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SPRING 1974

DELTAMU

METHODIST COLLEGE

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DELTA XI

FLORENCE STATE


BOX SCORE

PI KAPPA PHI GOALS Measurable goals of the fraternity recently accomplished are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

9. 10.

Chapter Advisor/Archon seminars conducted in five different regions this year. Star and Lamp article produced on subject of employment. "Getting a Job" kit produced to aid students in the securing of a career. Group Dynamics exercises used during Chapter Advisor/Archon seminars. Group Dynamics/Experiential learning exercises used at each staff attended conclave路 Direct and personal contact established with every chapter by a staff member. Each chapter visited this year with several being visited more than once. Scholarship Manual now available through the National Office. Recruitment Manual now available through the National Office. Colonies established on the West Coast (USC and UCLA). Colony established in Midwest (Missouri)

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STAR .and LAMP FEATURES Joe Sewell, the man who batted before Ruth in the New York Yankees' lineup, recalls some of the good old days of baseball. •

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Dr. Victor B. Scheffer discusses the morality of the killing of the fur seal. ~~-----------------~---------------------~--------~--------~----------

A review of a fascinating new book. "The Man Who Led Columbus to America" written by · Paul Chapman . •

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THE COVER - Three new chapters have been added to Pi Kappa Phi this spring. The fraternity welcomes Delta Mu, Methodist College at Fayetteville, N. C.; D elta Nu, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Ky.; and .Delta Xi, Florence State University, Florence, Ala. Read about the charterings on pages 10, 11 and 12.

MATERIAL FOR PUBLICATION All material should be sent directly to the Pi Kappn Phi National Offi<.:e, P . 0. Box 4608, C harl otte, N. C. 28204, to the attention of the Exet'utive Editor ' Durward Owen. Su~ge:-.tions for nrtides, news about yourself or other members and your comme nts are solicited. Pi Kappa Phi is your Fraternity;

The Star and Lamp is your ma~azine.

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The National Office has a file of literally hundreds of photographs, almost all of which are neatly identified. Recently, this one turned up in the back of an old file cabinet and it bothers us because we can't name these men. Written in pencil on the back is "Harvard Pi Kapp students" and rubber stamped, "For Reproduction only. Credit to The Marshall Studio, Cambridge, Mass." If you recognize yourself or anyone in this picture, will you PLEASE notify Durward Owen, Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity, P. 0. Box 4608, Charlotte, N. C. 28204. SPRING '74/ 3


Pi Kapp Joe Sewell, Alabama, 1920, has spent 35 years in baseball and today, at the age of 75, is actively employed as a public relations representative for a dairy corporation. . Sewell was the first man to go straight to the majors the same year he came out of college. He left the Universtt}' of Alabama in June, 1920, went to New Orleans for about two months and was called up as shortstop for the Cle~e­ land Indians (for whom he played 11 seasons) in time for the pennant. He spent his 21st birthday in a World Ser~s game. "It was a pretty good way to celebrate your birthday," Sewell grins. "I hit a double and a single. Everybo Y was congratulating me but we didn't have time for parties. We were in the middle of the World Series." Joe batted second in the New York Yankees' line-up before the immortal Babe Ruth for three seasons. He was~ 93 teammate of Ruth's when the UBabe" hit his famous home run off Chicago Cubs pitcher, Charlie Root, in the 1 World Series, but one of Joe's most memorable moments concerned a day when he did some hitting. d _,_ "We were playing the Athletics in New York," Sewell recalled d• "and we were fighting for the pennant. We must have ha 70,000 people· there. 11 "They had come to see Ruth and Lou Gehrig hit that ba · We knew that. "Lefty Grove was pitching for the Athletics. I got five hits in five times at bat and the last one was a borne .. run into the right field stands. When I hit it, Grov~ threw his glove into the air and followed me aroun _the bases, talking to me," Sewell said with a grind t "Ruth was waiting for me at home plate. He looke 1 me and said, 'Well, kid, they all came out to see rne a home run and you picked me up'." •

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26 January 1974 Box 24 San Luis Oriente Cuba My dear brother Durward:Hope that you and your family have had a Merry Xmas and that you all will have a very prosperous 1974A few days ago I had the pleasure of receiving the last Star and Lamp-I have enjoyed it so very much-as well as Teresa and many of our friends! am encl~sing a copy of the letter (of commendation) that I recetved from the Director of Mines, Fuel and Metalurgy of Cuba. A letter that I appreciate. On~~ ~O~h o~ Fe?ruary it will be my 60th anniversary of my mtttatton 1n Pt Kappa Phi at Iota at Georgia TechNow there are only very few of those dear brothers alive. Those boys certainly worked hard to build up our dear. Fraternity on solid foundation. And the work was continued by many, many Brothers very capable and that really loved our FraternityBrothers, may God Bless You and I as one of the early founders of Pi Kappa Phi want to thank you from the bottom of my heart. I wish I could have done more for Pi Kappa Phi-but I had to return to Cuba. I think that at present time I must be the oldest Pi Kappa Phi alive-1913-1914. Brother Rodriguez is from 1914-1915. Teresa sends your wife her love and her best wishes fo~ the year. How are your dear and beautiful children? Gtve them many kisses from Teresa and me. Hope you have time to write me soon. I have written to Marian Harper and am expecting her reply. I hear often from Betty Jepson. She is a very sweet girl and calls me her "big brother". Love and best wishes from-

Chic Quevedo

Chic was initiated at Georgia Tech on February 14, 1914. He graduated from Georgia Tech at the age of 16. He went from there to the University of North Carolina ~here he founded Kappa Chapter. Following the found· mg of Kappa Chapter he commenced working to create a group at Duke University and is considered also to be the founder of Mu Chapter at Duke University. In two years' time he graduated from the University of North Carolina with a graduate degree in Engineering. He went from there to the University of Virginia, at the age of 19, and did graduate work on that campus. While there, he created another group, and was disappointed when the National Council of the Fraternity turned down the petition of this local. Had they done so, he would have been the founder of three chapters of the fraternity. Chic was from fairly wealthy parents in Cuba. He returned to Cuba to manage family holdings. He later went to work for the Cuban government, and at the time of the Castro takeover was Chief Highway Engineer for Oriente province. Chic has attended many Supreme Chapter meetings, ~an~ Pi Kapps have enjoyed his hospitality while visiting ~rm m Cuba. He loves the fraternity dearly and woul~ like very much to once again return to visit with htS friends in the United States, but under current circurnst.ances is not able to do so. He has poor eyesight but at h1s advanced age does seem to maintain a very good health posture. Any alumni remembering Chic are ver'/ much encouraged to communicate with him. (See address at the beginning of his letter.) Initially following the change in government in Cuba we were not able to receive communications from Cuba, and Chic did not receive communications from us. !loWever, during the last six or seven years we have been able to receive communications' and he has been able to. receive letters from us. The person he mentions in htS letter is Bartolo B. (Roddy) Rodriguez, initiated Novern.. her 12, 1915, in Iota Chapter, current address: Box 163, C Victoria, Tamps, Mexico.

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The .letter to which Chic refers was in Spanish, but we managed to get .It translated enough to know that it is full of praise for Chic and ~Is work. The Cub.an official who wrote the letter on "the occ~sion of th.e ce!~brahon of Engineers' Day" ends his commendation by saying, yye are proud to be able to count among our rWa~ths thh.e most qualified people, among whom is Gonzales Quevedo I Im we are sure to realize our aspirations.'' ·

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RSHIP

FOUNDATION

Otis McCollum

A Special Thanks

Otis R. McCollum, Chairman of the Pi Kapp~ .Phi s.cholarship Foundation, has a hjstory of ~ctive partictpahon in community service. Born in Rockingham C?unty, N. C., he entered the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1948. There he served Kappa Chapter as Secretary and helped on various committees. After graduation in 1952, he served wit~ .the ~: S. Army 1952-54 and then in 1955, accepted a position With a New York stock broke;age firn1. In 1956 he joined the management training program of the New Hanover Bank (now Manufacturers Hanover Trust Co.) in New York. Brother McCollum attended Columbia University in 1955-56 and received his MBA from New York University Graduate School of Business Administration in 1962. lie became associated in 1963 with the National Bank of Washington where he currently serves as Vice President and Trust Officer in the Trust Department. Long a booster of community involveme~t by cit~z~ns, ~e has acted to support this concept by active partiCIJ?ahon himself. A former Director of the North· Carohna State Society of Washington and the Maine State Society of Washington (he was also president of the latter), he has been a precinct leader and presently. serves on the State Committee of his political party ..~e Is Treasu;e~ of the Spring Valley-Wesley Heights Citizens Ass.oct~tton. In addition he is an active member of the Dtstrict of Columbia Estate Planning Council and the Fiduciaries' Section of the D. C. Bankers. · I~ the early 1960's, he gave his time and e!forts to

The Pi Kappa Phi Scholarship Foundation has an. . nounced that contributions in response to the fund raising letters mailed during 1973 have reached the grand total of $9,174.32.. Four hundred ninety-seven loyal Pi Kapps have made donations during this annual drive.

house. In ad ition to his service as a Director of Kappa Council, Inc., he was Secretary-Treasurer of the Council for several years. Mr. and Mrs. McCollum (she is the former Hilda Hut~hins of Bangor, Maine) have two children, · Courtney {'oberts McCollum and Bradley Curtis McCollum, and they live at 4825 Rodman, N.W., Washington, D .C. 20016. . Of the Pi Kappa Phi Scholarship Foundation of ~hich McCollum has been a trustee since 1968 and Chairman since 1970, he says: ''Of all my community involvements, this ha~ to be the most satisfying. The Trustees are an outsta~dtng group, Who are dedicated to serving the Foundation and our

~fraternity.

''The assets of the Foundation have increased substantially in recent years due primarily to the generosity Of Pi Kapps everywhere, and these funds enabl~ the Foundation to assist, boost, and support the education o_f 0 Ur young members in an ever increasing manner, prtlllarily through loans and scholarships."

Otis R. McCollum, who is Chairman of the Foundation, asked that we thank each of you for your donation to the Foundation. Individual expressions of appreciation are not mailed to donors in order that the maximum amount of money would be available for the support and enhancement of scholastic opportunities and achievements within the brotherhood of Pi Kappa Phi. •

* * * * * * * * * * *~ * * * The following brothers are due special recognition for their generous contributions during the past year, each having given a minimum of fifty dollars:

W. Robert Amick, Omega '25 Purdue Rollin V. Anderson, Jr., Gamma '68 Univ. of CalifomiaB.e rkeley Charles H. Babcock, Jr., Epsilon Davidson Robert L. Bennett, Sr., Alpha Alpha Mercer Robert L. Bennett, Jr., Alpha Alpha '70 Mercer A. H. Bostater, Omega '31 Purdue Bern K. Bullard, Jr., Rho Washington & Lee Oliver E. Cathey, Alpha Lambda '27 Mississippi Thornton W. Crouch, Zeta '43 Wofford William M. Ford Alpha Eta '68 Samford Fred S. Gilbert, Jr., Alpha Epsilon '35 Florida William L. Gordy, Iota Georgia Tech Byrori E. Herlong, Alpha Epsilon '36 Florida Ronald E. Krebs Beta Gamma '59 Louisville G. H. Little, Eta '32 Emory Charles T. Manley, Gamma '14 Univ. of Ca-Berkeley Frank T. Marsh, Kappa '17 UNC . .CH James L. May, Jr., Omicron Univ. of Alabama Otis R. McCollum, Kappa '52 UNC . .CH Henry H. Meyer, Alpha Xi '28 Poly Inst of N.Y. · John F. Miller, Alpha Sigma '43 Univ. of Tennessee Beverly C. Moore, Kappa UNC-CH MarshaJJ I. Pickens, Mu '25 Duke W. A. Wallace, Alpha Charleston S. J. Westbrook, Eta Emory Ben H. Wilkens, Jr.._ Iota '21 Georgia Tech. John C. Wilson, Eta '28 Emory

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SPRING '7417


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Victor B. Scheffer, a Pi Kappa Phi alumnus and a world authority on the biology of marine animals, is also a Prize-winning writer and nature photographer. He graduated from the University of Washington with a B.S. in zoology • 1n 1930 and a Ph.D. in 1936. He worked with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service until 1969 when he retired to devote more time to Writing. As a member of the Service he traveled widely, conducting a number of studies, one of which was the life Process of the Alaska fur seal on the Pribilof Islands. In 1973, he wrote an article for a national magazine a bout the morality of killing seals for whatever reason. He has kindly given us permission to paraphrase from this work. Dr. Scheffer tells us that in an old trunk he found a "Band of Mercy" pledge he had signed in a school campaign in 1914 in which he promised that he would try to be kind to all harmless living creatures and to protect them from cruel usage. So, very early in his career as a biologist, he had to decide which creatures were harmless and the best Way to be kind to them. Seals come high on his list. As a background to the seal-killing controversy, he explains that the argument is simply a difference in viewPoints between those who would continue to harvest the seal resources of the world for the benefit of mankind, and those who would not. The history of man's relationship with this fur-bearing mammal is one of shame. In 1868, 300,000 of these animals Were slaughtered on the beaches of the Pribilof Islands. Men were consumed with a greed for these luxurious furs Which made them lie and cheat and gamble for their possession. Before 1911, when the Fur Seal Treaty was signed, the seals were even hunted at sea, shot indiscriminately, many of them pregnant females, and many sank to the bottom of the sea .before they could be recovered. However, we have begun to make amends. Canada and Norway are now working through treaties to reduce the killing of the seal population to a conservative figure. . It should be explained that the harp seals visit the sea lee off the shores of eastern Canada and Newfoundland to mate and give birth. The Alaskan fur seals visit the Pribilof Islands in the Bering Sea to bear their young in tnid-summer. The products of the harp seal industry are blubber, pelts, and leather valued at about $3 million a Year. Those who harvest the Alaskan fur seal reap their Profits (about $5 million a year) from the rich pelts of tho half-grown males and a thousand tons of dark red seal meat which is processed each year for animal feed. It is only natural that the industries engaged in this Profitable business should wish to continue it. Even the President of the Humane Society in the United States conceded that it might be more humane to kill a seal \\rith a quick blow on the head than to let it die from starvation or be trampled as a pup from overcro~ding. On the other hand, Dr. Scheffer points out, the sealkilling controversy has attracted an extremist group fallliliar to all wildlife conservationists- the professional saviour - well-meaning but more often than not inept, Unfair or inaccurate. They picket and propagandize with horror pictures of baby seals being killed and skinned. (Some of this is true, but often only half true and misrepresented.) Naturally we do not like to think of the suffering or

• death of any animal, ·wild or domestic, though we are quite willing to use its products in our economy. As T. S. Eliot said, "Human kind ·cannot bear very much reality." Dr. Scheffer, who has studied the Alaskan fur seal for 30 years, presents both sides of the question, amplifying them with statistics about the seal population in their various habitats. He feels that no one would deny the Alaskan native the right to kill a seal for food, but, at the san1e time, questions the right of governments to allow their killing to provide pelts for the luxury fur trade. Indeed, he would be pleased if the nations \vould agree to stop the killing of seals altogether, although he realizes that they will continue to be killed as long as world opinion assigns a high priority to their commercial use. Further, he dreams of the Pribilof Islands as a great international park of education and wildlife study. The cycle of life and regeneration would be unfolded before the eyes of the people who came to see the great herds of Alaskan fur seals swim in the spring. There they would give birth, mate, fight, and some would be trampled, and this is the natural way. Dr. Scheffer also would like to see completely independent citizen advisory councils periodically review all agency programs that deal with the conservation of the fur seal. He reports that much has already been accomplished by concerned people to reduce the carelessness and cruelty of the sealing business, yet more needs to be done. SPRING '74!9 •


First Pr

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On Saturday evening, April 20, 1974, the Kappa Phi Colony at Methodist College in Fayetteville, N. C., became Delta Mu Chapter of Pi Kappa Phi with 23 charter members. The chartering banquet was held at the Methodist College Student Union. National Vice President, John Wilson, was the speaker and James L.Daley, Jr. of Chase Manhattan Bank in New York and former Field Secretary acted as Chartering Officer. Initiating teams were Delta Lambda, UNC at Charlotte, and Delta Kappa, Pembroke State. The history of Delta Mu starts November 9, 1972, when six students met in the science building of the college to found what was to be the school's first fraternal organization. They called themselves the Methodist College Men's Club. During the year that followed, the club organized dances and parties, remodeled and painted, distributed trash barrels, sponsored a student-administration basketball game and, generally, won the support and admiration of the faculty, administration and students. When Dr. Richard Pearce became the new President of Methodist College in the spring of 1973, the rules against Greek fraternities were relaxed. Alvin Leslie, as President of the Methodist Men's Club, talked with Dr. Pearce about bringing Pi Kappa Phi to the campus and received his permission to attempt to do so. Jerry Matthews, Assistant Executive Director of the Fraternity, was contacted and, subsequently, the Methodist College Men's Club became Kappa Phi Colony, November 11, 1973. The first officers were elected, membership grew, and the men became more involved in campus activities. Every intramural sport found a Kappa Phi team on the roster; but the major contribution of the colony was the production of the first Miss Methodist College Pageant. Since the introduction of Pi Kappa Phi at Methodist College, another fraternity and a sorority have been started. As pioneers for the fraternity system on campus, Pi Kapps were proud but not surprised to have two of their members elected as Chairman and Vice-Chairman of the Interfraternity Council. With such an auspicious beginnin~, Delta Mu is determined to continue to .."lead the way'.

Officers: AIvin Leslie ................................................................ Archon Nick Fowler .......................................................... T reasur.er Ken Sykes ................................................................ Secretary Royal Rogers ............................................ .............. Historian Gilbert Forbes ........................................................ Chaplain Joe Brown .................................................................. W arr::Len 10/ THE STAR AND LAMP

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National Vice President John Wilson at Banquet

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Charter members of Delta Mu are: . r Alvin Jodie Leslie, Jr. Michael Wayne G1Ilrn~ Rembert Charles Hamilton, III Nicholas Wade Fowle Joseph Franklin Brown Richard Patrick Rose William Harry Motes Arthur Mack Staple James Arthur McLaurin Gilbert Stephen For es William Jesse Croom Gary Strawder Rogers nd

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Clayton McLam House, Jr. Gary Russell Godwin Robert Richard Castana, Jr. ~ussell Emmett Davenport, Jr. Franklin Albert Dawson

John M. Underwoo Royal Pittman Rogers, Jorge Luis Berrios Bruno Franco Rizzato

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The Chartering Officer was Frank Parrish, Alpha Omicron, Iowa State, who is now Director of Admissions for the Graduate School of Business at Indiana University. Assistant Chartering Officer was AI Peterson Gamma Upsilon, Oklahoma State, who is a graduate student at Ohio State where he also serves as Director of Housing.

The rolling hill country of Bowling Green, Kentucky, and Western Kentucky University have been enhanced by the installation there of Delta Nu Chapter of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity. The chartering occurred on Saturday, April 27. Representing the National Council was Spence Harper, Beta Gamma, Louisville.

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Charter Members of Delta Nu Chapter: !?red Franklin Price Joseph Richard Wallace !francis Benedict Iaconis Michael Ray Cowles ~?Yd Lindsey Champion Michael Anthony Meffert \V~~thy John McGill Galen Harlen Freeman, III llham Henry Ricke, Jr. Tony Glen Babb ~ary Michael Stevens Ronald Allen Sharp tank English Lacy John Bushkar, Jr. Charles Kirby Perkins Stephen Robert Engle arry Lee Davis Thomas John Sabetta, Jr. William Larry Walker Robert Charles Lohman George William Miller Robert Henry Gates Officers: ~e Wallace ................................................................ Archon ary Stevens .......................................................... Treasurer eUtch Freeman ...................................................... Secretary !<'ill Ricke ........................................ ........................ H istarian ~ted Price .................................................................. Warden ike Meffert .......................................................... Chaplain

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Initiating teams from Morehead State and Middle Tennessee State did an excellent job with the chartering ritual. The formal banquet at the Red Carpet Inn was enjoyed by everybody - good food, good band, and a good speaker, Mr. Andy Offutt. Beta Gamma~ Louisville. Mr. Offutt, who lives at Funnyfarm, Halderman, Ky., gave up a very successful career as an insurance executive to devote full time to the writing of science fiction. His main theme was that the good sci-fi writers of today care dee ly about humanity; are, indeed, writing about the possi le future of society, using their talents to make people more aware. The Kappa Phi Colony of Western Kentucky University, founder December 7, 1973, has been outstanding on campus since its inception. They have been cited for academic excellence and have attracted commendation for their participation in service activities, only one of which was raising $400.00 to aid the regional chapter of the Muscular Dystrophy Foundation this spring. SPRING '74/11


At Florence State University G

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Chartering Officer Richard Baker (L) presents charter to Archon Mark Blackburn. Looking on are Chapter Advisors Dr. John Yeates and Dr. Russell Godwin.

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Charter Members of Delta Xi Chapter: John W. Yeates Russell W. Godwin James L. Glass Terry W. Huffman Mark H. Blackburn Michael E. Beadle William B. Lockhart Gary A. H elmick Michael R. Harris Mark W. Williams Barry L. Martin Tim L. Williams Whitney T. Dooley Stan D ebord Mark T. Sanders John M. Counts III Dane P. Dixon Vernon L. D enton

When Tau Kappa Delta Colony of Florence State Vni.. versity in Florence, Alabama, became Delta Xi ~>ll ~5th 4, 1974, Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity chartered tts active chapter. . fi .. cer Richard Baker, Chapter Advisor for Alpha . u of Penn State. Mr. Baker was the 1973 Chapter Advtsor of the Year. He was assisted by Walt Dendy, Archon Omicron, University of Alabama. Initiating teams from Bethel College and J acksonvl State installed the chapter. rt The speaker for the evening's festivities was Dr. Robee-

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Officers: Mark Blackburn ........... ........................ ·~ ................... Archon Barry Martin .......................................................... Treasurer Jim Glass ................................................................ Secretary Whit Dooley .......................................................... Historian Mike Beadle .......................................................... Chap lain Terry Huffman ........................................................ Warden 12i THE STAR AND LAMP

voted brother of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity, Alpha Chapter at Auburn. at It was largely through the efforts of Dr. Guillot t~y Tau Kappa D elta became a chapter of the Frater~11 . 5 ~ Previous to 1972 when he became President, the .adrntn~ 0 tration did not favor social fraternities, so the siX ~ men who founded Tau Kappa Delta in 1967 had ~o 8 9 their activities more or less "underground" ~n~Il 1 to when Bill Waugh, a new pledge, presented their tdej\er the Board of Trustees and won his case. Waugh was a en elected as· the first President of Tau Kappa Delta in December, 1972, National President, Ted Scha e stein, named it an official colony of Pi Kappa Phi. . ted The colony grew stron , its men politically mottva ill and academically oriente . As Delta Xi Chapter they w continue to strive for campus superiority.

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a dread call in the night . . . G and the Beta Phi Chapter House at East Carolina, reenville, N. C., went up in flames. At five o'clock in the morning on February 26 there Was some kind of explosion and subsequent fire. No one really knows what happened but the fire might be attribUted to the furnace (which had been recently checked) or a short circuit in the electrical wiring. Ten men jumped out the windows and no one was ~urt. Some of the brothers who evacuated the fire-gutted ouse are living in the other ·Beta Phi House and some are in dormitories. Although damage was extensive, it is believed that the burned house can be restored.

Charred doors seem to miss Pi Kapps coming and going

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Trophies stand proud in the midst of destruction

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Paul H. Chapman, Furman University, has written a history, painstakingly researched and authenticated, that reads like an adventure story and adds to our knowledge of the discovery of the New World. "The Man Who Led Columbus to America" is based on the travels of St. Brendan and a small band of Irish monks who sailed to North America and back-not in the 12th or 13th century, but circa 564-565 A.D. Chapman's interest in St. Brendan dates from World War II when he ferried planes across the Atlantic as an Air Force Navigator. He explored many of the islands in the Atlantic on these crossings ·and kept ccbumping into St. Brendan", stories of the ancient monk's having explored there. In 1959, the University of Notre Dame Press published the late Dr. Carl Selner's compilation of St. Brendan's manuscripts including his seafaring diaries. Chapman had the Latin work translated into English by Atlanta Latin scholar, Father C. R. Collopy. (CAmazingly", Chapman points out, ccst. Brendan kept careful and almost scientific notes on his sailing routes supplemented by detailed geographic descriptions of his landing sites on his way to and from the New World." Chapman's other main source was a relatively recent translation of "The Journal of Christopher Columbus" by Cecil Jan e. Both Columbus and St. Brendan used the trade wind route to the Caribbean, though it was unknown to navigators even in Columbus's time. Brendan stumbled on to it by accident and passed it on to Columbus via Brendan's manuscripts first published, Mr. Chapman believes, in Columbus's day. On their 10,000 plus mile journey, the Irish monk and his 14 fellow clerics sailed in their 40 ft. vessel, a square rigged currach made of hides stretched over a wooden frame. They went from Ireland north to the Faeroe Islands, south to the Azores and then southwest across the Atlantic to the Caribbean. They continued up the North American coastline past Newfoundland, Greenland and Iceland and, finally back home. In his research, Mr. Chapman not only corresponded with the historic and geographic authorities on these islands, but he and his wife visited many of them. They wouldn't leave the Faeroe Islands until they had found the very wild flowers that St. Brendan had described as growing there. Paul Chapman is a business man; founder and President of Chapman Company, a business brokerage firrn specializing in media properties.

SPRING '74!13


LENDMAN

ASSOCIATES

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Editor's Note: In the process of checking the chapter letters for publication in this issue, we found this note from Chi and a Xeroxed clipping from the DeLand, Fla., Sun News. We detached it from Chi's chapter letter and reproduce it here because we think it worthy of more than passing interest. We at Chi Chapter believe that the works of someone outside the fraternity, whom we have given service to, can sum up the type of fraternity we strive to become better than we. In a recent article of a local newspaper we found this:

.•• AN EFFECTIVE EMPLOYMENT SERVICE. IF YOU ARE INTERESTED, REGISTER TO ATTEND ONE OF THE LENDMAN CAREER WEEKENDS CONVENIENT TO YOU. LENDMAN EXECUTIVE OFFICES P. 0. BOX 14027 NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 23518 804/583-5921 AFTER YOU'VE COMPLETED A RESUME AND RETURNED IT TO THE LENDMAN OFFICE, YOUR INFORMATION AND JOB INTERESTS WILL BE CIRCULATED AMONG PROSPECTIVE EMPLOYERS. THROUGH AN ORIENTATION SESSION, YOU BECOME ACQUAINTED WITH THE REPRESENTATIVES OF SOME OF THE MAJOR COMPANIES WHO OUTLINE WHAT THEY HAVE TO OFFER. THEN YOU SCHEDULE YOUR OWN PRIVATE INTERVIEWS WITH THE REPRESENTATIVES OF THE COMPANIES IN WHOM YOU ARE INTERESTED. CAREER WEEKENDS ARE FREE EXCEPT FOR TRAVEL AND HOTEL EXPENSES. LISTED HERE IS THE LENDMAN CAREER WEEKEND SCHEDULE THROUGH DECEMBER 7, 1974. JUNE, 1974 7-8 14-1 5 21-22 21-22 28-29 28-29

Cincinnati, Ohio Saddle Brook, New Jersey Denver, Colorado Washin!!lton, D. C. Dallas, Texas Jacksonville, Florida

JULY, 1974 Chicago, Illinois Norfolk, Virginia San Francisco, California Boston, Massachusetts Washington, D. C. Atlanta, Georgia

12-13 12-13 19-20 19-20 26-27 26-27

AUGUST, 1974 9-10 16-17 16-17 23-24 23-24

Detroit, Michigan Denver, Colorado Saddle Brook, New Jersey Atlanta'- Georgia Dallas, 1 exas

SEPTEMBER, 1974 •

Chicago, Illinois San Diego, California Boston Massachusetts Williamsburg, Virginia Washington1 D. C. Jacksonville, Florida Kansas City, Missouri

6-7 13-14 13-14 13-14 20-21 27-28 27-28

OCTOBER, 1974 4-5 11-12 11-12 18-19 18-19 18-19

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Cincinnati, Ohio Saddle Brook, New Jersey Denver, Colorado Washington, D. C. Atlanta, Georgia Dallas, Texas

NOVEMBER, 1974 1-2 8-9 8-9 8-9 15-16 22-23 22-23

Chicago, Illinois San Francisco, California Boston, Massachusetts Norfolk, Virginia Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Kansas City, Missouri Atlanta, Georgia

DECEMBER, 1974 6-7 6-7 6-7 6-7

14/THE STAR AND LAMP

Dallas, Texas Los Angeles, California Washington, D. C. Jacksonville, Florida

ose 'College Kids' Editor, Sun News: No one will ever again be able to make any disparaging remarks about "those irresponsible college kids" in my presence and get away with it! I would like to share my recent experience with a group of really great brothers of the Pi Kappa Phi fraternity of Stetson University. I am handicapped and through a series of personal com· plic~tions found it necessary to move. The only place I could find that was functional for a wheelchair needed considerable cleaning and painting, in addition to the fol'tnidable tasks in· volved in moving furniture and personal belongings. A few friends volunteered for painting, cleaning and moving. The general move took place on Friday. On SaturdaY morning the Pi Kap brothers arrived en masse. They painted laid linoleum, put up rods and hWlg curtains, applied contact paper, shifted carpets and furniture, reached unreachable places, ran errands and disposed of cartons, plus innumerable other necessities. One did the unfamiliar task of putting on a tank set in the bathroom with the laughing comment that he'd "never dressed a toilet before." · They were friendly, respectful, polite and willing. However, when they left on Saturday I honestly didn't expect to see them again. But on Monday morning when I had reached a point when I could not proceed without help, the phone rang with the cheerful news that four of the "brothers" were "on their way." Again they painted and did many chores, even provided paint and brushes for doors. During Saturday's activity my new neighbor, a mechanic, checked a bad noise in my car and said I could no longer drive it without repairs (which he generously offered to do). My new friends offered to drive me back and forth to work until the car could be repaired. They provided much needed physical assistance, but also gave me much more. They have turned despair to hope; renewed my faith in people; given me an insight into the Stetson community and boosted a sagging morale. I almost hate to see the work completed for I will miss mY new friends of Pi Kappa Phi. They and my other generous friends have proved that DeLand really is "a great place to live." Connie Hardy DeLand

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than expected. As it now stands, we have eight pledges six of which are due to be initiated on March 10. ' At intramurals, Iota has much to be desired. Our basketball team just couldn't get it together. Although better than the basketball team, our soccer team still had many problems besides those of swollen shins. Our bowling team also did not reach the lofty peaks to which they aspired. Anyway, the participants had fun and as before we are hoping to field a softball team that won't stop. Iota, along with many other new things, has started a little sister chapter which will become effective next quarter. Seven little sisters are the founders of the chapter. Iota has been undergoing many changes, both internally and externally, and has had a rough time at it. Hopefully, everything will work out towards a bigger and better Iota.

KAPPA University of North Carolina

ALPHA College of Charleston

BETA Presbyterian The new year has brought a change in attitude in Beta Chap~r. Winter semester saw seven new pledges enter our chapter. Bhose joining were Forest Secord, Hay Wyman, David Fortune, U~dy Medlin, Tom Stanley, Mark Hallman, and Denny Griffin. ih1s pledge class set a record for pledging in the winter term. h Two chapter retreats have been held since January. One was "eld at the house of Brother David Connolly and the other at ,...ledge John Lake's home, the latter being a trip for the new Pledges and their big brothers in hope that the new members Would voice some innovations. New officers were elected for the coming year with George McAbee taking the Archon position, Clay Dykes retaining the Secretary's post and David Connolly being elected as new l'H~easurer. Warden for next year will be Clark Riddle and the lstorian position remains with Robert Owens.

GAMMA University of California at Berkeley Once again Gamma has had a strong summer rush thanks to Past Archon Mike McBride. We pledged 27 men, three of whom Participated as live-outs. We initiated 16 men in a marathon Ceremony from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. on January 27. These new men are concerned with the well being of Gamma a~d are learning many of the duties of the officers and comrtllttees to insure efficient and economical operation of the House. We have been looking into a cooperative food purchasing Program with other fraternities on campus to curb rising food costs. Brother Bob Steele did an excellent job of putting together our first publication this year. This was witnessed by the numerous and encouraging alumni responses we recei~ed. Gam'!"a is hoping that with the further support of our alumni, along w1th the diligent efforts of our Housing Corporation, we will be able to finalize our housing plans by the summer of '74. . We look forward to entertaining you all at the Supreme Chapter 1n San Francisco in August of 1975.

~ETA ' Wofford

IOTA Georgia Tech Iota has been doing quite well this winter quarter. After a terrible fall rush, things have been picking up nicely. Due to excellent weather, for a change, our winter rush came out better

Kappa chapter began its 59th year with fifteen outstanding pledges. Spring rush at UNC-CH was slow overall, but not so at Pi Kappa Phi. This seemed to reflect our ability as a chapter to meet the demands and expectations of an ever changing college campus. To continue to meet these demands, the brotherhood is in the process of initiating a campaign to improve our image among the fraternities on campus and also in the Chapel Hill community. We feel this is necessary to insure that the brotherhood continues to grow in the future as it has in the past. Our chapter was united this spring in an effort to elect Lew Warren as president of the student body. It proved to be an excellent chance to improve the chapter's image on campus as well as to draw the brotherhood and pledges closer路 together. This spring also gave way for several capital improvements. Thanks to the cooperation of our alumni, a drainage network was installed around the chapter house to remove excess rain water which was causing major damage to the house. Also, the bar room received a new rug which changed its entire atmosphere. Kappa, realizing the need for support by its alumni, took a step to improve those relations this semester. The chapter will be working with Mr. Bennett Smith of Charlotte to produce at regular intervals the chapter newsletter, Kappa Kapers. The paper will be alumni oriented and contain pertinent chapter information. This partnership frees the historian to concentrate on gathering material which should be of interest to the alumni. This semester also saw a renewed interest in fraternity ritual. Brothers' meetings were held in formal sessions, with officers wearing their respective robes, plus the brotherhood was challenged before entering a meeting. It proved to be impressive and also facilitated the meeting to everyone's surprise. The semester has been a busy one for Kappa Chapter, but it has also been an enjoyable one.

LAMBDA University of Georgia The past two quarters have been busy ones for the brothers of Lambda Chapter. Fall quarter netted us 10 pledges which were initiated in December, and during winter quarter, we gained three more pledges which were initiated in early March. We are currently engaged in spring quarter rush which we hope will be fruitful. As of this moment, we have one man pledged and hope to have 10 more just like him by the beginning of spring quarter. Fall and winter quarters were good to Lambda in the sports arena. At the end of the fall quarter, we found ourselves tied for first place in intramurals. Winter quarter, we started strong by winning the bowling championship, but a disappointing basketball season has put us back into third place in overall competition. We hope to regain first place by winning the badminton championship and placing high in weight-lifting . Winter quarter brought about a facelift for the Lambda Chapter House. The old dishwasher room off the dining room was converted into a most pleasant bar room complete with juke box and ice machine. We extend special thanks to alumni Bobby Goolsby and BiU Allen for their help with this project. Overall, our old house is still in very bad condition. However, due to the efforts of Mike Montesani, our new Chapter Advisor, the Lambda Housing Association and interested alumni, we are making some headway in solving our housing problems.

XI

Roanoke College SPRING '74/ 15


OMICRON University of Alabama

UPSILON University of Illinois

Since the beginning of the spring semester in January, Omicron has completed the initiation of 17 men from the fall semester pledge class and have already pledged 11 fine men to the spring class. The success of our rush program these last two semesters, coupled with a promising outlook for rush this summer and next fall, is encouraging to the future prosperity of Omicron. In the area of community service projects this semester, Omicron has contributed to the University's Rehabilitation Program through its successful efforts to send a young boy to summer camp where he will be helped to overcome his physical handicaps. Also, the Pi Kapp Colonels, a boys' basketball team, coached and sponsored by the brothers, won the city championship with a record of 13 wins and one loss. Founders Day was a shining success this year highlighted with National President Ted Scharfenstein conveying a well noted message to the brothers and a number of visiting alumni.

The Winter and Spring months have provided a lot of enjoY~ ment for the Pi Kapps at Upsilon Chapter. In Basket~a~l . w finished with a 3-2 season and took third place in our diVISIOn~ Entering. our third season in Hockey, all players had fun ~nd t~e are look1ng forward to the next season in hopes of mak1n9 11 playoffs. Baseball will be here soon and we are ready to ro after having several successful practices. Our soccer te~m, taking second place in Fraternity Division in the Fall, are looking me at the first place spot as they enter Spring League. Many new changes are being made at the Chapter: 5 0 improvements were made in the kitchen and more are 1n ~tor~ for the dining room. The outside of our house is being patnt~s and should look beautiful along with the new roof that W added last year. . . 51 Again, we have had a successful Little Sister Rush add1n9 ~ new girls, giving a total of 25 active girls. The Little Sisters adts plenty of excitement to the Chapter by planning many even such as a picnic, a kite fly, a pajama party, an outdoor barb~c~: and a swimming party. We are all looking forward to the .0 t Ball which will mark the 53rd Anniversary of Pi Kappa Phi a the University of Illinois.

RHO Washington & Lee Rho Chapter has just held its annual Rose Ball, and many say this was the most sucessful one yet. 'The affair, moved this year to Lexington's new Holiday Inn, drew several Rho alumni as well as virtually the entire brotherhood, including our 18 new initiates. Miss Helen Radcliffe, a senior from Frederick, Maryland, and Mary Baldwin College, was selected Rose Queen. Helen is the fiancee of Chapter Treasurer, Ted Gregory. The initiation of 18 new brothers followed an excellent rush and pledging program that saw Rho bring in the second highest number of pledges on campus. As is characteristic of the total brotherhood, these pledges were distinguished most by their geographic, economic, and ideological diversity. Thirteen different states were represented in this year's pledge class. Rho continues to hold its own in intramurals. An influx of talented freshmen may lead the Chapter to its first winning basketball season in recent memory. And Rho Chapter continues to excel in academics at Washington and Lee. Joe McMenamin, a senior pre-med major from York, Pennsylvania, was recently named to the school's Phi Beta Kappa chapter.

SIGMA University of South Carolina Sigma Chapter 1974 is now in full swing starting the semester with 9 new associate members preceeded by activation in November 1973 of 20 new brothers. We are all proud of brother Warden Pete Manos who has made innovations in pledge education which have proven outstanding. We are presently in third place in competition for the "All Sports" Trophy, with Softball, Tennis, Track and field left on the agenda. Also in sports our annual Alumni vs Active basketball game will be held March 31. One highlight of our semester has been our participation in a recent Heart Association radiothon which collected over $20,000.00. We are beginning preparation for Cockfest 74 which will be held October 11, under direction of brother Bob Swelgin. Sigma Chapter would like to wish our brother chapters the best of luck.

TAU North Carolina State University Last fall's rush produced six new initiates at Tau Chapter. They are: Alan Baldwin, Joe Cowan, Walt Petit, Steve Sanders, Myron Smith, and Brian Vick. At present, we have nine pledges for the spring semester. They are: Joe Bobbitt, Vaughn Debose, Ray Franklin, Jay Gilbert, Dean Kirkley, Mike Lopez and David Martin, Darrell Pardue, Art Williams. Tau Chapter continues to work with the retarded Boy Scout Troop. David Benson, who is in charge of Troop 239, is continuing to do a fine job and has planned for the troop to attend a professional wrestling match. Our Eye Drive for the N. C. Eye and Human Tissue Bank is becoming an annual event. Mike Jordan is heading up the project for Tau Chapter this semester. Wayne Lowder, who last year served as Vice President of I.F.C., was elected as l.F.C President for the year and has some big events planned for the spring semester. We are having a good semester athletically as we were runners-up in basketball and are fielding perhaps the strongest fraternity softball team. Best wishes to our fellow chapters.

16/THE STAR AND LAMP

CHI Stetson We at Chi Chapter are proud to announce the addition °~ fourteen new active brothers initiated in January. We now ha~t a good membership of fifty-four, and spring rush is about to 9 under way. . _ Chi Chapter has been very active in recent months ~~ fco~t munity and social work. Each Monday afternoon a d1f ere10 r group of underprivileged children are brought to the h.o~~e 0 planned activities by the brothers. The brothers plan actiVIties t~d that each child participating can benefit in some way. Loca rs only a few miles from campus is a prison farm where the brothe will go this Saturday to play the inmates in softball. d Each spring, Stetson University sponsors a Parents' Weekenkfor the parents of the students. This year during Parents' Wt~~r­ end the Pi Kapps will be inviting those parents of the br~ Pi hood to have lunch at our house. That same weekend. t e 't Kapp Blue Grass Band will be providing music for a Unrversl Y sponsored bar-b-que. . .. d So far, the fraternity has done well in intramural act1v1t1es an scholarship. At the present time we are first place in both.

PSI Cornell After a short but exciting Christmas intermission, the Brothe;~ and Little Sisters returned to the lodge full of excitement ~ itY vigor to take on full responsibility of the house and commu nd and some campus activities. Mike Conklin became Scout master for a troop in Ithaca a _ Kevin Parkes the Asst. Scout master. They take the troop ca~~d ing and hiking. Freddie Depass also joined the Big Brother itY· Big Sister program to help the poor children in the commu.n at Also, Rober! AIJen is a tutor for the interfr~ternity coun"'cl~ Cornell help1ng freshmen who have problems 1n the1r cour~ed. to Everyone at Psi chapter is anxiously awaiting March 2 n as exchange thoughts and ideas when we host a conclave for are one and two. . k up Psi chapter had gone on the deferred rush program to P~~hi le some more pledges and so far, it is proven to be a wort Little venture. Psi chapter is also glad to announce tha! our . ters Sister program is progressing very well with six little SIS now. . wed-We would still like to see more alumni over on the f1rs~ psi nesday night of any month for cocktails and dinner. e us chapter Pi Kapps are invited. All we ask is that you 9 1v 24 hours' warning.

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OMEGA Purdue Spirits are high at Omega Chapter for a good spring .. We~~~ anticipating a fine pledge class and a fun time at U-Stn9 Alpha Xi Delta. use House imp.rovements on the physical structure of ou.r hO have been established thanks to our Housing Corporatton.


ALPHA ALPHA Mercer University

ALPHA DELTA University of Washington

A new slate of officers was installed at Alpha Alpha on March 3, 1974. They are: Archon, Jim Huntsinger; Treasurer, Web Curl; Secretary, Bill Lillycrop; Warden, George Perreault; Historian, Bob Stalkmith; Chaplain, Rod Roberts. A new Chapter Advisor has been named since our publication Was mailed. He is Bill Youngblood, Gamma Xi '73, who has al.ready shown that he will be a tremendous asset to our chapter. Btll will serve as co-advisor with Raymond Baggerly. We look forward to wo'rking with these two guys and welcome them once again to our chapter. The Pi Kapps at Mercer were named the most spirited organi~ation on campus for the third straight year. The Spirit Award IS given by the cheerleaders during the Homecomina festivities to the group who has demonstrated outstanding school spirit during the year. Final plans for our spring weekend will be made at our first meeting after spring break. It will be some time in May at either Myrtle Beach, S. C. or Panama City, Fla. Everyone is looking forward to this event and all alumni are welcome to join the fun.

On February 23rd, 1974, Alpha Delta celebrated its 50th anniversary with a small banquet. Alpha Delta alumni from near and far came to the event, i.ncluding Gordy All!3n, Alpha Delta # 1. (A much larger celebration of the 50th ann1versary will be held during Homecoming this Fall. More information is forthcoming to Apha Delta alumni on this event.) The future, as well as the past, was discussed at the banquet. Although the chapter has been in financial difficulty the brothers are working hard at recruiting new members. New 'members will not only add new blood to Alpha Delta, but they will help financially. The prospects look good. The chapter is getting input from its newer initiates more than ever before. (On Novem.ber 14th, 1973, 13 men were initiated.) Not only are they carryrng much of the rush load but at the el~ctions of March 4th, four Freshmen were chosen as officers. Wrth a repe:at of last. year'~ successful Summer rush, Alpha Delta should be rn good frnancral shape this Fall, as well as having a strong base of young members to carry the chapter on for many years to come .

ALPHA GAMMA University of Oklahoma

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..Alpha Gamma chapter started the spring semester after the tnttiation of six new brothers into the chapter. We are extremely Proud of this associate class as they achieved the highest gradePoint class average of any pledge class on campus.. Brothers Craig Rainey and John Cooper were able to achieve 4.0 grade averages last semester. Alpha Gamma also initiated three girls into our Little Sister organization. Our Little Sisters have been indispensable through the years. They help the chapter in rush and also decorate for Parties. If any chapter does not have a Little Sister organization, I recommend that they start one. Our Founder's Day banquet was a great success. Mel Metcalfe Was the fife of the party. He was our guest speaker and entertained us all with his magical bag of tricks. Already this semester we have raised money for our housing . fund by sponsoring a spaghetti dinner for the students. A delegation made up of brothers attended the 16th annual Model United Nations and placed fifth in the voting for outstand!ng delegation. Last month Alpha Gamma won one trophy for havrng the best house percentage donating blood and another trophy for giving the most total pints among Greeks in the Universities' annual blood drive. We are also looking forward to having anOther good season in softball, and in addition to our regular Softball team, we are planning to enter a coed team. If any of our brothers around the country happen to be in or near the Norman area, please feel free to drop by and stay with

Alpha Delta's home for the past four years at the University of Washington

us.

ALPHA EPSILON University of Florida Alpha Epsilon Chapter observed its 50th anniversary February 22, 1974, and was honored by the attendance of several outstanding alumni. Lonnie Strickland, National Treasurer, and Dean Frank Maloney were guest speakers. Alpha Epsilon Chapter is currenty in a rebuilding stage and all indications promise that the next 50 years will be as rewarding and enjoyable as the previous years. Special thanks to the AE Board of Directors for their untiring efforts and tremendous loyalty to Pi Kappa Phi and Alpha Epsilon.

ALPHA ZETA Oregon State

lDe Brothers and Little Sisters of Alpha Gamma (Oklahoma) disPlay the two blood drive trophies

Alpha Zeta will be celebrating its 50th Anniversary on November 22-24, 1974. Alumni, start planning for this important event now! This will be the weekend after Homecoming, so that hotel rooms will be available for incoming Pi Kapps. Drop us a line if you want a room reserved. Everyone is invited to attend. We really hope to see you here! We initiated six great members this semester. In terms of enthusiasm, these guys are # 1. Dad's Weekend was very successful, with over 50°/o of the Dads attending even with a monstrous gas shortage. Alpha Zeta's "A" team in intramural basketball took their league 6-0 and lost their only game in the semi-finals to the alluniversity champs, Delta Tau Delta.

SPRING '74/ 17


Party, House Party (this year in Pensacola, Fla.) and the Easter Bunny contest. . . House improvements are underway. A loan of $25,000 IS betn9 secured for needed interior and exterior renovations. We feseh this will also enhance our chances for a successful fall ru next year. ) L. Cole Bryant (popularly known as Freddie by the Brothe~s our cook, is presently recuperating from a cataract operat~~r and prolonged illness. Our sympathies and support are 1n or d for this outstanding lady; she has given many years of unequal~e service to this chapter. Any response to this situation maY sent in care of the chapter.

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ALPHA MU Penn State

The Alpha Zeta House at Oregon State

ALPHA ETA Samford University This year has proven to be the most successful year in the history of Alpha Eta. We are doing exceptionally well in rush. The chaoter has initiated nine new brothers this February and pledged seven men since the spring semester began. We are also participating in school organized charities. The Pi Kapps led the way in the Red Cross Blood Drive and donated much money to aid one of the football players when his mother passed away. Step-Sing was the greatest success. The chapter has finished first in the fraternity division ten out of the past twelve years and this year was no exception. However, Alpha Eta did put a new face into Step-Sing 1974 by becoming the first fraternity to ever win the overall trophy. We have been saddened by the death of our faculty advisor, Dr. Jean Meade Dunbar. This man affected the life of every Alpha Eta brother and his death was a sharp blow to each of us. The brothers will long remember this man and the tremendous work he did for Alpha Eta.

ALPHA THETA Michigan State University The Alpha Theta basketball team did quite well this season after getting off to a shaky start early in the year. We fought our way into the semi-finals, but got defeated in a close, hardfought game. The brothers of the Chapter are pulling together in an organized way to pull ourselves up from where we were. Our winter rush efforts netted us five pledges who are very enthusiastic and will make fine additions to our House. Spring rush is all set to go with the plans and actions well thought out, and everyone knows what has to be done. We are looking for 10 pledges minimum, and with a concentrated effort, this should be no problem. We are making minor house improvements with our limited funds. However, there are fund raising plans on the drawing boards for spring which, if they go right, will be a big asset to the House. All in all, the men at Alpha Theta Chapter are looking toward the future with anticipation and hope, and are ready to blossom into a strong and stable chapter once again.

ALPHA IOTA Auburn Alpha Iota has had another outstanding quarter in the field of sports. We have won the ping-pong championship in our intramural league and look forward with great anticipation to spring quarter and a winning season at softball and horse shoes. Gradewide, we have had a good quarter, also. Our pledge class may expect a composite grade of 2.8, an outstanding showing for a 3 pt. scale. With spring rush around the corner, Alpha Iota is preparing itself with numerous outdoor functions, including the Jungle

18/ THE STAR AND LAMP

Winter term found the Alpha Mu chapter, once again, inyo1ve~ in all aspects of Penn State life. With four brothers working ~e the Interfraternity Council and one serving as an Undergratd~ain Student Government Senator, Pi Kapp was well represen e 48 student government. . Brother Arnie McFarland tripped the light fantastiC fo{ ble hours in the IFC Dance Marathon and finished a respec a er sixth place earning over $500 for the heart fund. ManY o~rch Pi Kapps were involved in the running of the marathon w stnetted over $10,000 for the fund. Public Relations has been revitalized and we now are boa ing 30 of the greatest girls on campus as our big siste.rs. dge Six prospective Pi Kapps are now winding up the1r P1e program and six new acceptees are expected to pledge soonthe In sports we fielded a basketball team that wasn't exactlY all Harlem Globetrotters but fared better in wrestling and hahn~bwe doubles reaching the semi-finals in each. We also feel t a have the racquetball champ for the upcoming season. we Scholastically we are slowly creeping back up to where once were: in the top ten. a After the graduation of 8 brothers fall term, Alpha Mu little low in numbers and morale. Winter term has be~n a onof rebuilding. The regained spirit of the House prom1s~sK cppa tinued improvement to keep the Alpha Mu chapter of PI a Phi number one.

wr:rm

ALPHA XI Polytechnic Institute of N. Y. •

aniAlpha Xi's recent past has been marked by a. lack of org ned zation and s'p irit. However, thi~ spring, with the a.1d of cancer on alumni and our Chapter Adv1sor and Area Adv1sor, we ar~han the road back. Things are beginning to seem smoother ore before and hopefully things will be as they should be bef too long. been Reorganization at PINY was .also needed. A new I.FC has. an formed. The Rotating leadership has us slated as V1ce Chalr~as this term with Chairmanship ahead next Fall. A coffee ho~r the held during club hour to introduce the PINY students 0 lsO Greek letter fraternities on campus. A softball league has a all. been organized for the spring. Rush, of course, is important for us as our numbers are s~ew A small pledge class was inducted last fall giving us thre~hinQS brothers: Richie Groller, Jose Refecas, and John Mayer. durinQ are looking up for the spring with five pledged so far the still young rush period. . bout As for spirit, please see the back cover for a s~or.t p1ece a fraternity written by one of our new brothers, R1ch1e Groller.

ALPHA OMICRON Iowa State ALPHA SIGMA University of Tennessee A march for St. Jude's Childrens Hospital, in ~hich t~~ brothers of Alpha Sigma Chapter participated, highlighted active winter quarter for the chapter. . . . ar's Inter-chapter relationship was the emphasis 1n thiS Y~see annual Rose Ball. Delta Iota chapter from Middle Tt:nneear's State University joined with Alpha Sigma to make thiS Y held Rose Ball one of the best in recent years. The event was phiS, in Gatlinburg, Tenn. Christy Horn, a Sophomore from Mem . . inQ Tenn., was named as the 1974 Rose. Alpha Sigma's intramural teams took first place In swr~mwas and Track, and second in Basketball and Water Polo. ThiS ·ckiY the first season for Water Polo, and this new sport qui


gained popularity among the brothers and little sisters. The special projects committee began a collection of news~apers for recycling in order to raise money for the use of the ntuals committee. The chapter has received favorable responses from alumni answer forms and would like to hear from the others soon.

ALPHA TAU Rensselaer

Lots of things are happening at Alpha Tau with many signs l~oking up. First, we've taken 12 fine pledges, forming a very diversified group. The one thing they all share is an unbounded love for the chapter. At this point, we are well into the development of a working Little Sisters program. Any chapter would be proud of these eight charming ladies, all from nearby Russell Sage College. In another vein, our new kitchen is about 80°/o finished. Doing all the work thus far ourselves, from the pouring of the cement floor to the paneled ceiling, we can be especially proud of this project. On the sports front, we're improving constantly. Our basketball team has amassed a 4-2 record. The pledges are an integral part of the team and have shown a lot of hustle. In all we feel Alpha Tau is making a very strong comeback toward increasing our campus and national standing.

ALPHA UPSILON Drexel University March first saw the informal initiation of eight new brothers and spring term nets us 6 pledges with the possibility of several more initiates. With a present active brotherhood of 60, we have a graduating class of 18. To those, good luck. The Sunderland Court apartment fire on March first was one of the highlight events of the year. Being nearby neighbors to the now devastated structure, our house was designated the Red Cross Emergency Center. Although much credit should be given to the Red Cross and Fire Dept., Pi Kapps donated their assistance from the pre-dawn hours throughout the day and followed up the crisis situation with a clothing drive and fund · collection center. . Major house improvements this past year included the paintIng of all exterior woodwork and trimming on our house by several brothers. I. F. sports had some potential for Pi Kapps this year. Last summer our volleyball squad had a winning season, our tennis group a winless one. Fall term we eliminated ourselves from an opening in the football hall of fame. Before being nailed by sickness and a broken ankle on our starting five, our bumbling b-ballers chalked up a 9-0 record only to lose the last two regular season games securing second and losing the first playoft. From the bowling team we extend an invitation to anyone Who can keep out of the "gutter".

ALPHA PHI Illinois Institute of Technology (liT) ALPHA PSI Indiana University BETA ALPHA Newark College of Engineering

As far as the spring semester is concerned, things could not ~e better for Beta Alpha campus-wise. Brother Joseph Manfredi IS President of Newark College of Engineering Student Senate and his little brother, Bob Morgan, is the Vice-President, with ambitions tor becoming President next semester. Brother Rich Delcore is the President of the College Student Activities Council Which makes it very easy to coordinate house events with school events. We also have two brothers who have been initiated into Phi Eta Sigma, which is the National Freshman Honor Fraternity. The brotherhood itself at Beta Alpha really pulled together during the fall rush season. Under the guidance of Rush Chairman Glenn Romanek, we were able to obtain ten freshmen and two upperclassmen pledges. At this point in time the latter two, Bob Morgan and Steve Flatley, have been initiated and the freshmen pledges have finished their pledge period and are awaiting initiation. Taking into account and trying to resolve any problems ~e may have incurred previously, our rush this semester promIses to be our best ever, which is unusual because generally

spring rush is never as good as fall rush. However bids will not go out for a while yet, but we have many aspirants ~waiting them. As far as Brotherhood i.s concer.ned, the spirit at Beta Alpha, we feel, has been exceptional. Th1s camaraderie and esprit de corps. wer.e emphasized especially during our "Help Weekend" at w~1.ch t1me bo~h ~rothers an~ pledg~s worked side by side in repa1nng, refurb1sh1ng, and reJuvenating our ancient facilities. As a result, this activity becomes the most effective part of our pledge education. Beta A~pha is engaged in various community service functions. Last Chnstmas our brothers got together with other brothers from other fraternities on campus and through their united efforts gave a Christmas Party for a Day Care Center and Orphanage in Newark. The brothers collected and repaired old toys, and purchase~ new ones, which were then distributed by Santa Claus. A Mag1c Show and refreshments made the day a huge success. More recently the Inter-Fraternity Council held its annual blood drive and Beta Alpha came through with 93°/o of the brotherhood contributing. We are now engaged in raising money for the Peter Jensen Memorial Fund. Peter Jensen, one of our brothers met an untimely death on campus and this fund, in his honor offers ' help to a student in financial need. Our Alumni relations could be better and we are striving for a more efficient method of keeping in touch with them. In order to keep our files up to date with our elusive Alumni, we enclose questionnaires along with any correspondence that we have with them. We have been getting a fair response from this endeavor.

BETA BETA Florida Southern . The brothers of Beta Beta have started the semester off well w1th a pledge class of nine, our biggest in three years. They are a bunch of enthusiastic, hell raising guys. Although we have nine brothers graduating in May, we feel that these pledges will gre.atly add to our brotherhood and keep the house going as well as rt has been. Our little sister program is getting bigger and better each sem~ster. We now have 17 little sisters. They are a great group of g1rls and have helped us out tremendously, especially during our rush. Again we participated in Greek Sing this year. Glen Graff our so~g master, led us ~n singing a medley of Beatie hits. Althbugh los1ng two brothers 1n the bathroom beforehand the rest of us had a fantastic time just the same. ' Our softball team is starting to shift into high gear again. Although we have not started the season yet, we are definite contenders under coach Herb Grove. Since our 25th anniversary banquet last semester in which we e~tended all our alu~ni invitations, we have bJilt up our alumnr program to t~e po1nt wryere ~any alumni are dropping in to see us. Larry W1dman, Anel Vrera, Mitch Manting, Duane H_oran and .Guy Chappell have all extended us visits. Guy, using h1s J?rof!3ss1onal background, is helping us put out our chapter publrcat1on. The great success of our chapter retreat in February can be attri~uted to Beta Beta alumni Jim Turner's hospitality. He lent us hrs house, one you would have to see to believe for the entire weekend. Not only did he house and feed us but he also used. his past fraternity experience in helping us du~ing our hash SeSSIOnS. Although many alumni have dropped in to see us, there are many more of you who have not. If you are ever in our area feel free to stop in. Our doors are always open to a Pi Kapp. ,

BETA DELTA Drake University Beta Delta began the spring semester proudly when Drake's Inter-Fraternity Council retired the traveling fraternity scholarship trophy to our house. After winning the trophy for six consecutive semesters I FC decided to permanently leave the trophy in the Pi Kapp's hands. . A house retreat took place in February with three main topics discussed by the brothers: Rush, Communciation and Motivation. A general discussion was also conducted o~ where Beta Delta wants to be in two years. The retreat was a success many viewpoints were aired, and there were positive results. ' As our house has doubled within the past several years the brothers have been aware of the fact that a new organization was ne.eded. We haye taken steps in this direction by the implementation of total Involvement by all brothers in several new house committees and by revamping the officers' responsibilities. We also changed our weekly meeting time from Monday nights to Sunday evenings, while leaving our formal meal on Monday

SPRING '74/19


to encourage more contact with out-of-house brothers. A bimonthly house-newsletter was reinstated. A breakdown by the treasurer of the monies spent by Beta Delta has helped the brothers to see exactly where our money is going. Along with the Chi Omega Sorority, the Pi Kapps again won first place in Drake's annual Bulldog Tales variety show. This marks the second consecutive year Beta Delta has won the fraternity/sorority group acts. In intramural sports the Pi Kapps placed 4th in Fraternity standings for indoor track with softball, swimming, volleyball and golf still up-coming this semester. In all fraternity competition for all sports Beta Delta holds fourth place in 1973-74. The Little Sisters of the Star and Lamp have been very active in house activities this semester. On Valentine's Day the Little Sisters were treated to dinner. A Monte Carlo party held by the Little Sisters was well attended in March. In April, in conjunction with the annual Drake Relays, Beta Delta will celebrate its 25th Anniversary. This event has been eagerly looked forward to all year by all the brothers. A great showing by the alumni to help in the event, along with Durward Owen's presence at the banquet to be held, will certainly top off the highpoints of the semester. On May 4th our Rose Queen will be crowned at Pi Kappa Phi's annual Rose Ball. The brothers expect many Des Moines area alumni to be present for the spring formal. All in all, Beta Delta has reached new heights with house involvement, campus involvement and total Greek involvement this semester. It's been a great semester, with all men truly glad to be brothers of Pi Kappa Phi.

BETA ETA Florida State University BETA IOTA University of Toledo BETA KAPPA Georgia State BETA LAMBDA University of Tampa Once again the spring semester proved to be a fruitful one for the Pi Kapps at the University of Tampa. The Pi Kapps look strong in all facets of student life. Beta Lambda ranked second in scholarship at UT. The house has been named to the national register as a national landmark. As always, 1973-74 was a strong intramural year for the brotherhood. The Pi Kapps ranked high in both major and minor sports, and the possibility of picking up the Intramural Trophy looks good. Pledging prospects for 1973-74 were good in numbers and in spirit. We've been fulfilling our civic duties as well as those concerned with UT. Beta Lambda has represented such organizations as the American Cancer Society and the Heart Fund by promoting interests in various projects concerned with fund • • ratstng. As on can easily see, Beta Lambda is putting in a strong bid for The Most Outstanding Fraternity on Campus award. If things go as planned it will be the third year in a row we have won this award. We would like to express our appreciation to our alumni for r-aising the money necessary to re-wire our house.

BETA MU McNeese State University Beta Mu chapter started the spring semester by pledging seven men. In addition to these seven undergraduates, a new faculty advisor, Dr. Joe Lynn Cash. Dr. Cash joins Doug Handley in advising the chapter. A member of the McNeese faculty, our new advisor is an instructor of English. After a break for Mardi Gras, the chapter members have started work for Rose Ball, to be held this year on March 8th thru 1Oth. Beta Mu is looking forward to greeting many Alumni back to the event this year. Our Little Sisters have been doing a great job in helping plan for Rose Ball. The chapter is certainly appreciative for their efforts thus far. The chapter held our Spring retreat recently, at which various topics of concern were much cussed and discussed. Although all the answers may not be found in a retreat-type session, it is

20/THE STAR AND LAMP

a great starting point. Beta Mu looks forward to the Area VII retreat and conclave to be held in Natchitoches on April 2nd. w_e certainly do hope that all chapters and colonies in the Area Will be well represented. The chapter would sincerely appreciate all Alumni filling 0 ~~ the questionnaire which is in the recent copy of the "Beta Moos. We hope to have our files completely updated for both our us~ and yours very soon. In addition, we would like to know as muc about what you are up to as we can. If you return the form,. we will all benefit. We hope to see a lot of Alums in San Franc1sco in '75 for Supreme Chapter!

BETA XI Central Michigan BETA OMICRON N. W. State of La. BETA TAU Valdosta State Beta Tau has had a successful year thus far. We recently initiated 3 new ~rothers, that we are very proud of, and we. are s~re that they will help carry on the tradition of Pi Kappa Phi on thts campus. Among our projects this year was the Annual Miss Valdo~ta State College Pageant. Once again we produced an outstandrng pageant with guests that included the current Miss Georgia and Miss Georgia of 1972. Our house has undergone some drastic changes, for the better. A lot of work has been put into the house and yard. We have carpeted the front rooms of the house and put up wallpaper. More changes are expected to come about next quarte.r. Recently, we took part in Valdosta State's homecoming. ThiS was a very special weekend for us because we had a number of alumni that came back and spent the weekend. This was truly a rewarding experience and it was enjoyed very much bY our brothers. We hope that we can have many more get-togethers like this. Our Rose Ball is planned for April 27, 1974. We would like to cordially invite any alumni that can to try and come. Beta Tau has also recently elected new officers for the upcoming quarter. These officers are: David Alvarez, Archon; Torn Wiley, Vice-Archon; Bill Maxwell, Treasurer; Rusty Peavy, sacred tary; Chris Cleaveland, Warden; Jimmy Holt, Historian; an Barney King, Chaplain. We are looking forward to a successful spring and we are convinced that we will have one.

BETA UPSILON University of Virginia Beta Upsilon began the second semester by making its lonQ awaited move into the newly completed House addition. The addition, which cost over $18,000, includes a large modern bathroom, three new bedrooms and a new dining and party room· Begun in late summer, construction proceeded slowly through the fall until House Advisor and local attorney Leroy Hamlett brought legal action against the original construction companY and hired a new firm. Mr. Hamlett was at the House every daY following the progress until the construction was successfull~ completed in January. The new addition will be dedicated at our annual Rose Ball on April 26, and we hope that a large numbe of alumni will be on hand for this big event. In other news, Sonny Ellis, one of our fourth year borthers, was involved in a near fatal accident in January. Sonny suffere~ severe thoracic injuries and remained in intensive care tor ~y most three weeks. The House, brought very close togeth~r the accident, responded with many brothers making the tnpWt~ the Blood Bank to see that Sonny's need was taken care of. are- pleased to report that Sonny has made a remarkable recovery. Our officers have worked very hard this semester and undef their leadership Pi Kapp has maintained its position as one. 0h the strongest Houses here at Virginia. The officers are: RtCr Luscomb, Archon; Jack Mclaughlin, Vice Pres.; Buck Koeste ' Secretary; Ed Martin, Treasurer; Rich Elder, Chaplain; John Berry, Historian; and Tom Rouse, Warden. And finally, Beta Upsilon has initiated a fund drive to .c.over expenses of the addition, renovations, and furniture acquis1t1on~ We hope that many alumni will respond in our efforts to im~ro~ our .physical plant, and we sincerely hope that many alumni will come to see us and our many improvements.


BETA PHI East Carolina BETA CHI East Texas State University

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Now that the fall semester is over, the brothers of Beta Chi have started their work for an exciting spring semester. The new officers for this semester are: Archon, Tim Hunter; Treasurer, Lynn Schoelerman; Secretary, Mark Cole; Warden, Robert Yowell; Historian, Roger Kliebert; Chaplain, John Earley. At the first of this semester, six pledges were initiated. They are: Roger Kliebert, Mark Cole, Ricky Guinn, Gary Wa.tterson, Tom King and Robert Mitchell. Of these, two are now officers. Our annual money-raising event, the Pi Kapp Bowling Tournament, was a success as usual. Enough money was raised to make the event well worth the effort. The Rose Ball was held in February when Mary Haynes was crowned Rose Queen.

BETA PSI Tennessee Wesleyan

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BETA OMEGA East Tennessee State GAMMA ALPHA Livingston University GAMMA BETA Old Dominion Our first semester rush at Gamma Beta was pretty bad, but With the concern of National, which was expressed by the arriva~ of traveling secretaries, the situation began to change. Our second semester rush functions fell short once again, but through the concern and guidance of our Chapter Advisor, the leadership and vigor of the executive committee and the cooper- . ation and effort of the remaining brothers provided one of the best rushes in our history. This is an example of the Greek system and especially the Pi Kappa Phi fraternal organization working and cooperatin~ t<;>Qether from the national level to the undergraduate base. Th1s 1s the true meaning of brotherhood and our thanks go to National.

GAMMA GAMMA Troy State University Gamma Gamma Chapter recently returned from its Rose format in New Orleans where we had the largest alumni turnout in years. We recently completed our community project by picking up cans and bottles and turning them in to the Miller Beer Co. We won the contest and received a new pool table for our game room. Gamma Gamma has made a good showing in sports this quarter and has a good chance of winning the overall sports award. We are now establishing our chapter library in a new room of the fraternity house and our last two pledge classes have given us a very bright outlook for the future of our Chapter and Pi Kappa Phi.

GAMMA DELTA Memphis State The spring semester proved to be one of great progress for Gamma Delta with the most notable advances in the areas of member recruitment and housing. The brothers racked up the largest pledge class on campus for the second consecutive semester in a field of fourteen national fraternities. The chapter's housing corporation is in the process of being totally revamped and negotiation has begun for new quarters suitable to our greatly increased chapter size. The thrust of this effort has been toward inspiring increased interest among the area alumni. The chapter is now printing an alumni newsletter which it is hoped will aid in communication with our area alumni between regular chapter publications. Along with numerical growth, the brothers have branched out into campus activities to a much greater extent than in past years. Members now hold the following positions on campus:

Vice-President-! FC; Public Relations Director-! FC; Election Commissioner-Student Government Association; President ODKScholastic Honorary Society; Who's Who In American Colleges and Universities; Student Senators-SGA; Campaign CoordinatorsSGA Greek Ticket; Resident Hall Association Senators. On the sports scene Pi Kappa Phi, second place in overall points, is battling for the All-Fraternity championship title.

GAMMA EPSILON Western Carolina University GAMMA ZETA West Virginia Tech Once .again th~. brot~ers of Gamma Zeta .are striving for leadership and abll1ty. S1nce these are two ma1n factors in the growth of our fraternity, we take pride in our efforts to grow bigger and better each year. Our growth is displayed with a pledge class of thirteen willing and able men who are being taught the importance of leadership and cooperation. We are showing them how important it is that they take pride in our fraternity and strive for its betterment. Here at 641 Fayette Pike the brothers are making plans for house repairs this spring and summer. Participation by the brothers, in an attempt to reduce the expenses, will begin when spring arrives and a new image will be displayed by our house for both old and new brothers. With the help of the Alumni Chapter and the city of Charleston, our annual Oil Drum Regatta will be held in Charleston on August 31, 1974. The change has been made for the betterment of Gamma Zeta and the whole of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity. Gamma Zeta's athletes once again are holding their own in intramurals. We are number 1 here at West Virginia Tech in intramurals and are striving earnestly to stay there.

GAMMA ETA Athens College Gamma Eta Chapter has had another year of declining membership but we're still trying hard, putting emphasis on not "how many" but "how good". Pi Kapps on the campus of Athens are not alone in their dilemma. Since 1967 when fraternities were introduced here there has been a steady decline in all fraternity membership' ' perhaps because of school restrictions. We need to hear from some of our alumni who have ideas on how to help the Chapter survive the standards the school has placed upon us.

GAMMA THETA University of North Carolina

Wilmington

GAMMA KAPPA Georgia Southern College Fall quarter saw the return of only fifteen active Brothers to Gamma Kappa, all of whom were Juniors and Seniors. It was evident that we needed to have a great rush. Through a united effort we succeeded in pledging eighteen fine young men. Gamma Kappa once again maintained its number one scholastic ranking on the Georgia Southern campus. Our grade-point average of 2.6341 was higher than any other fraternity on campus. We have been active in the community this year through many outstanding service projects. So far this year, we have collected money for such worthy causes as the American Red Cross the March of Dimes, and for the Mentally Retarded. We also' did some painting for the Catholic Church and gave a Christmas party for the Children's Ward at the local hospital. Homecoming entry for Queen was Miss Joni Banks, a sister of Delta Zeta Sorority. We are most proud of the fact that she won the Homecoming Crown over some very tough competition. At the present time, we are in the process of obtaining a fraternity house. The plans are in the initial stage and we will need the support of all our alumni if we are to follow through. We have had some minor setbacks this year but, overall, Gamma Kappa is definitely on the move upward. We are proud to be part of such a fine institution and we shall continue to strive for excellence. Pi Kappa Phi is definitely Tomorrow's Fraternity Today!

GAMMA LAMBDA University of Missouri at Rolla

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SPRING '74/21


GAMMA MU Belmont Abbey GAMMA NU LaGrange College The brothers of Pi Kappa Phi, Gamma Nu Chapter at LaGrange College had another very successful rush during Winter Quarter. We pledged nine new men into our fraternity and they have proved many times to be worthy neophytes by helping keep the house in shape and planning parties. Also, we expanded our Little Sisters by initiating 13 new girls into the Order of the Star and Lamp. Basketball was not one of our strong points this year, but we are looking forward to softball with the championship in sight. We won the blood drive for the fifth straight time and along with the plaque went a keg of beer to replace the liquid we lost. Everyone agreed it was worth it.

GAMMA XI Georgia Southwestern GAMMA OMICRON Bethel College This year's basketball team has put our Fraternity at the top. Our season record was 9-1-0. Now we are engaged in the final playoffs and have high hopes of winning the whole thing. Winter quarter, we pledged 5 freshmen and 1 transfer student. With the talents of these new brothers, our softball season next quarter looks to be one of our best. In other activities, the brothers of Gamma Omicron were second in the annual bloodmobile drive; we are leading the race for the overall intramural trophy. At this time, we are planning several money making projects, such as a wrestling match and gospel sing.

GAMMA RHO Lander College GAMMA SIGMA Armstrong State GAMMA TAU North Texas State GAMMA UPSILON Oklahoma State University Gamma Upsilon is experiencing "growing pains" in the second semester at the new house at 703 University. Adjustments are being made for the new situations that arise. Apathy, which set in, is now being met through the restructuring of the M.R.E. program and the values of the Chapter. Like most chapters, Gamma Upsilon has had its dormant period. The future looks promising as concerned members are not willing to let Pi Kappa Phi become a boarding house. Involvement in service projects such as our current one, "Operation Gift", is emphasized.

GAMMA PHI University of South Alabama After a very bad fall quarter in all aspects except in the areas of brotherhood and finances, Gamma Phi has turned around completely, got our heads together, and put our minds to work for Pi Kappa Phi and our chapter. We held a tuition drawing and it turned out to be a great public relations project. In the homecoming lawn decorations this year, we came in fourth out of 13 participating fraternities, again building our name on campus; and, this is the first year we will have pledges all three quarters. We are looking forward to the best fall rush ever. Some improvements have been made on the House, due to the diligent efforts of the pledges and brothers. At our first annual Active vs. Alumni Volleyball game and Bar-b-que, we had a 40°/o turnout of Gamma Phi alumni. Plans are in motion for an Active vs. Alumni softball game with refreshments.

22/ THE STAR AND LAMP

If any chapters are in the area or on their way to New Orlean~ (such as Pembroke has been twice), drop on in and let's swa ideas. Our Rose Ball is April 6, the weekend after our retr~~t (April 30-31 ), and all brothers are welcome to both even , ' 11 especially the brothers and alumni from other chapters. Ya come by now!!

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GAMMA OMEGA University of Montevallo DELTA ALPHA VPI

Delta Alpha? You wouldn't recognize the place! We h~ve changed so much that we wonder sometimes how we're dolnQ everything right. Our member induction has increased three-fol~ from last year due to our extended efforts in rush, even th~UQ having to work within the framework of university regulat 1 ~~sr The pledges and new brothers we are getting are of such ca 1 e that getting the brotherhood to work is not only easier, but also more rewarding. We're getting more accomplished this year than ever befor~­ 1 Our efforts in maintaining organized meetings have resulted more work done in committees, lessening the need for omn r directional meeting discussion. We have initiated plans for t'?ue Little Sister Program, for which we have several prospec IV 5 girls (from our "L.S. Rush" parties) to comprise the charter clas r this Spring. Our star-crossed athletic record doesn't refle.ct out present trend of improvement, but participation is at its h1gh~~r On the other hand, we received the honor of being the num . h one out of twenty-six fraternities in scholarship last quarter,, Wl!o the chapter averaging 2.75 out of 4.0. Getting the fraternitY work obviously gets the b.rother to work better. . e As we observe our ments, we don't hesitate to admit that w t can improve. Criticism is appreciated, but none so much as t~ae from our alumni, who perhaps can note faults which otherWIS i would go unattended. In effect, we have strengthened our atum~t relations and plan this Spring to have the biggest (and moxexpensive) banquet in honor of these brothers. We hope. to e t press to them our deep appreciation of their continuing 1nte~gfy in Delta Alpha of Pi Kappa Phi. And nothing could poS 51. complement their interest in our progress more than receiving a Champion Master Chapter Award this year.

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DELTA BETA North Georgia College The brothers of Delta Beta are in the midst of a hectic quarte~ The I.F.C. has just introduced a new rush system. We are no r allowed to pledge freshmen at mid-term, Winter quarter. A~~s we Pi Kapps fought for an open rush system, we accep!ed ek as a happy medium. This rush system works on a s1.x-~e period where the rushees look at all fraternities during thiS tH!ln~ Hopefully, this will work towards our advantage. We are hodpl be to pledge as many as forty rushees this time which woul the highest ever at Delta Beta. . he The Pi Kapp Athletic Club put on a great performanc~ In t0 n recent I.F.C. sports program. The Raiders of Pi Kappa Phi put. 5t a great drive in the closing minutes of the Soccer gam~ ag~:gn Sigma Nu but came up short 7 to 1. Against Sigma Phi ~pSI . ' 1 after a hard-fought game, we tied them 3 to 3. We are h,0~ n Q for a rematch in the near future. Looking ahead, we will deflnlt~n~ hold the upper hand in the Ice Hockey at the beginning of spn quarter because of our skill in no one ever playing befor~. the The North Georgia Beauty Pageant will again be put on Your Pi Kapps here. We are hoping that Dorothy Ackerman, voluptuous entry, will win it. . re One of our Alumnae recently sent us a hand-painted P1ctu ld and frame of the Seal and Crest of the Fraternity, and we ~ou in like to greatly thank Tom Persia for this. It is proudly hanglnQ the Student Center above our Composite. in Things are definitely looking ahead for spring quarter. Aga 5 ... this year, Gatlinburg, Tennessee, will be endowed with th~ P;~th ence of fifty hell-raising Pi Kapps on the weekend of Aprt through the 28th. All Hell to Gatlinburg!

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DELTA GAMMA University of Nebraska at Omaha It was a shock to all of us in Delta Gamma when brother Robert Placek died of cancer last September. For an associate member project, the fall pledge class took over a project sponsbored by the American Cancer Society which was being done Y an elderly man at the time. . The purpose of the project was to show the harmful effects of smoking to elementary and junior high students in the Omaha area. The project consists of a film, a qu~stion and answer sesSion and a demonstration with a dummy called "Smokin' Sam,. . The dummy is used as a cigarette smoker in the demonstratton. The tars and nicotines are collected in two glass jars as Sam smokes the cigarette; these jars are then shown to the students. So far we have been to schools and the project, manned by the brothers, is very successful. The groups we have spoken to have ranged from the smallest of twelve to the largest of four hundred and fifty. The brothers of Delta Gamma hope to continue this community service project next year. In sports this season the A team for basketball came out with a 5 and 2 record, the B team came out with a 1, 6. We are looking forward to a good season in volleyball and Plan to have a softball team this summer in the Metropolitan area league.

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DELTA ZETA Appalachian State Starting Winter Quarter, the Delta Zeta chapter was pleased to have 45 active brothers and 5 pledges. One of our brothers, Greg Honeycutt, is currently running for SGA president. We are very proud of Greg and hope he is victorious. Recently we held elections for Rose Queen. This year Miss Libby Moody of Mt. Airy, N. C. will represent us as our Queen. She is a very beautiful, sweet girl and we are most proud of her. This year's Scholarship award for the highest nrade-point average goes to David Vaughn with a 3.55 overall. He is a Sophomore Business major. We are currently fighting for 1st place for overall Club & Fraternity lntramurals. This year we have won our division in football, basketball, and soc cer. We also had a second place finis h in volleyball.

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We are off to our best start ever in our quest to win the all sports trophy between the Greeks here at JSU. We were undefeated during regular season play in volleyball. We were able to carry our winning ways over into basketball. We lost only one game during regular season play and finished up in undisputed possession of first place. We are all looking forward to Greek . Week and the coming softball season. The brothers and pledges held a retreat on the top of Cheaha Mountain near Anniston and it turned out to be a great success. We were able to look ahead and make plans for the future. It was a good learning experience for the brothers as well as the pledges. Our spring formal was held on March 30 in Gadsden. Many alumni were down and it went off real well. Come by and visit with us at Delta Epsilon Chapter. Our doors are always open.

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DELTA ETA Morehead State University

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DELTA THETA Mars Hill College

Delta Gamma (Nebraska at Omaha) gives lecture to school children

DELTA DELTA Northeast Missouri State Delta Delta Chapter of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity is working hard to overcome a few minor problems such as an enrollment drop here at NMSU. We are cooperating on work projects including farm labor and selling first aid kits to the local inhabitants of Kirksville. Most of the money goes to better the fraternity house, but enough is saved out to provide for a few retreats. We are currently planning another retreat for group dynamics to take Place on farm acreage near Kirksville. We are all looking forward to a very eventful summer and a prosperous rush season. We are already looking forward to the Initiation of our latest pledge brother, Max Lytle.

DELTA EPSILON Jacksonville State University Delta Epsilon held its semi-annual election of officers Sunday, March 3, 1974. Those elected are Donny Mallicoat, Archon; Steve Jones, Treasurer; Terry Kendrick, Secretary; Mike Hopkins, Warden; Joey Mathews, Historian; Randall Wood, Chaplain. These new officers began their terms of office March 17. Rush began the second week in January and we are fortunate in having 13 fine young men to pledge our brotherhood.

Spring has arrived in the mountains of Western North Carolina and with it a rejuvenation of spirit for Delta Theta Chapter of Mars Hill College. After an absence of two months, due to Christmas vacation and m~ni-term, the morale here was relatively low, but with the enthus1asm of Beta pledge class our latest initiates we moved right into the activities for the Spring Semester. Our turning point seemed to come with the celebration of our Chapter's first birthday. This event came at the end of our spring rush which produced eight new pledges. Plans for the semester include our annual Easter party and egg hunt for the Mars Hill Handischool; a super star weekend which will determine the "super brother" for 1974· and a series of fund-raising projects including car washes, s~ndwich sales and doughnut sales. Plans for our Spring Rose Ball are taking shape. This will be our biggest social event of the semester and Brothers are hard at work planning this event. As usual, Delta Theta has come through with its spirit. For the third consecutive year Delta Theta Chapter has won the Blood Donor Award by giving the most blood for our college quota.

DELTA IOTA Middle Tennessee State Delta Iota has overcome many hardships that can be encountered by chapters during their first year of charter. We have had many problems, but the brothers have fought together and have become more united each day as we solve each problem. We are the newest fraternity on the MTSU campus and we feel we are establishing a permanent place for Pi Kappa Phi on this campus. We are now seeking a permanent chapter house for Delta Iota. Much must be said for our alumni advisory committee as only through their help may we meet this objective. Most importantly, we have initiated eight new brothers last December at the first initiation held at Delta Iota Chapter. Our new Associate Member Program for the spring semester has a total of . five members. This figure is about average for most fraternities on this campus during the spring semester. We are very pro'Ud of the quality of members of Delta lota~s Beta Class. We feel that through them the ideals and objectives of Pi Kappa Phi may be met at MTSU.

SPRING '74123


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DELTA KAPPA Pembroke State University

ALPHA BETA Nicholls State University

Delta Kappa Chapter, at Pembroke State University has once again found itself in a very prosperous and outstanding semester. By full cooperation of the Brothers and Little Sisters, Delta Kappa ran away with several outstanding awards during Homecoming this semester, with our Rose Queen, Miss Wanda Phillips of Fayetteville, winning Miss Homecoming Queen for Pembroke State University. Wanda is a Senior at Pembroke, majoring in Elementary Education. Miss Phillips has been very active in the Little Sister organization. Aside from being our Rose Queen, Wanda has also held the office of President of the Little Sister organization and has been a very hard worker in all the Little Sisters' functions. The Brothers of Delta Kappa are very proud of this beautiful lady. With the unlimited help and cooperation from the Brothers and Little Sisters, Delta Kappa completed the float that would represent us in the float events. With the theme being "The Way We Were", our float came through for Delta Kappa by winning the "Most Relevant" trophy award. In the end, it was well worth all the time and unlimited work put into making the float that would bring Delta Kappa much pride. Homecoming was tipped off with a full day of festivities which started at dawn and carried on through the evening. Much of the success was due to the good representation of our strong alumni association present for the festivities. Finally, Delta Kappa is presently in the prepartions for our first Rose Ball. This will be the biggest event of the year for Delta Kapoa. The Ball will be a formal event with all the trimmings. A large banquet hall is being rented out and a band has been contracted to play for us. The Brothers and Little Sisters are all eagerly awaiting this exciting event. Delta Kappa is proud of this one year recognition and feel it is only natural to celebrate it in a formal manner.

The Alpha Beta Colony of Nicholls State University has be~~ extremely active the first half of this spring semester. J\long ~~n­ the usual parties and socials, our colony participated 1n a We clave at Northwestern State University on March the 1st. Phi were treated well and learned a great deal about Pi Kapp.a The Beta (Omicron) brothers showed a special interest 1n colony and gave us a great amount of if"!Spiration. e As a fund-raising project for the local day-care center, '!' s have obtained the services of the New Orleans Playboy BU~ 1 ~ 5 to engage in a basketball game with our male faculty me~ e: ~ A project such as this will require a great amount of organ1zatJ~r and coordination. We feel that this game will strengthen prestige and publicize our fraternity on campus.

DELTA LAMBDA North Carolina at Charlotte The cool dudes of Delta Lambda Chapter were awarded a $35 cash prize, two second place trophies, a 36-inch sterling silver first place trophy and the title of .. Most School Spirited" during the UNCC Homecoming Week festivities. The theme was the happenings of the fifties . . . Cruisin' '74. Our banner depicted a '57 Chevy hardtop. Our display, a '54 light blue Studebaker appeared on campus with a Pi Kapp slogan attached. At Saturday's parade, Pi Kapps dressed in the style of the SO's dominated Charlotte's main thoroughfare while dancing and playing the music of the era. During half-time at the game in which UNCC defeated Samford, Delta Lambda was awarded a 2nd place for its banner, a 2nd place for its display ... and the grand prize ••Most School Spirited" award. Credit is due to Brother Craig Fincannon, Chairmen of Delta Lambda's 49er Festival Committee, and the Brothers of Delta Lambda for a job well done.

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BETA EPSILON Missouri-Columbia The Beta Epsilon Chapter of Pi Kappa Phi has been re-estab~ fished as a colony at Mizzou. Starting out with only 9 mem~~;s in December of 1973, we have increased our size to 23. Besl working for entrance into the lntrafraternity Council, our co l~n~ is naturally striving to get chartered, having already elecReaofficers and formed three committees: Business & Finance, cruiting, and Constitution. On February 17, 1974, Asst. National Director, Jerry Ma.tt he~~ conducted a leadership lab on the Columbia campus. Us1ng the techniques, we hope to increase our membership to 40 bY end of this school year.

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KAPPA PHI University of New Orleans The brothers of Kappa Phi Colony, New Orleans, are h~PPY !~ report the safe but happy conclusion of another Mardi kG~ it season. This year, as in the past, we rented a van and p~r e b along the parade route for all to enjoy. We were ~1s1ted ~ several brothers from Memphis State who really enJoyed th festivities. art The brotherhood has been involved in planning a raffl.e, Pwe of the proceeds from which will go to a deserving cha.rrty. e are raffling off a lifetime subscription to Playboy Magaz1ne. Th drawing will be April 1. . in We are also busy planning our spring rush, especiallY connection with our IFC. · n Another big thing in the making is a name change ce~ebra~J<:~s The Louisiana legislature just recently changed the Un1versl\~e name from Louisiana State University in New Orle!ins to is University of New Orleans. Students have been push1ng f~r t~d change for about 10 years now, and it has finally been. ach1evon~ The brothers would also like to take this opportunity to tc to gratulate Bryan Nuss, one of our members, for his attemp ~ 1 keep streaking alive on our college campuses. Luckily, he fa "::~ The mailing address of the colony has been changed. P1e make a note of this fbr any future correspondence: Kappa Phi Colony Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity University of New Orleans University Center Lakefront New Orleans, Louisiana 70122

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Delta Lambda's parade in Charlotte, N. C.

24/THE STAR AND LAMP

Kappa Phi colony at Methodist College is finali zing pl.an~eto; their chartering weekend. The weekend of April 20th will . ce historic weekend for the colony and for Methodist College, Sl~st Pi Kappa Phi will be the first Greek letter fraternity at Meth~~~ of The colony has 43 men hoping to be initiated the 20th. e them are working to make Pi Kappa Phi at Methodist ColleQ what it is everywhere else, the biggest and the best. . roBesides chartering, the colony members are involved 1n P eY ducing the first annual Miss Methodist College Pageant. J~he hope to make this the main event for their Greek Weeks o ke future. Besides the pageant, the colony has been asked to ta to over production of other events whose sponsors can't seem . . . he be able to ge~ things together. Kappa Phi 1s the strongest, most act1ve organ1zat1on on tnd campus of Methodist College. They are proud of this fact. a e think it shows the validity of fraternities. All the members Will b proud to be Greek. Say it loud! d The address at Methodist College is box 429, so write us ~gg let us know what you think. We all look forward to becomt part of the family of Pi Kappa Phi.

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KAPPA PHI Western Kentucky Kappa Phi Colony produced a fraternity first this past winter. The colony sponsored and produced its first annual Carnival against Muscular Dystrophy the first ever produced in the United States by a fraternity. The carnival was held November 28, Which the mayor proclaimed as "Pi Kappa Phi Muscular DystroPhy Day" in Bowling Green. Games with prizes donated by local merchants and a dunking booth occupied by the Vice President of the Student Government, the Director of Fraternities, the Director of Placement and the Assistant Dean of Students, provided the nucleus of the carnival. Brothers Butch Freeman and Kirbv Perkins dressed as clowns added the extra touch to the carnival atmosphere. Special guests for the day were Mark Conquest, Muscular Dystrophy Poster Boy and Ms. Terry Cocker, Regional Director of the Muscular Dystrophy foundation. Ms. Cocker provided Valuable help in the production of the carnival. Despite bad weather the Pi Kapps collected nearly $400 in two hours to aid the regional chapter of Muscular Dystrophy foundation in its fight against the disease. Frank laconis, M.D., Chairman and originator of the idea said, ''We had been searching for a public service project and I felt the carnival would be an excellent selection. It was a way to raise money for a worthy cause but still be fun for the guys in the fraternity and the people contributing the money, while proViding some well deserved publicity for Pi Kappa Phi." Kappa Phi Colony plans on sending a packet concerning the M. D. Carnival to the National office for distribution to other chapters and colonies but in the meantime, any chapter desiring more information can write: Pi Kappa Phi, Box U30, College Heights, Bowling Green, Ky. 42101. Kappa Phi Colony celebrated founders day Saturday, December 7, 1973 with a banquet in the dining room of the Dero Downing University Center. The guest speaker was Dr. Dewayne Mitchell, educator and world traveler. The Mark D. Schwarzer award for excellence in intramural sports was dedicated in honor of Mark Schwarzer, a founder of Kappa Phi Colony, who lost his life this past summer in a diving accident while searching for the body of a drowning victim. Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Schwarzer, Mark's parents, were the colony's special guests for the banquet and were on hand for the dedication of the award in honor of Mark. Kappa Phi Colony is anxiously awaiting its chartering, which Will take place the latter part of April. All Pi Kapps everywhere are hereby extended an invitation.

It is from the brainstorming sessions of concerned fraternity men that chapters get their impetus and guidance. Pictured here are seminars of Chapter Advisors and Archons held in both Charlotte and Atlanta.

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TAU KAPPA DELTA Florence State

Tau Kappa Delta Colony, in keeping with Pi Kappa Phi's spirit ot public service, erected playground equipment at the First Methodist Church of Florence recently. Arriving early in the morning, the brothers and pledges began digging the foundations for the new equipment. By noon a dragon-shaped climbing apparatus stood waiting for its first Sunday School Class. A Sliding board was also constructed. Everyone had a great time Working together. We hope the children will have as much fun Playing on their dragon as we had putting it together. Late last semester, Tau Kappa Delta Colony went to the polls to elect officers for the coming term. Incumbent Archon, Mark Blackburn, and Warden, Terry Huffman, retained their offices for another semester. After a semester out of office, Jim Glass Was reinstated as secretary. Mike Beadle was elected Chaplain for a second time. Newcomers to Tau Kappa Delta Colony's leadership are: Barry Martin, Treasurer; and Whit Dooley, Historian. Our spring sports program is shaping up quite well. In a Pre-season softball game with Florence State's Kappa Sigma Colony, our team was victorious by a score of 3-2. In recently held intramural bicycle races, Tau Kappa Delta placed seven People in the semi-finals. The competition ended with our John Knaur placing a respectable third in the finals. We expect to do much better in Florence State's coming cross-country bike race.

SPRING '74! 25


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Whatever it was, it wasn't regulation basketball but the audience at Nicholls State University enjoyed the action. Alpha Beta Colony sponsored the game between the New Orleans Playboy Bunnies and the NSU faculty and donated the proceeds to charity for mentally retarded children. Referees were basketball Coach Don Landry and Dean William Duncan who made sure the girls won the garne 125-26. Giving the Bunnies 15 points on one shot and denying the faculty players as little as two points for a regulation basket didn't hurt their chances for winning. The girls even coaxed their opponents into helping them score by lifting them on their shoulders to make easy baskets. The officials let the girls shoot from 10 feet out instead of the usual 15 feet and allowed them to keep on shooting until they finally hit the basket. The game was followed by a cocktail party and a dance. A plaque was presented by the Alpha Beta Colony to the Assistant Manager of the New Orleans Playboy Club in appreciation for his cooperation and for the wonderful performance of the Bunnies.

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UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI

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HONOR AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED SERVICE IN JOURNAUSM

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RAYMOND B. NIXON

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In recoqnition of his 50 years of service as a journalism teacher

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His editorship of Journalism Quarterly for 20 years 1 firmly establishinq it as the preeminent scholarly journal in its field, and His Hfelonq contribution to international communication 1 in-

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26/THE STAR AND LAMP

H. W. Schoolinq Chancellor

Mr. Nixon (left) talks with Senator Sam Ervin at the Awards Banquet

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ducted by Capt. Neil V. White, Commanding Officer, Naval Hospital.

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John Os_w ald Christiansen, Jr., Auburn, 1964, is a Captain-A6A Bombhardier/Navigator for the USMC. liis home address is 3156 Clais St., Mobile, Ala. 36606. In 1973 he was listed in ccWho's Who in North Carolina" and served on the Vestry of St. Christophers Episcopal Church 197273. Chris says he is interested in stamp collecting, hunting, deep-sea fishing and football. He was in Viet Nam 1968-1969 where he flew 235 combat sorties. He has been awarded 15 strike/flight air medals, 1 Distinguished Flying Cross, 1 Navy Commendation medal w /Combat ((V", and a Combat Action Ribbon. Chris and his wife, Petsy, have a baby son, John 0. ((Chris" Christiansen III. Otis E. Engleman, Jr., College of Charleston, 1969, is a Lieutenant in the Medical Corps, USNR. He was the first Family Practice intern at the Naval Hospital in Pensacola and, on January 15, he was presented a certificate upon completion of his internship. The ceremony was con-

Brother Engleman, an initiate of Alpha Chapter, is married to the former Deborah Boyle. He may be contacted through his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 0. E. E.n gleman Sr., 103 Overbrook Ave., North Charleston,

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Ben F. Overton, University of Florida, 1951, has been appointed to the Florida Supreme Court. Overton, who's appointment was announced March 14 by Gov. Reubin Askew, is Florida's first justice to have been recommended by an official nominating commission. He was selected from the top three men of a field of 26 lawyers and judges who applied to the Supreme Court nomi• • • nattng commission. He was appointed to replace Chief Justice Vassal Carlton who retired February 28. · One of the top three men selected by the commission was St. Petersburg attorney Alan C. Sundberg, also a Pi Kapp, initiate of Beta Eta. Overton said he planned to run this fall in the state's nonpartisan judicial elections for the four years remaining on Carlton's term. William McLeod, Overton's law partner for years, refused to label him a liberal or conservative, but

calls him a progressive and a man uniquely suited for the bench. Harry Mashburn, N.C. State University, 1964, has become very successful in the field of construction since his graduation in Civil Engineering. Harry is the Vice President and Director of Construction for EwingHungiville Realty & Construction. He has managed numerous major construction projects including many shopping centers and several apartment complexes. He has also served as field engineer for the construction of several large buildings; i.e., The Wachovia Building in WinstonSalem, the Charleston (S.C.) Municipal Auditorium, and the Carolina Coliseum (Univ. of S.C.). Harry and his wife Betsy, have three children. Their mailing address is 4658 Pamlico Circle, Columbia, S.C. E. David Haigler, University of Alabama, has been named a circuit judge by Gov. George Wallace. Judge Haigler will handle divorce and domestic relations cases. Before going on active duty with the Navy in WWII, he served as assistant U. S. District attorney. Upon his return from service he became law clerk for the U. S. District judge until he re-entered private practice in 1950. , He was first appointed a judge of the county civil court in 1959 and became presiding judge of that court in 1962. He has been appointed to four successive terms on the county court bench by the judges of the county. Judge Haigler is very active in civic and religious affairs in Birmingham. He is married to the former Florence Vance and they have two grown children. George L. Runt, Illinois Tech 1966, was recently installed as co-pastor of the Northland Parish of Co-operating churches in Ironwood, Michigan. Pastor Hunt's duties include Christian education, youth work, and preaching throughout the Parish, as well as pastoral work in the portion

SPRING '74127


of the Parish in Wisconsin. The Northland Parish is an experiment in interdenominational co-operation between the U n i t e d Presbyterian Church and the Evangelical Covenant Church of America. It provides a staff of two pastors and a secretary to four churches that would other\Vise find it difficult to call a pastor. The Hunts make their home at 305 Fourth Ave. So. in Hurley, Wisconsin, 54534. Herb Owens, Georgia Tech, '51, was honored recently with ccThe President's Award for Heroism'' which was presented by the Mayor of Toledo, Harry Kessler. Herb entered a flaming apartment building and rescued a woman who was trapped inside, overcome by the intense heat and smoke. The District Fire Chief commented that "Mrs. Bonett probably would not have escaped death without the brave, daring and effective method of rescue by Mr. Owens." Brother Owens has also been honored in his profession, chemical engineering. He worked for a Vicksburg, Miss. chemical plant (the only one of its kind in the world) where he assisted in the development of the nitrogen tetroxide chemical oxidizer used in the module landings on the moon and lift-off thrust back to earth in the Apollo program. This chemical plant, along with is several chemical engineers including Mr. Owens, was awarded the coveted c'Kirkpatrick Chemical Engineering Merit Award" in 1967. He is currently involved in establishing his own engineering consulting practice in ·Mississippi, Pennsylvania and New Jersey. His home address is 3700 Sheaf£ Lane, 206, Philadelphia, PA 19145. James Edward Jones, Jr., University of Tenn., 1942, graduated with a BS in Business Administration, majoring in accounting. He married the former Ann Pope who graduated from UT. They have two sons, James E. Jones III and Richard P. Jones.

Ed is a self-employed home building contractor and lives at 4105 Wiley Avenue, Chattanooga, Tenn. 37412. He has been active in the Chattanooga Alumni association and has helped raise some $2500 for Alpha Sigma. Thomas F. Sheridan, Jr., University of Florida, 1955, is an insurance agent with Southern In sur an c e Agency, Inc. in Jacksonville. He and his wife, Antonette, and their five children live at 4229 Genoa Ave. Tom is Deputy Grand Knight, and Grand Knight of the Knights of Columbus, Key Club advisor for the Kiwanis Club, President of the Little League, and on the Fraternity Housing Corp. Board of Directors. Tom writes this note: "I cherish all the good times and many lasting close friendships I made as an active Pi Kapp pledge and brother, and only regret that I have not been able to do more as an alumnus. A fraternity is more and longer lasting than a club, or you missed the whole lasting value inside." William Robert Flowers, Samford, 1963, is Vice President and Director of Human Resources of the Barnett Wilson Company of Jacksonville, Florida. Bob was Treasurer of the colony that re-established Pi Kappa Phi at Samford in 1963. He has received numerous awards for civic activities from the Jaycees and the Chamber of Commerce. He is active on the Executive Bo~rd of the March of Dimes, the Board of Directors of Dollars for Scholars, a member of the Constitution Action Council, and the Fine Arts Committee of the Jacksonville Area Chamber of Commerce. In 1968 he married the former Jane McRaney, Mississippi State College for Women, and they have a young son, Chad. Bob was previously personnel manager Ior Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida and served four and a half years in the Air Force. The Flowers family live at 4374 Charleston Lane, Jacksonville, Fla. 33210.

28/THE STAR AND LAMP •

Gilbert M. Barrett, Auburn, 1946, says his business is livestock and farming. He owns about 3800 acres of land and grows peanuts, cotton, corn, pecans and livestock in Dougherty County, Ga. He is President of the National Association of Counties and in that capacity travels to meetings of county officials in most of the United States, testifies before Congressional Committees, and has represented county government in Mexico, England and Scotland. He oversees a staff of about 60 people who represent the county viewpoint to federal decision-makers and pro• vide technical assistance to counties. Gil is also on the Board of Directors for the Albany Chamber of Commerce and has been a County Cornmissioner for 16 years. Barrett is a ccfantastically ethical commissioner," a local newspaper editor reported. ccHe's not in there for the money. People may disagree with his decisions, but no one ever questions his honesty". Gil and his wife, Alice, have two daughters and a baby granddaughter. Their home address is P. 0. Box 858, Albany, Ga.

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Join with other Pi Kapps on the TSS Fairwind, one of the most luxurious curise ships afloat ... 4 meals per day, 3 pools, 2 nightclubs, theatre, plush accommodations .••. departing Miami/Ft. Lauderdale. Ports of call: San Juan, St. Thotnas, Santo Domingo, Port-au-Prince Don't waste your vacation money getting to your vacation. Our Air/Sea program to the Caribbean can give you considerable savings as opposed to buying your airline ticket and cruise ticket separately. The table below shows how little it costs to start your Sitmar cruise via regularly scheduled airline from many U. S. cities. Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago

$20 20 20 20 25

L Category H Category F Category NOTE:

Cleveland Detroit Houston Kansas City Los Angeles

25 25 30 25 75

Lo uisvill e Minneapo lis/St. Paul New Orleans New York Philadelphia

25 50 20 20 20

Europa, Ocean, Monte Carlo Deck -Inside Twins Europa Deck - Outside Twin beds Ocean, Monte Carlo Decks - Outside Twin beds

Sa n Francisco 95 Seattle 100 St.• Lo uis 25 Tampa/St. PetersburgFree Washington, D. C. 20

$440. per person $545. per person $580. per person

All prices are subject to availability in each category by Sitmar Computer Reservations. AMERICAN TRAVEL CORPORATION 1 Group Operations Division P. 0 . Box 25399 1 Raleigh, North Carolina 27611 PI KAPPA PHI CARl BBEAN CRUISE November 2-9 1 1974 I would like to attend the Pi Kappa Phi Caribbean Fly/Cruise, flying fro m to Miami or Ft. Lauderdale, then sailing to San Juan St. Thomas, Santo Domingo Port-au-Prince Nov. 2 - 9, 197 4. I

-----and I

Please make reservations for people. We prefer a stateroom at $ per person on the Deck. Enclosed is our deposit of $50.00 per person for _____persons. Please make check payable to AMERICAN TRAVEL CORPORATION. Final payment is due on or before Sept . 1, 197 4. Full refund of deposit will be given up to 60 days prior to departure. Please add Port Taxes: $6.00 for adults, $4.00 for children under 12 • Don't forget to add the air fare to your package price. 3rd Adult $345.00. Children in same room with parents 1 $172.50. FULLNAME(S) _________________________________________________________________

ADDRESS-------------------------------------------------------------------CITY - - - - - - - - - - - - S T A T E _ _ _ _ _ ZJP _ _ _ _ _ PHONE - - - - - - - - - Your ent tre family and friends may join you on this cruise. Select your stateroom preference and send your deposit today! A single supplement is 50% above the fare of the cabin you choose . •

SPRING '74!29


NATIONAL COUNCIL President-Ted Scharfenstefn Addison Gilbert Hospital 298 Washington St. Gloucester, Mass. 09930 Vice President-John Wilson 5124 Scarsdale Rd., N. W. Washington, D. C. 20016 Treasurer-A. J. Strickland, Ill P. 0. Box 4555, University, AI. 35486 Secretary-Ron Krebs 120 S. Central Ave. St. Louis, Mo. 63105 Chaplain-Ph II Tappy 21881 Winnebago ln. El Toro, Ca. 92630 Chancellor-Ernest S. Delaney 4033 Beresford Rd., Charlotte, N. C. 28211 Past President-Jack Steward, 4375 Pearl St., Eugene, Ore. 97405 NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS Executive Director-Durward W. Owen Assistant Executive Director-Jerry Matthews Field Secretaries-Chuck Barnard, Travis Julian, Sonny O'Orobinak NATIONAL COMMITTEES Trust Investment-John Oefmler 1149 Green Tree ln. Narbeth, Pa., 19072 Scholarship-Jeff Clark Apartment Hgts. Apt. C-3 Blacksburg, Va. 24060 Ritual and Insignia-Glenn McConnell live Oak Plantation Ravenel, S. C. 29460 Advisory-Mel Metcalfe 2832 33rd St. Port Arthur, Tex. 77640 Endowment-Richard Viguerie 7777 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, Va. 22043 Nominating Committee-Mel Metcalfe 2832 33rd St. Port Arthur, Tex. 77640 AREA GOVERNORS Area I AI P. Brown, 522 Devon St. Kearney, N. J. 07032 II Vacant Ill Ken Forti, 3519 Raymoor Rd. Kensington, Md. 20795 IV Ernie Zlnkowskl, 4917 Forest lake Pl., Columbia, S. C. V William l. Finney 280 Northern Ave., Apt. 18-A Avondale Estates, Ga. 30002 VI Walt Brinkman, 5527 Capri Rd. Jacksonville, Fla. 32210 VII Larry Gracie, 4523 Metropolitan New Orleans, La. 70126 VIII Scott Even beck, 5306 N. Michigan Rd. N.W ., Indianapolis, Ind. 46208 IX Robert G. Bromley 32415 Dolly Madison Ave. Madison Heights, Ml 48071 X Martin R. Radtke, 1704 Devitt Muscatine, Ia. 52761 XI Earl Layman, 2409 11th Ave. Seattle, Wash. 98119 XII Rusty Patrick, 1700 Francisco St., Berkeley, Calif. 94703 XIII David McAllister 5729 Wintergreen Or. Raleigh, N. c. 27609 XIV John E. Baber, 208 Corarwood Or. Kingsport, Tenn. 37663 XV Vacant XVI Jack Edmonds, 9 Danbury Ctr. Amhurst, N. H. 03031 XVII Chuck Gordon, 7604 Goddard, Apt. 203, lenexa, Kan. 66214 XVIII Moyer 0. Harris, 4815 Williams Ave., NW Lawton, Ok. 73501 XIX Vacant XX Or. Warren Robb 1315 Verrea Or. Tempe. Az. 85282 XXI Richard Folger, 89 Berkley Rd. Avondale Est., Ga. 30002 XXII Bill Ford, 2901-A Rhodes Clr. Birmingham, Ala. 35205 XXIII Vacant XXIV Richard Rucker, 102112 E. Vine Murfreesboro, Tenn. 37130 XXV David N. Mielke, Dept. of Secondary Education, Appalachian State Un., Boone, N. C. 28608 PI Kappa Phi Scholarship Foundation Otis Me Collum, Chairman 4825 Rodman St., N. W. Washington, 0. C. 20016 PI Kappa Phi Properties, Inc. Kelly Bergstron, President Suite 3804, 875 N. Michigan Ave. Chicago, Ill. 60611

30/THE STAR AND LAMP

PI KAPPA PHI 1924 Vail Avenue, Charlotte, North Carolina Founded at The College of Charleston, S. C. - December 10, 1904 FOUNDERS SIMON FOGARTY, JR. ANDREW A. KROEG, JR. L. HARRY MIXSON

INSTITUTION Alabama Appalachian State Armstrong State Athens Au bum Augusta Belmont Abbey Bethel California-Berkeley Central Michigan Charleston Cornell Drake Drexel East Carolina East Tennessee East Texas Florence State Florida Florida Southern Florida State Georgia Georgia Southern Georgia Southwestern Georgia State Georgia Tech Illinois Illinois Tech Indiana Iowa State Jacksonville State Jacksonville La Grange Lander Livingston Mars Hill McNeese Mercer Memphis State Methodist Michigan State Middle Tennessee State Missouri-Rolla Montevallo Morehead Nebraska-Omaha Newark North carolina North carolfna·C North Carolina-W North carolina State N.E. Missouri North Georgia North Texas State N.W. State-La. Oklahoma Oklahoma State Old Dominion oregon State Pembroke Penn State Polytech. lnst. of N.Y. Presbyterian Purdue Rensselaer Roanoke Samford Stetson South Alabama south Carolina Tampa Tennessee Tennessee Wesleyan Toledo • Troy State Valdosta State Virginia VPI washington washington 1c Lee Western Carolina Western Kentucky West Virginia Tech Wofford

CHAPTER Omicron Delta zeta Gamma Sigma Gamma Eta Alpha Iota Gamma Psi Gamma Mu Gamma Omicron Gamma Beta XI Alpha Psi Beta Delta Alpha Upsilon Beta Phi Beta Omega Beta Chi Delta Xi Alpha Epsilon Beta Beta Beta Eta Lambda Gamma Kappa Gamma XI Beta Kappa Iota Upsilon Alpha Phi Alpha Psi Alpha Omicron Delta Epsilon Gamma Chi Gamma Nu Gamma Rho Gamma Alpha Delta Theta Beta Mu Alpha Alpha Gamma Delta Delta Mu Alpha Theta Delta Iota Gamma Lambda Gamma Omega Delta Eta Delta Gamma Beta Alpha Kappa Delta Lambda Gamma Theta Tau Delta Delta Delta Beta Gamma Tau Beta Omicron Alpha Gamma Gamma Upsilon Gamma Beta Alpha Zeta Delta Kappa Alpha Mu Alpha XI Beta Omega Alpha Tau Xi Alpha Eta

Chi

Gamma Phi Sigma Beta Lambda Alpha Sigma Beta Psi Beta Iota Gamma Gamma Beta Tau Beta Upsilon Delta Alpha Alpha Delta Rho Gamma Epsilon Delta Mu Gamma Zeta Zeta

AREA XV

XXV

XXI XXII XV

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XXV

XXIV

XII IX

IV I

X

II

XIII

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VII VII

VII X

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XIII IX

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XXIII X I XIII XXV XIII

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Ill XI

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II I IV VIII I Ill XXII

VI XV IV VI

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IX XV XXI Ill Ill

XI

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ADDRESS 312 University Ave., Tuscaloosa, Ala. 35407 Box 81 Workman Hall, Boone, N. C. 28607 Box 102, 1135 Abercorn St., Savannah, Ga. 31406 Athens College, P. 0. Box 232, Athens, Ala. 3561 1 255 S. College St., Auburn, Ala. 36830 2256 Central Ave., Augusta, Ga. 30904 Belmont Abbey, Belmont, N. C. 28012 Bethel College, McKenzie, Tenn. 38201 2395 Piedmont Ave., Berkeley, Calif. 94704 101 E. Park Ave., Mt. Pleasant, MI. 48858 27 George St., Charleston, S. C. 29401 722 University Ave., Ithaca, N. Y. 14851 3420 Kingman Blvd., Des Moines, Iowa 50311 3405 Powelton Ave., Ph iladelphla, Pa. 19104 803 Hooker Rd., Greenville, N. C. 27834 519 W. Pine, Johnson City, Tenn. 37601 East Commerce Sta., Box W, Commerce Tex. 75428 Box 1095, Florence State Univ., Florence, Ala. 35630 11 Fraternity Row, Gainesville, Fla. 32601 Box 735, Fla. So. College, Lakeland, Fla. 33882 Box U-6696, Fla. St. U., Tallahassee, Fla. 32306 930 s. Milledge Ave., Athens, Ga. 30601 Lamdrum Center, Box 8061, Statesboro, Ga. 30548 P. 0. Box 1538, Americus, Ga., 31709 33 Gilmer St., S. E., Atlanta, Ga. 30303 Ga. Tech, Box 32715, N. W., Atlanta, Ga. 30313 306 E. Gregory, Champaign, 111. 61820 3333 s. Wabash Ave., Chicago, Ill. 60616 408 North Indiana, Bloomington, Ind. 47403 407 Welch Ave., Ames, Iowa 50012 P. 0. Box 602, Jacksonville, Ala. 36265 Jacksonville University, Jacksonville, Fla. 32211 LaGrange College, LaGrange, Ga. 30240 C 646 P. 0. Box 270-lander College, Greenwood, s. · 29 Box T, Livingston, Ala. 35470 Campus Box 1414-C, Mars Hill, N. C. 28754 McNeese Univ., Box 708, Lake Charles, La. 70601 Box 112, Mercer Un iv., Macon, Ga. 31207 3841 Spottswood Ave., Memphis, Tenn. 38111 Ol Box 429, Methodist College1 Fayetteville, N. C. 283 121 Whitehills Dr., East Lansmg, Mich. 48823 MTSU, Box 558, Murfreesboro, Tenn. 37130 1

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Montevallo, Ala. 35115 Box 1247, Univ. P. 0., Morehead, Ky. 40351 P. 0. Box 14028, W. Omaha St., Omaha, Neb. 68114 249 High St., Newark, N. J. 07102 216 Finley Golf Course Rd., Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514 University Center, UNC-Charlotte, N. C. 28223 5415 Wrightsville Ave., Wilmington, N. C. 28401 2401 W. Fraternity Ct., Raleigh, N. C. 27607 516 s. Florence, Kirksville, Mo. 63501 G 533 Student Box 5165, N. Ga . College, Dahlonega, a. 30 610 West Oak, Denton, Texas 76203 Box 3684, Natchitoches, La. 71457 930 Chautauqua, Norma, Okla. 7360 1224 University Ave ., Stillwater, Okla. 74074 1516 Colonial Ave., Norfolk, Va. 23517 2111 Harrison, Corvallis, Ore. 97330 311 S. Main St., Red Springs, N. C. 28377 409 E. Fairmont, State College, Pa. 16801 33 Sidney Pl., Brooklyn, N. Y. 11201 Presbyterian College, Clinton, S. C. 29325 330 N. Grant St., W. lafayette, Ind. 47906 49 2nd St., Troy, N. Y. 12180 219 Market St., Salem, Va. 24153 Box 2474, Samford Univ., Birmingham, Ala. 35201 1241 Stetson, Deland, Fla. 32720 287 Bay Front Rd., Mobile, Ala. 36605 USC, Box 5111, Columbia, S. C. 29204 304 Plant Ave., Tampa, Fla. 32666 1828 Fraternity Park, Knoxville, Tenn. 37916 145 S. Jackson St., Athens, Tenn. 37916 1702 W. Bancroft St., Toledo, Ohio 43606 712 N. Three Notch St., Troyl Ala. 36081 605 1 Box 89, Valdosta State College, Valdosta, Ga. 3 510 Rugby Rd., Charlottesville, Va. 22903 1101 Redbud Rd., N. W., Blacksburg, Va. 24060 4520 21st, N. E., Seattle, Wash. 98105 lock Drawer 903, Lexington, Va. 24450 P. 0. Box 1173, Cullowhee, N. C. 28723 42101 Box 30, Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, Ky. 641 Fayette Pike, Montgomery, W. Va. 25136 Wofford College, Spartanburg, S. C. 29301

COLONIES Va. Wesleyan Unlv. of New Orleans south Florida Alabama-Birmingham Nicholls State Missouri-Columbia Southern California UCLA

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Campus Box 56, Norfolk, Va. 23502 0122 7 UNO - Univ. Center, Lakefront, New Orleans, LA Box 432, University Center, Tampa, Fla. 33620 P. 0. Box 10511, Birmingham, Ala. 35202 Box 2938, Nicholls State U., Thibodaux, La. 70301 5201 125-A Hatch Hall, Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, Mco· ~f 9ooo7 3760 S. McClintock Ave., 505-A, Los Angeles, a 1 • Los Angeles, California

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MAIL TO: Pi Kappa Phi, P. 0. Box 4608 Charlotte, North Carol ina

28204 •

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Second Class Postage Paid at Charlotte, N.

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Pi KAPPA PHI P. 0. Box 4608 Charlotte, N. C. 28204

OFFICE OF PI KAPPA PHI

•a UtAI( ptAA~JMJ a UtiU( ptAUJMi upfA.iota" P. 0. BOX 4608 • CHARLOTTE, N. C. 28204

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SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON fRATERNITY P. 0. BOX 1856 EVANSTON, l l . 60204 .

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---WHAT IS A FRATERNITY? _(; ' A

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FRATERNITY IS A LEGACY.

It is the experiences, the memories, the inheritance of a tradition, followed by a generation of young college men who together tt·ied to make their years , in school a more enjoyable experience, a learning ex- ' perience rooted in the growth of the individual person to rnaturity within the microcos1n of a small circle of friends.

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FRATERNITY IS LoVE.

Trust. Charity. And the metamorphosis of total stranger into a blood brother.

FRATERNITY IS PERSEVERENCE.

It is faith. It is hope. And it is a lot of hard work. Lastly,

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FRATERNITY IS SoLIDARITY.

It is sharing, sharing of responsibility and sharing of good times and bad times. And it is togetherness, the togetherness of brotherhood.

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WHAT IS A FRATERNITY?

To use the words of a well-known song by Poco, "It's a good feeling to know . . ." · •

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An{l to speak of my fraternity, fronl my experience, my / 'sharing, my hard work and my trust, Pi Kappa Phi can ' {' ~ , only be described as one big natural high. ••

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-Richard Groller --

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IF YOU KNOW A YOUNG MAN ENTERING COLLEGE SOON, OR ALREADY ENROLLED, PLEASE FILL OUT THE uRECOMMEND A RUSHEE'' BLANK ON THE INSIDE COVER (OTHER SIDE OF THIS PAGE) AND MAIL IT TO DURWARD OwEN, ExECUTIVE DmECTOR, PI KAPPA PHI, P. 0 . Box 4608, CHARLOTTE, N. C. 28204.

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1974_2_Spring  

DELTAMU DELTA XI SPRING 1974 y BOX SCORE Measurable goals of the fraternity recently accomplished are: 2/THE STAR AND LAMP ..

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