinola via www.neimanmarcus.com

Buscemi


FASHION

Ermenegildo Zegna Woven Wool Check Blazer

Versatility reigns when it comes to this notched collar, two-button blazer by the Italian house established in 1910, run by the fourth generation of the Zegna family. Masters of impeccable Italian menswear, join the polished cognoscenti and wear this blazer with tonal trousers. 1

Valentino

Santeria Etched Lace-up Shoe Š Ermenegildo Zegna, Valentino, Edward Armah and Barton Perreira via www.neimanmarcus.com

The Santeria by Valentino Garavani in etched calf leather is anything but your average derby shoe. Artfully adorned with stars and astrological symbols, the opulent details continue with the signature Rockstud pyramid detail at the heel.

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Edward Armah

Tapestry Paisley Silk Pocket Square It’s time to pack away the dark winter tones and experiment with colour. Take a baby step in the right direction with this Edward Armah silk pocket square in a classic but contemporary burgundy paisley print. 3

Barton Perreira

Plimsoul Round Sunglasses Co-founders Patty Perreira and Bill Barton believe in craftsmanship and ingenious yet understated design when it comes to their sunglasses. Add to your collection with these round frames, handmade in Japan, in a cobalt blue that speaks to the optimism of spring.

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PROJECT LUXURY & ART 54

Brunello Cucinelli

Deconstructed Sport Jacket A light-as-air casual jacket in linen, wool and silk sets the tone for the season. From a brand inspired by the languid Umbrian countryside and famous for its luxurious fabrics like cashmere, inject an air of nonchalance into your wardrobe with this goanywhere piece. 1

Maison Margiela

Dipped Suede Future High-Top Sneaker

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Hermès

Terre d’Hermès Encapsulated by the French perfumer Jean-Claude Ellena as “Feeling the earth, lying on the ground, gazing at the sky,” Terre d’Hermès is an expression of the power of the elements. Woody, vegetal and mineral, it features notes of flint, vetiver and orange. 3

Burma: An Enchanted Spirit

Photo Book by David Heath

David Heath has travelled extensively through this undiscovered nation, capturing beautiful images of the inspiring Burmese people along the way. Journey with him in this stunning leatherbound coffee table book and contribute to a good cause at the same time – a percentage of the sales from the book will be used to build and develop a school in Yangon.

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© Hermès; David Heath; Brunello Cucinelli and Maison Margiela via www.neimanmarcus.com

The off-duty footwear of choice, this high-top sneaker takes shoe design to futuristic heights. The dipped rubberised effect at the toe and the ankle grip strap enhance its sleek appearance. Add these conceptual sneakers to your outfit and step outside the mainstream.


FASHION

Gucci

Sylvie Handbag Creative Director Alessandro Michele combines the traditional and the new in this appliquĂŠd handbag with gold-tone hardware. The iconic Gucci stripe merges seamlessly with a smattering of sequinned roses, making this accessory our darling bud of spring.

Louis Vuitton

Studded Sunglasses

Š Prada; Louis Vuitton; Gucci and Gianvito Rossi via www.mytheresa.com

Seasons come and go but the aviator remains a style staple. This year is no different as Louis Vuitton offers an updated iteration of a classic, with elegant gold arms and a striking formation of glinting studs around the lenses.

Prada

La Femme The sultry fragrance La Femme is a floral, smooth and hyper-sensual scent that is the ultimate in femininity. Activate its frangipani, ylang-ylang, vanilla and tuberose notes and embrace your softer side.

Gianvito Rossi

Belle Metallic Sandals Known for his head-turning, sky-scraping heels, Gianvito Rossi makes an impact with the Belle sandal in lamb leather. Rose gold, red and orange combine in perfect harmony at the toe, while slinky gold ties snake around the ankle. Happiness in a shoe.


PROJECT LUXURY & ART 56

Burberry

Stanhill Lace Trench Coat A spring shower is no barrier to style when this ethereal dusty pink lace trench coat is in your fashion arsenal. With a delicate ruffle at the shoulder, the double-breasted design is a pretty take on Burberry’s functional classic. Pair with distressed denim for a tougher weekend look or a midi skirt to channel a sweet elegance. 1

No.21

Crystal-embellished Satin Kitten Heels

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© DeTiara; No.21 via www.matchesfashion.com; Roger Viver, Burberry via www.mytheresa.com

Inject a sense of playfulness into your shoe collection with these satin beauties from No.21 (by Alessandro Dell’Acqua), complete with crystal-encrusted cherry motifs. Add in the folded bow detail in khaki green and the of-the-moment mule design and these shoes are versatile enough to complement everything from cropped trousers to a gown.

DeTiara

Crystal Earrings A dash of sparkle elevates the simplest of outfits. These crystal embellished clip-on earrings by the Antibesbased brand certainly do the job this spring, with their oversized pink and gold gems and eye-catching curves. 3

Roger Vivier

Pilgrim Small Roses Satin Clutch Instantly recognisable by its regal buckle, this Roger Vivier satin clutch is embellished with roses and blooming with opulence. Pair with a white dress to offer a fresh canvas for this clutch to truly shine.

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FASHION

Johanna Ortiz

La Santa Maria Silk Dress This printed silk gown might be adorned with sweet blossoms, but its wearer is no wallflower. Designed by Colombian designer Johanna Ortiz who is known for her exaggerated silhouettes and ruffles, the off the shoulder cut and beaded embellishments ensure that this dress makes an impact. 1

Delfina Delettrez

Dots 18ct Rose Gold Phalanx Diamond Ring

© Johanna Ortiz, Delfina Delettrez and Lanvin via www.mytheresa.com; Louis Vuitton

The Dots ring is designed to sit in the middle of the finger as a new take on the much-loved and endlessly reproduced diamond ring. Throw out the rulebook and stack it with a multitude of other rings from your collection for an eclectic approach to accessorising. 2

Louis Vuitton

Petite Malle Phone Case Love the Petite Malle trunk handbag? It now comes in even more petite form as a phone case and it’s fast becoming the most coveted of tech accessories among the fashion pack. There’s nothing chic about an overstuffed handbag, so embrace your inner minimalist this season and carry everything you need in your hand. 3

Lanvin

Crystal Embellished Necklace Couturier Bouchrar Jarrar is now at the helm at the iconic French label, transitioning the signature glamour of the brand into a new era. Join her with this crystal embellished statement necklace, which sits high on the décolletage as a dramatic flourish to any evening ensemble.

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PROJECT LUXURY & ART 58

ASHION CALENDAR

Los Angeles LA FASHION WEEK: WOMEN’S March 13th to 15th, 2017

Tokyo TOKYO FASHION WEEK: WOMEN’S March 20th to 25th, 2017

Seoul SEOUL FASHION WEEK: WOMEN’S March 27th to April 1st, 2017

London

Paris

LONDON COLLECTIONS: MEN’S

PARIS FASHION WEEK: MEN’S

June 9th to 12th, 2017

June 21st to 25th, 2017

LONDON FASHION WEEK: WOMEN’S

HAUTE COUTURE

September 15th to 19th, 2017

Florence FLORENCE PITTI IMMAGINE: MEN’S June 13th to 16th, 2017

Milan MILAN FASHION WEEK: MEN'S

July 2nd to 6th, 2017

PARIS FASHION WEEK: WOMEN'S September 26th to October 4th, 2017

New York NYFW: MEN’S July 10th to 13th, 2017

NYFW: WOMEN’S September 7th to 14th, 2017

June 17th to 20th, 2017

September 20th to 26th, 2017

© Gucci

MILAN FASHION WEEK: WOMEN'S


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Diamonds BLACK

WE ALREADY KNEW THAT DIAMONDS CAN COME IN FABULOUSLY VIBRANT COLOURS LIKE RED, VIOLET, PINK, BLUE, OR YELLOW, TO NAME BUT A FEW. BESIDES BEING HIGHLY VALUABLE, THEY ARE STUNNING. THERE ARE ALSO BLACK DIAMONDS AND NATURAL FANCY BLACK DIAMONDS. IT IS, HOWEVER, IMPORTANT TO DISTINGUISH BETWEEN THE TWO.

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nlike most other diamonds, natural black diamonds are entirely opaque and they are found in very few locations, such as Brazil and Central Africa. In ‘regular‘ black diamonds, the black colour is not natural but instead comes from heating treatments. Natural diamonds are found in roughly the same black colour that they have at the jeweller’s. Black diamonds are opaque and they only come in one colour-intensity: fancy black. Natural black diamonds are very rare and they owe their colour to the graphite in the crystalline structure and random cluster-

ing throughout the diamond. Regular black diamonds have often been burned in their rough state to receive the opaque blackness, and are thus artificial and not graded by the Gemological Institute of America (GIA). Meanwhile, high pressure on carbon under the earth’s surface forms natural black diamonds, which produces a repeating geometric pattern in the crystal lattice. Black diamonds are growing in popularity and many celebrities have been spotted wearing beautiful black diamond jewellery. We have picked some of our favourites.

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© De Grisogono


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Š Boucheron; Graff Diamonds; Vhernier, Stephen Webster, Syna, Qeelin, Lana via www.neimanmarcus.com

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From left to right: 1. De Grisogono Crazymals Funky Monkey ring, with black and white diamonds; High Jewelry white diamond ring surrounded by back diamonds; Ventaglio white gold earrings, with white and black diamonds; Mascote ring in white gold with black diamonds and emeralds, jet; Pink gold cufflinks with black diamond 2. Boucheron Kaa, snake ring with black diamonds and emeralds; Hans, the hedgehog studs in white gold, with pave diamonds, blue sapphires and black diamonds; Hans, the hedgehog pendant, with rubies and black diamonds 3. Vhernier ring with black and white diamonds 4. Stephen Webster Love Me Love Me Not, agate quartz earrings with black diamonds 5. Syna black diamond and onyx bauble cuff links 6. Qeelin Wang Wang French Bulldog pendant necklace with black and white diamonds 7. Lana Reckless rose thread-through hoop earrings with black diamonds 8. Graff Diamonds GraffStar Slim Eclipse watch with a black diamond crown


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Bridal

HAUTE JEWELLERY FOR BRIDE AND GROOM GETTING MARRIED SOON? THEN IT’S HIGH TIME TO SELECT YOUR WEDDING RINGS, AND THE JEWELLERY YOU WILL WEAR ON THAT VERY SPECIAL DAY. BRIDAL JEWELLERY FROM TOP LUXURY NAMES OFFERS A MYRIAD OF BEAUTIFUL TEMPTATIONS.

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ow to select from amongst the sparkles? Once the tux or suit and dress have been chosen, the time has come to concentrate on your wedding rings. And for brides, the metals and stones should match your dress, hair and skin tone. Bridal jewellery will have different effects depending on the cut of your outfits, and on the veil and any hair accessories for the bride.

Most jewellers advise the couple-to-be to make appointments early on and leave enough time to go through all of the options. Researching in advance can help. Wedding rings and jewellery should be considered as an investment. You will wear your wedding rings every day, and the other pieces you select can be worn far beyond the day that you make your vows. 1

© Boucheron; Chopard

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© De Grisogono; Graff Diamonds; Tiffany & Co.; Buccellati; Cartier

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From left to right: 1. Boucheron Beloved solitaire platinum ring with blue sapphire, paved with diamonds; Quatre Radiant solitaire ring with diamonds in white gold; Quatre Black Edition cufflinks in white gold and black PVD, onyx sticks 2. Chopard Bridal collection white gold earrings set with two peer shaped diamonds, two brilliant-cut diamonds and four rose-cut diamonds; L.U.C 1937 watch in stainless steel, sun ray satin-brushed silvered dial and black alligator strap; Ring in white gold set with a heart shaped diamond 3. De Grisogono Allegra white gold ring, baguette-cut white diamonds; Chiocciolina white gold earrings, briolette-cut white diamonds; Florinda white gold and white diamond bracelet 4. Graff Diamonds Diamond scroll motif tiara; Constellation set oval cut diamond ring with pave diamonds; Platinum and diamond cufflinks 5. Tiffany & Co. The Tiffany diamond ring in rose gold; Pavé Tiffany Setting with a platinum band set with pavé diamonds; Victoria earrings in platinum with diamonds 6. Buccellati Antiope necklace, earrings and cuff links in white gold and diamonds 7. Cartier (from top to bottom) Destinée Solitaire ring with brilliant-cut diamond; Sterling silver cufflinks with engraved sodalite Double C logo; Love wedding band in white gold with 1 brilliant-cut diamond


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Milanese WATCHSTRAPS TIMELESS ELEGANCE ORIGINALLY CRAFTED IN THE 19TH CENTURY IN MILAN’S FINEST WORKSHOPS, MILANESE WATCHSTRAPS ARE NOW OFFERED BY MOST LUXURY WATCH BRANDS. THESE FINE-KNIT METAL STRAPS WERE CREATED YEARS AGO IN ATELIERS BY WORKERS WHO WOVE THEIR MATERIALS INTO ELEGANTLY INTRICATE BRACELETS, BUT THESE BANDS HAVE IN NO WAY LOST THEIR APPEAL AND SOPHISTICATION. GERMANY AND THE FAR EAST HAVE NOW BECOME MAJOR PRODUCTION CENTRES FOR THESE WATCHSTRAPS.

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tamped from sheet steel and stitched together or interlinked through up to 85 individual steps, Milanese watchstraps actually use a more economic process than traditional steel bracelets. And strong they are, they are sometimes referred to as ‘shark proof’. Their smooth mesh is also comfortable to wear.

Milanese watchstraps are classical and yet still modern, an all-rounder, all-weather, go-anywhere strap that often looks dressier than a leather band or traditional metal bracelet. Some call them streamlined, others say vintage or retro-inspired. At any rate, fancy or sporty, we think they’re chic.

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© Breitling


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Š Eterna, Junghans, IWC, Omega

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From left to right: 1. Breitling Transocean Unitime Pilot Blacksteel; Transocean Chronograph Unitime 2. Eterna Super Kontiki Black Edition (limited edition); Super Kontiki Chronograph (special edition) 3. Junghans Max Bill Chronoscope 4. IWC (from top to bottom): Portofino Automatic Moon Phase 37, 18ct rose gold set with 66 diamonds; Porto no Automatic 37, stainless steel, slate-coloured dial set with 12 diamonds 5. Omega Seamaster Ploprof 1200m


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ZENITH

CAPTURING TODAY’S DIGITAL NATIVES ZENITH, A WATCH BRAND FROM THE LVMH GROUP, HAS BEEN CAPTURING THE ATTENTION OF A YOUNGER AND YOUNGER AUDIENCE THANKS TO SMART DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY AND INFLUENCER PARTNERSHIPS. DIGITAL LUXURY GROUP’S GENNA MEREDITH REPORTS HOW.


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n 2011, watch industry sales were booming—the industry experienced a 21.2% jump in export sales from June to July, and it was one of only three of the ten largest industries to post growth. By 2012, the average export growth was an impressive 17%, outperforming any other Swiss industrial sector. Fast-forward to December 2015 and the Swiss watch industry was preparing for its fourth straight year of little to no growth. “Swiss Watch Industry Calls Time on Booming Growth of Prior Years”, reported Bloomberg. Added to the financial struggles, the traditional watch audience had grown older and the number of potential buyers had decreased, meaning that opportunities for growth had to come from a new pool of people. This younger, digital-savvy audience have higher expectations—expecting brands to be available online and provide a seamless experience. This was the scenario that luxury Swiss watch brand Zenith, owned by LVMH and best known for its El Primero watch movement, faced and tackled head-on as it approached its biggest moment of the year—Baselworld, in 2016. With over 200,000 people flocking to the city of Basel, Baselworld is the most important marketplace and trendsetting show for the world’s watch and jewellery industry. With a reported 80% of global watch sales for the year ahead generated at the fair, the annual exhibition hosts

over 1,800 brands and it welcomes aficionados as well as press to see what the industry has to offer. SO, HOW CAN A WATCH BRAND THAT IS WELL KNOWN TO SPECIALISED PRESS AND COLLECTORS APPEAL TO A YOUNGER, DIGITAL AUDIENCE? AND IMPORTANTLY, HOW CAN THE BRAND MAXIMISE ITS INVESTMENT SO THAT POTENTIAL CLIENTS AROUND THE WORLD WILL ALSO BE REACHED? To address these challenges, Zenith worked with Digital Luxury Group (DLG), a digital strategy and marketing agency dedicated to luxury brands, in order to help modernise what they were doing and tap into this digital audience. “We saw great potential to help widen the Zenith audience,” Inès Lazaro, Head of Client Services for DLG explains. “The first step was by communicating using the brand’s values (i.e. manufacture, legends and vintage). Then, by humanising the relationship between brand and audience, and finally by choosing Influencers that share Zenith’s values that were outside of the watch industry and could attract a fresh audience.” As part of its aim to communicate the brand’s values and connect with this new audience, Zenith teamed up with Uber to offer classic car rides during Baselworld. The Baselworld-goers were also invited to experience a classic barbershop with the famous Milanese barber, Bullfrog. They were treated to a style refresh, shoeshine and shave, right in the heart of the exhibition.


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speak to him, offering them an insight into Zenith’s values. Wessman posted live from the Distinguished Gentleman’s Ride (DGR) event where Zenith’s president and CEO, Aldo Magada, along with DGR President Mark Hawwa announced the partnership between Zenith Watches and the DGR. This partnership aims to help in raising both funds and awareness in the battle against prostate cancer. This is an important issue for the millennial luxury generation, with research showing that “88% of UK and US millennials and generation Xers believe brands need to do more good, not just ‘less bad.’” At the event, Hawwa said that “Zenith is the ideal partner for us, we share common values related to style and leisure, Zenith is a legendary brand.” To further capitalise on the power of human-to-human communication, DLG reached out to carefully selected influencers such as Cool Hunting and the Copenhagen-based bloggers A New Kind of Love—a couple who boast a following of over 240,000 individuals around the world. This couple documented their first time at Baselworld through beautifully shot images of themselves styling the watches. Together with their audience, they fit the Zenith aesthetic perfectly—enabling the brand to touch

© Zenith Watches

Using DLG’s influencer identification process, the team identified publications and bloggers who aligned with Zenith’s core values and could help promote the partnerships further. The lead partnership involved renowned tattoo artist Luke Wessman. On top of owning an ‘invite-only’ tattoo studio in Los Angeles, Wessman is passionate about taking the best from the past to forge the future—the perfect mirror image of the Zenith brand identity. Just as with watchmaking, the art of tattooing is about craftsmanship—creating wonders using your hands. Vincent Steinman, communication and marketing director for Zenith agreed, “When we met Luke, he oozed soul and style—the two things we really wanted to portray with Zenith.” Of the partnership Wessman said, “Zenith’s craft of watchmaking is second to none, and their rich heritage, tradition, passion and pursuit of excellence are reflected in the legacy of its slogan—‘Legends Are Forever’. When the opportunity arose to work with them, I was proud to unite my brand with theirs.” Wessman was present at the Zenith booth, indulging in the full barbershop experience and sharing his experience of being at Baselworld for the first time with his fans. His presence also meant that the press could


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an audience who would not have otherwise been privy to the Baselworld hype.

SOCIAL MEDIA ENGAGEMENT

Luke Wessman (l) with Zenith CEO Aldo Magada (r)

The engagement from fans cemented how important it is for a brand to communicate news about its products as well as its core beliefs—the passion points that a younger audience can relate to. DLG also developed a micro-site, an SEA programme and social media strategy. Each digital touch-point emotionally brought to life the key values of the brand, as well as highlighting the new products—an important factor in retaining the traditional watch connoisseurs. Zenith’s ‘human-first’ content contributed to exceptional results. The posts during Baselworld 2016 reached over 15 times more fans than usual, with 11% of traffic coming from social media channels. In addition, thanks to an efficient targeting strategy, the community size increased by 7.5 times in less than one month. Together, DLG and Zenith successfully created a digital journey where both product and brand information stood out from the sea of industry messages. Thanks to this value-first approach, a digital word-of-mouth effect was created amongst a new, younger audience.


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THE UNIQUE APPEAL OF

BASELWORLD

BASELWORLD 2017, THE UNMISSABLE TRENDSETTING SHOW FOR THE GLOBAL WATCH AND JEWELLERY INDUSTRY, WILL TAKE PLACE IN BASEL, SWITZERLAND FROM MARCH 23RD TO 30TH.

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Chef Massimo Bottura, Osteria Francescana

tre for more than 145,000 attendees, who comprised representatives from exhibiting companies, buyers and visitors, and journalists from over 100 countries. 2017 promises to be another success story. MARKET INSIGHTS Baselworld is the focal point of the entire industry, and provides attendees with a unique opportunity to take the pulse of the market, discover the new and trendsetting collections that will dominate the market for the next twelve months, and equally importantly, to capitalise on the enormous business opportunities that are available exclusively at Baselworld.

Chef Dieter Koschina, Villa Joya

Š Courtesy of Baselworld

or eight eventful and memorable days, 1,500 of the world's most famous and prestigious brands, representing the entire spectrum of watches, jewellery, diamonds, gemstones, and pearls, as well as machinery and supplies, will be united with renowned buyers and the global press to take the pulse of the market, celebrate the unveiling of new collections, and experience first-hand the launch of trendsetting innovations and creations. The last occurrence of the undisputedly trendsetting event for the world's watch and jewellery industry, Baselworld 2016, lived up to its reputation as the launch pad for global trends. The show was the nerve cen-


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THE MEGA EVENT Around 4,400 representatives of the press from over 70 countries typically attend the show. Over 11,000 journalists from all over the world last year followed the livestream of the opening press conference, underlining Baselworld's wide reach and universal attraction. Every form of mass communication is represented at Baselworld, and its incredible impact reverberates around the globe, with after-effects that will last for the next twelve months as the trendsetting innovations and creations presented here reach their final destinations and populate showcase windows in the most illustrious locations of the world’s metropolises.

According to the Swiss Exhibitors at Baselworld, inspiring new trends include: • Watches for women are in the spotlight for a good many Swiss brands, with complications and chronographs joining gemset models. • Classic timepieces for men make room for uncluttered dials and elegant cases, and new designs for complications and tourbillons can be seen at the high end of the market. • Sports watches, and chronographs in particular, play a prominent role this year. • An increase in the number of steel watches also enables brands to offer products at more attractive prices than in previous years.


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JEWELLERY INSURANCE THINGS TO KNOW

YOUR JEWELLERY IS MORE THAN JUST AN ACCESSORY – IT IS AN INVESTMENT AND A PRECIOUS ITEM IMBUED WITH EMOTIONAL SENTIMENT. THAT IS WHY IT IS SO IMPORTANT TO ENSURE THAT YOUR MOST VALUABLE JEWELLERY IS PROTECTED.

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that you can have your jewellery fixed or replaced if something happens to it. CONSIDER THE VALUE OF THE JEWELRY Should your jewellery be insured? Consider what it is worth to you. Something can be financially valuable and would be very expensive to replace, so it makes sense to protect it with insurance. However, a piece of jewellery can also be emotionally valuable, such as a wedding ring that has been passed down through several generations of your family. Insuring these sentimental items will make sure that you can have them repaired if something happens to them.

© Anna Kvach/123RF

hether it is your diamond engagement ring, your grandfather’s vintage Rolex or your collection of pearl necklaces, it is crucial to keep them insured. You may have homeowners’ insurance, but what many people don’t realize is that every item in your home isn’t always covered by this type of insurance. In fact, there are some types of homeowners’ insurance that exclude jewellery and other valuable items, such as furs and artworks. This can mean your coverage is inadequate, especially if your jewellery items have appreciated in value since you purchased them. That is why jewellery insurance exists – to make sure


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HOW JEWELLERY INSURANCE WORKS Jewellery insurance is not too different than any other type of insurance you might have; it is simply designed specifically for your jewellery. To get the right coverage, you need to have your jewellery appraised so that you are aware of the correct value of it. When you choose a jewellery insurance policy, make sure you understand precisely what the coverage includes. Then, you need to think about the deductible. The larger the deductible, the lower your premium – but that means you must cover more of the cost if you ever need to make a claim on the policy. Sometimes, if you make a claim for jewellery repair, the insurer will allow you to choose the jeweler, but in other cases, you need to select from their list of jewelers. Figure this out beforehand, as sometimes the jewelers specified by insurance companies are the cheapest but not necessarily the best. WHAT DOES IT COVER? Your jewellery insurance policy should provide you with comprehensive coverage in the event of loss, theft and accidental damage. If your coverage is very good, it also includes an unexplained loss – when your jewellery simply disappears, and you don’t know what happened to it. Each policy is different, so make sure you find out what yours covers. For example, if you lost your wedding ring, would the insurer create an exact

replica, or would they simply provide you with a ring of comparable value? GETTING YOUR JEWELLERY APPRAISED Before you insure your jewellery, it needs to be appraised by a professionally trained expert. The expert will estimate the current retail value and what it would cost to replace the jewellery if lost, broken or stolen. The appraisal also includes a detailed description of the jewellery itself. You don’t always have to pay for the appraisal – sometimes it is offered as part of the price when you buy a new piece of jewellery. However, if you insure an old family heirloom, you may have to pay for it to be appraised. Also, it is a good idea to consider getting your jewellery appraised every few years, because the value of gemstones can change over time, due to several factors, including inflation. If the value of your jewellery changes significantly, you may need to change your insurance policy. When choosing someone to appraise your jewellery before you have it insured, make sure the appraiser is a professionally trained jewellery expert. Check to see if he/she is qualified as an appraiser and has the correct training. Take your time when choosing jewellery insurance – something so valuable should be protected with the right policy that really meets your needs.


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ANGEL

IN THE MARBLE

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s the world dives headlong into the tsunami of the information age, it often seems that what is prized above all else is digitisation, efficiency, the growing intelligence of machines and the avoidance of human foibles. Such progress might be inevitable but Johann Rupert believes that it comes at a price: “These forces threaten to eclipse singular human skills and centuries of culture and know-how,” he says, “and we want to make sure that this precious heritage doesn’t get left behind.” Together with co-founder Dr Franco Cologni, South African business mogul Rupert established the Michelangelo Foundation in 2016, with the aim of redressing the balance between the creation of objects of lasting beauty and our increasingly screen-based culture. “More than ever, we are in great need of connection, both to our environment and to one another,” explains Italian author and philosopher Cologni. “We have been working in Italy for two decades to create a movement that acknowledges and encourages the work of master artisans and gives young people the chance to enter this world of culture and beauty.” One of the key objectives of the Michelangelo Foundation is the recognition and protection of not simply art but artisanship. This could take the form of a digital platform for young independent artisans, a Tripadvisor-style series of recommendations, or perhaps providing a forum for discovery and support. Other ideas for practical assistance that the Michelangelo Foundation may offer include underwriting collaborations between design-

ers and artisans, developing a title and recognition at national level for master craftsmen, building networks for like-minded artisans and creating an apprenticeship program to propel dying arts into the future. In this way, the Michelangelo Foundation aims to promote its vision of an age of ‘artisan humanism’ in which artisanal excellence can be defined, recognised and cultivated like a rare botanical. The Michelangelo Foundation is the latest in a series of charitable forays into the arts by magnates in the luxury sector. For example, Fondation Louis Vuitton rises as a Frank Gehry-designed beacon of contemporary art, music and dance on the outskirts of Paris courtesy of LVMH’s Bernard Arnault and is described as a ‘private cultural initiative’ to support contemporary artistic creation. Likewise, the eighteenth century Bourse de Commerce is set to transform into a museum for the private contemporary collection of Kering’s François Pinault, while Fondazione Prada pitches itself as a cultural institution embodying an interest in literature, art, cinema and philosophy. The focus of the Michelangelo Foundation is somewhat different. Not concerned with the promotion of its artisans into new super-brands, it is fixated on painstaking craft itself as art form, whether the production of linen in an Irish mill, haute couture in Rome, ceramics in Palermo or the restoration of vintage Ferraris in Modena. Expert craft as a last-gasp expression of humanity: slow, lasting excellence. Just like the masterpieces of the Michelangelo Foundation’s namesake, the transcendent Renaissance sculptor who ded-

© Michelangelo Foundation 2016. Photography by T. Bertelsen and S. Pozzoli

THE GENEVA-BASED MICHELANGELO FOUNDATION IS THE BRAINCHILD OF JOHANN RUPERT, WHO IS CHAIRMAN OF LUXURY GROUP RICHEMONT, AND ENTREPRENEUR AND CULTURAL EXPERT DR FRANCO COLOGNI. ITS LOFTY MISSION IS TO DEFEND THE FUTURE OF MASTER CRAFTSMANSHIP OR MÉTIERS D’ART FROM THE SYSTEMIC FORCES OF GLOBALISATION AND THE DIGITAL REVOLUTION.


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Musical instrument makers, Henri Selmer Paris

Atelier La Fucina di Efesto where Alessandro Rametta and Andrea Capriotti sculpt metal

icated his life to artistry. Michelangelo once acknowledged that, “If people knew how hard I had to work to gain my mastery, it would not seem so wonderful at all”. THE FUTURE OF BEAUTY As chairman of a luxury group that owns Van Cleef & Arpels, Cartier and Jaeger-LeCoultre among others, Rupert has already had his fair share of influence over a culture that venerates exquisite beauty in its commercial form, although he is clear that there will be no relationship between Richemont or its portfolio brands and the Michelangelo Foundation. Rupert told the New York Times in a candid interview in 2016, “Look, we’ve been very lucky and made more money than we ever thought possible out of luxury goods. But uncovering

Pino Grasso makes haute couture embroidery in Milan

the raw or enduring talent—for me, that’s the best part.” He added that, “What’s not fun anymore is going to Bond Street or Fifth Avenue or Via Montenapoleone where the shops and product all look the same and have done now for the last 30 years because all the smaller, independent artisans have been pushed out by the retail rentals. We have to protect their livelihoods.” The non-profit Michelangelo Foundation is Rupert’s opportunity to turn talk into action. “This will not be a moneymaking thing,” he urges. “It is going to be an open platform, a place where people can explore unique products in the one area where Europe is still better than America or Asia.” In Rupert and Cologni, the artisans of métiers d’art have found two formidable champions.

La Fucina di Efesto sculptures


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TOP BEAUTY TRENDS TO TRY THIS SEASON

THE EVENINGS ARE FINALLY LIGHTENING UP AND WE CAN FINALLY FEEL THE WARM BREEZE AGAINST OUR SKIN, IT IS SAFE TO SAY THAT SUMMER IS ON ITS WAY! AFTER A DAMAGING WINTER ON OUR SKIN, IT WILL HAPPILY WELCOME A SUDDEN SURGE OF VITAMIN D.

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THE RETURN OF THE 1980S Taking a retro throwback, the eighties have returned! From bright lipsticks to pop blushers, they have certainly put their stamp on summer 2017. Introducing a comeback of blusher and brighter tones, we cannot wait to reminisce in this retro trend!

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BOLD LIPS Of course we will see the return of coral tones and bright lips, but lipstick has done a whole 360 for this season. From adding glitter to lips to merging together fuchsia tones, 2017 has certainly welcomed an interesting trend for this season.

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BARE LASHES For this season, it seems that we will be leaving our mascara behind! Achieving a fresher and more youthful appearance on eyes, bare lashes create the perfect daytime. And what could be better than having an extra 5 minutes in bed or avoiding the difficult mascara application on the bus?

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THE SMUDGY EYE Forget the classic smoky eye, this season it is all about the smudgy eye. Favoured by Balmain and Altuzarra for spring/summer 2017, the smudgy eye gives the perfect ‘just woke up look’ and is great for those who aren’t confident with applying makeup—the ‘smudgier’ the better.

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SLICK SIDE PARTING Of course we have the Kardashians to thank for the slick hair trend, but for this season we are welcom-

© victorias, puhhha, ml_lilu1331, simoneandress, Nadzeya Korabkova/123RF

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owever, with a new season comes a new beauty trend. Waving goodbye to some rather bizarre treatments from last season, we cannot wait to see what is in store for this summer. So to help you take note of the upcoming beauty trends for next season, we have compiled some summer favourites.


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ing the slick side parting. A favourite look for Victoria Beckham and models at Kenzo, the smoothed down hairstyle is perfect for a sophisticated office hairstyle or in the evening for drinks with friends.

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SWEEPING LOCKS Adopting a sweeping cascade of locks for spring/summer, Gucci are famous for showcasing new and interesting hairstyles on the runway. Obviously, flaunting a slightly more theatrical look on the runway, the real-life sweeping hairstyle is much more relaxed, boasting the classic 1990s boy hairstyle.

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THE PREPPY FRINGE Dominating the Calvin Klein catwalk for this season is the forehead-skimming men’s fringe. Displaying the classic ‘just got out of bed’ look, the preppy fringe is sure to be a hit in your local barbers for this season. Using a razor cut instead of scissors, this blunt fringe will help add some drama to the look. So, to get ready for next season be prepared for an explosion of glitter, a burst of blush and plenty of vibrant tones!


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NATURAL

APPEAL

THE KEY TO HEALTHY, STRONG, BEAUTIFUL HAIR by Emma Hudson

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or many people, hair is a fundamental element of their personal style, so it comes as no surprise that the global hair care market is now worth approximately USD 83.1 billion. Keeping up with the latest trends and choosing high maintenance styles can take a toll on even well cared for hair. Although salon treatments can help, the key to actually reviving lacklustre locks may lie elsewhere. We took a look at some natural, more holistic alternatives. BOOST NUTRITION There are many advantages to having a good, well-balanced diet, but certain vitamins, minerals and nutrients are particularly beneficial when it comes to improving the condition of hair. Protein is especially important because it encourages growth and makes hair stronger, without it, it can become dry and brittle. The best sources of protein are foods like chicken, lean meat, fish, eggs and cheese, but legumes, lentils, nuts and tofu are a good secondary source. Iron also promotes hair growth, ensuring that the follicles receive a constant supply of nutrients. Iron-rich foods include oysters, red meat, lentils and green leafy vegetables like spinach, kale and broccoli. Vitamin C aids the absorption of iron and helps in the production of collagen, which is essential for healthy hair. Berries such as blackcurrants, strawberries and blueberries, and other fruits such as oranges, kiwis and

papaya are high in vitamin C, so should be included as part of a nutritious diet. Omega-3 is needed to keep hair hydrated and the scalp healthy, but the body cannot produce its own, so foods such as oily fish, avocados, nuts and seeds should be eaten regularly.

SOOTHE WITH MASSAGE A scalp massage is more than just relaxing, it can actually improve the condition of hair and encourage it to grow. For centuries it has featured in care routines be-

© puhhha, Luisa Puccini/123RF

NOURISH WITH OILS Hair has to withstand a great deal, from colour treatments and repeated washing to sun exposure and heated styling, but the application of certain oils can work wonders if it starts to look and feel tired or over-processed. Argan oil, also called ‘liquid gold,’ is a favourite amongst many top stylists, known for its moisturising and hydrating properties. It is extracted from the kernels of the argan tree and contains vitamin E, omega-6 and other fatty acids, as well antioxidants. Argan oil is ideal for use on coloured hair, but it is also good at reducing frizz, protecting against heat damage and preventing split ends. Macadamia oil is popular for use on dry and curly hair because it contains palmitoleic acid which is found in the naturally occurring oil, sebum, on the scalp. It is easily absorbed and penetrates both the scalp and follicles, helping to strengthen hair, prevent breakage and smooth curls. Suitable for all hair types, coconut oil is an effective conditioner that promotes growth. Like macadamia oil, it penetrates the follicles, leaving hair moisturised, soft and shiny. Coconut oil is rich in nutrients, vitamins E and K, and also contains lauric acid, which can improve the health of hair and help prevent damage.


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cause it helps boost circulation which channels more nutrients to the hair follicles. Massage is also thought to promote the release of endorphins and feel-good chemicals such as serotonin, which can lower stress and help organs function more efficiently. This, in turn, can enhance the ability of follicles to grow hair. Regular scalp massage has several benefits; most notably it helps spread natural oils, improving the appearance and texture of hair. It may even make it less prone to brittleness, split ends and dandruff. It is also thought to help increase resilience to environmental factors such as pollution, and variations in temperature. The positive effects of scalp massage can be heightened when combined with essential oils that have been diluted and mixed with a carrier oil like jojoba. Tea tree oil is popular because it soothes and encourages blood flow to the scalp, whereas lavender and rosemary can reduce inflammation and stimulate growth, revitalising damaged or thinning hair.


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TIPS FOR STAYING HEALTHY

WHILE TRAVELING © bluefox, dolgachov, Andrea De Martin, puhhha/123RF

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oing abroad and travelling is something that most of us look forward to. After slaving away on a gruelling workout and beauty regime in order to be picture-perfect for our trip, many of us want to sit back, relax and indulge. A soon as we head back to home soil, however, we all seem to utter the same phrase, ‘I need a detox’. Of course, whilst we are away it is only natural to relax our regular eating habits and treat ourselves a little more, but with a few simple steps you can continue feeling healthy before, during and even after your trip! We have put together some quick, simple and easy steps for you to follow during your travels. Not only will you still feel great when you get home, you can also enjoy the benefits while you are away!


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STAY HYDRATED Usually the first thing we think of when trying to remain healthy, there are endless benefits to drinking water. Of course for those travelling to hot countries, drinking at least eight glasses of water a day is essential to help your body function and avoid heat stroke. Drinking plenty of water can also prevent you from feeling sick or dehydrated, especially when indulging in rich foods and alcohol. Water can also help to flush toxins from our body and keep skin hydrated. ADOPT AN EXERCISE ROUTINE This is usually something we hope to avoid while we are away, but adopting a quick and simple exercise routine can provide a variety of benefits, especially for those who have been slaving away in a gym for that beachready body. Exercise is also an excellent de-stressor and can improve your sleeping patterns. It is ideal for those who have trouble sleeping in a strange place or bed, as maintaining a regular exercise routine can help promote sleep and high self-esteem. Even if it is only a quick stroll down to the beach or some sit ups before heading to the beach, make sure that you try to incorporate a small routine during your trip.

ENJOY ONE FRESH MEAL A DAY Of course travelling to new places means trying their local delicacies and cuisine. Not all of them will be considered ‘healthy’ but you’ve worked hard all year round, you deserve it right? Stodgy and heavy meals, however, can have an effect on the body. After a week’s indulgence, we tend to start feeling more sluggish and less energetic, making those trips to the gym even harder when we get home. Why not try visiting local supermarkets and stock up on fresh fruit and vegetables? Even starting the day with a watermelon or a smoothie can help fuel your body with the vital nutrients and minerals that it needs to function. STICK TO YOUR ROUTINE Especially those who tackle a military style skincare regime every morning, try to stick to it! Replenishing skin can help tackle sun damage as well as repair dry, cracked skin. For those who regularly take vitamins, make sure you take them with you!


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HERITAGE AND

HERMITAGE

UNDERSTANDING THE FINE WINES OF THE RHÔNE VALLEY UP NORTH The northern Rhône produces the majority of the region’s fine wines, despite accounting for just 5% of overall production. The most prestigious of these wines are powerful reds made from Syrah, although there are also some outstanding whites produced from Viognier, Marsanne and Roussanne. It is the smaller appellations, or crus, that produce the finest wines. Regions such as Saint Joseph, Crozes-Hermitage and Cornas all offer high-end wines with a superb quality/price ratio, although for something truly outstanding, consider the following: • Côte-Rôtie is the Rhône’s northernmost appellation. The steep, exposed hillsides here produce some of the world’s finest Syrah. The white grape Viognier can account for up to 20% of the blend, and gives the wine

© Rudmer Zwerver, Grzegorz Krysmalski, Wallace Weeks/123RF

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rance’s Rhône Valley produces fine wines at an incredibly high level, although is often overshadowed by the bigger names of Bordeaux and Burgundy. Producers here range from large-scale négociants to cottage industries with centuries of history behind them: famed winemaker Jean-Louis Chave is the 16th generation of his family to make wine at the legendary Hermitage site. Any diversified wine cellar would be enhanced by cases from this wonderful region, such is the quality and ageing potential on offer. Most of the wine here falls under the Côtes du Rhône or Côtes du Rhône Villages appellations; quaffable and inexpensive red blends designed for simple, everyday enjoyment. These generic wines are not bad by any stretch, but do not reflect the depth and quality of which the region’s top producers are capable. In order to understand the fine wines of the region, it is worth breaking the valley into its two naturally distinct parts: north and south.


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a sleek finesse and the seductive aromas of fruits, violet and spices. • Condrieu produces exclusively white wines from Viognier. Condrieu is best in its youth, with lively and fresh floral and fruit notes, typically including mango and apricot. • Hermitage is an esteemed appellation centred on a historic hill site. Reds are generally 100% Syrah, although they may also be blended with Marsanne and Roussanne. It is more common to find white grapes used instead to produce white Hermitage wines, which have a considerable capacity for ageing. Red Hermitage wines are the region’s most full-bodied, and can age for half a century and beyond. DOWN SOUTH The southern Rhône begins just south of the town of Montélimar, sixty kilometres from the northern vineyards. This sprawling vineyard is all about red blends,

and produces the vast majority of the everyday wines mentioned above. It is also home to a number of prestigious crus, whose fine wines can offer worlds of depth, complexity and flavour at a fraction of top Bordeaux or Burgundy prices. • Châteauneuf du Pape tops the table, and is perhaps the region’s best-known individual appellation. It is the largest cru appellation in the region, and was the first French wine region to actually achieve Appellation Contôlée status, back in 1936. Châteauneuf wines have thirteen different grape varieties from which to choose in blending, although the most prominent are Grenache, Syrah and Mourvedre. At its best, red Châteauneuf is full-bodied, textured and spicy. A small amount of white wine is also produced here, although red is king. • Gigondas and Vacqueyras are close neighbours of Châteauneuf and the best wines are every bit as good, and can be found at a considerable discount.


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UISCE BEATHA

THE CONNOISSEUR’S GUIDE TO IRISH WHISKEY

WHAT IS IRISH WHISKEY? The word whiskey comes from the Gaelic uisce beatha, meaning “water of life”. Whiskey (or “whisky” as the Scots say) is produced by distilling a mash of cereals to an eye-watering alcohol level and maturing the re-

sulting liquid in wooden casks. Irish whiskey must be distilled and matured on the island of Ireland, with at least three years ageing time. Conventional wisdom characterises Irish whiskey as milder than Scotch, attributable to things like triple distillation and a tendency not to use peat-smoked malt. These are generalisations, and are increasingly less relevant as more and more new distilleries open for business in Ireland. This new wave of whiskey production means that old practices are being questioned and challenged, and the whiskey itself is becoming more innovative, exciting and less homogenous.

© alex_l, igorr, karandaev, Kiko Jimenez, monticello/123RF

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reland is a small island with a big whiskey industry. Irish whiskey has enjoyed a storied history of ups and downs, and is rapidly becoming the most popularly drunk spirit. A raft of new distilleries have opened in recent years with many more planned or under construction. This guide will explain what Irish whiskey is all about, and what goes into making a good one.


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WHAT MAKES A GOOD IRISH WHISKEY? The Irish are proud of their whiskey, and rightly so. No master distiller sets out to make a bad whiskey, of course, but Irish whiskey comes in a number of distinct styles. Knowing how to identify one from another is a matter of simply knowing what to look for on the label. Arm yourself with this information and you’ll make the right choice every time. • Blended Irish whiskey is produced from a blend of malt whiskey, grain whiskey and pot still whiskey. This is the most widely produced and widely available of all Irish whiskeys. Due to the costs of production, it is also the most affordable. • Single malt is produced exclusively from malted barley, in one distillery. This is a considerable step up from blended whiskey, into the premium end of things. • Single grain differs from single malt because it is produced from a grain other than malted barley, though again in a single distillery. Such grains could be corn, rye or wheat. • Single pot still is produced using a pot still, from both malted and unmalted barley. This unusual combination

makes a unique whiskey that is among the rarest and most expensive. Beyond the points above, a very important consideration in choosing a whiskey is its ageing. • How long the whiskey has been aged will have a significant impact on how it tastes. Broadly, the older the better - and more expensive! Aged whiskies are beautifully mellow and smooth; the ageing process gradually removes the inherently harsh alcoholic flavours, as well as imparting additional flavour. • The type of cask in which the whiskey has been aged (or finished) will also impart a unique flavour profile. Used oak barrels from the wine and spirits industry are becoming more and more popular in Irish whiskey. Adventurous producers are using old Bordeaux, Burgundy, Californian, Port, Sherry and Madeira barrels to finish limited runs of their aged whiskies. There is no better way to discover your own palate and preferences than by tasting. Challenge yourself to try a dram of each style and figure out your favourite. Sláinte!


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CHARCOAL COCKTAILS MOVE OVER MARTINIS. WHEN IT COMES TO COCKTAILS IN THE BIG APPLE, CHARCOAL IS THE NEW BLACK

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BLACK TIE WHITE NOISE In New York City’s famous Lower East Side, the Beauty & Essex offers its special activated-charcoal concoction. Their recipe contains Gentleman Jack whiskey (charcoal-filtered), Bruichladdich Port Charlotte scotch, syrup, lemon juice, yellow chartreuse, Angostura bitters and one capsule dose of activated charcoal.

© Beauty & Essex

he "IT" drink on cocktail menus all around New York City is likely to be a hot new drink, a black drink, with one very interesting ingredient: activated charcoal. So, what’s the big fuss? Definitely cool looking and matching your sleek, black outfit, activated charcoal drinks are connected to the increasing health-conscious and holistic lifestyles on which we all seem to be focused. Used as a purifier in detox programmes, activated charcoal and other medicinal ingredients are stepping into the bar and club scene. For bartenders, it is easy to work with charcoal. For the guests, the ingredient is odorless. For those with certain conditions or on medication, however, beware and ask your doctor, as charcoal can also cause problems. And of course, as with any alcohol consumption, moderation is key. Once you are clear to try it, you’ll quickly figure out why charcoal cocktails are definitely the new black.


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RESTAURANT OPEN EVERY EVENING from 19.00 to 24.00 CLUB CIPRIANI MONTE CARLO MEMBERS ONLY - SERVICE NON STOP from 12.00 to 24.00

infomc@cipriani.com | T +377 93 25 42 50 | 1, Avenue Princesse Grace | 98000 Monaco www.ciprianimontecarlo.com


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HOW TO CHOOSE THE

RIGHT ARCHITECT TRANSFORMING YOUR DREAM HOME INTO REALITY TAKES TIME, KNOWLEDGE AND DEDICATION. THE RIGHT ARCHITECT WILL DELIVER YOUR UNIQUE DESIGNER HOME TO THE HIGHEST STANDARD, FROM START TO MOVE-IN, BUT FINDING THE BEST FIT FOR YOUR LUXURY BUILD COULD POSE A CHALLENGE. by Daniel Mazzel

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our architect should be qualified and able to understand your vision, to create a tangible product. Great professionals will offer sound advice, but the right architect will also know when to take a step back.

WHO DO THEY TAKE CARE OF? Architecture styles vary. A lot. If you choose to work with a leading architect who specialises in the knockdown rebuild, and you are planning a high-tech renovation, the end result could be different to the one you anticipate.

© Suwatchai Pluemruetai, Roman Motizov/123RF

AM I LOOKING IN THE RIGHT PLACE? Look to your friends and family for their recommendations, including the architectural firms that they would not work with again. This will give you a detailed starting point on which to build your list. From there, the best place to search is online. Most reputable architects will have a digital portfolio to showcase their past projects, client testimonials and qualifications. If you’re still at a loss, consider searching your local and national architecture institute, which will catalogue leading firms and freelancers.

ARE THEY QUALIFIED? The process of becoming a qualified architect is long and difficult, usually involving a Masters degree and registration with the official industry body. Managing the design of a custom home build requires extensive technical skill, knowledge and experience. Be mindful that rich experience is not always quantifiable. In many cases, more years of practice does not equal better delivery. Instead, choose the right architect who is the best fit for your home.


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To achieve the best results, enlist a professional who is able to take care of your custom home design from the initial concept through to construction until you have the keys in your hand and are ready to move in. DO OUR PERSONALITIES CLASH? In the early stages, you will need to decide whether you think you can work with your architect and, of course, vice versa. Remember that you will be entering into a one, two or even three-year journey, which will be made easier if you get on. Open communication, trust and being on the ‘same

page’ are what will push your build past any roadblocks and over the finish line. CAN THEY DELIVER ON REALISTIC EXPECTATIONS? Budget and deadlines are key parameters that every architect must work within, in order to deliver the dream home. If your architect makes a promise without having all the facts, you could end up with a costly surprise and expanded timeline down the track. In the case of a disconnect between your budget and the brief, the right architect will clarify the problem early on, so that an achievable project scope can be agreed.


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INTERNATIONAL

INTERIOR DESIGN TRENDS AS WE HEAD INTO 2017, IT’S TIME TO REFLECT ON THE LEADING LUXURY INTERNATIONAL INTERIOR TRENDS THAT CAPTURED THE DESIGN WORLD LAST YEAR. AS CONTEMPORARY LIVING BECOMES BUSIER AND MORE FASTPACED, OUR HOMES SHIFT TO ACCOMMODATE THIS AGILE ENVIRONMENT, AND OFFER A UNIQUE SANCTUARY. by Daniel Mazzel

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he global must-haves of the year responded to a growing need to switch off and on, quickly. Warm, calm colours complement carefully organised, flowing spaces and simple textures. At the same time, furniture is bespoke to the custom home design, creating a house that is perfectly balanced with modern living.

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REFINED CLUTTER Step back from busy textures and give your home a new beginning. Clean, simple colour illuminates the luxury and character of a space without overwhelming the occupant. The notion of redefining your clutter comes from the mainstream popularity of the minimalist style.

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ROSE QUARTZ & SERENITY Pantone surprised many of us this year by naming two colours for the Colour of the Year forecast. Serenity

and Rose Quartz, a powder blue and pastel pink hue, were hailed as ‘welcoming colours that psychologically fulfil our yearning for reassurance and security.’ In combination, each tone reflects connection and wellness to restore a sense of order and peace in the home.

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CUSTOM HOME FURNITURE Designer homes across Europe and America set the standard in 2016 for a build that is not only a tri-


© Monika Mlynek, Bogdan Mircea Hoda, Iuliia Nazarenko, Franck Boston, Katarzyna BiaÅ‚asiewicz/123RF

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umph in custom home design but in custom furniture too. Unique specifications blend with digital technology to allow homeowners to design every aspect, down to the most minute detail. The rise of flat pack furniture and 3D software programmes have created an environment where consumers can decide on colour, finish and bespoke detailing in a way that puts them in control. If you can dream an original shape, you can create it.

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CONCRETE FINISHES Industrial finishes are not only durable but tell an important story. Every mark, scratch and imperfection in poured concrete works in harmony with the cool grey colour and smooth surface. Being able to add roughness to an otherwise sterile environment intrigues the senses.

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GREY HARDWOOD FLOORS 2016 heralded a return to traditional quality with a contemporary twist. Grey hardwood floors have circulated in the global design community in recent times, as the ideal alternative for homeowners who struggle to overcome the sterile nature of industrial materials. This recent design trend responds to a need to build a new custom home that can accommodate 21st century tastes with the architectural history of a site.

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BLENDED SPACES With modern home design now completely bespoke, the movement this year toward seamless living spaces to facilitate a number of functions is hardly surprising. Although functionality is not a fresh concept, the idea that a piece of furniture can have multiple functions, within a multi-function space, redefines the modern lifestyle.


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AQUIJO

THE SAILOR’S DREAM


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or many years the general wisdom when it came to sailing yachts was that the bigger they were the less fun they would be to sail. You needed to make a choice between luxury and manoeuvrability. There were smaller sailing yachts with elegant steering, but limited room for entertaining on deck, or larger yachts with ample space for dining halls and on-deck Jacuzzis, and these larger yachts were said to have ‘lumbered’ in the water. This dilemma, however, may have finally been solved, after two of the Netherlands’ greatest ship makers, Vit-

ters and Oceanco, engineered AQUIJO, designed by Bill Tripp: the enormous luxury sailing yacht which is harder to pronounce than it is to sail. WHAT IS AQUIJO LIKE? AQUIJO is an awesome 282 feet in length, and rivals many motor yachts of similar size in terms of space and facilities. The interior was designed by the renowned yacht design, netspace engineering and consultancy firm Dölker + Voges and can accommodate up to twelve people in its seven cabins, including a vast bridge deck Owner's suite that opens to a private terrace with gimballed dining table and two lower deck VIP suites, both of which can be divided into two separate cabins.


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The living spaces capture the Dölker + Voges trademark blend of simplicity and sophistication, with interiors in textured wood, leather and stainless steel trim. The yacht houses a bespoke art collection that complements her bold and stylish interior design. AQUIJO offers many possibilities for entertainment, with a 24 person dining area on deck, a barbeque, three outdoor bars, and a sky-lit lower deck beach club with a Jacuzzi pool, steam bath and sauna. Vis-

itors on board can enjoy the sailing experience from the flybridge, where there is a second panoramic view: a Jacuzzi surrounded by sunpads and gimballed tables so you won’t spill your champagne. The yacht can be explored with the help of its elevator, which also allows disabled access. For those looking to take the fun off-ship there is a wide selection of water toys, including kayaks, wakeboards, and diving gear. © Stuart Pearce

TAKING AQUIJO TO SEA With all these features it can be easy to forget that this is a true sailing yacht at heart, and it’s here that AQUIJO truly sets herself apart.


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AQUIJO is 282 foot long with an above sea level mast height of 88.4 metres, and an internal volume of over 1,500 gross tons. To put that in perspective, AQUIJO is a sailing yacht that is almost as long as London’s Big Ben is tall. When those enormous sails are unfurled, this is a yacht that is fun to manoeuver with a high level of responsiveness, reaching speeds of up to 25 knots. Steering is firm and steady with powerful feedback, the colossal

keel can be adjusted with the touch of a button, and the helmsman will always feel in control and at ease. CHARTERING AQUIJO AQUIJO is available to charter through Y.CO, accommodating up to 12 guests and offering an attentive crew of 17. The yacht is for charter in the Mediterranean this summer from €400,000 per week.

THE YACHT HOUSES A BESPOKE ART COLLECTION THAT COMPLEMENTS HER BOLD AND STYLISH INTERIOR DESIGN.


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DISCOVER THE NEXT

BLACK SWAN

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hen we think about elegance of design in super yachts, our minds usually go to the interiors, to the grand chandeliers and floating art galleries. The exteriors, no matter how sleek, tend to stick to the tried and tested curved, white boat look that we all know. With the Black Swan, renowned designer and engineer, Timur Bozca, has redefined what yachts could look like, and even what they should look like. The Swan glides through the water like a fearsome harpoon, with its simple black lines cutting a shape that appears almost otherworldly on the open sea. Rather than suggesting a boat that is too stylish and sluggish to appeal to the seasoned boater, this impossibly clean and rectangular look invites a feeling of dynamism and control that demands to be helmed.

© Bozca Design

GRACE IN STEERING WITH THE BLACK SWAN The philosophy of the Black Swan’s exterior is something that is sewn into all of the elements of its design. Its four engines can reach speeds of up to 28 knots per

hour (32 mph), and it takes all of its combined 23,000 horsepower to get the 229 foot of enforced steel yacht moving. To fuel all of this, there are 183,000 litres of petrol at the ready. The smooth and powerful ride is what makes the unique design choices a thing of wonder. The Black Swan transitions the tradition of ocean architecture from one of functionality to one of connection with its surroundings—one that uses the same logic as landbased architecture. Light is let in through the vessel’s enormous scattered triangular windows and they cut through an interior glass wall which encourages guests to interact with the space between the deck and inner lodging in an entirely new way. Exploration is required to discover its hidden balconies. Each of the balconies looks ahead from the boat and their glass railings give surrounding views of the sea. An oblong swimming pool spills down the layers of the deck’s sun-side beach club—it runs along the back of the ship, stopping just short of the surrounding water.


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This makes bathers ask whether this is a yacht contained within the sea, or a sea contained within a yacht. THE LUXURIES WAITING INSIDE This is a super yacht and, naturally, there is more for you and up to eleven other guests to enjoy than just the futuristic architecture on display. The only chink on the silhouette of the ship is home to an onboard helipad that is reached by a concealed elevator. In some versions, this is home to a helicopter of the same space-black design as the yacht itself.

THE SWAN GLIDES THROUGH THE WATER LIKE A FEARSOME HARPOON, WITH ITS SIMPLE BLACK LINES CUTTING A SHAPE THAT APPEARS ALMOST OTHERWORLDLY ON THE OPEN SEA.

There is cabin space for every guest, with one master suite and six equally well-equipped guest suites. You can expect to enjoy luxury dining and fittings, but spending time in the surprisingly earthy and cosy interior will be a secondary thought to what waits at the beach club on the deck. Since its introduction to the design community, the Black Swan has yet to emerge from the shipyard. However, if you plan on owning or chartering the Black Swan, then you can expect a price tag well into the millions since the yacht is estimated to be one of the most expensive in the world on completion.


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AN OCEAN MIRROR: THE MEGA YACHT

‘SYMMETRY’

IN THE WORLD OF LUXURY YACHTS, PEOPLE ARE ALWAYS LOOKING FOR THE NEXT PUSH IN INDULGENCE, THE NEXT LARGEST YACHT IN EXISTENCE, OR THE NEXT FORAY INTO THE FRONTIERS OF DESIGN. IT IS NOT A WORLD THAT BELIEVES IN GOING BACKWARDS OR GOING SMALLER.


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utch yacht designers, Sinot, brought new waves of awe to audiences at the closing of the Monaco Yacht Show when they showed off the next development in yachting—the mega yacht ‘Symmetry’. This concept yacht has done something rare by not just showing sketches of a boat that could have the net worth of a small country if built—but instead introducing a fresh way of looking at yacht design.

A REVOLUTIONARY EXTERIOR CREATES A REVOLUTIONARY INTERIOR ‘An abundance of space’, is the phrase that Sinot uses to describe their yacht, and with 3,000 square foot (1 kilometre) of living space and cabin room for 34 guests

© Sinot Exclusive Yacht Design

WHAT DOES THE SYMMETRY DO DIFFERENTLY? Symmetry is in the nature of this yacht. Starting at the front of the yacht, there is an impressive mirror-cast bow leading the proposed 590 foot (180 meter) long ship into the sea, with a tiered deck towering into the sky like a Japanese castle. The back half of the ship is a mirror of this—which is to say it has no true back, but instead appears to have two hulls pointing in opposite directions.

Looking from the side-on, it is as if the yacht has been cut in half and held against a mirror. From the deck, a guest might find themselves easily turned around while lounging at the beach club or floating in the 55 foot (18 meter) pool, and find that they are always facing forward. Rather than presenting a challenge to the design or manoeuvrability of the ship, its symmetry enhances it. The yacht is able to move comfortably in both directions and should be able to perform pivots and turns that are typically difficult for a ship with an 18,000 gross tonnage.


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(double the number for traditional mega yachts) it is a fitting description. This space comes from its unusual design. Each of its layered decks has a unique function and the symmetrical design creates new pockets of space that allow the guests to flow through its body without interruption. Unlike the usual bed, bar, and beach facilities of most yachts—in the Symmetry the guests will have access to a state room, a library, and a sky lounge. Sea-view balconies are attached to each guest room and a private spa is available in the master suite. Planned luxuries include three swimming pools, one with a glass bottom and another filled with sea-water;

a full bar, dining hall, home theatre, and garden maintained by the 48 crew members; as well as day boats and limo tenders available for off-boat excursions. BOOKING A VOYAGE ON THE SYMMETRY When will we see the Symmetry on the open seas? Interest in its development has been heating-up for many months but the most important take-away from the design reveal is that renowned naval architects, BMT Nigel Gee, have given their stamp of approval in assuring its feasibility. Even if we never see Symmetry set sail, we will almost definitely see its influence in the yachts of tomorrow.


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FIRST CLASS ACT INSIGHTS INTO INDULGENCE WITH THE WORLD’S TOP AIRLINES

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ltra high net worth globetrotters have already figured out their favourite first class cabins high in the sky, and it is not all about better legroom or recline angles. Nowadays, it is the extra pampering that comes along with greater physical comfort and the networking opportunities that distinguishes the best in first class travel. Project Luxury & Art reveals our top seven first class cabins. Bon voyage!

© Etihad Airways


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ETIHAD AIRWAYS Etihad has recently rolled out the holy grail of the first class experience—The Residence—aboard the iconic A380 airbus. This is your own private mile high suite, featuring a leather armchair, 6-foot bed and sliding doors, as revealed by Nicole Kidman in the airline’s virtual reality film, Reimagine. A Hollywood-style vanity unit is available for mid-flight touch ups and the first class bathroom allows for an energising shower before touchdown. Head to The Lobby on the upper deck to work or socialise in a space that is inspired by the chicest of boutique hotels. You might just forget that you are in the air.


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© Emirates

EMIRATES Regularly topping the list of the best airline seats in the world, Emirates offers one of the most luxurious on-board experiences out there. The devil is in the detail. Sip a glass of its signature Dom Perignon, nibble some caviar and then head to the spacious shower spa (kept pristine by dedicated shower attendants) for a spot of pampering courtesy of the Bvlgari amenities before your turndown service. Even the pyjamas on overnight flights use Hydra Active technology to keep your skin soft while flying. Peckish between meals? Request ‘room service’ via the handset. The ultimate in Arabian indulgence.


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Š Singapore Airlines

SINGAPORE AIRLINES Singapore Airlines is the definition of outstanding service and its visually attractive first class compartments are always high on the bucket lists of passengers in the know. The first airline with a double bed in the sky, today the Boeing 777-300ER features the latest in Singapore Airline’s premier offering, with a hand-stitched extra wide seat, extended partitions for privacy and the ultimate in entertainment (including Bose noise-cancelling headphones). The airline prides itself on offering a personal experience to every passenger in first class, so you can choose your meal up to 24 hours before you fly, request breakfast mid-flight, or settle in to sleep. For even more comfort, you can upgrade to a Suite on the A380, which was designed by French luxury yacht designer Jean-Jacques Coste.


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BRITISH AIRWAYS Sleek and impeccably designed, the British Airways first class cabin is worthy of a scene from a Bond movie. The patriotism continues with an exclusive Liberty London amenity kit, which includes a crisp white cotton duvet and soft cotton pyjamas. On the new 787-9 Dreamliner aircraft, the number of first class seats is reduced from 14 to 8, allowing for an even larger screen and other

additional upgrades recommended by its first class passengers. Your ticket includes a complimentary concierge service from Quintessentially, bag pick up and checkin by AirPortr, as well as an invitation to the Concorde Room—the most luxurious lounge in Heathrow’s Terminal 5 and New York’s JFK Terminal 7, with private cabanas and state-of-the-art business suite. Jolly good show.

© British Airways, SWISS International Airlines

SWISS Described as ‘your home above the clouds’, SWISS First offers standard priority boarding, generous baggage limits and triple miles for members. With eight fully reclining first class armchairs on long haul flights, the first class cabin maintains a quietly exclusive air. The menu is taken care of by Michelin-starred chef Sven Wassmer at the Restaurant 7132 Silver (7132 is the postal code of the Vals winter resort), allowing passengers to experience seasonal Swiss gourmet delights such as seafood in February, caviar in May, and white truffles in November. After an exquisite meal and the treats from an amenity kit that contains select Swiss products, such as pyjamas by Zimmerli and skincare products by La Prairie, you will arrive with a healthy Swiss glow.


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© Lufthansa, Air France

LUFTHANSA Lufthansa’s first class experience begins with the First Class Terminal in Frankfurt, where passengers can enjoy individual support from a personal assistant, a limousine direct to the plane and access to luxury lounges. From then on, the customised lighting scheme of the cabin, combined with a neutral and understated colour interior palette, offers soothing comfort to the jet-setting traveller. The seats are ergonomically designed and the airline’s FlyNet connection keeps you in touch with the ground. For the full, bespoke service, Lufthansa will even assist with securing a private jet for onwards travel.

AIR FRANCE La Première is just that—from the moment that you are greeted at the exclusive first class meeting point by Air France’s crew, you luxuriate in the La Première travel experience. With priority access through the airport, a chauffeur-driven arrival and personalised spa treatments available in the Biologique Recherche centre in the lounge, the relaxation begins before you even step on-board the

plane. Of course gourmet dining is expected and signature meals from Joël Robuchon, Régis Marcon, Guy Martin and Michel Roth alternate every two months. Four private suites are available on the B777-300 aircraft, but even the gentle curves and subdued tones of the standard reclining seats in the first class cabin offer all the privacy and comfort of home.


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FOUR SEASONS PRIVATE JET TRAVEL MADE LUXURIOUS

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he world’s leader in luxury hospitality, the Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts, is no stranger to the pinnacle of luxury. Including fully customizable beds in their hotels and even Chocolate rooms, it has taken a bold new step catapulting the concept and industry of hospitality into the stratosphere with the introduction of its Four Seasons Private Jet. In combining the essence of luxurious globe-trotting travel with the company’s signature finesse, aesthetics, style, panache and near-legendary service, the Four Seasons group has come up with a fresh approach to travel. Every aspect of the operation, from services on the ground to the air, is enhanced to levels of excellence on par with the vision of the Four Seasons brand. Much the same as with the group’s world famous hotels, where luxury and elegance are part of the brands very DNA, the Four Seasons Jet is the very epitome of lux-

ury in the sky. Every aspect of the magnificent Boeing 757-200ER aircraft has been enhanced and given the Four Seasons touch, bringing out the highest standards of quality, luxury and sophistication, designed to be the very pinnacle of luxurious indulgence.


Š Four Seasons Hotels Limited

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SKY HIGH DESIGN The aircraft is equipped with 52 supremely comfortable lie-flat seats, positioned in a privacy-enhanced two-by-two configuration. Each seat, offering 78 inches of personal space, reclines to a length of 6.5 feet and is well placed to maximize legroom and aisle space. Each leather flatbed seat has been custom designed by premier Italian designer Lacobucci, has been hand crafted by the most skilled of artisans and is topped off by supremely comfortable Mongolian Cashmere blankets. The aircraft is also floored with hand-woven woollen carpeting and comes fully equipped with fine crystal tableware. The Four Seasons super luxury jet has a specially trained crew. It is operated by a minimum of 21 highly qualified Four Seasons in-flight crew members, who

not only carry the necessary aircraft-related training but also the highest standards of hospitality. Apart from the flight crew, the staff includes an Executive Chef, a Sous-Chef, a specialist Four Seasons Concierge and a Global Guest Services Manager. The lighting on board the aircraft has also been designed to enhance comfortable, luxurious travel, and shades of violet, white and soothing blues make the journey an effortlessly comfortable and relaxing experience. The aircraft in itself is a sight to behold. With its full 115 feet elegantly coloured in a deep glossy black, its sleek fuselage exudes grace and luxury. Its aesthetic design and finish are pristine and sophisticated, an image that is accentuated and defined by the largest-ever Four Seasons tree logo as its tail livery. The aircraft’s design seems to personify the Four Seasons brand, bringing to life every facet of its proud and luxurious hospitality heritage. The jet also features global in-flight Wi-Fi to ensure guests' connectivity and is well equipped with all the highest-grade facilities any discerning guest would come to expect of the Four Seasons.


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CUSTOM VVIP

BOEING 787-8 T

he VVIP Boeing 787-8 from Kestrel Aviation Management will exceed even the toughest of expectations. Turnkey-managed and sold by Kestrel, VVIP BBJ 787 is the world’s first carbon fibre, virtually all-electric, long-range widebody corporate aircraft, and has been dubbed the Dreamjet. Kestrel Aviation Management managed the purchase, modification and sales of the 143rd 787 Dreamliner and first-ever VVIP custom Boeing Business Jet (BBJ) 7878, which was unveiled in Geneva at the 2016 European Business Aviation Convention and Exhibition. This 2,400 square foot, 40-seat aircraft has a nearly 9,800 nautical mile range, and the ability to fly over 17 hours, non-stop, and thus between almost all major cities on earth. The interior design was co-produced by Kestrel Aviation Management and the French design firm

Pierrejean Design Studio. Kestrel explores the world for unique materials never before seen in corporate aircraft, and has sourced and customised high-quality leathers and fabrics, woods and marbles, and even innovative lightweight metal composites. Texture, colour and mood lighting choices offer a visually relaxing and functional, high-quality ambience, with no clutter. The low noise, vibration and cabin altitude of the BBJ 787 all contribute to minimising passenger fatigue, as do its optimised air filtration and distribution. The cabin design is perfect for long-haul flying and comprises zones that reflect the requirements of government, corporate and high-net worth principals, such as privacy via discrete guest and staff segregation. Tablets located throughout the cabin control lighting, video monitors, audio, window shades and flight attendant requests. Kestrel excels

© Kestrel Aviation Management

DREAMJET PERFECTION HARMONIOUSLY INTEGRATES LUXURY AND TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATION


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in aviation asset management and curating lifestyles in flight. With over 40 years of in-depth experience in both commercial and private aviation, Kestrel Aviation Management has purchased and sold over 300 commercial aircraft, founded or restructured eight airlines, and managed two airline acquisitions. It has worked with 47 heads of state, 21 corporate conversions, managed bank-owned aircraft portfolios and arranged US$9 billion of aircraft financing. Based in the USA, the company has been active worldwide on six continents, completing over US$50 billion in aircraft transactions.

INOVATIVE DISRUPTORS Kestrel’s CEO Stephen Vella told Project Luxury & Art that the “Cabin completion of this aircraft required discipline, knowledge and effective communication. The process involves coordinating multiple parties simultaneously, solving complex interrelated challenges... Kestrel had to become innovative disruptors in order to complete this project.“ Nohl Martin, partner and Executive Vice President added, “This is a flying masterpiece. From engineering, to art, to tactile and sensory excellence. An ultimate experiential artwork.“

Stephen Vella


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LEXUS UX CONCEPT CAR

LEXUS HAS ALWAYS BEEN AHEAD OF THE CURVE WHEN IT COMES TO STYLING, BUT EVEN THE MOST FLEETING GLANCE AT THE NEW UX CONCEPT CAR SHOWS THAT THEIR SIGHT IS FIRMLY FIXED ON THE FUTURE.

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UX takes these concepts and builds on them to create a powerful three-dimensional grill that melds effortlessly with the daylight running lights and forms a perfect counterpoint to the specially commissioned Amethyst paintwork, with subtle hues that serve to highlight volume changes in the bodywork, bringing focus to the sleek lines of the oversize wheel arches and power bulge of the bonnet. The running lights themselves pierce the main headlights, while the rear light system extends across the whole width of the rear and is incorporated into the spoiler.

© Toyota Motor Corporation

howcased at the 2016 Paris show, the UX is much more than just a concept; it’s a production-advanced creation. Designed exclusively by ED2, the Toyota and Lexus European Design centre, the UX has been described as following an inside-out motion, with bodywork lines flowing to continue within the spacious interior. Transparent A-pillars fuse the interior with the exterior in a sculptured meld of metal and polymer, giving the whole car a feeling of being in constant motion, even when it’s standing still. The front grill and daylight running lights architecture has always been one of Lexus’s strong points, but the


LIFESTYLE

LUXURY OUTSIDE AND IN If the outside astounds, the interior will thrill, with its deconstructed seats and bizarre but obvious floating ball instrumentation, which is the centrepiece of the wholly digital fascia. It looks so advanced that you can imagine a steep learning curve in how to change channels on the immersive music system, but Lexus haven’t just added futuristic electronics to make the cockpit striking, and indeed, the instrumentation plays second fiddle to the front seats. Described by Lexus as ‘kinetic’, these too follow the deconstructed theme, and exist as mechanical skeletons laced with a rich, strong, silk-like fabric that looks fragile but is said to offer perfect lumber support, making ride comfort unsurpassed. The Lexus isn’t so much about being transported to your destination but more about being part of the experience of getting there.

The Lexus designers like to push their ideas into parts that they wouldn’t usually control. No mere off-theshelf tyres here, the UX is shod in laser-cut Goodyears that become one with the radiating spokes of the alloys, making it difficult to see where the wheel ends and the tyres begin. Style indeed. Lexus haven’t said which of its power plants drives the UX, but it’s of little consequence really, as almost any of their powerful and sturdy engines would grace the concept car admirably. The UX is, undoubtedly, a concept showing where Lexus wants to go with its styling, both inside and out, and those features alone are enough to make you gasp. If only half the features moulded into the UX make it onto a production model, then you are likely to be driving something very special indeed in the future. The future is here, it’s a Lexus, and it’s highly deconstructed!


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FERRARI

LAFERRARI APERTA WHEN THE FERRARI LAFERRARI HIT THE ROADS IN 2013, IT CAPTURED THE IMAGINATION OF MANY HIGH-PERFORMANCE ENTHUSIASTS, AND WAS FERRARI’S ENTRY INTO THE HYPERCAR CLASS ALONGSIDE THE PORSCHE 918 SPYDER AND THE MCLAREN P1. THE LAFERRARI PUT THE MARANELLO COMPANY FIRMLY BACK AT THE TOP OF HYPERCAR MOTORING.

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POWERFUL COOL One of the obvious stars of the 2016 Paris Show, the Aperta has the thrilling looks of its earlier brother but with all the added coolness of an open top. Nor have Ferrari held back on the horses with this one; it is powered by the same combination of raw 6.2 litre V12, pushing out an astonishing 780bhp, along with the 120kW electric motor drive. Ferrari have tweaked the control electronics based on testing and feedback from the hardtop model to make it more efficient, leaving you with all the versatility of the powerful electric motor along with the roaring below of the six-into-one exhausts.

© Ferrari

ever being happy without a bit of tinkering, this year Ferrari decided to go that step further and take the roof off, and the LaFerrari Aperta was born. If you loved the standard LaFerrari – if it can be referred to as “standard” by any means – but fancied a bit of extra sun on your face and wind in your hair, then you should get in line to buy an Aperta. Unfortunately you have already missed the boat; of the 209 models being made, 200 have already been sold to private customers, selected by the board, and Ferrari are keeping the other nine to show off at race days and corporate events.


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PRECISION PERFORMANCE But the Aperta isn’t just a LaFerrari with a section of roof missing. This is a car that has been thought about, planned, and implemented with military precision. Among the changes built into the Aperta are new radiators which are angled to direct air along the underside rather than over the bonnet, making the drive less blowy, and a small L-shaped section at the top of each windscreen pillar, which helps reduce air compression in the cockpit at speed. The front air dam is slightly longer than in the 2014 car, helping to increase downforce and thereby assisting with hard cornering - and you could be doing plenty of that with the huge 15-inch disc brakes that allow you to reign in all that power as late as you dare when you come to road curves.

The Aperta comes in two forms – a removable soft top or a removable carbon-fibre section – but they are identical apart from that one difference. Regardless of which roof configuration you have, Ferrari claim that the enhanced aerodynamics will allow you to have a normal conversation, even at high speeds, in the cockpit. The lack of a roof doesn’t seem to make any real difference to the overall stiffness of the car, and it matches the 217mph top speed of the original LaFerrari, getting through 60mph in something under 2.9 seconds! This is definably a hypercar to own, but if you want one, you are going to have to trawl the dealerships to see whether any of those 200 lucky owners have tired – as if – of their ride, and moved on to something else.

THE LACK OF A ROOF DOESN’T SEEM TO MAKE ANY REAL DIFFERENCE TO THE OVERALL STIFFNESS OF THE CAR, AND IT MATCHES THE 217MPH TOP SPEED OF THE ORIGINAL LAFERRARI, GETTING THROUGH 60MPH IN SOMETHING UNDER 2.9 SECONDS!


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GADGETS

& MORE

GET READY FOR SPRING WITH THIS SEASON’S LATEST TECHNOLOGY, FROM MORNING TO NIGHT AND FROM HOME TO OFFICE. LIFE JUST KEEPS CHANGING.

APPLE MACBOOK PRO TOUCHY FEELY This updated version of Apple’s premium laptop comes with a new Touch Bar, which is an organic light-emitting diode (OLED) touchscreen strip just above the keyboard with customisable app-specific shortcuts that replace the use of a mouse and clicking with tapping and swiping. It also includes a dedicated button to summon Siri, a Touch ID fingerprint scanner that brings you iPhone-style security, and a large Force Touch trackpad.

BONJOUR ALARM Announced by Holi, a French design and innovation company, Bonjour is a sleek IoT alarm that anticipates and interacts with those of us who are not morning people. The elegant alarm connects to devices and services such as Nest, Spotify, and Amazon Echo. It has natural delivery and advanced intuition for an easy and enjoyable morning wakeup. Through precise voice activation technology, wireless connectivity, app integration, AI intuition, and an easy-to-read display, Bonjour enhances your wake up.

Horus was developed to assist the blind and visually impaired. Horus observes, understands and describes the environment to the person, providing useful information (e.g. text reading, and recognition of faces and objects) in a discreet way, with the right timing. Using bone conduction, the hearing of the person is in no way affected and it is possible to hear the device even in noisy situations. Horus is composed of the visual and balance sensors, which can be worn like a headphone, and the battery and the processor, which can be easily contained in a bag.

© Apple Inc., Holi, Eyra, Navdy, Omate, Zmodo, Cocoa Motors

HORUS WEARABLE ASSISTANT


LIFESTYLE

NAVDY HEAD-UP DISPLAY Reinventing the driving experience, the Navdy Augmented Driving device is the first of its kind. It projects information, through a transparent image, directly into the driver’s line of sight on the road ahead, enabling the driver to look forward at the road and still stay connected. With the Navdy App, your phone is now fully in sync with your car and the road ahead. The Next Trip feature lets you pre-load destinations through the app, so when you get behind the wheel you’re ready to go. Leveraging augmented reality technology and Navdy's breakthrough user interface also permits it to incorporate hand gestures to accept calls and control your phone hands-free.

OMATE YUMI The world's first home robot powered by Android and Amazon Alexa Artificial Intelligence (AI), Yumi has been built on AI from the ground up. It is an incredibly smart and cute robot, a personal assistant, a music hub and a smart-home control point all in one. Yumi connects to Alexa, a cloud-based voice service to provide information, answer questions, read the news, check sports scores or the weather, and more—instantly and hands-free. Yumi also has video-call and TV connection capabilities, and offers remote camera surveillance CCTV via its embedded high quality UltraPixel front camera, so you can remotely check your home wherever you are directly from your smartphone.

TORCH PRO Home monitoring is as easy as changing a light bulb—literally. The Zmodo Torch Pro is powered by your light socket, giving you instant HD video monitoring. It connects to your WiFi, allowing you to access your Torch from anywhere and at any time with the Zmodo app. Torch connects to the included doorbell and uses its camera and the doorbell's microphone to let you answer your door directly from your smartphone. You can see, hear, and speak to your visitors, even if you are not at home.

WALKCAR The time has come to carry a car in your bag. The world’s smallest car from Tokyo, Walkcar, is a 13 inch lap-top sized transport vehicle that has a carbon material body, travels 16 km per hour and is made from aluminium. It weighs only 2.8 kg and can carry loads of up to 120 kg. The Walkcar takes 60 minutes to charge and it gives you 60 minutes of driving time. Made by Cocoa Motors, it will change the way that you get around. Stand on it and it starts automatically. To change direction, just shift your weight. No more worries about finding parking when you’re carrying the lithium battery-powered Walkcar.


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CES 2017:

THE FUTURE IS NOW! LAS VEGAS IS HOSTING CES—THE CONSUMER ELECTRONICS SHOW—AND ONCE AGAIN IT WILL NOT ONLY BE A WINDOW INTO THE FUTURE BUT WILL ALSO REVEAL THE BEST IN CONSUMER ELECTRONICS AND ENTERTAINMENT RIGHT NOW. CES IS TRADITIONALLY THE PLACE WHERE GLOBAL GIANTS IN ELECTRONICS AND CONSUMER PRODUCTS SHOWCASE NOT ONLY THEIR LATEST GADGETS BUT ALSO GIVE US A TANTALISING GLIMPSE INTO THE TECHNOLOGICAL ROAD THAT THEY ARE ON AND HOW THEY MIGHT IMPACT OUR LIVES IN THE NEAR FUTURE.

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its current main competitor—the Tesla Model PD100— reaches the same speed a little less briskly at 2.5 seconds. In that sense, the Palo Alto Company are quite literally playing catch-up. Aside from its awesome performance, the FF91 boasts a fat package of high technology, including fully automated driving and fully driverless parking, as well as a retractable 3D LIDAR detector disc that operates many of the autonomous functions alongside 10 HD cameras, 13 long and short range radars, and 12 ultrasonic sensors that help control and navigate the car. Also on the motoring front, the Toyota Concept-i UX has been designed to keep you safe and comfortable, connecting with passengers through its very own Yui

© CTA

hile some tech giants such as Apple generally do not appear at CES, preferring to hold their own dedicated shows, there will be significant announcements from the likes of Samsung, IBM, Intel, Nvidia, Sony, and LG as well as major names from the world of motoring, with Faraday Future showing a productionised car, designated the FF91, and BMW flashing their new ‘floating' HoloActive Touch virtual car interface. The Faraday Future FF91 in particular has turned many heads. The company claims that it can accelerate from 0–60 mph (0–97 km/h) in 2.39 seconds, and boasts a little over 1,000 horsepower. Though the Faraday is not expected to be commercially available until 2018,


LIFESTYLE

digital assistant, who communicates through a combination of sounds, lights and even haptic shocks to stimulate and prompt. The outside looks wacky and the inside is akin to the Starship Enterprise, but it is closer to being a common sight on the roads than you may think. NEW TECHNOLOGY FOR THE HOME In-home personal assistants are now commonplace and fairly cheap too, and CES 2017 has seen a major push made by the Google Home speaker and virtual assistant, with the tech giant well aware that the Amazon Echo is building a solid user base that is ripe for sharing. However, this year’s exhibition has seen Amazon up the ante with the roll out of Lynx, which has

been dubbed ‘Alexa in a Robot’. Lynx is diminutive and quirky-looking, but it is definitely the way to go. Lynx is designed to mentally grow with the Alexa software and the intention is to introduce something akin to a robot butler into our homes. Font of knowledge, security option and mood sensor, Lynx has it all, and with more to come too. Google needs to get serious with their home automation concepts. From LG’s wallpaper televisions to virtual reality footwear for immersive gamers, CES is all about the products that have reached beyond blue-sky thinking and it is a refreshing look at what we are likely to be buying next Christmas. Judging by what is on offer at CES 2017, our stockings are about to get a whole lot more exciting.


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MYANMAR

MYANMAR IS UNLIKE ANY OTHER DESTINATION IN SOUTHEAST ASIA

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et there as soon as you can. The world is rushing to this destination, as it was once off limits and now can be visited freely. Unlike some of the highly commercialised destinations in Thailand or Vietnam, Myanmar is still fresh and unspoiled by mass tourism. Its shimmering golden temples, tranquil villages and cool pine forests are just waiting to be explored. Locals stroll slowly down dirt paths in sandals and longyi (sarong-like skirts), women smear yellow paste on their cheeks to protect them from the sun, wrinkled and smiling grandmothers sell fresh fruit in streetside stalls, families get around by horse and cart. It’s easy to fall in love with the slow and simple pace of life here.

Sunset overlooking the Ananda and Thabanyu Buddhist temples in Bagan (1)

POPULAR DESTINATIONS BAGAN (1) Imagine a vast plain, dotted with thousands of intricately carved ancient pagodas crumbling in the sunshine, as the Ayeyarwady River drifts slowly by. Bagan is a must-see in Myanmar, and you can rent a bicycle for the day to explore as many temples as you desire.


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Š David Heath, Joerg Hackemann, Sean Pavone, ml_blues527/123RF

INLE LAKE (2) This quiet and dreamy lake is quickly becoming one of the most popular destinations in Myanmar - and for good reason. It’s an unforgettable experience to drift around the lake on a wooden boat, visiting small villages and wooden huts on stilts and talking to the locals about their handicrafts. Watch the fishermen cast their nets into the lake while balancing elegantly on one leg in their boats, and paddling with the other.

Intha fishermen on Inle lake (2)

YANGON (3) Also known as Rangoon, Yangon is a thriving city that is the economic heart of the country and is known for its colonial architecture and beautiful gleaming pagodas. PYIN U LWIN (4) This peaceful, former British hill station has a cooler and more refreshing climate thanks to its higher elevation. It is quiet and laid back, and the colonial Tudor houses will remind you of England. MANDALAY (5) The former capital of the majestic Konbaung Dynasty, Mandalay was built around the amazing Mandalay

Yangon gleaming pagodas (3)

Pyin U Lwin hill station (4)

Mandalay Royal Palace (5)


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Royal Palace. It boasts plenty of great restaurants, lots of shopping and intriguing historical attractions.

HOW TO GET THERE

WHAT WAS IT ABOUT MYANMAR THAT CAPTIVATED YOU FROM THE FIRST VISIT? As an adventure traveller, I was captivated by Myanmar on my first visit due to its exotic, remote culture and pristine landscapes. I keep returning because of my love for the Burmese people.

Flights to Myanmar are available from several nearby airports, including Kuala Lumpur, Singapore, Bangkok, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Doha, Hanoi and Seoul. Photographer David Heath If you are entering Myanmar from one of the land borders in Thailand, you will WHAT IS THE MOST UNEXPECTED need to get a Myanmar visa in advance - which can THING ABOUT VISITING THIS COUNTRY? be obtained at the Embassy of Myanmar in Bangkok, The unexpected thing I find about Myanmar is that the or online. Burmese people exemplify pure joy. They are humorous, resilient, gracious, friendly and they have a very BEST TIME TO VISIT generous nature. The ideal time to plan a trip to Myanmar is during the cool season, from November to February. TemperaWHO IS THE MOST MEMORABLE PERSON THAT tures will be less sweltering hot at this time of year. If YOU HAVE MET IN MYANMAR? you can stand the heat, visiting during May and June This is my guide, Win, who is like a brother to me. I will mean fewer crowds. have become a part of his family. In addition, I have had the privilege of meeting many amazing people from all CAPTURE THE BEAUTY walks of life throughout the country. We speak with Californian photographer David Heath, who has travelled to Myanmar countless times, capturWHAT HAS BEEN THE BIGGEST CHANGE IN MYANing exquisite images along the way. MAR BETWEEN YOUR FIRST AND LAST VISITS?

Fisherman at sunrise from the shores of Taung Tha Man Lake, Amarapura in Mandalay


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A girl selling watermelon on a 1950s moving train that circles the entire city of Yangon

© David Heath

I have been to Myanmar 16 times over the past 7 years and I have seen many changes, but the biggest changes are the influx of tourists and the signs of modernity storming the country. You can also feel the effects of the transition from a military to a civilian government. HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE THE MYANMAR PEOPLE AND THEIR WAY OF LIFE? The main thing that I have noticed about the Burmese people is their joy of being and their simple, uncomplicated way of life. Throughout the country’s historic tapestry, a thread of consistency is prominent—the intrinsic pride and dignity of the Burmese people. They are primarily a Buddhist culture and they are very peaceful. I find them to be intoxicatingly genuine and colourful with a very artistic culture.

Novice strolling over Mya Thein Tan Pagoda in Mingun

Shwedagon Pagoda at night

IF YOU HAD TO CHOOSE THE MOST MAGICAL MOMENT OF YOUR TRAVELS TO MYANMAR, WHAT WOULD IT BE? Although I have had many incredible moments in this country I would have to say the most magical moment was having the honour of Aung San Suu Kyi, (the current State Counsellor and Leader of the National League for Democracy) endorse my book—Burma: An Enchanted Spirit—with her words, “Truly an enchanting book—the pictures reflect the beauty and diversity of Burma faithfully.” This was truly a very gratifying and humbling moment. AS A PHOTOGRAPHER, WHICH IS YOUR FAVOURITE IMAGE IN YOUR BOOK BURMA: AN ENCHANTED SPIRIT?


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IT’S AN UNFORGETTABLE EXPERIENCE TO DRIFT AROUND THE LAKE ON A WOODEN BOAT, VISITING SMALL VILLAGES AND WOODEN HUTS ON STILTS AND TALKING TO THE LOCALS ABOUT THEIR HANDICRAFTS. WATCH THE FISHERMEN CAST THEIR NETS INTO THE LAKE WHILE BALANCING ELEGANTLY ON ONE LEG IN THEIR BOATS, AND PADDLING WITH THE OTHER.

A young monk sails into the blue, Yangon

Sunset in Bagan

Smiling novices on lunch break in Bagan monastery


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View of surrounding stupas of Shwedegon from Rakhine Tazaung

© David Heath, Atischa Changsiripornpagorn/123RF

My favourite image I call Smile, which depicts several young novice monks having fun on their lunch break in a bamboo hut at their monastery. These young novices are quick to laugh and have fun, so it was easy for them to show their innocent love of their Buddhist life. WHAT TIPS DO YOU HAVE FOR BUDDING TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHERS? I have many tips for fellow travel photographers but I would say that the most important are as follows. First, make sure you have a professional guide who understands photography and the importance of shooting in the early morning and late afternoon when lighting is optimal. Second, travel with an open mind and bring a positive attitude, try to honestly connect with the people and their essence, and treat everyone with respect. Third, be sure to bring extra supplies (extra batteries, plenty of memory cards and other necessary backup), Myanmar is a photographer’s paradise and you may find yourself shooting far more than normal. Fourth, research the country, its history and cultural protocol to understand what is accepted and not accepted (for example, you cannot take pictures of the military). Finally, bring new, crisp bills for exchange because the country does not except money that is dirty, damaged or written upon.

FOLLOWING THE SUCCESS OF BURMA: AN ENCHANTED SPIRIT, WHERE WILL YOU TURN YOUR LENS NEXT? I am currently working on a second book on Myanmar, going deeper into the country to show many more iconic landmarks that are off the beaten path. I have many plans for trips to various countries and plan to eventually publish another book.

TRAVEL TIPS • Be prepared to be disconnected from the internet sometimes, as wi-fi access is quite poor, and electricity is sometimes spotty in the more remote locations, such as Bagan and Inle Lake. • When visiting temples or pagodas, avoid revealing clothing and cover your legs and shoulders as a sign of respect for these places of worship. • The tourist trade in Myanmar is still quite new, so your journey may not always go smoothly or logically. Don’t let travel delays make you stressed, just take a deep breath and relax, and you will get where you are going eventually.


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TRAVEL

LAUCALA ISLAND

PARADISE FOUND


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PRISTINE AND UNSPOILED Laucala Island is a Pacific hideaway that looks like something out of a dream – with white sugary beaches, dense green rainforests, dazzling turquoise lagoons,

HIDEAWAY ISLAND The current owner of this unspoiled Eden is another millionaire – an Austrian named Dietrich Mateschitz, whose fortune was made from the energy drink Red Bull. The good news is that Mateschitz is passionate about the natural beauty of the island, and he insists that there be very little impact on the environment. Only a small sliver of the land on the north of the island is inhabited, and the minimum number of trees have been cut down.

© Laucala Island Resort

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gently swaying palm trees and the chattering of tropical birds in the air. The air is fresh and clean and filled with the scent of coconut and fruit trees. The reefs are visible under clear waters – teeming with colourful marine life.

hen you are a multi-millionaire, you can enjoy a lot of luxuries – including yachts, private jets and even a French château. However, the American millionaire Malcolm Forbes owned something even more impressive – his own private island. He loved his little slice of Fijian paradise so much that he decided to be buried there. His gravestone on the 3,500-acre Pacific Island says “When Alive, He Lived,” and it’s easy to see why he chose this gorgeous retreat as his final resting place.


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A TOP NOTCH GETAWAY The island isn’t just for Mateschitz and his family to enjoy; he has opened it up for visitors. There are resorts on the island, but they are so exclusive that guests must “apply” to stay there. Most guests will arrive on the island’s airstrip with private planes. Mateschitz intends to make Laucala one of the most luxurious destinations in the world, with five-star amenities and a price to match. Every detail of the 25 spacious ocean-view villas has been carefully chosen to create the best possible experience. There is the highest ratio of staff to visitors in the world – 350 employees and a maximum of 80 visitors. So, no matter what you desire, it can be provided for you within the blink of an eye. Fresh flowers are placed on your bed every day, and your laundry is whisked away and delivered back, gently folded and wrapped in tissue. Guests of the island can enjoy the elegantly land-

scaped tropical gardens, the manicured lawns of the plantation style house, the five superb restaurants, the dive centre and the luxurious gym and spa. There is also a vibrant Cultural Village, where visitors can learn about traditional Fijian crafts and festivals. It is an 80% self-sustaining island, producing its own free-range livestock and vegetables. There is also a large herb garden with hydroponic greenhouses. Mateschitz owns the well-known restaurant Ikarus in Salzburg, Austria – so he is passionate about fine food created with high-quality ingredients. The seven-course tasting menu at the Plantation House is heavenly, including mouth-watering morsels of beef tortellini and crayfish with papaya. Or, you can try Seagrass Restaurant for fresh, fragrant and flavourful Thai food. This incredible island stands out above the rest as a truly unforgettable luxury paradise.


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ROVOS RAIL

AFRICAN JOURNEY

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from Rhodesia Railways, which include two restaurant cars, private sleeping compartments and two lounges. The trains are either pulled by electric or diesel locomotives and a maximum of 72 passengers are allowed on board. IT’S ALL ABOUT THE JOURNEY This style of slow and indulgent train travel demonstrates the old adage about how it is not the destination that is most important – it is the journey. Travel becomes no longer a rush to get from point A to point B, it is a chance to unwind and enjoy some of the scenery along the way.

© Rovos Rail

hen it comes to the world’s most beautiful and luxurious train journeys – Rovos Rail ranks among the very best. Rovos Rail trains are often known as the Pride of Africa or Africa’s answer to the Orient Express. It is a superb example of the glamorous golden era of the age of steam. It is a private railway company that operates out of Rovos Rail Station in Capital Park, Pretoria, South Africa and it was founded in 1989 by Rohan Vos. A luxurious hotel on rails, the Rovos Rail train runs on regularly scheduled routes throughout Southern Africa, from Tanzania to Namibia to South Africa. The trains themselves consist of restored historic coaches


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The largest and most luxurious suite on the train is the Royal Suite, which is 172 square feet and takes up half of the train car. Like all the cabins it has an en-suite toilet, sink and shower but it also boasts a Victorian-style bathtub. With wood panels and plush furnishings, these coaches allow passengers to experience the elegant atmosphere of a bygone era. Even the dress code of the patrons reinforces the atmosphere of elegance. There is a smart-casual dress code in place, requiring slightly more formal attire than the typical travel wardrobe. Guests will dine in a lavish Victorian-era train car on cuisine prepared by a talented team of chefs using the freshest and finest local ingredients. AFRICA ADVENTURES There are several routes available throughout Southern Africa – such as the three day summer Durban Safari, where

guests will travel between Pretoria and Durban and learn about traditional African ceramics, historic battlefields and wild game. The trip will take passengers to the Nambiti Conservancy in KwaZulu-Natal, which is a Big Five game reserve that is home to hippos, zebras, giraffes and cheetahs. This wild and pristine area is also known for its biodiversity and it is home to several different landscapes – from grasslands to acacia trees to savannah and much more. There is also a golfing themed trip that will take passengers from Pretoria to Cape Town, through Kruger Park and Zululand. As the train winds through the wonderfully scenic Garden Route, it will even stop at a brandy distillery for a tasting. No matter which of the routes you choose, you will be pampered in old fashioned elegance and style the entire way.


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PLACE VENDÔME A TOUCH OF PARISIAN LUXURY IN QATAR

ELEGANCE, FASHION, GLAMOUR AND LUXURY BEYOND EXCEPTION: EXPERIENCE THE HAUT MONDE OF PLACE VENDÔME IN THE HEART OF LUSAIL, QATAR, FAMOUSLY KNOWN AS THE HOME OF QATAR’S WORLD CUP 2022. by Olivia Werapermall

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project aims to become a beacon of luxury and high fashion while showcasing the Qatari commitment to national development. The project on a 1,000,000 square metre expanse will host two five-star luxury hotels, serviced luxury apartments and a mall with over 500 exclusive retail outlets, including a super luxury wing hosting retail stores for the top-of-the-range retail brands. The mall will also feature a central entertainment feature showcasing the latest entertainment attractions. The luxury hotels and apartments are to be operated by Le Meridien Lusail and the Luxury Collection Hotel, both of which are part of the hospitality behemoth Starwood Hotels.

© Place Vendome Qatar

lace Vendôme, the starting point for Paris’s famous high-end shopping street, Rue de la Paix, is well known as housing the crème de la crème of the world’s premier brands in jewellery and high-retail fashion. Place Vendôme, Qatar takes not only the moniker of its famous namesake but intends to become a name synonymous with unending luxuries and possibilities beyond imagination. A multi-billion Qatar Riyal development undertaken by United Developers, the


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The development as a whole is envisioned to be replete with Parisian architecture, much in the same vein as its namesake, the Rue de la Paix, which starts at the Place Vendôme. Designed to impress and radiate an aura of luxury and indulgence while maintaining an air of sophistication and artistic licence, Place Vendôme carries this luxury theme into the whole shopping experience. One’s encounter with pure blissful luxury is heightened by the stunning vista of a canal running through Place Vendôme directly from the sea, culminating in a breathtaking open plaza surrounded by cafés and restaurants on its banks. RETAIL HEAVEN Located in the very heart of Lusail, the Place Vendôme is to be the central attraction for visitors, both international and domestic, seeking a truly one-of-a-kind retail experience while being surrounded by the pinnacle of luxurious comfort and entertainment. It’s a heavenly home away from home, resplendent in its warm, welcoming hospitality and luxury, where elegance, comfort and quality come together in sublime harmony. It is also a family-oriented luxury escape, designed to enhance quality time spent with family, bringing together thrilling rides, fantastic entertainment and exceptional cuisine to create memories beyond compare. Place Vendôme promises to deliver a brand new fashion capital of the world, playing host to the world’s most prestigious, exclusive and elite brands. This is

all within a superior, pampering cocoon of finest luxury surrounded by structures inspired by effervescent Parisian architecture, complementing the developing cityscape of Lusail City. The development also runs in conjunction with the construction of infrastructure in the city that will service and enhance Place Vendôme via highways, parks, marinas and public transportation, all coming together to form this beacon and pinnacle of luxurious living.


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THE LUXURY MARKET

IN ASIA

WE CANNOT THINK ABOUT LUXURY IN ASIA WITHOUT TALKING ABOUT LUXURY OVERALL: A CONCEPT THAT HAS EXISTED THROUGHOUT THE HISTORY OF MANKIND. TODAY, WE EXAMINE THE EXCEPTIONAL GROWTH OF THE LUXURY MARKET IN ASIA. by Francis Gouten

OPENING OF CHINA The exceptional growth of real estate in China brought with it massive construction of shopping malls and an associated flow of corruption. Money was suddenly available to buy everything. Hong Kong was the first market to benefit from mainland Chinese visitors. Price differences existed because of non-uniform taxes between China and the rest of the world (the different level of taxes in China sometimes made the price 30 per cent to 45 per cent higher than in Hong Kong or Europe). Hong Kong was the first shop window in Asia. Consequently, its economy was concentrated on major real estate groups who controlled shopping malls to serve this new clientele. At this time, Hong Kong started offering mega-flagship store space to luxury brands. At that time, if you had a small shop, you were a small brand. However, this would soon change. In those days, in some districts, you could see queues of mainland Chinese in front of luxury shops. The motto was “queue up and shut up”. Many of us present in the early years of the booming Asian luxury market remember those images vividly. It was the era of golden profits for these brands, who started boasting about double digit growth every year. For the landlords, these times meant large increases of rent. Major luxury brands at this time were managed by financial people, although at times these luxury companies beefed up their headquarters with some fairly weak people—each department hired consultants and training companies to justify their existence.

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ntil the 1960s and 1970s, luxury was the exclusive reserve of a very wealthy part of the world’s population. In terms of product, luxury items used to be produced by a family business that specialised in one industry with an exclusive quality of know-how and very few points of sales (e.g. Louis Vuitton, Gucci). This has changed a great deal since the end of the 1980s and has accelerated with the fast development of technology as the world became one single global market. The love for luxury is not something new in Asia. Contrary to the Judeo-Christian culture, wealth and success is popular in Asia—everybody likes it and wants to reach the same goal. In Asia you are what you wear! I arrived in Asia in 1981 to take care of Cartier at a time when there were a few strong markets, such as Hong Kong, Singapore, Taiwan and Japan. China was not yet on the business map! Then suddenly, around 2002, the Chinese market was ready to wake up and open its doors to foreign luxury brands. Cartier and Louis Vuitton were among the first to enter, followed by watch brands, and then fashion and accessories names. This movement was supported by a strong peak in 2008 as the flow of money coming from China accelerated. It certainly was a rush! The Chinese market, which had been closed for so many years, now had a large part of its population who were eager to embrace the world, including its luxury brands. The era of bling bling was beginning.


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For hard products such as watches and jewellery, the strategy was exclusively based on price—it is luxury because it is expensive! In recent years, Swiss watch export statistics have shown that there has been an increase in value and a decrease in quantities. Despite this, brands continued to produce and focus on very expensive models. At the same time, following the fashion trends, watch brands launched new models during the watch fairs, just feeding the retailers’ stocks and ignoring the reality of the market. For the fashion brands, everyone was producing everything, as long as it had a logo on it. It was impossible to see a difference between the few brands. Although the Asian market started slowing down at the end of 2014, the brands still “danced on a volcano”, refusing to understand the changes. The first change or swing was the strong anti-corruption campaign in China, affecting probably around 30% to 35% of luxury business. This was the end of easy “corruption” money. There is a long tradition of gifting in China—you buy something expensive either to request a favour or to thank someone. Second, we had a very strong level of consumer maturity to deal with. Then along came the political issue in Hong Kong. In 2014, the young generation in Hong Kong demonstrated and occupied the Central District for a few months in order to protest against China not respecting its political engagement for the future of Hong Kong. Chinese people were now also travelling worldwide and not only within Asia. For example, 5 million travellers were on the go in 2014, compared to 110 million

in 2015. Recent surveys show that the buying trip is no longer the first priority—the Chinese want to discover the world. CHINA IS BECOMING A “NORMAL” MARKET Although it is becoming a normal market, the Chinese still revere the price point. For example, the Chinese rushed to Japan when the rate of exchange was favourable. So, where are we now? The Chinese market is a very large potential market with not only the biggest population of ultra-rich business people but a growing middle class with buying power. In China and in Asia, there is still a target market of very rich consumers but these markets are more and more mature. The fantastic development of the Internet and social media has completely changed the landscape and brands must now be careful because they can no longer catch clients with a flashy bling bling strategy. Brands must treat their customers well and give service, information and quality. They must go back to their DNA, promote their true value and know-how, adapt the public price of their new products to the real world, and keep some exclusivity for the ultra-rich only. There is also a real opportunity for “artisan” small brands that are specialised in one product with a high degree of know-how. Asia is definitely a strong market for luxury products. Brands must understand their Asian consumers, and mainly the Chinese who are moving very fast. They must hire the right people who can understand and feel these changes, particularly operational staff, who are the real engine of brands.


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BIG BUSINESS – THE AGE OF

VIRTUAL REALITY

VIRTUAL REALITY IS BACK AND THIS TIME IT INTENDS TO REVOLUTIONISE EVERY ASPECT OF THE WAY WE DO BUSINESS.

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ack in the eighties and nineties, virtual reality was the next big thing in tech. Admittedly, a few crazy nerds tried to point people towards a new thing called the internet, but virtual reality was where it was at. Things didn’t work out too well that time, but now it’s back with a new generation of technologies which could transform both the gaming and business worlds. At the head of this trend is the brains behind Oculus Rift, Palmer Luckey. He hit upon the idea of developing a head mounted display which was both better than existing products and more affordable for gamers. It worked. He proposed a crowd-funded development project and surpassed his funding total with room to spare, and now Oculus Rift is one of the most sought after gaming technologies in the world. Bigger names have also spilled onto the scene, with Sony, X Box and Playstation all releasing VR products. Luckey’s vision goes no further than gaming, but the possibilities for business are so much more.

THIS CREATES ENDLESS POSSIBILITIES Home buyers could benefit enormously. One of the biggest difficulties in buying or renting a new home is

HEALTH AND VIRTUAL REALITY VR is already making waves in the healthcare sector. V-Blast is a high-tech virtual simulation which allows surgeons to gain first-hand surgical training without the inevitable risk to the patient. It uses touch feedback technology to help young doctors develop the complex skills needed for surgery and is said to offer an experience close to that of real surgery. Estimates suggest that it takes between 50 and 100 patients for a surgeon to completely get to grips with a procedure, so that many people are potentially at risk from a surgeon who is learning their craft. A WORLD OF POSSIBILITIES Elsewhere VR could potentially be combined with augmented reality to help doctors see highly specific and visual details of a patient’s medical records simply by looking at them. Both VR and AR (augmented reality) also have potential in care for the elderly, for example by giving them the experience of a day out at the beach. Such technology still has some way to go, however, both in terms of sophistication and acceptance

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A REAL LIFE MATRIX In 2015, UK start-up Improbable launched what is already being termed a ‘real life Matrix’. The Spatial OS Platform was showcased at the Slush Start-up Conference in Helsinki, which allows users to build their own worlds connected by a complex cloud based infrastructure. The technology can simulate entire cities, vehicles and objects, and goes much further than creating a gaming world, but builds a real virtual universe which is limited only by the user’s imagination.

that you can’t see enough of them physically. Estate agent photos and video walkthroughs are one thing, but they can’t match the real thing. Virtual reality could do that, allowing you to walk around the house and take a look at the neighbourhood. The barrier to this has previously been the cost of laser scanning a space, however, development company Matterport has pioneered a means of virtual scanning. They started by simply trying to make 3D scans more affordable, but are now making that technology easily transferable to mobile devices and placing themselves at the forefront of the VR revolution.


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among its core user groups. Virtual reality is still in its relatively early stages. Most of the more advanced and sophisticated technologies are still a long way from being in the hands of the everyday consumer, but the possibilities are limitless and stretch across all sorts of sectors. Designers could use VR and AR to see designs in their full glory while they are working on them. Social media platforms will allow you to walk side by side with a friend even if they are thousands of miles away. Games will become ever more complex and realistic, and films could be based in virtual reality, allowing you to walk around a scene and see the action from multiple angles. It's an exciting vision, but before we get carried away

it’s worth remembering that we’ve been here before – a long time ago in fact. Back in the 1980s and early 1990s virtual reality was big business. Sony and Nintendo piled in with headsets which were not so dissimilar to the designs we see today. Films such as Tron and Lawnmower Man painted a picture of the virtual reality world which was surely about to descend. It didn’t. Part of the reason was a culture which wasn’t quite ready yet, but most of all the technology fell far short. Today’s experience is far more immersive, and the possibilities that much wider. That’s not to say VR won’t fall flat on its face once again, but comparisons to earlier failures do not bear scrutiny. The technology may be virtual, but the potential is very real indeed.


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LUXURY AND HAPPINESS: FRIENDS OR FOES?

PROFESSOR MICHAEL SCOTT HAS THE RARE TALENT OF BRINGING INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH ON ANCIENT GREEK AND ROMAN SOCIETIES TO LIFE, AS HIS ACCLAIMED SHOWS ON THE BBC, HISTORY CHANNEL AND NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC DEMONSTRATE. THE RECIPIENT OF MULTIPLE AWARDS, HIS MOST RECENT PUBLICATION IS “ANCIENT WORLDS: AN EPIC HISTORY OF EAST AND WEST” (PENGUIN). RECIPIENT OF MULTIPLE AWARDS, HE EXPLORES WITH US THE CONNECTION BETWEEN LUXURY AND HAPPINESS. by Cyril Demaria

Consumers splash out on coffee, which is not scarce. They can afford it and treat themselves, and this brings them happiness. This luxury is therefore marketed to society at large. This somehow squares the circle. High-end luxury can also cater to unhappiness, for example through eco-luxury or environmental luxury. This can include environmentally friendly travel, or goods using handmade materials.

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UXURY RELIES ON SOCIAL INEQUALITIES: HIGH QUALITY PRODUCTS AND SERVICES ARE SCARCE, THEREFORE EXPENSIVE AND THUS RESERVED FOR THE AFFLUENT. LUXURY IS ALSO ABOUT PROVIDING A CERTAIN LEVEL OF HAPPINESS, WHICH INVOLVES EMPATHY AND SYMPATHY. HOW IS IT POSSIBLE TO RECONCILE THESE TWO FACES OF LUXURY: EXCLUSIVITY AND SHARING? The 21st century has a love-hate relationship with luxury. The definitions of the term “luxury” itself are diverse and often accommodate opposite poles. Luxury is defined by rarity. It is differentiable and differentiating. Over the last decade, the trend of “affordable luxury” has emerged in the UK, involving, for example, chains of coffee shops offering a cup of coffee costing £3-4 – which is expensive.


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ANCIENT GREECE IS THE MODEL FOR DEMOCRACY AND THEREFORE POLITICAL EQUALITY, BUT IS ALSO KNOWN FOR ITS REFINEMENT, LUXURY AND THEREFORE, IMPLICITLY, ITS SOCIAL INEQUALITIES. HOW DO YOU ANALYSE THIS TENSION? Ancient Greece is not one society, but the combination of more than a thousand city-states with different ideas. It is a smorgasbord of mini-cultures. Being rich was seen as potentially problematic and did not necessarily equal happiness. In an allegory, King Midas transformed everything he touched into gold and ended up starving to death. In many stories, happiness does not require money. At the end of his odyssey, Ulysses ends up rich, but all he wants is a good dinner and good friends. Some city-states let their citizens be rich without intervention, and some of them are happy. Sparta banned luxury and declared absolute equality. Athens chose a middle ground, and did not outlaw luxury but legislated to curb and control displays of luxury. The idea was to channel spending for the benefit of the citizens and the city, encouraging, for example, the wealthy to spend on sanctuaries or items which were public and could be enjoyed by everyone (such as drama festivals). WHAT ARE THE IDEAL CONDITIONS FOR THE EMERGENCE OF LUXURY AS THE EXPRESSION OF A CERTAIN CULTURAL PROGRESS? Cultural progress is a variable notion, dependent on our values. The Athenian model in the ancient Greek world was the most sophisticated and successful. Would it work today?

Dr. Michael C. Scott, Associate Professor

Legislation to set up boundaries, social engineering to encourage giving something back to society (prestige) and spreading affordable luxury seem achievable. Many more societies have some elements of this already – but none I would argue that have all of them as well attuned as Athens did. DO YOU SEE A LINK BETWEEN SOCIAL PROGRESS, POLITICAL FREEDOM, HAPPINESS AND LUXURY? Every society has to negotiate these relationships. This is complex, as these concepts change over time. Today, the experience of luxury is marketed as a way to sign off from everyday life. In a connected world, it is an increasingly difficult task. Luxury is the opposite of social reality.


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STAYING SAFE IN THE CLOUD

THE FUTURE OF BUSINESS IS IN THE CLOUD, BUT MANY COMPANIES HAVE NO IDEA ABOUT THE DANGERS THEY FACE.

BIG BUSINESS The cloud is one of those ideas which has got businesses of all sizes excited, and they are flocking to

transfer all sorts of information online. Accounts, administration, sales, and HR can all be managed online, allowing staff to access information from anywhere and greatly reducing overall costs for business. Small wonder this is an area of exponential growth. The global market is expected to reach more than USD 79 billion by 2018. There is a problem, however. The cloud may offer many benefits – it can make administration systems more affordable, flexible and mobile, but it can also make a

© Maksim Kabakou, melpomen/123RF

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arlier this month millions of subscribers to the dating network Adult Friend Finder had a nasty surprise; their account details had been hacked. As well as providing plenty of embarrassment for those affected, it provided another timely reminder of just how dangerous cloud computing can be for business.


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ers a route into your system. Many people take a lazy approach when creating passwords and choose the same options for several platforms – this can be incredibly dangerous, because if one is hacked then everything else is also at risk. Always choose a reputable vendor. Ask for references and do a ‘due diligence’ or background research online. If customers have had problems with their data they will be eager to share their bad experiences.

company much more vulnerable to attack. As the Adult Friend Finder hack demonstrates, even those companies that have prided themselves on the security of their systems can be at risk. Indeed, most businesses have very little idea just how exposed they may be. The first thing to do is to understand where the risks lie and who is responsible for the security. For example, software as a service system – which takes software offsite and hosts it in the cloud – such as Salesforce – often causes confusion about who is responsible for security and what the response will be. Before choosing a provider, make sure you understand what happens if there is a breach and what the provider’s response will be. GET PROTECTED Providers will offer some security and encryption technologies, but you may well need to opt into these. Look for password protection and user controls which limit access to your more sensitive data. Look at the people within your organisation and only provide them with as much access as they need to carry out their jobs. When people leave a company, ensure that passwords and access are revoked promptly. Create a clear internal policy which outlines how cloud computing should be used, and who has access to the cloud. EDUCATE EMPLOYEES Employee education will play a central role. In the Adult Friend Finder hack a surprisingly high proportion of the email addresses were company emails. This is a problem, because employees may be vulnerable to blackmail, with hackers threatening to release the details if they are not given further access to company data. Equally, that information in itself can give hack-

UNDERSTAND HOW LEGISLATION AFFECTS YOUR SECURITY The UK has now passed the Draft Communications Bill, better known to most as the ‘Snoopers Charter’. This means that internet service providers must retain a list of all the websites you visit in a 12 month period. This is important for businesses, because they lose control of a large proportion of their own information. Imagine your internet service provider is hacked. Criminals could gain access to information about your internet activity over the past 12 months. If you store the contact details of clients and customers, or sensitive information, online, then it could all be at risk. Make sure you manage what you store, where. Create a virtual private network to make it more difficult for hackers to locate the source of internet activity and ensure your most sensitive data is kept offline. Above all, be aware of how these rules could affect your business and take steps to plug the gaps. STAY ON TOP OF IT The last point is perhaps the most important. Cloud security is an ever changing landscape – it’s a game of cat and mouse between companies and the criminals. The more you increase your defences, the more the cyber criminals will come up with new ways around them. Make sure you’re always at the cutting edge to ensure you don’t fall behind. This can often mean calling in an expert. They can look at your systems, identify weak spots and make sure you stay ahead of the game. We are entering an age of new and unfamiliar technologies. Nobody expects businesses to understand them completely, but you need to work with people who do understand them to ensure your sensitive data – and that of your customers – does not fall into the wrong hands.


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YASAVA

NO COMPROMISE

WE SPEAK WITH FOUNDER AND CEO OF YASAVA, CHRISTOPHER MBANEFO, ABOUT HOW HE TAKES THE BEST IN INTERIOR DESIGN TO THE SKIES.

plinary and multi-cultural, we are driven by a common vision that perfection in our thoughts and activities results in positive contributions to the common good. To achieve this, we accept no compromise! In South Africa, this idea is called Ubuntu. We call our humble contribution… Flight Couture!

HOW AND WHEN WAS YASAVA FOUNDED? WHAT IS ITS CORE PHILOSOPHY? YASAVA was born in an old farmhouse high up in the Swiss Alps in the late-1980s. At that time, I was working as an aerospace engineer and was engaged in aircraft design and flight-testing. Today, we are a multinational team that is based in various countries. Multi-disci-

HOW DOES THE LAYOUT AND DESIGN CONFIGURATION DIFFER BETWEEN THE BOEING BBJS, AIRBUS ACJS, GULFSTREAM 650ER, DASSAULT FALCON 8X AND BOMBARDIER GLOBAL 7000? You may be asking the wrong question. We have identified two simple parameters that define lifestyle and cabin layout, which we show in different possible air-

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ASAVA is a Swiss design firm that has caused stellar disruption in the world of high-flying aircraft thanks to its passionately committed, innovative and practical approach to providing luxurious, ergonomic designs for interior design, cabin layouts and seats.

HOW DID THE WHOLE PROJECT FIRST TAKE FLIGHT? In the late-1990s, YASAVA was appointed as one of the exclusive representatives of Bombardier Aerospace. We spent several hundred hours flying demonstrations of various corporate aircraft in the United States, the European Union, Africa, and the Middle East. During these flights, it became clear that the interiors were unsuitable for many clients. They did not offer the comfort expected by business and first class travellers. In fact, what you really get is a premium economy experience with limited seat recline, and you sometimes have to sit sideways… for up to 12 hours! This was when we understood why certain clients end up buying Boeing BBJs and Airbus ACJs, because they do not wish to accept compromises. This led us to ask many questions… and the result is what we are able to offer today: an efficient and comfortable cabin space for clients, which positively enhances their personal lifestyles!


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craft types. We then ask the client to choose the aircraft type that best meets their mission requirements (e.g. critical city pairs, range, airport limitations). The client then makes the final selection based on specific issues that are of importance (e.g. aesthetics, size, brand, cost, etc.). The ASTRAL cabin layout is then adapted and optimised for the selected aircraft. AIRCRAFT DESIGN SHOULD REFLECT THE DYNAMICS OF CULTURE AND SOCIETY. HOW DID THE ASTRAL DESIGN SERIES ACHIEVE THIS? Actually, we say that design must reflect lifestyle. By default, this will include elements of culture and society. If three HNWIs are running their business empires in Mexico City, St. Petersburg, and Shanghai, then most people would expect their interior designs to be radically different. They actually have very similar lifestyles… including early morning helicopter or limo transfers with security staff to their offices, time in the office, late-evening transfers with security staff back home, time with their families, weekends on golf courses, entertaining, and so on. By asking the two defining questions for the ASTRAL Design (i.e. How many guests? How many staff?), you would probably get similar answers, resulting in similar space requirements and cabin layouts. So lifestyle ends up defining the space… or, in our case, the cabin layout. It is only at this point that we start asking about colour, material, texture, and so on, which are a reflection of taste. It is, therefore, a paradox that most corporate jets have essentially identical cabin layouts that nobody asked for. Yet, the buyer is made to believe that by simply choosing his colours, materials and textures, he or she can customise the interior. WHAT ARE THE MAIN INSPIRATIONS BEHIND THE SELECTION OF THE MATERIALS, FINISHES AND FIXTURES? We are constantly looking to expand the limits, push the boundaries. Our senses are primarily visual, followed by sound, touch, taste and smell. Often, the mind is primed for expectations based on visual input. This enables us to either enhance and confirm the visual, functional, and tactile expectations of a design element… or do exactly the opposite and create an element of surprise. For example, if I position a small white

cube with a door on one side adjacent to a galley, most people will think that it's a refrigerator. If, however, I integrate OLED screens on the exposed sides, and depict water with fish swimming in it, then I can make you believe that it’s an aquarium. And now I open ‘the aquarium’ and get out a cold beer for you. That’s when people smile and say… wow, this is cool! A fridge has now become an integrated ‘functional’ part of a design that creates an emotional feedback. HOW DID THE AÏANA®WAVE SMART SEAT’S DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT BEGIN? The AÏANA®WAVE started with a series of questions. Given that today’s aircraft can fly up to 18 hours, is a seat still the right solution? Do you want to sit or lie down for 18 hours? What position do astronauts in space assume when they sleep? Do they lie fully flat or rolled up? We learned that both the US and Russian Space Agencies had ‘discovered’ the neutral body position, which astronauts assume naturally when they sleep. In this position, the muscular-skeletal system is in zero-balance. When you super-impose this position into a one G situation, the cardio-vascular system uses 30% less energy, translating into extreme comfort and relaxation. Furthermore, we use cutting edge aerospace and Formula One technology, such as high strength alloys, carbon-fibre and liquid metal applications. The AÏANA®WAVE can be customised with a conventional classic look all the way to an absolutely awesome gravity defying structure. It attracts clients who want their aircraft, yacht, office, or residence to be a statement of their vision of the future that can be experienced now. WHAT OTHER DESIGN PROJECTS ARE YOU CURRENTLY EXPLORING? We've been asked to offer the AÏANA®WAVE for private residences, yachts and most recently for an exclusive non-aviation luxury project. The results are fun, exciting, stunning… jaw dropping! WHAT CAR DO YOU PERSONALLY DRIVE, AND WHAT’S YOUR FAVOURITE DRINK? I drive a Tata Diesel, although some of my friends think it is Jaguar. My favourite drink I guess is the one I look forward to every morning when I get up.… a café latté!


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ANDREA

BUCCELLATI HONORARY CHAIRMAN AND CREATIVE DIRECTOR OF BUCCELLATI

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UNIQUE CREATIONS The brand honed its craft over decades, eventually widening its creativity to silver objects (and recently, watches), most of them one-of-a-

The first Buccellati jewellery store in Milan, opened in 1919 on Largo Santa Margherita, near the famous La Scala Theatre

© Buccellati

Andrea Buccellati, Honorary Chairman and Creative Director of the eponymous Italian high jewellery brand, was born in Milan, Italy, the second son of Gianmaria Buccellati and grandson of Mario Buccellati, the founder of the Company. In the tradition of a company that has prized family values since it was established in 1919, he in turn is charged with preserving the brand’s stylistic identity by reviving centuries-old goldsmithing traditions in high jewellery, passing on his creative knowledge to his daughter, coCreative Designer, Lucrezia.

rom the moment Andrea Buccellati began working for the family company—eventually taking over from his father as President and Creative Director of the Buccellati Group in 2013—his creative instinct drew him to the designing of the jewels themselves. In this way, the core hallmark of the Buccellati brand was conserved: each item is the result of the inspiration of a family member. Andrea represents the third generation of Buccellati designers and has guaranteed the continuity of this flow of creativity. He brings his masterpieces to life in true Buccellati tradition, overseeing the production of each piece, some of which can take months to perfect. With a nod to current trends that maintains a sense of modernity in his creations, Andrea remains a supporter of preserving the traditions and sources of inspiration that rendered Buccellati a globally renowned brand: the Italian Renaissance, Art Deco, the architectonical elements of Classicism and nature.


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Andrea with his daughter Lucrezia

kind creations and all marked with the typical style which is admired for its timeless beauty all over the world. Andrea’s father, Gianmaria (1929–2015), passionately learned the meticulous craftsmanship, and was most notably the driving force behind Buccellati, as he started to work as an apprentice with his own father from a very young age, following in his footsteps. In 1966, Gianmaria took over the management of the workshops and the creative side of the company: he conceived and designed every piece coming out of his ateliers, just as Andrea does today, alongside Lucrezia. Gianmaria worked with his brother, Luca, sharing with him the vision of turning Buccellati into a worldwide jewellery powerhouse. A pioneer like his father in the US (who had expanded internationally with a store on 51st Street New York in 1951), Gianmaria was the first Italian jeweller to set up a shop in Hong Kong in 1970, followed by Tokyo, Osaka and Nagoya in the next few years. In 1979, the House became the first Italian brand to launch a boutique in the world

famous Place Vendôme in Paris, where it remained until January 2016, before moving to the legendary jewellers’ street, Rue de la Paix. On the business front, Cressida acquired a 67 per cent stake in Buccellati in 2013, the remainder being retained by the family, a successful move that provided finance to improve distribution networks, strengthen management and refresh the brand’s image, and which resulted in a 60 per cent growth in revenue. Looking ahead, as every family business must, Andrea Buccellati continues to blend the contemporary and the traditional, not only with the launch of collections such as Opera, aimed at Buccellati’s growing band of younger customers, but by establishing a workshop school for trainees to study the intricate Buccellati techniques that can take five to ten years to master. Buccellati is the Italian ‘bottega’ of Renaissance times brought into the twenty-first century and, with Andrea Buccellati at the helm for this generation, way beyond.


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SIR JAMES

DYSON

CHIEF ENGINEER AND CHAIRMAN

D Sir James Dyson is the inventor, engineer and industrialist for whom failure was never an option. Born in 1947 in Norfolk, England, he attended the Byam Shaw School of Art before studying furniture and interior design at the Royal College of Art, London. In the early-1980s, he determined to unite engineering and design. He worked for five years testing over 5,000 prototypes of a bagless vacuum cleaner, the G-Force, which harnessed centrifugal forces. He established Dyson in 1993 and the success of his unique dual cyclone technology propelled the company’s turnover to around GBP 1.7 billion in 2015, reaching into 75 markets globally and holding 8,000 patents.

© Dyson

yson famously says that, “We solve the problems others ignore.” He adds that, “We engineer better technology and then explain why ours is better. The impossible spurs us on.” The quest to improve the function and design of everyday products is the backbone of Dyson’s vision and it drives the unparalleled growth of the business. The company continually crafts new designs, everything from cordless vacuum cleaners, air purifiers, hand dryers, humidifiers and the humble hair dryer have received Dyson’s Midas touch. In 2015, Dyson launched 17 new products in 5 categories and sold 10 million machines globally, which is projected to rise to 25 million by 2020. Dyson explains that, “By ramping up our investment in technology and expanding research and development we are developing machines that perform better and disrupt the status quo.” Speed, efficiency, intelligence and environmental impact are the watch words at Dyson’s headquarters in Malmesbury, UK, which considers its 7,000 global employees to be part of its self-styled family business. But, like fellow visionaries such as Bill Gates, Dyson is not simply content to sell a product. He intends to have a hand in guiding the future of consumer technology as the UK’s largest investor in robotics and he aims to invest in the future of engineering by tackling a dearth of skilled engineers. “We put faith in young bright minds—our average age is twenty six,” Dyson says of his staff. Opening in 2017, the Dyson Institute will invest £15 million over the next five years to teach undergraduate engineering degrees alongside real-world jobs at Dyson’s Research and Development campus in Wiltshire. This is intended to be an alternative to the traditional degree and the students will earn a salary throughout their education. This is a pragmatic solution that is typical of Dyson and which offers a brilliant solution to an existing problem, and one that might just produce the James Dyson of the next generation.


Project Luxury & Art - Spring 2017  

Welcome to the Spring 2017 Edition of Project Luxury & Art, the international luxury lifestyle magazine for the discerning reader, available...

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