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KATIE SCHUERGER Making a Difference in the Ohio Construction Industry

ESTHER C. KRAFT Helping Hispanic Students Succeed at Tri-C

HIGHLIGHTS, 3rd Annual Financial Literacy & Business Opportunities Conference

Dr. ELLEN BURTS-COOPER

Senior Managing Partner & Chief Improvement Officer Improve Consulting and Training Group


Beletu (Bele') Wondwossen

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Writers Shelley M. Shockley Ruby Lee Gamble Kimberly Smith-Woodford

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Cover Story: PWM Team Photo: Jason Garrett

Contributing Writers Marianna Marron Marsha Walker Eastwood Rhonda Crowder Michelle Phillips Fay Brittany Garrett Stephanie Phelps

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From the Editor: Shelley M. Shockley

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s I walk the streets of Cleveland, a sense of pride still rings through. The hearts are a little broken, but for the most part the citizens feel good about their town. Additionally, families are c e l e b ra t i n g t h e m a ny transitions taking place – p r o m o t i o n f r o m kindergarten to first grade; moving from elementary to high school and every teenager's dream – g ra d u a t i n g f r o m h i g h school. The penultimate celebrations are for those receiving associates, bachelors, masters, juris doctorates, and more. The transition that takes place in the lives of our children also affects each of us as they move along in life. Our role in their lives shifts. Your first responsibility is to supply their needs and desires and as they grow a tiny streak of independence begins to rear its head. They can feed themselves and before long they are choosing their own clothes, walking without holding your hands and long before you're prepared, the amount of time they want to spend with you is minimal. Now your role is that of Uber driver. From school to practice on an almost daily basis. Weekends are no longer yours instead you are the soccer, basketball, ballet Mom who sits on the sideline to cheer. When the transitions begin each year, you applaud their achievements and begin all over again. That's where you are now, but what transitions have you made in your life? Are you still working that job that prompts you to pray for twenty minutes before exiting the car in the morning and rubbing your temples at the end of the day due to the deep migraines? Maybe it's not that severe, but you just don't feel appreciated or valued and ask yourself “Why,” on a regular basis. If you have any of the latter symptoms, this edition should strike a chord with you. Here, we take a look at Cuyahoga Community College's (Tri-C) Hispanic Council and Esther Kraft, the program manager. Her job allows her to ensure that the needs of the Hispanic community are being addressed and by doing so, she and the College are opening doors for many in the community that may have been forgotten. There is a wealth of opportunity for women and men alike at Tri-C, so if you're in a rut, take a look at their offerings to help you plan out the next phase of your journey. While planning for your future or a change in careers, it is important that you keep an open mind and consider all of your skills. Are you the go-to person for party planning in your family? Do you have a knack for organization? These abilities may have nothing to do with your day-to-day job but could prove to be the basis for your entrepreneurial efforts or the job that will leave you fulfilled and happy at the end of the day. Katie Schuerger graduated from college with a degree in theology with a concentration in youth ministry, and just as one would expect she took a job right out of school that aligned with this course of study. For three years she held this 4 ▒ MAY - JUNE 2018

job before traveling overseas to volunteer. The experience from her job and the experience in China left her with a lot to ponder upon her return to Ohio. Today she is the coordinator of education and programs for the Construction Employers Association of Cleveland (CEA). With a firm commitment to

making a big difference in the Ohio construction industry, the CEA offers a wide array of professional activities that makes its members competitive in the industry. Take a look at the feature on Schuerger and the CEA as you contemplate your “Plan B” and keep an open mind on where you might find your dream position. If you have already began planning your move from employee to entrepreneur, then the Financial Literacy & Financial Empowerment Conference presented by Phenomenal Woman Magazine was the place for you to be. This annual conference offers the opportunity for women to get first-hand advice from financial institutions and professionals.

Additionally, it provides useful information on available and upcoming business opportunities. You can read all about it as we recap this event that had the generous support of Jump Start, Tri-C, State of Ohio Department of Transportation, Dollar Bank and many more. If you missed it, please check out the review, but most importantly plan to attend next year. Columnist Marsha Walker Eastwood continues the conversation on financial literacy as she underscores the importance of both your physical and financial health and wellness in order to have a truly fulfilled life. To illustrate she discusses the need for instant information and the proclivity to find answers instantaneously by going to the internet. You know exactly how that works. You have a nagging health issue and instead of calling your doctor your first thought is to check out WebMD for any symptoms similar to what you're experiencing. From that vague and general information, you diagnose your problem and begin to treat the ailment. The problem is two weeks later you still have the same problem. Similarly, in this age of seeking financial security we often seek out sources on the computer to save money, to invest and to aid us in making decisions that should really be handled by a professional. To learn more and see if you fit into these categories read her column and begin planning a way to hire a professional to ensure your financial health. Each of us strives to be “the best you” that we can be and our cover story offers insight on how to best achieve this goal. Dr. Ellen Burts-Cooper, the senior managing partner of Improve Consulting and Training Group and instructor at Case Western Reserve University has made it her mission to assist others in determining what the “best” is and how to achieve success. Now that you have your professional career on track, or a plan to achieve success, remember to take some time for yourself and to remove fear and self-doubt from your vocabulary. One way to this is through abandoning any fears you have for water and swimming. Swimming is not only a wonderful fullbody workout, but also a great stress reliever. Inside we highlight the work of Coach André and Do It Afraid Rhythm and Stroke LLC. This program is geared to the African American community, but provides a wealth of information to anyone seeking an improvement in their overall health and a way to reduce stress. It is our hope that something in this edition resonates with you and offers you information to pursue your goals to be the “best you!” So sit back, enjoy and share your thoughts with us. Until we meet again, enjoy your summer!


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COVER

CONTENTS

A Little Knowledge Can Break Your Financial Bank 6

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Katie Schuerger Coordinator of Education & Programs, CEA

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Dr. Ellen Burts-Cooper Everyday Heroes Activity Center Now Open at MALTZ Museum

Senior Managing Partner & Chief Improvement Officer - Improve Consulting and Training Group

12 Esther C. Kraft Program Manager, Hispanic Council at Tri-C

14 Coach André Encourages Fearful Individuals to Learn to Swim

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Shares those must have products for SUMMER GLOW 22 3rd Annual Financial Literacy and Business Opportunities Conference 26

Delicious Recipes

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How A Little Knowledge Can Break Your Financial Bank the pattern pieces. You know you are in over your head, so you decide to revisit the sewing show where it all looks so easy. No matter what you try nothing works and you end with a mess on your hands, lots of money wasted and you still must come up with a dress that you can't pay for. By: Marsha Walker Eastwood, BS.Ed, MSHSVC PWM Contributing Writer

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hysical and financial health and wellness are two of the top concerns of many Americans, and in many cases linked, through a variety of benefit packages, and investment options. Television, print media and the internet have become global classrooms with no shortage of students looking for the fast and easy way to become armchair experts in these two areas of interest. Every month an estimated 80 million people visit the most popular medical website, WebMD, and a great many of them self-diagnose based on symptoms they read about and map out sometimes life-threatening treatment regimens. In other cases, by the time the feeling of impending doom drives them to see their physician, their conditions may be too advanced to do much more than palliative care. This analogy can also be applied to the millions and millions of people who tune in to shows hosted by two very popular financial gurus who bill themselves as financial planners and the like, who claim they can revolutionize the way you handle your financial health. They don't have credentials, just the ability to provide a seemingly neverending litany of financially related information; just enough so that it makes their followers believe that they themselves can manage complex decisions about financial products and their financial health. But before you embark on that DIY plan to manage your money, here are a few things you might want to consider. The old adage about a little knowledge being a dangerous thing was never more relevant when it comes to mapping out a successful lifelong financial plan. Gleaning bits of information from the internet or social media does not replace an expert opinion. What it can and often times does is create the terribly flawed notion of why pay someone to do something you think you can do yourself. To put this in perspective, imagine taking a sewing course in Home Economics when you were 13 and then after having never sewn since, twenty or thirty years later you start watching a sewing show and think you can make a wedding gown for a relative. You buy a pattern (never noticing the level of expertise required), fabric, thread and all, and dust off that old sewing machine. You check out the guide sheet and even though there are parts you don't understand, you go forward, pinning and cutting. You decide to skip marking the darts or notches and remove 6 ▒ MAY - JUNE 2018

When it comes to money management, financial literacy happens with baby steps-learning the language along with an introduction to various financial products. The financial gurus on television or the internet have more than a basic understanding of the products and their applicability, but their information is flawed and falls short in many respects. First, there are no “experts” when it comes to financial planning, but rather dedicated individuals who although trained and knowledgeable on money management, continue to avail themselves of the most up to date information to teach, clarify and help you make wise financial decisions. There is a very long laundry list of financial sub-topics that can easily boggle the mind and without professional guidance can spell disaster for a do-it yourselfer, The onscreen gurus speak in generalities. They have no idea who you are or what your financial picture looks like. A certified financial planner meets with you and learns all the intimate details of your financial life and lifestyle. The woman on the sewing show has no idea what your skill level is. She presents information with the assumption that you know the basics and beyond, not with the assumption that you are going to watch the show a few times and open a dress shop. The on-screen financial guru is more interested in promoting a persona and/or a product, than providing you with enough information to formulate questions about your personal financial picture because once again they do not know what your situation is. Consider this scenario: You watch the show a few times, listen intently, take copious notes on stock market investing, and then make side notes to yourself to find a way to do this by yourself. After all, now you have the introduction and a little extra info. The gurus oftentimes don't spend a lot of time discussing the pitfalls on what could be a very risky undertaking, but you are thinking how hard it can be! Can it be? At this point your real financial picture has been blurred by the “What if I won the lottery” thinking. Mentally you have already decided how your life is going to change with the windfall from your investment, never mind the fact that your income could be rather unstable (independent contractor, varying work schedule, or unpaid time off.) Life is a gamble so by jumping right in and managing your own financial planning, you think it would give you an opportunity to make enough money to address the debt you have and boost that unstable income. You could buy more food, clothes, a car etc.


Now consider this outcome: You have Googled a way to become a day trader (a term you are totally unfamiliar but heard about in one of the shows.) It really sounds seems doable, so you go about collecting every spare dime you have including your stock money and find a way to enter the marketplace. Your first effort is less than you expected but you didn't lose anything, so you decide to try again. Now the cycle has begun. It doesn't take long for reality to set in and for you to realize the little change you have on hand isn't nearly enough for you to make some real money. So you revisit online guru who advises cutting out all the little feel good things like the morning gourmet coffee, lunches and dining out. You consider buying a couple of their books which have been mentioned several times on their shows. The books arrive, and they are like that pattern guide sheet-virtually useless, because they are above your level of comprehension. But you remain undeterred and try your hand at it again. In essence you are trying to get a degree without ever attending college, and in the process, you have managed to lose what little money you had, and maybe even some you didn't have. Unlike the do it yourself dress that didn't turn out right but could be replaced, disastrous outcomes from do it yourself financial decisions can have far reaching ripple effects that may be difficult, if not impossible to bounce back from.

Complex programs require professional assistance and to ensure a good outcome a little humility can go a long way towards preventing loss. In the case of the “I can do thisno problem wannabe� seamstress, consulting an experienced customer service representative at the fabric store for guidance could have saved time, money and angst. The money for that project could have then been used towards buying a dress which most likely would have cut the expense by half. In the case of the do-it-yourself stock investor, failure to plan spells disaster for any type of financial program. The Internet has become a global classroom filled with a plethora of information, hints, tips and the like but in no way should it replace sitting down with a professional financial planner and creating a comprehensive financial plan that includes goals, objectives and a complete analysis based on your current financial situation. Healthcare benefits, retirement, insurance, estate planning is all a part of mapping out a strategy for your particular needs. Taking this step will go a long way towards keeping you off financial life-support and allow you to enjoy seeing the bride in her lovely gifted dress.

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A Fit, Fun Summer

Make smart fitness choices with post-workout recovery and hydration During warm-weather months, fitness enthusiasts often take their exercise routines to the great outdoors. The spike in summer temperatures can make those tough workouts even more challenging. Even after your workout is complete, your body does not stop – after a tough sweat session in the summer heat, you need to replenish what you lost to rebuild and refuel muscles. A tall glass of chocolate milk may not be the first thing you think to reach for after a long run, but recovering from each intense workout with the nutrients in low-fat chocolate milk allows you to get the most out of your fitness routine. Before gearing up for your summer workout routine, make sure you are taking care of your body with these tips. Be Mindful of High Temperatures High temperatures don't have to get in the way of your workout plan, but it's important to consider the heat index and time of day when exercising. Temperatures typically peak during the middle of the day, so aim to work out in the morning or once the sun starts to set. The body loses a lot of important nutrients through sweat. Learn your sweat rate by weighing yourself with minimal clothing before and after one hour of sweaty exercise. One pound of sweat loss equals 16 ounces of fluid loss. This can guide your fluid intake during your next workout. Replenish What You Lose in Sweat After putting in real work this summer, your body needs real recovery. Recovery after strenuous exercise can make a difference in how well you can perform during your next workout. For example, low-fat chocolate milk helps replenish fluids and electrolytes lost in sweat. In fact, drinking low-fat or fat-free milk after exercise could restore hydration better than other popular post-exercise beverages, including water or sports drinks, according to a study published in the “American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.” Plus, chocolate milk has a 3to-1 carb-to-protein ratio scientifically shown to refuel and rebuild muscles quickly. Shield Yourself from the Sun's Rays Just because your fitness routine includes strenuous laps in a pool or a run through shady trails doesn't mean you are protected from the sun. Apply sunscreen with SPF 30 or higher to your face, neck, ears and body before exercising outdoors. If you're going back out for another round of laps in the pool or around the track, reapply sunscreen 20-30 minutes before getting back to work. While summer weather provides many opportunities for fresh air and fitness, it's important to remember these tips and more for healthy hydration. Find more information at builtwithchocolatemilk.com.

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DR. SAFFOLD IS BACK!!!

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COSMOPOLITAN DERMATOLOGY Call our office today to book your appointment

216.417.3250 www.cosmodermatology.com Dr. Angela Kyei — Board Certified Dermatologist Melissa Telenko — Nurse Practitioner Dr. Oscar Saffold — Board Certified Dermatologist www.PHENOMENALWOMAN.me ▒ 9


Katie Schuerger,

Making a Difference in the Ohio Construction Industry!

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onstruction is an important sector that provides livelihood to millions of families and contributes immensely to the development of a nation. In the US, the construction industry creates more than one trillion dollars worth of structures every year and employed approximately 10.7 million people. Projections indicate that these numbers will significantly rise in the years ahead and construction companies need to take concerted efforts and better position themselves to meet these demands. The Construction Employers Association of Cleveland (CEA) is one of the answers to this call and is committed to leading, learning and making a difference in the Ohio Construction Industry. The CEA provides training and education, safety services, labor relations, advocacy, diversity efforts, workforce development, networking opportunities, and more. It has around 145 member companies and 30 affiliate member firms. To learn more about the objectives and activities of the CEA, Phenomenal Woman Magazine recently touched base with Katie Schuerger, the association's coordinator of education and programs. The oldest of six kids, Katie grew up in Medina, Ohio and was homeschooled before attending St. Vincent-St. Mary High School. She then joined Franciscan University of Steubenville where she majored in theology and catechetics with a concentration in youth ministry. 10 ▒ MAY - JUNE 2018

Following graduation, she spent three years as a high school youth minister at a Catholic parish in Wapakoneta, Ohio. I learned so much in that role, Schuerger said, “leadership, public speaking, and event planning, just to name a few.” She spent a few months in China volunteering and considering opportunities before retuning back to Cleveland where she found a job at CEA. Schuerger concedes that she knew absolutely nothing about CEA or construction when she first applied to work at CEA. Nonetheless, she said “I have come to love this community! There are so many great people in the industry who are dedicated to doing quality work, providing career opportunities, and improving Northeast Ohio.” In her capacity at CEA, Schuerger coordinates much needed educational programs as well as social events, marketing and social media. She is also involved in the ACE Mentor Program of Cleveland – from helping to organize events such as Presentation Night and serving on the scholarship selection committee, to coordinating mentors. Recently, she has started co-managing collegeage interns in their office too. On her multitude of responsibilities, she said, “It's a challenge to handle so m a ny d i f f e r e n t p r o j e c t s a n d r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s simultaneously, but it's a great opportunity to stretch my abilities and grow.”


While many people get surprised as to how this theology major ended up working at CEA, Schuerger explains how her work in ministry closely associates with her current responsibilities at CEA. In both cases, she says, “I collaborate with a small staff, coordinate volunteers, work flexibly on multiple projects and events, etc. Most importantly, I enjoy working in the community with a shared mission.” With a firm commitment to supporting the construction industry, the CEA provides safety training (OSHA classes, Safety Council meetings, First Aid/CPR, Substance Abuse training, etc.), construction management courses (blueprint reading, estimating, etc.), training in specific areas of the industry (human resources, legal, accounting, marketing, etc.), AGC courses (Lean, BIM, etc.), along with other professional development opportunities (leadership, public speaking, etc.) Membership is available to contractors that are signatory to a union and affiliate membership is available to firms that provide services to those contractors. While the low percentage of women engaged in the construction workforce remains a concern, Schuerger remains encouraged by the determination of women she meets every day in the construction industry. Her office continues to play a meaningful role in highlighting the amazing work women do in the construction field and frequently posts news articles and interviews women in construction, which can be found in its website. Along with its partners, the CEA exerts concerted efforts to create opportunities and inspires women to enable them to join the construction industry. According to Schuerger, the Cleveland chapter of NAWIC (National Association of Women in Construction) is a great resource for women in the industry. “Each year, CEA partners with NAWIC to put on events for national Women in Construction week (or “WIC Week”) in March. For the first time this year, we held a luncheon with a panel discussion, featuring women at each stage in their construction career – from college student to company president.” She said. “The event was hoping to attract 15-20 people but ended up filling the room with 60 women. Such events need to be held periodically to educate and motivate women to join the construction profession.” Reinforcing its commitment to inspire students to join the construction industry, the CEA is deeply involved in the ACE Mentor Program of Cleveland, one of 70 ACE programs nationally, which introduces high school students to careers in architecture, construction, and engineering. Pointing at some of the results, Schuerger said “over this past school year, we had around 150 students and 130 mentors (A-C-E professionals) participate at 8 schools! Students meet after school for field trips, career exploration, and to work on a project that they present at the end of the year to an audience of 400+ parents, students, sponsors, mentors, and

community partners.” The ACE Cleveland has awarded over $700,000 in scholarships since its founding in 2008. The program has undoubtedly made a visible impact on students and mentors. Schuerger appreciates the support she gets from colleagues and community members in discharging her responsibilities. She is deeply grateful to her colleague Glen Shumate, Executive Vice president at CEA who“has made a huge influence on me and helped me to get where I am in my career today.” To young women and girls, Schuerger said “Don't feel like you have to be perfect or know everything before trying; you'll learn and figure things out along the way. I would recommend that every woman – and every person! – look up Brené Brown's talks or books on vulnerability and courage, especially as it pertains to work. I'd like to encourage you with her words: dare greatly!” She stressed, “if you want to try something, get out there and do it! It's tempting to wait until you've created the perfect plan in your head, where everything fits together in a neat and tidy box of your own making… but that's not life! Don't be afraid to ask questions, introduce yourself and seek out the people who can help you by sharing their own experience, wisdom, and connections.” To Schuerger, work is about impacting the people around her for the better, creating with excellence, and growing personally. Accomplishing any one of these would be considered as an outstanding achievement. But for her, winning is measured by how successfully she does all three noble works. Only then, she counts it as a win! Closing out the interview, Schuerger, a woman of strong faith left us with a powerful quote from St. Catherine of Siena “If you are what you should be, you will set the world on fire.”

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Coach André #SwimStrong Aquatics Coach

Everyday Heroes Activity Center Opens at Maltz Museum Museum’s Special Exhibition Space turns into Kids Indoor Play Area “What’s Your Everyday Superpower?” The Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage is proud to announce a summer installation for younger audiences. In lieu of a special exhibition, an Everyday Heroes Activity Center will be in the open space, inviting children to discover their own everyday superpowers, such as kindness, compassion, listening, and helping. From Painting Kindness Rocks to a Building a Better World Jumbo Lego Station, children and the big people who love them can explore themes of being an everyday hero. The Everyday Heroes Activity Center is open during regular Museum hours, June 5 – August 12 (2929 Richmond Road, Beachwood; 216-593-0575; maltzmuseum.org). David Schafer, Managing Director of the Maltz Museum, asked, “What makes a hero? Is it physical strength or is it the courage to use the strength we have for good? In each of us, there is a hero. Inside, we are strong enough, brave enough, and courageous enough to make choices that lift others up. Sometimes, we must even lift ourselves up first so that we can help someone else.” The Everyday Heroes Activity Center will feature interactive stations where children can enjoy books, crafts, movement, and more. Examples of stations include:

216.309.AQUA RhythmandStrokeLLC@yahoo.com

RhythmandStroke.com

· · · · · ·

Make Your Own Capes and Masks Zoom Around the Good Mood Movement Area Paint Kindness Rocks to Give and Share Build a Better World with Jumbo Legos Be the Hero of Your Own Story at the Puppet Theater And more!

In addition, guests can participate in an Everyday Hero StoryWalk, which is a self-guided, hands-on tour using a children’s book to explore the Museum’s core exhibition, An American Story. Discover heroic qualities of families moving to a new country on this newly designed tour created to engage younger audiences. Offered every Tuesday and Sunday at 2pm, starting June 5. Additional drop-in tours will also be offered throughout the summer, including An American Story, The Temple-Tifereth Israel Gallery, and Themes of the Holocaust. These tours are recommended for ages 12 and up. Throughout the summer, the Maltz Museum invites audiences of all ages to join in celebrating everyday heroes in the community, those who have broken through barriers, overcome obstacles, and fought for what they believe in. Dynamic films on making a difference, lectures and panel discussions on fighting for freedom, performances on breaking through barriers, and gallery talks on exploring Jewish Cleveland Heroes offer something for everyone. Schafer said, “Now is the time to support diversity and inclusion. Now is the time to be an everyday hero.” Special summer pricing offers reduced rates for admission: General (12+) $10; Youth (5-11) $5; Children under 5 are Free. Members are always free. New household memberships are just $55 when joining June through August. Support for Everyday Heroes generously provided by Cleveland Jewish News, Gross Schechter Day School, jHUB, The Lillian and Betty Ratner School, Macaroni Kid, Mandel Jewish Community Center, Mandel Jewish Day School, Northeast Ohio Parent Magazine, Northeast Ohio Family Fun, One Seven, PJ Library, and Playmatters. MALTZ MUSEUM OF JEWISH HERITAGE celebrates culture and identity to encourage connection and promote a greater appreciation of Jewish heritage and the diversity of the human experience. For more information, visit maltzmuseum.org and follow us on Facebook and Twitter @maltzmuseum

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Esther C. Kraft

Program manager of the Hispanic Council, Tri-C Esther C. Kraft serves as Program manager of the Hispanic Council at Cuyahoga Community College (Tri-C). The council identifies, develops and facilitates the implementation of initiatives that benefit both Tri-C and its Hispanic community. It advises the College on Hispanic issues and serves as a liaison between the College and the Greater Cleveland area Hispanic community. Kraft, the youngest of three sisters who hails from the southwest side of Chicago inherited a strong work ethic and discipline from her family. Her father graduated from high school as a machinist, worked diligently and rarely took a day off to ensure his family kept going. Her housewife-mother who was originally from Chihuahua, Mexico took care of household activities. Despite her limited education, her mother understood the values and importance of education and always talked to her children about going to college as if it were the next natural step in life after high school. After her father eventually saved enough money to move his family from an apartment into a home, Kraft said “we were one of few minority families living in a predominantly white neighborhood. My mother was always so worried about us fitting in and being accepted.”The tight-knit family managed well and all three sisters turned out to be very successful. In high school, they all got part-time jobs, enrolled in college after high school, took out loans, 14 ▒ MAY - JUNE 2018

graduated, secured employment and went on to become independent, professional Latina women. In her own words Kraft says “I'm convinced that the consistent support provided by both my parents from a young age, and the college guidance provided by my sisters, made all the difference in my education, my independence and in my career. Being the youngest, I had three sisters before me to show me the ropes when it came to navigating life.” Kraft's upbringing and experience have been instrumental in facilitating her current role as Program Manager of the Hispanic Council at Ti-C. “My department is able to identify resources that our students may be lacking and we try to help them build those resources. We coach and support them along their educational journey and provide a “map” to follow so that their educational goals can be met and they can see their futures on the horizon.” Kraft said. Her office also offers bi-lingual (English/Spanish) assistance to students with admissions and registration, the financial aid process, scholarships and connects them with Tri-C programs, services, faculty and staff that can address specific academic and student support needs. In addition, it manages its own Hispanic Endowment Scholarship Fund.


As Program Manager of the Hispanic Council, Kraft's responsibilities include designing and managing Hispanic student programs and activities that support college access, student success and degree/certificate completion. She also chairs the Hispanic Scholarship Review Committee and Hispanic Council Employee Resource Group and co-chairs the Student Equity Committee at the College's Western Campus. Supported by a small team of passionate staffs and operating out of its central office in Tri-C's Western Campus in Parma, the council offers student appointments and walk-ins for assistance with placement testing, admissions, registering for classes, financial aid, English as a second language and career advising. Since 1993, the council through its Hispanic Scholarship Endowment, supports and recognizes Tri-C Hispanic students in accomplishing their educational goals by awarding annual scholarships to under-represented students with financial need. Approximately 1,400 Hispanic students across all campuses gain support from the council. Excited to work at Tri-C, Kraft says “working in a studentserving environment means that no one day is alike! In a given week, our office sees anywhere from 10-20 students on average. In addition to meeting one-on-one with students, I also mentor several students each semester.” Kraft appreciates the many positive effects of coaching and mentoring on a student's success. “To observe the personal growth of a student first-hand, is one of the greatest “fringe benefits” of my job – it never gets old.” When she is not interacting directly with students, Kraft plans and prepares student programs and departmental events and hosts 2-3 major events a year as well as a variety of success workshops! According to Kraft, the council's main challenge is getting more students to understand the value of getting involved on campus, taking advantage of programs and utilizing the many resources available to all students. She concedes that “often we are simply a “stop” in the very busy day of a community college student. As a result, engagement on campus can be quite a challenge for students who work, have children or many other responsibilities in addition to attending college.” She is thankful that Tri-C recently began offering second semester pathway courses that includes student training on building resources, connections and the value of human capital. The council partners with the College's office of Diversity and Inclusion in hosting an annual Hispanic Heritage Day celebration college-wide, during Hispanic Heritage Month. It also collaborates with the Black American Council and Student Support Services when it comes to referring and supporting students of color across all our campuses. Externally, the Hispanic Council works closely with the Cleveland Metropolitan School District (CMSD) in recruiting Hispanic students for the annual education conference and also supports and sponsors the Esperanza organization's Fiesta of Hope Scholarship Luncheon for Cleveland-area Hispanic high school seniors. In addition, Kraft and her colleagues carry out outreach works in the Cleveland community in a variety of ways.

(Pictured L to R) Esther Kraft & Sylvia Royle

When the CMSD welcomed more than 300 new students following the devastations caused by hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico, the Hispanic Council organized a backpack and school supply drive as a way of welcoming all these new students to Cleveland. The College also donated over 200 new backpacks and several hundred dollars' worth of supplies. Kraft prides herself on being innovative when it comes to student programming and meeting students where they are. “Our case-management approach allows us to build trusting relationships with our students – which I believe is the foundation for retention and ultimately, academic completion.” She is grateful for the support she gets from her team and in particular credits Sylvia Royle, “who is a model for superior customer service and shares the same passion for the work we do and the students we serve.” She describes that she is very fortunate to work for an organization whose mission is to provide accessible, affordable, quality education for all. She noted “everyone in our department is passionate about the work we do and we are all committed to narrowing the achievement gap facing minority college students in any way we can.” Moving forward, the council plans to keep the momentum with respect to student programming, student success and community outreach. “At the end of the work day, it is a wonderful feeling to know that what you do, has the ability to change many lives for the better.” Kraft concluded! www.PHENOMENALWOMAN.me ▒ 15


Black People Do Swim By Marianna Marron PWM Contributing Writer

Takeitha Warner (13), JaMarcus Warner (14) and JaTavious Warner (17). Litrelle Stewart (18), LaDarius Stewart (17) and Latevin Stewart (15).

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fter a long pause, those are the names Coach André recalls when I asked him why he feels it is important for people in the African American communities to learn to swim. These are the names of the six (6) black teens that died in the Louisiana Red River drowning on August 3rd, 2010. Not only did these six children lose their lives, but adults nearby could not help because none of them could swim. According to analytical studies, “70% of African-American children, 60% of Latino children and 40% of Caucasian children can't swim.” These numbers remain too high for today's society. African American children die from drowning accidents three times more than white children. Swim programs are often expensive or unavailable in urban areas. Therefore, lack of accessibility is partly the reason why water safety has not been stressed in many communities. “Non-swimmers and fearful individuals will just avoid the water instead of learning to swim, but considering the earth is made up of 70% water, avoiding water is not always an option” said Coach André. He continues, “Additionally, while there are some programs that offer instructions for children, fewer programs are geared towards the adult education of non-swimmers.” This is where Coach André comes in, his specialty are adults who have been ignored and left to drift away. 16 ▒ MAY - JUNE 2018

Coach André's classes remain full because his patience and extraordinary skill set to teach the adult population is astonishing, he is affectionately known as “the water whisperer.” His oldest first-time swimmer being 75 years old, Coach André reflects on the fact that many of his students' fears stem from traumatic childhood experiences. While many are even senior citizens, they can vividly remember the exact moment in time when they were pulled under water unexpectantly or pushed into the deep end as a child. It is this childhood experience that Coach André is helping these adults face and conquer. To this end, he alongside his partner Kimberly, have created The 'Do It Afraid program.' DO IT AFRAID! Rhythm and Stroke LLC, along with ELYSTA Foundation created: The 'Do It Afraid' Swim Program. A free program for Adults and Children designed to encourage fearful individuals to learn to swim. Rhythm and Stroke LLC was recently chosen as one of 78 Make a Splash programs in the U.S. to receive grant money from the USA Swimming Foundation in 2018. The awarded money will go toward Rhythm and Stroke's continued efforts to provide free or reduced cost swim lessons for children. “The fear of swimming has crossed a multitude of decades, g e n e r a t i o n s a n d c u l t u r e s , p a r t i c u l a r l y, t h e African–American and Hispanic communities. This program is a perfect synthesis in our mission to empower people by disabling fear. Fear can be debilitating, it holds so many people back from achieving greatness, but once it is conquered and overcome, each individual will be overwhelmed with a feeling of great accomplishment. This


program will allow for applicable real-life skills that not only promotes water safety but enables children and adults to enhance their skills and receive jobs as lifeguards, swim coaches/instructors and even compete and receive college funding as well as go on to compete in the Olympic games,” Coach André stressed. Exercising in the Water offers many physical and mental health benefits. A slower pace swimmer can burn 400-600 calories/hour with the freestyle stroke. High Intensity water aerobics can burn 300-500 calories/hour with little impact on the body. Swimming is not limited by physical handicap either. Swimming is also great for the mind whether depression, ADHD or dementia, people with these conditions have all found benefits in the relaxation of the water and discovered their mental focus was enhanced. Swimming also provides an increased stamina, endurance, body toning and increased blood circulation. Even some vocalists have found the breathing techniques that are necessary in swimming to be helpful due to increased lung capacity. What to Do Today? Coach André stresses that adults should learn to swim and should not supervise children or young adults at any body of water where there is not a certified lifeguard. The importance of African Americans swimming is paramount at this time. Coach André recalls: “A few years ago when I googled black people swimming, I never saw

us actually swimming. Most times it was us in danger of drowning and even finding humor in the fact that “black folks don't swim”, but now with myself and instructors like me across the nation, these images have changed. When I google black people swimming now, I actually see positive, beautiful images of black people swimming, some of whom are my own students. And it makes me proud to see black women and men showing off their swim stroke skillsets from one end of the pool to another, even adding in a flip turn here and there.” The number of African American parents signing their child(ren) up to swim lessons has increased. However, we urge everyone to support the #BlackpeopleDoSwim Movement. Learning to swim takes time, so we encourage you to stick it out, don't quit and when you get to the scary moments in swimming (because there will be some), Do it Anyway and Do it Afraid! Coach André Morton www.Rhythmandstroke.com RhythmandsrtokeLLC@yahoo.com 216.309.AQUA (2782) www.PHENOMENALWOMAN.me ▒ 17


COVER STORY: Dr. ELLEN BURTS-COOPER

Dr. Ellen Burts-Cooper, Senior Managing Partner & Chief Improvement Officer - Improve Consulting and Training Group

Photo: Page 18-21 Jason Garrett

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“Do the best you can until you know better, Then when you know better, do better”—Maya Angelou It's been four years since the renowned poet and author Maya Angelou passed but her poems continue to inspire many people worldwide. Her wise words engage us all to be the best we can be and more importantly make this world a better place. The city of Cleveland is lucky to have phenomenal professionals who transform these quotes into reality. Meet Dr. Ellen Burts-Cooper, the senior managing partner & chief improvement officer of Improve Consulting and Training Group. Her firm not only reminds her to get better every day, but drives her to ensure others continue to improve and get better each and every day. The youngest of seven, Ellen grew up in Birmingham, Alabama. As a child, her parents were instrumental in guiding and shaping her to become successful even though they had differing visions of that success. On the one hand, her mother was a big supporter of volunteer and community works, while her father pushed for education and getting a high paying job. Keeping the wishes of both her mom and dad, she pursued her education to the highest level and engages in several mentoring and philanthropic works. That was what her parents wanted her to accomplish. “Though they were different, I see parts of each of them in me” Cooper reveals. Both have since passed but she continues to honor them with her impressive works.

was given, who was in my network and being very observant about watching others for learning experiences.” Cooper realized that teamwork led to increased productivity, cohesion and resilience. She also studied the organizations she was a part of and found ways to align with the culture and deliver the work in the ways that most greatly benefited the customers. Her desire to do business always encouraged her to getting a business degree. Ten years into her career, she earned an MBA from the University of Minnesota, Carlson School of Business and her Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt certification from 3M Company. Cooper said “I found that the other work was less relevant if you couldn't get people to work as a team, trust and appreciate each other, communicate well together, and make solid decisions together.” So, she began to focus on individual work place leadership and behavior in her roles and saw huge results. “The results were so substantial at three different companies that I decided to go beyond just working with my teams at a specific corporation but go to multiple companies to do this work.” She revealed.

My mother told me to give back to the world more than you take and practice that both personally and require that of the people around me. It's just the right thing to do.

Early on, Cooper wanted to be a business major but because she performed better in math and science related courses, a counselor advised her to switch majors in college. Her professors also encouraged her to pursue a career in science. She accepted their advice, and with determination and hard work, she earned a BS in chemistry from Stillman College in Tuscaloosa, Alabama and her PhD in organic/polymer chemistry from Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia. Prior to starting her own business, Cooper worked for major corporations. She served as a Senior Vice President and Senior Director of Operational Excellence, IT Performance Management and Governance for PNC Financial Services. She also worked in the electronics industry, where she led global teams in several functions at 3M Company in St. Paul, MN. Working in these major corporations, Cooper obtained extensive experience and recalled “I was always promoted without having to ask—I managed to demonstrate my value through my work. I also managed to think strategically about how I approached whatever project I

These findings culminated in Cooper establishing Improve Consulting and Training Group, a firm whose mission is to “provide high quality, customized personal and professional development services.” In a nutshell, she says Improve Consulting was born out of the need to “improve” the experience of those working in corporations and other organizations.

Dr. Burts-Cooper has served as Chief Improvement Officer since April, 2011 following a distinguished career with a number of major corporations and has led her company to new heights. Her remarkable firm has worked with over 80 organizations and visited over 30 cities a year helping to increase engagement and productivity, while maintaining or developing a culture that allows for cohesive team dynamics. A team of six people support her work to train, offer team building sessions at their Cleveland facilities, executive coaching and senior leader meeting facilitation. While details of the work that her company does remain confidential, it generally helps companies increase engagement, build stronger team support, increase productivity on their major product or service, decrease inefficient processes, train members of the organization to increase competences in trust, process improvement, change management, and navigate major organizational transformations while decreasing unhealthy resistance, etc. Continued on next page... www.PHENOMENALWOMAN.me ▒ 19


COVER STORY: Dr. ELLEN BURTS-COOPER

Dr. Burts-Cooper with colleagues

The ability and proven track record to deliver comprehensive, customized and exceptional services to its clients easily makes Improve Consulting and Training Group a stand out among its peers. Successfully running her consulting and training firm is not without its challenges. While Cooper puts extraordinary efforts into fully satisfying her clients, she is faced with the daunting task of “finding the right talent to be able to flex and adjust their style, approach and content to serve such a broad range of clients with very different needs.” Her interactions with several scientific, technical and chemical companies are still intact. “I find that they will resonate with me more to hear about leadership when they find we have the same background. I use my statistical analysis, process of discovery, creativity and innovation and investigative skills on a daily basis.” Cooper said. She also has a segment entitled "Improve Your Day with Dr. Ellen," aired on The Wave 107.3 Community Affairs Show enabling her to reach a broader audience. The segment provides insights on her work, providing simple yet effective tools, techniques and tips to be successful in any organization. 20 ▒ MAY - JUNE 2018

Dr. Burts-Cooper continues to serve as an instructor at Case Western Reserve University in the Weatherhead Executive Education Program and The Institute for Management Studies (IMS). She is the author of the books “aMAZEing Organizational Teams: Navigating 7 Critical Attributes for Cohesion, Productivity and Resilience” and “Canine Instinct: A Guide to Survival and Advancement in Corporate America.” She has also created the workshop curricula “Personal Positioning: Building Personal Brand Equity” and “Don't Just Think Outside the Box, Make the Box Bigger.” One of the ways in which Cooper and her staff are noticeably making a difference is in giving back to the community. In addition to participating in several mentoring/community outreach activities, Improve supports the Cleveland Non-Profit Community by donating its time, using its talents and contributing financially. One such example is the Bagby, Palmer Memorial Scholarship. Named after her and the mother of her husband, the scholarship offers funding to graduating high school seniors from the Cleveland Metropolitan School District or its innerring suburbs who will be attending a qualified educational institution and meet eligibility criteria. Thanks to this initiative, Scholarship recipients are pursuing their studies in several universities.


For Cooper her mission is clearly personal and not merely business. She appreciates the many positive effects of giving back and fondly cites her mother. “My mother told me to give back to the world more than you take and practice that both personally and require that of the people around me. It's just the right thing to do. We didn't get here without the support of others so we really should evaluate how to give back, to give someone else the chances we were given,” she said. In an effort to inspire young ladies to join STEM fields, Cooper underscores the need to “Talk about it early and often with young ladies and remove the negative words associated with it, like science is hard, boys are better at math, engineering takes too long in school, etc. Teach them to work hard but not to stay away. Show them examples on both a local, regional, national and international level. Allow young ladies to explore various experiences, projects, etc.” She also encourages young women and girls to pursue studies and explore careers in science and engineering. In this aspect, she said “STEM careers provide you with pathways to really study innovation in a variety of ways. There are endless opportunities to apply science and math to technology and engineering needs. It provides flexibility in your career by having transferable tools (detail analysis, structured and strategic thinking, etc.) that can serve you well in any industry.”

With so many responsibilities that need close follow-up and lead, Cooper integrates work – life well. She says “I do a little of both throughout the day—so I might stop in the middle of the day to take care of something personal and might answer an email late at night.” Adding, “I found that for my style and for the type of work I do, integration of both activities was essential for me to get things done and not feel overwhelmed.” To entrepreneurs starting out today, Cooper advises to “spend time really exploring what you love to do, cultivate the skills to do the work or surround yourself with people competent to assist you,” she stressed, adding, “work hard each day planning how you will execute the work such that you have enough control to be aware of what is going on in your firm but empower others to help you so that you can grow your organization through your team.” As to her, she strives to exceed her excellence and measures her success in this way: “I measure my success by the number of days I get up and can't wait to get started.” She explained, “I absolutely love what I do and the flexibility that I have in helping organizations thrive.” Honored with several awards and accolades for her remarkable works, Dr. Burts-Cooper instills a culture of continuous improvement in the society and coupled with a commitment to giving back to those who actually gave to her- makes her truly phenomenal!

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BS, Chemistry Stillman College, Tuscaloosa, AL

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MBA, Business University of Minnesota, Twin-Cities, MN

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PhD, Organic/Polymer Chemistry Virginia Tech., Blacksburg, VA

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Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt certification 3M Company, MN

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Member of Board of Directors JumpStart Inc.

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Member of Board of Directors First Federal Lakewood www.PHENOMENALWOMAN.me ▒ 21


10 Steps to Help Prevent Cancer Nearly 4 out of 10 Americans will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetimes, and it remains the second-leading cause of death for Americans, but nearly half of all cancer cases can be prevented.

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Research from the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) shows that diet, exercise and weight play a critical role in cancer prevention.

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“Making changes in what you eat, being physically active and maintaining a healthy weight have strong and clear links to your risk for cancer,” said Alice Bender, MS, RDN and director of nutrition programs at AICR. “We know from decades of research and a thorough review of the science that there are simple things we can all do to reduce our risk.”

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To live a cancer-preventive lifestyle, consider taking these 10 steps recommended by the scientific experts at AICR: 1. Be a healthy weight. Higher body fat can be a cause of many cancers. Try to stay at a healthy weight and avoid weight gain as you get older. 2. Be physically active. Incorporate moderate physical activity into your daily life through steps like walking more and sitting less. 3. Eat a diet rich in whole grains, vegetables, fruits and beans. Make these foods a major part of your diet. 4. Limit consumption of “fast foods” and other processed foods high in fat, starches or sugars. 22 ▒ MAY - JUNE 2018

8. 9. 10.

Cut down on processed foods to help control calorie intake and maintain a healthy weight. Limit consumption of red and processed meat. Eat no more than three portions of red meat per week, and little – if any – processed meat. Limit consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks. Don't drink sugar-sweetened drinks, which contribute to weight gain. Choose water instead, when possible. Limit alcohol consumption. For preventing cancer, it's best not to drink alcohol. Do not use supplements for cancer prevention. Aim to meet nutritional needs through diet alone. For mothers, breastfeed your baby, if you can. Breastfeeding is good for both mother and baby. After a cancer diagnosis, follow these recommendations, if you can. Cancer survivors are encouraged to continue following these guidelines.

Refraining from smoking, avoiding other exposure to tobacco and limiting sun exposure are also important in reducing cancer risk. Because it can be hard to make lifestyle changes, AICR aims to help people adopt healthier behaviors through efforts like the Cancer Health Check, a tool that shows people how their lifestyle stacks up against known cancer risks and recommends changes that can improve health. For recipes, tips and other resources, visit aicr.org.


HEALTHY

Summer HAIR CARE

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3rd Annual Financial Literacy & Business Opportunities Conference focuses on empowerment and relationship building! For the third year, Phenomenal Woman Magazine hosted the Annual Financial Literacy and Business Opportunities Conference at The JumpStart facilities in Cleveland. The all-day event is an opportunity for women in business or those seeking to launch businesses to hear from subject matter experts in the area of finance and gain insights on various business opportunities. At the core of this year's conference were the themes of empowerment and relationship building. Setting the stage for the day, Dr. JaNice Marshall, E.D. Associate Vice President of Cuyahoga Community College (Tri-C) said, “I came to inspire and plant a few seeds about why financial empowerment matters not only to you but also to your community.” In her address she explained that once a woman is financially empowered, she is free to assist others not only financially but with her time, because the hours spent mulling over how you're going to manage this or that bill are now open. While the title of the conference was “financial literacy,” Marshall chooses to emphasize the empowerment aspect because, “those who are struggling to manage funds are not illiterate on the subject,” they just don't feel empowered so her goal is to help you empower yourself. The key to financial empowerment she said “is when you are in charge of your money and your money is not in charge of you.”

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Suggestions on how to become empowered included listening, taking great notes, asking great questions and always seeking knowledge. As an example, she encouraged the women to visit coursera.org, a website offering free online courses from some of the nation's finest colleges and universities. As the associate vice president, Marshall has developed valuable relationships that allow her and team to impact the larger community. She explained, “Everything I do is with someone else's money,” to be successful at this, you “have to know how to ask for it, what to do with it and be able to say please and thank you.” Marshall advised the entrepreneurs that they too can use similar practices if you are, “creative and innovative about how you secure resources to support your mission and your vision.” This can be achieved by listening, reading, and taking full advantage of the resources that are available to you. To begin, she suggested you build a plan, build a budget but most importantly you must “work the plan and follow up in the execution of the plan. Concluding she said, “When you are connected and understand financial empowerment, you are set to be wildly successful.” Continuing the theme of relationships was Evelyn Burnett, vice president, economic opportunity, Cleveland Neighborhood Progress but even more importantly she spoke of empowerment through knowledge and social activism.


Burnett began her time connecting with the audience stating, “I stand in front of you as somebody that messes up all the time.” Then she explained that financial literacy is a component financial planning and management, yet minorities and women “are often cut short of the opportunities that we deserve, because there are systemic reasons that we are not as financially successful as others.”

and understanding that feelings are not fact and rights and privileges are different. Ultimately, he said, “The real currency in today's society is our time. When you start to value your time and demand that everyone else values your time in the same way you begin to build your business on choices that benefit you.”

As an example, she recounted asking a friend who worked for a major financial management firm how she could set up an account with the firm, only to find out that in order to have a seat at the table, you have to bring $250,000 to be serviced by them. To learn more about how this works, Burnett had the opportunity to sit in on some classes offered for new clients and she learned, “It was all about relationships – respect and dignity.”

Closing out the morning session was Nicole Williams, branch manager, Dollar Bank. Williams discussed basic budgeting practices as well as encouraging the ladies to “finance before you have exhausted all other options.” She explained that the time to seek funding is not when you have maxed out your credit cards, instead she encouraged obtaining lines of credit before this happens. She said, “Loans are based on your credit and debt ratio,” so staying current on credit and not extending yourself will work in your best interest.

The lack of relationships and being treated with respect and dignity she sees as a systemic problem that leads to the fear and discomfort many have with financial institutions and finances in general. Additionally, she discussed the personal connection one needs to feel to discuss their financial health.

The afternoon sessions featured an overview of the myriad programs at JumpStart to assist new entrepreneurs succeed, doing business with the Ohio Department of Transportation and the highlight was hearing from new entrepreneurs who have successfully completed JumpStart programs.

The bottom line she said, “your financial health is a deeply personal matter, I don't want to talk about my finances with just anybody,” and this relationship-building is imperative to help eradicate the divide.

Gloria Ware who serves as the Director, KeyBank Center for Technology, Innovation and Inclusive Growth under the JumpStart umbrella gave an overview of the programs offered in this Center that now stretch throughout the state of Ohio.

Todd Allyn Williams, associate professor of business and economics at Tri-C discussed the “Special Relationship” between women and money. In discussing the difference been men and women when it comes to finances, Williams noted the paradigm shift in the 21st century that not only has women as the head of the household, but also at the head of some boardrooms. To explain he looks at neuroeconomics, “how your brain works, combining genetics, biology, economics, psychology and social sciences.” At its base, economics is the study of choices

While JumpStart is tasked with aiding entrepreneurs, the ultimate goal is to create and economically transform communities. To that end they have launched the Core City: Cleveland Program targeting Cleveland residents/business owners. With Core City, business owners are offered free entrepreneurial assistance and access to the “full ecosystem” to aid in growing their businesses and creating jobs. Continued on next page... www.PHENOMENALWOMAN.me ▒ 27


Ware said, “We not only help you hit milestones, but also achieve milestones.” For these programs to be successful they work with other agencies including the Urban League, Operation Hope, Council of Smaller Enterprises, President's Council and the Ohio Minority Supplier Development Council.

Shelley M. Shockley, EMCEE Managing Editor – PWM

In order to sustain this economic growth, a new program Core City: Mentor Program works with successful entrepreneurs and community leaders serving as Mentors to new entrepreneurs to share advice and critical experience. Job growth in this area is often limited due to the loss of young talent – either students leaving for college and not returning or young people lacking in skills to work in many of the new businesses. One area, unique to Jumpstart is the development of young entrepreneurs, which is the focus of the Emerging Talent Network. The focus is to provide internship opportunities to 11th and 12th grade students. Still in the infancy stage, the prospects are promising. Each year during the conference a key component is learning how as a small business, you can work with large Organizations. Maria Davila, Northeast Ohio Regional Outreach Manager with the Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT), whose office initiates and coordinates outreach efforts including promoting certification and prequalification of Small and Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (S&DBE) firms, offered an overview of how to do business with ODOT. She outlined the steps needed for business registration and certification and encouraged participants to seek great opportunities with ODOT. The day ended with testimony from Nichelle McCall, CEO, Bold Startups and Betsy Gates, owner, Simply Betsy Company. Both women offered inspiration and transparency to the women gathered. McCall's life was shifted when a job tailor-made for her upon the completion of her collegiate studies was withdrawn and she found herself unemployed with no prospects. She spoke of being on public assistance to taking an idea and raising $500,000 to turn that idea into a company. The question she encouraged the women to ask is “What is your Why?” Once you understand the why, the next step is to work to pursue your dream and to never give up on yourself.

Dr. JaNice Marshall, KEYNOTE SPEAKER Associate Vice President, Tri-C

PRESENTERS

Evelyn Burnett, Vice President, Economic Opportunity, Cleveland Neighborhood Progress

Todd Allyn Williams Associate Professor - Business and Economics - Tri-C

Nicole Williams Branch Manager, Dollar Bank

Gates had a similar story of hitting rock bottom and taking a skill she learned in a class and turning it into a successful business. She recalled her husband losing his job and the family losing its home and wondering what they would do when her husband said, “You're going to sell soap.” The road has not been easy, but both women believe they had to go through their experiences in order to get to where they are today.

Gloria M. Ware - Director, KeyBank Center for Technology, Innovation and Inclusive Growth

Networking among participants-a principal objective of the conference-was done during lunch and break times discussing and sharing ideas as well as exchanging contact information. This conference would not have been possible without the generous support of Cuyahoga Community College, JumpStart, Ohio Department of Transportation, Cleveland Public Power, Dollar Bank and OPTIMA Lender Services. Many Thanks to all of them!

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Maria R. Davila, NEO Regional Outreach Manager, ODOT Office of Outreach

Nichelle McCall CEO, Bold Startups

Betsy Gates - Owner, Simply Betsy Company


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Tiffany Tarpley

LIZALYN SMITH,

Inspiring Young Minds

Mechanical Engineer at NASA

Flo Brett Founder/ Effective Leadership Academy

ALICIA ROBINSON, Empowering Women & Girls

DR. MARGARET LARKINS-PETTIGREW

Dr. JaNICE MARSHALL

An Advocate for Women’s Health, here and abroad

PUSHING OBSTACLES ASIDE TO FULFILL HER VISION

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DEBRA GREEN,

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DESTINATION CLEVELAND Meet the Women Helping to Shape Cleveland's Image

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Dr. KATHLEEN BUSE EMPOWERING WOMEN THROUGH

STEM

Dr. HELEN MUGA Engineer/Entrepreneur

BLACK HISTORY MONTH CELEBRATION

LaSHAWN REED-KENDRICKS Women Business Advocate

FREE

GIVE FROM THE HEART With an Eye on The Budget

TO ADVERTISE CALL 216.702.0845 34 ▒ MAY - JUNE 2018

SEPT-OCT 2016

NOV-DEC 2016

ADVANCING DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION AT Tri-C

FREE

Magda Gómez

Dr. Talisa Dixon PROPELLING MORE STUDENTS INTO COLLEGES AND CAREERS COUSINS HARDY & JACKSON

“THIS LIGHT OF OURS”

Tri-C’s WIT PROGRAM

STEPHANIE MORRIS NUNN

CHOOSE OHIO FIRST

Are Keeping it All in The Family

Exhibit Looks at The Civil Rights Movement

Training Women Seeking a Fresh Start

Creating Beauty One Stitch at a Time

Helping to Develop Our Future Innovators

OR EMAIL TO: ADS@PHENOMENALWOMAN.ME


www.PHENOMENALWOMAN.me â–’ 35


GOING THE DISTANCE

FOR OUR

COMMUNITIES. At Dominion East Ohio, going the distance for our customers means more than just delivering safe, affordable natural gas. It means being a positive force in the communities we serve. Our EnergyShareÂŽ program has raised $6.8 million and helped more than 70,000 people in Ohio alone. These resources, combined with more than 6,300 volunteer hours from our employees, have benefited organizations as diverse as the American Red Cross, the Boy Scouts of America and the Ohio & Erie Canalway Coalition.

Profile for Phenomenal Woman Magazine

May-June 2018  

May-June 2018  

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