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Maps Events Events Restaurants SightseeingCafés Restaurants Nightlife Sightseeing Nightlife Shopping Shopping Hotels

Poznań No. 55, March – June 2020

City Guide

Poznań’s Forts

p.6

Al Fresco Drinking

p.74

May Days

p.85


Contents

Poznań Poznań’s Forts p.6

Foreword

4

Feature Poznań’s Forts

6

Events 10 Arrival & Transport

16

Sightseeing Stary Rynek Tour Old Town Tour Ostrów Tumski Citadel Park Lake Malta

26 32 38 41 44

Museums

48

Kids & Families

46

Cafés Regional Dishes

54

52

Restaurants Nightlife Shopping Health & Services Hotels Index

56 68 78 84 86 89

Maps City Map City Centre Map Stary Rynek Map Old Town Map Ostrów Tumski Map Citadel Park Map Lake Malta Map

20 23 26 32 39 41 44 3


Foreword As the smog lifts and leaves begin to unfurl (we’d say something about melting snow, too, but - alas - there’s little of that what with global warming), Poznań once again kicks into high gear. Spring and summer festivals are coming up, and what a busy season it’s going to be: from big music & multimedia veterans like Malta Festival (p.14), Enea Spring Break (p.13), and Ethno Port (p.14) to the Europe-wide Night of Museums (p.14) to small film festivals including Short Waves (p.10) and Spanish Film Week (p.11) to the Aquanet Jazz Festival (p.12) to food trucks galore (pp.11-12). In this issue, we’re also refreshing our feature about Poznań’s 19th-century Prussian fortifications (p.6), which at one point made Poznań one of the largest cityfortresses in Europe. Forming a 30-kilometre-long ring around the city, these military landmarks make for nice springtime excursions for those who have tired of more central attractions. As always, we welcome your comments, questions, and suggestions, which you can send via e-mail (poland@ inyourpocket.com) or via our facebook page (Poznan In Your Pocket). Have a great time in Poznań! Born in Upper Silesia, Janina Krzysiak spent her formative years outside of Philadelphia, PA, before moving back to Poland to indulge her love for cheap air travel, walkable cities, and Eastern European nostalgia. When she’s not writing and editing travel guides, she moonlights as a particle physicist. No, really.

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COVER STORY This issue’s colourful cover portrays a few of the stunning houses found on Poznań’s Old Town Square one of which happens to be the Archaeological Museum (p.48). Fancy a walking tour of all the square’s attractions? Turn to page 26.

PUBLISHER & STAFF Publisher IYP City Guides Sp. z o.o. Sp.k. ul. Karmelicka 46/51, 31-128 Kraków iyp.com.pl poland@inyourpocket.com Circulation 15,000 copies published 3 times per year Writer & Editor: Janina Krzysiak Sales: Agata Urbanowicz (+48) 606 749 642 Events: Monika Boguszewska-Stopka (+48) 882 079 723, Katarzyna Mrozewska-Fenz, Patrycja Ples Research: Dominika Sosnowska, Aleksandra Sosnowska, Zuzanna Onuszko Layout & Maps: Tomáš Haman Social Media & Marketing: Juan Sarabia Copyright Notice Content and photos copyright IYP City Guides Sp. Z o.o Sp.k. unless otherwise stated. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. The brand name In Your Pocket and maps are used under license from UAB In Your Pocket (Bernardinu 9-4, Vilnius, LT, tel. (+370-5) 212 29 76).


Fort VII, the Wielkopolska Martyrs Museum

Poznań’s Forts Once part of Prussia and known as Posen, Poznań is surrounded by extensive Prussian fortifications, which are sure to thrill military history geeks.


Poznań’s Forts If you spend your time exclusively in the centre of Poznań, you probably won’t realize that not too long ago, this city was a formidable fortress, one of the largest such structures in Europe. While city fortifications in Poznań were first built some 1000 years ago, it wasn’t until after the Prussians acquired the Wielkopolska region (a result of the Partition of Poland in 1793) that a need was seen to seriously amp up the defenses. The reason? After the Napoleonic Wars of 1803-1815, the Prussian-Russian border shifted uncomfortably close to Berlin. Posen - as Poznań was called then - was located on the most direct route connecting the Prussian capital and Moscow, and thus an essential roadblock for staving off a possible Russian invasion. The first fort, originally called the Kernwerk, was built in 1828-1842 on a hill just north of the city, an area now called Citadel Park (p.41). At around the same time, the Old Town was snugly encircled with a ring of walls and bastions, only one of which remains to this day - the Colomb Bastion, which now houses the Fort Colomb Pub - and the Warta River was peppered with locks. Enthusiasts of hydrotechnology can still visit one of these, the Cathedral Lock, which is now part of the Porta Posnania Interactive Heritage Centre (p.38), and in excellent shape after a much-needed refurbishment. In the second half of the 19th century, defenses were strengthened even further by building a system of 18 forts in a much larger, 30-km-long ring around the city. The nine main forts - numbered I to IX on our handy map - were completed in the 1780s. Afterwards, gaps between them were filled in with ‘intermediate forts’, numbered Ia-IXa, with the last brick probably laid sometime in 1896. By this time, the inner ring of fortifications was outdated and hampering the city’s growth, so in 1902 the decision was made to tear down the old bastions and walls. This made room for the Imperial Castle (p.37) and other, badly needed expansion. To keep things simple, outer forts were renamed after the inner bastions - this is why Colomb Bastion and Colomb Fort are both named after Friedrich August Peter von Colomb, a Prussian general. The dismantling of the inner fortifications wasn’t finished before the WWI rolled around, and it was continued by Polish authorities in the interwar period, after Poznań was returned to the newly resurrected Poland. The city’s imposing defenses were tested only once, and not by the Prussians, but by the Nazis. In January 1945, as WWII was drawing to a close, 40,000 German troops hunkered down in the fortress to stall the Red Army’s advancement. The resulting Battle of Poznań lasted for a full month. Though the fortress ultimately fell to the 100,000 Soviet soldiers (and some 5,000 Polish ones), it proved difficult to breach - especially the Citadel, which was the last to fall, and which sustained little damage, even as most of the city was reduced to rubble.

Bird’s-eye view of Fort VI

© Marcin Kantor

When the communist regime took over following WWII, the forts fell into disrepair. Today, a few have been shaped up at least partially, as renovation works are mostly ongoing - and are open to tourists, in various forms. Unfortunately, despite being considered a major asset by Poznań, and even arranged into an official ‘Fortress Route’, on the whole frustratingly little has been done to make the forts viable tourist attractions. The majority remain in private hands and are considered private property - trespassing prosecuted by law. No matter what google maps might tell you about them being open 24/7 (we were certainly fooled), many are actually behind tall fences, so it’s difficult to even catch a glimpse from the outside. Fortification enthusiasts have only a few chances to visit these closed-off structures during special events, such as the ‘Fort Weekend’ which takes place annually in August.

FORT COLOMB PUB

Fort Colomb, technically the Colomb Bastion, is the one place where you can drink in Poz’s Prussian fortifications - and there’s no worrying about invading private property or the lack of English tours. During the summer, we take every opportunity to get away from the hustle, bustle, and loud drunks of the main square and hide away in the leafy garden of this splendidly historic building, located right in Park Marcinkowskiego. QF‑8, ul. Powstanców Wielkopolskich, tel. (+48) 609 99 02 82, www.fortcolomb.pl. Open 14:00-24:00; Fri, Sat 14:00-02:00; Sun 17:00-24:00. X­E 7


Poznań’s Forts arrangement only) and monthly guided tours, led by guides in full Prussian military attire. Tours are organised on the last Saturday of each month at 12:00 and 15:00 and take approximately 1h. Unfortunately, the default language is Polish, but guides speak English too, so they might be able to accommodate you; alternatively, you can set up a private English-language tour, but this will set you back 300zł.Qul. Lechicka, tel. (+48) 50 144 55 66, www.kernwerk.pl. Admission 10/7zł.

The Cathedral Lock

That being said, the few that are open to the public forts III, Va, VI, and VII, the last of which houses the Wielkopolska Martyrs Museum - are absolutely worth visiting. We describe those in more detail below. FORT III - GRÖBER This is one of the city’s better-known forts due to it being situated literally right in the middle of the New Zoo (p.47). Unfortunately, this means that if you want to visit, you need to first purchase a ticket for the zoo, and then pay separately for a guided tour of the fort. The tours take place on Sundays, May to September only, at 14:00, 15:00, and 16:00 (at least those were the hours last year - we were unable to verify them for the coming season). These guided tours are likely to be in Polish only, but private, English-language tours can be set up by phone or e-mail. If you manage to get in, you’ll find that snooping around the eerie hallways, rooms and stairways hidden throughout gives a real sense of what it must have been like to be stationed in such a place.Qul. Krańcowa 81 (Nowe Miasto), tel. (+48) 51 886 25 81, www. fort3.ptpf. org.pl. Open from May, Sun only. Admission 10/8zł, not counting the zoo ticket. FORT VA - BONIN This intermediate fort has been undergoing renovation works for a while, but is in good enough shape to accommodate paintball and laser tag sessions (by previous

The gloomy corridors of Fort III

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© Radoslaw Maciejewski

FORT VI - TIETZEN Due to the fact it was continually used by the military following the end of WWII, Tietzen was still in perfect condition when it was purchased by a private Polish investor for a reported 2.55 million złoty. It has since been turned into a conference and event centre and occasional film set. Tours are organised by the same guys as in Fort Va, and take place on the last Saturday of each month at 12:00 - the expected duration is 1h30, and, again, the default langauge is Polish.Qul. Lutycka/ul. Strzeszyńska (Jeżyce), tel. (+48) 50 144 55 66, www.fortpoznan.pl. Admission 10/7zł.

WWII tanks at the Citadel

© Michal Wrombel

FORT VII - COLOMB Undoubtedly Poznań’s best-known and darkest fort, this place was set up as the first Nazi concentration camp. It’s estimated that Nazi officials began using the place for this purpose way back in October 1939 and some sources state that as many as 20,000 died at the site. Today it operates as the Wielkopolska Martyrs Museum and is the only fort that can be visited individually, without taking part in a guided tour. Inside you’ll see the dark tunnels used as improvised gas chambers and haunting displays that include a guillotine, an execution block, truncheons, whips, and arrest warrants. The personal effects of prisoners have also been preserved including hand-written letters, playing cards, rosaries, and identity papers. Chilling inscriptions etched into the walls by prisoners can also still be discerned, the writing framed with red and white ribbons. Overall, an impactful experience - though short on English-language information - rightfully making this Poznań’s most visited fort. QAl. Polska (Jeżyce), www.wmn.poznan.pl. Open 10:00-17:00; Sun 10:00-16:00; closed Mon. Admission 6/3zł, Tue free.


Events

Ethno Port Festiwal (p.14) | Photo by M. Kaczyński/CK Zamek

EVENTS BY DATE 07.03 - 08.03 » APPETITE FOR ASIA - ASIAN FESTIVAL

Asia is home to one of the World’s oldest street food cultures. Travel magazines, shows, and films all showcase the uniqueness of the quick eats on offer all over Asia. The Asian Festival in Poznań is the Polish version of this phenomenon. Businesses from around Poland will come to showcase their interpretation of Asian food and what passes for a quick and tasty meal. There is sure to be plenty of ginger and spice, but to cater to the Polish pallet there will also be the less spicy variety of fair.QD‑7, Concordia Taste, ul. Zwierzyniecka 3, tel. (+48) 609 00 29 64, Admission free, www.apetytna.pl.

ART GALLERY ARSENAŁ CITY GALLERY Founded in the late 1940s under the somewhat commie-sounding name Central Exhibition Bureau, Arsenał is one of the oldest players on Poznań’s art gallery scene - and probably the most important, especially given its very central location. Currently organised by the Poznań City Council, the institution hosts exhibitions by Polish and foreign contemporary artists and organises educational meetings.QH‑7, Stary Rynek 6, tel. (+48) 61 852 95 02, www.arsenal. art.pl. Open 12:00 - 19:00, Sun 12:00 - 16:00. Closed Mon. Admission free. 10

12.03 19:00 » CANDOCO DANCE COMPANY (UK): “FACE IN” & “HOT MESS”

The phenomenally unique and refreshing UK Dance Company Candoco have been highlighting disability in dance since 1991. They are renowned for their unique work that challenges perceived norms with creativity and often humour. The company includes both disabled and able-bodied dancers. Candoco dancers tackle political correctness and prejudice with mischievous humour, and each new production seems to revel in showboating the particular range of skills, stories and bodies these dancers bring to the stage. The dancers bring to Poznań two spectacular performances, “Face In” dir. by Theo Clinkard and “Hot Mess” dir. by Yasmeen Godder.QF‑7, ZAMEK Culture Centre, ul. Św. Marcin 80/82, tel. (+48) 61 646 52 60, Tickets 30/20zł, www.ckzamek.pl.

17.03 18:00 » ST. PATRICK’S DAY AT ZAMEK CULTURE CENTRE - EACHTRA

Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day while embarking on a fantastic Celtic journey! Eachtra is a multimedia performance combining music, dance, animation and narration. It grew out of the collaboration between Celtic music band Jig Reel Maniacs, Irish dance group Tuatha & Ellorien, and Visual Jokey Tomasz Frąszczak. The production combines elements of Celtic culture from Ireland, Wales, Scotland and Brittany. The narration portion of the performance consists of Scottish, Irish and Welsh prose and poetry, recited in both original Celtic languages and in English translation. QF‑7, ZAMEK Culture Centre, ul. Św. Marcin 80/82, tel. (+48) 61 646 52 60, Admission 50zł, www.ckzamek.pl.


Events 17.03 - 22.03 » SHORT WAVES FESTIVAL

You may have noticed quite a number of short film festivals popping up on the Polish cultural landscape these days, but this one presents itself as the most “concise” of all. This year they have prepared two focuses: the motto Fixing The Future, inviting us to consider ways in which we can shape our contemporary reality and - most of all - the future for the next generations, and a geographical one - dedicated to the cinematography of Lebanon. The films will be shown with Polish and English subtitles.QF‑7, ZAMEK Culture Centre, ul. Św. Marcin 80/82, tel. (+48) 61 646 52 60, Info about tickets soon, www.shortwaves.pl.

21.03 11:00-21:00, 22.03 11:00-20:00 » BIG FOOD TRUCK SEASON OPENING NEAR CHWIAŁKA

Lazy sunny summer (or at least spring) days are just around the corner and so is the food truck season! So dust your bike, shake your blanket, find your sunglasses and head towards the food trucks for some delicious treats. This year the event will take place in the heart of Wilda, right next to John Paul II park. You will find there not only a variety of dishes from around the world but also spectacular drinks, craft beer, not to mention many fun attractions that are waiting both for adults and kids.QAdmission free.

26.03 - 29.03 » MOTOR SHOW FAIR

Poznań is the city of industrial fairs, and the Motor Show might be one of the most interesting ones hosted by the city. See some of the best and newest cars, campers, and motorcycles. According to organisers, this is the biggest car show in this part of Europe - presumably Central-Eastern. We don’t know if that’s true, but the fair is definitely worth checking out if you’re into automobiles.QD‑9, Poznań Congress Center, ul. Głogowska 14, tel. (+48) 61 869 20 00, Tickets 27-130zł, www.motorshow.pl.

27.03 - 02.04 » SPANISH FILM WEEK

One week, 10 Polish cities, and a whole lot of film. As the title suggests, Spanish Film Week provides a glimpse into the world of Spanish film—presenting some of the country’s most important and most popular recently released flicks. The best way to cultivate new potential tourists is through film, don’t you think? Even if you aren’t planning a springtime vacation, this might just be the ideal time to do a little cinematic-style getaway of sorts.QG‑8, Muza, ul. Św. Marcin 30, tel. (+48) 61 852 34 03, www.kinomuza.pl.

28.03 - 29.03 » FOOD TRUCKS LOVE ANIMALS!

Spring is just around the corner and so is your neighbourhood food truck in Poznań! Enjoy a variety of tasty dishes but do not forget about animals in need. They deserve a special treat as well! Bring food and pet accessories on the 28th and 29th of March to the Poznań stadium. The animals from the shelter are going to be very grateful!QPoznań Stadium, ul. Bułgarska 17 (Grunwald), tel. (+48) 61 886 30 31, Admission free, www.festiwalsmaku.com.pl. 11


Events 28.03 - 29.03 » HOPLA FEST - GREAT BOUNCE&SLIDE FESTIVAL!

Children accompanying adults at the Great Szama (Feast) Festival are never going to be bored! There will be plenty of jump’n’slide bouncy houses and castles set up to make sure your kids will use all their energy! After crazy bouncing fun, you can take them straight to one (or two) food trucks offering all sorts of dishes from around the world. Just make sure you to feed them after bouncing, not before!QPoznań Stadium, ul. Bułgarska 17 (Grunwald), tel. (+48) 61 886 30 31, www.festiwalsmaku.com.pl.

28.03 12:00-21:00, 29.03 12:00-20:00 » GREAT SZAMA (FEAST) AT THE STADIUM! THE BIGGEST FOOD TRUCK JAMBOREE IN POZNAŃ!

The Great Szama (‘szama’ means ‘feast’ in Polish slang) is opening the food truck season! 60 food trucks will be set up at the Poznań Stadium, offering plenty of burgers and fries, scrumptious bites from European cuisine and the most exotic dishes from the farthest corners of the world. Kids will be well entertained as well, thanks to Hopla and the Soap Bubbles Festival, plus a speed burger eating competition! Various charity events will accompany the festival - donations will support children in need, and they will also be collecting pet food and accessories for homeless animals. In the spirit of environmentalism, you are also encouraged to bring your own dishes, and dishes will be served on-site in eco-friendly containers.QPoznań Stadium, ul. Bułgarska 17 (Grunwald), tel. (+48) 61 886 30 31, Admission free, www.festiwalsmaku.com.pl.

28.03 - 05.04 » EASTER FAIR

After December’s Christmas Fair, it’s time for the Easter Fair - this time around the wooden stalls will be filled with decorated eggs, woven baskets, sheep made out of sugar lumps, Easter palms, seasonal baked goods, and various pastel-colored craft items. Might be a good place to pick up a souvenir or two and sample some rye soup and dumplings.QI‑7, Old Town Square, Admission free, www.targowiska.com.pl.

29.03 16:00 » VISUAL CONCERT

The Visual Concert is a multimedia music show that uses popular movies soundtrack motifs while projecting images of the most beautiful places in the world on a large panoramic screen. The 80-member symphony orchestra accompanied by the Academic Choir of Adam Mickiewicz University led by Adam Domurat will fill the space with music to the rhythm of the simultaneously projected images, featuring the most unusual and spectacular places on our planet, among them Hawaiian beaches, 7 Wonders of the World, unique National Parks, tropical forests, snow-covered mountain peaks and urban jungles. The repertoire will include movie soundtracks from Gladiator, Avatar, Pirates of the Caribbean, James Bond, Dreamer, Transformers, Lord of the Rings, and many others.QC‑9, Earth Hall, ul. Głogowska 14, Tickets 70-175zł, www. visualproduction.pl. 12

02.04, 03.04, 04.04, 05.04 18:00 » CINDERELLA

Sergei Prokofiev’s Cinderella is a brilliant, colourful, and delightful composition that certainly does not bring the war to mind. Nevertheless, this particular composition is the product of these grim times. It was written during World War II, partly probably in the Caucasus where the authorities first evacuated the composer. It is precisely the war that distracted those in power momentarily to allow for the burst of artistic creativity that gave birth to Cinderella among other works. The ballet was choreographed by Paul Chalmer.QF‑6, Great Theatre, ul. Fredry 9, tel. (+48) 61 659 02 31, www.opera.poznan.pl.

03.04 19:00-22:00 » AQUANET JAZZ FESTIVAL: GRIT ENSEMBLE

Krzysztof Komeda was a Polish film music composer and jazz pianist. Best known for his work in film scores, Komeda wrote the scores for Roman Polanski’s films Knife in the Water, Cul-de-sac, The Fearless Vampire Killers, and Rosemary’s Baby. The project “Komeda Deconstructed” presents not only unique Krzysztof Komeda compositions performed by established musicians, but also original interpretations of Komeda’s music by Wielkopolska artists. This time the Poznań-based Grit Ensemble have prepared lesser known jazz compositions by Komeda, which combine acoustic sounds with the ensemble’s penchant for electronic improvisation. More than just jazz pieces, these compositions by Grit Ensemble purport to be traces of a bygone world, a record of an apparently elusive, but deeply felt atmosphere of freedom.QF‑7, ZAMEK Culture Centre, ul. Św. Marcin 80/82, tel. (+48) 61 646 52 60, Tickets 120-150zł, www.jazz.pl.

03.04 19:00-22:00 » AQUANET JAZZ FESTIVAL: ESPEN ERIKSEN TRIO

At Aquanet Jazz Festival the Norwegian Espen Eriksen Trio will present the program “Komeda Time” in honour of Polish film music composer and jazz pianist Krzysztof Komeda. The Norwegian jazz trio will perform interpretations of compositions by Krzysztof Komeda together with the premiere of their new piece, “Komeda,” specially prepared for this occasion. The Espen Eriksen Trio perfectly represents today’s very creative Scandinavian jazz scene; their sound is often referred to as “nordic,” with many references to European classics and modern jazz, coloured by the group’s Scandinavian roots. “Less is better” has become the Espen Eriksen Trio’s self-proclaimed artistic motto.QF‑7, ZAMEK Culture Centre, ul. Św. Marcin 80/82, tel. (+48) 61 646 52 60, Tickets 120-150zł, www.jazz.pl.

04.04 19:00-22:00 » AQUANET JAZZ FESTIVAL: ANDREA MOTIS

25 year old Andrea Motis is a Catalan jazz singer, trumpeter and composer, named by Quincy Jones as “the golden child of jazz”. Discovered at the age of 12 by her teacher, a Catalan bassist Joan Chamorro, she quickly became an international jazz sensation. The artist is fascinated with Latin rhythms, samba and bossa nova, and those rhythms became the inspiration


Events for her album “Do Outro Lado Do Azul”. The album is also a break with the influence of “American song-book” and a search for inspiration in Mediterranean and Latin American rhythms. Wonderful to listen to, the artist levitates somewhere between Norah Jones and Chet Baker, while improvising brilliantly on the trumpet.QF‑7, ZAMEK Culture Centre, ul. Św. Marcin 80/82, tel. (+48) 61 646 52 60, Tickets 120-150zł, www.jazz.pl.

05.04 19:00-22:00 » AQUANET JAZZ FESTIVAL: KANDACE SPRINGS

Kandace Springs is an American jazz pianist and soul singer, whose style is compared to such jazz giants as Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald, Nina Simone, Roberta Flack and Norah Jones. Her debut album “Soul Eyes” is a mixture of original compositions by Kandace Springs, Mal Waldron’s jazz standard “Soul Eyes” and Jesse Harris’ and Shelby Lynne’s compositions. The second album “Indigo” features diverse compositions, and it is described by American critics as “Simple, yet funky. Classic, but modern.” Kandace Springs combines with great grace and subtlety jazz with complex ideas and styles.QAula UAM, ul. Wieniawskiego 1, Tickets 100-180zł, www.jazz.pl.

23.04 - 25.04 » ENEA SPRING BREAK: SHOWCASE FESTIVAL & CONFERENCE 2020

Enea Spring Break is one of the biggest showcase festivals in Poland, acting as a conduit between some of the freshest up-and-coming Polish artists and an impressive number of Poland’s highly influential representatives in the music industry. While providing a great networking experience for those seeking to step up their musical careers, it comes as no surprise that thousands of people frequent the various concerts and venues showcasing Poland’s cream-of-thecrop musical talents. The seventh edition of the festival will feature Poznań’s native Rosalie and Swiernalis, as well as Mrozu, Natalia Przybysz, Mery Spolsky, Ralph Kamiński, Karian, Opał, Augustyn and Koza.. During this year’s Popkiller: Młode Wilki 7 Showcase, the most promising hip-hop talent is going to be selected. More artists will be announced soon.QG/H‑7, Plac Wolności, Plac Wolności. Three day pass 120zł. More info about tickets soon, www.spring-break.pl.

25.04 19:00, 26.04 18:00, 28.04 19:00, 29.04 11:00 » BER

Three innovative ballet works Take Me With You, Blind Words and Episode 31 are the best introduction to the modern ballet. Created by choreographers Robert Bondara, Martynas Rimeikis and Alexander Ekman to the sound of Radiohead, music composed by Steve Reich, Lawrence English, Meredith Monk, Mikael KarlssonAne Brun, and Erik Satie, these works are highly unusual and present modern ballet in a unique way. The newcomers to the world of ballet will appreciate it, and for the fans of classical ballet, it will be a chance to be introduced to the more nontraditional form of ballet. QF‑6, Great Theatre, ul. Fredry 9, tel. (+48) 61 659 02 31, Tickets 27-100zł, www.opera.poznan.pl. 13


Events 05.05 19:00 » SINATRA WITH MATT DUSK

Matt Dusk is a Canadian jazz vocalist with four certified gold albums Two Shots, Good News, Old School Yule!, Jet Set Jazz, and two certified platinum albums My Funny Valentine, The Chet Baker Songbook and Just the Two of Us. The upcoming concert in Poznań is a tribute to the American music legend, Frank Sinatra. The artist will take its audience to the times of elegance and sensuality, into the smoky clubs of Las Vegas in the 1960s, when the charts were dominated by such standards as “Come Fly With Me”, “I’ve Got You Under My Skin” or “Fly Me To The Moon”.QC‑9, Earth Hall, ul. Głogowska 14, Tickets 99-219zł, www.goodtaste.pl.

09.05 19:00, 10.05 18:00, 12.05 19:00, 05.06 19:00, 06.06 19:00, 07.06 18:00 » MANON LESCAUT

Manon Lescaut, an opera in four acts composed by Giacomo Puccini with the libretto written by several people - Ruggero Leoncavallo, Marco Praga, Giuseppe Giacosa, Domenico Oliva, Luigi Illica, and Giacomo Puccini himself plus his publisher, Giulio Ricordi. Puccini’s fiery and defiant heroine forsakes true love for material luxury only to become ensnared by a desire to have both. Experience the unmatched feeling of dawning love in the opera that skyrocketed Puccini to success. The Poznań’s performance is directed by Gerard Jones.QF‑6, Great Theatre, ul. Fredry 9, Tickets 50-100zł, tel. (+48) 61 659 02 31, www.opera.poznan.pl.

15.05 19:00, 16.05 19:00, 17.05 18:00 » CARMEN

One of the absolute must-sees of the operatic world, Georges Bizet’s exotic and once-controversial Carmen is worth seeing anywhere, anytime. Denis Krief’s version, although bereft of classic costumes and set design, remains a universal tale of unchanging human passions. Performed in the original French with Polish supertitles.QF‑6, Great Theatre, ul. Fredry 9, tel. (+48) 61 659 02 31, Tickets 2565zł, www.opera.poznan.pl.

16.05 18:00 » NIGHT OF MUSEUMS

The first Night of Museums took place in Berlin in 1997, and the concept spread through Europe like wildfire: currently over 120 major European cities (and many minor ones) organise their own museum nights. It’s a pretty big deal, with thousands of people heading out to take part and visit museums big or small. If you’re into this kind of stuff, keep in mind that Kraków is organising the event a night early, giving you a chance to swing by both cities (they’re certainly both worth it). Follow facebook to find more attraction during Night of Museums in Poznan.QH‑7, National Museum, Al. Marcinkowskiego 9, tel. (+48) 61 856 80 00, Admission free, www.nocmuzeow.poznan.pl.

16.05 - 17.05 » POZNAŃ 2020 TATTOO CONVENTION

Visit Poznań 2020 Tatoo Convention, the place for meeting and exhibition for tattoo practitioners and enthusiasts. Whether you have tattoos from your head to your toes, or don’t have one drop of ink under your skin, the Poznań 14

Convention is an event everyone should experience. Tens of tattoo artists, tattoo enthusiasts, and the tattoo curious will gather from May 16 to 17 to celebrate the ancient art of tattooing. QD‑9, Poznań Congress Center, ul. Głogowska 14, tel. (+48) 61 869 20 00, Admission 39zł, www.poznan.tattookonwent.pl.

05.06 - 07.06 » ETHNO PORT FESTIVAL

This year is the 13th edition of Ethno Port festival. Featuring music from around the world (and we mean a legitimately diverse selection), this music festival crosses all sorts of boundaries into visual arts, literature, theatre, dance, and cinema. In previous years, Ethno Port has hosted artists from Mali, Hungary, Norway, Ukraine, Maroko, Columbia, India, Egypt, Spain, France, Romania, New Guinea and Cape Verde, among many others. This year’s focus will be on Africa, a huge, diverse, dynamically changing continent, we, Europeans, still do not know much about. And as always, there will be plenty of performers representing Asia and Europe. In addition, there will be plenty of opportunities to meet the festival’s participants during workshops, dances, screenings and meetings. The festival’s organisers have just announced its first guest artists - Maya Youssef, Trio Da Kali, and Les Filles De Illighadad.QF‑7, ZAMEK Culture Centre, ul. Św. Marcin 80/82, tel. (+48) 61 646 52 60, Three day pass 190zł. More info about tickets soon, www.ethnoport.pl.

14.06 18:00, 16.06 19:00, 17.06 19:00 » FIDDLER ON THE ROOF

Chances are your time on this earth means you’ve come in contact with Fiddler on the Roof in one way or another—either you’ve seen it live (as it’s one of the longest-running Broadway shows in history) or you’ve seen the movie (because at some point in your life you’ve owned a TV). But have you seen it performed by top-class actors in Poznań? Well, there’s a first time for everything. (Or a second, or a third...) This musical, set in Imperial Russia in 1905, is a story about love, faith, family, and the tensions brought on by the need for preservation of Jewish traditions and culture. Language: PolishQF‑6, Great Theatre, ul. Fredry 9, tel. (+48) 61 659 02 31, Tickets 45-150zł, www.opera.poznan.pl.

19.06 - 28.06 » MALTA FESTIVAL

Malta Festival, a unique meeting of artists and intellectuals, often representing opposing views, has been in the centre of Poznań’s cultural life since its conception in 1991. In its original form, the festival concentrated mainly on the alternative theatre. Since then, it widened its scope to include musical performances, concerts, and even went as far as organising a silent disco. This year’s festival celebrates its 30th anniversary, and to mark this occasion a special concert was prepared - “Krynicki’s Project” during which the compositions of renowned composers, Paweł Szymański, Paweł Mykietyn and Alek Nowak will be performed. The pieces were specially composed to illustrate poems of the well known Poznań’s artist, Ryszard


Events Krynicki. The open-air gala concert featuring all Malta friends will end the 30th edition of the festival.QN‑8, Lake Malta, ul. Wiankowa 3, tel. (+48) 61 876 60 11, Admission free, www.malta-festival.pl.

EXHIBITIONS UNTIL 29.03 » UNKNOWN IMPRESSIONISM: MANET, PISSARRO AND THEIR CONTEMPORARIES

The Ashmolean Museum in Oxford holds the largest single collection of 19th-century prints by the giants of Impressionism. Part of their collection will be available for viewing at the Zamek Culture Centre in Poznań, starting the 9th of January through the 29th of March, 2020. Of the Impressionists, Camille Pissarro was the most prolific printmaker–producing approximately 200 etchings and lithographs in the years from 1863 to 1902. Technically, he pushed the medium to its limits through his manipulation of etching plates. In addition to Pisarro, the works exhibited at Zamek will include such artists as Alfred Sisley, Paul Cezanne, Auguste Renoir, Henri de Toulouse Lautrec, and Edouard Manet. The exhibition will be accompanied by workshops, lectures and tours.QF‑7, ZAMEK Culture Centre, ul. Św. Marcin 80/82, tel. (+48) 61 646 52 60, Tickets 10/7zł, www.ckzamek.pl.

16.03 - 27.06 » CRINOLINE: FASHION’S MOST MAGNIFICENT DISASTER

The magic of Fotoplastikon, where a visitor sits at a viewport around the circumference of the machine. Each picture appears for 15 seconds before moving on to the next. Above each viewport is a window which displays an illuminated card with a brief description of the scene below. Recorded music plays in the background. This time the exhibition will present a stereo photography from Brian May’s collection. The whole is based on the book by Brian and Denis Pellerin Crinoline: Fashion’s Most Magnificent Disaster.QG‑7, Poznań Kaiserpanorama, ul. Ratajczaka 44, tel. (+48) 61 854 07 52, Admission 5/2zł, www. poznan.pl/mim/wm.

19.03 - 16.04 » SYMBIOSIS OF OPPOSITES

“A piece of art evolved through the observer and art [...] does not reproduce the visible, rather it makes it visible” --Paul Klee. Mariusz Kruk’s artwork is known for its poetic form, telling a tale about the surrounding world. His paintings, drawings and objects astonish with philosophical references and reflections on the human condition. The artist tells the story of micro-events contained in his works, of seeing and representing often unnoticed phenomena which emerge right in front of us, buried in millions of other issues constantly demanding our attention. Kruk attempts to isolate these in-between moments and freeze their images in the paintings, collages and assemblages he creates out of  old and discarded objects, recycled and upcycled garbage.QMAK Gallery, ul. Źródlana 4, tel. (+48) 61 844 63 20, Admission free, www.makgallery. com. Closed Sat, Sun. 15


Arrival & Transport

Poznań Główny Train Station, AKA the Breadbox

BY TRAIN MAIN TRAIN STATION Poznań’s main train station (Dworzec Poznań Główny) is opposite the Trade Fair Centre and about 10 minutes by taxi to the main square. The site of a massive 160 million złoty redevelopment project over the last few years, a new transportation centre has arisen alongside the old train station building, creating a strange clash of deep People’s Republic and shiny 21st century - the latter packaged in a breadbox shape, as critics have sneered - with train platforms scattered confusingly between the two. Allow extra time to locate your train, and woe to those departing from the notoriously difficult to find platform 4a - reach it by following platform 4 (in the old section) to the very end, away from the trade fair grounds. If you see 4b, you’ve gone in the wrong direction. But back to the breadbox: modern and state-of-the-art, it finally integrates rail, tram, and bus connections in one squeaky clean transit station. As a result, this is now the point of entry for most visitors to the city, including those arriving at the airport and taking the direct bus to the centre, which drops off here. In this day and age, it’s practically impossible for any new train station in Poland to not come prepackaged with a shopping centre, and that is certainly the case here: welcome to Avenida, a shopping haven with a food court and parking for 900 cars, plus additional opportunities for consumerism and refreshment spilling out into  the train station hall. Other now-standard amenities include lockers for large luggage (have some coins handy), currency exchange, and bank machines. The city of Poznań operates a tourist information desk, but there’s also the PKPoperated Train Station Office (open 07:00 - 21:00), which can help you plan your trip, get tickets, and even get into town. 16

Normal ticket windows are conveniently open 24hrs, but using the ticket machines (which have English options) is just as easy. If you’re running late, it is possible to buy tickets onboard the train from the conductor for a small surcharge - but be sure to do this right after boarding. Note that if you want a seat on a particular train, it is best to book ahead. You can also purchase tickets and check timetables online at the Polish railways website - rozklad.pkp.pl which has good English functionality, and track your train using portalpasazera.pl (click on ‘find a train’). Taxis await you immediately outside, and a ride to the main square costs about 20-30zł. Alternatively, hop on tram number 5 (to ‘Wrocławska’) or number 8 (to ‘Pl. Wielkopolski’) from the ‘Most Dworcowy’ stop located on the bridge, and you will only have a short 6-7 minute walk to the main square; a 10-minute ticket will suffice.QD‑9, ul. Dworcowa 2, tel. (+48) 22 39 19 757 (from foreign mobile phones), www.pkp.pl. Open 24hrs. Note that due to system maintenance seat reservations cannot be made between 24:00-01:00.

© Tomasz Francuzik; courtesy of City of Poznań


Arrival & Transport BY BUS MAIN BUS STATION At the end of 2013, PKS Poznań Bus Station was integrated into the city’s spiffy new transportation centre below the Avenida shopping mall - more info on which you can find under Main Train Station, including what amenities are available, and how to get into town.QE‑9, ul. Stanisława Matyi 2, tel. (+48) 703 30 33 30, www. dworzecautobusowy.poznan.pl. Ticket office open 07:00-20:00; Sat, Sun 08:00-19:00. TI open 09:00-17:00; Sat, Sun 10:00-19:00.

BY PLANE POZNAŃ ŁAWICA AIRPORT Poznań Ławica Airport lies a convenient 7km west of central Poznań. In the Arrivals terminal you’ll find an exchange bureau (kantor), cash machine (bankomat), and food vendors, as well as a tourist info point where you can pick up additional copies of Poznań’s best guidebook (wink). As with all sensible airports in this day and age, there is absolutely no left luggage facility. Getting to town is a cinch. Car rental is available, and taxis stand right outside the entrance, though you’ll probably overpay to take one. Aim to pay around 30-35zł for the taxi fare to the centre, but keep in mind that it can shoot up to 50zł during the nighttime; as always, agree on a fare with the driver before committing.

Alternatively, cut costs by catching a bus, which will get you to the centre in 15-20 minutes. From the stop right outside the entrance, line 159 heads to ‘Poznań Główny’ (the main train station) at least three times per hour from 05:05 to 22:54. At other times the airport is connected to the train station by night bus 242, which runs at 23:25, 00:00, 00:25, 01:25, 02:55, and 03:55 daily; journey time 23 mins. Single 45-minute tickets (5zł) can be bought from kiosks, TI, or ticket machines; remember to validate your ticket immediately upon boarding.Qul. Bukowska 285 (Jeżyce), tel. (+48) 61 849 23 43, www.airport-poznan.com.pl.

PUBLIC TRANSPORT Poznań is crisscrossed by over one hundred tram and bus lines, including night routes, and represents the most time and cost efficient way to move about town. Due to frequent track work and route changes, however, your best bet for figuring out how to use public transport in Poz is the super-helpful website poznan.jakdojade. pl (mobile app also available), which can tell you exactly how to get from point A to Point B in English. Transport tickets are bought from automated machines found on most buses and trams, as well as at most transport stops, and thankfully you can pay by card (no need for coins!). The galaxy of ticket options are far too complex to review here; you can take it to heart that you won’t be leaving ‘Zone A’ unless you’re travelling far outside of the citycentre, as even Lake Malta is within Zone A. Tickets are timed, and the cheapest option is a not-very-cheap 3zł for only 10mins - which might only get you 3 or 4 stops. A 40-min ticket for 4.60zł is the safer bet, but if you plan on travelling often, you may want to consider a 24hr or 48hr ticket. Note that kids under five and adults over 70 ride for free. Finally, it is extremely important that you validate your ticket by punching it in the ‘kasowniks’ found by the bus/tram exit as soon as you board. Inspectors regularly travel the lines handing out hefty fines, and they aren’t sympathetic to tourists; seriously, riding without a ticket can not only ruin your day, but your entire trip to Poz. 17


Arrival & Transport USEFUL TRANSPORT APPS JAKDOJADE Despite the fact that Poznań’s tram and bus network is easy to use, even for foreigners, we’ll still admit to being a bit put off from using it at first; that is until we discovered the veritable skeleton key to unlocking public transport: the poznan. jakdojade.pl website and the jakdojade app for your smartphone. The former is a wonderful free tool for advance planning, but the paid app is more practical for figuring out how to get from point A to B once you’re out in town and away from your computer. Just type in your starting address (the app does this automatically) and destination, or pin the locations on a map; select the time you want to depart or arrive, and Jakdojade magically churns out the best method for you to get there. Finished at the museum and want to head back to the hotel? This app will tell you exactly which bus or tram to get on, lead you to the correct stop, and even tell you which ticket to buy. It’s brilliant and absolutely worth the few euros it costs to download.

BY CAR Poland is one of Europe’s leading nations in road fatalities, a statistic that will surprise few who have had the pleasure of getting behind the wheel here. A lethal combination of poor road surfaces, networks unsuited to the volume of different traffic and, most of all, aggressive driver behaviour result in the common sight of mangled wrecks around the country. Exercise caution, keep a safe distance from the vehicle in front, rub those rosary beads and God speed. The speed limit in Poland is generally 50km/hr in cities (60km/hr between 23:00 and 05:00), 90km/hr outside urban areas, 120km/hr on dual carriageways and 140km/hr on motorways. All cars must have their headlights switched on at all times and carry a red warning triangle, first aid kit, replacement bulbs, a national identity sticker and proper registration and insurance documents. Poland also has strict drunk-driving laws: 0.2‰ is the maximum blood/ alcohol limit, so forget about having even a single beer. EU citizens may use their home driving licences as long as they are valid (and you have it on you when driving), however citizens of countries that didn’t ratify the Vienna Convention (tsk, tsk Australia and America) will find their licences technically invalid (though this has never been a problem for anyone we know).

E-PODRÓŻNIK This site can also help you get from point A to point B within Poznań, but is really invaluable when it comes to planning the journey to your next destination by bus or train. Use e-podroznik.pl to easily search bus and train connections and timetables, compare prices, and even buy tickets in one of seven languages. There’s also a mobile app (Android only). FREE NOW Formerly MyTaxi, Free Now appeared in the summer of 2019 as the new dominant taxi app in Poznań. Free Now is present in over 100 European cities, including Kraków, Katowice, Gdańsk, Warsaw, and Wrocław, and allows you to select the type of ride you need, pre-book a taxi up to 4 days in advance, track your ride’s progress and share it with others, pay within the app, save addresses, and more - even rent electric city scooters in some cities, though this particular option has yet to be introduced in Poznań. Find them at freenow.com. UBER If you’re already an Uber user, you’ll find that the alternative taxi service - whose free mobile app offers cheap one-tap, no cash, no tip rides from local drivers - has good coverage across Poznań and all of Poland, however there are some drawbacks. Specifically, Uber drivers don’t have the same permissions as regular cabbies and may not be able to take you as close to your destination, or get you there as directly; such is the tradeoff for slightly cheaper rates. Find them at uber.com 18

Photo by Acubens, CC BY-SA 3.0

Driving to Poznań is fairly easy as it’s on the main E30 highway between Warsaw and Berlin. Once you’ve arrived, driving around Poznań’s congested one-way streets can be incredibly trying, however, so we suggest you ditch your vehicle for public transport at the first opportunity, which raises the question of where to put it. Public parking lots are marked on our maps, and free parking is basically non-existent, though some hotels have limited parking spaces for guests; check when booking your room. For street parking you’ll easily recognise the universal large blue ‘P’ sign, but be aware that a blue circle with a red ‘X’ over it means ‘No Parking’ (not sure which universe that sign is from). Pay via the automated ticket machines on the sidewalk, but note that they only take coins or special chip cards from the parking authority office (so forget that option). Generally having a private car in Poznań is a bad idea unless you have a safe, inexpensive place to keep it.


Arrival & Transport CAR RENTAL

THE MALUCH

All most travellers need to rent a car in PL is 18 years of age, a credit card (not debit), and a valid foreign driver’s licence. Be aware, however, that those from countries that didn’t ratify the Vienna Convention on Road Traffic (United States, China, Australia...) cannot legally drive on their home licences; technically an International Driver’s License is required in those cases. Though some rental companies (the dodgier ones) will still rent you a car, be aware that you are assuming full liability for any damages if you get behind the wheel; you also run the risk of getting a citation from the police for driving without a valid license. If you’re looking to leave the country, be aware that you can’t cross the Polish borders into Ukraine, Belarus or Lithuania in a rental car. AVISQul. Bukowska 285 (Ławica Airport), tel. (+48) 22 113 91 64 , www.avis.pl. Open 08:00-24:00; Sat 09:0021:00; Sun 10:00-24:00. DUDA-CARSQul. Ptasia 4, tel. (+48) 61 864 44 44. Open 08:00-17:00; Sat 09:00-16:00; closed Sun. EUROPCARQul. Bukowska 285 (Ławica Airport), tel. (+48) 665 30 16 31, www.europcar.pl. Open 08:3023:30; Sat, Sun 09:30-23:30.

TAXIS Not the dodgy enterprise it once was, most taxis are reliable and use their metres without any fiddling around. Calling ahead should get you a better fare, but if you hail one from the street make sure you choose a clearly marked cab with a company name and phone number displayed, as well as a sticker demarcating prices in the window. Taxis are now legally obliged to give you a printed receipt at journey’s end further limiting the likelihood of any funny business. You should expect to pay 5zł for entering the taxi followed by 2zł per kilometre. Prices rise on Sundays, holidays, late at night and for travel outside of the city limits. EURO TAXI Qtel. (+48) 61 811 11 11, www.euro-taxi.com.pl. RADIO LUX TAXI Qtel. (+48) 61 196 62, www.luxtaxi.com.pl. TALIXO This global transport service (operating in over 1000 cities) connects you to the best local taxi and limousine fleets. Their simple online reservation system allows you to get a ride that matches your needs, whether it’s a child seat or just a super fly ride. Specialising in airport transfers, their system can track your flight, ensuring that your English-speaking driver will be there (looking snappy with a personalised sign), whether you land ahead of or behind schedule.Qtel. (+49) 30 346 49 73 60, www.talixo.com/iyp-poznan. ZTP POZNAŃQtel. (+48) 61 196 22, www.taxi.com.pl.

The ‘Maluch’ - iconic communist-era family car, and sadly unavailable to rent.

Like the Czech Škoda and the East German Trabant, the Polish Maluch has served several purposes during its lifetime; a Godsend for families behind the Iron Curtain, source of amusement for smirking foreigners and now, as a cult icon for nostalgics. Through the years Polish exports have won world acclaim, from expertly cut glass to dangerously delicious vodka, so this flimsy tin deathtrap on wheels is something of an unlikely hero of Polish engineering. Manufactured between 1973 and 2000 in Bielsko-Biała and Tychy, the car was produced under the Italian Fiat license with its official title being the ‘Polish Fiat 126p’. Its diminutive size earned it the moniker of ‘Maluch’ (Little One), a name so widely used that the manufacturers officially re-christened the brand in 1997. When first produced in June 1973 it was priced at 69,000zł (approximately three times the average annual wage), and became the first popular family car in Poland, despite being the size of a small refrigerator. Throughout communist times the car could only be purchased by joining a lengthy waiting list, though diligent workers would often be rewarded with special vouchers allowing them to jump the queue. Though production came to a halt in 2000, the surprisingly reliable cars have achieved a remarkable staying power, and you’ll still find scores of them coughing smoke as they zip around Polish cities. Today a used Maluch retails for only about 500zł, so there’s little stopping you from becoming a proud owner yourself.

A souped-up Polski Fiat

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Poznań Sightseeing Crowded with cobbled streets, soaring steeples and historical monuments, Poznań’s Old Town is a collage of architectural styles and historical monuments, waiting to be explored… 24


Sightseeing A city of half a million with a history dating back to the 8th century, considered a likely site of the baptism of Polish ruler Mieszko I and thus the birthplace of the Polish state, Poznań is the capital of the Wielkopolska region and a popular business and tourism destination. Its runs as the residence of early Polish kings, a medieval trade hub, Prussian-occupied Posen, a WWII Festung, and finally its return to Poland created a city rife with historical monuments, with much to offer those who enjoy outstanding architecture and diverse cultural attractions. While part of the beauty of Poznań lies in aimlessly roaming the streets and alleys, making chance findings from one turn to the next, there are a number of must-see sights whose discovery should not be left to chance. Your natural start point should be the Old Town, and its main square, the glorious Stary Rynek; we make touring both easy with two sections beginning on the next page. Along the way, make sure not to miss the gem of the Old Town, the Lesser Basilica of St. Stanislaus (p.33), which boasts an interior by a veritable who’s who of Roman Baroque artists as well as a flamboyant pink facade, and Poznań’s two castles, the Royal Castle (p.35), once the seat of the first Polish kings, and the Imperial Castle (p.37), built as the residence of Prussian ruler Kaiser Wilhelm II in 1910. Once done with the wonders of the Old Town, make your way across the river to the most important place of worship in Poznań, the Poznań Cathedral (p.39) in Ostrów Tumski with its twin towers and surrounding chapels. This is the site connected with Mieszko’s baptism, a story which is now told in all its glory at Porta Posnania (p.38). Poznań also boasts some glorious parks and green spaces. Lake Malta (p.44), just east of the centre is one of the more unique urban leisure areas in the country, and offers loads of family activities for all seasons, including skiing, roller-coasters, and the New Zoo. Meanwhile, just north of the Old Town lies Citadel Park (p.41) with 89 hectares of public greenery stuffed with interesting monuments, and even two museums focussed on the city’s military past. Those with an interest in more recent history will no doubt also appreciate museums dedicated to Poznań’s two famous uprisings, the 1918 Wielkopolska Uprising against Prussians (p.51) and the 1956 Uprising against communist authorities (p.48), and the Wielkopolska Martyrs Museum (p.51) housed in a former Gestapo penal camp.  Also keep an eye out on the multitude of cultural events taking place in and around the city, especially in the summer - we list the highlights in our events section starting on p.10. No matter how long your stay, you’ll find plenty in Poznań to keep your interest. Use our guide to explore it all and enjoy one of Poland’s most ancient and exciting cities.

TOURIST INFORMATION TOURIST INFORMATION CENTRE Qul. Bukowska 285 (Poznań Ławica Airport, Grunwald), tel. (+48) 61 849 23 43, www.poznan. travel.pl. Open 24 hours. TOURIST INFORMATION CENTRE QD‑9, ul. Dworcowa 2 (Main Train Station), tel. (+48) 61 633 10 16, www.poznan.travel.pl. Open 09:0017:00.

GUIDED TOURS If an authoritative print guide and expansive web portal simply aren’t enough, and you need someone to literally take you by the hand (hey, we kid), there are plenty of tour companies to choose from in Poznań and we list the best of them here. CITY EVENT POZNAŃ More from City Guide Poznań - going beyond walking tours and standard tourist itineraries, City Event Poznań organises multimedia city games, foodie and feast tours, costumed performers, and more. Perfect for groups, school field trips, and team building.Qtel. (+48) 608 28 42 08, www.cityevent-poznan.pl. CITY GUIDE POZNAŃ Excellent local guides offering tours in English, German, Polish, Italian, Russian, French and Spanish to attractions throughout Poznań and beyond (the Piast Route). During Poland’s EU presidency, City Guides was chosen to show delegates of the European Commission around the city - solid credentials indeed.Qtel. (+48) 608 28 42 08, www.cityguide-poznan.com.pl. KULTOUR.PL City guides offering tours of Poznań and the surrounding area. Languages spoken include German, English, Russian, Ukrainian, Spanish, and even Japanese. Please call in advance to book a tour.Qtel. (+48) 601 87 16 61, www.kultour.pl. VISITPOZNAŃ VisitPoznan offers a wide variety of traditional and alternative-themed walking tours for groups and individuals during the warm season (roughly MayOctober). All tours are by prior arrangement only. Qtel. (+48) 663 03 62 95, www.visitpoznan.info. For groups 1-6 people 190zł/2hrs, 250zł/3hrs, 340zł/5hrs; prices negotiable for larger groups.

BOOK A TOUR link bit.ly/PoznanTour 25


Stary Rynek Tour

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23 L ute


Stary Rynek Tour Packed with monuments, landmarks, museums, and mementos from the city’s rich history, Poznańs marvellous Old Town Square warrants more than a passing glance and smartphone pic. Faithfully reconstructed after the immense damage of WWII, the Square can easily take a few hours to properly explore and enjoy. 1 OLD TOWN HALL First erected in the early 14th century, Poznań’s glorious Town Hall (Ratusz) really flowered in mid-1500s when Italian architect Giovanni Quadro of Lugano added the Renaissance loggia, attic, and classical tower, earning the structure acclaim as ‘the most beautiful building north of the Alps.’ Unfortunately a catalogue of historic disasters - including a 1675 fire, 1725 hurricane and WWII bomb damage - have resulted in the sad reality that today little of the original structure actually remains, though it has been faithfully rebuilt to retain its status as the city’s showpiece.

Today the Old Town Hall houses the Historical Museum of Poznań -  currently closed  for renovations scheduled to run until 2021 -  whose collection encompasses exhibits from the 10th century till the present day. The biggest draw is the Great Entrance Hall with its elaborately decorated vault, supported by two huge pillars. The tableaux are inspired by the bible, astrology and figures from mythology. Directly outside the Town Hall is the original whipping post (Pranger), dating from 1535, with a recently repaired figure of Poz’s executioner standing on top. Crowds gather outside the Town Hall each day to witness two mechanical billy goats emerge from a door above the clock at precisely 12:00 and proceed to butt heads twelve times. Simultaneously, a trumpeter plays the town’s traditional bugle call from a balcony. The bugle call (hejnał) dates back at least to the 15th century, and the goats have been ramming heads 1551. Replaced and restored over the years, the present pair have been bludgeoning each other since 1954. Of course there’s a half-baked legend to go along with them: When the clock was completed in 1511, the governor of the Poznań province was invited for the unveiling. The hapless cook preparing the celebratory feast burnt the venison, so he went out and managed to steal a pair of goats to serve instead. Alas, the goats escaped and traipsed up to the top of City Hall, where the governor saw them butting heads and decreed they be added to the clock. The rest, as they say, is history - much like the cook, who was likely tied to the whipping post and given a bloody good thrashing.QI‑7, Stary Rynek 1, tel. (+48) 61 856 81 93, www.mnp.art.pl.

The Town Hall Goats

© Grzegorz Babicz. Courtesy of City of Poznań

2 PRANGER Just outside the Town Hall, near its southeast corner, you’ll find the proudly protruding Pranger, a 16th-century punishment device funded by fines placed on servant women, wet-nurses, and barmaids who dressed up too frilly or wore jewellery deemed inappropriate for their social standing (the outrage!). Topped with a severe statue of a sword-wielding executioner in a Crusader’s outfit, unlucky criminals would be chained to this octagonal column and whipped, or - if the executioner was feeling fancy or the crime warranted it - have his ears or fingers chopped off. Sadly, the contraption no longer elicits deserved fear, as evidenced by repeated vandalism by drunken students and football hooligans - an offence which would surely be more creatively punished in the Pranger’s heyday than in our current times. Luckily, the original isn’t actually in any danger, as it has long been moved to the Historical Museum and replaced with a copy.QI‑7, Stary Rynek.

BOOK A TOUR link bit.ly/PoznanWalkingTour Pranger

27


Stary Rynek Tour MYTHOLOGICAL FOUNTAINS

Apollo Fountain

© teressa, AdobeStock

Guarding the corners of the square are four mythological fountains depicting Neptune, Mars, Apollo, and perhaps in order to combat the under-representation of the fairer sex - Proserpina. The fountains date back to at least the 16th century, though the original adornments were quite different: historical records show a commision for wooden sculptures of a lion and a deer. In the 17th century, city authorities decided to go Roman and splurge on figures of mythological dieties, also in wood (later they were redone in stone). Of the four currently standing, only Proserpina is the original, dating back to 1766; it depicts the goddess of grain and agriculture being abducted by Pluto. The other three fountains were revealed between 2002 and 2005 and placed in their correct historical spots.

3 BUDNICY HOUSES To the left of the Town Hall is perhaps the most recognisable Poznań sight: the picture-book-worthy, technicolor row of townhouses planted right in the middle of the Main Square. Originally called “herring shops” (budy śledziowe), they were home to merchants, and their arcades held fish, candle, torch, and salt stands. They were later renamed to Budnicy Houses (domki budnicze) in honour of a class of merchants known as Budnicy, whose headquarters used to operate at no. 117. Look closely and you’ll see their coat of arms on the facade: three palm trees and a herring.QI‑7, Stary Rynek. 4 WIELKOPOLSKA MILITARY MUSEUM Situated inside a brutal communist-era pavilion, the Military Museum documents the history of the Polish military from the 11th century onwards. Starting with scythes and halberds the collection includes the armour of winged hussars, sabres, muskets and cannons, as well as portraits of Polish military commanders and famous moments in their history. The unwieldy musket ‘kolowy’ is a particularly impressive effort, and surely completely useless in combat. The 20th century section features grenades, compasses and medical kits, and the upstairs is devoted to the Wielkopolska Uprising, with medals, uniforms and postcards from the era. The collection was decimated during WWII, with the only surviving item being a fragment of Wojciech Kossak’s 1901 painting, The Battle of the Pyramids.QI‑7, Stary Rynek 9, tel. (+48) 61 852 67 39, www.mnp.art.pl. Open 10:0016:30; Fri 10:30-20:00; Sat, Sun 10:30-17:00; closed Mon. Admission 7/1-5zł. Sat free. N 5 JOHN OF NEPOMUK MONUMENT As you stroll Stary Rynek, you’ll see numerous monuments, including this noteworthy 1724 figure of John of Nepomuk (Jan Nepomucen), a Bohemian martyr saint who was tortured and drowned in the Vltava River after refusing to divulge the secrets of the Queen of Bohemia’s confessional to her jealous husband Wenceslaus. It was hoped that the saint would be able to protect the city from repeated, disastrous floods, but ultimately the 1960’s re-routing of the Warta River did a far better job of that.QI‑7, Stary Rynek. 6 ARSENAŁ CITY GALLERY Founded in the late 1940s under the somewhat commiesounding name Central Exhibition Bureau, Arsenał is one of the oldest players on Poznań’s art gallery scene - and probably the most important, especially given its very central location. Currently organised by the Poznań City Council, the institution hosts exhibitions by Polish and foreign contemporary artists and organises educational meetings.QH‑7, Stary Rynek 6, tel. (+48) 61 852 95 02, www.arsenal.art.pl. Open 12:00-19:00; Sun 12:00-16:00; closed Mon. Admission free.

Get the In Your Pocket City Essentials App John of Nepomuk Monument

28

Photo by kwolana, CC BY-SA 3.0


Stary Rynek Tour POZNAŃ STREET ART

Arsenał City Gallery 7 OD:ZYSK The weirdest spot on the Old Market Square, this former squat is a testament to the city’s large anarchist presence. The late 19th century building on the square’s corner housed a succession of fashion stores, before it was abandoned by its owners sometime in the early 21st century, a signal for the local anarchists to take over. The move took place in late 2012, sparking conflict with city authorities; the squatters used the space to host parties, concerts, and various anarchist events while simultaneously housing some fifty people in shabby conditions, which put the Old Square’s peaceful touristy appeal in some jeopardy. It took until 2015 for the two sides to come to an agreement: the anarchists would move out in exchange for 125 thousand zł (some 35 thousand USD), which would go towards helping the city’s evictees and debtors. Since then, the graffitied and postered building has stood empty, though there are plans to eventually turn it into a posh hotel and restaurant. This doesn’t mean that the anarchists have left the centre completely; you’ll still find them running the Zemsta cafe and bookstore and tagging city walls with leftist messages, while their headquarters remain at ul. Rozbrat, just off Pułaskiego.QH‑7, ul. Paderewskiego 2.

For a long time, the height of Polish street art amounted to scrawling less-print-friendly versions of “All Cops Are Bastards” and “Lech Poznań 4ever” on residential buildings and/or historical monuments in the dead of night, while the ‘artist’s’ accomplices kept watch on the street corner. Older Poles will also remember the occasional party-sanctioned propaganda murals - not the best connotation either. It was only around 20092010 that quality outdoor art started rapidly gaining ground in PL, spawning mural artists and street art festivals throughout the country. The local scene took off in 2011 with the first edition of the Outer Spaces Festival, which saw renowned muralists from Italy, The Netherlands, Spain, and France invited to spice up the drab exteriors of five carefullychosen buildings. The project was a hit, and two more editions were organised, adding a pop of optimism to Wilda and Jeżyce.

2017 mural by Maupal, ul. Nowowiejskiego 17 (G-6).

Not everyone has opted for the legal route, however: a certain Banksy-esque character operating under the pseudonym Noriaki is responsible for an infestation reminiscent of Wrocław’s ‘gnome problem,’ tagging the city walls with variations of Pan Peryskop (Mr. Periscope) AKA The Watcher - a loveable maverick who has integrated himself into the fabric of the city. Keep an eye out, and you’ll realise this watchful rascal is ubiquitous, peering from walls, walking his dog, playing b-ball, and getting passed-out drunk depending on the circumstances. In the summer you can even meet him at Perygród, a seasonal, streetart-themed hangout. Fancy a walking tour of Poznań’s best street art? We’ve not only marked street art locations on our maps with a spray can icon , but we’ve also put it all online with GPS coordinates at iyp.me/poznanstreetart so that your smartphone can do the work for you. We encourage you to do just that, and check out some of Poz’s alternative artistic visions.

Od:zysk

29


Stary Rynek Tour

The Guardhouse

Radomil CC BY-SA 3.0

8 GUARDHOUSE This 18th-century police guardhouse was originally haphazardly constructed using wood, and later redone in classicist style by Jan Chrystian Kamsetzer in 1783-1787. In the inter-war period, it served as a garrison jailhouse. Like much of the Old Town, this structure was all but levelled in the Battle of Poznań in 1945, and the building had to be reconstructed in later years, serving as the Workers’ Movement Museum during communism. It currently houses the Wielkopolska Uprising Museum.QH‑7, Stary Rynek 3. 9 WIELKOPOLSKA UPRISING MUSEUM Primarily chronicling the 1918-1919 Wielkopolska Uprising (though the exhibition starts at the time of partition) this museum occupies a rebuilt structure that once served as home to the Royal Guard. A /big renovation ended in December 2017, taking the exhibition from a series of artefacts to a modern multimedia creation on par with the Silesian Museum in Katowice or the Warsaw Uprising Museum in the nation’s capital (though much smaller, of course). Downstairs is a mish-mash of weapons, uniforms, reconstructed bunkers and trenches, and vintage photographs, which look great but fail to convey much meaningful information; the historical info is all upstairs,

Bamber Monument

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Photo by SuperGlob, CC BY 3.0

Municipal Scales Building

Photo by kwolana, CC BY-SA 4.0

where you can also take a picture dressed as a Wielkopolska soldier.QH‑7, Stary Rynek 3, tel. (+48) 61 853 19 93, www.wmn.poznan.pl. Open 10:00-17:00; Sun 10:0016:00; closed Mon. Admission 12/6zł. Tue free. 10 MUNICIPAL SCALES BUILDING This cute, freestanding building on the Main Square almost looks like something out of Hansel and Gretel. Originally constructed in 1534, it once housed hardware for weighing merchandise on its way to the market. The little that remains of the original furnishings is now located in the Historical Museum, and the building itself is used by the city’s civil registry to issue marriage certificates.QH/I‑7, Stary Rynek. 11 BAMBER MONUMENT This small statue of a traditionally-dressed Bamber peasant girl carrying jugs used in wine-making stands beside the historical Municipal Scales building. Created by sculptor Joseph Wackerle, who would later become Reich Culture Senator and Hitler’s favourite artist, Bamberka was unveiled in 1915 and originally stood over a well providing drinking water for horses. This iconic monument commemorates the Bambers, poor Catholic farmers from Bavaria (today south-east Germany), who came to the Poznań area in the hundreds in the early 18th century at the invitation of the city authorities to help rebuild villages devastated by war and plague. Known for the elaborate folk dresses worn by women, this ethnic group quickly integrated into Polish society, learning the language, identifying themselves as Polish and fighting for Polish national causes. An important contributor to Poznań’s  history and culture, to find out more about this unique ethnic group, visit the Poznań Bamber Museum (p.50).QI‑7, Stary Rynek.


TRADITIONAL POLISH CUISINE A.D.1954

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RATUSZOVA RESTAURANT

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Old Town Tour

Photo by Katarzyna Kubasik-Błaszyk. Courtesy of City of Poznań

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Old Town Tour While Poznań is relatively spread out, the bulk of its tourist attractions are located within its historical Old Town and west towards the train tracks, where the Imperial Castle resides. This is the area covered by this walking tour; for places of interest further away from the centre, including Ostrów Tumski and Citadel Park, see relevant sections up ahead, on pages 38-43. The tour is approximately 2km long and can take as little as half an hour if you dash through it, though for the more inquisitive tourist a few hours seems more likely. Meandering through the Old Town streets is encouraged, as are breaks for coffee, beer, or your poison of choice in the city’s many cosy cafes and beer gardens. 1 LESSER BASILICA OF ST. STANISLAUS One of Poznań’s most impressive historic monuments, the Lesser Basilica of St. Stanislaus, which it became in October 2010, was created as a Jesuit temple in the 17th century. It boasts an interior by a veritable who’s who of Roman Baroque artists, with some fine period ornamentation found in the chapels of the Holy Cross (which features a 16th-century crucifix), and the Virgin Mary (which has a precious copy of the painting of The Mother of God of Incessant Help). The Basilica hosts organ concerts played on an instrument dating from 1876 on Saturdays at 12:15. QI‑7, ul. Gołębia 1, tel. (+48) 61 852 69 50, www.fara. archpoznan.pl. Open 06:00-19:30. 2 UL. ŻYDOWSKA Originally called ul. Sukiennicza (Cloth Hall Street), this unassuming lane became the de facto centre of Jewish life as early as the 13th century, when the first Jewish settlers in Poznań were given plots of land here. Eventually renamed Judenstrasse and later ul. Żydowska (both meaning simply Jewish Street), it retained this character until the tragedy of the Holocaust.

While here, keep an eye out for the former Salomon Beniamin Latz Home for the Elderly and Infirm (ul. Żydowska 15/18). Established in 1908 after the Latz foundation swapped properties with the Jewish Community, the home took the place of three synagogues that used to exist at the address; meanwhile, the foundation’s former hospital at ul. Wroniecka was torn down to make room for the New Synagogue. If you manage to get in (the building is currently residential), traces of the in-house synagogue’s balcony can be seen in the stairwell. Another building of note is the former Jewish Library at ul. Żydowska 32, founded in 1904. Closer to the market square, the unassuming Church of the Most Holy Blood of Jesus (ul. Żydowska 34) is a testament to the vicious anti-Semitism that plagued the city for much of its history. As the sordid story goes, in 1399 several local Jews managed to get ahold of Christian sacramental bread and desecrated it by placing it on a table and stabbing it with a knife, whereupon blood burst from the wafers. Terrified, the Jews attempted to bury the hosts, only to find that the stubborn things would magically unbury themselves and float about in the air.

Lesser Basilica of St. Stanislaus

Photo by Zbigniew Ratajczak. Courtesy of City of Poznań

When a young shepherd found them floating above the marshes, a chapel was erected at the site - later rebuilt as the Corpus Christi Church - and the perps were harshly punished. This fabulous yarn was passed down among the city’s Christian populace for centuries, and when a mysterious blood-stained table was found hidden in the building at ul. Żydowska 34 in the 17th century, it was immediately deemed to be the piece of furniture involved in the infamous act of sacrilege and carried to the Corpus Christi Church in a procession of several thousand. The building itself was transformed into the Church of the Most Holy Blood of Jesus; dare to venture inside and you’ll be greeted with an 18th-century fresco portraying the Jewish trio at their nefarious task assisted by none other than the devil. The only good thing we can say here is that an antique plaque referring to the profanation of the hosts, which used to adorn the church’s facade, was taken down in 2005 by the archbishop; better late than never.QI‑6/7, ul. Żydowska.

ul. Żydowska

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Old Town Tour

New Synagogue

Roweromaniak CC BY-SA 2.5

ALPHAS Widely considered the buildings that ruined ul. Święty Marcin, the ‘Alphas’ are an architectural nightmare from the deep People’s Republic, more due to their current dishevelled state and unfortunate contrast with neighbouring townhouses than due to the actual design. These five modernist high-rises connected by a sprawling two-level gallery with shops and services are actually very similar to the Hötorget buildings in Stockholm and high-rises along Prager Straße in Dresden. Born a bit later than their counterparts in other countries, they were built between 1965 and 1972, designed by Poznań architect Jerzy Liśniewicz. To make room for this new ‘cosmopolitan’ complex, 19th century houses had to be torn down, but the end result fulfilled its goals – it modernized the street and drew communist-era masses, impoverished and longing for more consumerist options, to its relatively well-stocked shop windows. Recently, the stretch of ul. Św. Marcin along the Alphas underwent a major overhaul, and is now a more welcoming, pedestrian-oriented area with outdoor art installations and a modest amount of greenery, if the visualisations are to be believed. The Alphas too are set for renovation, though complicating matters is the fact that each has a different owner. We‘re keeping our fingers crossed for results, as - for better or worse – the Alphas remain one of Poznań’s most characteristic structures.QF/G‑7, ul. Św. Marcin 40-72.

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Photo by Radomil, CC BY-SA 3.0

3 NEW SYNAGOGUE Consecrated on September 5, 1907, the New Synagogue on ul. Wroniecka was once a much more lavish structure. Designed by Berlin architects Cremer & Wolfenstein at a cost of one million marks (to put things in perspective, the cost of the Imperial Castle came to five million), the synagogue boasted a floor plan based on the Greek cross, space for 1,200 worshippers (600 men, 600 women), and originally included a copper-plated dome. Following the outbreak of WWII the building was commandeered by the Nazis and redeveloped into a swimming pool and rehabilitation centre for Wehrmacht soldiers. After the war the synagogue continued to function as a municipal pool - leading some to jokingly brand it the ‘swimagogue’ - until the poor state of the building forced its closure. Returned to the Jewish community in 2002, a gallery was opened instead, sporadically hosting free exhibits. Though plans have been raised to adapt it into a community centre complete with prayer halls, kosher restaurant, and conference facilities, the small problem of raising what was once estimated at $50 million USD (the number may be higher now) proved too large an obstacle. More recently, plans have been made to convert the building into a commemorative museum, with or without an upscale hotel attached, but for now the synagogue continues to stand empty.QI‑6, ul. Wroniecka 11A.

4 CITY FORTIFICATIONS As a typical central European city, Poznań of course was once snugly encircled by city walls and a moat, with four gates guarding the passage into the narrow streets. Along the walls rose a number of defensive towers named after the guilds who were normally responsible for manning them: there was the Wheelwright Tower, Butcher Tower, and Cloth Tower, to name a few. Originally built sometime in the 13th century, the fortifications were unfortunately largely destroyed during the Swedish Deluge in the 17th century and later invasions of the city, and what was left was almost completely taken apart by the Prussians in the 19th and early 20th centuries to make room for new building projects. One of those was a rather splendid neo-


Old Town Tour Gothic fire station, which lovingly refurbished - survives to this day at ul. Masztalarska 3. Passing through its courtyard is a stretch of reconstructed city wall and two rebuilt towers: Baszta Strażacka (Firefighter Tower, not the original name), and Baszta Katarzynek, once part of a convent inhabited by Dominican nuns (then known as ‘Katarzynki’). Part of a third tower, Baszta Armatnia The Old Fire Station on ul. (Artillery Tower) stands on Masztalarska 3 (H-7). the Roman Wilhelmi Square. Completed in 2008, the resurrected city fortifications are a lovely place for a (short) stroll north of the main square. QH‑6, Between Skwer Rabbina Akiwy Egera & Skwer Romana Wilhelmiego. 5 ROYAL CASTLE Every European city worth its salt has a castle, and Poznań actually has two. Indeed, the 20th century ‘Zamek’ west of the Old Town is neither Poznań’s oldest, nor most important castle. Wander just one block west of the market square and you’ll find yourself at the foot of Góra Przemysła, crowned by Poznań’s former Royal Castle. Once the pride of Poznań, the original construction was begun approximately 1249 by Przemysł I - Duke of the Piast dynasty who had chosen Poz as his capital. Work on the royal residence was continued by his son, and by the time Kazimierz the Great (a prince at the time) moved in in the early 14th century, Poznań’s Royal Castle was the largest non-ecclesiastical building in Poland. Its fortunes took a serious turn for the worse in early 18th century when it was sacked several times in quick succession by the Swedes, the Russians, and then disgruntled nobles. Governor General Kazimierz Raczyński restored the medieval buildings and created a state archive here in 1783 - a function it would serve until WWII. During the Siege of 1945, the castle had the misfortune of being in the line of fire with the Nazi stronghold on Citadel Hill and that was that. In 1959 the decision was taken to rebuild Raczyński’s contribution to the hill, which today houses the Applied Arts Museum. Until recently, the Castle’s rich historical value as the seat of early Polish royalty, numerous royal births, weddings, and treaty signings seems to have been undervalued, but that’s in the past now. Between 2010 and 2016 the castle underwent a total restoration, and is now fully open, including the castle tower, observation decks, and Prince Przemysł I Hall.QH‑7, Góra Przemysła. Admission 12/8zł. Tue free.

Royal Castle

Photo by Diego Delso, CC BY-SA 4.0

STARY BROWAR Housed in an old brewery dating from 1844, the awardwinning Stary Browar complex has been dubbed an art, leisure, and shopping extravaganza, and its success a sign of Poznań’s economic renaissance. Its opening in 2003 also marked a successful move away from out-of-town developments, and a new trend for inner-city regeneration projects. Originally home to the Huggerów Brewery, the building produced beer until 1980, then mineral water until 1998, when it was bought by the Fortis Group and a $66 million USD investment transformed it into the shopping and entertainment Mecca it is today. Home to tonnes of art and outstanding design details, Stary Browar also features a 5-star hotel, cinema, fitness club, dozens of restaurants, cafes, and bars, and over 200 retail spaces, in which you’ll find both name brands and popular chain stores.QG‑9, ul. Półwiejska 42, tel. (+48) 61 859 60 50, www.starybrowar5050.com. Open 09:0021:00; Fri, Sat 09:00-22:00; Sun 10:00-20:00.

BOOK A TOUR link bit.ly/PoznanWalkingTour

© Michal Gabryelski

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Old Town Tour 6 FRANCISCAN CHURCH Built in the years 1674-1728, there’s seemingly not much to this church just off the market square. Hidden behind the bland exterior, however, is an absolute explosion of Baroque over-indulgence, with colourful carved wood, stucco, and paintings by local monk Adam Swach. His brother, Antoni, designed the high altar and ornamented stalls, which literally jump out at you in their bright flamboyance. It’s a spectacle worth seeing, but visitors also flock to this church to see the Marian shrine, which has housed a famous picture of the Miracle-Working Virgin Mary, also known as the Lady of Poznań, for 300 years.QH‑7, ul. Franciszkańska 2, tel. (+48) 61 852 36 37, www.poznan.franciszkanie.pl. Open 06:30-19:00.

Franciscan Church

Photo by Mikołaj Borowicz. Courtesy of City of Poznań

NEON ART

POZNAŃ NIGHTINGALES NEON This playful neon art, portraying a flock of colourful nightingales sitting on a five-line music staff and lighting up in rapid succession, has been installed on the facade of the Philharmonic to honour its “Poznań Nightingales” choir. Founded in the early days of WWII by a nineteen-year-old named Stefan Stuligrosz, the men’s and boys’ choir initially staged underground performances in Poznań churches as an act of resistance against Nazi occupation. After the war they were taken under the wing of the Philharmonic, with Stuligrosz acting as the choir’s artistic director as well as the president of the Poznań Music Academy. The neon was created in 1974 by Antoni Rzyski and symbolises Stuligrosz (the yellow nightingale at the bottom of the staff, whose light doesn’t flicker off ) and his singers. It’s worth to note that the Poznań Nightingales are of no relation to the Polish Nightingales, another Poznań choir which has been implicated in a horrific child abuse scandal - just in case you were wondering.QF-7, ul. Św. Marcin 81. 36

7 PLAC WOLNOŚCI Though it is difficult to imagine now, Poznań’s large and typically empty ‘Freedom Square’ was once the heart of the city - a favourite spot of the upper classes for strolls and coffee. Originally named Wilhelmsplatz (William’s Square) in honour of King Frederick William III of Prussia, it was demarcated by the city’s new Prussian authorities at the very end of the 18th century, soon after Poland was wiped off the map by the three partitioning forces of Prussia, Russia, and Austria-Hungary. The main reason for a square this large? Big-headed higher-ups needed a representative space capable of containing an entire infantry regiment during military parades. In the years leading up to the Great War the square underwent numerous changes, as Polish and Prussian institutions vied for space and influence, encircling the space with buildings designed according to the latest architectural fashion; those included St. Adalbert’s Publishing House (now St. Adalbert’s Bookstore aka Księgarnia Św. Wojciecha, no. 1), the Haase Department Store (no. 4), the Brandt Department Store (no. 8), the Raczyński Library (no. 19), the Provincial Museum in Posen (now a National Museum building, Al. Marcinkowskiego 9), and Bazar Hotel (Al. Marcinkowskiego 10). A monument to the 1866 PrussoAustrian Battle of Nachod popped up, as did a figure of King Wilhelm III; both were torn down triumphantly when Poznań returned to Polish hands following WWI, and the square was given its current name. It wouldn’t last; after a blissful 20 interwar years, during which the square functioned as the cultural centre of Poznań, the square was dug open with trenches in preparation for WWII, and soon German forces once again marched in, renaming the square - you guessed it - Wilhelmsplatz. After the war (and another name change), Plac Wolności was rebuilt according to the concept of Milewski and Skupniewicz, with trees cut down and a Hygieia statue (which had been placed on the square in 1908 to commemorate the expansion of the city waterworks) moved in front of the Raczyński Library. In 2005 a large underground parking lot was added, and in 2012 Freedom Square’s most recognizable landmark was unveiled - the Freedom Fountain (Fontanna Wolności), a geometric structure with two 10-metre wings (or sails) made out of glass. Nowadays the square is the go-to for protests and demonstrations.QG/H‑7, Plac Wolności.


Old Town Tour

Plac Wolności

Photo by HRS Poland

8 OKRĄGLAK Looking for remnants of the People’s Republic? Cast your camera to the western end of ul. Grudnia (A-2), where the imposing Okrąglak (Rotunda) presides over a four-point intersection. This cylindrical marvel is one of Poznań’s defining icons and has been a listed building since 2003. Constructed between 1948 and 1954 this beast is a leading example of Polish modernism, built to a blueprint by Marek Leykam. Originally slated to be ten storeys, this eight floor masterpiece once housed Poznań’s top department store, and it was here that during the lean years of communism locals would queue to buy ‘luxury’ products unavailable elsewhere. After years of abject neglect, in 2011-2012 the Okrąglak was restored and converted into 51,000 square metres of A-class office space.QF‑7, ul. Mielżyńskiego 14, www.okraglakpoznan.pl.

9 IMPERIAL CASTLE More a palace than a ‘castle,’ work began on Poznań’s fearsome ‘Zamek’in 1905 to serve as the provincial residence of Kaiser Wilhelm II. Designed in the neo-Romanesque style by Franz Schwechten, the west wing held Wilhelm’s living quarters, the east wing his immaculate throne room, with the northern part of the complex consisting of service rooms and beautiful gardens based on the Alhambra’s Courtyard of the Lions. The Kaiser got the keys in 1910 but didn’t stay long before WWI and the following Wielkopolska Uprising resulted in a Polish Poznań once again. Between the wars the Zamek became the seat of Poznań University, before the Third Reich swooped in and Albert Speer, Hitler’s pet architect, transformed the tower chapel into the Fuehrer’s office, and the second floor into the residence of Arthur Greiser (Nazi governor of the district). The castle was badly damaged during the Soviet liberation and there was even a post-war campaign to have the structure bulldozed. In the end the drastic measures stopped with reducing the principal tower to a third of its original height.

Imperial Castle

Okrąglak

Photo by Przemysław Turlej

Photo by Radomil, CC BY-SA 3.0

Used by the University in the two years following the war, and then as the seat of local government, the Zamek has operated as a cultural centre since 1962, hosting hundreds of theatre performances, concerts, film screenings and other events in its palatial halls each year. The basement houses the 1956 Uprising Museum, and throughout the large complex visitors will find several restaurants, cafes and bars, including the popular Dubliner Irish Pub. Guided tours of the castle in English are available for 150zł but must be booked in advance by calling +48 61 646 52 88.QF‑7, ul. Św. Marcin 80/82, tel. (+48) 61 646 52 60, www.ckzamek.pl. Open 10:00-22:00. Free admission without tour. 37


Ostrów Tumski

Photo by Łukasz Gdak

Just north-east of the centre of Poznań sits Ostrów Tumski (Cathedral Island) - the island where Poznań was founded, and “where Poland began” in the words of Pope John Paul II. According to the prolific legend, three Slav brothers known as Lech, Czech and Rus met on this tiny island after not seeing each other for many years. To commemorate their reunion the brothers named the place ‘Poznać,’ after the Polish word for ‘to meet.’ From there the island thrived, with a castle erected in the 9th century and Ostrów Tumski becoming a major centre of the Piast state. More than a millennium ago one of Poland’s first rulers, Mieszko I, ushered the country into Catholicism here and soon after the first bishopric was established in 968. The first iteration of the Cathedral of Poznań was built in the second half of the 10th century, and in the island’s thousandyear history it has been home to kings and bishops alike. Remains of 19th century Prussian fortifications are still visible on the Cybina riverside, easily viewable from the Jordan Bridge (I-3). In more recent times the Communists showed their disdain for the Catholic Church’s heavy presence in Poznań by building a road across the island that bisected the Archbishop’s garden (what jerks!). A trip to Ostrów Tumski not only makes a peaceful respite from the tackiness and tourist noise of Stary Rynek, but also serves as an important crash course on early Polish history and Poznań’s role in the country’s birth as a nation. Taking that task on as its very mission, in fact, is the new Porta Posnania Centre, which straddles the river (with its own bridge) between Ostrów Tumski and Śródka, and should be considered the mandatory starting point for all visitors before carrying on to the magnificent Poznań Cathedral itself. 38

1 PORTA POSNANIA INTERACTIVE HERITAGE CENTRE OF CATHEDRAL ISLAND Opened in early 2014, this modern culture complex symbolically connects Poznań’s two oldest districts Ostrów Tumski and Śródka - via a covered ‘skywalk’ bridge between the main exhibition building and the Cathedral Lock - a restored section of the former Prussian river fortifications. The main building is actually on the Śródka side of the Cybina River, and presents the fascinating history of the area from medieval times to the modern day, with a dollop of Polish-Catholic propaganda, via a rather gimmicky combo of audioguide and interactive multimedia displays. The touring route concludes by leading visitors across the ‘skywalk’ straight into Ostrów Tumski itself, making this the ideal starting point for exploring the district. Audioguides are available in English, German, French, Spanish, Czech,  Russian, and Ukrainian, with three specially designed audiotour routes - one for individuals, one for groups, and one for families - that make the experience worthwhile for everyone, especially kids. Topping it off is a souvenir shop and a lovely rooftop terrace (open during the warm season only) that offers unique views of Poznań Cathedral and the surrounding area.  QL‑6, ul. Gdańska 2, tel. (+48) 61 647 76 34, www.bramapoznania.pl. Open 09:00-18:00; Sat, Sun 10:00-19:00; closed Mon. Admission for the permanent exhibition 20/15zł. Group tickets (from 10 people) 11zł per person. Audio guide 7/5zł. U


Ostrów Tumski 2 POZNAŃ CATHEDRAL The most stunning site on Ostrów Tumski is certainly Peter & Paul Cathedral, more commonly called ‘Poznań Cathedral,’ which ‘Cathedral Island’ takes its name from. Originally erected way, way back in 968, this was the first cathedral in Poland, and has had a storied history. As it was razed, rebuilt, and remodelled numerous times over the centuries, each resulted in the addition of a new architectural style: a 1622 fire led to a Baroque finish, while a 1722 fire ushered in a change to neo-Classicism. During the 1945 battle to liberate Poznań, 65 percent of the Cathedral again burned down, exposing the building’s buried Gothic elements and leading to its restoration in the style visitors see today. The interior is a trove of sacral and historical treasures, surrounded by twelve different chapels, including the Chapel of the Holy Sacrament, which has several outstanding examples of Renaissance art (the tombstones of the Górka family and Bishop Benedykt Izbieński, to be specific) and the Baroque altar houses a miraculous crucifix brought to the Cathedral from the former Wrocławska town gate. The Golden Chapel was designed as the mausoleum of the first Polish monarchs and houses the sarcophagi of Kings Mieszko I and Bolesław Chrobry; the two kings are also depicted in a bronze monument together, above which is a painting by January Suchodolski showing Mieszko I, the instigator of Catholicism in Poland, destroying pagan idols. The chapel is indeed thoroughly golden, but to fully admire the glitz you must drop a coin into an absurd contraption, whereupon the illumination will come on. The eye-catching high altar at the centre of the Cathedral is a 14th/15th polyptych depicting Our Lady surrounded by 14 female saints, while the outer wings feature eight paintings depicting the Passion of the Christ. The Cathedral’s lavish Baroque pulpit is equally stunning and dates to 1720. Also worth noting are the Cathedral’s

Photo by Łukasz Gdak

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five Gothic and early Renaissance bronze tomb slabs, which originated at the famed Nuremburg workshop of Herman and Peter Vischer. The slabs were originally on the Cathedral floor to cover the entrances to tombs, but were later mounted on pillars and chapel walls. Stolen during the war, the slabs were returned to Poznań in 1993 and are back on display. Visit the vestry to request entry to the crypt, where you’ll see evidence of the pre-Romanesque and Romanesque versions of the Cathedral, and a 10th century baptismal font most likely used to baptise the first Polish sovereign and his subjects. Excavations here also unearthed two tombs, most likely of the first Polish monarchs Mieszko I and King Bolesław Chrobry. The second crypt houses an exhibition of artefacts found during the excavation, and it also leads to the crypt of the Poznań archbishops. Be aware that while the lights in the crypt work for free (no coins!), they are motionactivated, so if you stand and look too long, you’ll suddenly end up in the dark.QK‑6, Ostrów Tumski 17, tel. (+48) 61 852 96 42, www.katedra.archpoznan.pl. Open 09:00-16:00. Admission 4/3zł.

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Mural on Rynek Śródecki (L-6)

Once you’ve explored Ostrów Tumski, the next natural step is to cross the red Jordan Bridge over into the ancient - and irresistibly cute - Śródka neighbourhood. Once its own town, Śródka was named in honour of its weekly Wednesday market (‘Środa’ means ‘Wednesday’ in Polish), and records suggest the small enclave had urban features and its own autonomous government as early as the mid-1200s. The presence of Dominican monks, along with the regular market, gave Śródka prominence in the area, which unfortunately didn’t last long; the monks picked up and moved across the Warta River, and Przemysł II (who subsequently became King of Poland) turned the city over to the control of the Bishopric in the 13th century. Suddenly reduced to the role of supplier to Ostrów Tumski, Śródka would continue to slide in prominence as the nearby city of Poznań grew. Śródka had a revitalization of sorts in the 17th century when orders of Phillippines and Reformists swept in and established churches and residences in the city, yet Śródka was nonetheless absorbed into Poznań in 1800. During Prussian times the city was part of a fortified zone that didn’t improve its fate, nor did the regular occurrence of floods and fires. During World War II much of the city’s centre at Rynek Śródecki (the location around St. Margaret’s Church) was destroyed, and the arrival of the People’s Republic of Poland, which slapped a garish highway across the Archbishop’s gardens and Ostrów Tumski, didn’t improve the area either. But much like Ostrówek, Śródka is slowly experiencing a noticeable revitalization.

3 CHURCH OF THE VIRGIN MARY This small Gothic church was built in 1432-1448 and is modelled on the West Pomeranian building style, with a three-nave hall, star vaulting, and polychromatic decorations. The altar was designed by Wacław Taranczewski in 1954. The adjoining building with the crowstep gables is a Late Gothic Psalteria, dating to 1518, which contained flats for the clergy. Unfortunately the church is closed for renovation until mid 2020, so it is presently impossible to get inside.QK‑6, ul. Panny Marii, tel. (+48) 61 852 96 42, www.katedra.archpoznan.pl. 4 ARCHDIOCESE MUSEUM Adjacent to the Cathedral is the large Lubrański Academy building, once home to Bishop Jan Lubrański’s institute of higher learning and today the Museum of the Archdiocese. The first floor is devoted to temporary exhibits, while the next two floors are filled with all manner of religious art and relics, including the Sword of Saint Peter, numerous statues and paintings of the Madonna, Jesus, and various saints, plus well-preserved robes and heavily-bejewelled rings from Poznan’s long line-up of bishops. QK‑6, ul. Lubrańskiego 1, tel. (+48) 61 852 61 95, www.muzeum. poznan.pl. Open 10:00-17:00; Sat 09:00-15:00; closed Sun, Mon. Admission 10/7zł. N 5 GENIUS LOCI ARCHEOLOGICAL PARK Genius Loci gives a different view on Poznań’s medieval genesis by unearthing, reconstructing, and offering insight into the lives of those early individuals who inhabited the island one thousand years ago. Explore multimedia displays and documentary films, and brave the glass walkways while peering down at the city’s original walls and embankments. The audioguide (included in the price) comes in Polish, English, German, Russian, and French and helps explain how Poznań took shape centuries ago.QK‑6, ul. Ks. I. Posadzego 3, tel. (+48) 61 852 21 67, www. rezerwat.muzarp.poznan.pl. Open 10:00-16:00; Fri, Sat 10:00-18:00; Sun 10:00-15:00; closed Mon. Admission 10/6zł, Sun free.

There are also some surprisingly good eats to be found here - while our all-time favourite quirky eatery Raj (p.57) has moved out a while ago, there is still Na Winklu (p.66), which offers delicious pierogi with some exciting non-traditional fillings, and Hyćka (p.66), which serves traditional Wielkopolska home cooking. Genius Loci Archeological Park

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Citadel Park Just north of Poznań’s Old Town sits Winiary Hill and 89 hectares of picture-perfect green space known as Citadel Park. Much like any coveted location in Poland, this scenic overlook has a long history that involves multiple name changes, military battles and even some old-fashioned mystery. For visitors, the park offers not only beautiful promenades and leafy city escapes, but also a plethora of monuments, museums and historical tales. The hill itself didn’t become notable until Prussia took over Poland in 1793 and Poznań suddenly found itself in a strategic location on the Prussian-Russian border, less than 300km from Berlin. A fort seemed in order, and design responsibilities were given over to the exasperatinglynamed General Carl Wilhelm Georg von Grolman. Work began in 1828 after moving two villages - Winiary and Bonin - to make room, and continued over the next decade. The result was an impressive polygonal brick fortress with 1.3-1.8 metre-thick walls, observation towers, artillery decks and even a moat, making it the central element of the city’s defences. Despite the efforts that went into the construction, and seemingly opportune wars with Denmark, Austria and France, the fort saw little military action, instead serving as a military prison throughout the 19th century. By the time WWI arrived, the fort was too outdated for modern warfare and played no role until it was captured by insurgents during the Wielkopolska Uprising in 1918, after which it was home to Polish army units throughout the inter-war years. When Nazi Germany occupied Poland in 1939 the fort returned to its role as a POW camp (British, Russian and Polish soldiers ended up here) until it was thrust into the history books as the final Nazi stronghold during the Battle of Poznań in 1945, finally captured by the Soviets on February 23, 1945. After the war, the ravaged and obsolete fort was largely dismantled, contributing its bricks to help rebuild local housing estates and decimated cities like Warsaw. Yet plenty of the fort still remains, and those intrepid enough to wander off the park’s paths will be rewarded with a close-up look at history (this is where a guide comes in

British Military Cemetery

handy, as ours pointed out locations of strategic Russian movements, how the fort was breached, and even the charred bricks where a group of the last German soldiers evidently met their end). Under communism, the fort and surrounding area were given a new strategic purpose when Winiary Hill was turned into the chummy ‘Monument Park of Polish-Russian Friendship and Brotherhood’ in 1962, and a Russian cemetery and Red Army memorial soon found a home here. Re-dubbed ‘Citadel Hall’ in 1992 after the regime finally fell, today visitors will find this former military stronghold is home to art installations, monuments, several museums, cemeteries and large outdoor events. There are few better ways to spend an afternoon in Poznań than exploring all there is to see and do in the city’s largest park.

WHAT TO SEE 1 POZNAŃ ARMY MUSEUM Recently re-opened after a long renovation, the museum provides visitors with the chance to learn more about the city’s military history, with a particular focus on the Second World War and the inter-war period. A large number of items from these times are on display, including various newspaper cuttings, weapons, photos and uniforms. But other eras are covered too, with some artefacts - such as old bullets and army storage devices - dating back as far as 1897. Note that the ticket also includes entrance to the Museum of Armaments, also located in Citadel Park. QI‑4, Al. Armii Poznań (Po. Armii Poznań Citadel), tel. (+48) 663 86 64 14, www.wmn.poznan.pl. Open 10:0017:00; Sun 10:00-16:00; closed Mon. Admission 10/5zł, Tue free; ticket also valid for the nearby Museum of Armaments. U

GETTING THERE

WWII destruction

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If the weather is nice there’s no reason not to walk to Citadel Park from the Rynek. The stroll is just under 2km and should take 25-30 minutes. Those who prefer an (arguably) quicker route can grab bus number 174, 176, 190, or 603 from ‘Wielka’ to ‘Garbary’.


Citadel Park 2 THE BELL OF PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP AMONG NATIONS Erected in 1986, the ‘Bell of Peace and Friendship Among Nations’ was installed too late to spare Poznań from a largely turbulent 20th century, but it plays a role in the remembering when it’s rung on holidays and anniversaries such as Liberation Day (February 23rd) when the Germans capitulated at the fort during World War II. Weighing 850 kg, the dove-embossed bell hangs 10m above the ground and can allegedly be heard from 10km away.QI‑4, Park Cytadela. 3 BRITISH MILITARY CEMETERY Citadel Park hosts several cemeteries, but the one typically of most interest to tourists is British Military Cemetery (also known as the Commonwealth Cemetery). Why? It’s here that you’ll find the graves of several of the men involved in what is now known as “the Great Escape” (it wasn’t just a movie, folks!). In addition, the cemetery houses graves of servicemen from WWI (all of whom died in various parts of Poland as POWs), and those who died in bombing operations over what is now the Polish city of Szczecin.QH‑4, Park Cytadela. Open from dawn till dusk. 4 MONUMENT TO THE HEROES OF THE POZNAŃ CITADEL One of the most noticeable features of Citadel Park is the Soviet Obelisk located prominently at the top of the grand staircase as you enter the park from Aleja Armii Poznań (H-4). The giant Socialist Realism column is dedicated to the Russian soldiers killed during the 1945 siege of the fort, and it’s most interesting aspect is perhaps the one you can no longer see: the large red star affixed to the top which disappeared in the dead of night after the fall of communism in Poland in 1989. Official complaints by the Russian Embassy to track down the star and its thieves were, unsurprisingly, largely ignored by police, and for years the public was left to speculate what became of the red emblem (a rumour that the star was filled with jewels proved to be one popular urban myth). In recent years, however, a local journalist looking into the mystery was able to swiftly solve it: local firemen had removed the star using their rescue ladders. They fessed up and turned it over without consequence to the city, which has plans to restore it and eventually put it on display at the Historical Museum of Poznań.QH‑4, Park Cytadela. 5 MUSEUM OF ARMAMENTS The remains of this Prussian fort (which was used as a war laboratory to produce gunpowder and shells during World War II) prove to be the perfect location for the Museum of Armaments, which features displays of various weaponry and ammunition as well as photos of battles from Poznań’s history. Most interesting for military buffs however is the outdoor exhibition laden with a whole host of war machinery including a T-34 tank, a ‘Katyusha’ rocket launcher, bombers and a MIG-15.QH‑3, Park Cytadela,

Museum of Armaments

tel. (+48) 61 820 45 03, www.wmn.poznan.pl. Open 10:00-17:00; Sun 10:00-16:00; closed Mon. Admission 12/6zł, Tue free; ticket also valid for the nearby Poznań Army Museum. 6 HEADLESS FIGURES Unveiled as part of Poznań’s 750th birthday celebrations in 2002, this massive troop of towering, headless cast iron figures marching aimlessly across Citadel Park is officially titled “Unrecognised” (“Nierozpoznani”). 112 in all, each measuring 2 metres tall, the odd installation is the work of local arts grad and international art star Magdalena Abakanowicz, who is keeping mum on its meaning. Those with ties to Chicago might recognise a similar installation in Grant Park, while a few more of Abakanowicz’s headless fright patrol can be found wandering lost in the courtyard of the Imperial Castle.QI‑3, Park Cytadela. 7 ROSE GARDEN Certainly one of the nicest and most popular parts of Citadel Park, particularly in fine weather, is the ‘rosarium.’ Consisting of six landscaped terraces planted with different roses, trees, and shrubs descending to a small lake at its centre, this is perhaps Poz’s most romantic corner, as evidenced by all the couples getting very cosy on the numerous benches scattered about. Go for a stroll, stop to smell the roses, and maybe sneak in a snog on the side.QH‑2, Park Cytadela.

Archiwum Urzędu Miasta Poznania, photo D. Krakowiak

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Lake Malta Of Poznań’s many lakes it’s Malta - to the east - that is the best known, and its surroundings are well worth further investigation. Formed in 1952 as a result of damming the Cybina, this 2.2km long lake is the largest man-made lake in the city, with an average depth of 3.1 metres. Surrounded by parks and woodland, it is today one of the principal recreation areas in the region - in both summer and winter - with an ice-rink, ski slope (the first in former communist Europe), a world-class regatta course, zoo (p.47), water park, and dozens of other attractions, including several historical sights. Just east of the centre, but miles from the madness of the market square, if you’re in town to decompress, head to Malta. MALTESE BATHS Located on the north shore of Lake Malta this year-round facility offers sport pools (one Olympic-sized and another with a 10-metre diving tower), a water park (a series of 16 pools including a wave pool and children’s play pool), and 13 water slides along with two wild rivers. There is also the World of Saunas (14 saunas, two of which are outdoors, and a vapour bath) and, most recently, a full spa complex (Spa 1306) with underground thermal springs, offering therapeutic and beauty baths including Turkish Hammam and Rasul mud bath, massage, hydromassage, rehabilitation, Pollogen slimming and rejuvenating treatments, and more from the fully trained staff.QP‑8, ul. Termalna 1, tel. (+48) 61 222 61 61, www. termymaltanskie.com.pl. Open 06:00-23:00; Sun 07:0023:00; SPA open 10:00-21:00; Sat, Sun 09:00-21:00.

Adrenaline Alpine Coaster

MALTA SKI PONTOON HIRE Our first thought was boat rental, but nope, that would be too conventional for Lake Malta. This what happens to Poz’s 70m artificial ski slope in summer (May to the end of September to be exact) - people go speeding down it in plastic inner tubes.Qul. Wiankowa 2, tel. (+48) 501 35 51 53​, www.maltaski.pl. Open 10:00-21:00. Opening hours depend on the weather. 1 ride 5zł; 3 rides 10zł. Prices subject to change. MALTA SKI MINI GOLF 18 hole mini golf course overlooking Lake Malta; hours and availability weather-dependent.Qul. Wiankowa 2, tel. (+48) 501 35 51 53​, www.maltaski.pl. Open 10:00-18:00; Sat, Sun 11:00-18:00. Admission 18/15zł. Prices subject to change. ADRENALINE ALPINE COASTER A 500 metre long roller coaster filled with twisting loops (even a 360 degree twist) that hauls screaming visitors around the track at 40km per hour.Qul. Wiankowa 2, tel. (+48) 501 35 51 53​, www.maltaski.pl. Open 10:0018:00; Sat, Sun 11:00-18:00. Opening hours depend on the weather. 1 ride in a 1-person cart 10zł; 3 rides 20zł. 1 ride in a 2-person cart 15zł; 3 rides 30zł. Prices subject to change.

GETTING TO LAKE MALTA Maltese Baths

MALTANKA MINI RAILWAY Pleasing the paying public since 1956, this is one of the last 600mm narrow gauge railways in PL, faithfully pulled by ‘Borsuk’ (Badger) - a steam engine with two whistles. Operating from late April to September, it’s a unique attraction for rail buffs, and also a great way to view Malta. Better still, this is one of the most practical ways to get to the ‘New Zoo’ – catch it from the Maltanka stop near Rondo Śródka (M-6) and ride it to the end, namely the Zwierzyniec stop at the zoo. Trains run on the hour Mon-Fri and on the half hour Sat-Sun, with the first ride at 10:00 and the last one at 19:00; tickets 7.50/5zł.QM‑7, tel. (+48) 61 839 66 90, www.mpk.poznan.pl/turystyka/maltanka. Open 10:00-19:00.

Lake Malta is situated just to the east of the city centre, and Rondo Śródka - at the lake’s northwest corner, is the best place to access it. Below are the public transport options from three main points in the centre. Alternatively, a taxi from the centre to the north shore will cost about 30-35zł. From the main train station (D-9): Take tram number 6 from the ‘Poznań Główny’ stop (walk just past the Avenida shopping centre going east) directly to ‘Baraniaka’. The journey takes about 14 minutes. From the Old Town Square: Take tram number 3, 16, or 17 from either ‘Pl. Wielkopolski’ (H-6) or ‘Małe Garbary’ (I-6) to ‘Rondo Śródka’.QM‑6. 45


Kids & Families

Porta Posnania | Photo by Łukasz Gdak, CTK TRAKT

Tots in tow? That might mean less time marveling at historical landmarks and more time hunting down ice cream, and wining (and dining) replaced by whining, but Poznań offers plenty of ways to keep little ones occupied. Here we’ve compiled our recommendations for making your trip enjoyable for the whole family; and should you urgently need to find the closest playground, we’ve marked those on our maps as well. First up, a trusted crowd-pleaser: everyone loves seeing the mechanical billy goats emerging from a window on the Town Hall tower (p.27) to butt heads at noon (daily), and it might be the only thing your kids really remember from your Old Town tour. Nearby, the Croissant Museum offers a hands-on opportunity to learn about Poznań’s favourite pastry, and Blubry6D will take kids on a trip through local legends while simultaneously melting everyone’s eyes (oh, the fluorescence). If you’re determined to get some serious sightseeing in, consider visiting the Porta Posnania Interactive Heritage Centre in Ostrów Tumski (p.38), which has prepared a special audioguide tour for children ages 5-11.

POZNAŃ CROISSANT MUSEUM Considering how much of a Poznań trademark St. Martin’s croissants are, it’s surprising that a museum dedicated to them has only just recently popped up in the city. The Croissant Museum hosts numerous daily and weekly shows, one of which is in English and takes place at 13:45 Sat-Sun; the 50 minute session includes a multimedia presentation, legends, a tour of the historic museum building, a chance to bake croissants using traditional tools, and - of course - a tasting.QI‑7, Stary Rynek 41/2 (entrance from ul. Klasztorna 23), tel. (+48) 690 07 78 00, www.rogalowemuzeum.pl. Admission 19zł.

For good, old fashioned outdoor fun, we recommend a day at Lake Malta (p.44), which boasts a plethora of attractions like the Pyrland Park ropes course, the Maltese Baths water park, a playground, carousel, roller coaster, mini golf, tobogganing, and a mini railway which will take you straight to the New Zoo, plus standard swimming and paddling. Check out the listings in this section, and best of luck! 46

Poznań Croissant Museum


Kids & Families CHOCOLATE MUSEUM Joining the Croissant Museum is another sweet temptation under an educational guise: the Chocolate Museum where kids of all ages (including those quite grown and greying) can learn about cacao tree plantations, the history of chocolate, and chocolate-making techniques while sampling decadent creations. The guided tours last an estimated 50 minutes and include workshops during which participants create their own chocolate bars - to take home, of course (if you can refrain from wolfing them down on the spot).QH‑7, ul. Wrocławska 12, tel. (+48) 502 45 41 77, www.muzeumczekolady.edu.pl. Open 10:0018:00. 35zł/person, group of more than ten 29zł/person.

Chocolate Museum

BLUBRY6D If you ever thought of dropping some acid with your young children, here’s the legal way to do it. Put on a pair of 3D glasses and immerse yourself in a hallucinatory, brightneon labyrinth of spastic trees, deranged mushrooms, and dizzying miscellany while listening to a narration about two Poznań legends (offered in English, Polish, German, and Spanish). Do try to stay focused, as the staff will quiz you at the end of each room - the punishment for failing, presumably, is to leave you forever wandering the LSD maze from hell. The whole experience lasts around 30 minutes, but you’re almost guaranteed to lose all sense of space and time.QI‑6, ul. Wroniecka 6, tel. (+48) 61 307 04 46, www.blubry6d.pl. Admission 17/15zł.

Blubry6D

Pyrland Park

PYRLAND PARK Open from April. Located on the east end of Lake Malta, this adventure park features 4 ropes courses (3 large ones and one smaller one  for kids over 3 years old) and two Tyrolkas - sweet 70m zip lines. If you need a rest afterwards, there are two designated picnic areas with bonfire and BBQ options.Qul. Abpa A. Baraniaka/Chartowo, tel. (+48) 660 04 89 01, www.pyrlandpark.pl. Opening hours vary depending on the month. Rope courses 25-36zł each, or 35-65zł for combination; kids 19zł; family ticket (2 adults plus 1 kid) 75-85zł. Tyrolka 19zł (10zł with ropes course ticket).

THE ZOOS

THE OLD ZOO (STARE ZOO) Dating back to 1874, the Old Zoo still has some picturesque vintage pavilions, but most of the critters have been carted off to the New Zoo, and the Old Zoo has largely been reshaped as a public park. There is, however, a modern Reptile House here, where you can see Komodo dragons, pythons, and caimans.QD‑7, ul. Zwierzyniecka 19, tel. (+48) 61 848 08 47, www.zoo. poznan.pl. Open 09:00-17:00 in March, 09:00-19:00 from April. Admission free; 8/6zł for the Reptile House. THE NEW ZOO (NOWE ZOO) The much larger of the two zoos, the New Zoo houses over 2,000 beasts representing nearly 350 species, many of which live in recreations of their natural habitats.Qul. Krańcowa 81, tel. (+48) 61 877 35 17, www.zoo.poznan.pl. Open 09:00-17:00 in March, 09:00-19:00 from April. Admission 10zł. U 47


Museums

Porta Posnania, p.38 | Photo: Łukasz Gdak / CTK TRAKT

1956 UPRISING MUSEUM The Zamek is an impressive building alright, but pride of place goes to the 1956 Uprising exhibition, honouring the first armed resistance the communist regime faced. Hidden down a side entrance, this basement masterpiece will reopen after renovations in March 2020, but in its previous incarnation featured  stretchers used to carry the wounded, a tank, a display of arms and rifles, a room of Socialist propaganda posters, a typical Poznań family’s flat from the 1950s, and a direct copy of a detention cell. Most poignant of all, though, was the space set aside for 13 year old Roman Strzałkowski, the youngest to die in the troubles. Exhibits included his harmonica and domino set, and newspaper clippings showing Strzałkowski picking up prizes for his piano skills.QF‑7, ul. Św. Marcin 80/82, tel. (+48) 61 852 94 64, www.wmn.poznan.pl. Open 10:00-17:00; Sun 10:00-16:00; closed Mon. Admission 10/5zł. Tue free. U APPLIED ARTS MUSEUM Housed in the Royal Castle of Poznań, this museum has recently undergone huge changes which shifted the focus from medieval craftwork and princely decorations exclusively to applied arts, rolling out a 2000-piece exhibition of furniture, fabrics, ceramics, glassware, weaponry, and clothing from around the world. For those more interested in the actual history of the place, we recommend skipping the arts and checking out the (sparse) ground-floor exhibition dedicated to the castle and its founder, Duke Przemysł II, as well as climbing the seasonallyopen tower.QH‑7, Góra Przemysła 1, tel. (+48) 61 852 20 35, www.mnp.art.pl. Open 10:00-16:30; Fri 10:30-20:00; Sat, Sun 10:30-17:00; closed Mon. Admission 12/1-8zł. Tue free. 48

ARCHAEOLOGICAL MUSEUM Housed in the beautiful 16th-century Górka Palace, Poznań’s Archaeology Museum contains a collection of 42,000 rare and mystifying objects that chart life in North Africa and prehistoric Poland. The first part of the museum takes you through the earliest settlements in the region, with lifesized figures as well as miniature dioramas depicting life from the Stone Age to the Iron Age. The other permanent exhibits include  ‘Death and Life in Ancient Egypt,’ ‘Archeology of Sudan,’ and ‘Rock Art of North Africa.’QI‑7, ul. Wodna 27 (Pałac Górków), tel. (+48) 61 852 82 51, www.muzarp.poznan.pl. Open 09.00-16:00; Fri, Sat 10:00-17:00; Sun 12:00-16:00; closed Mon. Admission 10/6zł. Sat free. Guided tours by prior arrangement 75zł. Free audio guides avaliable in English. U

Curator’s touch at the Applied Arts Museum


Museums ARCHDIOCESE MUSEUM See Ostrów Tumski, p.40.QK‑6, ul. Lubrańskiego 1, www. muzeum.poznan.pl.

ENIGMA: POZNAŃ’S WWII CODEBREAKERS

CHOCOLATE MUSEUM See Kids&Families, p.47.QH‑7, ul. Wrocławska 12, www. muzeumczekolady.edu.pl.

The vital role played by Polish exiles during the Battle of Britain is today common knowledge, as is the role Polish forces played in breaking the siege of Monte Cassino, and the daring raid on Dieppe in 1942. A lesser known Polish contribution towards the Allied victory in 1945, but equally significant, is the battle that took place inside the minds of Poland’s finest academics to crack the Enigma code.

LITERARY MUSEUM OF HENRYK SIENKIEWICZ Winner of the 1905 Nobel Prize in Literature, Sienkiewicz is best known internationally as the author of Quo Vadis, a birth-of-Christianity epic that has been translated into 50 languages. This museum dedicated to his legacy is located in a house that once belonged the Italian architect Jean Baptiste Quadro (that’s his bust you can see outside), and the collection is the life work of Ignacy Moś, who started collecting Sienkiewicz memorabilia after helping to free Sienkiewicz’s only son from the Gestapo. The exhibition includes the author’s Lennon-style specs, post-mortem facial and hand casts, correspondences, and a collection of his novels including an English version of Quo Vadis dating from 1899.QH‑7, Stary Rynek 84, tel. (+48) 61 852 89 71, www.bracz.edu.pl. Open 09:00-17:00; Sat 08:00-16:00; closed Mon, Sun. Admission 4/2zł, Sat free. N MUSEUM OF ARMAMENTS See Citadel Park, p.43.QH‑3, Park Cytadela, www. muzeumniepodleglosci.poznan.pl.

Porta Posnania

Photo by Łukasz Gdak / CTK TRAKT

NATIONAL MUSEUM A large and excellent museum with a rich collection of modern Polish art (including interesting Impressionist works) in the new wing, and medieval art, impressive Italian, Dutch, and Flemish paintings in the connected old building. The museum also holds the largest collection of Spanish art (including Zurbaran and Ribera) in Poland and plenty of Polish art from the 16th century onwards. In addition, a Monet painting stolen in 2000 was recently recovered and is back on display. Selected paintings have extensive English explanations about the artist and topic. QH‑7, Al. Marcinkowskiego 9, tel. (+48) 61 856 80 00, www.mnp.art.pl. Open 09:00-15:30; Fri 10:30-20:00; Sat, Sun 10:30-17:00; closed Mon. Admission 12/1-8zł, Sat free. N

It all began in Poznań, namely in the mathematics class of the university. Ace students Jerzy Różycki, Marian Rejewski, and Henryk Zygalski came to the attention of Polish intelligence services on account of their excellent German skills and sharp mathematical minds. Recruited to attend cryptology courses in Warsaw alongside 17 other Poznań University alumni, the three were set to work in 1932 on cracking German ciphers. It was here they made the first vital Engima breakthrough using a mathematical theorem since described as ‘the theorem that won WWII.’ On the day before the Nazi invasion of Poland the three fled to Romania where they immediately sought contact with the Allies. Originally they turned up at the British Embassy in Bucharest, but having been told to ‘come back in a few days’ decided to try their luck with the French instead. This proved more successful and from there they found themselves in France, working in Cadix, a secret intelligence cell operating in the unoccupied south. With the risk of discovery by the Germans growing greater the team were forced to flee. Różycki drowned at sea in 1942 after the boat carrying him sank under suspicious circumstances. Zygalski and Rejewski eventually made it to England, where they were employed in Boxmoor, cracking simple codes for the rest of WWII. In spite of having done the groundwork that broke the original Enigma code, their knowledge was not called on by the American and British codebreakers who were cracking new and improved Enigma codes at Bletchley Park, and the vital Polish contribution has been allowed to fade in the memory, a situation not helped by films like 2001’s Enigma or 2015’s The Imitation Game. An Enigma Museum is actually in the works in Poznań, though the completion date keeps getting shifted; as we’re sending this guide off to print, the aim is for 2021. 49


Museums POZNAŃ TRADE FAIRS

While many foreign visitors to Central Europe may be unfamiliar with Poznań, businesspeople involved in foreign trade are likely to be more than aware of the city. That’s because Poznań is Poland’s trade fair capital with the title justified by the country’s largest fair grounds, where the biggest and best fairs in Poland take place each year. Though Poznań’s rich trading tradition can be traced back to the thirteenth century, the true predecessor of today’s fair was the 1911 East German Industrial Exhibition, which showcased Germany’s achievements in annexed Polish territories. Six years later the Union of Merchant Associations, comprising merchants from Greater Poland and Eastern Pomerania, decided to develop a specialised cyclical expo based on the successful model of the Leipzig Trade Fair. This idea reached fruition on May 28, 1921, when the first Poznań Fair took place. Since then, the Fair’s fortunes have risen and fallen according to the political and economic changes that periodically moved through Poland and Europe: from playing a key role in re-integrating economic activities in the newly independent second Polish Republic, to the near-demise of the fair complex during WWII air raids (which destroyed the iconic Upper Silesian Tower), and to a new start in the post-war communist state. Though the 1950s were a time of uncertainty and tension, with the fair closed down for a few years due to the Cold War atmosphere, the ‘60s proved to be a period of robust growth, so much so that organisers started running out of exposition space. From 1973 on, the event was broken up into smaller chunks, as more specialised fairs branched off from the main expo. Currently, the Poznań International Fair constitutes over 60% of the Polish exhibition industry, hosting some 10,000 exhibitors a year - approximately a quarter of them foreign - in the complex’s sixteen halls, which add up to 150,000 square meters of space. The total number of annual visitors attending the sixty or so trade fair events - everything from welding to horticulture, logistics to beach fashion - usually reaches half a million. 50

PHARMACY MUSEUM One of the smallest museums in Poznań, and certainly the trickiest to find – go through the courtyard, ring the doorbell then climb to the second floor. The series of rooms here are filled with rusty pots, scales, vials and cast iron mortars from the 18-20th centuries. While once you’d find yourself wandering around in ignorance, the museum now offers small guides in English, German, and French. One room has been designed to mimic a 19th century pharmacy - complete with a box for morphine while another includes over 1,200 rare medical books, a stuffed alligator and an inmate’s uniform recovered from Mathausen.QH‑7, Al. Marcinkowskiego 11, tel. (+48) 798 19 59 88, www.woia.pl. Open Tue, Wed, Fri only 09:0015:00. Admission free. POZNAŃ ARMY MUSEUM See Citadel Park, p.42.QI‑4, Al. Armii Poznań (Po. Armii Poznań Citadel), www.wmn.poznan.pl. POZNAŃ BAMBER MUSEUM Learn about the Bamber people, ethnic Germans from Bamberg who settled in Poznań in the 18th century, inside a mildly interesting museum that includes a 19th century timber house once owned by a wealthy Bamber farmer. Inside displays include old  bonnets, looms, paintings, clothing, and timber furniture – everything you’d expect in an ethnographic museum - but very little written information.QJ‑8, ul. Mostowa 7/9, tel. (+48) 605 62 16 11, www.bambrzy.poznan.pl. Open Fri, Sat only 10:0014:00. Admission free. U

Kaiserpanorama

POZNAŃ CROISSANT MUSEUM See Kids&Families, p.46.QI‑7, Stary Rynek 41/2 (entrance from ul. Klasztorna 23), www.rogalowemuzeum.pl. POZNAŃ KAISERPANORAMA Think that explaining cassette tapes to your kids is difficult? Try to get them to wrap their heads around this crazy 1920s entertainment system. Peer inside the Kaiserpanorama (called Fotoplastikon in Polish) for a collection of stereoscopic photographs of turn-of-the-century Poznań. Ooh, 3D!QG‑7, ul. Ratajczaka 44, tel. (+48) 61 854 07 52, fb.com/ fotoplastykonpoznanski. Open 10:00-18:00; Sat 10:0017:00; closed Sun. Admission 5/2zł, group ticket 20zł.


Museums WIELKOPOLSKA MARTYRS MUSEUM One of 18 forts built by the Prussians in the 1870s to protect Poznań’s perimeter, ‘Fort VII’ gained notoriety when it was used as a Gestapo penal camp between 1939 and 1944. At least 18,000 Polish prisoners were processed here, of which 4,500 were murdered, though other estimates have the death toll as high as 20,000. The windswept grassy grounds make for a thought-provoking walk, along which visitors will see the ‘death wall’ where up to seven prisoners were executed daily during Nazi rule, as well as dark underground tunnels used as makeshift gas chambers. Elsewhere a vaulted brick room holds a small but haunting display that includes a guillotine, an execution block, truncheons, whips, and arrest warrants. The personal effects of prisoners have also been preserved, including hand-written letters, playing cards, rosaries, and identity papers. Chillingly graffiti etched into the walls by prisoners can still be discerned, the writing framed with red and white ribbons. Reaching Fort VII is not an easy task, however. It’s found in the western suburbs, so your best bet is a taxi, with reputable drivers charging around 20-22zł for the journey.QAl. Polska (Jeżyce), tel. (+48) 61 848 31 38, www.wmn. poznan.pl. Open 10:00-17:00; Sun 10:00-16:00; closed Mon. Admission 6/3zł. Tue free. WIELKOPOLSKA UPRISING MUSEUM Primarily chronicling the 1918-1919 Wielkopolska Uprising (though the exhibition starts at the time of partition) this museum occupies a rebuilt structure that once served as home to the Royal Guard. A /big renovation ended in December 2017, taking the exhibition from a series of artefacts to a modern multimedia creation on par with the Silesian Museum in Katowice or the Warsaw Uprising Museum in the nation’s capital (though much smaller, of course). Downstairs is a mish-mash of weapons, uniforms, reconstructed bunkers and trenches, and vintage photographs, which look great but fail to convey much meaningful information; the historical info is all upstairs, where you can also take a picture dressed as a Wielkopolska soldier.QH‑7, Stary Rynek 3, tel. (+48) 61 853 19 93, www.wmn.poznan.pl. Open 10:00-17:00; Sun 10:0016:00; closed Mon. Admission 12/6zł. Tue free.

Wielkopolska Uprising Museum

POZNAŃ STADIUM Originally built in 1980, the city’s stadium was redeveloped rather than completely reconstructed when Poznań was chosen to host the EURO2012 football championship, with the capacity  raised from 27,000 to 43,090 -  an investment of €160 million. Today the home of popular local side Lech Poznań, Poznań  Stadium (formerly INEA Stadium) is one of the top stadiums in Europe, featuring covered seating throughout, plus all the service points you would expect at a modern sports complex, including the rather splendid Podanie Restaurant.  Host to largescale events throughout the year, the stadium has also become a bit of a tourist attraction with 45min-1hr guided tours available in Polish and  English, during which you’ll get a chance to experience the changing rooms that Lech Poznań call home, the Presidential boxes and skyboxes, the press room and  conference room, a detention room for misbehaving fans, and, of course, the pitch itself; check their website for exact tour times and prices. Getting there is easy - just catch tram no. 13 from ‘Marcinkowskiego’ (H-7), getting off at ‘Stadion Miejski’.Qul. Bułgarska 17 (Grunwald), tel. (+48) 61 886 30 31, www.stadionpoznan.pl. Tours start 10:30, 12:00, 14:00, 16:00; Sat, Sun 10:30, 12:00, 13:30, 15:00, 17:30, 19:00. Admission 19/14zł. Kids under 4 free. Y 51


Cafés

Breakfast at Petit Paris.

COFFEE MIEL This airy, French-style cafe is a strong new player on Poznań’s specialty coffee scene. Chat with the barista about the newest beans on offer, then grab a chemex and a slice of delicious cake (or morning croissant) and head to the small mezzanine to watch the increasingly-busy Św. Marcin from above. Also on the menu:  wine by the glass and bottle, cider, and herbal infusions like hibiscus with berries or elderflower with lemon.QH‑8, ul. Św. Marcin 14, tel. (+48) 698 95 31 62, www.coffeebymiel.pl. Open 08:0020:00; Sun 10:00-19:00. 6 DA VINCI CAFFE Filled to the brim with date-night couples and gossiping girlfriends during the evenings, this is one of the most popular spots to have a glass of wine or a cup of fancy tea by candlelight. The heavily da-Vinci-inspired decor (sketches of elaborate contraptions, parchment-style walls) is clever, but slides into tacky here and there.QG‑7, Pl. Wolności 10, tel. (+48) 502 48 44 74. Open 09:00-22:00; Fri 09:00-23:00; Sun 09:00-21:00. 6 HAPPA TO MAME Unapologetically uncoventional, this Japanese cafe concept has turned a communist-era Jeżyce locale into a minimalist space furnished with a short-legged table perched on a wooden pedestal, cushions for sitting, and a bar with a selection of mysterious-looking desserts. With one wall painted to resemble kintsugi (broken pottery repaired with gold) and another sporting a peculiar, eerie creature, Happa To Mame is not your run-of-themill hipster coffee shop, though the end result is a bit disquieting. Prepare to feel out of place, but do go if you 52

enjoy matcha lattes and daifuku - they are delicious.QB‑6, ul. Augustyna Szamarzewskiego 17, tel. (+48) 576 54 64 47. Open 12:00-21:00; Sat 13:00-21:00; Sun 13:00-20:00; closed Mon. T­6 KAWIARNIA STRAGAN Obnoxious in principle, but perfectly warm and inviting in actuality, Stragan adheres to some stringent self-imposed rules, including a non-negotiable no-Americano policy (they also refuse to make scrambled eggs). Instead, they’re committed to serving top-notch alternatively-brewed coffee, using all the new-fangled (or just currently trendy) methods like drip-brewing, aeropress, Chemex, and siphon; boxes of equipment are displayed on the back wall and available for sale, as are coffee beans. The dedication shows: their coffee was among the best we’ve tasted, so give it a go if you’re a caffeine enthusiast. Light breakfast is served as well.QG‑7, ul. Franciszka Ratajczaka 31, tel. (+48) 789 23 39 65, www.craftcoffee.pl. Open 08:0021:00; Sat, Sun 09:00-20:00. T­6 MINISTER CAFE Ministerstwo Browaru has earned itself quite a reputation and is the perfect pub to find a healthy mixture of expats, business types, and tourists enjoying one of the best selection of beers in Poz. But its sister venue - Minister CAFE - has also earned a faithful following and it’s easy enough to see why. The self-professed ‘cafe for those who like beer’ offers a trendy, laid-back interior (white tiles, wood, stainless steel), two beer gardens, and a creative menu of burgers, cake, and beer snacks that will leave you watching your waistline.QG‑8, ul. Ratajczaka 34 (1st floor), tel. (+48) 601 53 37 47. Open 14:00-24:00; Sat, Sun 10:00-24:00. 6


Cafés MÓWISH MASH Specialty coffee, several varieties of homemade cheesecake, and (mercifully optional) language lessons are the order of the day at this cosy and modern Jeżyce cafe. The attention to detail here is praiseworthy: coffee comes served with a laminated bit of paper describing the bean variety, origin, and flavour profile, so some learning is unavoidable after all. Those keen on improving their English or Spanish can set up lessons with a private tutor, which take place in a separate section of the cafe (70zł/h, with a beverage included in the price). Tasty breakfast toast with various toppings, shakshouka, omelettes - is served before 14:00 on weekdays and all day on weekends. QC‑7, ul. Zwierzyniecka 41, tel. (+48) 573 93 89 89, www.mowishmash.pl. Open 08:00-19:00; Sat, Sun 10:00-18:00; closed Mon. B­6 PĄCZUŚ I KAWUSIA Should you wander out to the largely residential Łazarz district - known for its Palm House, swanky City Park complex, old-school open air market, and mild state of disrepair definitely aim for a pit stop at this charming cafe just off the district’s main square. Called ‘donut and coffee’, the selection of treats won’t surprise you, but the quality will - the delicious pączki (Polish hole-less doughnuts) are homemade, often warm, and come in a variety of fillings, and the specialty coffee is brewed using a number of alternative methods. Recommended.QUl. Rynek Łazarski 8, tel. (+48) 513 41 01 14. Open 10:00-18:00; Sun 12:00-18:00. T­6 UN POT You’d think utilizing all the stereotypically hip-n-cool paraphernalia of modern-day hipster locales - like wooden pallets, whitewashed brick, and mason jars (hence the name) - would turn this place into one big fat (cool) cliche, but the rustic decor is absolutely fresh, cozy, and pretty darn unique. With gentle mood music and an all-around calming ambience, this is the perfect place to eat a light breakfast, chat over coffee, or try out one of the “1001” flavors of beer, like cotton candy, watermelon, cucumber, or pistachio. One word of warning - they tend to close an hour or two early if business is slow.QH‑7, ul. Sieroca 5/6, tel. (+48) 662 27 74 25. Open 09:00-24:00; Mon, Tue, Sun 09:00-23:00. VANDAL CAFE NEW Somehow, Poznań’s cafes manage to get hipper and hipper each year. The current state of the art, in our humble opinion, is this spot in the Łazarz district, which sports the latest interior design trends, unruly houseplants, vintage touches (including a fuzzy TV set), a few scattered board games, and a full-wall sticker-and-print collage. The coffee, unsurprisingly, is great - specialty beans and alternative brewing methods are now expected in Poz coffee shops, but Vandal goes beyond with creations like the freshpresso, a mix of espresso and freshly squeezed grapefruit juice. The cheesecake is also top notch. Recommended. QC‑10, ul. Strusia 9. Open 11:00-22:00; Sun 11:00-19:00; closed Mon. T­6

BREAKFAST ALEKOSMOS One of our favourite breakfast spots, ALEkosmos recently moved to a new, larger locale, making room not just for a lush tangle of houseplants (some planted in a bathtub), but also for an upsized menu. On our last visit, we were knocked off our feet by the avocado toast with red pesto, cherry tomatoes, eggs, and greens, but there are many other enticing dishes to try as well, from Italian foccacia with ricotta cheese and Parma ham to French toast with blueberry jam, sour cream, and caramelised almonds. Breakfast is served until 15:00; after that, you can pop in for coffee and cake.  QB‑6, ul. Jackowskiego 43, tel. (+48) 781 82 20 77. Open 09:00-19:00; Sat, Sun 10:00-19:00; closed Mon. €. 6 BAJGLE KRÓLA JANA Though now inseverably connected to NYC, the humble bagel can trace its roots to Central Europe, with many agreeing it was invented by Cracovian Jews after 1496 when King Jan Sobieski lifted the decree that formerly restricted the production of baked goods to the Kraków Bakers Guild. This bit of culinary history is celebrated at ‘King Jan’s Bagels’, a breakfast spot in the Jeżyce district, cloned from the original Szczecin location. The menu bursts with a generous selection of bagel sandwiches with fixings including salted caramel, mascarpone, pulled chicken in tonkatsu sauce, prosciutto, even potato pancakes.QC‑6, ul. Kraszewskiego 15, tel. (+48) 732 80 64 44, www.bajglekrolajana.pl. Open 08:00-18:00; Sat, Sun 09:00-18:00. 6 PETIT PARIS BOULANGERIE A perfect breakfast option, where the most important meal of the day is served all day. Choose from French classics like croque madame, crepes, croissant sandwiches, tartines and more - all made from authentic French ingredients, and delicious fresh bread that is baked on-site. Second location at Aleja Wielkopolska 40a.QH‑9, ul. Półwiejska 32 (Stary Browar), tel. (+48) 61 667 15 55, www.petitparis. com.pl. Open 08:00-21:00; Sun 09:00-20:00. €. U UNO Absolutely smashing breakfast and specialty coffee (cold brew, chemex, aeropress, the works) in a typical ‘cool 2010s interior’ of exposed brick, light wood, plants, and wall art - pleasant. The menu changes regularly, but expect elevated versions of popular brekkie dishes like toast (served here with goat cheese and courgette ribbons), shakshouka (with lentils), and oatmeal (with coconut milk and peanut butter), with a strong focus on local ingredients, from artisinal sausages to freshly baked sourdough bread.QC‑6, ul. Bolesława Prusa 4/2, tel. (+48) 501 03 17 87. Open 08:00-18:00; Sat 09:00-16:00; closed Sun. €. 6 53


Regional Dishes

St. Martin’s Croissant | Photo courtesy of City of Poznań

Though much of their cuisine is shared with Poland as a whole, Poznań and the wider Wielkopolska region do have some of the most distinctive dishes in the country. Here’s a rundown of popular fare that you can get your hands on even when all the local grannies are busy cooking for someone else. Do keep in mind that restaurant menus change, and these dishes might become unavailable during the shelf life of this guide - luckily most restaurants post their menus online, so you can quickly double-check before showing up for dinner.

POTATOES WITH GZIK

Nearly ubiquitous as a starter in Poznań’s Polish restaurants, gzik is made of quark cheese mixed with cream and chives or radish. Served together with jacket potatoes, this 19th century peasant dish is known as ‘pyra z gzikiem’ in local parlance. Where to try it: Wiejskie Jadło (p.68), Oberża Pod Dzwonkiem (p.66), Bamberka (p.67), and Hyćka (p.66). 54

ROAST DUCK

Whereas in most corners of Poland, until fairly recently, Peking duck was an eyebrow-raising oddity, and ‘edible’ poultry was limited to chicken and turkey, Wielkopolska has long liked its kaczka. Traditionally served roasted with cabbage, apples, and dumplings, duck has recently also founds its way into pierogi and even burgers. Where to try it: Ratuszova (p.67), Bazar 1838 (p.65), Wiejskie Jadło (p.68), Oberża Pod Dzwonkiem (p.66), Bamberka (p.67), FermentuJEMY (p.64), and Hyćka (p.66).


Regional Dishes GREY DUMPLINGS / SZARE KLUCHY

Grey - the #1 least appetising colour. Unfortunately, that’s just the hue raw potatoes turn after you shred them, a necessary first step in the making of these popular but uninspired dumplings. After shredding, the potatoes are mixed with egg and flour and cooked to lumpy perfection. Traditionally accompanied by sauerkraut, szare kluchy aren’t exactly a fashionable dish anymore, though they seem to be making a comeback in some restaurants. Where to try them: Wiejskie Jadło (p.68), Oberża Pod Dzwonkiem (p.66), Bamberka (p.67), FermetuJEMY (p.65), and Hyćka (p.66).

ST. MARTIN’S GOOSE

Another St. Martin’s Day delicacy is roast goose, a nod towards a legend detailing how St. Martin was hiding in a flock of geese in an attempt to avoid becoming a bishop (the geese gave him away by honking loudly). Unlike croissants, St. Martin’s goose really does make an appearance only around St. Martin’s day; there’s even an official ‘Goose for St. Martin’s Day’ food festival (November 8th - December 1st), now in its eleventh year. Where to try it: out of luck until November, unfortunately.

HYĆKA

CZERNINA

A bit grisly, this mixture of clear broth and duck’s blood with a handful of noodles is commonly said to taste better than it looks, though you be the judge - we’re keeping mum. Perfect for Halloween and beyond. Where to try it: Bamberka (p.67) and Hyćka (p.66).

A local rendition of elderflower cordial, and not a popular drink elsewhere in Poland. The recipe is simple: elderflower, sugar and water, resulting in a sweet, vitaminrich concoction. Where to try it: where else - Hyćka (p.66).

ST. MARTIN’S CROISSANTS

St. Martin’s Day (November 11th) has been a Poznań obsession ever since a church named after the saint was erected in the 13th century. The celebrations call for a very specific treat, and that’s rogale świętomarcińskie (St. Martin’s croissants) Filled with a poppy seed and almond paste and topped with a healthy pile of sugary glaze, these croissant-like pastries apparently date back to the 19th century. If you believe local legend, their inventor was baker Józef Melzer, who prayed to St.Martin for pastry ideas to honour the saint’s holiday, and was inspired when seeing a horse slip a shoe in the St. Martin’s Day parade. Where to try them: while November is the high season for these treats, their immense popularity means that they can be found in bakeries year-round. 55


Restaurants

Muga (p.61)

Poznań might have a reputation as an international centre of commerce, but its restaurant scene has only recently started taking off, with a scattering of world-class restaurants and an increasing number of good ethnic options. While In Your Pocket once listed every venue in the city, the explosion of the market and its sheer redundancy now makes that pursuit impossible. Our print guide carries a wide selection of what we feel are Poznań’s most noteworthy restaurants, however there are many more listed on our website (poznan.inyourpocket.com) where we encourage you to leave your own reviews of the places you’ve visited. All our reviews are updated regularly, completely subjective and unsolicited. The figures we quote in brackets represent the cheapest and costliest main courses on the menu. The opening hours are verified as we send this guide off to the printer, but keep in mind that they’re subject to change. Where the venue is not on our map we have included the district where it is located in brackets. Below is a selection of recommendations depending on what you may be looking for. SPLURGE Any ‘best of’ list in Poznań is invariably going to see a slew of nominations for Blow Up Hall 5050 (p.59), where you’ll find very modern versions of Polish cooking in an impossibly cutting edge neo-industrial setting. For upmarket close to the market square try Ratuszova (p.67), and for something out of the centre head to the daringly modern SPOT. (p.61). 56

COUPLES Restauracja MUGA (p.61), and its attached Casa De Vinos wine bar (p.76), is the perfect place to impress your date, while Figaro (p.62) is so over-the-top you half expect to be served by Cupid himself. For something completely different, think of all the naughty things you can do under the table in the pitch black of Dark Restaurant (p.68). POLISH By popular vote, the market square’s Ratuszova (p.67) is the best Polish food you’ll find in Poznań, and served in one of the most elegant interiors you’ve ever eaten in. In contrast, Oberża Pod Dzwonkiem (p.66) and Wiejskie Jadło (p.68) do traditional interpretations of Polish food in rustic environs, Hyćka (p.66) has the widest selection of regional cuisine, and the pierogi spot Na Winklu (p.66) prefers a contemporary twist. QUICK EATS For a speedy but tasty meal that will leave you with more time for sightseeing, try the falafel bowls at Falla (p.69), bibimbap at Min’s Table (p.58), or pho at PHOBAR (p.58). SPECIAL DIET Our Vegetarian listings are on p.67, but you’ll also find tasty vegan and gluten-free dishes in Projekt Kuchnia (p.61) and SPOT. (p.61). If it’s Polish food you’re after, Oberża Pod Dzwonkiem (p.66) will adapt any of their dishes exactly to your dietary needs and desires.


Restaurants SYMBOL & PRICE KEY 6 Animal friendly

C‑1 Map Coordinate

T Child-friendly

N Credit cards not accepted

E Live music

U Facilities for the disabled

B Outside Seating

X Smoking room available

€ €€ €€€ €€€€ €€€€€

most mains under 25zł most mains 25-45zł most mains 45-75zł most mains 75-115zł most mains over 115zł

AMERICAN INDIAN STEAK Poland does still like its Native American cliches, and if you look past the name and harmless sprinkling of tribal and ‘wild wild West’ exotica (which admittedly is incorporated tastefully into the elegant, red-brick interior), you will discover an upscale steak house serving a wide assortment of cuts including tournedo, T-bone, fiorentina, ribeye, sirloin, and even the elusive 1.2kg tomahawk steak, widely considered the best of the bunch. Pair the perfectly-grilled meat - seved on a hot lava stone, no less - with sides like potatoes with gzik, sweet potato fries, oyster mushrooms, or meadow lettuces (all from locally-sourced ingredients), or opt for one of Indian’s Wielkopolska-centric options like venison or roast duck with cabbage and dumplings.     QA‑9/10, ul. Ułańska 1, tel. (+48) 61 221 78 07, www. indiansteak.pl. Open 12:00-23:00; Fri, Sat 12:00-24:00. €€€€. U­B SOMEPLACE ELSE Some baulk at the prices, but there’s no escaping that Someplace Else is the full monty – here’s a place that gets both food and drink completely right, with a largely American menu of burgers, steaks, and Tex Mex; sometimes that’s just what you need. The diner design is straight out of road-trip USA, and a great spot for ties-off, after-office chow, and beers. With 9 TVs, this is also one of your best bets for catching that match - be it European or American. QD‑7, ul. Bukowska 3/9 (Sheraton Poznan Hotel), tel. (+48) 61 655 20 00, www.poznan.someplace-else.pl. Open 18:00-24:00; closed Sun. €€€. T­U

ASIAN CAFE LA RUINA I RAJ Completely unique and infused with the owners’ love for travel, food, and coffee, Cafe La Ruina i Raj moved from their previous (and rather iconic) location in the tiny Śródka district to a more mainstream locale on ul. Św. Marcin. With more space comes even more outlandish decor, including airport-style departure displays mounted near the ceiling, which display the menu, a potentially 57


Restaurants seizure-inducing disco bathroom, and a horror vacui jumble of flags, signs, maps, artwork, and various bits and bobs from the owners’ many travels. Unfortunately, the quality of the food seems to have slipped a bit during the move - the pad thai, which has long been the star of the menu, lacked much of the complexity we remembered from Śródka. Here’s hoping that the fare can soon return to its former glory, as there’s much more to sample: fried rice, Vietnamese pho bo and bahn mi, Genovese testaroli with pesto (‘the great-grandfather of pasta’), Peruvian lomo saltado in burger form, Hong Kong style chow mein, Alaskan hotcakes, and more.QG‑7/8, ul. Święty Marcin 34, tel. (+48) 666 15 25 55. Open 12:00-21:00; Fri, Sat 12:00-22:00. €€. T­U­6 MIN’S TABLE Good Asian food is something we’ve come to expect from Poznań, and this trendy hole-in-the-wall churning out authentic Korean bibimbap - made by Min herself - certainly lived up to our expectations. Sit around the communal table and choose from one of six bibimbap options (vegetarian and meaty) or go for japchae (sweet potato noodles), toppokki (rice and fish cakes), dakgangjeong (crispy fried chicken), kimchi dumplings, or subak hwachae (watermelon punch). Cashless payments only.QC‑6, ul. Kraszewskiego 14, tel. (+48) 792 35 03 80. Open 12:00-20:00; closed Mon. 6 PHOBAR More like Berlin in Poznań rather than Hanoi in Poznań, and the local cool kids aren’t complaining. Big bowls of beautiful, meaty saigon pho and vegan wakame pho are served amid loud dubstep to hip youth seated at communal tables; the exposed-brick interior and party garlands complete the stylish atmosphere. The broth might not be the most flavourful, but a splash of sriracha and fish sauce from strategically placed bottles resolve the issue to an extent. Those pining for other Vietnamese specialties can enjoy spring rolls, banana leaf pockets with shrimp, suon ram man ribs, Vietnamese-style kimchi (?), and splendid coffee with condensed milk.QB‑6, ul. Wawrzyniaka 19, tel. (+48) 501 97 39 74. Open 12:0021:00; Fri, Sat 12:00-22:00. €€. 6

INDIAN HATTI Our hopes were not high for this establishment - good Indian is still fairly difficult to come by in Poland - but we were pleasantly surprised as the appetiser papadums with a selection of chutneys came out of the kitchen, followed by some very decent tikka masalas and mango lassis. From the ornate and slightly musty decor to the extensive selection of dishes, this is a familiar, Westernised version of the subcontinental eating experience such as you’ll find in the UK or US, and we goras are happy. Looking forward to coming back whenever the pakora cravings kick back in.QI‑7, ul. Woźna 13, tel. (+48) 732 71 00 00, www.hatti. pl. Open 13:00-22:30. €€. 6 58


Restaurants KWIAT PEONII The Peony Flower serves Asian fusion with a focus on Indian and Nepali dishes - the native cuisine of cooks working at this establishment. Choose from an extensive menu of classics like fried rice, chicken and mutton biryani, Nepali chow mein, aloo gobhi, creamy dahl, mutter paneer, malai kofta, lamb vindaloo, and more, served with rice or roti. Of note are the goat meat dishes, a rarity in Poznań: rogan josh, tawa goat, kadai goat, and a straightforward curry.QH‑6, Pl. Wielkopolski 5, tel. (+48) 884 80 40 94. Open 11:00-22:00; Fri, Sat 11:0023:00. €€. T­6

INTERNATIONAL BIERHALLE This familiar tourist-friendly franchise lives up to its name, bringing its Oktoberfest atmosphere to Poznań’s Posnania Shopping Centre. At Bierhalle they brew their own, offering 5 different ales most commonly ordered by the litre, but you can also go gorilla with a 5l barrel. The beer-friendly franchise menu consists of German bratwurst, ribs, pork knuckle, and other meaty feasts with fries, the busty servers in faux-folk costumes look like they’ve just finished milking the cows, and TVs stream sports to complete the lads magnet appeal. QM‑10, ul. Pleszewska 1 (Posnania), tel. (+48) 508 80 07 55, www.bierhalle.pl. Open 10:00-23:00; Fri, Sat 10:00-24:00; Sun 12:00-21:00. €€. T­B­6

Opening hours: Sunday - Thursday 11 - 22 Friday - Saturday 11 - 23

BLOW UP HALL 5050 Blow Up 5050 is a combination of gastronomy and art that will blow your socks off. The name is a combination of the 1966 Antonioni thriller combined with the owner’s philosophy of making all her enterprises 50% art and 50% business. Complementing the award winning hotel and bar is the restaurant, where prices are at the very top end of the Poznań market, as is the quality. The seasonal cuisine - crafted by Top Chef Poland winner Tomasz Purol - is superb, and the surroundings will leave you feeling you’ve become part of a living art exhibition, making it a truly unique experience in Poland, and perhaps even Europe. QG‑9, ul. Kościuszki 42, tel. (+48) 61 657 99 90, www. blowuphall5050.com. Open 17:00-23:00; closed Sun. €€€€. T­U BROVARIA Go formal and pick the right-hand room for a smoothly subdued dining area or else do as the rank-and-file and head either to the brewing hall out back, the bar to the side, or the al fresco terrace. Brovaria has something for everyone, from half a roast duck to a veggie lasagne, with the premium price reserved for the grilled beef sirloin. Or consider tucking into the beer feast – essentially a huge platter piled inches high with a mix of seafood and meat. Not for nothing has Brovaria been crowned king of the expatriate scene.QI‑7, Stary Rynek 73-74 (Brovaria Hotel), tel. (+48) 61 858 68 68, www.brovaria.pl. Open 12:00-23:00; Sun 12:00-22:00. €€€. T 59


Restaurants

TRADITIONAL POLISH CUISINE A.D.1954

RATUSZOVA RESTAURANT STARY RYNEK 55, POZNAŃ +48 618 510 513

CONCORDIA TASTE A long-standing editorial favourite, thanks to their willingness to buck trends and try something different. The design is what you would call post-industrial (the live cooking station is a huge plus) and the clientele sharp-dressed and out to impress. The food comes beautifully presented by efficient staff and the seasonal menu features some truly mouthwatering options, which in the past have included the likes of sturgeon with roasted cauliflower, potatoes, and confit onion; smoked bacon with caramelised vegetables and cherry demi glace; and blood sausage with rye bread, vinegar pear, and mustard sauce.QD‑7, ul. Zwierzyniecka 3, tel. (+48) 609 00 29 64, www.concordiataste.pl. Open 08:30-22:00; Sat 09:00-22:00; Sun 09:00-18:00. €€€. T­U FLAVORIA Tucked away deep inside the IBB Andersia Hotel, Flavoria isn’t the type of place you just stumble across by accident. But those willing to sniff it out will find a smart, modern restaurant with a good mixture of international cuisine ranging from standard breakfast buffets (06:30 - 10:00 MonFri, 7:00-11:00 Sat-Sun) to more sophisticated evening dishes like sirloin steak with roasted garlic, spring onions, vegetables, and corn churros. With daylight streaming through the large windows by day and dim candlelight during dinner, Flavoria is one of the city’s more formal restaurants, ideal for business lunches and other such upmarket eating occasions.QG‑9, Pl. Andersa 3 (IBB Andersia Hotel), tel. (+48) 61 667 80 81, www.andersiahotel.pl. Open 06:30-10:30; Sat,Sun 07:0011:00 for breakfast; 13:00-18:00 for lunch; 18:00-23:00 for dinner. €€€. T­B JUST FRIENDS BEER & FOOD A place made for hanging out with your crew, Just Friends specialises in shareable dishes and Polish fare like beef tartare, sour rye soup, pierogi, roast duck with dumplings, breaded pork cutlets with fried cabbage; you’ll also find more international offerings like BBQ ribs, sweet potato soup, pastas, and sandwiches. The day starts with breakfast (eggs, croissants, or Polish apple pancakes), progresses to 18zł daily-special lunch (12:00-16:00 Mon-Fri), and in the evening the restaurant fills with friends chatting over beer and mixed drinks. Located right on the main square, this might just make for a convenient pre-party fueling point. QH‑7, ul. Stary Rynek 80, tel. (+48) 570 99 99 00. Open 10:00-22:00; Fri, Sat 10:00-24:00. €€. T­B­6

PASSION FOR FOOD Wodna 3/4, 61-781 Poznań Phone +48 61 852 49 95 www.lavenda-cafelunch.pl 60

LAVENDA GASTRO & CAFE There are a slew of cosy little cafes dotted around the back streets of Stary Rynek, and competition is indeed tough; Lavenda slots right in there with the very best of them, though. A relaxed atmosphere and a great array of hot drinks, wines, and light food make this the perfect place to share a lunchtime coffee or to meet for an intimate first date. Breakfast is served daily between 08:00 and 13:00, while lunchtime goes from 12:30 until 16:00.QI‑7, ul. Wodna 3/4, tel. (+48) 61 852 49 95, www.lavendacafelunch.pl. Open 08:00-22:00; Thu, Fri, Sat 08:0023:00. €€. T­6


Restaurants PROJEKT KUCHNIA Poznań’s culinary scene has come on leaps and bounds over the last couple of years and nowhere is it more evident than here. Located in the heart of the city’s bustling Stary Browar shopping centre, Projekt Kuchnia provides a sleek, sexy environment in which to enjoy some of the finest food around town. Oh, and did we mention that much of it is organic, vegan, vegetarian, gluten-free, or dairy-free? Though the menu doesn’t discriminate against carnivores by any stretch, those on a special diet will find their ShangriLa here, and their foodie friends will be glad they tagged along. The top quality extends from the breakfast menu to the wine list, and if you’re browsing around the Old Brewery, you can stop your search for the best place to eat this is it.QG‑9, ul. Półwiejska 42 (Stary Browar Shopping Mall), tel. (+48) 606 99 29 99, www.projektkuchnia.pl. Open 09:00-21:00; Sun 09:00-20:00. On shopping-ban Sundays 10:00-18:00. €€. T­U RESTAURACJA MUGA Located right next door to Casa de Vinos wine bar (just step through the glass door), MUGA has managed to serve up a perfect mixture of fine European food, great service, and excellent wine. The seasonal menu rivals anything else we’ve sampled and the bright, well-lit interior makes for a warm and inviting stay. A perfect spot for courting couples, business deals, and those looking to impress; first-daters should head to the far corner where intimacy is almost encouraged.QH‑8, ul. Krysiewicza 5, tel. (+48) 61 855 10 35, www.restauracjamuga.pl. Open 17:00-22:00; Sat 13:00-22:00; closed Sun. €€€. RESTAURACJA PATIO PROVENCE Situated within spitting distance of the main square, this is one of Poznań’s hidden treasures. The main dining room is much like that of any restaurant, but head through the back and you find yourself in a small, beautifully-lit covered courtyard which will have you kneeling down on one knee and proposing to your darling within minutes. With a fashionable mix of baked eggplant, salmon with date sauce and vegetable gratin, confit duck breast, and other international dishes, the menu caters to a variety of tastes, as does the wine list. An absolute diamond, you won’t want to go anywhere after your meal.QI‑7, Pl. Kolegiacki 5 (Hotel Kolegiacki), tel. (+48) 61 855 05 05. Open 12:0022:00. €€. T­U SPOT. Fashion, design, and cuisine collide at SPOT, a unique shopping complex set inside the beautifully restored late 19th-century Wilda power station, which is surrounded by a lovely green park. Home to several shops and services, it all serves as mere garnish for the excellent restaurant, which should be your main motivation for visiting. Sporting a smart post-industrial swagger with monochrome colours, exposed bricks, and retro kitsch decor, the atmosphere is inspired, and the menu offers sophisticated European cuisine accented by Asian flavours, including vegetarian and gluten-free dishes. With craft beer, a large selection of 61


Restaurants wines, and their own sommelier, this is Poznań at its cutting edge best.Qul. Dolna Wilda 87, tel. (+48) 61 835 88 40, www.spot.poznan.pl. Open 10:30-22:00; Fri, Sat 10:3023:00; Sun 10:30-19:00; closed Mon. €€€. T­U­6

Eat all you want

WERANDA LUNCH & WINE Weranda is a restaurant worthy of its setting at the confluence of the old and new portions of the vast Stary Browar shopping centre, with an open two-story skylit space (what the hell are those colourful things hanging from the ceiling?) that is breathtaking even in a building that’s known for its architecture. If upscale mall dining exists then Weranda has perfected it, with a daily lunch menu (29zł from 12:00 till the food runs out) that can include anything from pasta to grilled meat to whatever strikes the chef’s fancy. All of it can be paired with wine, easily making shopping an afterthought. On non-shopping-ban Sundays (currently the last Sunday of each month) the restaurant is open 10:00-20:00.QG‑9, ul. Półwiejska 42 (Stary Browar), tel. (+48) 61 859 69 69, www.werandafamily.com. Open 09:00-22:00; Thu, Fri, Sat 09:00-23:00; Sun 12:00-18:00. €€€. T

60zł per person

ITALIAN

Korean-Japanese cuisine Circular sushi bar

y Happ

hour

12:00 - 17:00

All week!

sushi Buffet 17:00 - 22:00 70zł per person

BAR A BOO Looking for Poznań’s best pizzeria? Look no further. To be honest, labelling this place a pizzeria is a bit of a cop out as the menu also offers up breakfasts, macaroni dishes, and salads, and the smart, elegant interior rivals some of the city’s better restaurants. A good mixture of wines to order by the glass or bottle and plenty of beers and spirits mean that if you’re coming here to line your stomach, the inevitable ul. Taczaka pub crawl may kick off later than you planned.QF‑8, ul. Taczaka 11, tel. (+48) 61 883 43 15, www.baraboo.pl. Open 10:00-24:00; Sat 11:00-01:00; Sun 11:00-23:00. €€. T FIGARO Romantic repasts and serious business dinners take place amongst these starched tablecloths and vases of flowers. Prices are steep, but well within the spending power of most Western visitors. Diners can choose from a large list of pastas, beef tenderloin, veal, and an expansive wine list. What Figaro is famous for though is its fresh fish and seafood, which is said to be among the best in the city. Those wanting to really push the boat out may wish to take advantage of the restaurant’s VIP room, which can be hired out for those extra special occasions. The kitchen closes at 22:00 Mon-Sat, so don’t leave your culinary feast till the last minute.QG‑8, ul. Ogrodowa 17, tel. (+48) 61 856 01 89, www.restauracjafigaro.eu. Open 13:00-24:00; Sun 13:00-18:00. €€€. T­6

FREE DELIVERY WITHIN 5 KM FOR ORDERS OVER 100 ZŁ

ul. Kramarska 15, www.zindo.pl reservation (61) 853-01-78 62

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Restaurants JAPANESE KYOKAI SUSHI BAR The City Park development just to the west of the centre (past the Trade Fairs) is home to some of the city’s best eating establishments and this is true for Kyokai, one of Poznań’s most notable Japanese efforts. Laid out over two floors, Kyokai features sushi sets revolving around a circular bar, while a sushi sensei multitasks in the thick of it all. Set in a series of converted red brick buildings, the surroundings look chic and sexy, as do the clientele. Definitely one to check out, take tram 13 to the ‘Wojskowa’ stop.QA‑8, ul. Wojskowa 4 (Łazarz), tel. (+48) 519 37 61 82, www.kyokai. pl. Open 12:00-23:00; Sun 12:00-22:00. €€€. T­U­6 YETZTU Ramen, ramen, ramen - the best in Poznań, in fact (though that notion is now being challenged with the arrival of Ramen-Ya in Jeżyce). Tiny and decorated with assorted cutsey Japanese paraphernalia - beckoning cats, anime figurines, worried-looking bake-danuki - Yetztu offers several versions of the beloved noodles, including ‘classic’ options like shio (with wontons) or shoyu (with chicken) and ‘special’ creations like yakitori (with yakitori) or vegio (with a vegan broth and marinated tofu). There are also edemame beans to munch on, kakuni marinated pork belly, kimchi, and the very bold ‘wonton nachos’.QH‑8, ul. Bolesława Krysiewicza 6, tel. (+48) 61 840 17 12. Open 12:00-21:00; Fri, Sat 12:00-22:00; Sun 12:00-20:00. €€. T

RistoRante FigaRo ul. ogrodowa 17, 61-821 Poznań tel. +48 61 856 01 89 www.restauracjafigaro.eu figaro@restauracjafigaro.eu

ZINDO SUSHI KOREAN-JAPANESE RESTAURANT An expansion from their Warsaw and Wrocław operations, Zindo’s modern beige-heavy space still appears to be struggling to attract attention from the folks in Poznań. An all-you-can-eat sushi buffet keeps the place busy, and provides more of a bang-for-your-buck experience than the pricier dinner menu option - drop in between 12:00 and 16:45 for 63zł/person, and 16:45-22:00 for 73zł/person (or stay in and get Uber Eats to deliver). The Korean menu is a standout, and adventurous eaters can indulge in octopus, fried squid, or raw fish with vegetables to test their mettle. More traditional options like kimchi are reliably well done. QI‑7, ul. Kramarska 15, tel. (+48) 61 853 01 78, www. zindo.pl. Open 12:00-22:30. €€€. T

KYRGYZ U AIPO This delightful, bright, and simply-decorated hole-in-thewall serves a truly underrepresented cuisine - Kyrgyz - and Poznaniaks are flocking in to try it. The menu is short and to the point, offering the greatest Central Asian culinary hits: lamb kuurdak (meat with potatoes and onions), lagman (a brothy soup with hand-pulled noodles and meat), manty and samsa dumplings, a few salads, chak-chak (deep-fied dough with syrup), and milk tea made by the Kyrgyz owner, Aipo, herself.QC‑6, ul. Szamarzewskiego 8, tel. (+48) 609 65 53 18. Open 11:00-20:00; closed Mon. €. 6 63


Restaurants POLISH BAZAR 1838 Set in the historic building that once housed (and will again someday, according to rumours) the Hotel Bazar, the name of this smart restaurant honours both the building and the year it was built. Looking far pricier from the outside than it actually is, the food scores well in the price to quality ratio, and is served by a friendly English-speaking staff. Along with imaginative interpretations of typical Polish dishes you’ll find pastas, salads, and a variety of original dishes. Definitely a place to impress without buckling the credit card, though you may have to protect the plastic from the exclusive shops nearby.QH‑7, ul. Paderewskiego 8, tel. (+48) 61 222 68 64, www.bazar1838. pl. Open 11:00-22:00; Fri, Sat 11:00-23:00; Sun 11:00-20:00. €€€. U­B BISTRO POLKA NEW This modern, brick-walled bistro on the increasingly hip ul. Św. Marcin serves beautifully presented ‘new Polish’ creations courtesy of Chef Marcin Dolacki. While the highlights are many, one is undeniably the freshly-baked bread, made daily with local ingredients according to the inhouse baker’s secret recipes. Try it for breakfast (9:00-12:30) alongside a forest mushroom omelette or eggs benedict, or as part of the beef-cheek sandwich. For lunch and dinner, choose from a variety of elevated Polish dishes like duck with potato croquettes and halibut steak, which you can pair with craft beer, wine, or artisinal vodka. QF‑7, ul. Św. Marcin 76, tel. (+48) 661 77 77 94, www.bistropolka.pl. Open 09:00-21:00; Sat 09:00-22:00. €€. T­B­E­6

Regional Polish Cuisine

Stary Rynek 2 505 016 114

www.bamberka.com.pl 64

CHŁOPSKIE JADŁO Anyone who has set foot in Poland before will have most likely eaten in Chłopskie Jadło - a national chain which offers good old Polish grub at a reasonable price. This new Poznań location nails the formula, and trademark touristapproved standards like various types of pierogi, hearty cutlets, and sour rye soup in bread are as good here as you’ll find anywhere. The interior is also refreshingly modern, while retaining some folksy motifs, and a playground for kids makes this a good option for families. As is the case with most Polish restaurants, you’ll be leaving extremely filled with a smile on your face and a willingness to come back.QF‑7, ul. Fredry 12, tel. (+48) 725 10 05 25, www.chlopskiejadlo.pl. Open 12:00-22:00; Fri, Sat 12:00-23:00. €€. T­U FERMENTUJEMY Pickling seems to be the new hipster thing after indoor plants and knitting, and this small locale near the train station has dedicated itself fully to the new trend. Jars of delicous-looking fruits and veggies line the walls, and the menu offers exclusively dishes with fermented components, from kimchi to fermeted beet marinade to preserved lemon. For the full experience, try their fermented veggie appetizer plate and the fermented beet + pear smoothie.QD‑7, ul. Bukowska 15/1, tel. (+48) 577 83 09 16, www.fermentujemy.business.site. Open 12:00-20:00; Sun 12:00-18:00; closed Tue. €€. T­6


Restaurants

65


Restaurants GOŚCINIEC TRADYCJA NEW Located in one of the historical buildings of Poznań’s main square, the Tradition Inn is all about, well, Polish tradition. Serving no meat on Fridays but churning out an assortment of home-made alcoholic infusions (made from pine shoots, for instance, or from sloes), this restaurant is a throwback to 19th- and early 20th-century Poland, elegantly decorated with antique furniture and gold-framed paintings. The menu features the greatest hits of traditional Polish cuisine, from breaded pork cutlets with beets and potatoes to sour rye soup with white sausage to straightforward bread with lard. QI‑7, Stary Rynek 43, tel. (+48) 61 284 28 77, www. gosciniectradycja.pl. Open 11:00-21:00; Fri, Sat 11:0022:00; Sun 12:00-20:00. T­E HYĆKA While many restaurants in Poznań serve traditional Wielkopolska  duck (served with cabbage, apples, and dumplings) and pyry z gzikiem (potatoes with cottage cheese), Hyćka is the most reliable spot to sample a wider array of regional eats, including czernina (duck blood soup), grey dumplings (made with shredded potatoes), ‘szagówki’ dumplings, and the namesake hyćka, an elderflower cordial (also served in lemonade form). Though the decor isn’t spectacular and there are better places to eat in Śródka, it’s still worth keeping this place on your radar if you’re after very authentic Poznań fare.QL‑6, Rynek Śródecki 17, tel. (+48) 535 04 50 35, www.hycka.pl. Open 11:00-21:00; Mon 11:00-20:00; Sat 12:00-21:00; Sun 12:00-20:00. €€. T­6

ul Garbary 54 +48 61 851 99 70

Typical Polish Cuisine Slow Food Vegan Vegetarian Eco products enu Also gluten free m 66

NA WINKLU Plebeian boiled pierogi with meat or cheese and potatoes can be had in countless restaurants in Poznań, but Śródka’s Na Winklu (On the Corner) goes beyond, focusing on baked dumplings instead. Hide away in their small but hip interior and sample creations with unorthodox ingredients like dried tomatoes and mozzarella, liver and apple, blood sausage, or Mexican-style ground beef.QL‑6, ul. Śródka 1, tel. (+48) 796 14 50 04. Open 12:00-21:00; Sun 12:0020:00. €€. U­6 OBERŻA POD DZWONKIEM Resembling a traditional mountain lodge, ‘Under the Bell’ is bursting with giant timber beams, beautiful 200-year-old wooden furniture, rusty machinery, old pots and pans, piles of dusty books - even the barstools are fashioned out of saddles. It all contributes to a congenial rustic atmosphere, but the philosophy of the kitchen is hardly the throwback that the interior suggests. The menu is largely gluten-free and includes many vegetarian and vegan options; you’ll find both twists on  traditional Polish and regional fare (like potatoes with gzik  and confit duck leg) and more international creations like chicken burgers and prawns with shimeji mushrooms.QI‑7, ul. Garbary 54, tel. (+48) 61 851 99 70, www.oberza.com.pl. Open 12:00-20:00; Fri 12:00-22:00; Sat 13:00-22:00; Sun 13:00-18:00. €€. T­U­6


Restaurants PIEROGARNIA STARY MŁYN NEW This pierogi-obsessed franchise boasts a wide selection of the beloved Polish dish just off the main square. Inside a very folksy, tavern-like interior you will find a full range of pierogi styles: boiled, oven-baked, fried, and even a dessert variety made out of shortbread. Best of all, they can be mixed and matched, so you can try a variety of fillings from very traditional ones like potatoes and cottage cheese to more unusual combinations like blood sausage and cabbage. If dumplings aren’t your thing, you’ll also find soups, desserts (hot apple pie!), potato pancakes, and home-made drinks.QH‑7, ul. Zamkowa 7, tel. (+48) 61 101 50 00, www.pierogarnie.com. Open 12:03-22:56; Sat 11:03-22:56; Sun 11:03-21:56. €€. T­U­6 RATUSZOVA One of the longest-running establishments in town, and with good reason. Located right on the main square, Ratuszova serves up a vast array of healthy and modern seasonal dishes using the innovative sous vide method not found in many other Poznań restaurants. If the beautiful and unique interior doesn’t impress you (and it should) then the menu surely will. Prepare to indulge yourself with classics such as steak, roast duck with apple, duck pierogi, borscht, sour rye soup, lamb, fresh fish, and other Polish standards, or pop in just for coffee and cake. Two-course, daily-special lunch is served Mon-Fri 12:00-17:00. A perfect spot to spoil yourself.QI‑7, Stary Rynek 55, tel. (+48) 61 851 05 13, www.ratuszova.pl. Open 12:00-23:00. €€€. T­6 RESTAURACJA BAMBERKA A long-standing, traditional restaurant squirrelled away in the complex of buildings at the centre of the town square. Step in and you’ll find stained glass panels, floral touches, and a strong Polish  menu that includes a good selection of local Wielkopolska dishes like duck with cabbage and dumplings, czernina (duck blood soup), potatoes with gzik, gray dumplings with cabbage, Bamber blood sausage, and homemade nalewki - traditional alcoholic infusions. The beer is the cheapest you’ll find on the main square, starting at just 6zł for half a litre (Mon-Fri).QH‑7, Stary Rynek 2, tel. (+48) 61 852 99 17, www.bamberka.com.pl. Open 12:00-22:00. From April open 11:00-22:00; Fri, Sat open 11:00-23:00. €€. T­B­6 RYNEK Sheraton’s upscale dining offering is Rynek (The Main Square), offering creative, seasonally-changing ‘new Polish’ dishes and fusion cuisine, plus wine, craft beer, and cocktails - extravagant and delectable. During weekdays, 19zł salad buffet lunch is available between 12:00 and 15:00, while on Sunday between 13:00 and 16:00 guests can sample Polish Sunday lunch (obiad niedzielny) in an all-you-can-eat, buffet + live cooking station format for 99zł, alc and desserts included. A buffet breakfast makes an appearance Mon-Fri 6:30-10:30 and weekends 7:3011:00.QD‑7, ul. Bukowska 3/9 (Sheraton Poznan Hotel), tel. (+48) 61 655 20 00, www.rynekpoznan.pl. Open 06:30-24:00; Sat, Sun 07:30-24:00. €€€. T­U

TRADITIONAL POLISH CUISINE A.D.1954 WHERE KING JAN II KAZIMIERZ WAZA RESIDED IN 16571658 YOU MAY SAVOUR AUTHENTIC TRADITIONAL POLISH CUISINE AND DISHES OF AN INTERNATIONAL FLAVOUR EXPERTLY PREPARED BY OUR HIGHLY EXPERIENCED CHEF. FOUR DIFFERENT AREAS ARE AVAILABLE FOR OUR GUESTS: RESTAURANT, CAFE, BAR & SUMMER GARDEN

WWW.RATUSZOVA.PL +48 618 510 513

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Restaurants

Duck with dumplings and red cabbage

Stary Rynek 77 (entrance from the Franciszkańska street) tel. (+48) 618 53 66 00, www.wiejskie-jadlo.pl

WIEJSKIE JADŁO Wiejskie Jadło is just what you expect from a Polish restaurant - a warm wooden interior, bustling staff, and a huge menu of hearty grub like bread with pickles and lard, bigos, gołąbki, potato pancakes, pierogi, regional duck, and more. We enjoyed the żurek (sour rye) soup and after gutbusting sausages, it’s good we didn’t have far to go - they’re located just off the market square.QI‑7, Stary Rynek 77 (entrance from ul. Franciszkańska), tel. (+48) 61 853 66 00, www.wiejskie-jadlo.pl. Open 12:00-22:00; Fri, Sat 12:00-23:00. €€. T­U­6 ZDOLNI FOOD&SPORT NEW Bulking, cutting, or haven’t been to the gym in ages? This sport-obsessed eatery caters to all. There are essentially two menus: a high-calorie (but healthy) ‘bulk menu’ with the likes of pork chops and chicken with beetroot dumplings, and a ‘fit menu’ featuring lower-calorie options like Indian koftas and chicken+veggie bowls - though the portion sizes are still huge. Fortunately, nothing comes sprinkled with protein powder, and the ingredients are all fresh, colourful, and delicious. Clean eating at its best. We also enjoy the creative decor, which includes bike saddles and handlebars arranged on the wall like hunting trophies.QG‑8, ul. Piekary 24, tel. (+48) 666 61 20 05. Open 12:00-21:00; Fri, Sat 12:00-01:00; closed Mon. €€. T­6

SEAFOOD DARK RESTAURANT “Adventurous” isn’t a word we often like to pair with the word “dining” (after all, that’s how folks on reality TV end up eating spiders), but this place proves to be the exception. As its name implies, Dark Restaurant is devoted to having diners eat their dinner in inky blackness. We’re not talking mood lighting, either; the cavernous room is so dark that the waiters actually wear night vision goggles. The idea behind Dark Restaurant is that by impairing your sense of sight, you enhance your other senses, which makes for a more exciting dining experience. It’s also a great excuse to eat with your hands, because utensils are completely useless without the benefit of eyesight. Each of the menu themes - bizarre food, mood food, and a more standard option - comes with a variety of courses, and you aren’t told what you’re digging into until the meal is over. All these factors add up to a messy and intriguing meal that will have you guessing with every bite. Sure, some of the foods are obvious, but basil ice cream? Oranges with sea salt? Your tongue will undoubtedly be tantalized. Fortunately, your meal ends with a chance to talk with your waiter and the head chef, who delight in making you guess what you ate.QI‑7, ul. Garbary 48, tel. (+48) 61 852 20 57, www.darkrestaurant.pl. Open 16:00-21:30; closed Sun. €€€€€. 6 68

RESTAURACJA MOMO At Momo pasta dishes, duck, and salads are all on offer, but it’s the fresh seafood that really stands out. The specialty is the 80zł seafood plate filled with  mussels, calamari, octopus, and prawns, but the chef creates new delightful and imaginative dishes daily, with  the first page of the menu changed each morning. Of the two rooms to choose from, we prefer the smaller and cosier one, but many diners will no doubt prefer to keep an eye on the open kitchen. In the warm season, you can also sit out on a terrace hidden behind the building.QI‑7, ul. Szewska 2, tel. (+48) 501 41 51 36, www.momolovebite.pl. Open 13:00-23:00; Mon, Sun 13:00-21:00. €€€. T­6

THAI THAI FAST WOK A little gem of a place if you fancy quick, simple, and tasty Thai favourites at lunch-special prices, Fast Wok was recently enlarged to accommodate more traffic. Found through an archway leading from ul. Ratajczaka, Fast Wok, while having a Pole in the open kitchen, does seem to have got the basics of this ethnic dish right, something which isn’t a given in Poland. Nasi Goreng, red and green curry, and chicken in black bean sauce are a few of the dishes on the concise menu.QG‑8, ul. Ratajczaka 18 (Pasaż Apollo), tel. (+48) 508 52 89 89, www.fastwok.pl. Open 11:00-20:00; Fri 11:00-21:00; Sat 12:00-21:00; Sun 12:0019:00. €€. 6


Restaurants THAI THAI From fresh oysters, monkfish in red curry, and crispy duck, to classics like pad thai, green curry, and mango with sticky rice, this high-end Thai chain prepares veritable Southeast Asian feasts in a refined interior with dark wood, floral lattices, and Buddha ornaments. Top the experience off with a bottle of fine red, or try the 35zł lunches, served from 12:00 till 16:00 on weekdays. QA‑9, ul. Wojskowa 4, tel. (+48) 885 19 98 85, www.thaithai.pl. Open 12:00-22:00; Fri, Sat 12:00-23:00; Sun 12:00-21:00. €€€.

VEGETARIAN BYCZYN ‘No bitchin’ in my kitchen,’ proclaims the wall art, and the vaguely combative staff seem to agree. This small vegan eatery focuses on elaborate veggie burgers, which first entice with creative topping combinations and then disappoint with bland taste. We tried the banh mi burger, loaded with sweet tofu, pickled carrots, red onion, fresh herbs, and vegan mayo, which did nothing for our tastebuds; nevertheless, you might have better luck with some of the other creations, like the Mexican burger with a bean and peanut patty, chimichurri, fajitas, and grilled pineapple, or the Beyond Meat cheeseburger with vegan mac’n’cheese.QG‑10, ul. Górna Wilda 61, tel. (+48) 730 56 46 54. Open 13:00-21:00; Fri, Sat 13:00-22:00; Sun 13:00-20:00. €€. T­6 FALLA Falafel bowls so good, they make us want to weep. From the assorted pickles to the creamy hummus to the highly addictive seasoned pita bread, Falla churns out dishes that are not only expertly prepared, but also beautifully presented. First-timers will be wise to go for Fatima’s Hand, an impressive assortment of Falla’s best creations, which actually does come in the shape of a hand. Also on the menu: seasonal dishes taking advantage of whatever Polish greengrocers currently have to offer, harira soup, Tel Aviv eggplant, wraps, shakshouka, Turkish ayran, cocktails, and more. All this in a warm and stylish interior with industrial elements, squirrelled away in Poznań’s hip Jeżyce district. Recommended.QB‑6, ul. Wawrzyniaka 19, tel. (+48) 576 95 04 73. Open 12:0021:00; Fri, Sat 12:00-22:00. €€. T­6 WYPAS Widely regarded as Poz’s best vegan haunt, Wypas is known for heaping plates of “a bit of everything”; choose your adventure from Japanese, Middle Eastern, Mexican, Polish, or Spanish - or perhaps a nice ol’ bowl of ramen or tom kha soup. Bring your eating pants (trousers for you Brits) and wrestle local plant-eaters for seats at this below-ground hole-in-the-wall.QB‑6, ul. Jackowskiego 38, tel. (+48) 796 14 41 15, www.wypas.co. Open 10:00-22:00; Mon, Tue, Sun 10:00-18:00. €€. T­S­6

Read more reviews online: poznan.inyourpocket.com 69


Nightlife

Drinking from jars at Whiskey in the Jar (p.74).

Poznań bars are flexible - no matter what the official closing times are, most bars and pubs will stay open until the last customer has stumbled out. Most night spots are concentrated around the Old Town Square, but also check out ul. Nowowiejskiego (G‑6) and ul. Taczaka (F/G‑8) - both of which draw students in droves. If you don’t see it listed here, visit our website - poznan.inyourpocket. com - for reviews of almost every place in town, and the opportunity to leave your comments about all of them. Below are a few suggestions depending on what you might be looking for: SPLURGE The best cocktails in Poznań are found in Twelve Cocktails (p.73), Dram Explorers Bar (p.72), and Bar Susznia (p.71), with the latter conveniently situated close to one of the most exclusive danceterias in town - SQ (p.77). SQUARE With so many options, Poz’s Rynek can be overwhelming. Without doubt the most popular place is Brovaria (p.71), which regularly sees people queuing for tables in order to enjoy the in-house brewed beers. Of course it’s impossible not to mention Pacha (p.77) here - the

Where’s the party? /PoznanInYourPocket 70

legendary Ibiza club which has brought its international cred and celebrity crowds to Poz; good luck getting in. For the plebs, it’s the ever-popular Pijalnia Wódki i Piwa (p.72), of course. LADS If you need to catch the match, Poz has a rather classy sports bar in the Sheraton’s Someplace Else (p.73). Ministerstwo Browaru (p.72) emphasises plenty of obscure beers (including their own) for connoisseurs, while Brovaria (p.71) has excellent lagers brewed right on-site. Keep the night going in Pijalnia Wódki i Piwa (p.72), a cheap latenight eatery on the Rynek that will help you offset your hangover with piles of white sausage and pickled herring; it’s also a great place to meet the locals. COUPLES Another vote for Twelve Cocktails (p.73), Dram Explorers Bar (p.72) and Bar Susznia (p.71), the three best destinations for seductive cocktails. Those who prefer wine should check out Casa de Vinos (p.76) and Wino na Kieliszki (p.76), and if it’s entertainment you’re after, head to Blue Note Jazz Club (p.74), which attracts great international performers to serenade your better half. ALTERNATIVE Catch an underground concert or an obscure film screening at the cultural peculiarity that is Pies Andaluzyjski (p.76), participate in the Polish craft beer obsession at Piwna Stopa (p.73) and Ministerstwo Browaru (p.72), or try a self-serve wine bar concept at Wino na Kieliszki (p.76).


Nightlife SYMBOL KEY N Credit cards not accepted 6 Animal friendly U Facilities for the disabled E Live music X Smoking room available

C‑1 Map Coordinate

B Outside seating

BARS & PUBS BAR SUSZNIA Whoa, if there’s one place that keeps leaving an impact it’s the Blow Up. Their bar is the final word in industrial chic, with metal floors, exposed brickwork, and ceilings that stretch to the clouds. The artwork is mad, and deliberately messes with your head, as do the molecular cocktails, truly the work of a scientific hand. An in-house cigar lounge and extensive selection of wines complete the look; it’s not often we attach the word unmissable to a venue, so take note and visit.QG‑9, ul. Kościuszki 42, tel. (+48) 61 657 99 91, www.blowuphall5050.com. Open 17:00-01:00. U BROVARIA Brovaria feels an integral part of Poznań life, and it’s certainly become established as the main expat haunt since the demise of Dom Vikingów. Yet while it feels an ingrained piece of Poznań one look at the design reveals a modern, industrial space, one where steel and glass combine to create a sharp looking area that looks as edgy now as when it first opened. However, coming here to admire the interiors would be missing the point; this place is all about beer, namely the excellent house lagers that are brewed out back in the copper vats. Here’s one of the best microbreweries in Poland, quite possibly the best: enjoy it.QH‑7, Stary Rynek 73-74 (Brovaria Hotel), tel. (+48) 61 858 68 68, www.brovaria.pl. Open 10:0001:00. COOLIOZUM We were a little sceptical at the beginning but this place is unquestionably Poznań’s best sports bar. This isn’t the dark, divey venue you may be used to, rather a large modern space involving ice white sofas and a blue-lit bar; TVs aside, other bonuses include around 120 beers (with 14 on tap), as well as foosball and a few poker tables which seem to have a steady flow of customers. Head through the archway at no. 45 and find it down some stairs on your left. QG‑7, ul. Św. Marcin 45, tel. (+48) 783 48 76 91, www. cooliozum.pl. 6

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Enjoy your evenings at SomePlace Else!

happy hours delicious burgers and steaks craft beers and great drinks sport events live stream SomePlace Else (Sheraton Poznan Hotel) 3/9 Bukowska Str., Poznan phone: 61 655 2000 www.poznan.someplace-else.pl 71


Nightlife ENTERTAINMENT CENTER OF POZNAN

DRAM EXPLORERS BAR Grab your explorer’s hat and set sail for the famed world of fine cocktails and aged spirits inside this classy, leather-heavy bar just off the main square. Never ones to keep things safe and boring, Dram centred their newest signature cocktail collection around Bond, James Bond - so martinis (shaken, not stirred) are the stars of the menu, followed by a lineup of pretty cocktails based on the most memorable Bond girls. Those who prefer strong, barrel-aged spirits without the mix-ins can choose from an enviable selection of whisky, including seasonal tasting tests.QH‑7, Stary Rynek 92, tel. (+48) 739 90 31 97, www.dram.bar. Open 18:00-01:00; Fri, Sat 18:00-02:00; Sun 16:0023:00; closed Mon. E ISTNY WINE TAPAS BEER Refined but mercifully laid back (leave that tie at home), ISTNY offers a selection of 11 wines, 11 beers, and 2 ciders - all on tap - in a hip, industrial interior. Make sure to grab an assortment of tapas, which include pickled garlic cloves, prosciutto, chorizo, jamón serrano, and olives.QH‑8, ul. Podgórna 12, tel. (+48) 606 61 04 30. Open 18:00-24:00; Fri, Sat 18:00-02:00; closed Sun. 6

Święty Marcin 24, Galeria MM (3rd floor) www.mkbowling.pl

DRINK & BOWL

MK BOWLING ENTERTAINMENT CENTER At first glance, MK Bowling looks like a cross between an American diner and a night club - mainly down to the red booths, large bar, and larger choice of drinks including the very American option of ordering beer by the pitcher. It’s on the lanes (seven in total) where you’ll find the real fun, however, and there are plenty of daily promotions, including student discounts Mon-Thu until 17:00 (before which bowling is only 40zł/hour). QG‑7, ul. Św. Marcin 24 (Galeria MM), tel. (+48) 61 222 50 51, www.mkbowling.pl. Open 10:00-24:00; Fri, Sat 10:00-03:00. Prices vary depending on day of the week and hour of day: 1hr of lane time costs 69-119zł. 72

MIEJSCÓWKA Once the city’s most representative street, Św. Marcin has long been a snooze lane crammed with mediocre establishments you’d hurry past on your way to the main square. Luckily, the tide is starting to turn with the addition of increasingly recommendation-worthy restaurants and bars - and here’s one. Very ‘current’ what with the neons, exposed brick, and Pinteresty glassware, Miejscówka might not be the most original, but it does earn our seal of approval, and probably Instagram’s as well. The target group here is the more hipster types, so expect lots of whimsical cocktails and colourful shots.QG‑8, ul. Święty Marcin 29. Open 18:00-02:00. MINISTERSTWO BROWARU One of our favourite haunts for Polish craft beers; find AleBrowar brews like Black Hope and Rowing Jack on tap alongside the establishment’s own Ministerstwo beers and top-rated European names like Delirium Tremens. If we had it our way all pubs would be run by folks as knowledgeable as these fellows, who’ve boiled it down to wood benches, outdoor seating, and great beer. If you’re up before it’s afternoon, you’ll find the equally awesome Minister Cafe upstairs. Second pub localization at ul. Wroniecka 16.QG‑8, ul. Ratajczaka 34, tel. (+48) 601 53 37 47. Open 16:00-02:00. 6 PIJALNIA WÓDKI I PIWA The newspapered interior and nostalgic communist-era concept here are exactly the same as their dozens of locations all over the country (including a second in Poz at ul. Wrocławska 8, C-2): dirt cheap booze and dirt cheap grub like pickled herring and ‘awesome toasts’ to soak up the aforementioned booze. This place is packed at all


Nightlife hours, though it’s best sampled during the later stages of the evening when you’re guaranteed a right assortment of characters who are happy to spill out their life story for the price of a 5zł beer. Very ‘Polish’ and a welcome alternative to some of the Rynek’s more expensive and snobby bars. Karaoke nights take place Mon, Tue, Thu, and Sun 20:00-02:00.QH‑7, Stary Rynek 85, tel. (+48) 791 85 95 55. Open 09:00-05:00; Sat, Sun 10:00-05:00. U PIWNA STOPA Heralded for its broad selection - around 200 bottled beers and 16 on tap - Piwna Stopa is wildly popular with beer connoisseurs who don’t give two craps about trendy light fixtures or the instagrammability of the interior decor. Not that it’s bad: there’s a certain Czech tavern feel what with the old-fashioned wooden chairs, wall lamps, framed miscellanea, and fireplace (!) and live bands play jazz, blues, and rock during the warm season. Their leafy summer garden is highly recommendable, as are the cheese boards, smoked-sausage hot dogs, and other meaty treats (there’s even venison!).QI‑6, ul. Szewska 7, tel. (+48) 784 44 27 33, www.piwnastopa.pl. Open 15:00-01:00; Mon 15:0024:00; Fri, Sat 13:00-02:00; Sun 13:00-24:00. 6 PRL PUB There’s two communist theme bars in Poznań, and this place has the lower profile, the non-existent marketing budget, and a tiny entrance that’s easy to miss. But it’s certainly not second best, and if anything its underground chambers make it all the more convincing in its role as a hidden piece of history. Packed with memorabilia from the People’s Republic, and that includes pictures of Soviet icons and even a riot shield once used to suppress the striking proletaryat.QI‑6, ul. Żydowska 11 (entrance from ul. Mokra). Open 16:00-23:00; Fri, Sat 16:00-02:00. N SOMEPLACE ELSE SPE is a natural born winner – few places are better geared to meet foreign demands, and while the prices are undoubtedly steep (do you expect anything else from the Sheraton?), it’s a place where foreigners and locals mix with seamless ease, chatting about travels while sports beam down from their 9 TVs. American in spirit, you’ll find Route 66 extras mingled with rock pics, a strong menu of Tex Mex, burgers, and steaks, as well as more whimsical touches such as a car bonnet bursting from the wall. Taking centre stage is a circular bar, the perfect base to chat to staff while they fix earthquake cocktails and velvet smooth Guinness. Happy hours commence at 18:00 and go until 20:00 MonSat.QD‑7, ul. Bukowska 3/9 (Sheraton Poznan Hotel), tel. (+48) 61 655 20 00, www.poznan.someplace-else.pl. Open 18:00-24:00; closed Sun. U­E TWELVE COCKTAILS & CO. Located in the svelte Młyńska  12 business centre, also home to The Time restaurant and Wino na Kieliszki  wine bar, Twelve Cocktails offer classic cocktails, mocktails, and mouthwatering signature creations using unusual

Wine Tapas Beer Podgórna 12, Poznań

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Nightlife AL FRESCO DRINKING

© Leszek Jańczak

KONTENERART Open from May. One of Poznań’s most original spots, the seasonal KontenerART occupies a stretch of grass along the Warta River that makes finding the unusual venue feel like a drink-worthy achievement. Head down Ewangelicka (J-7) toward the Warta River and you may hear the clamouring of KontenerART before you see it. It’s worth the trouble - after all, where else can you drink in a stack of shipping containers surrounded by an artificial beach and “art” installations that stretch the definition of the word? One container operates as a stage, one as a bar, and the rest are filled with art projects that are more confusing than creative. Deck chairs and wooden pallets are the seating of choice at this hipster oasis, where no one is without a Grolsch and a pair of skinny jeans. Climb the stairs for a second-story seat that offers a view of the river and the ideal perch for people-watching. A welcome and unique summer alternative to pubs and clubs in the Old Town.QK‑8, ul. Ewangelicka (on the Warta River between Chrobrego and Rocha bridges), www. kontenerart.pl. Open 12:00-02:00. B­E­6 PERYGRÓD Open from April. Anyone who has spent an appreciable amount of time wandering around Poznań will no doubt be familiar with Pan Peryskop, AKA the Watcher, a loveable one-eyed maverick created by street artist Noriaki  (whom we write about more extensively in our street art feature). Well, this is one place where the little dude can feel fully at home, safe from municipal workers’ paint rollers and power washes - Perygród (previously Peryskop Garden), and its twin indoor venue Peryskop (ul. Dominikańska 7, I-6/7, open in winter), have been designed around their namesake character, with the needs of local hipsters and cool hunters firmly in mind. There are regular music parties and concerts, a more than satisfactory selection of craft beer, and even Peryskop’s own brew, Peryskop  Bro. A must for street art lovers.QI‑6, ul. Szewska 8, tel. (+48) 519 16 14 91. Open 19:00-01:00; closed Mon, Tue. B­E­6 74

ingredients - and prices start at just 25zł. To feel even more glamorous, take the stairs to the rooftop, where you can admire panoramic views of Poznań.QG‑6, ul. Młyńska 12, tel. (+48) 61 627 03 23, www.mlynska12.pl. Open Fri, Sat 19:00-02:00 only. X­E WHISKEY IN THE JAR What with Stary Rynek being most people’s first port of call, it’s always good to have a bit of variety. Whiskey in the Jar ticks the box for ‘good-old-fashioned rock ‘n’ roll bar,’ but this isn’t your typical grubby rock pub - rather a classy joint serving steaks and burgers and killer cocktails guaranteed to leave your head spinning (Don’t believe us? See how many of their Jack Daniel’s Whiskey Jars you can work your way through in one sitting). Keep in mind that the kitchen closes at 23:30 Mon-Sat and 22:30 Sun.QI‑7, Stary Rynek 100, tel. (+48) 515 72 03 36, www.whiskeyinthejar.pl. Open 13:00-01:00; Sat, Sun 12:00-01:00. E­6 WHISKY BAR 88 Steal yourself away to the darkened surroundings of Whisky Bar in City Park where you will find the ideal conditions to sit back and enjoy one of well over 1200 different types of the sainted liquid. Whether you’re looking for whiskey, whisky, or whatever it is in Japanese, you will not be disappointed with the elegantly backlit display cases holding some wonderful choices including some 25-year old single malts. Comfortable chairs and a modern take on an ‘open-fire’ complete the picture, and DJs get the party going on Fridays staring at 19:00.QA‑9, ul. Wyspiańskiego 26A (City Park Hotel & Residence), tel. (+48) 888 32 18 88, www.whiskybar88.pl. Open 16:00-01:00. U­E WIŚNIEWSKI The spotlight here is firmly on wiśniówka, traditional Polish cherry vodka made in small batches by Wiśniewski’s crew. With bottles of their product lining the walls, discrete neons, and huge cherry lights dangling from the ceiling, this unique bar offers more than your run-of-the-mill alcohol experience. Grab a shot for 11zł or a 0.7L bottle for 79zł.QH‑7, ul. Wrocławska 21/2, tel. (+48) 693 07 07 70, www.wisniewski.ltd. Open 12:00-01:00; Wed, Thu 12:0002:00; Fri, Sat 12:00-03:00. U­B­6

LIVE MUSIC BLUE NOTE JAZZ CLUB A vast multi-level jazz club whose spangly interior has shades of 90s club tragedy written all over it. Don’t let that discourage you, however; this is a legendary venue that has hosted some of the biggest names in Polish and international jazz. Do check their website for what’s cooking first - this space has been known to be rented out for teen hip-hop nights and other hooded-top twaddle, and if there’s no concert scheduled then they aren’t open. QF‑7, ul. Kościuszki 79, tel. (+48) 61 851 04 08, www. bluenote.poznan.pl. Open 40 min before event; check website. E


Nightlife

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Nightlife PIES ANDALUZYJSKI “Theatre / music / vodka” - this is how ‘An Andalusian Dog’ describes itself in short. Named after the 1929 surrealist short film by Luis Buñuel and Salvador Dalí, this eccentric den supplements its already alluring atmosphere with concerts, workshops, and performances.QG‑6, ul. Nowowiejskiego 17, tel. (+48) 505 27 91 21. Open 18:0001:00; Thu 18:00-24:00; Fri, Sat 18:00-03:00; Sun 18:0024:00; closed Mon. X­E

WINE BARS

new music club premium nightlife

experience! stary browar / level -1

CASA DE VINOS Thirty seconds from bustling Półwiejska Street, Casa de Vinos wine bar serves as an ideal stop-off for those who know they deserve a relaxing glass of wine (or two) after a hard day of shopping and sightseeing. The friendly and knowledgeable staff are happy enough to talk you through the 300 plus bottles on display before offering you a comfy seat in which to enjoy your final choice. It’s small, it’s intimate and it makes for a perfect little place to sample some of the finest wines from around the globe. Keep your credit card at hand - you’ll be needing it when it comes to ordering a bottle or three to take back home.QH‑8, ul. Krysiewicza 5/2, tel. (+48) 61 815 28 26, www. casadevinos.pl. Open 11:00-22:00; Sat 10:00-22:00; closed Sun. WINO NA KIELISZKI (WINE BY THE GLASS) The city’s first self-serve wine bar, ‘Wine by the Glass’ lets you pour your own vintage from a selection of forty. Just load up a pre-paid card by the bar, order a cheese board or some nice tapas, and enjoy your Dionysiac evening. Recommended.QG‑6, ul. Młyńska 12, tel. (+48) 61 627 03 00, www.mlynska12.pl. Open 18:00-24:15; Fri, Sat 18:00-01:30; closed Mon, Sun. 6

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CUBA LIBRE Set down a shadowy courtyard basement, Cuba Libre is a bouncy Latin venue replete with whitewashed walls, pics of Che, and wall space dedicated to an assortment of Cuban goodies. This place goes for detail, so much so that drinkers can even take a seat in one of those clapped-out vintage bangers you see pootling round the streets of Havana. The Fiesta Latino Fridays and Disco Latino Saturdays prove seriously popular.QH‑8, ul. Wrocławska 21, tel. (+48) 61 855 23 44, www.cuba-libre.pl. Open 22:00-05:00; Fri, Sat 21:00-05:00; closed Sun. X­E CUBA LIBRE SOCIAL CLUB An extension of dance-scene favourite Cuba Libre, the Social Club is an exclusive Cuban-themed cocktail bar with a focus on fine rum; try, for instance, their mojito made with Havana Club Añejo 3 años white rum. Frequent live Latin American music and DJ parties keep the tunes on-


Nightlife

brand and the patrons attempting the samba.QH‑8, ul. Wrocławska 21, tel. (+48) 605 04 07 66, www.cuba-libre. pl. Open 19:00-01:00; Fri, Sat 19:00-03:00. E PACHA Pacha? As in, the world’s most famous clubbing franchise Pacha? In Poznań? We’re as shocked as you, but yep, those cherries are real, and this is the only Pacha in Central Europe - validating Poznań’s growing international rep as a prime party city. Decked out in plush design and pumping out house music for the masses, Pacha is a divorcee’s paradise and one which is attracting big crowds looking to dance away those working-week blues. Will its reputation be enough to pull in the punters from Warsaw, Wrocław, and Berlin? Time will tell...QH‑7, ul. Paderewskiego 10, tel. (+48) 519 30 02 60, www.pachapoznan.com. Open Thu, Fri and Sat only 22:00-05:00. X PROJEKT LAB Inspired by the Berlin party scene - in fact, conceived as a direct result of the to-be owners’ wild night at techno club Berghain Projekt LAB is an experimental space and underground music venue that proved an immense hit as soon as it opened doors in 2013. The music of choice here is electronic and all sorts of alternative beats, often supplied by international DJs and bands. Brave the long entry lines and you’ll be rewarded with a true multimedia experience.QI‑6, ul. Grochowe Łąki 5, tel. (+48) 731 47 71 02, www.projektlab.pl. Open Thu 22:0004:00, Fri, Sat 23:00-07:00 only. X­B

SINNER NEW Brand new at Stary Browar, this sinfully delightful club offers a premium nightlife experience featuring fine spirits and signature cocktails, a top-notch sound and light system, and beats courtesy of top Polish and international DJs. With every party striving to be its own unforgettable show, this is a place to dress your best and mingle with well-heeled locals. To complete the experience, book a VIP lounge.Qul. Półwiejska 42 (Stary Browar), tel. (+48) 798 80 56 01, www.sinner.pl. Open Wed, Fri, Sat 22:0004:00. B SQ Dance with the fittest and the hippest in SQ, by far the most envied dance space in town. Silly haircuts and expensive wardrobes abound here, and they’re here for the music not the design – DJs arrive from all across Poland to play here, sometimes even further. The interior isn’t all that, but the nights are legend, and you’ll find no better place to puff the chest out and behave like a big time Bertie.QG‑9, ul. Półwiejska 42, tel. (+48) 663 78 65 47, www.sqklub.pl. Open Wed 22:00-04:00; Fri, Sat 22:00-06:00 only. X­E

Read more reviews online: poznan.inyourpocket.com 77


Shopping

Pamiątki z Poznania (p.82).

Yes, that’s a Burberry store you see in Poznań. And Armani. Even Versace. You can wander through the vast, awardwinning Stary Browar mall or the new Poznań City Centre spending złoty until you’ve solved the European debt crisis, but if you’re bringing gifts back to show your loved ones what a trip to Poznań is like, a Burberry bag made in London won’t cut it. That’s why we’ve made suggestions below for where to get gifts for darling that actually say, “I went to Poland.” You’ll find more local gift ideas and direct buying opportunities online in the Poland IYP  Shop: iyp. me/polandshop.

SUNDAY SHOPPING BAN Shops have traditionally had more limited hours on weekends, but since 2018 new regulations restricting Sunday trading in Poland entirely have been in effect. In 2019 trade was allowed on the last Sunday of each month, and in 2020 there will be a total of just 7 shopping Sundays. There are only a few exemptions to the rule, namely pharmacies, gas stations, kiosks, bakeries, open-air markets, Żabka convenience stores, and souvenir shops (oh thank god). Note that the Sunday hours we list for venues are the hours they keep only on those Sundays when trade is allowed. The following is a list of Sundays when shops are allowed to be open during the lifetime of this guide: April 5th and 26th | June 28th 78

AMBER & JEWELLERY FREY WILLE Fine jewellery and fashion accessories inspired by masters like Klimt and Mucha. Frey Wille boutique hails from Austria, and what sets it apart from most places is that the items on offer are handmade. The philosophy of the boutique is to create works of art which are rooted in humanism; pieces which are bourne from an artistic love and passion, and indeed, made by artists themselves. What’s more, much of the jewellery undergoes an enamelling process, binding fine glass onto metal, which revolutionised Frey Wille’s works from 1981 onwards to offer the fine pieces you see today.  QG‑9, ul. Półwiejska 42 (Stary Browar), tel. (+48) 61 667 13 94, www. frey-wille.com. Open 09:00-21:00; Sun 10:00-20:00. LILOU Pendants, charms, and delicate chains abound in this boutique-y jewellery shop staffed by immaculately-attired ladies keen to assist and advise potential buyers. Glamorous but not intimidating, this is the place to browse miniature shiny trinkets during an afternoon shopping break. Also located at the Posnania Shopping Centre (ul. Pleszewska 1, 10:00-22:00 Mon-Sat, 10:00-21:00 on ‘shopping Sundays’. QH‑8, ul. Półwiejska 8/1-2, tel. (+48) 797 33 43 52, www. lilouparis.com. Open 11:00-19:00; Sat, Sun 11:00-17:00. GALERIA YES YES jewellery stores can be found throughout Poland, but this location on ul. Paderewskiego sets itself apart by being an exclusive gallery, curated by YES founder Maria Magda Kwiatkiewicz herself, showcasing the highest achievements


Shopping in artistic jewellery by Polish designers. As such, it has played a significant role in the shape and direction of the Polish jewellery market for over a decade, and in addition to their lovely commercial display cases, the exhibits held here are always worth a peek.QH‑7, ul. Paderewskiego 7, tel. (+48) 61 851 58 48, www.galeriayes.pl. Open 11:00-19:00; Sat 11:00-15:00; closed Sun. ŚWIAT BURSZTYNU Major amber retailer and wholesaler with over 25 years of experience to their name - that’s a lot in a country that only returned to a market economy in 1989.QG‑9, ul. Półwiejska 42 (Stary Browar Shopping Mall), tel. (+48) 61 859 66 88/(+48) 607 07 07 33, www.desta-amber. com. Open 09:00-21:00; Sun 10:00-20:00. W. KRUK Poland’s oldest and most revered chain of jewellery stores caters to men and women with tastes that range from classic amber pendants and Tag Heuer watches to modern designs of their own making. Also at Stary Browar (ul. Półwiejska 42, G-4), Posnania (ul. Pleszewska 1, M-10), and Galeria Malta (ul. Maltańska 1, J-4). Opening hours subject to change.QH‑7, ul. Paderewskiego 2, tel. (+48) 661 98 05 61, www.wkruk. pl. Open 11:00-19:00; Sat 11:00-15:00; closed Sun.

ART & ANTIQUES ANTYKWARIAT Solid collection of antiques collected by Piotr Sobisiak. On offer is furniture, porcelain, silver cutlery, pitchers, jewellery and other pre-war treasures.QG‑7, ul. Kantaka 10, tel. (+48) 61 851 88 10, www.gem-art.pl. Open 10:00-18:00; Sat 10:00-14:00; closed Sun. ANTYKWARIAT (ANTIQUE SHOP) Specialises in old toys, technological relics, pre-war postcards, and other special keepsakes.QI‑7, ul. Klasztorna 1, tel. (+48) 61 851 75 13. Open 11:00-18:00; Sat 11:0014:00; closed Sun. ANTYKWARIAT NAUKOWY A vintage bookseller that rewards those who are patient enough to dig through boxes of old postcards, prints, and telegrams. It’s easy to lose track of time while meandering along the well-stocked shelves.QH‑7, ul. Paderewskiego 3/5, tel. (+48) 61 852 63 12, www.antykwariat.pl. Open 10:00-18:00; Sat 10:00-14:00; closed Sun.

BOOKS, MUSIC & FILM EMPIK This large store is a one-stop shop for foreign press and magazines (prices are gougey though), guidebooks, there’s a somewhat decent English-language book selection, CDs, DVD, video games and more. Find them in almost any Polish shopping mall. Also in Galeria Malta (M-9).QG‑9, ul. Półwiejska 42 (Stary Browar Shopping Mall), tel. (+48) 61 667 12 00, www.empik.pl. Open 09:00-21:00; Sun 10:00-20:00. 79


Shopping POLISH VODKA

© Pijalnia Wodki, Fabrizio Sciami

The Poles have been producing and drinking vodka since the early Middle Ages, distilling their skill into some of the best vodka blends available in the world. The two most highly regarded clear Polish vodka brands must be Belvedere and Chopin, both of which you’ll find in any alcohol shop. But you won’t find many tipplers throwing them back at the bar. While clear vodkas are generally reserved for weddings and mixed drinks, the real fun of Polish vodka sampling is the flavoured vodkas, the most popular of which we describe below. WIŚNIÓWKA Undoubtedly the most common flavoured vodka, wiśniówka is cheap and cherry-flavoured. You’ll see students and pensioners alike buying trays of it at the bar, as well as toothless tramps sharing a bottle in corners of tenement courtyards. A splash of grapefruit juice is often added to cut the sweetness of this bright red monogamy cure. ŻOŁĄDKOWA GORZKA Due to its very name, which translates to something like ‘Bitter Stomach Vodka,’ Żołądkowa Gorzka gives even the most infirm of health an excuse to drink under the guise of its medicinal properties. An aged, amber-coloured vodka flavoured with herbs and spices, Żołądkowa is incredibly palatable and best enjoyed when sipped on ice. KRUPNIK A sweet vodka made from honey and a multitude of herbs. Buy a bottle for Mum – drinking vodka doesn’t get any easier than this. In winter, hot krupnik is a popular personal defroster with hot water, lemon and mulling spices added. ŻUBRÓWKA One of Poland’s most popular overseas vodka exports, Żubrówka has been produced in Eastern Poland since the 16th century. Flavoured with a type of grass specific to Białowieża Forest (a blade of which appears in each bottle), Żubrówka is faint yellow in colour, with a mild fragrance and taste of mown hay. Delightfully smooth as it is on its own, Żubrówka is most commonly combined with apple juice – a refreshing concoction called a ‘tatanka.’ 80

VINYLGATE RECORDSTORE Worth seeking out, this is Poznań’s best music store full of thousands of new and used vinyl records and CDs covering all genres, but also with an emphasis on more contemporary DJ-favoured sounds like techno, house, electronica, drum’n’bass, breakbeat, etc. Inside you’ll also find plenty of DJ and home stereo equipment, accessories for taking care of records, music merch and other gear that make the crew behind Vinylgate the leading ambassadors for the city’s vinyl revival. QF‑7, ul. Garncarska 3, tel. (+48) 501 72 77 97, www. vinylgate.eu. Open 13:00-19:00; Sat 12:00-16:00; closed Mon, Sun.

FASHION & ACCESSORIES MOLIERA 2 BAZAR POZNAŃSKI Located in the gorgeously renovated Bazar Hotel, this luxury fashion boutique features women’s clothing, shoes, and accessories from top designer brands like Casadei, Christian Louboutin, Gianvito Rossi, Kenzo, Burberry, Moncler, Valentino, Aquazzura, Balmain, Isabel Marant, Alexander McQueen, Beach Bunny, Self Portrait, Mystique, Maison Michel, Herve Leger, and Zimmermann. Shop online to find even more swag and savings.QH‑7, Al. Marcinkowskiego 10, tel. (+48) 512 03 88 08, www.Moliera2.com. Open 11:00-20:00; Sat 11:00-19:00.

GIFTS & SOUVENIRS CEPELIA A leading chain of souvenir shops selling native arts and handicrafts.QI‑7, ul. Klasztorna 21, tel. (+48) 61 852 58 14, www.cepelia.pl. Open 10:00-18:00; Sat 10:00-14:00; closed Sun. CULTURAL INFORMATION CENTRE A wide selection of souvenirs connected with Poznań including lots of stuff with the most popular symbols of Poznań. Pick up t-shirts, cups, ornaments, post cards, and the like all associated with the head-banging goats, for instance. You’ll also find tickets and event information.QG‑7, ul. Ratajczaka 44, tel. (+48) 61 854 07 54, www.cik.poznan.pl. Open 10:00-18:00; Sat 10:00-17:00; closed Sun. Y HANDMADE For souvenirs which are both authentic and actually useful, hand-painted pottery is the way to go; easily recognisable across Poland, these beauties from the Bolesławiec Pottery Factory have a trademark look and a tradition dating back to the 14th century. We recommend skipping the tacky tourist kitsch and considering Handmade your one-stop-shop for gifts to bring back home. Whisper “IYP” to the cashier for a special 5% discount.QF‑7, ul. Mielżyńskiego 16, tel. (+48) 61 284 17 04. Open 10:00-18:00; Sat 10:0015:00; closed Sun.


Shopping

Boutique - Atelier

Symbols of precious moments Lilou is an upscale polish jewelry brand created by Magdalena Mousson-Lestang. Lilou’s philosophy is to create unique, engraved j e w e l r y , customized and customizable to mark events, small and big stories of your life, emotions or simply to please or be pleased. Real caskets in terms of architecture, Lilou Boutique - Atelier are warm and inviting stores where engraving is handmade on demand. Lilou jewelry is made of 14k gold, 925 silver or 23 k. platedgold, and can be accessorized with strings, ribbons, leather bracelets and precious stones, crystals and pearls. Mark stories of your life by creating unique, engraved jewelry.

POZNAŃ, Półwiejska 8/1-2 Street POSNANIA SHOPPING & LIFESTYLE, 1 Pleszewska Street lilouparis.com /bemylilou

/bemylilou

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Shopping MARKETS

PAMIĄTKI Z POZNANIA Souvenirs galore - magnets, t-shirts, postcards (oh the nostalgia), handicrafts, mugs, and wonderful Bolesławiec ceramics should take care of your most pressing souvenir needs.QH‑8, ul. Wrocławska 25A, tel. (+48) 517 59 41 38. Open 10:00-19:00; Sat 10:00-18:00; Sun 11:00-16:00.

SHOPPING MALLS

Poznań’s open-air markets are the best places to get cheap local produce and some of the only places in the centre where you can buy vegetables that aren’t white or in jars. Add to that meats, cheeses, spices, baked goods, doorknobs, dog leashes, pagers, potholders and literally anything else you can think of and you’ve got yourself a nifty cultural experience as well. Practise your “proszę” and point skills at any of the unique shopping environments listed below, and remember that haggling and attempting to pay with large bills will both be met with disdain.

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AVENIDA POZNAŃ Shopping ‘centres’ simply don’t get any more ‘central’ than this modern marvel located right next to Poznań’s impressive new train station (lovingly dubbed ‘the breadbox’); as such, it couldn’t possibly be better connected to public transport or easier to get to and from. Featuring over 200 retail spaces, including Media Markt, H&M, TK Maxx, Mango, Reserved, and Peek & Cloppenburg, Avenida Poznań also offers plenty of cafes, restaurants, and fast food eateries (like Costa Coffee and Sushi Point), as well as the ‘Avenide Lounge’ and a multilevel parking garage (parking up to 3h is free of charge). Opened in October 2013, if nothing else this megacomplex is worth checking out just to appreciate how much Poznań has developed and progressed over the last several years.QE‑9, ul. Stanisława Matyi 2, tel. (+48) 61 627 01 90, www.avenidapoznan.com. Open 09:0021:00; Sun 09:00-20:00.

JEŻYCE MARKET One of Poznań’s most historic and centrally located markets is just west of the Old Town on historic Rynek Jeżycki. Established in 1891, this was once one of the city’s finest market squares, as evidenced by the faded glory of some of the intricate Art Nouveau facades on the tenement buildings that surround it. Lately the area has been going through a bit of a resurgence, and though the market itself may be a bit tatty and you can hardly expect English to be spoken or understood, the 400 merchant stalls here are still a good place to pick up fresh fruit and vegetables, as well as peruse clothing and other random goods you might be wiser not to take home. You certainly won’t beat the prices.QC‑6, Rynek Jeżycki, www.targowiska.com.pl. Open 06:00-20:00; closed Sun.

FACTORY POZNAŃ This outlet centre, one of just a few establishments of this type in Europe, is preoccupied with fashion, offering top brand names at 30-70% discounts over other shopping malls. Recognisable names among the brands include Puma, Calzedonia, Desigual, Gino Rossi, 4F, Nike, Timberland, Guess, Tommy Hilfiger, Calvin Klein, and more. To get here, take tram number 2 or 9  from  ‘Pl. Wiosny Ludów’ (on ul. Strzelecka, H-8) to the terminus at ‘Dębiec’, then  change to bus 610, getting off at ‘Luboń / Factory Outlet’ - or let jakdojade.pl figure out the optimal route for you.Qul. Dębiecka 1, Luboń, tel. (+48) 61 652 30 30, www.factory.pl. Open 10:00-21:00; Sat 09:00-21:00; Sun 09:00-20:00.

WIELKOPOLSKA MARKET With Poznań’s historic main market square apparently not big enough, fruit and veg merchants have been relegated to this 1600 square metre plaza only a few minutes walk away. Renovated and generally more orderly than some of Poz’s other open-air markets, this is the best place for fresh produce in the Old Town. Among its 200 tent-covered stalls you’ll also find copious amounts of meat, cheese, nuts, and other food products, fresh-cut flowers, pots and pans, socks and sweatpants, sweets, screws, staplers, toilet scrubbers, and whatever else you can imagine.QH‑6, Pl. Wielkopolski, www.targowiska.com.pl. Open 06:00-20:00; closed Sun.

POSNANIA Poznań’s new shopping behemoth swung its doors open in late 2016 in a style so lavish, even Eva Longoria couldn’t keep away (yes, it’s not everyday that random Polish shopping malls manage to invite A-list celebrities). Inspired perhaps by the celebrated Stary Browar shopping complex, which manages to seamlessly blend retail space with creative contemporary art, Posnania collaborated with Pop-up Galerie 208 to integrate unique sculptures and installations into its layout. The most eye-catching of those is David Mesguich’s Lucie, the sculpture of a little girl symbolising the future, located outside near the main entrance. Oh, and the shopping? They’ve got brands like Guess, MAC, Sephora, Pinko, and many more.QM‑10, ul. Pleszewska 1, tel. (+48) 61 628 65 27, www.posnania.eu. Open 10:00-22:00; Sun 10:00-21:00.


Shopping

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Health & Services 24-HOUR SHOPS LEWIATANQG‑8, ul. Św. Marcin 28, www.lewiatan.pl. LOTOSQL‑7, ul. Jana Pawła II 2, tel. (+48) 519 07 56 26.

24-HOUR POST OFFICE POCZTA POLSKAQD‑9, ul. Głogowska 17, tel. (+48) 61 869 72 67, www.poczta-polska.pl. Open 24 hours.

COMPUTER REPAIR DOCTOR GADGET Computer, tablet, and smartphone repairs, chargers and powerbanks for sale.QF‑8, ul. Kościuszki 72/5B, tel. (+48) 690 98 30 33, www.doctorgadget.pl. Open 11:00-18:00; closed Sat, Sun. NN SERWIS Laptop and tablet repairs.QG‑8, ul. Św. Marcin 28, tel. (+48) 602 39 67 16, www.nnserwis.pl. Open 08:00-18:00; Mon, Wed 08:00-19:00; Sat 10:00-14:00; closed Sun.

CONSULATES & EMBASSIES AMERICAN CONSULATE IN POZNAŃ QH‑7, ul. Paderewskiego 8, tel. (+48) 61 851 85 16, www.pl.usembassy.gov.

EMERGENCY In the case of an emergency, mobile phone users should dial 112 to be forwarded to the police, fire department or ER. From a landline or public phone dial the following: Ambulance: 999; Fire: 998; Police: 997. English, German and Russian speakers have separate lines specifically designed for foreigners in distress: +48 608 599 999 (mobile) or +48 22 278 77 77 (landline). For urgent medical emergencies, use the listings below. The emergency room in PL is called SOR and should only be visited when absolutely necessary. In less urgent crises we recommend you visit a private clinic, where you’ll get better service and avoid the notoriously long queues in Polish hospitals. HCP MEDICAL CENTRE (EMERGENCY ROOM) Poznań’s most central Emergency Room (SOR), located south of the train station in Wilda.Qul. 28 Czerwca 1956 r. 194 (Wilda), tel. (+48) 61 22 74 181, www. cmhcp.pl. JÓZEF STRUS MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL Qul. Szwajcarska 3 (Nowe Miasto), tel. (+48) 61 873 93 46, www.szpital-strusia.poznan.pl. 84

AUSTRIAN HONORARY CONSULATE IN POZNAŃ QF‑7, ul. Aleksandra Fredry 1/18, tel. (+48) 61 855 19 91, www.konsulataustrii.pl. RUSSIAN CONSULATE IN POZNAŃ Qul. Bukowska 53A, tel. (+48) 61 841 77 40, www. poznan.mid.ru.

CURRENCY EXCHANGE KANTOR GOLD QH‑8, Pl. Wiosny Ludów 2 (Kupiec Poznański), tel. (+48) 61 850 89 51, www.kantor-gold.pl. Open 09:00-20:15; Sat 10:00-20:15; Sun 11:00-18:15. KANTOR PRZEMEKS QG‑9, ul. Półwiejska 42 (Stary Browar), tel. (+48) 61 859 64 66, www.kantorprzemeks.pl. Open 09:00-21:00; Sun 10:00-20:00. KANTOR PRZEMEKS QE‑9, ul. Stanisława Matyi 2 (Poznań City Center/ Main Train Station), tel. (+48) 667 31 31 31, www. kantorprzemeks.pl. Open 09:00-21:00; Sun 09:00-20:00.

/polandinyourpocket


Health & Services DENTISTS

MAY DAYS (MAJÓWKA)

CHILLIDENT Root canal​treatment, microscopic endodontics, dental prosthetics, pedodontics, aesthetic dentistry, and other services. English spoken.QG‑7, Pl. Wolności 9/1, tel. (+48) 61 852 27 55, www.chillident.com. Open 09:00-20:00; closed Sat, Sun. DENTOPOLIS Dental surgeon with 30 years of experience. English and Spanish is spoken here.QA‑11, ul. Morawskiego 2D, tel. (+48) 503 19 03 37, www.dentopolis-poznan.pl. Open 10:00-20:00; Fri 10:00-15:00; closed Sat, Sun.

LAUNDRY PRALNIE SAMOOBSŁUGOWE Self-service laundromat. 16zł for one wash in a small machine (up to 6kg of clothing), 18zł for large (up to 8kg). Drying 5zł for 20 minutes.QG‑7, ul. Święty Marcin 39, tel. (+48) 604 91 65 94, www.pralnia.samoobslugowa.eu. Open 08:00-22:00.

PRIVATE CLINICS LUXMED A private medical centre just west of the Old Town.QE‑7, ul. Roosevelta 18, tel. (+48) 22 332 28 88, www.luxmed. pl. Open 07:00-20:00; Sat 08:00-14:00; closed Sun.

SPA & BEAUTY THAI-LAND MASSAGE Sightseeing can be hard work, and sometimes a bit of relaxation time is in order. Be it a traditional Thai foot massage, an oil massage, hot compress, or a classic full body massage, it’s all done by Thai masseuses at this splendid parlour located a leisurely ten-minute walk away from the Main Square. Monthly promotions and passes give customers a welcome discount, so do try to take advantage of those.QH‑8, ul. Długa 14, tel. (+48) 510 40 45 04, www.thai-land.pl. Open 12:00-22:00. THAI SMILE MASSAGE Anyone looking to escape the raucous buzz of Poz’s city centre could do a lot worse than relaxing with a fine massage. A peaceful, modern environment (with English speaking staff ) only five minutes from the market square, Thai Smile Massage is an ideal place to forget about the day’s woes while you let one of the authentic Thai massage therapists work their wonders. Two rooms to choose from (massage room and the oil room) and a cup of tea afterwards is enough for the IYP staff to give this place the thumbs up.QG‑8, ul. Ogrodowa 17/4, tel. (+48) 727 90 52 96, www.thai-smile.pl. Open 12:0022:00.

The Constitution of May 3rd, 1791 by Jan Matejko

Spring ushers in the arrival of not only fair weather, but also the country’s ‘National Holiday Season’, which in addition to Easter offers two other dates to note down: First up is May 1st, otherwise known as Labour Day, and a direct leftover from the communist lurch. In those days it was dominated by parades, speeches, and coordinated gatherings to celebrate the glories of socialism, and while Poland was gradually edging further and further away from Moscow’s manipulation, the people were damned if they were going to give up a well-deserved day off from work. Despite the political and social changes Poland has since experienced, the post-communist government opted to keep the plebiscite happy and maintain May 1st as a public holiday – only without any red flag and party badge nonsense. As such, it resembles the American Labour Day, which is basically a day off for the sake of having a day off. Amen to that. A mere two days later, on May 3rd, comes Constitution Day, one of the most important annual celebrations of Polish independence and nationalism. It was on this day in 1791 that the Polish parliament signed what was to become Europe’s first national constitution (and second in the world after the US). A ground-breaking document that introduced political equality between the bourgeoisie and the nobility, it also placed the peasant class under the protection of the government. Not everyone was happy with the reforms, however, namely Poland’s bullying neighbours. Russian troops soon invaded Polish soil, and in 1795 Poland began what would become 123 years of partitions. When Poland regained independence in 1918, May 3rd once more became a day of national celebration, though was banned again by the Nazis, and then the communists who followed. The holiday was finally restored to its current mantle in 1990. Together the May holidays are known locally as Majówka and are a popular time for Poles get out of town for a few days. Those visiting the country on either May 1st or 3rd may find efforts to enjoy themselves thwarted, as a large number of restaurants and bars shut their doors over this period. “Mayday! Mayday!” 85


Hotels

Sleep in Hostel & Apartments (p.88)

Visitors to Poznań will be pleasantly surprised to find that the city is home to some of the most impressive hotel properties in the country. While Poznań’s role as Poland’s epicentre for conferences and fairs has clearly benefited those who like plush accommodations and modern conveniences to come standard, on the flip side those major conferences can cause prices to shoot up when space is in demand (rates tend to double during the annual MTP, Polagra, Budma and Infosystem fairs). Fortunately most hotels compensate by offering impressive weekend discounts to encourage travellers to stick around and explore the city. With the increasing irrelevance of official rack rates these days due to these special offers, online booking discounts and other price variations, we no longer find it particularly instructive to list room prices in our guide, as we once did. On our website - iyp.me/poznan - you’ll find full reviews, photos and reader comments, on all of the hostels and hotels listed in our print guide, plus dozens of other accommodation options in the region; unfortunately, space constraints no longer allow us to print these reviews. Accommodation is categorised here subjectively based on a combination of lodging type, location, price and amenities. The venues listed here also serve as distribution points for our print guide, which can be picked up for free at the reception desks of the addresses listed. Sleep well. 86

CREAM OF THE CROP BLOW UP HALL 5050QG‑9, ul. Kościuszki 42, tel. (+48) 500 16 16 71, www.blowuphall5050.com. 22 rooms. P­U­B­K­H­D hhhhh CITY PARK HOTEL & RESIDENCE QA‑9, ul. Wyspiańskiego 26A, tel. (+48) 61 221 84 00, www.cityparkhotel.pl. 88 rooms. P­U­6­K­H­C­ D­F hhhhh IBB ANDERSIA HOTELQG‑9, Pl. Andersa 3, tel. (+48) 61 667 80 00, www.andersiahotel.pl. 172 rooms. P­U­ L­6­K­H­C­D­F­w hhhh ILONNQul. Szarych Szeregów 16 (Jeżyce), tel. (+48) 61 668 75 75, www.ilonnhotel.pl. 77 rooms (1 apartment). U­L­6­K­H­D­F hhhh NH POZNAŃ QF‑7, ul. Św. Marcin 67, tel. (+48) 61 624 88 00, www. nh-hotels.com. 93 rooms. P­U­L­6­K­H­D­F­w hhhh SHERATON POZNAN HOTEL QD‑7, ul. Bukowska 3/9, tel. (+48) 61 655 20 00, www. sheratonpoznan.pl. 180 rooms (13 apartments). P­U­ L­6­K­H­C­D­F hhhhh


Hotels SYMBOL KEY P Air conditioning H Conference facilities F Fitness centre

U Facilities for the disabled

K Restaurant

L Guarded parking on site

D Sauna

X Smoking rooms available

w Wellness

C Swimming pool

6 Animal friendly

C‑1 Map Coordinate

UPMARKET BROVARIAQH‑7, Stary Rynek 73-74, tel. (+48) 61 858 68 68, www.brovaria.pl. 21 rooms. P­K hhh DON PRESTIGEQH‑8, ul. Św. Marcin 2, tel. (+48) 61 859 05 90, www.donprestige.com. 73 rooms. P­L­6­H­F HOTEL DESILVA PREMIUM POZNAŃQG/H‑8, ul. Piekary 5, tel. (+48) 61 658 80 00, www.desilva.pl. 60 rooms. P­U­L­K­H­F hhhh HOTEL KOLEGIACKIQI‑7, Pl. Kolegiacki 5, tel. (+48) 61 855 05 05, www.hotelkolegiacki.pl. 24 rooms. P­U­K­H hhhh HOTEL MODERNOQC‑12, ul. Kolejowa 29, tel. (+48) 61 664 66 66, www.hotelmoderno.pl. 88 rooms (1 apartment). P­U­L­K­H­D­F hhhh HP PARKQP‑9, ul. Baraniaka 77, tel. (+48) 61 874 11 00, www.hotelepark.pl. 97  rooms (1  apartment). P­U­6­K­H hhh MAT’SQul. Bułgarska 115 (Grunwald), tel. (+48) 61 868 78 31, www.hotelmats.pl. 35 rooms (1 apartment). U­L­6­K­H­D hhh MERCURE POZNAŃ CENTRUMQD‑7, ul. Roosevelta 20, tel. (+48) 61 855 80 00, www.mercure-poznancentrum.com. 228 rooms (1 apartment). P­U­L­6­ K­H­D­F­Y hhhh NOVOTEL & IBIS POZNAŃ CENTRUMQG‑9, Pl. Andersa 1, tel. (+48) 61 858 70 00, www.accorhotels.com. 516 rooms (3 apartments). P­U­L­6­K­HF ­ hhhh NOVOTEL POZNAŃ MALTAQP‑7, ul. Termalna 5, tel. (+48) 61 654 31 00, www.accorhotels.com. 149 rooms. U­L­6­K­H­C­F hhh PLATINUM PALACE RESIDENCEQul. Reymonta 19 (entrance from ul. Wyspiańskiego) (Grunwald), tel. (+48) 61 882 39 40, www.platinumpalace.pl. 39 rooms. P­6­K­H hhhh ROYALQF‑7, ul. Św. Marcin 71, tel. (+48) 61 858 23 00, www.hotel-royal.com.pl. 35 rooms. L­H hhh 87


Hotels MID-RANGE CAMPANILEQul. Św. Wawrzyńca 96, tel. (+48) 61 845 66 00, www.campanile.com. 80 rooms (4 apartments). P­U­6­K­H hh GARDEN BOUTIQUE RESIDENCE QI‑7, ul. Wroniecka 24, tel. (+48) 61 222 29 99, www. gardenhotel.pl. 14 rooms (1 apartment). P­L hhh HL HOTEL LECHICKA Qul. Lechicka 101 (Stare Miasto), tel. (+48) 61 821 07 00, www.hotel-lechicka.pl. 108  rooms (7  apartments). P­L­6­K­H­C­D hhh HOTEL KSIĘCIA JÓZEFAQul. Ostrowska 391/393 (Nowe Miasto), tel. (+48) 61 872 63 19, www.hotelkj.pl. 35 rooms (1 apartment). P­K­H hhh HOTEL POZNAŃSKI Qul. Krańcowa 4, Luboń, tel. (+48) 61 649 99 88, www. hotelpoznanski.pl. 105 rooms. U­L­K­H hhh HOTEL ŚRÓDKA QL‑6, ul. Śródka 6, tel. (+48) 61 222 00 07, www.hotelsrodka.pl. 25 rooms (7 apartments). U­L­H hhh IBIS QJ‑9, ul. Kazimierza Wielkiego 23, tel. (+48) 61 858 44 00, www.accorhotels.com. 146 rooms. P­U­L­6­ K­H hh REZYDENCJA SOLEI B&B QI‑7, ul. Szewska 2, tel. (+48) 510 11 01 30, www.hotelsolei.pl. 10 rooms (1 apartment). P

PLATINUM PALACE APARTMENTS QG‑8, ul. Ogrodowa 17, tel. (+48) 61 671 05 66, www. apartamenty.platinumpalace.pl. 27 apartments. 6 POMARAŃCZARNIA QH‑9, ul. Rybaki 12, tel. (+48) 515 37 73 20, www. apartamenty-pomaranczarnia.pl. 45  apartments. T­L­6 SUPER-APARTAMENTY.PL QH‑6, ul. Wenecjańska 8, tel. (+48) 661 21 08 20, www. super-apartamenty.pl. P­U­L

HOSTELS EXPLORER HOSTEL QI‑8, ul. Wszystkich Świętych 6, tel. (+48) 600 96 55 55, www.explorer-hostel.pl. 22 rooms (22  singles, 12 doubles, 6 triples, 3 quads, 1 apartment). L­K FUSION HOSTEL QF‑7, ul. Św. Marcin 66/72, tel. (+48) 61 852 12 30. 17  rooms (6  doubles, 4  triples, 3  quads, 3  six-person room, 1 seven-person room, 61 dorm beds). U LA GUITARRA QG‑7, ul. Marcinkowskiego 20A, tel. (+48) 61 852 20 74, www.lagitarra.com/poznan. 22  rooms (6  singles, 6  doubles, 12  quads, 1  eight-person room, 78  dorm beds). L­6

RZYMSKI QH‑7, Al. Marcinkowskiego 22, tel. (+48) 61 852 81 21, www.hotelrzymski.pl. 87 rooms (5 apartments). U­L­ 6­K­H hhh

MELODY QH‑7, Stary Rynek 67 (entrance from ul. Kozia 16), tel. (+48) 61 851 60 60, www.melody-hostel.pl. 16 rooms (2  singles, 11  doubles, 1  quad, 48  dorm beds, 1  sixperson room, 2 eight-person room).

STARE MIASTOQH‑8, ul. Rybaki 36, tel. (+48) 61 659 00 43, www.hotelstaremiasto.pl. 23 rooms (1 apartment). P­L­H hhh

ROSEMARY’S HOSTEL QI‑7, ul. Wrocławska 13, tel. (+48) 61 855 27 61. 12 rooms (8 singles, 8 doubles, 2 triples, 2 quads).

BUDGET

SLEEP IN HOSTEL & APARTMENTS QH‑7, Stary Rynek 77, tel. (+48) 61 639 40 04, www. sleepinhostel.pl. 26 rooms (7 apartments). 6

GOLDQul. Bukowska 127A (Jeżyce), tel. (+48) 61 842 07 74, www.goldhotel.pl. 15 rooms (2 apartments). 6­H hh HOTEL RAMKAQul. Dąbrowskiego 474 (entrance from ul. Wejherowska 10, Jeżyce), tel. (+48) 61 849 94 99, www.hotelramka.pl. 29  rooms (3  apartments). P­L­K­H hhh

APARTMENTS APARTAMENTY VELVETQC‑9, ul. Śniadeckich 7, tel. (+48) 606 88 88 00, www.evelvet.pl. 24 apartments. 88

CAPITAL APARTMENTS QH‑8, ul. Piekary 16, tel. (+48) 61 852 53 00, www. capitalapart.pl. 30 apartments.

SODA HOSTEL & APARTMENTS QD‑6, ul. gen. Jana Henryka Dąbrowskiego 27A, tel. (+48) 793 27 27 20, www.sodahostel.com. 22 rooms (6 singles, 5 doubles, 3 quads, 8 suites, 52 dorm beds). P VERY BERRY HOSTEL QH‑7, Al. Marcinkowskiego 11/17, tel. (+48) 61 855 17 63, www.very-berry.pl. 23 rooms (5 singles, 10 doubles, 2  triples, 4  quads, 60  dorm beds, 2  six-person room). L­6


Index If the venue you’re looking for isn’t listed, you’ll likely find it among the hundreds of places in Poznań listed on our website: poznan.inyourpocket.com 1956 Uprising Museum 48 Adrenaline Alpine Coaster 45 ALEkosmos 53 Antykwariat 79 Antykwariat Naukowy 79 Apartamenty Velvet 88 Applied Arts Museum 48 Archaeological Museum 48 Archdiocese Museum 40, 49 Arsenał City Gallery 28 Avenida Poznań 82 Bajgle Króla Jana 53 Bamber Monument 30 Bar a Boo 62 Bar Susznia 71 Bazar 1838 64 Bierhalle 59 Bistro Polka 64 Blow Up Hall 5050 59, 86 Blubry6D 47 Blue Note Jazz Club 74 British Military Cemetery 43 Brovaria 59, 71, 87 Budnicy Houses 28 Byczyn 69

Cafe La Ruina i Raj 57 Campanile 88 Capital Apartments 88 Casa de Vinos 76 Cepelia 80 Chłopskie Jadło 64 Chocolate Museum 47, 49 Church of the Virgin Mary 40 City Event Poznań 25 City Fortifications 34 City Guide Poznań 25 City Park Hotel & Residence 86 Coffee Miel 52 Concordia Taste 60 Cooliozum 71 Cuba Libre 76 Cuba Libre Social Club 76 Cultural Information Centre80 Dark Restaurant 68 Da Vinci Caffe 52 Don Prestige 87 Dram Explorers Bar 72 Empik 79 Explorer Hostel 88 FACTORY Poznań 82

Relaxing in Malta Festival’s Chill-Out Zone (p.14).

Falla 69 FermentuJEMY 64 Figaro 62 Flavoria 60 Fort 1 - Röder 8 Fort 6 - Tietzen 8 Fort 7 - Colomb 8 Fort Colomb 7 Franciscan Church 36 Frey Wille 78 Fusion Hostel 88 Galeria YES 78 Garden Boutique Residence88 Genius Loci Archeological Park  40 Gold 88 Gościniec Tradycja 66 Guardhouse 30 Handmade 80 Happa To Mame 52 Hatti 58 Headless Figures 43 HL Hotel Lechicka 88 Hotel DeSilva Premium Poznań 87 Hotel Kolegiacki 87 Hotel Księcia Józefa 88 Hotel Moderno 87 Hotel Poznański 88 Hotel Ramka 88

Hotel Śródka 88 HP Park 87 Hyćka 66 IBB Andersia Hotel 86 Ibis 88 Ilonn 86 Imperial Castle 37 Indian Steak 57 ISTNY wine tapas beer 72 Jeżyce Market 82 John of Nepomuk Monument  28 Just Friends Beer & Food 60 Kawiarnia Stragan 52 KontenerART 74 KulTour.pl 25 Kwiat Peonii 59 Kyokai Sushi Bar 63 La Guitarra 88 Lavenda Gastro & Cafe 60 Lesser Basilica of St. Stanislaus  33 Lilou 78 Literary Museum of Henryk Sienkiewicz 49 Maltanka Mini Railway 45 Malta Ski Mini Golf 45 Malta Ski Pontoon Hire 45 Maltese Baths 45 Mat's 87



© M. Zakrzewski

89


Index

Silent disco at the Malta Festival (p.14) Melody 88 Mercure Poznań Centrum 87 Miejscówka 72 Minister CAFE 52 Ministerstwo Browaru 72 Min's Table 58 MK Bowling Entertainment Center 72 Moliera 2 Bazar Poznański 80 Monument to the Heroes of the Poznań Citadel 43 Mówish Mash 53 Municipal Scales Building 30 Museum of Armaments 43, 49 National Museum 49 Na Winklu 66 New Synagogue 34 NH Poznań 86 Novotel & Ibis Poznań Centrum 87 Novotel Poznań Malta 87 Oberża Pod Dzwonkiem 66 Od:zysk 29 Okrąglak 37 Old Town Hall 27 Pacha 77 Pączuś i Kawusia 53 Pamiątki z Poznania 82 Perygród 74 PETIT PARIS Boulangerie 53 Pharmacy Museum 50 PHOBAR 58 Pierogarnia Stary Młyn 67 Pies Andaluzyjski 76 Pijalnia Wódki i Piwa 72 Piwna Stopa 73 Plac Wolności 36, 37

90

Platinum Palace Apartments  88 Platinum Palace Residence 87 Pomarańczarnia 88 Porta Posnania Interactive Heritage Centre of Cathedral Island 38 Posnania 82 Poznań Army Museum 42, 50 Poznań Bamber Museum 50 Poznań Cathedral 39 Poznań Croissant Museum  46, 47, 50 Poznań Kaiserpanorama 50 Poznań Nightingales Neon 36 Poznań Stadium 51 Pranger 27 PRL PUB 73 Projekt Kuchnia 61 Projekt LAB 77 Pyrland Park 47 Ratuszova 67 Restauracja Bamberka 67 Restauracja Momo 68 Restauracja MUGA 61 Restauracja Patio Provence 61 Rezydencja Solei B&B 88 Rose Garden 43 Rosemary's Hostel 88 Royal 87 Royal Castle 35 Rynek 67 Rzymski 88 Sheraton Poznan Hotel 86 Sinner 77 Sleep In Hostel & Apartments  88

© Klaudyna Schubert

Soda Hostel & Apartments 88 SomePlace Else 57, 73 SPOT. 61 SQ 77 Stare Miasto 88 Stary Browar 35 SUPER-APARTAMENTY.PL 88 Świat Bursztynu 79 Thai Fast Wok 68 Thai-Land Massage 85 Thai Smile Massage 85 Thai Thai 69 The Bell of Peace and Friendship Among Nations 43

The New Zoo 47 The Old Zoo 47 Tourist Information Centre 25 Twelve Cocktails & Co. 73 U Aipo 63 ul. Żydowska 33 Uno 53 Un Pot 53 Vandal Cafe 53 Very Berry Hostel 88 Vinylgate Recordstore 80 VisitPoznań 25 Weranda Lunch & Wine 62 Whiskey in the Jar 74 Whisky Bar 88 74 Wiejskie Jadło 68 Wielkopolska Market 82 Wielkopolska Martyrs Museum  51 Wielkopolska Military Museum  28 Wielkopolska Uprising Museum 30, 51 Wino na Kieliszki 76 Wiśniewski 74 W. Kruk 79 Wypas 69 Yetztu 63 Zdolni Food&Sport 68 Zindo Sushi Korean-Japanese Restaurant 63

FEATURES & CATEGORIES Al Fresco Drinking Alphas Breakfast Emergency Enigma Markets May Days (Majówka) Mythological Fountains Neon Art Polish Vodka Poznań Stadium Poznań Street Art Poznań Trade Fairs Śródka Sunday Shopping Ban The Maluch Useful Transport Apps

74 34 53 84 49 82 85 28 36 80 51 29 50 40 78 19 18


LET’S MEET IN

BROVARIA The only place like it in Poznań

A business lunch, a family dinner, a date or a beer with friends... Original dishes from European cuisine and unique beer brewed in our own brewery help create a unique atmosphere for every occasion.

Stary Rynek 73-74, 61-772 Poznań, tel. +48 61 858 68 68, +48 61 858 68 78 • www.brovaria.pl


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Poznań In Your Pocket City Guide - March - June 2020  

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