KSAE Association & Meetings, Vol. 5, Fall 2021

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CONTENTS VOL. 5 • FALL 2021

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ON LOCATION: CASINOS

22

28

28 BOARD GOVERNANCE

Test Your Luck with Casino Conventions By Cecilia Harris, writer, KSAE Magazine

How to Elevate Board Engagement By Bob Harris, CAE, and John Gormley, CAE

10 NONPROFIT

32 SOLUTIONS

Keeping Up with Donor Behaviors By Lorie Williamson, owner, Blue Pencil LLC

Bringing Safety to Face-to-Face Meetings By Melissa Munoz, association operations manager, Kearney & Associates, Inc.

16 HUMAN RESOURCES Tips for Attracting and Retaining Talent By Kristin Scott, president, Scott Human Resources

18 FOCUS Made in Kansas – Giving the Gift of Community By Liz Stevens, writer, KSAE Magazine

22 MEMBER SPOTLIGHT: KANSAS INDEPENDENT ENERGY AND CONVENIENCE

36 BOOKLIST Stay Hip, My Friends By Dianna Brodine, managing editor, KSAE Magazine

DEPARTMENTS 4 31 34 38

Letter from the Director Association News Industry News Calendar / Ad Index

Connecting the Dots in the Petroleum Industry By Jewlissa Frickey, writer, KSAE Magazine

26 MANAGEMENT Why Today’s Associations Must Prove Their ROI By Ed Rigsbee, Rigsbee Research

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KSAE Magazine • Fall 2021 |

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LETTER FROM THE DIRECTOR

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Christy Classi, CAE Executive Director KSAE

eflecting on the past 18 months, the thing I have missed most in my professional journey are all the opportunities to connect with my fellow association colleagues. For me, the chance to share perspectives, have discussions about how best to move our organizations forward and conversations about future possibilities is how I learn and grow. Lucky for me, it’s time to reconnect! KSAE is excited to bring those opportunities back to all our members in person at the 2021 KSAE Golf Classic and KSAE Conference and Expo, October 21-22. We invite you to join us for the tradeshow, high-level educational programs, plus fun and engaging networking opportunities with the association colleagues you’ve been missing.

One speaker I’m looking forward to is Jeff Fromm, a partner at Barkley where he serves as president of FutureCast, a weekly contributor at FORBES and author of five books. Fromm graduated with a degree in marketing from The Wharton School and attended London School of Economics. He spearheaded the first public study of “Millennials as Consumers” in a research partnership between Barkley and the Boston Consulting Group in 2011. He has traveled most of the world sharing insights on consumer trends, youth culture as well as how brand purpose and sustainability drive Brand Love®. Fromm and his colleague, Gen Z strategist Kat Chertkow, will give insight into connecting with teens and young adults to attract them to industries and make them association members for life. I hope to see all of you, our KSAE members, at Prairie Band in October. The opportunity to come together to learn, grow and prepare for the future should be celebrated – and I plan to do just that! Sincerely,

Christy Classi, CAE Executive Director Kansas Society of Association Executives

Kansas Society of Association Executives (KSAE) PO Box 4790 Topeka, KS 66604 785.234.0155 • www.ksaenet.org KSAE Board of Directors President Sean Miller, Capitol Strategies President-Elect Amy Dubach, CAE, Midwest Political Science Association Secretary-Treasurer Niki Sadler, Kansas Dental Association Immediate Past President Ron Seeber, Kansas Grain & Feed Association/Kansas Agribusiness Retailers Association Chad Austin, Kansas Hospital Association Shahira Stafford, Stafford Public Affairs, LLC Brad Parker, MBA, CAE, Braden Heidner Lowe & Associates Carrie Riordan, Riordan & Associates Alex Orel, Kansas Bankers Association Hannah Yeubanks, Kansas Automobile Dealers Association Becky Schwartz, Fuel True: Independent Energy and Convenience

Published by:

Peterson Publications, Inc. 2150 SW Westport Dr., Suite 101 Topeka, KS 66614 Phone 785.271.5801 www.petersonpublications.com Editor in Chief Jeff Peterson

Advertising/Sales Vicki Peterson

Managing Editor Dianna Brodine

Copy Editor Jewlissa Frickey

Art Director Becky Arensdorf

Circulation Manager Brenda Schell

Graphic Designer Kelly Adams

4 | KSAE Magazine • Vol. 5

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ON LOCATION CASINOS

TEST YOUR LUCK WITH CASINO CONVENTIONS

C

By Cecilia Harris, writer, KSAE Magazine

onvention and meeting planners hit the jackpot when choosing casinos connected to hotels as a destination. Nationally, casinos have evolved beyond roulette and slot machines to attract convention and meeting business by creating a “one-stop shop.” Three Kansas casinos offer a winning combination of fun and convenience with meeting spaces, hotel rooms, restaurants and leisure activities all in one location. Owned by the Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation, Prairie Band Casino and Resort near Mayetta is on a winning streak with multiple recreational options to make an event successful. The casino offers many ways to play, including bingo, 1,200 classic and new slot machines, and 29 table games such as blackjack, roulette and Texas Hold’em. Blackjack lessons and other such amenities may be added to the convention package.

Casinos have evolved beyond roulette and slot machines to attract convention and meeting business by creating a “one-stop shop.” To cultivate business relationships while alleviating stress, the Prairie Band Resort suggests a “Stay and Play” package that includes a round of golf on its nationally recognized Firekeeper Golf Course adjacent to the casino. Named the best public golf course in Kansas by Golfweek® magazine, the golf course is a par 72.

For those who prefer to spend free time shopping for handcrafted items, the Prairie Band Gift Shop offers beadwork and sterling silver jewelry created by members of the Potawatomi Nation. Attendees wishing to up their networking game may choose to gather in the Resort’s Lobby Bar for fellowship while enjoying hand-chosen locally brewed beers and signature cocktails. The 12,000-square-foot convention center offers flexible meeting space when it is time to get down to business. A pre-function space for conference registrations leads to the Great Lakes Ballroom, easily divided to create two large and four small break-out rooms. The Algonquin Conference Room seats 14, or small groups may enjoy a more intimate setting in the adjacent Prairie Meadows Lodge that offers four bedrooms, four baths, a kitchen, a living room with a fireplace, a patio and full audio/visual equipment. Just a few steps away from the casino floor stands the luxurious hotel and courtyard, with 297 guest rooms and numerous amenities. A sure bet is the Kansas Star Casino Hotel Event Center in Mulvane. The Kansas Star Casino offers more than 1,700 slot machines and over 50 table games including craps, roulette, no-ante blackjack and an Asian Gaming pit. There are also restaurants and a nonsmoking gaming room. “It’s a gaming entertainment destination without equal in the region,” says Sonya Jackson, the casino’s marketing and public relations manager.

Prairie Band Casino and Resort, 12305 150th Road in Mayetta, has a courtyard as part of the hotel complex.

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The Kansas Star Casino Hotel Event Center, 777 Kansas Star Drive in Mulvane, has a ballroom with a 1,600-guest capacity. Photo courtesy of Kansas Star.

The Kansas Star Arena is a multipurpose venue that has hosted concerts by notable performing artists, as well as the Miss Kansas USA pageant, mixed martial arts events by Bellator MMA, and equestrian events, including Championship Bull Riding and the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association.

The Kansas Star Arena has hosted events from concerts to pageants, from mixed martial arts matches to various equestrian events and rodeos. Regarding meeting space, the Kansas Star Event Center Ballroom may be divided into six separate rooms or used as a whole with a capacity of 1,600 guests, depending on configuration, she says. Each of the three boardrooms, named Sunflower, Kansas and Star, comfortably seats up to 12 guests in executive chairs at a permanent conference table and includes a flat screen television. High-speed internet, full audio/visual equipment and on-site catering are available. Connected to the casino is the Hampton Inn & Suites that offers 300 deluxe rooms, including over 90 king suites, all offering a number of amenities. www.ksaenet.org

Another winner is the Boot Hill Casino & Resort in Dodge City. The Boot Hill Casino offers over 500 slot machines, featuring all the latest games in a variety of denominations. Blackjack, craps, Ultimate Texas Hold’em, Mississippi Stud, TriLux, 3-card poker and roulette are among the 18 tables games. On the menu at Firesides restaurant are steaks, burgers, salads and more for lunch and dinner; however, group reservations must be made in advance. “Boot Hill Casino & Resort can work with your group leader to create fun, learning experiences for your attendees,” says Jessica Rabe, senior director of marketing. “Learn games like blackjack or craps or grab a few tips on slot machines. We also offer groups free play and free food based on your size; all offers are based on reservations, so call early!” In addition, Rabe says that while the casino staff does not offer outside activities, they connect planners with the local Convention and Visitors Bureau. “Dodge City can offer unique, personalized experiences to make any conference a ‘must attend,’ ” she says. “Sing along with Miss Kitty in the all-new exhibit space at Boot Hill Museum. Sip locally made spirits with friends at the Boot Hill Distillery located in Dodge City’s old City Hall building.

continued on page 8

KSAE Magazine • Fall 2021 |

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ON LOCATION CASINOS continued from page 7

“Dodge City can offer unique, personalized experiences to make any conference a ‘must attend.’ ... The possibilities are endless!”

The Boot Hill Casino & Resort, 4000 W. Comanche in Dodge City, is close to United Wireless Arena, where live entertainment is often featured, as well as a 7,000-squarefoot conference center.

Deputize VIPs and honored members with the Drovers. The possibilities are endless!”

feet and offering audio/visual equipment, IT support, event coordination and food and beverage services.

Connected to Boot Hill Casino & Resort by a breezeway, United Wireless Arena brings in popular live entertainment including top musicians, comedians, ice shows and even an international circus. “Although it is a separate facility, we work closely with United Wireless Arena staff to make the conference perks seamless,” Rabe says.

Adjacent to the casino and arena is the Hampton Inn & Suites offering 108 rooms. Each includes a flat screen television, coffee maker, full and lap desks, and free Wi-Fi; a suite also contains a sitting area and kitchenette.

Just steps away is the Conference Center, a state-of-the-art, multipurpose facility boasting approximately 7,000 square

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The odds are in your favor when you choose one of these casinos as your meeting destination. F

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NONPROFIT

KEEPING UP WITH DONOR BEHAVIORS By Lorie Williamson, owner, Blue Pencil LLC

N

onprofit organizations have had to “pivot” and “adjust” so often in recent times that even reading these words may make you cringe. Therefore, I promise, you will not see these words again for the remainder of this article. With the shifting your organization may have been forced into when it comes to fundraising, there’s a payoff for all your hard work. Several trends are emerging when it comes to keeping up with donor behaviors to continue bringing in revenue for nonprofits; trends that will continue far into the future. As we make our way through a second year of the pandemic (another cringe-worthy word), nonprofit fundraising efforts have been an interesting mix of strategies. In her online article for America’s Charities on January 20, 2021, Ronita Mohan expresses an undeniable move towards “digital channels, human connections and increased flexibility, mainly because of the increase in remote working.” Let’s look at the top trends taking shape for nonprofits this year and how organizations can boost fundraising efforts now and in the future.

Digital fundraising

The nonprofit sector has experienced success using online channels for years, but with social distancing, Mohan notes it became the primary source of donor communication in 2020. The ability to successfully engage with donors last year has resulted in an expectation that digital fundraising will remain as a major strategy in 2021, and in the future. Learning how to best utilize digital touchpoints between nonprofits and donor bases – to convert engagement into dollars – will be a key trend for several years.

Diversify

Concentrating all your fundraising efforts in just one area can be very risky, so be sure to diversify the ways you are generating revenue. Explore new opportunities and keep your options open. A few ideas to consider when looking to diversify your fundraising streams include social media ads, workplace giving, crowdfunding campaigns, peer-to-peer campaigns and virtual events. Examples of highly popular and profitable digital fundraising include Giving Tuesday campaigns, gift matching drives and hashtag campaigns. Incorporating live video and a social media presence are common and will help increase donor reach and increase revenue.

Engage donors with social media

When it comes to a social media presence, nonprofits will need to remain strong this year. Encourage comments and actively

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With the shifting your organization may have been forced into when it comes to fundraising, there’s a payoff for all your hard work. Several trends are emerging when it comes to keeping up with donor behaviors to continue bringing in revenue for nonprofits; trends that will continue far into the future. engage with your followers via posts, videos (especially live videos) and blogs on a regular basis. Additionally, take full advantage of any analytics tools to learn the best times to post to achieve the most engagement.

Workplace giving

Workplace giving has gained momentum, especially during the pandemic, as more employers offer matching donations for their employees. The wonderful thing about these programs is the engagement with employees, helping them feel more connected to their jobs and their communities.

Crowdfunding

The Council of Nonprofits’ online resource guide explains how crowdfunding can reach a much more diverse audience and allows for sharing via social media and links to giving portals. Peer-to-peer fundraising is a multi-tiered approach to crowdfunding. Individuals set up fundraising pages for your organization to share with family, friends and community members. A live crowdfunding event puts the talents of your spokesperson to great use by sharing their pitch for your organization. One of the top benefits of any type of crowdfunding is the ability for donors to ask questions and offer feedback, thus building a relationship with your nonprofit. Be sure to take the time to investigate the multiple websites available for crowdfunding. Cost, collection of donor information and state fundraising regulations are all important aspects to take into consideration. continued on page 12

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NONPROFIT continued from page 10

Hybrid events reap great benefits

Still missing your in-person events, but attracted to the ease and success virtual events can offer? Even if you decide to hold an in-person event, offer your donors a hybrid option to attend virtually. According to Sarah Baker, a digital fundraising strategist at MobileCause, including virtual elements to your in-person events has astounding benefits. In her May 23, 2021, article for Nonprofit Tech for Good, Baker explains how including virtual elements at an inperson fundraising event can offer the following benefits: • Expands reach and brings in more new donors • Enables those who cannot attend to still participate • Increases giving, often outraising previous in-person events

Transparency is more vital than ever

According to a survey conducted among 3,000 donors by Network for Good1, the number one reason why donors stop giving is not knowing how their gifts are being used. While you may be familiar with the importance of transparency when raising funds during a crisis, the need for transparency is a trend that is going to extend into the future.

Adding value to your donation appeals and campaigns will help ensure your donations continue and is vital for maintaining trust. With nonprofits around the globe all vying for attention from prospective donors, it is necessary to show how your organization is making a positive impact. Mohan emphasizes that the goal here is showing – not just telling. So, what does that look like? Share stories, testimonials, images, data, etc. to explain who you are helping and where donation dollars are going. Allowing supporters to see, and appreciate, your efforts and how revenues are managed will let them know just how close you are to achieving your mission-driven goals. Heather Mansfield, author of “101 Digital Marketing & Fundraising Best Practices for Nonprofits” blog and webinar series for Nonprofit Tech for Good2, suggests featuring one to four news stories in your e-newsletter and focusing on one story in fundraising appeals. A word to the wise: Be sure to get your beneficiaries’ permission before you share their stories! continued on page 14

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NONPROFIT continued from page 12

Email still rules

Email marketing is still rated as the number one way to reach your target audience and works well to retain donors. Communicating via email on a regular basis is a great way to help your donors remain informed and connected to your organization. Mansfield2 recently shared the following tips for email marketing: • Embrace a mobile-first design strategy. Make sure your email is designed to be easily read on smartphones and tablets. • Personalize your email campaigns and write short subject lines to maximize open rates. • Prioritize growing your email list in 2021. Consider adding an e-newsletter sign-up box to every page of your website. • Take email security seriously. Taking advantage of today’s technology can be a daunting task for nonprofits. Developing a willingness to take on the challenge of keeping up with donor behaviors will allow for human connections, diversification, increased flexibility

and, most importantly, survival to continue supporting your cause and helping those in need. F Lorie Williamson, founder and owner of Blue Pencil LLC, combines her business and nonprofit experiences to help small business owners, entrepreneurs and nonprofits communicate effectively and efficiently in today’s ever-changing climate. For more information, visit www.BluePencil.site.

Williamson

Sources

1.   N.A. “7 Reasons Why Donors Give (and 1 Reason They Don’t).” Network For Good. Retrieved from https://www.networkforgood.com/resource/7reasons-why-donors-give/. 2.  Mansfield, H. “10 Email Marketing Best Practices for Nonprofits.” Nonprofit Tech for Good. Retrieved from https://www.nptechforgood.com/101-bestpractices/10-email-marketing-best-practices-fornonprofits/.

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HUMAN RESOURCES

TIPS FOR ATTRACTING AND RETAINING TALENT By Kristin Scott, president, Scott Human Resources

E

very employer is facing recruiting and retention challenges in this current labor market. It is a far cry from when it was an employer market; today’s applicants have many opportunities to choose from and can request higher wages. Honestly, the labor market overall is exhausted and fatigued, particularly human resource professionals and business leaders, as they have been making policies on the fly for the past 18 months and rushing from one deadline to another. Business leaders have only been able to do what has to get done versus what they would like to do, such as spend quality time with the current staff to learn of successes and challenges. On top of the stress, it has been challenging to even bring staff together for events and any other team member activities. The first step to address this turnover tsunami is to retain current staff. The key to retaining (and attracting) staff is different for each individual and depends on the personalities you have on staff. Recently, the Topeka Independent Business Association hosted a lunch and learn with a panel of Forge members and others from the younger generation to learn what they want from an employer. A few of the key takeaway items shared are: • Benefits are not one-size-fits-all (Employers should customize benefits based on the stage of life the individual is in). • Be open-minded to offer remote work options, even if is it only for a portion of the workweek. • The younger generation desires unique work experiences and growth opportunities (What is a career path they can have with your organization?).

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• Allow a couple of days a year to donate time to community projects as paid time. • In general, most all team members want clear expectations and to know if they are not meeting performance standards (“Just tell me!”). In a recent SHRM (Society for Human Resource Management) webcast, “The Great Resignation,” the following are interesting statements for organizations to consider: • Re-skill, up-skill and learning new things is the focus for retaining talent. – Focus to attract talent by having a sophisticated training and development program. – Attention was brought to horizontal capabilities as much or more important than vertical capabilities. – The new name for soft skills is “Power Skills.” • Staff may be in the workforce for up to 50 years and simply cannot continue to do things as we always have. • Industry and technology continually change and to stay abreast one must intentionally invest in themselves. • Internal mobility: Allstate Insurance is going to “mirror the market.” i.e., no requirements to be in the job for a specified period and no requirement to notify/ask the current supervisor before applying for a different position within the company. • Companies are working to remove barriers to expand applicant pool and broaden diversity. • The reasons most employees state they leave companies is due to the inability to go anywhere and feeling like they are not progressing. www.ksaenet.org


The feedback from young workers and the comments from the SHRM webcast address how to retain staff, but how do we attract talent? Many organizations are implementing or increasing referrals to staff for referring new team members and sign-on bonuses are appearing across the board starting at entry-level positions, such as fast-food workers. Some organizations are paying the full sign-on bonus with the first paycheck; some pay one-third with the first paycheck and the remaining two-thirds at 90 days. Others are including a claw back should the team member leave within a specified period. A few other success factors for recruitment are: • Job postings should reflect the culture of the company, reference core values and share why someone would want to work at your company. • Several organizations are implementing job shadows as an opportunity for the applicant to observe a future co-worker. Allowing the potential hire to see what the position is like and how the company operates while also allowing the company to see how the applicant learns, what questions they ask and how excited they may be for the opportunity. • The hiring process needs to move quickly and if you

are interested in someone you will need to stay in communication. Meaning, get those hiring managers together to make decisions. • While we all know it is a challenge to wait for the right hire, but it is always better to wait than to settle. We have seen managers hire someone less than ideal and almost 100% of the time, that team member leaves or is let go within 12 months. While we believe recruitment is important, retaining staff is the most important! F Scott Human Resources service philosophy is to build long-term relationships with clients in northeast Kansas and Kansas City area by providing solid recommendations and business practices balanced with compliance, employee engagement and budgetary considerations. Strategies are customized to improve bottom-line dollars and employee productivity while teaching managers how to Scott lead and motivate staff. For more information, call 785.272.5410 or visit www.ScottHR.com.

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FOCUS

MADE IN KANSAS – GIVING THE GIFT OF COMMUNITY By Liz Stevens, writer, KSAE Magazine

T

he holidays are just around the corner, and so is a new year of organization programs, initiatives and (hopefully in-person) events. To offer a leg up to organizations looking for thoughtful holiday business gifts, and for year-round options for thank-you tokens, incentives, rewards, awards and swag bag content, KSAE Magazine is highlighting a quartet of companies offering “made in Kansas” products, confections, food and wine. If delicious chocolates fit the bill or handcrafted cheese made from the milk of Kansas dairy cows sounds like a winner, look no further. Maybe a selection of wines from Kansas vineyards will hit the spot, or if personalized, etched glass mugs, pitchers or glasses are just the ticket, read on. KSAE members can shop these Kansas entrepreneurs’ websites for gift boxes, customized products and gift packs, gift baskets, assortments and party platters.

Glass Decorators

Glass Decorators, founded in 1985 and located in Lindsborg, Kansas, is owned by Corey Peterson, former president of KSAE (2008). Peterson’s company offers a wide selection of glassware, including coffee mugs, beer glasses, wine glasses, cocktail glasses, shot glasses, water glasses, carafes and pitchers, all of which can be decorated with high quality etching. The etched image – text or a company logo – is created with a sandblasting technique that produces a clean, crisp and permanent design.

“A common gift idea is a pitcher/ carafe and drinking glasses to promote the company in their own conference room.” Rather than having standard gift packages, Glass Decorators works with customers to design individualized packages. “A common gift idea is a pitcher/carafe and drinking glasses to promote the company in their own conference room,” said Peterson. “Employees often surprise their partners with this type of gift.” Glass Decorators specializes in glassware, said Peterson, “but we also can brand or personalize awards and items like glass ornaments. We take pride in our personalization capabilities and will personalize anywhere from one to hundreds of items.”

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Glass Decorators in Lindsborg specializes in glassware that can be decorated with high quality etching.

Peterson noted that his company offers items that are popular as business gifts. “Many customers have had their company logos etched on coffee mugs, ale glasses, wine glasses or cocktail glasses,” he said. “We do special event glasses to commemorate an event or for special recognitions. Our deep etching technique sets us apart from other, larger merchandising/marketing companies.” Glass Decorators can convert most company logos into an etchable format and can add text in an endless variety of fonts. For more information, visit www.glassdecorators.com or call 800.779.3344.

Alma Creamery

Alma Creamery, founded in 1946, is located in Alma, Kansas, and features cheeses made by hand with milk from a local Kansas dairy. The company produces handmade jack and cheddar cheeses, and offers a variety of additional “made in Kansas” edibles, including beef jerky, flavored popcorn, bread mixes, sausages, cookies, preserves and jelly, salsa and mustard. continued on page 20

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FOCUS continued from page 18

Alma Creamery in Alma features handmade cheeses made from milk from a Kansas dairy. Gift boxes are among the company’s main gift products.

Alma Creamery’s Cody Dillon explained that the company’s main products for the holidays are its corporate gift boxes. “Prices for the boxes range from $20-$60,” said Dillon, “and we can also custom build boxes.” The Creamery’s corporate gift boxes come with an assortment of Alma cheeses and can be packed with these added treats: • Summer sausage (8oz./16oz) • Prairy Peppernuts (Traditional Pfeffernusse, Pfeffernusse-Anise Free) • Prairy Bites (Orange Dream Cookies, Chocolate Crunch Cookies) • Grandma Hoerner’s (Triple Berry Preserve, Big Slice Cinnamon French Toast Apples, Berry Habanero Jelly) • Holmes Made (Mild Garden Salsa, Medium Garden Salsa, Hot Salsa, Nightmare Extra Hot Salsa, Smoky Cowboy Mustard) For more information, visit www.almacheese.com, call 785.765.3522 or send inquiries to info@almacheese.com.

Hazel Hill Chocolates

Hazel Hill Chocolates, located in Topeka, Kansas, offers craft chocolate bars, hand-dipped chocolates, kettle-cooked candies/toffee/apples, barks and panned items, and even Keto chocolate for carb-restricted diets. Sweets from Hazel Hill Chocolates are made by owners Terry and Nick Xidis, who is a third-generation chocolatier, using only the finest ingredients, chocolate, fresh cream and butter, to produce handmade treats that are whipped up the old-fashioned way, in small batches. The company’s craft chocolate bars feature cacao from Madagascar, Peru, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador,

20 | KSAE Magazine • Vol. 5

Hazel Hill Chocolates in Topeka offers small-batch treats, including craft chocolate bars and hand-dipped chocolates.

Belize and Tanzania. Hazel Hill’s hand-dipped chocolates include truffles, cluster/nut/fruit delicacies, chocolatecovered cookies, pretzels and fruit, caramels, cream centers and jellies, and English toffee. There also are kettle-cooked candies, toffee and applies, as well as panned candies and candy bark. For holiday and business gift-giving, the company offers gift baskets, boxed chocolates, party platters and glass assortments. For the holiday season, assorted chocolates are the most popular items, and Hazel Hill’s gift-boxed candies are also very popular. “The companies we work with regarding corporate gifts seem to like the Christmas baskets and tins filled with chocolates,” Terry Xidis said. “Some prefer boxed assorted chocolates.” All the gift baskets and other combination packages can be customized to suit customers’ desires. For more information, visit www.hazelhillchocolate.com, call 785.215.8883 or email chocolate@hazelhillchocolate.com.

Wyldewood Cellars

Wyldewood Cellars is a family-owned vineyard and winery located in Peck, Kansas, about 20 miles south of Wichita. Wyldewood Cellars was founded in 1995 by the brother and sister team of Dr. John Brewer and Merry Bauman. The vineyard began by making elderberry wines but has expanded drastically to now include more than 40 wines made from various fruits, berries and grape varieties. There is a wine for every taste, including sweet wines, meads, sangrias, semi-sweet wines, semi-dry wines and dry wines. Wyldewood’s Merry Bauman explained that gift baskets are available during the holiday season. “An amazing holiday selection from the Cellars would be our Partridge in a Pear www.ksaenet.org


Tree semi-sweet white wine, which comes with special information about the holiday song, our Rudolph Rosé semisweet with information about the red-nosed reindeer’s song, and our Spiced Elderberry wine – which is like a German gluwine.” For a complete taste tour of Wyldewood Cellars wines, Bauman suggested a sweet-to-dry flight of Lady Dulce, Elderberry Blackberry Mead, Peach Sangria, Prairie Sunshine Semi-Sweet, Traminette Semi-Dry and Elderberry Dry Reserve.

“An amazing holiday selection from the Cellars would be our Partridge in a Pear Tree semisweet white wine, which comes with special information about the holiday song.” “Corporate customers,” said Bauman, “can purchase at our winery in Peck/Mulvane or at our tasting room in Wichita.” Orders to be shipped can be placed by calling the winery. “We also offer volume discounts,” noted Bauman. “For purchases over 12 bottles, we offer 10% off both in-store and

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Wyldewood Cellars in Peck began by making elderberry wines but has expanded to include more than 40 wines made from various fruits, berries and grape varieties.

online. There is also an additional 5% in-store discount for military, teachers and first responders.” For more information, visit www.wyldewoodcellars.com, call 316.554.9463, extension 1, or visit in person at the Peck, Wichita or Paxico locations. F

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KSAE Magazine • Fall 2021 |

21


MEMBER SPOTLIGHT KANSAS INDEPENDENT ENERGY AND CONVENIENCE

CONNECTING THE DOTS IN THE PETROLEUM INDUSTRY By Jewlissa Frickey, writer, KSAE Magazine

“K

ansas Independent Energy and Convenience is the connection between fuel distribution and convenience store owners and government at all levels,” stated associate executive director Becky Schwartz. “That includes legislative bodies, the DOT, FDA, EPA, KDOR and KDHE.” Despite the changes in technology, or even its name, Kansas Independent Energy and Convenience’s focus has remained the same: opportunity, strength in numbers, education, friendship to steward resources, manage regulatory impact and bring about continuous innovation and success. By working as a one-stop information portal, Kansas Independent Energy and Convenience provides critical information like economic factors and trends, COVID-19 and pandemic-related updates, employment practices, edifying networking connections and contact info and more. The information can be accessed on various platforms, including its website, publications, webinars, events or even the staff. “All our members select from a range of programs and services designed specifically to help them in the day-to-day

22 | KSAE Magazine • Vol. 5

operations of their business,” said Schwartz. Today, Kansas Independent Energy and Convenience members include fuel distributors, retailers and convenience store operators. These members can benefit from a range of programs and services including education and networking to keep members “in the know” and connected to other segments of the industry, representation at the Kansas Capitol, newsletters and alerts that provide regulatory updates and guidance, sponsored health insurance, daily business consumables and Tank Management Services. Tank Management Services is the Kansas Department of Health and Environments sole provider of underground storage tank operator training for all underground storage tank owners and operators in Kansas. Tank Management Services also provides assistance to tank owners with required monthly inspections by either training for those who wish to do inspections themselves or contracting with Tank Management Services to complete inspections. Kansas Independent Energy and Convenience involvement at the Kansas Capitol are shown through executive director Tom Palace and Schwartz. “We are both registered lobbyists continued on page 24

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MEMBER SPOTLIGHT continued from page 22

and have a constant presence at the Capitol through the legislative session,” said Schwartz. “We actively work with legislators and state agencies to ensure the proposed regulations and legislation are beneficial, or the least harmful, on the fuel marketers.” As with any industry, Kansas Independent Energy and Convenience doesn’t go without its challenges. “The issues facing the petroleum industry are many,” stated Schwartz. “That includes environmental regulations, electric vehicles (EV) and alternative fuels, motor fuel tax, trucking regulations, shortage of truck drivers, consolidation of companies along with the countless issues all businesses face.”

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Kansas Independent Energy and Convenience also was faced with the COVID-19 crisis, much like the rest of the world. Being considered “essential personnel” meant business persisted with slight changes as members continued to deliver fuel and keep retail locations open for business. In order to face these challenges, Kansas Independent Energy and Convenience, along with their national association Energy Marketers of America, constantly work with regulators on regulations that affect the petroleum industry. “Kansas Independent Energy and Convenience and its members understand that electric vehicles are part of our future and have begun working with companies to provide charging stations at fuel locations across the state,” said Schwartz. “The number one concern is an even playing field for all who offer EV charging.” In addition to these challenges, Kansas Independent Energy and Convenience also was faced with the COVID-19 crisis, much like the rest of the world. Being considered “essential personnel” meant business persisted with slight changes as members continued to deliver fuel and keep retail locations open for business. “Knowing our members were still continuing to work, we made sure our they had the most up to date information on how to continue to safely keep businesses open,” said Schwartz. “We sent out email correspondence with the most www.ksaenet.org


up-to-date information then created an extensive COVID-19 resources page on our website where the information was archived for future use.” Despite the challenges many faced over the last year, Kansas Independent Energy and Convenience continues to work not only for their members, but for the energy marketing industry as a whole. “We want the best for every Kansan,” stated Schwartz. “By working together with national, state and local governments we are able to balance the need for environmental and consumer protections with the need for Kansas petroleum marketers to secure profitable and sustainable businesses.” As technology evolves, so does communication. “We are working on tools to allow our members to communicate with each other, as well as us at Kansas Independent Energy and Convenience, in a much quicker and robust manner,” said Schwartz. “Our members can look forward to podcasts, a membership communication hub, webinars and text message blasts as just some of the tools we plan to start utilizing.” Looking to the future, Kansas Independent Energy and Convenience hopes to provide members with the tools to

Front row, from left: Collin Munson, Colton Fouch and Thomas Palace. Back row, from left: Lori DeschRanallo, Judy Menke, Tina Wages and Becky Schwartz.

grow their business while also staying ahead of the various regulations. “Our industry, like others, is facing a lot of mergers and acquisitions, as well as burdensome regulations,” stated Schwartz. “We want to be the least expensive while also the most valuable employee to each of our members.” F

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KSAE Magazine • Fall 2021 |

25


MANAGEMENT

WHY TODAY’S ASSOCIATIONS MUST PROVE THEIR ROI

Y

By Ed Rigsbee, Rigsbee Research

our membership organization is most likely delivering quite a bit of value to the members. Unfortunately, very few of your members know about the real-dollar value. In reviewing yet another association magazine, I’m reading a two-page article about this particular association in which the virtues are explained for the members. The subheadlines are education, a new inspection initiative, distributor best practices, and (of course) the annual convention. It was a great feel-good, warm and fuzzy article about the association. However, to quote the 1980s Wendy’s TV commercial campaign tagline, “Where’s the beef?”

Baby Boomer vs. Gen X and Y members

God bless the baby boomers; they joined their trade association or professional society because they should. They believed in supporting the industry that provided them with a living. However, today the younger folks are saying, “I’ll come and play in your sandbox if you can prove to me that it is worth my time and money.” They want you to prove the ROI that you deliver – bummer! Back to the article, in the entire two pages, there was not a single mention of real-dollar ROI. While this is commonplace for an association “member benefit” article, it really does not have to be. Because of retirement and death, from this day forward, there will be less baby boomer members than the day before. But will there be more Gen X and Y members? Perhaps there will be, but only if you can prove the ROI.

Why not state the ROI?

So why are associations not stating the member ROI that they deliver? 1.  Unwilling to dedicate the time and money resources to determine the yearly sustainable real-dollar

26 | KSAE Magazine • Vol. 5

membership ROI. This is truly the number one reason. 2.  Afraid that if they go through the process that they will fall short of member expectations. 3.  Stuck in the 1970s mentality that industry stakeholders “should” join. 4.  Still believe that the association is the one and only repository of industry-specific knowledge and education so those that “want what we have” must join. 5.  Still believe 12 magazines and an annual meeting each year is enough value for members to remain loyal. 6.  The Board of Directors and the paid professional staff cannot agree on the strategic direction of the organization. 7.  The individual members that make up the Board of Directors are engaged and see the value and they cannot fathom that other members cannot see the value of membership. 8.  And the list goes on and on…

Morphing to communities of reciprocity

Twenty-first century associations that plan to survive will transcend from the 12 magazines and an annual meeting, the 1970s model, to vibrant communities of reciprocity for various member contingencies, thereby remaining relevant to all ages of membership. Recently, the Los Angeles County Bar Association created their “Dinosaur” group for the senior lawyer members. They charge a little extra and deliver special age and topic specific meetings for that community. What are you doing? The current social media platforms like LinkedIn, Twitter and, to some degree, Facebook offer very low-cost methods of delivering community specific value to your members. For most associations, LinkedIn should be your number one www.ksaenet.org


choice. LinkedIn groups cost nothing but deliver amazing return. My recommendation is to keep your groups closed. The idea of letting everyone in is not a good idea for reasons of control and ROI delivery.

Google makes it easy

Never in the history of mankind has information been so available to the masses. Since it is now impossible for associations to be the exclusive holder of industry information, best practices, codes, etc.; associations must prove their value to retain members and to recruit members. The stakeholders in your industry can get much of the industry specific information that they need to succeed in business through a simple Google search of the topic – and they can do it almost anywhere with their smartphone. Yes, the paradigm has shifted. Today’s associations cannot rely on their old paradigms for member recruitment. The conversation from member to prospective member can no longer be, “You should join the association to support your industry and network at the convention.” Today the conversation must be, “Let me explain to you why it is a good business decision to join the association. The return on investment of time and money that most members receive is…”

Reality check

I’m a baby boomer, and I admit that I frequently mourn many traditions that are no more. Gosh, today’s men even believe it is acceptable to wear their hats indoors – oh well, that’s progress. Kids think profanity is simply additional adjectives, adverbs and nouns that are necessary for their expression punctuation. And the world is becoming far less provincial. Things change, and so must associations. Feelgood is no longer good enough. For today’s associations to thrive; each one must continually prove the real-dollar ROI they deliver to their members. F Ed Rigsbee is the founder and CEO of the 501(c)(3) nonprofit public charity, Cigar PEG Philanthropy through Fun, and president at Rigsbee Research. He holds the Certified Association Executive (CAE) and Certified Speaking Professional (CSP) accreditation. Learn more at www.rigsbee.com.

Rigsbee

V I S I T D O D G E C I T Y . O R G

The Dodge City Convention & Visitors Bureau can help you select post-conference attractions, restaurants, and entertainment that will make your next conference or meeting the stuff of legends.

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KSAE Magazine • Fall 2021 |

27


BOARD GOVERNANCE

HOW TO ELEVATE BOARD ENGAGEMENT By Bob Harris, CAE, and John Gormley, CAE

“T

he directors don’t reply to my messages.” “Fewer than 50 percent show up for meetings.” “Nobody has read the bylaws.” “Directors mistakenly think their role is to direct and evaluate the staff.”

Set an altimeter

These are frustrations expressed by association executives about board engagement. Use these techniques to increase understanding and participation.

The governance altimeter reminds the board to stay at a level where they focus on strategy at an altitude of 50,000 feet and higher. Too often, boards delve into operational details or personnel matters. Committees get their authority from the board, working at 25,000 feet. The staff is responsible for implementing decisions at 10,000 feet. Help volunteers soar by focusing on what they need to know rather than operational and administrative details. Stay out of the weeds.

Governance adaptation

Fiduciary and trustee roles

It used to be that directors were expected at frequent meetings, sometimes traveling hours to the destination. The pandemic has impacted governance in ways that might be better for the organization and volunteers. Associations frowned on directors who asked if they could join the meeting by phone, rationalizing, “We need to see board members in person and read their body language.” Since the pandemic, meeting frequency, formats and focus has changed. Organizations have mastered technology use. Today’s agendas focus on the most vital issues, leaving off drudgery reports. Expect hybrid meeting formats to continue.

Brief is better

In nearly every way, brevity is better. Volunteers respond best to brief committee assignments, brief reports, and brief meetings. Use bullets and infographics to communicate. Time is a valuable commodity. Mark Twain said, “If only I’d had more time, I’d have written a shorter letter.”

28 | KSAE Magazine • Vol. 5

Not all board volunteers have knowledge of the responsibilities of serving as a fiduciary. Too many think the term fiduciary means they must raise money, rather than the proper reference to representing the interests of members. When told they serve as trustees of the corporation, they are confused by thinking the association is simply a non-profit and they are only volunteers. The board’s fiduciary duty is to protect the organization’s assets and to be prudent stewards of the members’ money. Annual orientation, dubbed “refresh and blend,” helps the board understand their fiduciary roles.

Strategic plan

Transform the plan it into a placemat for the board table, frequently asking, “How does this discussion advance our strategic plan?” Create a pop-up banner for the conference room displaying the mission and goals. continued on page 30

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BOARD GOVERNANCE continued from page 28

Integrate the plan’s goals into the meeting agenda. Without a strategic plan, directors may wonder why they should attend. When it’s woven into the fabric of the association’s culture, the strategic plan keeps the board, committees and staff focused on the right things.

The right people

When someone steps out of the meeting they return to hear, “We’ve made you the chair of a committee.” Boards and committees perform best when they are comprised of dedicated, competent volunteers. Regarding committees, rely on task forces and quick action teams to get the work done. Few have time to join a yearlong standing committee. As for the board, the average size is 15 persons, allowing for meaningful conversation and accountability. If directors come from “chapters,” ask them to only send persons who are fully trained in governance.

Agenda design

It might seem like a small thing but when asked about agenda design you’re likely to hear, “It’s always been this way.” Craft a board agenda that ties to the strategic plan. Reduce time listening to reports by distributing them in advance; it is

a fiduciary duty to read reports before the meeting. Focus the agenda on the goals in the strategic plan. Include the mission statement on the agenda to frame discussions.

Know the lanes

The four most important words of governance are, “Board governs, staff manage.” Discourage directors from having interest in micromanagement or supervision. The board’s purpose is to be strategic and visionary, advancing the mission and serving the membership. When board, committees or staff get out of their lanes, help them get back on the right track. Associations rely on governing boards and volunteer committees. Use these ideas to elevate board engagement. F Bob Harris, CAE, provides free governance tips and templates at www.nonprofitcenter.com. John Gormley, RCE, CAE, CIPS, AHWD, is the chief executive officer at the Mainstreet Organization of REALTORS® in Illinois.

Harris

KSAE 2021 Golf Classic, Conference and Expo If you attend only one KSAE event this year, make it the 2021 Golf Classic, Annual Conference and Expo, set for Oct. 21-22. This two-day event will give you the opportunity to share and learn best practices for your association though educational sessions, as well as participate in a wide range of networking opportunities with your peers. We promise you’ll walk away with ideas for greater success for both you and your organization in 2022.

For more information or to register, visit ksaenet.org. 30 | KSAE Magazine • Vol. 5

www.ksaenet.org


ASSOCIATION NEWS

To register for events, visit www.ksaenet.org.

KSAE 2021 Golf Classic, Conference and Expo

The KSAE Golf Classic is scheduled for Thursday, October 21, 2021, allowing time for golfing and networking with your association peers at Firekeeper Golf Course. Shotgun start at 1:00 PM. Following the golf classic will be the KSAE Expo from 6:00-8:00 PM. Make sure to stick around for food and drinks and check out all our vendors.

This two-day event will give you the opportunity to share and learn best practices for your association though educational sessions, as well as participate in a wide range of networking opportunities with your peers.

Ready to play some golf, attend the conference, the expo or do all three? Learn more at www.ksaenet.org.

Thursday 10/21/2021 – Friday 10/22/2021 – 1:00 PM CT The KSAE 2021 Golf Classic, Annual Conference and Expo is to take place October 21-22 at the Prairie Band Casino and Resort, Mayetta, Kansas.

KSAE has a broad slate of upcoming programming for member education.

The Power & Pitfalls of The Hybrid Work Model

Wednesday, 10/13/2021 – 12:30 PM CT When it comes to the future of the workplace, we know many organizations are converting to a hybrid model. On the surface, it looks like the best of both worlds: everyone feels supported through the “flexible” work environment, the organization’s fundamental culture is preserved, and working from home maintains individuals’ productivity. However, a hybrid work model can pose some serious pitfalls if not planned for correctly: more effort is needed to schedule time for collaboration, additional training and support may be required for new processes, and structures, policies, and expectations need to be in place for all employees.

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Meeting Space for any Event

In this session, you will learn a framework for creating the decisions and policies required for a successful hybrid workplace. We will explore how organizations are putting this framework into practice and share insights for developing a model that incorporates your association’s mission and values and maximizes the value you add to members and employees. 1 Total Credit: 1 CAE

Connect Mission and Money – Incorporating Racial Equity, EDI, Climate Change and More

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KSAE Magazine • Fall 2021 |

31


SOLUTIONS

BRINGING SAFETY TO FACE-TO-FACE MEETINGS By Melissa Munoz, association operations manager, Kearney & Associates, Inc.

A

fter being immersed in the pandemic mindset, many individuals have gotten used to the routine of attending meetings and events virtually. As some groups have started to discuss plans to meet in person, others have started to attend their normal face-to-face meetings and events. Planning for the remainder of 2021 will look different for each meeting or event, as individuals who have been more directly impacted by COVID-19 may be more reluctant to meet back in person. Now more than ever it is imperative to have a keen understanding of the attitude and preferences of each client when entering the planning stages of an event. For those who are eager and willing to meet in person there are many new aspects of event and meeting planning to discuss and consider. Almost everyone has differing opinions and thoughts on things such as social distancing and masks. Hotels and meeting spaces may have their own requirements, and often existing spaces are not large enough to accommodate even the best of safety plans because they were not designed with social distancing in mind. Even if a group is ready to meet back in person, their preferred speaker or speakers may not yet want to travel. Some may offer to speak virtually but guests might be turned off by virtual speakers at an event that they traveled to attend. Event planners should keep these things in mind as they work with clients to establish safety protocols and a clear plan of action to keep everyone involved safe and healthy before, during, and after the event.

32 | KSAE Magazine • Vol. 5

Pre-conference safety plan

During the planning stages of the event, create a clear list of all the safety protocols that will be in place during the event or meeting. This list should include details for each aspect and experience throughout the event. It should be distributed to all attendees and vendors and should be included on the event webpage so that everyone has access to the information. If there are any personal protective equipment (PPE) supplies to be distributed, include information on which supplies and where to access them. If there will be food and meals served, give detail to reassure guests that they will remain safe while enjoying their meals. This may mean switching away from traditional buffet options in favor of boxed meals. Another option for those wanting to keep their buffets could be to have designated staff wearing masks and gloves to dish out food at each station to avoid having each person handle the serving spoons. Other things to consider are requiring vaccinations, negative COVID tests within a certain period or daily temperature checks. Whatever the plan may be, it should be clearly communicated to all individuals involved well before the actual event. Transparency and communication are key to ensuring that guests feel at ease and are focused and excited on the event. Be sure that the hotel or event venue is also aware and on board with the safety plan for your event. It may be www.ksaenet.org


helpful to add a clause to the event contract detailing the procedures that need to be followed by venue or hotel staff to ensure the safety of guests. If the hotel has its own procedures, there must be agreement with the hotel on the safety plan, including, at a minimum, the incorporation of the standards your organization has approved. Having a clear plan communicated thoughtfully to all parties involved will immediately alleviate any stress or confusion that people may have, while also allowing everyone time to reach out with any additional concerns. Another aspect meeting planners should take into consideration when selecting a venue or hotel is to be sure that the venue has enough staff to cover the event. Many businesses across the nation are facing employee shortages, and an absence of event staff could cause problems that affect the attendee’s experience. This can be more devastating for larger conferences with breakout sessions and lots of staging required. Facilitating a small face-to-face meeting prior to the event with the hotel staff that will be on site during the event is a great way to ensure that they are briefed on how to deal with any situations that may arise. Individuals will naturally desire to connect and socialize with each other in person. During this time of uncertainty, it is crucial for meeting planners and event venues to cultivate strong collaboration that facilitates trust, putting their attendees at ease. One conversation to have early on in your event planning is the potential for a hybrid option allowing for some people to attend virtually. Since the start of the pandemic, the demand for virtual offerings has grown. Offering a live hybrid option may be a great possibility for those who have the capability to do so. Another option is to record the event and then present it afterwards as a virtual offering to those who could not attend. Adding these virtual aspects to the list of things to do while planning an event or meeting can be daunting – but can also ensure that your association members and event attendees feel cared for during this time where their health may be jeopardized. Vendors and sponsors are an important piece of many events and conferences. Due to COVID-19, traditional exhibit halls may not be the safest options for attendees. Because of this, many events are also offering virtual tradeshows that occur at the same time as their live events. Virtual tradeshows can be highly interactive, offering almost the same experience as an attendee would have if they were to visit the booth in person. Prize and giveaway bags are a very safe way to connect sponsors and guests. Promotional items, such as hand sanitizer or alcohol wipes, are convenient ways to stay with the theme of safety and health. Many vendors are unable to travel during this time, especially if they are coming from www.ksaenet.org

out of state. Reaching out to them well before the event and collaborating with them based on their individual needs and ideas can easily lead to new marketing ideas and partnerships that were not previously possible or needed. With all the health and safety precautions floating around, it can feel hectic and difficult to maintain a fun event where people feel connected to one another. As we enter autumn, there will be various opportunities for general sessions, such as keynote speakers and group activities/breakout sessions, to be held outside if possible. Although the outdoors is a safer option by providing better social distancing and airflow, an outdoor venue may be more difficult logistically, especially if there is technology involved with an event or meeting. With flu season approaching, having health and safety protocols set in place will be important for those continuing to meet throughout the winter months. For the time being, many meetings and events will need to be carefully planned with lots of extra attention to detail. It is to be expected that some in person events are unexpectedly changed to virtual formats, and simultaneously planning both an in-person and virtual format may be useful so that a switch in format does not cause a huge disruption to planning efforts.

During this time of uncertainty, it is crucial for meeting planners and event venues to cultivate strong collaboration that facilitates trust. As the COVID-19 pandemic starts to abate, it is likely that associations will keep some of the safety protocols in place moving forward. The pandemic has brought with it a new attention to cleanliness, safety and health that will improve the standards in these areas at future events and meetings. 2022 will be an interesting year as even more groups agree to meet back in person. F Kearney and Associates, Inc. offers full-service government affairs and association management solutions including lobbying consulting, public relations, board leadership training and more. Melissa Munoz, the association operations manager, is responsible for client membership, finance and event planning. To learn more, visit www.kearneyandassociates.com.

KSAE Magazine • Fall 2021 |

33


INDUSTRY NEWS

HR Partners Celebrates Lisa Zerbe

Lisa Zerbe, one of HR Partners’ most senior human resource advisors, recently passed the Society for Human Resource Management – Certified Professional (SHRMCP) certification examination. The SHRM-CP examination contains two types of multiple-choice questions: stand-alone knowledge-based items that assess a candidate’s knowledge and understanding of factual information, and scenariobased situational judgment items that assess a candidate’s judgment, application and decision-making skills. For more information, visit www.hrpartnersks.com.

Kansas Independent Energy and Convenience Announces Retirement of Executive Director

Kansas Independent Energy and Convenience has announced that Thomas Palace, the association’s longtime executive director, has decided to retire effective December 31, 2021. Palace began serving the fuel marketing and retail industry in 1996 and as executive director, he has overseen the operations and management of the association and its affiliated entities for over 25 years. Palace Current associate executive director Becky Schwartz will take the helm upon his retirement. For more information, visit www.fueltrue.org.

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Acorns Resort Announces New Addition

Acorns Resort, Milford, Kansas, announced that their newest addition, Acorns Wild, is live. Acorns Wild is made up of 1,000 acres of Flint Hills ground located 20 miles south of Acorns Resort. It offers controlled shooting areas for guided pheasant hunts, elk tours, farm to table, historic sites and other events. In addition, Acorns Resort has a state-of-the-art conference center, lodging, transportation and restaurant. To learn more, visit www.acornsresort.com.

NEW FACES

Lallier

Pfannenstiel

Walsh

New Face Comes to Visit Wichita

Visit Wichita announced new hire Mindy Lallier as the organization’s vice president of sales. In this role, Lallier will lead the Visit Wichita sales and services team. For more information, visit www.visitwichita.com.

Kearney and Associates, Inc. Announces New Team Member

Photo courtesy of Yunghans Images

Stormont Vail Events Center Unveils Renovation Project

The Stormont Vail Events Center, Topeka, Kansas, unveiled the completion of a $48 million renovation project. The two-year project started in May of 2019 and included improvements and additions to Domer Arena, Landon Arena, and Exhibition Hall, focusing heavily on improving the patron experience. The updates to Exhibition Hall include a nearly 40% expansion in floor space, allowing accommodation to growing events. Landon Arena now features the Happy Basset Craft Beer Garden, new concession stands, bathroom upgrades, locker rooms, revitalized parking lot, a grand lobby

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Kearney and Associates, Inc. announced that Abraham Pfannenstiel has joined the team. Admitted to practice law in the state of Kansas, he will be providing counsel to and representing the interests of the firm’s government affairs, nonprofit and legal clients. For more information, visit www.kearneyandassociates.com.

Hampton Inn & Suites Names Regional Director of Sales

Hampton Inn & Suites announced Erica Walsh as the new director of sales. In this position, Walsh oversees 11 properties, including the Hampton Inn and Suites by Hilton Dodge City, Hilton I/35 Mulvane and Hilton Kansas Crossing-Pittsburg. “My passion is connecting people and always putting a smile on someone’s face,” said Walsh. “The hospitality industry, especially sales, gives me the opportunity to do this every day.” Learn more at www.hilton.com. F www.ksaenet.org


Venues.

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CREATE "YOUR SCENE" FROM THE BEST OF SALINA.

PERSONLIZED SUPPORT FROM JO ANN.

Salina offers meeting space in diverse locations. Contact us to assist you planning the perfect conference. Email your RFP to jmcclure@salinakansas.org Call Toll Free 1.877.725.4625


BOOKLIST

STAY HIP, MY FRIENDS By Dianna Brodine, managing editor, KSAE Magazine

I

’ll admit it – I have a few more gray hairs than I used to, and I don’t have TikTok on my phone. I don’t understand the “mom jean” trend, and I find it irritating that teenagers with YouTube channels make more money in a year than I will make in a decade. It’s possible that I am no longer cool.

However, that doesn’t mean that I shouldn’t keep up with what’s changing in the world. I work in a global economy – and the majority of the workers in that economy are younger than me. How do I work with them? How do I communicate with them? How do I keep them as employees? These books may not have all the answers, but they’re a start. Zconomy: How Gen Z Will Change the Future of Business – and What to Do About It Authors: Jason R. Dorsey and Denise Villa Released: Sept. 22, 2020

Gen Z changes everything. Today’s businesses are not built to sell and market the way Gen Z shops and buys, or to recruit and employ Gen Z the way they find and keep jobs. Leaders need answers now as Gen Z is the fastest growing generation of employees and the most important group of consumer trendsetters. The companies that quickly and comprehensively adapt to Gen Z thinking will be the winners for the next twenty years. Those that don’t will be the losers or become extinct. Zconomy is the comprehensive survival guide on how leaders must understand and embrace Generation Z. Researched and written by Dr. Denise Villa and Jason Dorsey from The Center for Generational Kinetics, the insights in Zconomy are based on their extensive research, they’ve led more than 60 generational studies, and their work with more than 500 companies around the world. In Zconomy, Dr. Villa and Dorsey answer: Who is Gen Z? What do employers, marketers and sales leaders need to know? And, most importantly, what should leaders do now?

Belonging: The Key to Transforming and Maintaining Diversity, Inclusion and Equality at Work

Authors: Sue Unerman, Kathryn Jacob and Mark Edwards Released: Oct. 27, 2020 One in four US workers feels they do not belong at work. Structural racism, the patriarchy of the boardroom and pay

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disparities are just a few of the obstacles in our workplaces that systematically alienate and repress employees of color, women, LGBTQ workers and employees with disabilities, but the statistics are clear: companies with diverse management teams report 19 percent higher revenues and are far more likely to perform above their industry medians. Diversity in business is good for everyone – so why do women and minorities make up only 34% of boards of Fortune 500 companies? Following interviews at over 200 international businesses about the irrefutable business case for diversity at work, the book sets out to understand why more men aren’t engaged with D&I initiatives in organizations.

Sticking Points: How to Get 5 Generations Working Together in the 12 Places They Come Apart Author: Haydn Shaw Released: Oct. 6, 2020

This is the first time in American history that we have five different generations working side-by-side in the workplace: the Traditionalists (born before 1945), the Baby Boomers (born 1946-1964), Gen X (born between 1965-1980), Millennials (born 19812001) and Gen Z (born 1996-present). Haydn Shaw, popular business speaker and generational expert, has identified 12 places where the five generations typically come apart in the workplace (and in life as well). These sticking points revolve around differing attitudes toward managing one’s own time, texting, social media, organizational structure, and of course, clothing preferences. F www.ksaenet.org


advertising/promotion

showcase

KSAE

Association & Meetings

five top picks in northeast kansas Flint hills discovery center 315 S. 3rd St. in Manhattan, 785.587.2726 flinthillsdiscovery.org Situated in the heart of the Flint Hills, the Center offers an unforgettable venue to host your next event. From elegant weddings to casual gatherings, staff are there to make your vision a reality. Reserve an intimate space for daytime meetings, luncheons and celebrations. After hours, host the ultimate, exclusive event: a private evening in the exhibits and galleries.

townsite avenue ballroom 534 S. Kansas Ave. in Topeka, 785.213.1904 townsitetower.com Located in the former Bank of America Lobby, Townsite Avenue Ballroom is newly renovated and booking events! This modern venue is 18,000 square feet and features state-of-the-art audiovisual, including a 44-foot-wide projection wall. K1 Hospitality can help you with a variety of floor layouts, table and chairs, and full-service onsite catering. Townsite Avenue Ballroom is one of many meeting/venue spots available at Townsite.

Liquid art winery & estate 1745 Wildcat Creek Road, info@liquidartwinery.com liquidartwinery.com Liquid Art Winery & Estate is a family-owned vineyard, tasting room, and event venue perched on top of a hill just west of Manhattan. Our venue offers two distinct settings for your next wedding, holiday party, corporate event or retreat. With 360-degree views of the surrounding Flint Hills, Liquid Art Winery is sure to provide an experience unlike any other, no matter which setting you choose.

GReat overland station eagles landing at lake olathe 475 S. Ward Cliff Drive in Olathe, 913.971.5501 olatheks.org/venuesat061 Eagles Landing at Lake Olathe is the newest addition to Venues at 061. The event space accommodates up to 192 guests banquet-style and offers a large deck overlooking the lake, two dressing rooms and a catering kitchen. It is also equipped with a screen, projector, Bluetooth speakers and customizable colored LED lighting.

701 N. Kansas Ave. in Topeka, 785.251.6945 parks.snco.us Built in 1927 and restored to its original grandeur, this former Union Pacific railroad station offers several event spaces: the Main Waiting Room and Mezzanine (up to 200 people), and the East Gallery (up to 100 people), which together, can hold up to 300 people. A conference room, suitable for small business meetings of up to 12 people, is also available.


CALENDAR To register or for more information, visit ksaenet.org.

OCT. 13

The Power & Pitfalls of the Hybrid Work Model

OCT. 21-22

KSAE 2021 Golf Classic, Conference and Expo

AD INDEX

OCT. 27

Connect Mission and Money – Incorporating Racial Equity, EDI, Climate Change and More

NOV. 2

Hands-On with the Future of Copywriting for Associations

Alma Creamery.............................................................. almacheese.com...........................................................................................................21 Boot Hill Casino and Resort..................................... meetdodgecity.com....................................................................................................8 DoubleTree by Hilton-Lawrence............................ lawrence.doubletreebyhilton.com.......................................................................17 Eagles Landing at Lake Olathe.............................. olatheks.org/venuesat61.........................................................................................37 Flint Hills Discovery Center...................................... flinthillsdiscovery.org................................................................................................37 Geary County Convention Center......................... marriott.com/mhkcy..................................................................................................13 Glass Decorators........................................................... glassdecorators.com................................................................................................. 19 Great Overland Station.............................................. parks.snco.ks.................................................................................................................37 Hilton Garden Inn-Hays.............................................. hilton.com/en/hotels/hysiigi-hilton-garden-inn-hays/............................ 24 Hilton Garden Inn-Topeka......................................... hgitopeka.hgi.com........................................................................................................11 Hilton Garden Inn-Wichita Downtown................ wichitadowntown.hgi.com.......................................................................................11 Holiday Inn Wichita East I-35.................................. holidayinnwichita.com...............................................................................................31 Homewood Suites Salina Downtown.................. hilton.com/en/hotels/slnknhw-homewood-suites-salina-downtown/... 14 Hyatt Regency Wichita.............................................. wichita.regency.hyatt.com.................................................................................... 23 J.O. Sundstrom Conference Center...................... visitlindsborg.com...................................................................................................... 19 KSAE 2021 Golf Classic, Conference and Expo... ksaenet.org...................................................................................................................30 Kansas Star Casino & Event Center..................... kansasstarcasino.com/gather.............................................. inside front cover Liquid Art Winery & Estate...................................... liquidartwinery.com...................................................................................................37 Marriott Wichita............................................................. marriott.com/ictwe.................................................................................................. 29 Milford Lake Conference Center............................ acornsresortkansas.com..........................................................................................13 Prairie Band Casino & Resort.................................. prairieband.com............................................................................................................5 Townsite Avenue Ballroom....................................... townsitetower.com.............................................................................................. 12, 37 Treefall Marketing (Allen Press)............................. treefallmarketing.com............................................................................................. 24 Visit Dodge City............................................................. visitdodgecity.org.......................................................................................................27 Visit Emporia................................................................... visitemporia.com/meet.............................................................................................15 Visit Leavenworth......................................................... visitleavenworthks.com.......................................................................................... 25 Visit Manhattan.............................................................. visitmanhattanks.org............................................................................. back cover Visit Salina........................................................................ visitsalinaks.org.......................................................................................................... 35 Visit Topeka...................................................................... visittopeka.com/meetings......................................................inside back cover Visit Wichita..................................................................... visitwichita.com.............................................................................................................9

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Crowd WITH YOUR NEXT EVENT

Contact the Visit Topeka Team for more information and to book. 785-215-8190 | info@visittopeka.com visittopeka.com/meetings


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