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Features...

COVER STORY: Lead Revival - The true art of leadwork is not lost in the UK – Page 4

LEAD 6

Help is at hand in fighting lead thieves

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Lead and other metal theft

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New EH guidance accepts need for alternatives to lead in some cases

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LCA – over 25 years of maintaining standards

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How Sarnafil metal-effect membranes are helping churches beat thieves at their own game

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Nothing worth nicking here!

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Brian does things on a grand scale!

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HESPR 12 How clients can benefit from Institute’s standards

In this issue...

THE HISTORIC CHAPELS TRUST 15 Chapel’s restoration marks an end to 25 years in the dark

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Dunphy joins forces with DRU for large, modern church heating project

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Saint Leonard’s Church gets disabled access

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Applications open for grants to establish endowments

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DCMS and Wolfson: 8 years in partnership

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HLF confirms £4.6m grant for Bletchley Park

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MLA passes on the museums baton

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Who are the country’s Heritage Angels?

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Cleaning a Moore sculpture requires access to all areas

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Harrods choose Good Directions to manufacture Big Ben replica for new Signature Room

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New trade body unifies storage industry

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London’s archives refurbished to SEMA standards

THE GROVES RIVERSIDE PROMENADE 26 Victorian Chester takes a leap forward into the 21st century

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Statue unveiled in honour of village paragon

Church & Heritage Supplies – Classified Section p40

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Window specialists

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Hand-made tiles fit square pegs into square holes ...and there’s room up top for roosting bats!

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Stairrods (UK) completes refurbishment project for Scottish Portrait Gallery

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New energy conservation Guidance Note and fully updated Product Guide from Selectaglaze Secondary glazing is a hot topic at this Yorkshire church

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21 PARKS AND GARDENS 21 Knotweed problem is causing public concern 21

Grant gets conservation trust buzzing with excitement

TRAINING 22 Apprenticeship training pledge in major contract 22

New Business Development Director for specialist construction college

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A safe pair of hands

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The past is present for Heritage Skills Training Centre

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Richard Shepherd – Business Development Manager Tel: 07896 967168 Email: richard@dmmonline.co.uk All other enquiries: Tel: 0161 850 1680 Fax: 0161 850 0918 61 Lower Hillgate, Stockport, Cheshire SK1 3AW Copyright Ecclesiastical & Heritage World. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be copied, reproduced or transmitted in any form without prior permission of Ecclesiastical & Heritage World. Views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of the publisher. 1DMM

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Lead Revival

The true art of leadwork is not lost in the UK

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hen lead and construction are mentioned in the same sentence, many will think of a malleable, heavy, robust metal mainly for flashing applications. Some will see it as a cladding material and many others as a long lasting low maintenance roofing material. Regardless of how specifiers regard its purpose, the main reasons for its selection are its in built historic place within British construction and its proven track record for longevity with minimal maintenance. Ongoing maintenance can equal ongoing costs which many do not account for when selecting their preferred material, surprisingly even when that choice is based around cost. Unlike many ‘new’ materials currently on or entering the market, lead has an actual full life cycle history in real-time true conditions testing. New products on the market require accelerated testing to prove how they ‘should’ perform long term - all being well if nature behaves similar to the lab conditions. Lead in construction has been used in pretty much every conceivable way and, correctly specified and installed, rolled lead (manufactured to what has now become BS EN 12588 standard) has been known to last 500 years. At the end of its life, the material still has a high residual value and can again be recycled and re-used for the same purpose. Both the manufacture and recycling of rolled lead involves very low energy requirements. In addition to roofing, cladding and flashings, lead is also a highly suitable material for decorative pieces. Owing to its malleability lead can be cut, shaped, folded and bossed to take on an abundance of different forms. Hertfordshire based Associated Lead Mills offers various standard pieces such as finials, pinnacles, tudor roses, decorative vent gablets and trimmed ridge flashings to name but a few.Further to this they are able to offer more bespoke items through a network of highly skilled LCA approved lead workers. One such company who specialise in leadwork used ALM rolled lead for a recent project where the architects, Donald Insall Associates, requested that among other specific elements of the building, 8 lion head cartouches be preserved during demolition. Even though the cartouches had been in place on the verges of The Regent Palace Hotel building in the heart of London’s Piccadilly since it arose in 1912, they were in good enough condition to be replicated, showing again that even decorative leadwork will offer many years service in the harshest urban environments.

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The cartouches were formed of separate cast and pre-welded lead units with lead sheet dressed over and secret fixed to a profiled timber substructure. This substructure was then bolted to the main structure with the addition of iron straps and support ties. NDM Lead Sheet Specialists took on the huge challenge of bringing the cartouches back to their former glory under the leadership of managing director Nigel Miles and operations director Chris Deady. The mammoth task of restoring began for NDM with the receipt of six single and one double cartouche that were all a little worse for wear but, combined, provided enough detail for NDM’s skilled carpenters and lead workers to make good. Once the timber bases had been repaired, at a labour cost of 64 man days, the leadwork could begin. Whilst the lion heads all appear to be the same, when viewing up close each mouth and jaw differ slightly meaning each required a separate template. Four leadworkers were given the task of completing 2 cartouches with each cartouche taking 10 days of solid and exacting workmanship. When completed, the pieces were everything they needed to be. Well built solid timber carcasses dressed beautifully in hand crafted ALM rolled lead – 1.160m high by 1.250m wide weighing in at approximately 300kgs per piece and ready for another 100 plus years service. NDM are members of the Lead Contractors Association and the Regent Palace Hotel project is a strong contender for the LCA’s Murdoch Award competition, an annual event to find the outstanding example in the craft of working with lead – literally the best of the best. Associated Lead Mills have sponsored the Murdoch Award since 2004 as part of their commitment to quality standards and in 2006 introduced the Murdoch Sponsors Award for lead projects up to 5 tonnes. Both awards now feature in the National Roofing Awards programme organised by the NFRC. ALM have always strongly supported the Lead Contractors Association as the ultimate exponents of leadworking and have partnered the LCA in several projects concerned with the training and development of future craftsmen and the overall promotion of the craft itself. Associated Lead Mills has strong longstanding relationships with the majority of lead workers throughout the UK who are able to purchase ALM lead through a network of conveniently placed merchants, all of whom hold extensive stocks of ALM rolled lead and ancillary products. In addition to rolled lead products and accessories, ALM are also the main UK distributor for all major non ferrous/hard metal manufacturers operating within the UK. These include amongst others VMZINC, Rheinzink, KME Copper, Aperam Stainless Steel (formerly Arcelor Mittal) and Falzinc. ALM stock all the associated fixings, standard and structural underlays, breather membranes, soldering equipment, tooling and machinery required for all materials listed. They are the registered owners of WARMFAST® Systems and can offer insulation, WARMFAST® fixings and vapour barriers. They are also able to put those interested in entering metal roofing in contact with the correct associated bodies where training and advice can be obtained. q • ALM have a customer service team ready to take any enquiries and, where required, put you in contact with the correct people to ensure your project goes without issue. Should you have any queries, please do not hesitate to call 01992 444 100 or email your enquiry to sales@associatedlead.co.uk

www.associatedlead.co.uk 


Help is at hand in fighting lead thieves

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ased in Canterbury, Kent, Metal Roof Ltd receive regular calls from churches or architects needing help where thieves have removed lead from church buildings. The company have worked on various such projects and have used both stainless steel and zinc as the replacement material. Terne-coated stainless steel, defined as ‘stainless steel continuously hot dip coated with a lead-tin alloy’, is often specified by architects as it obviously gives a good visual match for lead. Zinc, however, can also be very satisfactory, particularly natural zinc which is bright when installed but weathers down and acquires its own protective patina, finishing up quite difficult to distinguish from lead. The great virtue of both these hard metals is that they are not attractive to thieves in the same way as lead because firstly, the scrap value is less and secondly, they are much more difficult, slower and noisier to remove. The pictures below are of Scraptoft Church in Leicester which was entirely reroofed in stainless steel – the photos were taken at the time of installation when the metal is quite shiny. The picture on the right is of St Martin’s Church in Epsom, also with ternecoated stainless steel – unfortunately we had to make a second trip here when the thieves returned to take the lead from another part of the roof. The roof in this picture is older and shows how the steel has weathered. St Martin’s is a traditional wooden batten roll roof (like lead) whereas Scraptoft is a standing seam roof, where the metal is folded over itself. R

Lead and other metal theft

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e at Ecclesiastical and Heritage World thought you might like to join us and others in an effort to do something about this growing problem. Historically the scrap metal trade has been a cash in hand industry which creates difficulties as there is no audit trail, making identification of individuals who may be trading stolen metal or who may be committing tax or benefits fraud, a difficult proposition. An amendment to the Scrap Metal Merchants Act 1964 to prohibit cash transactions would make payment by cheque or directly into a bank account mandatory and would be a significant component in reducing metal theft. R • Sign the petition and forward to anyone else you think might be interested please: http://epetitions.direct.gov. uk/petitions/406

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New EH guidance accepts need for alternatives to lead in some cases

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n recent months local broadcast media in many parts of the country have been reporting on the burgeoning levels of metal thefts, and in particular the theft of lead from roofs. Many parish councils and other building managers have shown a reluctance to replace the lead, particularly where roofs have been stripped repeatedly. In response to the problem, English Heritage has issued new guidance on the theft of metal from church buildings, offering greater clarity on when alternative materials might be appropriate and which ones are likely to be considered following theft of roofing materials. The guidance states: “English Heritage will continue to encourage the use of authentic and appropriate metals, particularly on roofs. However, there will be instances when a change of material will be accepted, examples include a building that has already been a target and where there is no reasonable way of implementing preventative measures. Each case will be considered on its merits.” In a letter to Ecclesiastical and Heritage World, English Heritage emphasised that view: “It is very disheartening to know that so many churches have been the target of metal thieves. English Heritage’s guidance has always meant to be just that, guidance. It encourages the use of authentic materials and lead is generally considered to be the best for church roof replacement for a number of reasons, including its high resistance to atmospheric corrosion, durability, ductility and aesthetic appeal. “But clearly the dramatic increase in cases of lead theft from church roofs will require extra consideration when applying this guidance, and in many cases it is the decision of the local authorities. Our guidance emphasises that like-for-like replacement is English Heritage’s starting position, but it also makes clear the conditions under which alternative materials can be considered and used by local authorities and owners on a case by case basis.” English Heritage points out that, where changes to the external appearance of a listed church are proposed, planning permission is normally required. Most churches fall under the remit of local authorities who may or may not follow English Heritage guidance. “We are very open to discussing with parishes and local authorities on the best course of action. As with most things to do with historic buildings it is not generally appropriate to apply a blanket policy as circumstances differ.” English Heritage pointed out two examples where their advice accepted the use of alternative materials. The church warden at St Nicholas’s Church in Fyfield, Essex, approached EH at the beginning of July asking for advice on the proposal to re-roof the north aisle in felt following lead theft. EH’s historic buildings architect considered the proposal and advised that, in the circumstances, EH does not object to temporary felt roofing but would recommend that a more durable material, such as stainless steel or something similar, be used in the longer term. The Grade I listed St Helen’s Parish Church in Treeton, South Yorkshire, had several lead thefts in succession where all the lead from the roof was removed. The church is in a deprived area and – being near to Sheffield, where stolen metal can be easily passed on due to the metal industry located there – is particularly vulnerable. The roof of the church is not visible from ground level because of its

parapet, which made it a straightforward decision for English Heritage to allow a grant for the roof to be covered in terne-coated stainless steel. That decision is made harder, of course, where the roof covering is part of the aesthetic of the building. The new guidance also highlights the importance of prevention and the need to use a combination of security measures to deter thieves. Many of the options suggested are low-cost but effective measures, like locking gates to prevent vehicles getting close, preventing easy access to roofs such as by removing water butts and waste bins, applying anticlimb paint to drainpipes and roof guttering and erecting prominent warning signs. English Heritage will also consider grants towards electronic security systems in cases of like-for-like replacement, as there is a need to go further than the use of smart water in order to try to prevent theft. q




LCA – over 25 years

of maintaining standards by ALISTAIR RAE, Chairman, Lead Contractors Association 1984 - 1986

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t was a cold November day in London as I arrived off the sleeper from Edinburgh to attend the first meeting of a working party set up to consider the formation of a trade association for specialist lead contractors. The meeting had been arranged by the Lead Development Association after earlier efforts involving the BSI had foundered, mainly because of the cost of running a small independent trade organisation of only a hundred members. I was expecting to become part of an organisation which would involve some very large companies and was therefore somewhat taken aback when Dick Murdoch, Senior Technical Officer of the LDA, (now Lead Sheet Association) asked me to chair the first meeting. However, what were to become the basic principles of the new Lead Contractors Association came to the fore right from the outset and, over the months that followed, the fundamentals of the association were developed. We agreed that all companies would have to prove their ability to install lead sheet correctly by being vetted. Membership would be open to both large and small companies and there would be one vote per member, regardless of company size. Developing these ideals into a formal constitution didn’t just happen overnight. The discussions ranged (perhaps I should say ‘raged’) over the size of companies which could be members, the timing and frequency of vetting, the designation of a company and how the LCA could distinguish work carried out on a ‘labour-only’ sub contract basis from that where the contractor took full responsibility on a ‘supply and fix’ contract, as well as many more issues. The arguments were often heated with different views sometimes being quite forcibly expressed by those attending the early meetings. However, despite the different convictions held, the first meetings were purposeful and friendly and a really good camaraderie quickly developed. My first aspirations for the new association were to gain early recognition and acceptance by architects and specifiers and, in doing so, start to create a better understanding of good design and workmanship. Twenty five years later, the LCA now holds a position of respect within the building industry that few other organisations can claim. We are acknowledged as specialists by architects and specifiers, with an increasing requirement of LCA membership for building projects that involve



the installation of lead sheet. It is recognised that all our members have been assessed for their technical ability in designing and installing lead sheet in order to join our association, and thereafter their continuing ability to produce work which complies with the current standard (BS 6915) is regularly tested. There is no doubt that, essentially as a result of ongoing communication, standards within the LCA have risen since its formation, as photographs over the years in the annual directory will testify. The training programme that was started at Leicester College in 2001, transferred to the Building Craft College at Stratford in 2004 and is now operated from the Lead Sheet Association’s Roof Training Centre in Kent certainly helped increase awareness of good practice. The LCA technical seminars, held annually at various locations, have highlighted new applications and discussed problems that have arisen over the years. Specific projects have been dissected and examined as case studies so that one contractor’s experiences have provided benefits for all our membership, both new and old. Most importantly, this communication and contact at our various meetings and events has not only brought about the exchange of knowledge between members which in the past rarely ever occurred, it has also provided for both the development of a mutual appreciation in quality standards and a professional camaraderie that I am proud to have been a part of. The Murdoch Award, which has been presented annually since 1996 to the contractor showing excellence in design and workmanship, has encouraged members to consistently carry out work of the highest standard. The competitive element of this award has given a quality standards incentive to large and small companies alike. The future of the LCA is now in the hands of our younger members and if older councillors like myself could offer any advice, it would be to willingly give of the knowledge they have for the benefit of all - the contractor, the tradesman and the customer. Only by maintaining good design and workmanship will our craft continue to out-live and out-perform alternatives that may initially appear cheaper but which cannot possibly match the long term value of lead sheet in the hands of a skilled specialist. q

LOOK IN OUR CLASSIFIED AT THE BACK OF THE MAGAZINE FOR AN LCA MEMBER IN YOUR AREA. LOOK FOR THE ‘LCA’ LOGO (from p40)


How Sarnafil metal-effect membranes are helping churches beat thieves at their own game

All Saints Church of England in Stretford, Greater Manchester, after its roof was stripped of its copper

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ecent figures from specialist church insurer, the Ecclesiastical Insurance Group, show that 2010 was the third worst year for church roof metal theft since the problem first escalated in 2007. The cost of metal theft from churches over the past four years has now exceeded £21 million, with over 7,000 claims.

With scrap-metal prices soaring, the illicit trade in lead and copper ripped from church roofs is a real problem for our country’s churches. Not only are parishes faced with the cost of replacing the roof, but also the cost of repairing damage thieves leave behind, which often far exceeds the value of the metal itself. What’s more, most church insurance policies have a £5,000 to £10,000 claim cap, making it difficult for churches to cover the costs of basic repairs and replacements. Many are simply shored up against the elements, meaning the original aesthetics of a community’s muchloved church are lost forever. So how can churches safeguard themselves against this crime? How can they preserve their heritage and appearance in the face of limited recompense and funding? While sophisticated alarm systems and SmartWater are an option, many affected churches are instead replacing their stolen roofs with single ply roofing systems that mimic

Nothing worth nicking here!

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hen the theft of lead or copper occurs from our churches, schools and public buildings, the damage caused and subsequent replacement cost are often great in comparison to the scrap value – not to mention the risk to life in accessing these roofs. According to Neilan Symondson, contracts manager at K Pendlebury & Sons, who replaced the roof at All Saints Church “On the majority of contractor’s vans there will be a sticker saying ‘No tools left in this vehicle overnight’ or rather here in Wigan it is often ‘No pies’! Due to the versatility of single ply membranes and the range of colours available, a cost effective replacement is available simulating the original materials, standing seam and batten roll profiles. So perhaps a new sign ‘No lead or copper on this roof’ would now be more appropriate to place around these buildings. The use of single ply membranes will remove the temptation for further theft and revisits to the premises.” R

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Brian does things on a

grand scale!

All Saints Church of England after being refurbished with Sarnafil single ply from p9 the appearance of lead and copper roofs. Market-leading single ply roofing system, Sarnafil, has been providing metal-effect membranes in Lead Grey, Copper Patina and Copper Brown for over 25 years. Its business unit manager, Nigel Blacklock, has seen an increase in uptake from churches stripped of their roofs. “While it’s tragic that thieves are robbing churches of their original roof coverings, single ply represents a more cost-effective alternative to metal that eliminates the risk of future theft.” The waterproofing, performance and lifespan of single ply roofs are also impressive, says Nigel. “Sarnafil single ply can benefit from a BBA-certified life-expectancy ‘in excess of 40 years’ as well as industry-leading guarantees. Together with its strong environmental performance, waterproofing and wind-uplift properties, and attractive price-tag, single ply comes a close second to metal roofs. For many churches, it is the most viable option for replacing a roof.” Wigan-based roofing contractor K Pendlebury & Sons Ltd is one such contractor successfully replacing church roofs with Sarnafil single ply. Contracts manager Neilan M Symondson has restored several churches to their original aesthetics using the lead- and copper-effect membranes, including All Saints Church of England in Stretford, Greater Manchester. As Neilan explains: “A major copper theft in July last year left All Saints Church with a £25,000 bill to repair the roof. The church could only afford to replace the rear section of the roof where the thieves removed the copper. Nevertheless, retaining the original copper to the front elevation also showed the versatility and ability to adapt the Sarnafil system to that situation. “We used Sarnafil G410-12ELF Copper Patina membrane bonded with Sarnacol adhesive to a new plywood over-decking of the original close-boarded timber roof. Sarnametal was used in the same matching colour for the ridge/verge and gutter drip-edge detailing. Decor profiles were also hot air welded to the membrane to replicate the original copper standing seams. I’m pleased to say the church is happy with the new roof, which is also protected by a 10-year guarantee.” Sadly, however, the thieves have since been back to the church and stripped the copper from the roof’s front elevation – further proof of the metal theft endemic. Neilan has provided a quote to replace this part of the roof with the Sarnafil system also, but work must wait while the church raises funds. q • For further information on Sarnafil’s metal-effect membranes and refurbishment service, call 01603 748985, email sarnafilroofing@ uk.sika.com or visit www.challengeustoday.co.uk

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ater features in lead are not that unusual, however the sheer scale of the chalices tackled by Brian Turner of Norfolk based Turner’s Ornamental Leadwork for a private client was in itself hugely impressive. The requirement from the client was for two lead chalices, each made of an internal and external bowl, shaped and then lead-welded together to form a water feature at his large country house. The bowls had a finished diameter of 1.5m, starting from a diameter of 1.7m. The thickness was 50mm at the centre, tapering to 10mm at the edge. The weights were 905kgs and 825kgs. To address the handling logistics Brian first built his own turntable from steel and plywood. The centrepiece casting was a plate 300mm in diameter and 50mm thick. Brian then sand cast further plates in curved section which he welded to the outside circumference of the centre plate to form a complete circle of solid lead 1.7m in diameter. Using firstly a large rubber mallet and then specially adapted metal club hammers to boss the lead (unusually) inwards, Brian worked the lead from the outer edge towards the centre, at the same time shaping the circle downwards to form the outer inverted bowl of the chalice. After finishing the outer bowl, Brian then set about the inner bowl in exactly the same fashion. Having completed the first chalice, Brian started all over again for the second. The bossing work to shape the inner and outer bowls alone took a total of four days for each of the chalices and Brian used a gas burner underneath continuously throughout the process to assist in the workability of the lead. The finished effect is a stunning tribute to the skills of a dedicated craftsman. However, those that might casually admire the finished result in situ would have no concept of the sublime craftwork and sheer physical effort required to create this work of art. q • From a report in the LCA Yearbook

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How clients can benefit from Institute’s standards

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ne of the most important resources for those looking for specialist advice in the field of historic building conservation is the Historic Environment Service Provider’s Recognition (HESPR) scheme, part of the trading arm of the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC). HESPR has been described as “…a recognition and promotional service for companies and practices active in the historic environment, which work to the IHBC’s professional and ethical standards. [It] provides both an endorsement of the historic environment standards within which a business operates and an easily accessible listing service for prospective clients …a ‘one-stop shop’ for anyone seeking specialist conservation services.” The scheme carries with it mutual benefits for all parties. Writing in Ecclesiastical & Heritage World last year, the IHBC’s Seán O’Reilly and Fiona Newton explained: “Clients benefit from the knowledge that they are using a practice that operates a service standard supported by a lead professional working in line with the IHBC’s expectations. Businesses gain from being put in touch with clients and the IHBC wins, as such works benefit from best practice in conserving places.” At the last count the IHBC website received around 200,000 page visits each month and the most popular pages on the site exceed 7,000 hits monthly. Apart from visits by IHBC members and other conservation professionals, many of those visits are from members of the public seeking conservation advice and enquiries fed into the site are often looking for conservation services. Those visitors can then access the link to HESPR. HESPR listing can be achieved by a company which has as an employee a full member of the IHBC, who must formally endorse the company’s operations and service standards – the designated service adviser (DSA). O’Reilly and Newton continued: “Any failing in the standard of service or care will be addressed by the IHBC through the adviser’s professional obligations to the institute, and their personal standing in the sector. A full member of the IHBC should take appropriate and reasonable professional responsibility for the service standard of their employer, so their formal role as DSA simply enhances recognition of existing duties and responsibilities to client, business and the historic environment. “HESPR does not – and could not – provide absolute guarantees. It simply serves as a practical and efficient tool to maximise the benefits of any investment in conservation.” The web-based searchable service provides each recognised company with an individual entry, with full contact details and links to the company’s own website. q

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Dunphy joins forces with DRU for large, modern church heating project

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hurch heating specialists Christopher Dunphy Ecclesiastical and heating manufacturers DRU have combined to supply a complete new heating solution to a large, modern Roman Catholic church in Chester. St Columba’s, which is named after a Celtic saint, was built in the early

Kamara heaters in St Columba’s, Chester

St Columba’s RC church is a fine example of 1960’s church architecture 1960’s and is an impressive example of church architecture from that period. The light and airy interior can accommodate up to 600 people. Most of the structure consists of laminated timber portal frames with a vaulted timber ceiling. There is very little insulation and some of the walls are made entirely from single-glazed stained glass. This, together with the high ceiling, presents a major challenge to the heating system, as the heat loss of the building is considerable. Prior to the new installation, the church had to frequently leave its heaters on all weekend during the winter, resulting in fuel costs that were unsustainable and unaffordable. Following a detailed survey, Christopher Dunphy specified the replacement of the church’s ageing balanced flue heating system with 10 new DRU Kamara 16 powered flue gas heaters. This delivers 160 kW of heat to the main body of the church, with a heat up time of only one hour. Kamara heaters have an efficiency rating of over 90%. They are designed for large space heating in churches, schools and other public buildings. They are room sealed appliances with a powered flue system. This draws air from outside the building for combustion and expels waste gases to the external atmosphere. In addition to the Kamara heaters, Christopher Dunphy installed its own Churchwarden Supreme control system. This constantly monitors the internal temperature of the building, allowing for the optimum start time of the heaters. The entire project was carried out by Christopher Dunphy’s own engineers with the help of DRU technical support staff. Commenting on the installation, Graham Leech, chair of the church buildings sub-committee said: “The new system has been fully tested during the exceptionally cold winter of 2010/2011 and has proved to be capable of delivering rapid and effective heating whenever required. The electronic timing system allows us to plan our heating requirements on a weekly basis for services, weddings, funerals and all other church activities. This helps to minimise fuel wastage and should ensure a reduction in our gas bills in the future. “Because the heaters are fan-assisted, the noise levels are greater than the old natural convection system we had previously. However, we have been able to alleviate this by making adjustments to the thermostat settings. “Furthermore, the installation was carried out with impressive skill by Christopher Dunphy and his team and they were always available to deal with any problems that we had during the entire process.” R

The system is designed to deal with the high ceiling and expansive stained glass windows

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Client: The Historic Chapels Trust Architect: Brownhill Hayward Brown Project architect - Adrian Mathias Main Contractor: Croft Conservation Quantity surveyor: Armson & Partners – Geoff Eaton Structural engineer: Hancock Wheeldon & Ascough – Steve Mason

Chapel’s restoration marks an end to 25 years in the dark

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nce regarded as the ‘Cathedral of the Potteries’, Bethesda Chapel in Stoke-on-Trent is moving ever closer to completion in its new role as a community arts space. The building occupies a central location in the cultural quarter of Hanley – one of the famous ‘Five Towns’ that, with Stoke-on-Trent itself, constituted The Potteries – which is itself currently going through a programme of urban regeneration. The building is currently owned by the Historic Chapels Trust and came to national attention in 2003 when it was featured in the first series of the BBC’s Restoration programme. There has been a chapel on the site since the founding of the Methodist New Connexion in 1797, the first breakaway from the Wesleyan Methodists following the death of John Wesley in 1791. The first purpose-built chapel was erected in 1798 and extended in 1811. Most of the existing building dates from 1819 and the rendered frontage and grand Corinthian

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Award winning projects – delivered on time

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rmsons are a practice of Chartered Quantity Surveyors, Construction Cost Consultants, Project Managers and Building Surveyors. The practice was established in 1972 and since 1977 has operated from its current office on the outskirts of Derby in an 18th Century Grade II Listed Building which was previously a village school. Armsons have been involved in many prestigious projects and have gained considerable expertise in all sectors, involving both new build and refurbishment works including works to listed buildings, one such project being the award winning Roundhouse project for Derby College in Derby. Most recently they have been involved with The Historic Chapels

The award winning Roundhouse project for Derby College Trust, Brownhill Hayward Brown and Croft Building and Conservation Limited, in a quantity surveying role, on the Phase II refurbishment and repair works to the listed Bethesda Methodist Chapel in Hanley, Stoke-on-Trent – a project they are delighted to have been involved with and are pleased to say was completed within budget and on programme. Armsons look forward to providing their services and expertise for the final Phase III works. They provide the following services: quantity surveying, project management, building surveying, facilities management and dispute resolution. R

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from p15 portico were added in 1859, as an outward expression of the status of the chapel and its congregation – it remained one of the largest non-conformist chapels outside London. The architect was Robert Scrivener, who also undertook other notable commissions within The Potteries, including Hanley Town Hall. However, by the 1940’s the congregation had declined to only 150 regular worshippers – a far cry from the 3,000 people which the building had housed at the peak of its popularity. This was due in large part to the gradual movement of the population out of the centre of Hanley and the decline of the pottery industry. Repairing the damage that resulted was beyond the congregation and the chapel was sold to a developer in December 1985. Fortunately the building was Grade II* listed and proposals to radically alter or even demolish it were refused. The chapel lay dormant for many years, falling into further structural decline. In 2002 ownership of the chapel was transferred to the Historic Chapels Trust, which is when the project to repair it was initiated, leading to its inclusion in the Restoration programme. Local interest and pride was stimulated and work started on a feasible programme of repair. The works are expected to cost approximately £3m and they will ensure that the building can offer comfortable accommodation with flexibility to meet a range of local needs. The project has been split into three phases, with support coming from the Heritage Lottery Fund and English Heritage, as well as a multitude of other supporters including the Friends of Bethesda. The intention of phase one was to make the building watertight, stem the dry and wet rot inside the chapel and undertake structural repairs to the roof. In addition to the complex programme of structural repairs being carried out, damaged elements on the front façade and colonnade were reinstated, following extensive research and detailing by Brownhill Hayward Brown Architects. That first phase not only stemmed the rot but also significantly improved the appearance of the building, instilling a sense of local pride. The second phase of works has recently been completed. The opening up of the fabric revealed the full scale of decay embedded in the structure of the grand internal balcony. A further series of complex structural repairs was undertaken prior to the re-forming of the deeply coffered ceilings, using traditional lath and haired-lime plaster.

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from p17 A greatly improved appreciation of the interior was facilitated by the repair of all the sash windows, complete with leaded lights. They now permit light to flood into the building, which had remained boarded up for nearly a quarter of a century. A key intervention saw the restoration of the wide-spanning ceiling, complete with decorative roundels. The architects used various historic photographs to piece together the original detailing of the roundels, and the large central ceiling rose which originally formed a significant centrepiece of the interior. Wall plaster and the deep cornice will be restored as part of the final phase. Other missing key features have also been restored. The pulpit and curved chancel rail were vandalised following the television exposure. Earlier survey drawings produced by the architect were utilised, allowing the reconstruction of this important focal feature. Original elements were salvaged and reinstated, together with new sections of cast-iron scrollwork and mahogany rails. The raised dais and rails are now demountable and can be removed to permit greater flexibility of the space. The highly decorative external railings were removed during World War Two as part of the war effort. A limited number of remaining elements on site and a number of historic photos were utilised to detail up the missing ironwork and stone walling, which were completed by specialists from Croft Conservation of Staffordshire. The organ had long since been removed and the Historic Chapels Trust managed to secure a similar instrument. At the opening service the box pews were filled with supporters of the chapel, who were able once more to enjoy the sound of organ music filling the cavernous chapel. It is hoped that the final phase will be completed in 2013. That will include the sensitive integration of modern services to permit a variety of uses linked with the adjacent theatres, the adjoining Stoke Potteries Museum and Art Gallery and the wider community. q

he Historic Chapels Trust (HCT) was established in 1993 to take into ownership redundant chapels and other places of worship in England which are of outstanding architectural importance and historic interest. The object is to secure their preservation, repair and maintenance for public benefit, including contents, burial grounds and ancillary buildings. Buildings of all denominations and faiths can be taken into care with the exception of Anglican churches, which are eligible for vesting in the Churches Conservation Trust of the Church of England. Once HCT has acquired a building an architect is appointed to survey its condition and supervise any necessary repairs and upgrading. Chapels are open to visitors and available for a range of suitable events. HCT encourages the continuance of services of worship on an occasional basis. Alternative uses may also be agreed where appropriate as long as these do not involve unsympathetic alterations. HCT establishes local events committees for each chapel and actively seeks suitable community uses for its buildings, provided the purposes are compatible with the chapel’s former religious character. The Historic Chapels Trust obtains roughly 1/3 of its funding from English Heritage (including 70% annual support towards office overheads and chapel maintenance); 1/3 from the Heritage Lottery Fund and 1/3 from grant-giving trusts, Subscribing Friends, donations, the Landfill Tax Scheme and other sources. Over £8½ million has been raised by HCT for its objectives but they urgently need more Friends and sponsors. q • For further information contact Dr Jennifer M Freeman t: 020 7481 0533, e: chapels@hct.org.uk, or visit www.hct.org.uk and see some of their wonderful chapels.

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Knotweed problem is causing public concern

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t seems that the general public is at last becoming aware of the menace of Japanese knotweed, the ‘alien invader’ that has caused heartache and pain for developers, listed building owners and church wardens for decades. The weed, introduced by the Victorians as a pretty garden plant, can become rampant if allowed to grow in open land or even in gardens, growing up to two metres in the space of a few weeks, only to die back to nothing at the end of the growing season. The problem with knotweed is that the visible part is only the tip of the plant. The rhizome, as the underground stem that makes up the bulk of the plant is called, can weigh hundreds of tons and is thought to be world’s largest living creature. Yet a small fragment of the stem above ground can reproduce if discarded during an unprofessional removal attempt. Now, however, local papers are starting to feature calls for local authorities and other landowning bodies, such as churches, to have the pest professionally removed. In the past couple of months West Yorkshire has become a hotbed of ‘knotweed resistance’. In August the Huddersfield Examiner reported the presence of the weed in various localities in the borough with the chilling declaration: “Communities in Huddersfield are under attack from a deadly invader. The dreaded Japanese knotweed is on the march across parts of the town.” It quotes local resident Susan Griffiths as having spotted the invader in the graveyard of her local church, St Paul’s in Armitage Bridge. A major frustration people have is that the issue doesn’t seem to be being addressed. The Examiner quoted Susan as saying: “It looks like a lovely plant but it can cause a huge amount of damage and nobody seems to be doing anything about it. I think there’s a lack of awareness of the problem and people don’t know who to go to, to get it removed.” In nearby Keighley a ‘hit squad’ from the Environment Agency began tackling the problem in September. They will be injecting the stems of the Japanese knotweed with a herbicide that targets only those plants and is the most environmentally friendly option. The agency stresses: “This must only be done by fully trained and licensed people using specialist equipment.” Local paper the Keighley News quoted the EA’s Daniel Jagucki as saying: “We will be focusing on eradicating these voracious plants from the banks of

the river and its tributaries over the next few years. We are starting on the River Worth, as this is where the first Japanese knotweed plants were found. “If people have plants such as Japanese knotweed or giant hogweed in their gardens we would encourage them to be careful not to spread them further.” Other reports of local people demanding action have come from Scotland, where the Rutherglen Reformer identified a major problem local authorities have, that of identifying who is responsible. The paper quoted South Lanarkshire Council as saying that they are not the owners of the land in question. A spokesperson told the paper: “It is the responsibility of the landowner to deal with Japanese knotweed and we are currently working to identify ownership”. R

Grant gets conservation trust buzzing with excitement

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he Heritage Lottery Fund has announced a grant of £340,000 for an ambitious project by the Bumblebee Conservation Trust, to conserve a variety of endangered bumblebee species and their habitats throughout the UK. In its announcement the HLF said “Bumblebees are fundamental to our ecosystem, with hundreds of species of wildflower, fruits such as raspberries, strawberries and tomatoes and vegetables such as runner beans dependent on them for pollination. “In the UK, the flower rich grasslands on which bumblebees depend have reduced by 97% since the 1930’s. This is primarily a result of a move to more intensive forms of agriculture after the Second World War, resulting in the loss of hay meadows and clover leys.” The grant will enable the Bumblebee Conservation Trust, which is based at Stirling University, to begin a three-year conservation project, helping to protect the bumblebees and their habitat for the future. Working with landowners, farmers, the public and schools across the UK, the project will raise awareness of these important pollinators and help inform people on how best to protect them.

The Bumblebee Conservation Trust’s chief executive Dr Ben Darvill said: “This funding adds to grants and donations from Scottish Natural Heritage, an anonymous Charities Aid Foundation (CAF) donor and several other generous supporters. It takes us to within reach of our fundraising target. “There is a lot of hard work ahead before we reach our aims, but we nevertheless hope that you will join us in celebrating this significant success. Thank you to everyone who has played a role in supporting our work to date.” R

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Apprenticeship training pledge in major contract C Conservator Neil Doherty rebuilds one of 400 windows from the Town Hall extension

hester based Recclesia has been awarded the contract to carry out specialist conservation work to four hundred stained and leaded glass windows as part of the £95m Manchester Town Hall extension and Central Library transformation project in partnership with Laing O’Rourke and Manchester City Council. The removal work started at the end of July, with completion scheduled for August next year. All of the windows are to be removed for highly sensitive studio conservation work and the company has pledged to provide apprenticeship training as part of the contract in line with the regeneration, employment and skills objectives of Manchester City Council. Recclesia has drawn up the UK’s first approved apprenticeship framework in leaded glass repair, with support from ConstructionSkills, and is preparing to recruit for the positions.

New Business Development Director for specialist construction college

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he College of Estate Management (CEM) has appointed Tracie Smith to the position of Director of Business Development. Tracie has worked in real estate business development for some of the world’s largest professional service businesses and is keen to increase the opportunities offered by CEM to its extensive global audience, as well as to develop its industry partnerships. The College of Estate Management, founded in 1919, is the leading provider of supported New Director of Business Development Tracie Smith distance learning courses for real estate and construction professionals. CEM provides courses at diploma, bachelors or masters level, accredited by a wide range of professional bodies, such as RICS, CIOB and BIFM, and complemented by its integrated corporate training and research activities. Over the past 90 years, CEM has helped more than 150,000 people, at all levels of the profession, with a wide range of business and academic backgrounds, to gain the skills needed to enhance their careers. R

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Recclesia MD Jamie Moore was very enthusiastic about the project and the apprenticeship training, saying: “We are extremely pleased to be carrying out this specialist work to one of Manchester’s most outstanding historic buildings. The opportunities for long-term training in our industry are few and far between and must be grasped with both hands. We hope that our pledge to provide placements and our work in drawing up the specialist heritage training framework demonstrates our ongoing commitment to sustaining traditional skills in the UK.” The stained glass is by English artist George Kruger Gray who was best known as a coin designer for countries around the globe. He also designed a number of stained glass windows for buildings in the UK and his work can be seen in both the Town Hall extension and the Central Library. Recclesia’s stained glass studio will be working on the windows for nine months, delicately cleaning and repairing some 60,000 individual pieces of historic glass and over 4 miles of leadwork. R

Manchester Town Hall

A safe pair of hands H

ealth and safety has never been more important than it is today. There are constant reminders in the media of the devastating consequences to people, and to businesses, when companies fail to meet legislative requirements. Fortunately most employers are conscientious when it comes to

making the workplace a healthy and safe place for their staff. And one of the best in the business for delivering excellent health and safety training is Berkshire based Nimrod Training & Assessment Providers Ltd. That’s because Nimrod proprietor Brian Middlemiss not only has excellent qualifications in health and safety, but his experience in this area is very difficult to match. His credentials include: • Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Building. • Associate member of the Institute of Safety and Health (Tech • IOSH). • General Certificate in Health and Safety (NEBOSH). • Certificate in Construction Health and Safety (NEBOSH). • Certificate to teach in the life long learning sectors (CETLLS). Brian has been admitted into the Institute for Learning which now allows Nimrod training to deliver additional accredited courses. He is also a member of the Thames Valley Branch of the Institute of Safety and Health so, all things considered, you know you’re in safe (and healthy) hands when you call upon him for advice and training. An active member of the Surrey branch of the Chartered Institute of Building, Brian’s experience does not only lie within the field of health and safety. “Developing client training needs and plans, assessing operatives for their all-important qualifications, delivering PASMA training and British Ladder Manufacturers training are all part of our services,” he said. Also keeping the Nimrod team busy is training in safety harnesses, working at heights, hot works, risk assessments, abrasive wheel training and manual handling. If you’re worried about having to attend a certain course on a certain date, that’s not a problem as far as Brian is concerned. “We provide ‘tailored’ courses for many clients and will provide on-site or in-house training to suit timescales and workloads,” he said. Convinced that Nimrod might be just the team to help you and your business through these tricky times? Then give Brian a ring – you won’t be disappointed. R • For further information contact Brian Middlemiss on 07791 377559, fax 01344 429071, e-mail info@nimrodtraining.co.uk or visit www.nimrod-training.co.uk

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The Past is Present for Heritage Skills Training Centre

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centre to train craftsmen in the skills needed to protect England’s historic buildings has officially opened in North Yorkshire. The Heritage Training Centre in Bedale is the first of its kind in the UK, dedicated to ensuring skills like stone masonry and building with lime are not lost. It’s been created by Heritage Craft Alliance Ltd in the grounds of the Thorp Perrow Arboretum, with the support of organisations like The Prince’s Foundation for the Built Environment, the National Trust and British Waterways. It’s taken more than a year to plan, and will offer professionals training in specialist skills, as well as giving young people formal qualifications to go into the workforce. A grant from DEFRA allowed the development to go ahead. Thorp Perrow’s owner, Sir John Ropner, said “I’m relieved to see these buildings being used to train the next generation of craftsmen, with a bright future in caring for our past”. Keen amateur enthusiasts will also be able to try their hand at courses like repairing leaded glasswork and green timber framing. Managing Director of Heritage Craft Alliance Ltd, Glenn Young, said “We’re terribly excited about the project, and we’re working very hard to ensure that people enjoy the experience”.

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Foreign Secretary and local MP William Hague pictured with managing director of Heritage Craft Alliance Ltd, Glenn Young at the official opening of the centre in September The centre can cater for around one thousand people every year, and it’s hoped that it will now attract more visitors to the area and generate revenue for the Thorp Perrow Estate. q

Heritage Craft Alliance Ltd received funding through the Rural Development Programme for England for the development of its training centre and workshops


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Victorian Chester takes a leap forward into the 21st century

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ne of the favourite tourist attractions in Chester is The Groves Riverside Promenade, a fine example of a Victorian promenade which is as popular today as it was in the 19th

century. Now the facility has been refurbished and enhanced to provide visitors and residents alike with a stunning waterside landscape along which to walk and enjoy the River Dee between the weir and the famous suspension bridge. Work started in January to enhance the beautiful promenade alongside the River Dee between the Weir and the suspension bridge. The project was a partnership between Cheshire West and Chester Council and Chester Renaissance – the partnership of public and private bodies that is driving a major regeneration programme in the city. The design of the refurbishment was led by the City Council’s Landscape Design team, with its Streetscene Team contributing to the street furniture and its Highways Department managing construction work. The area has been improved by using high quality materials which complement the city’s heritage and will last many years. The latest phase of work was completed in July and includes: • Replacing and widening tarmac footpaths with York stone (extending • work begun last year) • Replacing grit stone with natural stone sets in an arc pattern • Planting six large semi-mature lime trees to replace six which were • removed because of their poor condition

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• Creating larger areas for the trees to grow and installing bespoke • tree grills with ornate detailing • Replacing or refurbishing 100 benches and installing new bins • Improved signage Rita Waters, chief executive of Chester Renaissance, said: “The River Dee is an important asset to this city and The Groves area welcomes thousands of visitors each year, enjoying the river with boat trips, cafes, restaurants and weekend bandstand concerts. “This area of great significance has been further enhanced by the quality of workmanship and materials used. It complements the ongoing regeneration works across the city.” Cllr Lynn Riley, Executive Member for Community and Environment, added: “The refurbishment scheme along The Groves builds on previous improvement work undertaken by the council. “The high quality of materials used is an investment in our city, to enhance the heritage of the area and pave the way for residents and visitors for many years to come.” R


Saint Leonard’s Church gets disabled access A heritage project from Booth and Sons

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his Parish Church, dedicated to St Leonard, dates from the 13th century and has many interesting features. It is a Grade I listed building located in Little Downham, Cambridgeshire. Norfolk based Booth and Son were called upon by Archimage Architects of Wilburton, Cambridgeshire to convert the choir vestry into a disabled toilet facility. This brought about many challenges as there had never been a toilet inside the church, requiring a trench to be excavated through the churchyard to access the public sewerage system.

The excavations required regular on-site visits from an archeologist as a trench was opened through the churchyard, carefully avoiding graves, table top tombs and sensitive areas.

Inside the church they removed a previously built partition wall between the vestry and the alter, replacing it with a stronger structure, lime plastered in keeping with the church structure. They then carefully removed the existing parquet flooring to enable the necessary groundworks to be laid within the church to connect to the external trenching. A bespoke cubicle, with oak detailing, was then built to house the disabled toilet facility. Restrictions of space meant that complying with ‘Document M’ (Building Regulations, Access and Use of Buildings) left no margin for error as the vestry was barely big enough to meet requirements. An oak seat and storage area was also commissioned to enable the vestry to also be used for the choir. Once the disabled cubicle was complete Booth and Son were asked to carry out further

works in the vestry to complete the conversion and refurbishment. Historic movement of the building had caused cracks to appear in the internal masonry and plastering of the vestry. The loose and cracked lime render was carefully removed to reveal a considerable crack in the masonry. A structural solution was deployed using the Helibeam system to prevent further movement and stabilise the brickwork, inserting stainless steel helibars and specialist cementitious grout to effectively ‘stitch’ the crack. The effected area was then finished with lime render and finish plaster, followed by a complete limewash of the interior walls and ceilings. The resulting conversion was praised by church officials and the architect involved for being completed on time, including additional works requested, to such a high standard. q • Find out more about Booth and Son’s heritage services at www.boothandson.co.uk

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Applications open for grants to establish endowments A pplications are now open to heritage organisations for funding under the Government’s new Catalyst Endowments programme. The scheme is designed to help arts and heritage bodies increase their capacity to secure private funding. The scheme was launched in July by Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt. Applications for arts organisations open on 1 November. Mr Hunt said: “Supporting a culture of giving is one of my top priorities. Today’s announcement shows that we are making rapid progress, with £100m now available to help culture and heritage organisations strengthen their fundraising skills and attract significant sums from private sources. “I remain incredibly grateful to everyone who gives money to support these vital sectors and look forward to the Catalyst scheme making a huge impact on the financial resilience of organisations across the country.” The scheme is intended to create a culture of donation and endowments similar to that in the US. At its launch in July Mr Hunt cited the example of the Metropolitan Museum in New York. “It took the Met in New York over 100 years to build up their £2bn endowment,” he said at the time. “I want our endowments century to start today. Worldclass cultural organisations should have

world-class financial resilience.” Catalyst: endowment is a £55m endowment scheme jointly funded by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, Arts Council England and Heritage Lottery Fund. It offers match funding for the purpose of building a new endowment fund, or increasing an existing one. Applicants may make a single application for between £500,000 and £5m, to be matched by new fundraising at different ratios dependent on the amount for which the applicant applies. Applicants into this scheme are expected to be experienced fundraisers and must additionally demonstrate the financial management expertise needed to manage an endowment. Heritage awards will be considered by the Heritage Lottery Fund. Applications are open to all types of heritage organisation across the UK. An independent advisory panel, chaired by former government minister Michael Portillo, will assist with the assessment process and make recommendations back to the relevant funding body on awards to

organisations based in England. The deadline for applications for this scheme is 16 January next year and decisions will be announced at the end of March. A second programme, Catalyst Arts and Catalyst Heritage fundraising capacity building grants, will open for applications on 1 April next year. They will be openaccess grant schemes aimed at arts and heritage organisations with little or no fundraising experience. Grants of between £15,000 and £25,000 will be awarded to organisations for the purpose of building fundraising capacity and capability, so that they can attract new donors, strengthen their financial resilience and enhance their artistic output or engagement with the public. The programmes are part of a major initiative by the Government to encourage private giving to the arts and heritage bodies. It includes proposals to encourage the donation of works of art in return for a reduction in tax liabilities and the reform of Gift Aid. R

DCMS and Wolfson: 8 years in partnership

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he emphasis placed by the current government on encouraging private patronage of the arts was highlighted in October by the publication of a document recording eight years of funding by the DCMS/Wolfson Museums and Galleries Improvement Fund. From tanks to longbows and from shrunken heads to scent bottles, all have gone to new homes thanks to the unique public/private partnership between the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) and the Wolfson Foundation. The document, downloadable in pdf format from the DCMS website, details £28m of funding that has gone towards museums and galleries across the country over the past eight years, to make capital improvements to their displays, enhance their educational facilities and provide greater accessibility to visitors. Speaking at the Museums Association conference in Brighton, Culture Minister Ed Vaizey paid tribute to the collaboration, calling the fund “…an excellent example of what can be achieved when public funds are matched with private philanthropy.” Earlier this year DCMS announced a commitment of £4m toward an £8m fund that will see the partnership continue until at least 2015. R

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HLF confirms £4.6m grant

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he Heritage Lottery Fund has announced a grant of £4.6m for the restoration of Bletchley Park, the internationally-renowned base for the secret code-breaking teams in World War Two. It is one of three confirmed grants totalling £6.34m announced in the latest round of funding. Bletchley Park was originally a country house and estate until it was purchased by the British Government in 1938 for the Government Code and Cypher School and Secret Intelligence Service. Its codebreakers, who were among the 10,000 people working there at its peak of activity, deciphered the famous Enigma and even more complex Lorenz code systems using what became the forerunners of modern electronic computers. Not only did the remarkable people working there cut short the war by up to two years and ensure the allied victory, they also launched the modern computer age. For the past 20 years the Bletchley Park Trust has been working to ensure that their achievements are recognised and the site developed, both to inspire and educate generations to come and as a permanent testament to the people who made those achievements possible. Most of the vital work was carried out in rows of wooden huts erected in the grounds of the sprawling estate. During its post-war years of secrecy and neglect, many of them descended into near-dereliction. They are now listed and this latest grant will enable the restoration of iconic Codebreaking Huts 1, 3

for Bletchley Park Hut 6, one of the Codebreaking Huts that will be restored (Photo by Matt Crypto) and 6 and create a world-class visitor centre and exhibition in the currently derelict Block C. The trust must, however, raise £1.7m in match funding to carry out the project. Actor and technology aficionado Stephen Fry welcomed the announcement: “Today marks a monumental triumph for the Bletchley Park Trust. This investment from the Heritage Lottery Fund will finally enable the trust to do justice to this amazing place in tribute to the tremendous intellectual feat of those who worked there. Not only did these people change the very course of history by helping to secure the allied

victory, thereby quietly and modestly providing us with the free world, they also gave birth to the information age, which underpins the way we all live today. HLF has now ensured that recognition for these extraordinary accomplishments is finally in sight. Now we must all see that the trust is given every support it needs in order to raise the match funding required to make this project a wonderful reality.” R

MLA passes on the museums baton

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n 1 October responsibility for museums and libraries in England passed from the Museums, Libraries and Archives Council (MLA) to Arts Council England. The winding down of the MLA is part of a government review to reduce the number of armslength bodies. The move was announced last year. Areas such as museum accreditation, library development and the Renaissance programme will now be administered by the Arts Council and some MLA staff have moved to the organisation to help deliver this work. The National Archives will take on leadership of the UK’s archives sector from the MLA. A skeleton staff will remain at the MLA until next May to complete the work and the website will remain live for the public to access until 31 March, although it will not be updated. MLA chair and former Poet Laureate Sir Andrew Motion said: “The MLA board wishes the Arts Council and The National Archives all the best and looks forward to them building on all the achievements of the sector, and the work of the MLA, to help bring about better and more accessible museum, library and archive services for the public.” R

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Who are the country’s Heritage Angels?

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n 31 October a glittering cast of stars will take to the stage at the Palace Theatre in London to celebrate the unsung heroes of the heritage world at the first English Heritage Angels Awards. Taking centre stage with the winners will be Lord Andrew Lloyd Webber, whose Andrew Lloyd Webber Foundation is co-funding the awards and who is lending his theatre for the event. He will also be chairing the panel of judges, which also includes Melvyn Bragg, Charles Moore of the Daily Telegraph and Simon Thurley, Chief Executive of English Heritage. From a short-list of 16 entries from around the country, they will choose four winners, one

each for: • The best rescue or repair of a historic place of worship • The best rescue of a historic industrial building or site • The best craftsmanship employed on a heritage rescue • The best rescue of any other entry on the Heritage at Risk register Lord Lloyd Webber said: “Protecting our heritage is one of the most important causes we, as a community, can undertake. Therefore, I am proud to help English Heritage celebrate the rescues of some of our most valuable cultural treasures. The ‘Angel’

Lord Lloyd Webber pictured with Simon Thurley, Chief Executive of English Heritage

Awards are a brilliant way of saying ‘Thank You’ to those who have made a significant contribution towards protecting our heritage and I hope by raising awareness for the sites that are at risk we can maintain these distinctly English landmarks for posterity.” Tickets for the awards ceremony cost £5 and can be booked by calling 0870 333 1183. q • To find out more, visit www.english-heritage. org.uk

Cleaning a Moore sculpture requires access to all areas

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n innovative scaffolding installation has played a key role in helping to make the most of a highly celebrated sculpture. The Henry Moore bronze, Large Figure in a Shelter, has been one of the most famous landmarks at his former house and studios in Perry Green, Hertfordshire, since its installation in the mid1980’s. On-going maintenance work called for a scaffold structure to provide access to each face of the 21-tonne work of art for cleaning – a requirement that was met by nearby Bishop Stortford based Connect Scaffolding using the Layher Allround scaffolding system. “We were contracted by the Henry Moore Foundation to enable the specialist work teams to access the full surface area,” commented Connect Scaffolding’s director Oliver Cave, “and anyone familiar with the sculpture will be aware of the size, shape and range of surfaces and faces that it presents. “Our solution was a Layher Allround scaffold structure, which was sufficiently adaptable to meet the challenge and which provided ground-level and elevated access to all internal and external surface areas. We believe the system was the logical choice, particularly its versatile rosette connector design, which allows a range of angles

and fixing points to be established – clearly vital with a project of this type.” Sean Pike, Layher’s UK managing director, added: “The importance of the sculpture is widely recognised and acknowledged, and we are very happy to have been able to supply a scaffolding system that meets both aesthetic and performance objectives at the site.” q • For more information on Layher’s Allround system, visit www.layher.co.uk

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Harrods choose Good Directions to manufacture Big Ben replica for new Signature Room

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ood Directions was excited to receive an enquiry to manufacture a replica of Big Ben for Harrods’ prestigious London themed Signature Room, which was designed and recently installed by Prop Studios. Harrods’ Signature Room, home to their branded products and souvenirs, has been given a complete new look thanks to a range of iconic replicas of London buildings and British landmarks. The room has been themed with large-scale models which include Tower Bridge, Big Ben and traditional telephone boxes. Good Directions was asked to manufacture four working clocks to exactly replicate a scaled version of Big Ben’s actual clock faces. The dials were produced in white opal acrylic with black numerals and gold detailing, with back illumination behind each face. Standing 2.4 metres tall the Big Ben replica makes for an impressive addition to the scheme. Inside the clock feature the company’s Total Control System was fitted to keep all the clocks accurate and alter them at the summer and winter time changes. The replica clocks are even fitted with a chiming system installed to mark every quarter of an hour and strike on the hour, just like the real Big Ben. R • For further examples of their work please visit their clock website www. exterior-clocks.co.uk or for their full range of products visit their main website www.good-directions.co.uk. For more information please call 01489 797773.

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New trade body unifies storage industry

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he launch of a new trade association in the storage equipment industry has brought together two major players in the field. In September the Storage Equipment Manufacturer Association (SEMA) launched a new group for distributor members, the SEMA Distributor Group (SDG). The new body takes the place in the industry previously occupied by the Storage and Handling Equipment Distributors’ Association (SHEDA). Over many years, SHEDA developed increasingly strong links with SEMA and both associations recognised the benefits of unity. SHEDA has now ceased to be a formal entity. Members of the SDG will be known as SEMA Distributor Companies (SDC’s) and are entitled to display the SDC logo on promotional materials and vehicles. They will supply products that are recognised as fit for purpose and all work will be carried out by installers that can be individually certified through the Storage Equipment Installers Registration Scheme (SEIRS). So, when looking for a distributor, an end user can turn to independent companies that are members of the SDG and know that they are dealing with reputable organisations. The SEMA Distributor Group has laid out rigorous criteria for membership. An SDC business must have been formally constituted as a legal company for at least two years, it must hold a main distributorship from a recognised manufacturer of storage equipment and an appropriate health and safety policy must be in place. There is an undertaking to conform to SEMA Codes of Practice, standards and safety initiatives including SEIRS where the SDC also undertakes installation work. Where installation is carried out as part of the company’s activities there must be at least one SEIRS supervisor on board. Permanent

David Camm, chairman of the SEMA Distributor Group (left) with John Halliday, President of SEMA installation staff must hold full SEIRS ID cards. Critically, SDG members must conform to a random audit. A SEMA-appointed auditor will study a recent completion and review all documentation including quotation, design, submission, installer details, methods and sign off. SDC’s may only use the SEMA Distributor Company logo in association with new, original equipment supplied. They must demonstrate compliance with the SEMA Distributor Quality Assurance Scheme. Chairman of the new group, David Camm, said: “We have more than 20 SDC members nationwide already fully approved and we anticipate that many more companies will see real value in applying for SEMA’s Distributor Group status. However, our joining criteria are strict and commitment to a random audit will be a deterrent to some. There will be continuity as practically every single former member of SHEDA has chosen to opt for a SEMA Distributor Group membership.” R • For further information, visit www.sema.org.uk or call 0121 601 6350.

London’s archives refurbished to SEMA standards

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ne of the most high-profile contracts to be carried out by a SEMA member in recent years was at the London Metropolitan Archives, the largest local authority record office in the country and custodian of the City of London Archives among others. In the 1960’s the creation of the Greater London Council led to the establishment of the Greater London Record Office (GLRO). It was originally housed in several facilities in London, including the old County Hall on the South Bank. The sites came together on the present site on Northampton Road in 1982. By the end of the decade the repository needed a major refurbishment and extension, including the installation of shelving systems on an innovative floor design. In 1997 it was renamed the London Metropolitan Archives and in 2004, a second large installation was fitted within the existing building. Standing some 5.5m high, it became one of the first ‘high-rise’ mobile systems in the UK.

To comply with BS5454 when tendering, a performance specification was written and adopted by the City Surveyors that asked for SEMA Codes to be adhered to and only SEIRS installers to be engaged. The latest refurbishment project was carried out in 2008. A SEMA member company was awarded Principal Contractor status for the installation, managing all site activities under CDM regulations, with a recommendation to engage only SEIRS installers. The project, which conforms to the SEMA codes of practice – the UK’s only recognised design standard for storage equipment – had the following key objectives: • Maximise storage capacity with only minimal increase in footprint • Accommodate standard archive box dimensions used by the facility, alongside storage for larger items including maps and plans • Permit on-demand access to the full archive throughout the installation period • Incorporate building support beams and

sprinkler locations into the shelving design • Ensure that flooring alignment issues, which relate to the building’s previous use of heavy machinery (it was originally a printing plant), do not affect the function of the mobile shelving system • Comply with customer’s requirement for BS5454 The mobile shelving is operated by an easyto-use, ergonomically-designed hand wheel. Its configuration allows most of the shelving to be kept closed, so maximising floor area capacity, while additional static shelving provides even

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Statue Unveiled in honour of village paragon

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bout 40 people gathered at St Peter’s Church in the village of Cockfield, near Bury St Edmunds, recently to see the installation of a sculpture of St Peter on the 15th century south side. This part of the church sits beneath a vaulted ceiling which many believe means its niches were always meant to house a statue or similar item. Whether there was ever a statue there remains unclear. What is known, however, is that from the time of Henry VIII’s Reformation in the 16th century, that part of St Peter’s has remained empty. The new sculpture – by stone carver Simon Keeley – has been installed in memory of Luanne Stockwell, who died two years ago at the age of 95. Mrs Stockwell enjoyed a successful career as a stage actress and was intensely active in village life. She served as the village correspondent with the East Anglian Daily Times, a church warden at St Peter’s, the chairman of the village’s Women’s Institute and a deliverer of the Meals on Wheels service. Following the death of her husband Ginger in 1967, she remained in the village without any relatives until her death in 2009. Mrs Stockwell’s nearest and dearest became the village itself and the church. The statue was commissioned by a group of her friends in and around Cockfield and was unveiled by the former rector of Cockfield, the Rev Dr Simon Hill. Gillian Hodge, one of the group which arranged for the statue to be made, said: “This unique tribute represents her deep faith, love for the community she lived in and her life in the arts. It reflects the extraordinary impact this effervescent actress and dancer had on the community in which she lived for so many years and for which she cared so deeply.” q

Window specialists

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ounded in 1967 by the late Graham Holdsworth, Holdsworth Windows Limited continues under the leadership of managing director Mark Glover, who joined the company in 1985. They specialise in the manufacture of purpose made hot dip galvanized polyester powder coated steel windows and genuine leaded lights. The steel windows can also be double glazed. The company can manufacture windows from a variety of sections to suit most requirements, depending on the individual contract. This could be simple angle iron frames, standard sections, W20 or even heavier box sections. The fittings are normally brass, but they do have their own period handles and stays. If required they can often re-use existing fittings. q

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Hand-made tiles fit square pegs into square holes ...and there’s room up top for roosting bats!

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efurbishing the roofs of old and historic buildings can pose a challenging problem for builders, particularly when the original peg tiles and rafters need to be replaced and the protection of an endangered species is also involved. Such a challenge was recently encountered during the refurbishment of Bethersden Primary School near Ashford, Kent. The roof of this hundred year old local landmark still retained the original peg tiles which, over the years, had fallen into a state of disrepair and needed urgent replacement to avoid school closure. The £100,000 refurbishment project was undertaken by Breyer Roofing on behalf of Kent County Council’s Property Group. As the building was situated in a building conservation area, only ‘like for like’ peg tiles could be used, which would complement the character of this impressive Victorian red brick school. To make maximum use of the existing tiles, approximately 25% of the original tiles were painstakingly salvaged and re installed at the back of the building, and a further 28,000 tiles were supplied by Kent based Tudor Roof Tile Co Ltd, one of the largest specialist manufacturers of hand made clay peg tiles in the UK. One of the problems often encountered by architects and conservationists is that the ‘rustic’ character of the original Kent Peg Tile, with its subtle variation in texture, colour and camber is not easy to replicate using modern manufacturing methods. Modern machine made peg tiles are generally far too flat and uniform in appearance to suit historic buildings. However, Tudor’s traditional handmade peg tiles offered an ‘olde world’, time weathered appearance, which perfectly complemented the character of this nineteenth century building. In keeping with the original roof structure, each of the new peg tiles was individually crafted with the traditional square peg holes, so that they could be simply hooked onto the replacement battens, in the time honoured way. Because of the high retained second hand value of good quality handmade tiles, Tudor Roof Tile Co was also asked to take the unusual measure of individually kiln-stamping each peg tile with the initials ‘BPS’ on the back for traceability and security purposes. Before building work commenced, a number of site surveys were conducted by Jacobs Engineering UK Ltd, one of the world’s largest and most diverse providers of technical, professional and construction services. It was established that the roof could be a possible roosting site for long-eared

The bat access tiles

brown bats, with the further possibility that the common pipistrelle bats might also be present. Construction work therefore had to be carried out strictly in accordance with the Bat EPS Licence. To avoid interfering with the summer roosting season, all refurbishment work was conducted during term time, with artificial lighting placed in areas of the roof space to reduce the likelihood of bats being present at that time. Furthermore, as bats could potentially be found roosting amongst the loose and slipped tiles, each tile had to be individually removed, by hand, from the old rotting pegs and battens, and carefully examined. As the creation of a modern water-tight and frost resistant new roof can reduce roosting opportunities, alternative forms of bat access had to be provided, including a number of bat access tiles on the roof and ridges, which were also specially supplied by Tudor Roof Tile Co. Designed with an 18mm x 165mm tunnel, which leads to an entrance hole in the undertiles, they are suitable for most of the more common species of bat within the UK. Tudor’s traditional range of tiles has a large double camber, which also helps to keep the area between the tile and underlay well ventilated and protected from extremes of heat, helping maintain a suitable environment for bats. The finished project has been well-received by both Bethersden School and Kent County Council, for its high quality workmanship and excellent use of sympathetic materials as well as its careful approach to conservation in accordance with the EPS Licence. q • Tudor roof tiles are available from leading roofing and builders merchants. For more information, contact Tudor Roof Tile Co. Ltd, Tel: 01797 320202, e-mail: paul.lythgoe@tudorrooftiles.co.uk, website: www.tudorrooftiles.co.uk

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Stairrods (UK) completes refurbishment project for Scottish Portrait Gallery

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he Scottish Portrait Gallery in Edinburgh is due to re-open in November following a major refurbishment project, which includes the renovation by Stairrods (UK) of all 180 original, solid brass stair rods. The period rods had been damaged over the years by heavy foot traffic, the application

of various cleaning materials, plus natural ageing, which had left them scratched, significantly marked and looking worn. Stairrods (UK) of Consett, which manufactures an extensive collection of solid and hollow stair rods in a variety of designs and finishes, provides various specialised services including the re-polishing of rods and brackets, re-plating and making extra long and curved rods to precise specifications – all are particularly useful for renovation and refurbishment projects, where the original style of the building needs to be preserved or restored. All of the rods have been re-polished, which involves gradually removing the existing surface whilst paying particular attention to the ornate finials, so that the original decorative design is preserved and the original rod is not damaged in the process. Then, using special polishing mops, the rods are extensively handrubbed to bring them back to life and restore a highly polished and flawless sheen. This technique is suitable for solid brass rods, and Stairrods (UK) is able to handle both round and triangular shaped rods at their works in Consett. For clients wanting to transform

the look of their original rods and achieve a different finish, the company can re-plate in a number of finishes including satin nickel, chrome, antique brass or black. The completed Portrait Gallery will open in late November and John Leighton, Director General of the National Galleries of Scotland commented: “The transformation within the building is simply stunning”. • For further information contact Stairrods (UK) T: 01207 591176 www.stairrods.co.uk R

New energy conservation Guidance Note and fully updated Product Guide from Selectaglaze

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electaglaze, the UK’s leading secondary glazing specialist, has launched a new Guidance Note on the ability of secondary glazing to improve a building’s energy performance. This will be of great interest to all building owners and managers wishing to reduce energy usage and so manage costs and environmental impacts. A new comprehensive Product Guide demonstrates the range and diversity of styles available together with technical information, detailed drawings and photography. The range of 22 products includes multiple options for horizontal and vertical sliding, hinged, lift-out and fixed units. These options cover simple energy saving, high performance acoustics and a unique ‘Secured by Design’ security range offering resistance against intruders and blast. A notable addition to the ‘Saving Energy’ range is the Series 47 ‘Heritage’ Casement which can fit neatly into the staff bead of most traditional sash windows. It is discrete and unobtrusive and the use of low emissivity glass provides very good levels of insulation. (http://www. selectaglaze.co.uk/products/hinged-casement/47.php) The two new publications are free upon request or can be downloaded (http://www.selectaglaze.co.uk/literature/index.php) from the extensive library of information which includes guidance notes, CAD and NBS files. The launch of these two publications comes in a year which sees the company celebrate its 45th anniversary and move into a new purpose designed factory and office premises in St. Albans. • For further information please contact Selectaglaze on 01727 837271, enquiries@selectaglaze.co.uk or visit www.selectaglaze.co.uk

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Selectaglaze's newly launched Guidance Note (left) and (below) a page from their new comprehensive Product Guide


Secondary glazing is a hot topic at this Yorkshire church

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or a long time it was one of life’s ironies that ancient and valued buildings with beautiful windows were invariably cold and expensive to heat. The buildings are often listed, meaning little can be done to update them and the very beauty of the windows means that modern double-glazing techniques can’t be employed. Such was the case with the conference hall at Rawmarsh Methodist Church near Rotherham. As well as being the church hall, the building acts as the base for the High Street Centre, a community facility for meetings, events and training courses. Earlier this year, however, all that changed when Sheffield-based secondary glazing specialist Clearview fitted bespoke secondary glazing units behind the beautiful leaded windows at the hall. Many of the windows are of a neo-gothic arched type and the secondary units were specially designed to cover the whole of the window area. As the units fit inside the existing windows they cannot be seen from

outside and they are completely non-invasive, meaning they can be fitted to listed buildings. Almost immediately users of the hall began to see a difference. The work was funded by an environmental grant from Veolia Environmental Services and a condition of the grant was that the management had to monitor the temperature inside the hall. According to the centre’s development manager, Caroline Langton, the new glazing brought about an immediate rise in temperature of 10 degrees Fahrenheit – from 45 to 55. That has been reflected in a large saving in heating bills, which means the secondary glazing will quickly pay for itself. That is besides the environmental benefits of less energy use. In addition, there has been a significant decrease in street noise penetrating into the hall. Clearview was founded by Andrew Saunby in 2003 and specialises in the installation of secondary glazing in buildings where conventional double-glazing is inappropriate. Many of its customers are owners of listed buildings or period properties and in a lot of cases double-glazing is not permitted. Secondary glazing had been a low-cost option for many years for houses that had been built before double-glazing was the norm, yet were not old enough to need reglazing. The problem had been producing secondary glazing units that were big enough for public buildings and custom-built for the individuality of the buildings. Clearview is now a leader in the supply of just such a product. They will supply anything from one unit to a complete building, either supply only or fully fitted. All the testimonial needed came from Caroline Langton, who said: “Clearview were brilliant to deal with, and we are very happy with their work.” R

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ACCESS EQUIPMENT

ARCHIVE STORAGE

ANTIQUE FURNITURE RESTORATION

ASBESTOS ARCHAEOLOGY

AUDIO VISUAL

BELLS

ARCHITECTURAL METALWORK

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BESPOKE JOINERY

BLACKSMITHS

BRICK REPAIR TOOLS

BUILDING CONSERVATION & RESTORATION

BIRD PROOFING

BUILDING SERVICES

CANDLES

CHURCH HEATING

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CLERICAL CLOTHING

CONSERVATION ENGINEERS CLOCKS

DAMP PROOFING

CONSERVATION

DISABLED ACCESS CONSERVATION BUILDERS

DRAINAGE

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ELECTRICAL CONSULTANTS

GLAZING

ENGINEERING CONSULTANTS

GUILD OF MASTERCRAFTSMEN

ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING

JAPANESE KNOTWEED

EXHUMATION SERVICES

LANDSCAPING

FENCING

FURNITURE

LEADWORK

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LIGHTING & SOUND

LIGHTNING PROTECTION

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LIME

THE STEEPLEJACK AND LIGHTNING PROTECTION TRAINING GROUP

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ORGAN PIPES

PAPER CONSERVATORS LOOP SYSTEMS

PAINT REMOVAL MEMORIAL FIXINGS

PAINTING CONSERVATION MORTAR SUPPLIES

MOSAICS

PAINTING & DECORATING ORGANS

PERIOD PROPERTY CONSERVATION

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PEST CONTROL

PHOTOGRAPHY

ROOFING

PHOTO PLAQUES

PLASTERERS

RESTORATION

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STAINED GLASS ROOF TILES

SASH WINDOWS

SIGNS

SOUND SYSTEMS

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STONE


TESTING AND CONSULTANCY

STONE CARVERS

TRAINING

STOVES

SUNDIALS

TERRACOTTA

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TREE SURGERY & CONSULTANCY

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WORSHIP

WROUGHT IRON

WEB DESIGN

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Ecclesiastical and Heritage World  

Ecclesiastical and Heritage World Magazine and Directory