Issuu on Google+


IN THIS ISSUE

14 Cadet Program mandate = Aim+mission+vision+participant outcomes Find out what has changed. Capt Catherine Griffin 15 Cadet Program framework shift A simpler framework for programs and activities. Lt(N) Shayne Hall 17 Cadet Program activities Capt Andrea Onchulenko

16

18 Interactive learning—in or outside the classroom 20 Responding to problem behaviour in the classroom

Cadets 2012

22 Orienteering: A best-kept secret? Capt Peter Westlake and Maj Phil Lusk

Will the cadet unit of 2012 be radically different from the cadet unit of 2006? Some things are changing, but it looks like cadets will still be having fun learning. Capt Rick Butson

26 Retaining new recruits Give them a sense of belonging Lt David Jackson 28 University courses for CIC officers Capt Carl Choinière 30 A collective national voice What the CIC Branch Advisory Council can do for you. LCol Tom McGrath 31 Cadet evaluation reports Substantiate your awards, senior positions and summer training positions. Lt(N) Tom Edwards 32 Honours and awards Take the time to nominate someone LCdr Gerry Pash 34 The Ipsos-Reid Survey—now what? Survey results present Cadet Program challenges. Lt(N) Julie Harris

23 New policies have positive impact CIC officers are no longer required to meet the CF physical fitness standards. New standards are being developed specifically for CIC officers, based on their requirement to perform as youth specialists. Col Robert Perron

2

IN EVERY ISSUE 4

Opening notes

19 Test your knowledge?

5

Letters

6

News and Notes

37 Viewpoint

CADENCE

Issue 20, Fall 2006


UPCOMING In recent years, the CF has attempted to reduce the training time of new CF recruits—or of members transferring from one branch/component to another—by recognizing prior learning.

10 FRONT COVER Physical well-being A healthy mind and body More than half of Canada's children and youth are not active enough for healthy growth, according to the Public Health Agency of Canada. Youth development organizations like the Cadet Program are doing their best to encourage youths to be active. Here, Cdr Pamela Audley, commanding officer of HMCS QUADRA Cadet Summer Training Centre, gives a helping hand to cadets on the confidence course during the summer. (Photo by Lt(N) Ronald Desjardins, CSTC HMCS QUADRA public affairs)

This can also help reduce the training time for those wishing to become members of the Cadet Instructors Cadre. Academic achievements, learning experiences, knowledge or skills of anyone wanting to become a CIC officer, including former Regular Force and Reserve Force officers, may be recognized to reduce training time. The same is true for serving CIC officers who acquire new skills outside the Cadet Program. The winter issue looks at the CF system of prior learning assessment—situations requiring it, factors considered, the process and its potential outcomes. Recognizing an individual's prior knowledge is expected to greatly reduce duplication of training, ease the transfer of former Regular or Reserve Force personnel into the branch and help achieve formal recognition for specific youth-related skills of new members. The next issue will also include a follow-up article from educator Michael Harrison, who will offer an 'outsider's' perspective on increasing the visibility of cadets in local communities. Additional articles will include more on the Cadet Program Update and first-year corps and squadron programs; age-appropriate learning; a local officer's approach to 'operational risk management' that leaves no cadet's safety to chance; and upcoming regional trials for basic officer and CIC military occupation training courses.

24

Deadlines are Oct. 13 for the Winter 2006 issue and mid-January for the Spring/Summer 2007 issue.

Strategies for recruiting in schools An educator from outside the Cadet Program gives us some insights into recruiting in schools. Michael Harrison, a former teacher and principal in Ottawa, discusses strategies to gain school access, including the 'homework' you need to do before meeting school principals.

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

3


OPENING NOTES

By Marsha Scott

A holistic approach to cadets “

olistic” is defined at http://dictionary.reference.com as “Emphasizing the importance of the whole and the interdependence of its parts,” or “Concerned with wholes rather than analysis or separation into parts”. Some of us may have used “holistic” to describe a specific approach to medicine, to education, or to another discipline.

H

Two features in this issue—“Physical well-being—a healthy mind and a healthy body” on page 10 and the entire section on the Cadet Program Update (pages 14 to 19)—reveal the Cadet Program as taking a holistic approach to cadet training. It approaches each cadet as a whole person with body, mind, emotions and spirit—all interconnected. There was a time when the terminology “physical well-being” brought to mind, exclusively, the fitness or healthiness of the physical body. In our feature on physical well-being, however, you will see that the Cadet Program describes physical wellbeing as “a life-long process of healthy mind and body development”. In other words, the Cadet Program is looking at the 'whole' cadet. And when the Cadet Program pursues its aim of physical fitness, it is with this definition in mind. An element of wholeness is also evident in our new mission statement, created as part of the Cadet Program Update. Our mission is described as “contributing to the

4

development and preparation of youth for the transition to adulthood.” In other words, the Cadet Program is not only concerned about cadets during their time in Cadets. It is also concerned with their transition to adulthood and the kinds of adults they will become. The design of the updated training program, scheduled to begin with first-year training in corps and squadrons in September of 2007, is based on a better understanding of youth as a whole. Contemporary research related to how they learn, how they develop and what they want and need has enabled us to work with a more complete picture— a holistic picture that will help us make learning fun, active/interactive and memorable for cadets. Speaking of more complete pictures, we have added extra dimension to our physical well-being feature by soliciting the views of seven officers in the field on the Cadet Program's success in promoting physical fitness. They also share information on local initiatives that take that extra step. The final article in our series on “Recognition for CIC officers” and part two of “Responding to problem behaviours in the classroom” also appear in this issue. As well, an expert in education from outside the Cadet Program shares his strategies for recruiting in schools, and an officer from the field shares his ideas for retaining new recruits. Finally, you won't want to miss the results of the most recent Department of National Defence and Ipsos-Reid survey on the Cadet Program. Check the contents page for these stories and more.

Issue 20 Fall 2006 Cadence is a professional development tool for officers of the Cadet Instructors Cadre (CIC) and civilian instructors of the Cadet Program. Secondary audiences include others involved with or interested in the Cadet Program. The magazine is published three times a year by Chief Reserves and Cadets—Public Affairs, on behalf of Directorate Cadets. Views expressed do not necessarily reflect official opinion or policy. Editorial policy and back issues of Cadence are available online at www.cadets.forces.gc.ca/support.

Managing editor: Lt(N) Julie Harris, Chief Reserves and Cadets—Public Affairs

Editor: Marsha Scott, Antian Professional Services

Contact information Editor, Cadence Directorate Cadets and Junior Canadian Rangers National Defence Headquarters 101 Colonel By Drive Ottawa ON, K1A 0K2

Email: marshascott@cogeco.ca CadetNet at cadence@cadets.net or scott.mk@cadets.net

Phone: Tel: 1-800-627-0828 Fax: 613-996-1618

Distribution Cadence is distributed by the Directorate Technical Information and Codification Services (DTICS) Publications Depot to cadet corps and squadrons, regional cadet support units and their sub-units, senior National Defence/CF officials and selected league members. Cadet corps and squadrons not receiving Cadence or wanting to update their distribution information should contact their Area Cadet Officer/Cadet Adviser.

Translation: Translation Bureau Public Works and Government Services Canada

Art direction: ADM(PA) Director Public Affairs Products and Services CS06-0294 A-CR-007-000/JP-001

CADENCE

Issue 20, Fall 2006


LETTERS NICE TO BE NOTICED I would like to comment on the article “Recognition for Cadet Program Leaders” (Cadence, Winter 2005). CIC officers are rarely recognized, especially at the national level, for their work. A full-page newspaper advertisement in our local newspaper (last Nov. 11) offered "A special thank you to those reservists serving in Northwestern Ontario". The ad listed every reservist in Thunder Bay— except CIC officers. I realize that we are not deployable and are the lowest priority in the CF, but we are still serving our community.

Unfortunately, the statistics on the Directorate of History and Heritage Honours and Awards website would seem to indicate that we would be wasting our time to nominate a CIC officer for a national award. Here are the statistics: Medal of Military Merit — 1999 recipients since 1972, all ranks, all services; Meritorious Service Cross — 78 military recipients since 1984; and Meritorious Service Medal — 135 military recipients since 1991. Statistics on other awards are the same—few recipients, with the chances of a local CIC officer receiving one, next to none.

The last article I read on this subject, entitled “Rewarding a job well done” (Cadence, Spring 2003), listed available awards and recognition to officers, but it seems that little has changed. I can probably count on one hand the number of CIC officers who receive these awards.

So, what can we do nationally to thank CIC officers? How about a CIC service medal after six years of service, upon recommendation by the unit commanding officer (CO) or detachment commander? Why six years? The officer is recognized for a job well done at the half-way point

to receiving their Canadian Forces' Decoration (CD)—an incentive to stay on for another six years. If six years seems like a short time to qualify for a medal just for “doing our jobs”, then you may be interested to learn that the Special Service Medal is awarded to Canadian Rangers after only four years of “just doing their jobs”. The medal is also awarded to those at Canadian Forces Station Alert after only six months of “just doing their jobs”. I agree with the Cadence articles that no CIC officers are in the Cadet Program for medals or money. But it's always nice for the national government to thank us for keeping the program strong and dedicating much of our lives to it. Capt Shawn Wright CO, 66 Air Cadet Squadron Thunder Bay, ON.

SUFFERING FROM LOW ESTEEM? One of the most rewarding parts of being a civilian instructor (CI) in Cadets is accompanying cadets to the airport for their glider familiarization flights. For many cadets, it is their first experience in the air, and I take great joy in seeing the smile on their faces after their flights.

As the Cadence article mentioned, it is true that the 2-33 is not the Porsche of aircraft. In fact, many civilian clubs have replaced this venerable aircraft, once the backbone of most civilian clubs in Canada, with higher performance trainers with more appeal.

Reading that last year's glider familiarization program in Atlantic Region had to be cancelled because of a lack of instructors (Cadence, Winter 2005) made me think about the issues and write this letter.

The low esteem that the gliding program suffers from, however, goes beyond a specific aircraft. I have heard cadets refer to the ITAC [Introduction to Aviation Course] as “I slack”. Are these cadets choosing this course for the wrong reason? Where are they getting the perception that gliding courses are any less rigorous (or less glamorous) than other courses?

At our local squadron, I teach ground school to flying scholarship candidates. I am a former air cadet who continued gliding, having joined a civilian club and accomplished many of my goals of soaring cross-country. My experience in gliding in a civilian club and being involved with Cadets gives me, I think, a different perspective.

Perhaps, we, as instructors, are partly to blame. Are we missing the significance that gliding has as an aero sport? Are we missing the fact that many top professional pilots learned

the subtle skills of “feel” and co-ordination during their glider flying years? Having young people who trained as air cadets come back to the gliding program as instructors—giving familiarization flights and teaching courses—is the best reflection of a successful program. In the interim, I would suggest that the Cadet Program encourage leaders to promote gliding as a skill worthy of honing and an aero sport that's just 'plain' fun. It should also encourage CIC officers and CIs who are qualified to help with familiarization flights. Over the long term, I hope the Cadet Program can find ways to raise the esteem of the gliding program. CI Sue Eaves 201 Air Cadet Squadron Dorchester, ON

Cadence reserves the right to edit for length and clarity. Please restrict your letters to 250 words. Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

5


NEWS AND NOTES

Quebec squadron tackles ambitious project Team work, perseverance and riskmanagement were key factors in an ambitious project undertaken by 921 Air Cadet Squadron in Quebec City to return a crashed Beech Craft Musketeer (B-23) to flying condition! It was ambitious in cost ($98 000), ambitious in effort (requiring more than 3000 hours to complete) and ambitious in complexity—with cadets doing the work, under the supervision of aviation mechanics. “Thirty cadets, 15 sponsors and 12 adult volunteers were involved in this co-operative effort,” says Capt

< Cadets take a break from painting the aircraft.

New staff accommodation at Albert Head < The Beech Craft Musketeer, now in flying condition. Denis Rousseau, squadron CO. “We required six wings to obtain two finished wings, did more than 350 different tasks and took out and reinstalled more than 500 aircraft pieces.” Sponsoring committee president Roger Robert proposed the project in 2003. Supporters raised $25 000 and a year later, purchased a damaged aircraft in Nova Scotia. They then created a non-profit organization to manage the project and ensure that ownership of the aircraft would stay with the squadron. The organization's board—Jeune-Air Aviation Inc.—consists of a sponsoring committee representative, a squadron officer, two local aviation stakeholders and Mr. Robert as president.

6

“The devotion of the aviation mechanics who volunteered to teach the cadets and supervise their labour was a major part of the project's success,” says Capt Rousseau. “So was the team effort when problems arose—such as rust on the two main spars of the wings making them unusable, difficulty in finding parts, finding financial sponsors for the project and so on.” By the end of June, the aircraft was airborne. The project gave the cadets a hands-on learning experience, resulting in real-life skills. On top of that, Jeune-Air's members— mostly air cadets—now have the chance to fly at a cheaper cost, says Capt Rousseau.

A new staff accommodation building has replaced a 1940's vintage building and six 20-yearold 'temporary' trailers in the Albert Head training area in Esquimalt, B.C. The new building can accommodate 67 people and includes 30 double rooms and seven single rooms. During the winter, the training area functions as Regional Cadet Instructors School (Pacific). During the summer, it is headquarters for Albert Head Cadet Summer Training Centre, attended by approximately 800 air cadets each year. The Army Reserve, the Canadian Rangers and the Regular Forces also use the training area throughout the year.

CADENCE

Issue 20, Fall 2006


Fortress fast! “It might be easier to complain about everything that is not working,” says Capt Mario Marquis, CO of 2920 Army Cadet Corps in Gatineau, Que., “but it's just as important to stress what is working.” For his corps, what is working is the new user-friendly Fortress database that allows cadet information to be stored in a single location and shared with detachments and other headquarters. “We are finally starting to reap the benefits of our work in populating Fortress,” says Capt Marquis. The system proved itself when Capt Marquis began to register his cadets for 2006 summer camps. One hour before a parent meeting, Capt Marquis started to print off CF-51 forms for Green Star cadets. “In less than 45 minutes, I had printed 63 CF51s,” he says. “Parents merely had to check the information, complete the medical section and sign the form. I shortened their time at the meeting by 30 to 45 minutes. Better yet, the information on the forms was clear and concise.” “I sincerely believe that the time spent entering this basic information in the Fortress database is, and will continue to be, handsomely repaid,” he concludes. “For a volunteer-based organization the size of ours, Internet has been a gift from heaven,” says Maj Guy Peterson, national information management co-ordinator for the Cadet Program. “Things are getting even more exciting because the regions have agreed to fund the use of high-speed Internet for all corps and squadrons—where such a connection is possible. This will definitely help local headquarters take greater advantage of the important improvements made to Fortress recently, including the capability to mass update the new and improved cadet service records and attendance sheets.”

New governing authority for CIs

Cut pop from cadet activities

Until recently the provisions of CFAO 49-6 governed employment policies for civilian instructors (CIs). The responsibility for these policies has now been transferred to Directorate Cadets, and a new CATO 23-05 reflects this change.

Here's something to nibble on. Capt Louise Zmaeff, CO of 577 Air Cadet Squadron in Grande Prairie, Alta., says officers concerned about overweight cadets may be interested to hear that according to a CNN news report on obesity in children, a person who cuts one soft drink a day from their diet could drop 15 pounds in a year.

This is a positive step that will increase the efficiency of the Canadian Cadet Organization.

“Now that may not sound like much, but think about it,” she says. “If you had 30 pounds to lose, you could lose half of it by simply doing one small thing a day.” You may want to pass on that to your cadets, or take it into account when planning beverages for cadet events.

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

Governor General Michaelle Jean has commended OCdt Cameron Hull, an instructor with 2822 Army Cadet Corps in Surrey, B.C., for his response to a bullying incident in 2004. While driving with his wife in Surrey, OCdt Hull spotted three older boys attacking two young boys. He stopped his van, ensured the victims were alright and then chased the attackers. The police, guided by the victims, caught one attacker, while OCdt Hull caught the other two. A letter to OCdt Hull from the deputy secretary to the Governor General states, “Your selfless actions are an inspiration to others and represent a high form of citizenship of which you can be very proud.” The commendation is issued to those who have made a significant contribution by providing assistance to another person in a selfless manner.

<

Wonder how it will affect you? For the time being, you will see little difference; however, with D Cdts as the new managing authority, future updates to regulations governing CIs will be quicker.

Response to bullying incident commended

OCdt Hull of Chilliwack, B.C., accepts his certificate of commendation from Chilliwack Mayor Clint Hames, who presented the award on behalf of Canada's Governor General.

7


NEWS AND NOTES

New national president for Air Cadet League Craig Hawkins is the new national president of the Air Cadet League. Mr. Hawkins is a secondary school principal in Midland, Ont. He joined the Cadet Program as an officer cadet in 1975. He sees this as an exciting time to be part of the Canadian Cadet Movement.

March 11-18, 2007: 2007 National Cadet Biathlon Championship in Whitehorse, Yukon, using the Canada Games athletes' village and biathlon venue. Coordinator is Capt Ken Gatehouse at gatehouse.kdh@forces.gc.ca. May 5-12, 2007: 2007 National Cadet Marksmanship Championship in London, Ont. Coordinator is Capt Peter Westlake at westlake.pj@forces.gc.ca.

<

“In the upcoming year, we are going to see the implementation of the new Memorandum of Understanding between the leagues and the Department of National Defence, the first phase of the new cadet training program, and the evolution of Craig Hawkins the CIC as a separate and distinct component of the reserve structure. On the air side, we are also entering into a time of significant consultation and co-operation with the Canadian Aerospace and Aviation Industries that promises additional support for our squadrons and summer camps.”

Events

Mr. Hawkins adds, “The importance of professional growth and development for the CIC and for the leagues is more important now than it ever has been. As such, professionals from both sides of the partnership must seize opportunities to exchange ideas and best practices as never before.”

CIC officer receives War Studies degree Lt(N) Allan Miller, a former CO of 79 TRENT Sea Cadet Corps in Trenton, Ont., has graduated from Royal Military College (RMC) in Kingston, Ont.— 34 years late! He received his Master of Arts in War Studies in June. Lt(N) Miller, who is also an ordained minister of the United Church of Canada, says he intended to go to RMC in 1968, but a medical problem sidetracked his plans. He continued his studies at the University of Toronto instead and stayed active in the Reserves. Along the way, he was influenced by his minister—a former First World War stretcher-bearer and Second World War chaplain—to go into ministry. His first contact with cadets was as a Reserve chaplain for a First Nations' Residence School sea cadet corps in St. Paul, Alta. from 1975 to 1977. He was a minister in the province at the time. Rev. Miller has been a CIC officer since 1997. He is currently looking for a cadet corps to serve with.

8

<

For more information on RMC degrees, see the article “University courses for CIC officers” on page 28.

Lt(N) Miller received his degree June 24 during the RMC convocation at the CF Command and Staff College in Toronto.

CADENCE

Issue 20, Fall 2006


Innovative teaching Capt Roy Harten, CO of 2310 Army Cadet Corps in Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., took the initiative this past training year to teach his cadets about the humanitarian aid efforts of CF troops in Afghanistan. Through his wife, who was deployed as a civilian barber for troops in Kabul, he learned of Canadian troops working, on their own time, to help orphanages and schools and provide safe drinking water in Afghanistan. To engage his cadets, he asked Capt Tony Petrilli, a reservist with the Provincial Reconstruction Team in Kandahar and a former cadet, to answer questions his cadets had about the country and the operation. Capt Petrilli did so in great depth, commenting on everything from the Afghan people and culture

to spitting camels and the complications of dust in weapons and vehicles. The result was a booklet, including photos, created for display at the corps' annual parade. “Our cadets now have a better understanding of the Afghan people and their plight after 25 years of war,” says Capt Harten. “At the same time, they learned a lot about CF efforts to assist the Afghan people in rebuilding their country.” The corps, along with other corps and squadrons in the area, sold magnetic “support the troops” ribbons for cars or fridges, with proceeds going to Canadian troops in Afghanistan for the purchase of school supplies for Afghan children.

Capt Harten encourages similar efforts in other corps and squadrons. He also encourages other cadets to learn about the CF by writing to troops, or taking a few minutes to go to the DND website at www.dnd.ca to click on Images and then Afghanistan to look at upto-date photographs of Canadian troops there.

(Photo by Sgt Carole Morissette, Task Force Afghanistan Roto 1 imagery technician)

More Innovative teaching

“We used role-playing to teach,” says Lt Zinchuk. Before the exercise, participants received a role to play in the exercise, based on real accounts or on what was possible during the historical period. Working with a half-page backgrounder, cadets researched what it would have been like to be that person in 1940. During the exercise, the air cadet hall became a time machine, transporting the 40 cadets and their officers to the 1940s during the London

Blitz. The hall became an underground subway station serving as a bomb shelter. The evening started with a true story from a local member of the Royal Canadian Legion who was 14 years old when the blitz began. The evening continued with the movie “Battle of Britain”, followed by a simulated bomb strike and fire, staged by North Battleford Fire and Emergency Services. Roleplaying, with period costumes, continued until sunrise. Cadets played military roles, as well as the roles of a German Jewish diamond merchant, a Nazi spy, nurses and even an insurance agent selling war bonds to name a few. Cadets playing Women's Volunteer Service and Red Cross roles staffed a soup kitchen with food authentic to the period and to the realities of rationing. Capt Deb Nahachewsky, 38 Squadron CO, was amazed at what could be cooked up.

ty—including the local museum, which provided authentic helmets for the military police; the local Legion branch; and the local amateur theatre group, which provided some costuming. “This kind of exercise gets us totally away from our sometimes overly academic teaching program,” says Lt Zinchuk. “It's also a retention/interest-building exercise.”

Black marketer/Nazi spy Ryan Palmer is whisked away by cadets playing the roles of military police and the London bobby.

<

Capt Barb Kirby, CO of 43 Air Cadet Squadron in North Battleford, Sask., taught her cadets about the involvement of Canada and its Allies in the Second World War. To do this, squadron supply officer Lt Brian Zinchuk planned an exercise that recreated a night during the London Blitz. The exercise involved cadets from 43 Squadron, as well as from 2537 Army Cadet Corps in North Battleford and 38 Air Cadet Squadron in Prince Albert, Sask.

A remarkable aspect of the exercise was how it involved the communi-

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

9


FEATURE

Marsha Scott

< Maj Ken Fells, deputy commanding officer of CSTC Argonaut in Gagetown, N.B. and a former physical education teacher, leads cadets during morning physical training classes at the camp. Physical fitness is integral to the CSTC program. (Photo by CSTC Argonaut public affairs)

Physical well-being A healthy mind and body More than half of Canada's children and youth are not active enough for healthy growth, says the Public Health Agency of Canada. And experts agree that being inactive is a major factor in obesity. s we have discussed in our past two issues, obesity is of great concern in Canada and other Western nations. Governments are responding with healthy living programs, and this country is taking steps to educate Canadians regarding their need to be physically active. Canada's Sport Minister Michael Chong has said he hopes to get 71 percent of teenagers between 14 and 17 working out over the next six years, compared with the 66 percent who currently do. He is also introducing a tax credit for young people taking part in athletics and other forms of physical activity such as dance classes or exercise groups.

A

Because youths spend so much of their time in schools, school nutrition programs and physical education classes are another focus of Canadian efforts.

10

A new report by the Heart and Stroke Foundation, called Tipping the Scales of Progress, says a dramatic increase in school time dedicated to fitness is required to help turn back the obesity epidemic in children and prevent an explosion in the

Corps and squadrons will pursue physical fitness through a range of activities; some—like recreational sports and biathlon—will be common to the three elements. number of Canadians living with chronic illnesses such as heart disease and stroke. The report recommends that elementary and secondary school students get at least one hour of mandatory structured physical

activity at school every day. Currently, primary school children get as little as 30 minutes of physical education weekly, and physical fitness is not a required course after Grade 10 in most of the country. In fact, Canada's physical activity guides for children and youth recommend 90 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per day. Youth development organizations like the Cadet Program can obviously be part of the solution to inactivity among young people. “In today's technology-oriented world of computers and video games, youths need physical outlets more than ever,” says Susan Mackie, director of communications for Scouts Canada. “Exercise promotes fitness, mental health and self-esteem; encouraging outdoor activities for CADENCE

Issue 20, Fall 2006


our youth will help them build a firm lifelong foundation of fitness and the self-fulfillment that will make them productive citizens. Physical fitness and outdoor activity go hand in hand in all Scouts Canada programs. Cadet Program efforts Promoting physical fitness and a healthy lifestyle among cadets has long been an aim of the Cadet Program. Physical fitness is particularly integral to the cadet summer training centre (CSTC) program; however, each element has its own approach to local physical fitness training. Every army cadet participates in a fitness test each year. As part of mandatory training, components of physical fitness are taught, with examples of activities/sports to help improve the cadets' fitness and promote a healthy lifestyle. Sea cadets learn about basic nutrition and exercise, based on Health Canada's physical activity guide.

If the Cadet Program is successful in its aim, cadets will develop an understanding of the benefits of fitness and a healthy lifestyle. This understanding, combined with ongoing participation in fitness activities and recreational sports, will help them develop positive attitudes and behaviours that will benefit them far beyond their years in Cadets. In the updated program, personal fitness and healthy living, as well as recreational sports, will be common activities across the elements. The approach will be consistent, with an elemental flavour. Corps and squadrons will pursue physical fitness through a range of activities; some—like recreational sports and biathlon—will be common to the three elements. In the updated CSTC program, one set of fitness and sports-related courses is being developed for use by all three elements. Improvements to evening and weekend extra-curricular activities are also being explored.

The air cadet fitness program is based on the Canada Fitness Award— a program of six fitness performance tests that give an overall picture of a cadet's physical fitness. Crests are awarded, based on achievement levels. Senior cadets who have attained the excellence level help motivate younger cadets. 'Sensible living' specialists are also invited to squadrons to talk about hygiene and nutrition, drugs, alcohol and smoking. Although there is no formal test, cadets have to attend presentations to complete second-year training. As a result of the Cadet Program Update, the aim to promote physical well-being among cadets is more clearly defined than ever. “Physical wellness is not a state of perfection, but rather, a life-long process of healthy mind and body development,” according to Cadet Program parameters. Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

Are we doing enough? Are we doing enough to promote physical well-being among cadets? The 'reviews' are mixed, but overall, there seems to be a lot going on. Here's what some officers have to say. Capt Garnet Eskritt, CO of 294 Air Cadet Squadron in Chatham, Ont., says some cadets in his squadron walked more than 1000 kilometres this year to prepare for the Nijmegen March in Holland in July. As part of the CF contingent, they walked 160 kilometres in four days, with 10kilogram rucksacks on their backs. The march originated in 1909 with Dutch military efforts to increase the long-distance marching and weight–carrying ability of infantry soldiers. It has evolved into a prestigious international event that the CF has participated in since the Second World War. During the war, Canadian soldiers liberated the area around Nijmegen. Capt Eskritt says, “The walk was physically and mentally very difficult, but with proper training and team work, it was a rewarding experience for everyone.” The Canadian contingent is made up of Regular and Reserve members, cadets and veterans from across the country. Continued on page 12

11


FEATURE prepared the holistic classes on exercise and diet. Cadets learned everything from how to live a healthy lifestyle to how to stretch and exercise without injury. Beyond that, however, 20 corps cadets took part in a physical fitness challenge at the end of the training year—a 500-kilometre bike ride over four days!

NCdt Richard Fortin, an instructor with 37 Sea Cadet Corps COURAGEOUS in London, Ont., says his corps has monthly sports nights following ceremonial divisions and throughout the year, holistic fitness classes for cadets in all phases of training. A senior cadet who had aged out

Training for the ride was rigorous, including moderate and intermediate rides indoors, as well as outdoor cycling over increasing distances. Cadets had to complete a minimum number of training rides to qualify for the main ride. This required them to train from eight to 10 hours a week over and above their mandatory/optional cadet training. “The cadets were looking for more rides, rather than less,” says NCdt

Fortin. “They were very energetic and there was never a shortage of enthusiasm.” Not only did the cadets become physically fit and have fun, but they also supported the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario in its work to address youth obesity. The corps partnered with the London branch of the foundation for the marathon ride. The foundation launched the ride, talked to the corps about healthy eating choices and provided materials for presentations. For their part, the cadets raised funds during their training rides to support the work of the foundation. The cadet who raised the most money won a personal computer. An added incentive for sponsors was the chance to become a reviewing officer for ceremonial divisions or for the annual inspection, based on the level of sponsorship.

biathlon. “The growing popularity of biathlon is phenomenal,” she says. Sometimes, however, small things make a difference. At 531 Squadron, instructors encourage cadets to walk and run as much as possible. At the gliding site, they all help to launch the glider. When they move to and from the runway, they run.

Lt Llora Brown, an instructor with 531 Air Cadet Squadron in Trail, B.C., bemoans the fact that not all CSTCs require morning physical training, and some have even bused cadets to breakfast in past summers. She says the amount of physical activity that cadets participate in may not be enough when one considers how much time they spend in classroom lectures and adds that it's too bad that not all interested cadets have the opportunity to compete in

12

“Cadets need positive leadership,” says Lt Brown. “When they are dropped off to the athletic staff for physical training and their own flight/platoon/divisional staff are elsewhere, they get the idea that physical activity is only for cadets. We should all participate with our cadets—not only to help enforce the idea of a healthy lifestyle, but to reiterate the importance of it for a lifetime.” She believes that if cadets see their leaders demonstrating healthy lifestyles, the chances of them learning to lead healthier lives increases. “For many cadets, CIC officers and civilian instructors are the most positive and sometimes the only real adult role models they have.”

Maj Chris Barron, chief instructor and deputy CO of CSTC Whitehorse, Yukon, says the balanced and wide-ranging physical activities offered through various courses at Whitehorse are working. “I believe most cadets at our facility return home in better physical shape than they would if they had been home all summer,” he says. “This has been proven in the fitness testing, which sees cadets achieve better results on their second testing at the end of camp.”

CADENCE

Issue 20, Fall 2006


planning a whole evening of circuits: groups of cadets will spend 15-20 minutes at each station, learning various methods of exercise, as well as proper eating.”

Capt Louise Zmaeff, CO of 577 Air Cadet Squadron in Grande Prairie, Alta., likes to promote physical fitness and healthy lifestyle choices for her cadets and officers through example. “I'm not always successful, but I certainly try,” she says. “The statistics are worse than we thought in the Northwest Alberta Region. Thirtynine percent of the population is overweight and 22 percent is obese. Almost 22 percent of our youth are considered obese or overweight.”

Another idea she would like to see implemented in the Cadet Program is a “fit and slim challenge”. Corps/ squadrons of equal size would compete, with everyone (including officers) weighing in and doing a Canada Fitness test at start-up. Results could be sent to a regional/ provincial/national site. A second weigh-in and fitness test would follow a few months later, with another at the end of the training year. “This would supplement sensible living classes and sports nights/CO's parades,” she says. “I think this would be relatively easy, with the goal being to lose, say, 10 percent of the total weight of your corps/ squadron, or some such strange number”. To start, she would like to challenge other corps/squadrons in northwest Alberta. Recognition, she says, could be a feature article in Cadence.

She believes many misconstrue the Cadet Program's current physical fitness program as “participation in sports”, whereas the emphasis should really be on a healthy lifestyle. “At our squadron,” she says, “we are

“If we don't start doing something soon—not just talking about healthy lifestyle choices—we are going to start seeing major health issues with our kids and officers alike,” Capt Zmaeff says. Lt(N) Keith Nutbrown, CO of 349 Sea Cadet Corps in Chilliwack, B.C., agrees with experts who say that the largest contributor to teen obesity is the sedentary lifestyle of today's youth. “Television, Internet and video games were not available to the same extent to previous generations,” he says. He's not certain that the current program can do much to fix the problem. Although he schedules a fitness program into his corps' training schedule, he says the nine periods are not enough to see specific fitness improvements, but provide more of an introduction.

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

Maj JoAnn MacDonald, CO of 583 Air Cadet Squadron in Maple Ridge, B.C., says “Teen obesity is an issue that my squadron has been thinking long and hard about.” The squadron schedules a sports night every two months, but it goes beyond that to promote a healthy lifestyle. “One of our solutions is Operation Get Fit—an annual multisquadron exercise designed to fulfill the cadet physical fitness performance objective,” she says. Started by 861 Air Cadet Squadron in Abbotsford three years ago, it grew to a wing exercise this year, with all Fraser Valley Wing squadrons participating. The exercise took place over the long May weekend and included cycling, orienteering, leadership tasking scenarios and a games tabloid of intersquadron sports. Each leg of the bike route was 47 kilometres, with the route developed to provide a safe riding environment for everyone. For approximately 13 weeks before the exercise, participants completed five hours of physical fitness a weekmostly on their own. “This prepared them both mentally and physically for the challenge,” says Maj MacDonald. A checkout ride before the weekend ensured cadets and bikes were ready for the trip. “It was a great opportunity to increase their level of physical fitness, have fun and use exercise towards Duke of Edinburgh credits,” she says.

13


CADET PROGRAM UPDATE

Capt Catherine Griffin

Cadet Program mandate = Aim + mission + vision + participant outcomes So, you ask, “What about the Cadet Program has been updated?” The answer is, “Five things!” • Although unchanged, the aim has been amplified to provide greater clarity. • The mission statement is new to the program. • The vision statement is updated. • We have established a clear set of 'participant outcomes'—in other words, the benefits for cadets. • Collectively the aim, mission, vision and participant outcomes are referred to as the “Cadet Program mandate”—a new term we should all get accustomed to using because it provides strategic direction and the basis for a common language for everyone who works in support of the Cadet Program. In the last issue of Cadence, we discussed the amplified aim. This article includes the mission and vision statements, as well as participant outcomes. Detailed information is available in the new CATO 11-03 released this past May. Over the next several months, you will start to see elements of the Cadet Program mandate published in other forms, such as on posters and the Cadet Program websites. Capt Griffin is the educational development staff officer at Directorate Cadets.

14

Mission — Focus on today! A mission defines the core purpose of an organization or program—why it exists, or its raison d'être. A famous mission you have probably seen before is Star Trek's “To boldly go where no one has gone before”. Cadet Program mission: “To contribute to the development and preparation of youth for the transition to adulthood, enabling them to meet the challenges of modern society, through a dynamic, community-based program.”

Vision — Focus on the future! A vision outlines what we want an organization or program to look like, in ideal terms, in the future—what we can work towards achieving. A former vision of General Electric, for instance, is “We bring good things to life”. Cadet Program vision: “A relevant, credible and proactive youth development organization, offering the program of choice for Canada's youth, preparing them to become the leaders of tomorrow through a set of fun, challenging, well-organized and safe activities”.

Participant outcomes —

Benefits for cadets (skills, knowledge, attitudes and behaviours) during or after their involvement with the program. 1. Emotional and physical well-being. Cadets develop an ability to: • display positive self-esteem and positive personal qualities; and • meet physical challenges by living a healthy and active lifestyle. 2. Social competence. Cadets develop an ability to: • contribute as an effective team member; • accept personal accountability for actions and choices; • exercise sound judgement; and • demonstrate effective interper sonal communication skills. 3. Cognitive competence. Cadets develop an ability to: • solve problems; • think creatively and critically; and • display a positive attitude toward learning. 4. Proactive citizenship. Cadets develop: • (an ability to) exemplify positive values; • (an ability to) participate actively as a valued member of a community; and • commitment to community. 5. Understanding the CF. Cadets develop: • a knowledge of the history of the CF; and • a knowledge of the CF's contributions as a national institution.

CADENCE

Issue 20, Fall 2006


Lt(N) Shayne Hall

Cadet Program

framework shift The Cadet Program Update project has resulted in a shift in the Cadet Program framework—how we categorize programs and activities for all three elements. ur current big-picture framework, which has evolved over many years, is made up of several overlapping categories including local headquarters training, summer training, mandatory training, mandatory support training, directed optional training, optional training and specific directed activities.

O

The re-designed framework will better accommodate the continuing evolution of the Cadet Program. The new framework has four main categories: • Corps/ squadron program • Regionally directed activities • Cadet summer training centre (CSTC) program • Nationally directed activities Corps/squadron program

< Fitness and Sports is among the CSTC courses common to all elements. (Photo by Capt Elisabeth Mills, CSTC Whitehorse public affairs)

The corps/squadron program—fundamental to the Cadet Program—focusses on giving all cadets instruction and opportunities to develop knowledge and skills in a variety of subject areas, while introducing them to specialized activities. A complete description of this program, now divided into two sub-programs (phase/star/proficiency-level training and optional training), is outlined in the article entitled Cadets 2012 on page 16. As is the case now, the corps/ squadron primarily conducts phase/

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

star/proficiency-level training. In some cases, other training establishments (such as regional sail centres for sea cadet sail training) conduct this training, fully supported by the Department of National Defence. The corps/squadron may also conduct optional training, through support external to DND (for example, a local sponsor). Regionally directed activities In addition to overseeing the delivery of corps/squadron and CSTC programs, regional headquarters may choose to institute regionally directed activities to augment these programs. The purpose of these activities is to maintain cadet interest and to allow regional headquarters to tailor the overall program to their regions, while capitalizing on regional resources. For example, within the activity area of drill and ceremonial, a region may choose to conduct drill competitions. Or, under the activity area of recreational sports, a region may choose to conduct intercorps/squadron sports competitions. CSTC program The CSTC program—integral to the Cadet Program—focusses on giving selected cadets instruction and opportunities to develop advanced knowledge and skills in specialized Continued on page 38

15


CADET PROGRAM UPDATE

Capt Rick Butson

Complementary

(Photo by CI Wayne Emde, CSTC Vernon public affairs)

Cadets 2012 Every cadet corps/squadron has an album showing cadets from years past doing what cadets do best—having fun while learning. ince starting as one of those cadets, I have seen three evolutions of the Army Cadet Program, and now working at Directorate Cadets, I am helping to craft the future program, which is being rolled out between 2007 and 2012.

S

In 2012, the photos of our cadets will be much the same as today, showing cadets experiencing new things and smiling with excitement about what they have discovered. However, some of the framework around that discovery will have changed. Officers in 2012 will be speaking a new language when they talk about the Cadet Program. To help us 'old dogs' keep up with the officers of 2012, we need to update our language. Let's start with the big picture. The 2012 corps/squadrons will conduct more training, as they implement a five–tier training program called—

16

depending on the element—the Phase, Star, or Proficiency Level Program. This program will be conducted over 30 parade nights during the week (each consisting of three 30-minute periods called sessions) and 10 days, which are supported, during weekends. Although the idea of a fifth tier of programming for senior cadets is relatively new, particularly for army and sea cadets, the time allotted for training remains the same as it is today. Phase/Star/Proficiency Level Program In 2012, this program will consist of two types of activities—mandatory and complementary. Mandatory Mandatory activities will account for two-thirds of the structured material being instructed, so every cadet corps/squadron will instruct this portion of the program the same.

Complementary activities will make up the other one-third of structured material. These activities are chosen from a range of options that best suit your individual corps/squadron. For example, some army cadet corps may choose to do more drill, while others may choose winter camping. This choice will apply to training being conducted during sessions or supported days on weekends. It's sort of like a fast-food outlet where everyone gets a single hamburger with the number one combo, but you can choose between a limited range of side dishes, selecting what you like best. Optional In some cases, a 2012 corps/squadron may want to do something that is outside the Phase, Star, or Proficiency Level Program. Provided this training still meets the big-picture framework of what cadets are permitted to do, and your sponsor is willing to pay the complete cost of the training, a corps/squadron can add it to their program as optional training. Some examples would be a band program or a trip to Ottawa. Going back to the fast food example, optional training would be much like the chili— you can have it with your number one combo, as long as it is something you want and someone is willing to pay for it. So will the cadet unit of 2012 be radically different from the cadet unit of 2006? I think the best way to answer that would be to take a photo from when I was a cadet and put it next to the photos on the national website at www.cadets.ca. Some things have changed, but it still looks like cadets are having fun learning! Capt Butson is the army cadet program development staff officer at Directorate Cadets.

CADENCE

Issue 20, Fall 2006


Capt Andrea Onchulenko

Cadet Program

activities henever someone asks, “What is Cadets?” or “What do you do in Cadets?” the easiest way to answer is to describe some of our programs and activities. Maybe you are speaking to parents of a youth interested in joining or a young person who wants to learn more about the program. Depending on your element and your own preferences, you might answer with details on sailing, expeditions or flying, or on a mix of corps/squadron activities, such as drill, leadership and marksmanship.

W

The new [General Cadet Knowledge] lesson has been designed so that sea, army and air cadets spend the same amount of time learning the material, but content and application are element-specific. One significant aspect of the Cadet Program Update (CPU) was to review the activity base in each elemental program and determine how to update it. The goal wasn't to eliminate what we do, but to make sure that what is fun—and what we do well—remains a key part of the program. The result is an enhanced list of common activities and three lists of element-specific activities. Common activities are activities common to all three elemental programs. As you can see from the

Common Activities

common activity list in the sidebar, many more activities are common to all three elements than you may have thought previously.

-

General Cadet Knowledge Drill and Ceremonial Leadership Instructional Technique Community Service Cultural Education/Travel Citizenship Personal Fitness and Healthy Living Recreational Sports Air Rifle Marksmanship Music — Military Band and Pipes and Drums Band - Summer and Winter Biathlon - CHAP Program - First-Aid

As part of the CPU, these activities have been updated so that learning is similar for all three elements. A good example is General Cadet Knowledge, which includes learning to wear the cadet uniform. The new lesson has been designed so that sea, army and air cadets spend the same amount of time learning the material, but content and application are element-specific. Currently, this material is covered under different titles in each - Expedition elemental program—“Serve • Field Training with a Sea Cadet Corps” for • Navigation sea cadets, “Fundamental • Trekking Training” for army cadets and • Outdoor Leadership “General Cadet Knowledge” - Target Rifle Marksmanship for air cadets—and varying - Canadian Army and Civilian Outdoor Community Familiarization amounts of time are spent teaching similar material.

Army Cadet Program Activities

Having common Cadet Program activities is really about having common sense. In updating these broad activity areas, we can take the best of what we already do and ensure that the experiences of sea, army or air cadets are equitably great! Capt Onchulenko is the air cadet program development staff officer at Directorate Cadets.

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

Air Cadet Program Activities -

Aviation-Piloting Aviation-Ground Technology Aerospace Aircrew Survival Canadian Air Force and Civilian Aviation and Aerospace Community Familiarization

Sea Cadet Program Activities -

Seamanship (rope work and so on) Sailing Small Craft Operations Ship's Operations Canadian Navy and Civilian Maritime Community Familiarization

17


CADET PROGRAM UPDATE

Interactive learning—

in or outside the classroom

< Sea cadets from 65 IRON DUKE Sea Cadet Corps in Burlington, Ont., receive instruction from Lt(N) Aaron Bean at a Hamilton sail centre during a sail training weekend. In the updated phase one program, cadets will have at least two opportunities for weekend sailing, or small craft operation.

18

Last spring, we posed the following question on the Cadence conference of CadetNet: “What do you think is the biggest challenge you/instructors face at your corps/squadron?” Lt Cory Thibodeau, training officer with 122 MONCTON Sea Cadet Corps and standards officer with 292 COVERDALE Sea Cadet Corps, both in Riverview, N.B., responded that “In every community across the country we have an issue with retaining cadets longer than three years.” The main reason, he says, is how we deliver training. “Too often, cadets go to school all day long, move from class to class and listen to teachers lecture about topics that—more times than not—do not interest the students at all,” he says. “Then they go to their corps or squadron and sit through the same thing—three hours of class lectures.” SLt Thibodeau believes the only way to increase our numbers is to step outside the traditional

S

classroom setting and use alternate methods of instruction that get the cadets involved. “We all know that if we get them involved, they are more likely to learn and thus more likely to have fun and stay with the program longer,” he says. SLt Thibodeau will be happy to hear that the Cadet Program Update has faced this issue head on. Here are some examples of what’s happening. Sea cadets Lt(N) Shayne Hall, sea cadet program development staff officer at Directorate Cadets, believes some instructors stick to lecture-style instruction because they lack the training or experience to try other instructional methods, or more likely, because their lives outside of Cadets don't permit them the extra time required to plan and prepare engaging lessons that create a more active learning environment. “In an effort to alleviate some of this burden, comprehensive instructional guides for all corps/squadron lessons are being created,” he says. “These

guides will provide instructors with tools to get away from traditional lecture-style instruction.” Currently, sea cadets receive instruction in Sailing and Small Craft Operation in a classroom setting throughout the year. The cadets are

Can a cadet learn how to hike in a classroom? Probably, but when it comes to teaching hiking technique, a better location might be along a hiking trail system. then given one opportunity to attend a sailing weekend. In the updated phase one program, cadets will be given a minimum of two weekend opportunities to go sailing or operate other types of small craft. Periods of instruction at the corps in these subject areas will be limited to two, which focus merely on letting the cadets know what to expect and what to bring on the weekends. The

CADENCE

Issue 20, Fall 2006


OFFICER DEVELOPMENT

result? Training happens in the ideal setting—a boat. Air cadets At this time, air cadets receive most of their Air Survival training in a lecturestyle format in the classroom. In the updated program, they will receive only one lecture (Pack Personal Equipment for a Field Exercise) in the classroom, using the demonstrationperformance approach. Following that, all instruction will be hands-on and participatory in the field. Here's another simple example of the new approach to training. Instead of giving first-year air cadets a boring lecture on where the squadron offices and other facilities (parade square, washrooms, canteen and so on) are located, instructors will be encouraged to take the cadets on a tour of squadron facilities. “This walk-and-talk approach makes much more sense,” says Capt Andrea Onchulenko, air cadet program development staff officer at D Cdts, “and the cadets are more likely to remember key people and places this way.” Army cadets “Can a cadet learn how to hike in a classroom?” asks Capt Rick Butson, army cadet program development staff officer at D Cdts. “Probably, but when it comes to teaching hiking technique, a better location might be along a hiking trail system.” The new Green Star program for army cadets encourages just that in its new subject area: “Participate in a Day Hike”. This day-long programmed hike includes instruction on trail etiquette, injury prevention, hiking technique, resting, rations and water. “This is only one example of how the Cadet Program Update will be moving cadets out of the classroom to 'experience' cadet training”, says Capt Butson.

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

19


CADET TRAINING

Problem behaviour in the classroom In our Spring/Summer issue, we discussed how instructors can deal with a variety of problem behaviours displayed by cadets in corps and squadron classrooms. This issue looks at more problem behaviours and the right way to respond to them.

ere are some suggestions for managing cadets who socialize, distract, arrive late, sleep or become preoccupied during classroom instruction.

H

and attention either because this reinforces the behaviour.

Socializers

The best thing to do is discuss the behaviour privately with the cadet, emphasizing appropriate and expected behaviours. You may even want to develop a 'work contract' to hold the cadet to any decisions made during private discussion.

Socializers engage in side conversations during classroom presentations. Their conversations may, or may not, be relevant to the topic. This could lead to problems, as socializers may distract others from learning. You cannot allow these little pockets of conversation in the classroom. A common mistake in dealing with this problem is to single out and embarrass these cadets. Subtle techniques, such as switching to group activities or changing group membership, may lessen side conversations. Posing a question to either the socializer, or to a member of the monopolized side group, may help. If subtle techniques do not work, seek a private conversation with the cadet. Distractors Distractors ask questions to lead you away from a lesson topic. They often interrupt directions. They are easily distracted and seldom focus on the lesson. You and other cadets may become irritated with these cadets. These cadets crave attention and may suffer from a lack of self-esteem, or find classroom instruction difficult. Don't take this behaviour personally. Don't ignore the behaviour, but don't give it too much public time

20

Assigning some physical tasks to these cadets in the classroom as part of the lesson (such as distributing handouts) may give them the break they need to stay focussed. It also helps to stand close to these cadets when giving instructions, make frequent eye contact and give positive reinforcement for appropriate behaviour.

Sleepers may be insecure about their academic abilities or may just be in need of rest. Inadequate sleep may be the result of the cadet's actions, or a physical problem that needs to be addressed. Late arrivals These cadets come late, or return to class late after breaks. They may be one-time offenders, or chronic offenders. If allowed to go unchecked, their behaviour may affect the entire class. These cadets may be seeking attention or lacking in self-confidence. They may feel insecure, or be indecisive.

CADENCE

Issue 20, Fall 2006


Interrupting a lesson in progress to discipline these cadets is a mistake and may cause greater disruption. Belittling or shaming these cadets will create an uncomfortable atmosphere in the classroom and will garner disrespect. It may also cause the cadet to continue being late out of spite.

If it is a one-time situation, find out the cause and carry on with the class. If it is chronic, find out the cause, advise that a recurrence is not acceptable and deal with the situation to the best of your ability. Start every lesson as though you expect the cadet to arrive. Place hand-outs on the cadet's desk to minimize disruption when they do arrive. Don't stop the lesson. Wait for an opportunity in the lesson, such as during group work, to talk privately to these cadets. Remind the cadets of their responsibilities. Sleepers Cadets may doze off or actually fall asleep during lessons. They may hide behind books or daydream. When awake, they may display a lack of interest and look bored. This causes problems for the classroom, distracting other cadets who may view the cadet negatively. This behaviour undermines the importance of whatever you planned for the lesson. Sleepers may be insecure about their academic abilities or may just be in need of rest. Inadequate sleep may

<

A good way to deal with this problem is to ensure that cadets are aware of timings. Make punctuality a classroom rule.

be the result of the cadet's actions, or a physical problem that needs to be addressed. Don't allow this behaviour to continue; however, don't disrupt the class, or embarrass the cadet. Sleeping in class cannot be treated as a straight discipline problem. Discover why the cadet is sleeping.

Make [preoccupied cadets] aware of the impact of their actions on the rest of the class. Confront their reservations and allow them to express themselves and get the problem off their chest. As inconspicuously as possible, waken the cadet. Privately discuss the problem at the break or end of class and try to discover why this is occurring. Also, consider that there may be a problem with the lesson or how it is being given. Varying your voice pattern by changing volume, rate, tone or pitch may help. Change activities or adjust seating arrangements. This could be your cue that you have not varied your activities and instructional styles enough.

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

If only one cadet has the problem, try seating the individual near a window, or give the cadet physical classroom duties to complete. Preoccupied cadets Preoccupied cadets are not focussed on learning. They may not respond to questions, may not participate, may have facial reactions when spoken to, may doodle in class, write letters, or read books and other material during class. Instructors should react as quickly as possibly to these cadets to regain their focus.

If you respond quickly to problem behaviours in your classroom, you will create a positive environment where cadets will enjoy learning.

Again, don't take this behaviour personally and be careful not to ignore it. Enlist the leadership support of these cadets in activities. Although it may be frustrating at times, give them opportunities to become involved in the class. A private discussion with these cadets may be effective. Make them aware of the impact of their actions on the rest of the class. Confront their reservations and allow them to express themselves and get the problem off their chest. Adapted from the CIC occupational training course that will be delivered to CIC officers in the future.

21


CADET TRAINING

Capt Pete Westlake and Maj Phil Lusk

If Cadets is the best-kept secret in Canada, then orienteering is the best-kept secret in Cadets. Or should we say it was the bestkept secret?

Orienteering:

A best-kept secret? < Capt Mike Wionzek observes a unit orienteering team at the finish control line.

t is no longer a secret in Central Region, specifically in Central Ontario Area (COA), which has conducted an annual orienteering competition since 2002. This event has grown steadily from 42 cadets participating in the first year to more than 150 last year. This success has inspired our region to conduct orienteering competitions in all four areas, beginning this fall. It has also inspired the region to share what it has learned.

I

A large part of our success is our strong partnership with Orienteering Ontario. Orienteering Ontario volunteers provide technical expertise by setting up courses, providing maps, assisting with registration and maintaining statistics for competition. When COA conducts competitions, local corps/squadrons promote them and provide logistical support, such as pre-registering competitors, looking after lunch and arranging for safety vehicles and support staff. The region has provided medals and plaques for the past two years, and the detachment increased its level of support after the first year when it

22

recognized the value of orienteering. Building on the success of previous years, Central Region will be using COA's model for its other three areas—appointing area co-ordinators who will hire staff to organize and conduct competitions. By doing so, the region will ensure that all four area competitions will be conducted under the same conditions so that the top teams and individuals qualify to compete at the first annual regional orienteering championship in April 2007. What have we learned? • There is a sizeable difference between orienteering and military navigation. Although both activities are usually timed events and make use of maps and compasses, orienteering is typically 95 percent map—reading and five percent compass—use, while traditional map and compass is closer to a 50-50 split between the two skills. In orienteering, CIC officers and cadets often overuse their acquired map and compass skills, wasting valuable time by standing

still rather than moving towards their control marker. • Orienteering is a great activity for all three elements. Navigation is a skill taught in all three elements, and although the Orienteering Instructors course offered by regional cadet instructors schools is intended for army and air officers only, most schools have permitted sea officers to attend the course, provided the desire exists to build or maintain an orienteering program within their corps or training centre. Our orienteering competitions feature both team and individual events, with every cadet having an opportunity to participate in each. They are designed to accommodate both novice and experienced cadets. Although we encourage each corps/squadron to send at least one team, those who cannot may still send individual cadets who have a chance to advance to the regional championship. Continued on page 38

CADENCE

Issue 20, Fall 2006


POLICY

Col Robert Perron

New policies have positive impact There are a number of new policies circulating that will have a positive impact on the Cadet Organization and, especially, on the Cadet Instructors Cadre (CIC). I want to introduce you to some of these in anticipation of the arrival of new Cadet Administration and Training Orders (CATOs). New CIC component The most significant change is, without question, the Armed Forces Council's endorsement to create a separate CF component for the CIC. How many times have you been frustrated when consulting CF regulations and procedures only to find that certain regulations do not apply, or that an exception must be created to accommodate the CIC? The new CIC component will make that a thing of the past. The creation of a new CIC component is already having an impact. The CF recently issued new regulations regarding Universality of Serviceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the principle that in addition to the duties required by their military occupational specification, CF members are liable to perform general military duties and common defence and security duties. This includes the requirement to be physically fit, employable and deployable for general operational duties. In the past, the CIC would have had to request exceptions to these regulations. The new regulations, however, were written already taking into account the fact that as youth specialists, CIC officers are not required to deploy. Consequently, CIC officers are no longer required to meet the CF physical fitness standards. New fitness standards are being developed

specifically for CIC officers, based on their requirement to perform as youth specialists. Enhanced screening In the very near future, new screening policies will be implemented for the CIC. The current enhanced reliability check is not considered detailed enough for adults who work with the 'vulnerable sector', which includes children from 12 to 18â&#x20AC;&#x201D;our cadet population.

Remember the best way to predict the future is to participate in creating it. There are two avenues available to CIC officers who want their opinions heard. You can go through your chain of command or, if you prefer, you can contact the regional representative of the CIC Branch Advisory Council. Contact information is available on CadetNet. Col Perron is Director Cadets and Junior Canadian Rangers.

All CIC officers will be required to undergo a police records check and vulnerable sector screening that will have to be renewed every five years. This policy is being put in place to ensure that our cadets are protected and that our requirements are in line with most other organizations in Canada that deal with young people. Modernized officer training To prepare CIC officers for their unique role as youth specialists, we are modernizing the officer-training program to include military training as well as the specialized youth training CIC officers need to effectively do their jobs. The new CIC component is the most positive step ever taken to improve CIC terms of service. Never before has there been an occasion to review every aspect of the regulations and tailor them to requirements.

< New fitness standards are being developed specifically for CIC officers, based on their requirement to perform as youth specialists. Lt Llora Brown, seen here interacting with CSTC Whitehorse staff cadet Sgt Ian Lin, is required to work as a youth specialist both at the camp and at her local squadron in Trail, B.C. (Photo by Capt Elisabeth Mills, CSTC Whitehorse public affairs)

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

23


RECRUITING

Michael Harrison

As the fall season begins, the Cadet Program turns its emphasis from summer camps to recruitment and regular training activities.

Strategies for recruiting in schools ost CIC officers are aware of increasing competition for young people's timeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;from other youth-centered organizations, parttime jobs, community service, organized sports and local school extracurricular activities. For this reason, you must be more strategic than ever when recruiting.

M

To recruit youth, you have to access them. Since young people spend most of their day in school, this article will outline some strategies for contacting schools, meeting with school personnel and emphasizing the many benefits youth will gain from being a cadet. Before you start, you need a clear understanding of the students you want to recruit. Profile of youth for recruitment The students with the highest potential for engagement in Cadets are 12â&#x20AC;&#x201D;and 13â&#x20AC;&#x201D;year-olds in Grades 7 and 8. In all provinces, these young

24

people are considered elementary school students even though, in some cases, they are housed in a school that offers Grades 7 to 10.

Present the Cadet Program in such a way that the principal will believe that having students in the program will improve her/his school. The elementary school program is significantly different from secondary (high school) programs in that elementary school students are enrolled in a program, while secondary school students take courses that are part of a permanent record. Senior students in a Kindergarten to Grade 8 school are the oldest and most experienced students in the school and are often its leaders. Grade 7 and 8 students in a Grade 7 to 10 school are the youngest and smallest students in a much larger student population.

Grade 9 is considered one of the most anxiety-causing events for students coming from an elementary school. There is an intense desire to belong and not stand out from their peers. Adolescents face anxiety about their physical appearance, new situations, judgment by others (peers and adults), threats to their self-esteem, and what they will do in the future. Making a connection In my experience as a principal and teacher, I have learned that the Cadet Program is virtually unknown by many adults in our communities and particularly in our schools. I believe that emphasizing what you do well and raising the visibility of cadet youth on a regular basis will help recruit new candidates. To recruit successfully, CIC officers need to make a connection between the benefits and rewards of being in Cadets with both the students' needs and the goals and expectations of local schools and provincial ministries of education. CADENCE

Issue 20, Fall 2006


For example, Cadet Program aims and core values have strong linkages to major initiatives of Ontario's Ministry of Education, such as health and fitness; identifying bullying, intimidation, harassment and abuse and teaching students and staff how to deal with them; technical training; trades training and community service. How could a school not be supportive of the Cadet Program’s core values of loyalty, professionalism, mutual respect, and integrity? Or how could a school not be supportive of some of the most important benefits of being in Cadets, such as self-confidence, self-discipline and self-awareness? Access to schools and students Getting access to schools and students is a critical part of recruitment. You must become well informed about local schools and also be well prepared when meeting with school staff or parent groups. What do you need to know? These facts about Ontario schools may serve as an example. • There will be declining enrolment across the province for the immediate future. This means that in Ontario, your targeted cohort of 12- to 13-year-olds will diminish in numbers for the next decade. • Virtually all principals and viceprincipals in our schools are female, as are most teachers. This trend is becoming more pronounced in the secondary schools. • Remembrance Day is the only service conducted in publicly funded schools. • Guns or weapons (models or real)— on display or as part of a ceremony— are not permitted in elementary schools and most secondary schools because of zero tolerance policies. Principals, teachers, and parents

are not aware of the Cadet Program's “arm’s length” from the military. • Principals are regularly out of their schools, attending meetings. • Principals spend most of their days dealing with personnel, parents, and pupils. MEETING THE PRINCIPAL Some of the above facts may be relevant to your locality; some may not. Regardless, when recruiting, there are some basic steps you should take before/when meeting with the school principal: • Don't arrive unexpectedly at a local school. Make an appointment, and plan on a maximum of 15 to 20 minutes of the principal's time. • Do your homework on the school—visit its website, or the board's website for information.

they might serve as volunteers for sports events and field trips, place flags on stage for assemblies and take part in band concerts and assemblies. They might even sponsor and run a robotics club or competition. The important thing is to look for opportunities to show off your cadets in schools. They will rarely let you down. And recruitment will be a lot easier! Michael Harrison was an educator with two Ottawa school boards for close to 40 years. He is a former teacher, viceprincipal and principal and was seconded to the Ministry of Education for six years. He is currently a site administrator for the Ottawa Carleton District School Board and a part-time professor for the Faculty of Education at the University of Ottawa. Mr. Harrison will present some more ideas for increasing the visibility of Cadets in your community in our next issue.

• Find out the multi-cultural mix of the students, or if there are classes for students with special needs. What is the major focus of the school? What big events are planned? • Be prepared to outline which students you want to access, for how long and have copies of what you want to present on hand. • Present the Cadet Program in such a way that the principal will believe that having students in the program will improve her/his school and that students who are cadets will enhance the school's reputation in the community. • Try to find some school activities where cadets can play a role and remember that in Ontario at least, any volunteer hours count towards a school credit. Perhaps cadets can serve as school crossing guards, read to younger students, or take part in Remembrance Day services, Canadian Flag Day celebrations and school anniversary celebrations. Or perhaps

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

25


RETENTION

Lt David Jackson

Retaining new recruits < Invite new recruits to Remembrance Day services, or other services in which your cadets are taking part, even if they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have uniforms.

ur corps and squadrons have chains of command and ranks to provide proper placement for duties and responsibilities. For new recruits, this can be confusing as they try to figure out their place in their corps/squadron. One key to retention is providing new recruits with a sense of belonging. Here are some tips that may make it easier for your new recruits to find their place and develop that sense of belonging.

O

Create a separate flight/platoon/ division for new recruits. This works for corps/squadrons that receive a large influx of new recruits in the fall. Placing new recruits in a separate flight, with a side view of the parade square and all the action, allows them to see what is going on and what they can aspire to. It also offers them a chance to learn drill togetherâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;fostering a sense of teamwork and reminding them that they are all in this together.

26

Place a senior and junior cadet leader in charge of the new recruits. This gives two cadet leaders the opportunity to practise leadership and instruct drill with the new recruits. As peers, they can also act as the primary points of communication, getting messages to them, encouraging them to attend upcoming events and addressing any concerns.

Uniform or no uniform, invite and encourage new recruits to attend events! Hold a special recruit training day. This is a Saturday activity giving the recruits an opportunity to practise drill, catch up on General Cadet Knowledge classes missed and focus on aspects such as uniform preparation, boot shining, paying of compliments and the chain of command. They can also practise lesson plan preparation, instruction and be evaluated on this day.

invite and encourage new recruits to attend events! If you are attending an external function where uniforms are to be worn, such as a Battle of Britain Parade or Remembrance Day, invite the new recruits whether they have a uniform or not. Ask them to dress up, wearing shirt and tie and dress pants, or a dress. Whether to have them parade and do drill is your call, but the point is, they are at the event, they get to see the other cadets in action, and will be inspired to do that next year too. Have an official welcome night. Any time between mid-November and the end of January, the corps/squadron should officially welcome the new recruits. All new recruits should have a uniform by this time. Invite a reviewing officer, a provincial league representative and parents for the event. This would be the evening when your recruits take the Oath of Allegiance, be assigned to their permanent flight/platoon/

CADENCE

Issue 20, Fall 2006


Initiatives that develop a sense of belonging:

One key to retention is providing new recruits with a sense of belonging. By having the recruits work together, dedicating peers as points of contact, providing them with information in a timely manner, encouraging them to come to events and holding a special parade in their honour, you can ensure your new recruits feel welcome and develop a sense of

< Air Cadet Daniel Schenker receives a squadron membership certificate from 2Lt Kyla Ewasiuk, assistant training officer in charge of new recruits at 810 Air Cadet Squadron. belonging. They will know that they matter to their corps/squadron. They will have found their places and begun to develop friendships— key to their retention. Lt Jackson is the administration officer at 810 Air Cadet Squadron in Edmonton.

LAC Donavin Kavich and new recruit Connor Oranchuk give a thumbs up to the food served during the multi-cultural “Taste of 810” potluck supper—an event that helps make new recruits feel welcome.

<

810 Air Cadet Squadron in Edmonton holds a recruit graduation parade during the commanding officer’s parade in December, with a dignitary as reviewing officer. Recruits are sworn in, assigned to flights and presented with certificates welcoming them to the squadron. A multi-cultural “Taste of 810” potluck supper is held. Organized by the squadron’s official sponsor and prepared by parents, the supper includes multi-cultural dishes to represent the diversity of heritage and culture at the squadron. The cadets are able to sample foods from India, Sri Lanka, Korea, Germany, Ukraine, Russia and of course, Canada. The evening concludes with an information session on summer courses.

division, receive new contact information for their new commanders and receive a token of recognition for being made an official member. The recruit flight/platoon/division is then disbanded until the next training year. Any new recruits who join after this date would be automatically placed in a permanent flight/ platoon/division and assigned a cadet leader to bring them up to speed.

504 Air Cadet Squadron in Edmonton holds a “Loyal Order of the Chinthe” parade in January. The chinthe is a mythical half-lion half-dog from Burmese and Buddhist mythology and is the squadron’s mascot—the same mascot as the squadron’s affiliated Regular Force unit, 435 Transport and Rescue Squadron. After cadets have completed two years of service with 504 Squadron, they receive a coin, emblazoned with the chinthe, the squadron’s name and number and the coin’s number on the back. By holding the coin, the cadet becomes a member of the “Loyal Order of the Chinthe” and pledges to uphold a charter, a set of rules and conditions.

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

27


OFFICER DEVELOPMENT

Capt Carl Choinière

University courses for CIC officers Does learning ever stop? Can we ever get to a point where we say, “That's it, my head is full, I couldn't learn another thing even if I tried”? Of course not. The Royal Military College (RMC), and more specifically its Division of Continuing Studies (DCS), is the one place where CF members who are interested in formally continuing their learning can do so from the comfort of their own home or office.

28

hrough distributed learning (DL), the DCS offers undergraduate and graduate degrees, as well as undergraduate certificates and Officer Professional Military Education (OPME). The majority of these programs can be taken in French or English, and are open to all CF members.

T

The good news is that if OPME [Officer Professional Military Education] is what you are interested in, it's free! The good news is that if OPME is what you are interested in, it's free! Unless you've taken one of the courses before and want to take it again, there is no cost and the books will be sent to you for free as well. If the undergraduate or graduate

programs interest you, they are not free but they are a lot cheaper than what you would pay in any other learning institution—about $350 for an undergraduate course and from $710 for a graduate course, books not included. OPME OPME is intended to enhance critical thinking skills and develop innovative responses by ensuring that junior officers all possess a common body of knowledge related to the military profession. While Regular Force junior officers must complete this program to be eligible for promotion to major/lieutenant-commander, all other CF members can take these courses to enhance their knowledge of these topics in a military context. There are currently six courses, each covering a specific subject deemed essential for officership: defence

CADENCE

Issue 20, Fall 2006


management, military law, military history, civics and politics, leadership and ethics, and the application of military technology to military operations. For more information on the OPME program or to register, visit www.opme.forces.gc.ca.

For more information, or to register, visit the DCS website at www.rmc.ca/ academic/continuing. Tuition fees are listed at www.rmc.ca/academic/ registrar/allfees_e.html. Undergraduate degrees Like most Canadian universities, RMC offers bachelor degrees of a conventional three-year (30 oneterm courses) length. These degree programs are built around a core of courses to which approved and relevant electives are added. Three fields can be chosen: Military Arts and Science (BMASc), Arts (BA) and Science (BSc). Bachelor of Military Arts and Science The BMASc is thoroughly grounded in the elements of the military profession, making it a unique program for the CF. Though it has the same length as a conventional three-year degree, it is actually designed to be earned over an extended period of time, by integrating professional military training (such as OPME courses) with standard and special academic studies, thereby recognizing university-level achievement appropriate to the profession of arms. An Honours program also exists for students who are interested in pursuing graduate studies in this field. Bachelor of Arts

minors can be in the following fields: Business Administration, History, Psychology, English, French, Political Science or Economics. Members who begin a general BA or a BA with a minor always have the option of later registering for a concentration. Bachelor of Science The BSc program is offered as a general BSc or with a minor. If a minor is chosen, it will be in Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics or Computer Science. Other subject areas considered as science courses include calculus, algebra, algorithms and computing, mechanics, and optics. As with the BA program, a minor can be registered after the BSc has been started. Graduate degrees Master of Arts in War Studies The MA(WS) program is dedicated to the examination of the phenomenon of war and peace. Members can choose two patterns to be awarded this degree: the course pattern requires five two-term graduate courses, while the thesis pattern requires three two-term graduate courses and a thesis. Completion of a bachelor's degree with honours (four years) in Arts, Science or Engineering is required for admission. Master of Arts in Defence Management and Policy The MA(DMP) program addresses issues of the contemporary business and management world. Members can choose three patterns to be awarded this degree: the course pattern requires 12 one-term graduate courses, the project pattern requires 10 one-term graduate courses, while the thesis pattern requires six oneterm graduate courses and a thesis. Completion of a bachelor's degree with honours (four years) is required for admission.

The BA program is offered as a general BA, or with a minor or a concentration. Concentrations and

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

Undergraduate certificates Certificate in management with applications to defence This certificate allows individuals to gain a basic understanding of the defence management field, and covers topics such as principles of management, methods, marketing, information systems, accounting, decision-making, and human psychology. In addition, the 10 oneterm courses taken for this certificate can be applied to the BA and BMASc degrees offered by DCS. Certificate in environmental protection This certificate contributes to the achievement of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;DND Sustainable Development Strategyâ&#x20AC;? by providing personnel with the skills, techniques, and knowledge they need to prevent pollution and conserve our environment. In addition, the nine one-term courses (including a research project) taken for this certificate can be applied to the BA and BMASc degrees offered by DCS. Capt Choinière is the CIC courseware development officer at Directorate Cadets.

29


BRANCH ADVISORY COUNCIL

LCol Tom McGrath

A collective national voice The mandate of the Cadet Instructors Cadre (CIC) Branch Advisory Council (BAC) is to provide a platform for 7500 CIC officers to voice professional concerns and provide input into policies affecting the branch. he BAC is an advisory body comprised of senior CIC officers whose mandate is to identify and discuss officers' professional concerns and provide advice to the Directorate Cadets (D Cdts). This said, the BAC does not replace the CF chain of command and does not under any circumstances promote or support personal grievances.

T

At the end of the day, your BAC represents you as a collective national voice for professional concerns. We can be your sounding board for new ideas and your champion. The council consists of seven representatives, one from each region and a Class B representative. The Director General Reserves and Cadets appoints the BAC chair. Each of the six regional advisors chairs a council of CIC representatives chosen from their respective regions. Since its reformation in 2000 council has been actively engaged in a myriad of CIC policy issues. The BAC champions branch issues and meets twice a year with the D Cdts to discuss concerns. Given the geographic and organizational

30

complexity of the organization, this group represents the opinions of local officers. We are engaged in issues as diverse as uniforms and accoutrements to a multitude of human resource management issues. CIC officers can rest assured that the council is fully engaged in the CIC Military Occupational Structure (MOS) project. In recent years, the council has done the following: • acted as a catalyst in the introduction of a pension plan for CIC officers and increased paydays; • provided input into CIC promotion policies and honours and awards; • engaged proactively in encouraging the Canadian Forces Liaison Council to recognize the branch; • provided feedback on scales of issue; • crafted with others the CIC Omnibus Survey and the forthcoming CIC Exit Survey; and • discussed the inclusion of noncommissioned members in the CIC, as well as the need to regulate some inequities in regional employment opportunities.

Additionally the council continues to champion issues from the field concerning the need for additional clothing, seek comment on dress issues and formulate recommendations to the D Cdts on these matters. Recently, Col Robert Perron, Director Cadets and Junior Canadian Rangers, has given added value to the role of the BAC by including the chair at all D Cdts/commanding officer regional cadet support unit (CO RCSU) conferences. Strengthened relationships with RCSU COs have garnered support and action on important CIC issues. At the end of the day, your BAC represents you as a collective national voice for professional concerns. We can be your sounding board for new ideas and your champion. We encourage your input. Past chair LCol Roman Ciecwierz summarizes our successes best: “Perhaps most importantly the BAC continues to develop its added value as a direct link between national and local headquarters. A clear evolution has occurred in the BAC as a proactive advisory council, leading discussions on relevant issues.” LCol McGrath is the new chair of the CIC BAC. Visit CadetNet for details on how to contact LCol McGrath or your regional representative.

CADENCE

Issue 20, Fall 2006


OFFICER DEVELOPMENT

Lt(N) Tom Edwards

Cadet evaluation reports Awards, senior positions and summer training positionsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; how does a corps or squadron make selections and, more importantly, substantiate decisions with real data on cadets chosen? his is a dilemma for many corps/squadron officers and staff faced with making these choices every year. In 1996, as commanding officer (CO) of 237 TRUXTON Sea Cadet Corps in Lawn, N. L., I saw that there had to be a better system for selecting cadets for awards and various positions.

points. The candidate with the highest score receives the award. The board considers information included in the cadet's annual evaluation report, which is also sent to parents. Officers grade the cadets each week, using an evaluation sheet that allots points for dress and deportment. This recorded information is valuable for making selections.

T

In 1997, the groundwork was laid to implement a method to record data on each cadet's performance over the year. This would be used to evaluate the cadet when awards and cadet summer training centre positions were being allotted. The evaluation system has evolved over the years to meet the corps' changing needs. The cornerstone of our system is a written policy which has evolved and is adopted into Standing Orders. For example, all cadets must have a minimum 85 percent attendance

<

At the time, our process for selecting award recipients consisted of corps officers having a short discussion on the particular award to be presented and then casting a vote to determine the recipient. Little information was available to account for the decision and invariably, questions as to why a particular cadet was selected for the award arose among fellow cadets and parents. In reality, any serious challenge to the decisions would not have been backed up by a transparent and accountable system.

Lt(N) Edwards can substantiate every award he presents. record to be considered for awards. Further, any officers sitting on the selection board must themselves have a least 85 percent attendance.

The recorded data allows for a complete and informed decision-making process. To try and make the system fair, we decided that a cadet can receive only one award. The only exception is for skill-related awards such as marksmanship. We also invite a representative of the corps' sponsor to view the selection board process, which enhances accountability. When the selection board convenes, the CO presents each officer with a list of candidates for consideration. The CO's responsibility is to ensure that all candidates meet policy requirements and any criteria set forth for the awards. Selection board members score each candidate, using an evaluation sheet with

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

A cadet's involvement in activities is also important in the selection process. If a cadet tried out for, or participated in, various activities such as marksmanship, public speaking, and drill competitions, this is taken into account. Preparing evaluation reports on our cadets has worked extremely well for our corps. The recorded data allows for a complete and informed decision-making process. More importantly, the system makes us accountable and stands up to any scrutiny which may arise. All of this works well, but it has to be a transparent structure. A key aspect of our approach is our open-door policy. We notify parents and encourage them to become involved with the cadets' performance. We invite them to visit the corps at their leisure to discuss any issue of concern to them and their child. There's no doubt that keeping such an extensive system of records adds to our officers' workload. However, having well-documented records on our cadets' performance is invaluable to accounting for our decisions. It's like having all your expense receipts ready when Revenue Canada does an audit on your income tax. Well, maybe not that extreme, but you get the idea.

31


LCdr Gerry Pash

Honours and awards Take the time to nominate someone he commanding officer of 296 Air Cadet Squadron appeared before then Governor General Jules Léger on Oct. 26, 1977 to receive the insignia as a Member of the Order of Canada. Maj Glenn Drinkwater was recognized for his extensive community service. The citation for his award declares “A fireman who has given countless hours to scouting, air cadets, the Order of St. John, the YMCA, his church, and the mentally handicapped, thus making the community of Cambridge a better place for both young and old.”

T

Thirty years later the process to gain recognition for a deserving member of the community is the same as it was in 1977. Someone must take the time to produce a nomination. Glenn Drinkwater was just 35 years of age when he was appointed as a Member of the Order of Canada. The Order was relatively new and still evolving. The award, in the category of “Voluntary Service”, was clearly for more than his activity as a member of the CF Cadet Instructors List. Furthermore, it is likely that several members of the community supported his nomination. Thirty

32

years later the process to gain recognition for a deserving member of the community is the same as it was in 1977. Someone must take the time to produce a nomination. André Levesque at the Directorate of History and Heritage is responsible for administering the orders, decorations and medals program for CF members. He confirmed that officers in the Cadet Instructors Cadre (CIC) are equally eligible for the long list of Canadian honours and awards. From his perspective, there is no bias against CIC officers with regards to honours and awards. All CF members, Regular and Reserve, are eligible and compete under the same criteria. An example is the Order of Military Merit (OMM) that is presented each year to one-tenth of one percent of the total number of members in the CF during the previous year. Awards are allocated based on the total number of personnel (Regular and Reserve Force) in the chain of command of seven recommending authorities. The recommending authorities include the former Deputy Chief of Staff Group, Vice Chief of Defence Staff (VCDS), Chief of Maritime Staff (CMS), Chief of Land Staff (CLS), Chief of Air Staff (CAS), Assistant Deputy Minister Human Resources

(Military) and Assistant Deputy Minister (Materiel). Nominations for most CIC members would be forwarded through the respective regional commander to the environmental chief responsible for the region. Thus, Pacific and Atlantic Region nominations would go to the CMS, Eastern and Central Region nominations would go to the CLS, and Prairie Region nominations would go to the CAS for vetting and selection. Nominations of officers employed at Director Cadets would go to the VCDS. Each recommending authority can select as many reservists as they choose within their allocations. For example, every OMM appointment within a group could conceivably be given to a reservist. It is also worth noting that recipients of the OMM usually have more than 20 years of service at a minimum. Also, the award is not only related to what the recipient does in a military career, since criteria include activity in the community at large and broader citizenship activities. “It is impossible to say how many nominees are CIC officers,” says Mr. Levesque. “It would not be unreasonable that among the small number of long-serving members of the more than 7000 CIC officers that some would qualify for the award.

CADENCE

Issue 20, Fall 2006


But, they must first be nominated at the local level through the chain of command, and the nomination must make it through all levels to the recommending authority.” It is also difficult to specifically identify Reserve recipients (CIC or Primary Reserve) because the OMM is a “total force” award. “The lack of recognition and awards is not specific to CIC officers,” says Mr. Levesque. All levels of the CF are examining what is required to increase nominations for various awards. The Meritorious Service Decoration (Meritorious Service Cross and Meritorious Service Medal) is one example of a national award that is 'under utilized'. There is no annual numerical limit for it and criteria are quite wide. Still, it does require someone to be nominated.

Being a nominator is itself a selfless deed, as it requires setting one's own ego aside and gratefully working for someone else's glory, knowing that the effort may not bring success. It is true that some CIC officers contribute a significant part of their lives to the Cadet Program. The statistics on Canadian Forces' Decorations (CDs) provides one indication. In 2005, 22 out of 42 third clasps to the CD went to CIC officers. In 2004, the number was 24 out of 51 and in 2003 it was 14 out of 25. Yet if there is any value in the premise that awards contribute to retention, one might question why the average CIC officer leaves after only 5.4 years— less than half the time required for the initial award of a CD.

CIC award of excellence

Establishing and nurturing national awards is neither simple nor easy. On the 10th anniversary of the Order of Canada, Maxwell Cohen, the 1000th member of the Order, was commissioned to write an essay. Here is an excerpt from “A Round Table from Sea to Sea”:

Regional Cadet Instructors School (Eastern) created a CIC award of excellence in 2005, not only to celebrate its 30th anniversary, but also to honour CIC officers.

“The medal is a message—not a mark for remote supermen, but the stamp of the home-grown family of adjudged merit. Of course there is always the danger that the 'merit' system plays half true and half false. Choices must be made and if it is asked why 'x' and not 'y', it is not easy for the wisest Advisory Council to inform the Governor General...that no mistakes in judgement have been made.” The most difficult work of the honours and awards process is that of the selection committee. The easiest part is generally the most neglected— someone must first observe that someone else has performed an exemplary deed or contributed in a superior fashion over a sustained period of time. The nominator must do the homework and write up a submission and then 'sell' it to the chain of command. Being a nominator is itself a selfless deed, as it requires setting one's own ego aside and gratefully working for someone else's glory, knowing that the effort may not bring success.

The award is presented annually to a CIC officer who is innovative and takes the initiative to apply the concepts he/she has learned at the school to their work in the field. The innovation or initiative must have a positive impact on a component of the Cadet Program, or the Cadet Program as a whole. The award is intended as an incentive to excel. This year, Capt Jean-Guy Boudreau, an instructor with 2768 Army Cadet Corps in Grande-Rivière, Que., became the award's first recipient. In our next issue, we will carry an article on the project for which he received the award.

If members of a group do not provide nominations, no member of the group will be recognized. The question as to whether Cadet Program instructors are receiving a fair share of the available recognition can only be answered when people at all levels of the program put forth nominations.

<

Are Cadet Program instructors receiving their due rewards? This writer can only offer that in recent years more than one instructor in British Columbia has received the Chief of Maritime Staff Commendation, the Formation Commander “Bravo

Zulu” Certificate, The Order of St. John and the Minister of Veterans Affairs Commendation in addition to the CD.

LCdr Pash is the regional public affairs officer for Regional Cadet Support Unit (Pacific).

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

Capt Jean-Guy Boudreau, centre, receives the first CIC Award of Excellence from Maj Yves Leblanc, commanding officer of Regional Cadet Instructors School (Eastern), left, and LCol Marcel Chevarie, the former commanding officer of Regional Cadet Support Unit (Eastern).

33


Lt(N) Julie Harris

The Ipsos-Reid Survey—now what? How well does our youth program imprint on the minds of Canadian youth and their parents? his is what the Department of National Defence and IpsosReid Corporation set out to discover through a survey last year of cadets and parents of cadets, as well as youth and parents of youth within the general public. The idea was to probe their minds on various issues regarding the Cadet Program. Who is aware of the program? What are their impressions? What are the perceived strengths and weaknesses of the program? What are their views on training? These questions are all critically important to the Cadet Program.

T

< Many young people are attracted to the Cadet Program because of its military characteristics, including the uniform— right down to the boots.

A significant proportion of cadets identify time management concerns and particularly, the extent to which the program may conflict with schoolwork Here are some results of that survey and the challenges we face because of them. Familiarity and impression of the Cadet Program The Cadet Program enjoys an extraordinary amount of good will among its participants and their parents, as well as among members of the general public, despite their unfamiliarity with the program.

34

• The top source of information about the program among parents and youth in the general public is word of mouth from family and friends. • The top reason cadets give for deciding to join is that they have family and friends in the program. • The top reason parents give for enrolling their child is that the child wanted to join. Our Challenge: Making the Cadet Program more widely known, especially directly to potential participants. Alternative marketing, such as an organized word-of-mouth campaign, could be investigated. Word-ofmouth marketing is far and away the most powerful force in the marketplace and, according to the survey, the Cadet Program seems more influenced by word of mouth than anything else! In word-of-mouth marketing, ‘champions’ (die-hard fans of the program) can be enlisted to spread the word through their existing social networks. Word-of-mouth is unlimited. In theory, if you tell the right champion the right message, that champion would tell 10, who would tell 10, who would tell 10, who would tell 10, who would tell 10, who would tell 10, who would tell 10, who would tell 10. That’s 100 million hits!

CADENCE

Issue 20, Fall 2006


Drawbacks of the program A significant proportion of cadets identify time management concerns and particularly, the extent to which the program may conflict with schoolwork. This is not surprising given that nearly two in three cadets say they also participate in extracurricular activities other than the Cadet Program. Other significant turn-offs among members of the general public are that the program is too militaristic, requires too much discipline or they don’t like the uniform.

Marksmanship, bush craft and leadership are the elements of local training with which cadets express the highest satisfaction. The general public appears to perceive the Cadet Program as more militaristic than it really is, prompting respondents to mention survival and technical skills as the key benefits of the program. On the other hand, cadets—who are more aware of the reality—mentioned leadership and unique experiences as the key benefits. Downplaying the program’s military affiliation, however, would be unwise since many cadets are attracted to the program because of its military characteristics. Our challenge: To ensure that communications and marketing efforts convey the value of the program as an important part of youths’ busy schedules. Continued on page 36

Survey highlights Familiarity and impression of the Cadet Program • • • • • • •

Only 5% of the population is very familiar with the Cadet Program 11% were once members Most have learned about Cadets through word of mouth or school The majority of people who are aware of the Cadet Program have a positive opinion about it Cadets joined Cadets because their family members were/are cadets, friends are in it, it is fun and to get new experiences 94% would recommend that friends, family or other young people join cadets Once we get cadets, most (70%) stay on

Benefits and drawbacks of the Cadet Program Main Benefits • • • • •

Leadership Experiences you can't get anywhere else Developing self-discipline Confidence Meeting new friends

Main Drawbacks • • •

Conflicts with schoolwork Time-consuming (50%) Repetitive programs

Attitudes towards the Cadet Program • • • •

90% of cadets are proud to be cadets 74% of cadets enjoy wearing the uniform Only half of the people surveyed feel that Cadets prepares you for the military Very few (8%) cadets feel that the program is too militaristic

Most popular activities • • • • •

Marksmanship Bush craft Leadership Drill Sports/physical fitness

< Sports/physical fitness is one of the most popular Cadet Program activities. Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

35


Value is one’s perception of the worth, excellence, usefulness, and/or importance that they will receive if they become involved. Value addresses the question, 'What can this person or organization do for me?' We need to communicate how the Cadet Program can facilitate and enhance scholastic achievements, rather than how busy the Cadet Program can keep them. We need to ensure that communications and marketing efforts underline the fact that the Cadet Program offers unique experiences and teaches youths real-world skills that are relevant beyond the military context. Benefits of the Program • Marksmanship, bush craft and leadership are the elements of local training with which cadets express the highest satisfaction. • No significant problems or factors lead to dissatisfaction with the program. • That said, enthusiasm for the program and the sense that there is still more to learn decline with age. Our challenge: To make the program as relevant and exciting to older participants as it is to younger ones. Opportunities exist for us to realign our marketing tactics. The Cadet Program is a great organization that fosters positive views and attitudes. As indicated by the survey results, we are on the right track, but still remain one of the world’s best-kept secrets. Lt(N) Harris is with Chief Reserves and Cadets Public Affairs.

36

Can we “categorize” our cadets? As part of the survey, Ipsos-Reid Corporation grouped cadets according to common attitudes. They were found to be a heterogeneous group that fall within five basic categories.

Busy enthusiasts (32%) Along with gung-ho cadets, these participants are the most positive towards the program. However, they are less enamoured by the military trappings and are also kept busy by schoolwork and other extra-curricular activities.

Gung-ho cadets (30%) These cadets have the least experience with the program and are the most attracted by the uniform and other military aspects of the program. The fervour that they feel today may fade as they progress in the program.

Moving on and ageing out (15%) These cadets have been in the program longest, and while they express a high degree of good will, they are ready for new experiences and ready to consign Cadets to the status of fond and fruitful memory.

Sociable reformers (16%) These cadets are most attracted by the social opportunities the program offers and are highly positive towards the program overall. However, they are not as enthusiastic as others and do not take as much enjoyment from local training activities as others. They want to get as much out of the program as they can, but do not see enough in the program as it is now to stimulate greater enthusiasm.

Non-conformists (7%) These cadets are the least positive towards the program and are particularly negative with respect to the militaristic aspects of participation, particularly the uniform. These cadets are more likely to say they are there because their parents want them to be and are least likely to say they will continue in the program after this year.

CADENCE

Issue 20, Fall 2006


Lt(N) Catherine Pichette and Lt(NL) Pierre BeauprĂŠ

VIEWPOINT

Co-operation between sea cadet and Navy League cadet corps

<

n one way, our future lies in the hands of Navy League cadet corps. Their program is similar to ours. Their corps, however, are not financed by the Department of National Defence and must cover their own costs so they can operate efficiently and provide interesting activities for their young people. Thus, having a sea cadet corps located close to a Navy League corps training area can be of great help.

I

Sea cadet corps can provide Navy League corps with personnel, materiel and even recruiting assistance. Sharing our resources is an effective means of creating solid links between the two, allowing both to benefit. Navy League corps can also assist us in our recruiting efforts; in fact, informing Navy League cadets about sea cadets is a reliable recruiting method which can account for more than 50 percent of annual recruit-

ment. As well, Navy League corps officers can offer a wide range of services. In addition, joint corps activities provide a greater adult presence, which in turn allows closer supervision of our cadets. This mutual support is not possible without close and seamless co-operation between commanding officers (COs) of Navy League and sea cadet corps. You may understand the problems, as well as the benefits, associated with co-operation, but do you know how to foster a positive and solid relationship? Avoiding and resolving conflict Conflicts discourage close co-operation. Conflicts can be avoided if both COs keep each other informed. To foster a positive relationship, especially during events involving both sea cadet and Navy League corps, information can be disseminated in

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

writing as an operations order, or during a meeting before the event. In addition, to improve relations, positive and negative comments should be aired so that conflicts can be resolved as soon as possible.

Cadets from 240 Sea Cadet Corps and 106 Navy League Cadet Corps served as guard of honour for Quebec Lieutenant Governor Lise Thibault during her visit to Repentigny, Que., last April.

Sea cadet corps can provide Navy League corps with personnel, materiel and even recruiting assistance. Sharing resources Once communication links are wellestablished and trust exists between COs, it becomes easier to share resources. A materiel loan system can be set up and an agreement signed so there are no problems regarding the return of materiel. Continued on page 38

37


Co-operation between sea cadet and Navy League cadet corps ...Continued from page 37

Sea cadet program information sessions can be held for Navy League cadets who will be old enough to transfer to sea cadets the following year. Also, these same cadets can be invited to attend activities outside training evenings in the company of their officers. Indeed, it is quite feasible to envisage such co-operation between sea cadet and Navy League cadet corps. However, it won't happen overnight. It must be allowed to grow and should not be abandonned at the first sign of a problem. Navy League cadet corps have the same goals we do, and working together will help raise our profile, instill in young people a passion for Cadets and, most importantly, give them unforgettable experiences. Lt(N) Pichette is the CO of 240 AMIRAL LEGARDEUR Sea Cadet Corps in Repentigny,Que. Lt(NL) Beaupré is the CO of 106 LE QUÉBEC Navy League Cadet Corps in Repentigny.

38

<

CIC officers can assist Navy League officers in strengthening their training and provide them with additional tools to help in their own professional development. Since Navy League cadet corps are not supported by DND, they may not have sufficient funds to provide as many courses for their officers. CIC officers can fill this gap by providing training sessions—discussed in advance with the Navy League corps CO. Furthermore, staff cadets skilled in teaching techniques can teach Navy League cadets during their evening training sessions.

Annette Van Tyghem, Orienteering Ontario, left, and Maj Kimberly O’Leary, regional cadet training officer for Central Region, right, with a winning orienteering team from 2824 Army Cadet Corps. Orienteering: A best-kept secret? ...Continued from page 22 It's certainly no secret that orienteering is a challenging yet fun activity. Our focus is to generate interest in the sport and to train and encourage cadets to compete at a higher level each year.

Capt Westlake is the common training officer for Central Region; Maj Lusk is the regional cadet adviser for COA and senior instructor of orienteering at Regional Cadet Instructors School (Central).

Cadet Program framework shift ...Continued from page 15 activities, and on developing instructors/leaders for these activities. Additionally, this program gives these cadets more opportunities to use the general knowledge and skills they have learned at their corps/squadron. Each elemental CSTC program is made up of courses common to all three elements (fitness and sports and musician courses, for example) and element-specific courses. Nationally directed activities National headquarters may choose to institute nationally directed activities to augment other programs. The purpose of these activities is to help maintain cadet interest and allow national headquarters to tailor the overall program to elemental interests and capitalize on national

and international resources. For example, within the activity area of cultural education/travel, national staff may choose to conduct international exchanges. Or, in the activity area of air rifle marksmanship, they may choose to conduct national air rifle marksmanship championships. As you can see, some terms and definitions in our framework have been eliminated, some remain the same or are similar, while others are new. These provide the basis for a common language for all of us. New Cadet Administration and Training Orders, as well as other materials detailing this framework, will be distributed this fall. Lt(N) Hall is the sea cadet program development staff officer at Directorate Cadets.

CADENCE

Issue 20, Fall 2006


DANS CE NUMÉRO

14 Mandat du Programme des cadets = But + mission + vision + résultats pour les participants Trouvez ce qui a changé. Capt Catherine Griffin 15 Changements apportés au cadre de travail du Programme des cadets Un cadre de travail plus simple pour les programmes et activités. Ltv Shayne Hall 17

16 Les cadets de 2012 L’unité de cadets de 2012 sera-t-elle radicalement différente de celle de 2006? En dépit de certains changements, les cadets pourront vraisemblablement continuer à apprendre tout en se divertissant. Capt Rick Butson

Activités du Programme des cadets Capt Andrea Onchulenko

18 Apprentissage interactif à l’intérieur comme à l’extérieur de la classe 20 Réagir aux comportements problématiques en classe 22 Orientation Que vous a-t-elle appris? Capt Peter Westlake et Maj Phil Lusk 26 Maintien en poste des nouvelles recrues Donnez-leur le sens de l’appartenance Lt David Jackson 28 Cours universitaires pour les officiers du CIC Capt Carl Choinière 30 Un porte-parole national Qu’est-ce que le Conseil consultatif de la Branche CIC peut faire pour vous? Lcol Tom McGrath 31 Rapport d’évaluation des cadets Pour étayer les titres honorifiques, postes supérieurs et postes d’instruction d’été. Ltv Tom Edwards 32 Récompenses et titres honorifiques Prenez le temps de procéder à une nomination Capc Gerry Pash

23 Les nouvelles politiques: un impact positif! Les officiers du CIC ne sont plus tenus de répondre aux exigences des FC en matière d’aptitude physique. On est en train d’élaborer de nouvelles normes à l’intention des officiers du CIC, en ce qui a trait à leur rôle de spécialistes des jeunes. Col Robert Perron

2

34 Sondage Ipsos-Reid – Et maintenant? Les résultats du sondage révèlent les défis du Programme des cadets. Ltv Julie Harris

DANS CHAQUE NUMÉRO 4

Mot d’ouverture

5

Courrier

19

Testez vos connaissances?

37 Point de vue

CADENCE

6

Bloc-notes

Numéro 20, Automne 2006


NUMÉRO À VENIR Ces dernières années, les FC ont essayé de réduire le temps d’instruction des nouvelles recrues et des militaires qui passent d’une branche/composante à l’autre, en reconnaissant leurs acquis.

10 PAGE COUVERTURE Le bien-être physique Un esprit sain dans un corps sain Selon l’Agence de santé publique du Canada, plus de la moitié des enfants et des jeunes du pays ne mènent pas une vie suffisamment active pour favoriser une croissance saine. Les organismes en faveur des jeunes, comme le Programme des cadets, s’efforcent d’encourager les jeunes à être actifs. Ci-dessus, le Capf Pamela Audley, commandant du Centre d'instruction d'été des cadets NCSM QUADRA , aide les cadets lors du parcours du développement de la confiance en soi, cet été. (Photo par le Ltv Ronald Desjardins, CIEC de HMCS – Affaires publiques)

Cette mesure peut aussi aider à réduire le temps d’instruction pour ceux qui souhaitent devenir membres du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets (CIC). Les réalisations scolaires, les expériences d’apprentissage, les connaissances et les compétences de quiconque veut devenir un officier du CIC, incluant les officiers de la Force régulière et de la Réserve, peuvent être reconnues afin de réduire la durée de l’instruction. Il en va de même pour les officiers du CIC déjà en service qui acquièrent de nouvelles compétences à l’extérieur du Programme des cadets. Le numéro d’hiver examine le système de reconnaissance des acquis des FC, si les situations l’exigent, les facteurs considérés, le processus et ses effets potentiels. La reconnaissance des acquis devrait permettre de réduire considérablement les recoupements dans l’instruction, faciliter le transfert des anciens membres du personnel des Forces régulière et de la Réserve à la Branche, et d’officiellement reconnaître les compétences spécifiques aux jeunes nouveaux membres. Le prochain numéro proposera la suite de l’article de Michael Harrison, l’éducateur qui a offert le point de vue d’une personne externe sur la façon d’accroître la visibilité des cadets dans les communautés locales. Entre autres articles à venir, mentionnons la mise à jour du Programme des cadets et ses répercussions sur les programmes de première année des corps et escadrons; l’apprentissage en fonction de l’âge; l’approche d’un officier local de la « gestion du risque opérationnel » et ne laisse pas la sécurité des cadets au hasard, et les prochains essais régionaux pour les cours d’instruction de base pour les officiers et les groupes professionnels militaires du CIC.

24

Les dates limites sont le 13 octobre pour le numéro Hiver 2006 et la mi-janvier pour le numéro Printemps/Été 2007.

Stratégies de recrutement dans les écoles Un éducateur externe au Programme des cadets nous offre quelques stratégies pour recruter dans les écoles. Michael Harrison, ancien enseignant et directeur d’école à Ottawa, montre comment avoir accès aux écoles, y compris quels sont les « devoirs » à faire avant de rencontrer les directeurs d’école.

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

3


MOT D’OUVERTURE

Par Marsha Scott

Une approche holistique à l’endroit “ des cadets e site http://dictionary. reference.com définit le terme « holistique » par : « qui met l’accent sur l’importance du tout et l’interdépendance entre ses parties », ou « qui s’intéresse à des systèmes entiers plutôt qu’à l’analyse ou à la séparation en parties. » Certains d’entre nous ont utilisé le mot « holistique » pour décrire une approche particulière à la médecine, à la pédagogie ou à d’autres disciplines.

L

Deux articles du présent numéro – « Bienêtre physique – Un esprit sain dans un corps sain » à la page 10 et toute la section sur la mise à jour du Programme des cadets (pages 14 à 19) – révèlent que le Programme des cadets adopte une approche holistique en matière d’instruction. Il considère chaque cadet dans sa totalité : corps, esprit, émotions et âme. À une certaine époque, l’expression « bienêtre physique » n’évoquait que la forme physique ou la santé du corps. Toutefois, dans notre article de fond sur le bienêtre physique, vous constaterez que le Programme des cadets décrit le bien-être physique comme étant « un processus permanent visant à développer un esprit et un corps en santé ». En d’autres mots, le Programme des cadets qui vise la bonne forme physique tient compte de la personne dans sa totalité. On retrouve également un élément holistique dans notre nouvel énoncé de mission, qui a été créé dans le cadre de la mise à jour du Programme des cadets. Notre mission consiste à « contribuer au développement et à la préparation des jeunes pour les aider à passer à l’âge adulte. » En d’autres mots,

4

Numéro 20 Automne 2006

le Programme des cadets ne se soucie pas des cadets seulement lorsqu’ils participent au programme, mais également de leur passage à l’âge adulte et du type d’adultes qu’ils deviendront. Le nouveau programme d’instruction, qui commencera en septembre 2007 dès la première année dans les corps et les escadrons, se fonde sur une meilleure compréhension des jeunes car ils y sont considérés dans leur totalité. Les travaux de recherche contemporains qui examinent comment les jeunes apprennent et se développent, ce qu’ils veulent et ce dont ils ont besoin nous ont permis d’avoir une vue d’ensemble plus complète — un tableau holistique qui nous aidera à rendre l’apprentissage divertissant, actif/interactif et mémorable pour les cadets. Parlant de tableau plus complet, nous avons rehaussé notre article sur le bien-être physique de commentaires formulés par sept officiers de terrain quant au succès du Programme des cadets concernant la promotion de la bonne forme physique. Ces officiers nous renseignent aussi sur des initiatives locales plus poussées. Le dernier article de notre série sur la « Reconnaissance des officiers du CIC » et la deuxième partie de l’article « Aborder les comportements problématiques en classe » figurent aussi dans ce numéro. Un expert en éducation externe au Programme des cadets partage ses stratégies de recrutement dans les écoles, et un officier de terrain propose quelques idées sur la façon de retenir les nouvelles recrues. Pour finir ne manquez pas les résultats du tout récent sondage du ministère de la Défense nationale et d’Ipsos-Reid sur le Programme des cadets. N’oubliez pas bien sûr de consulter la table des matières.

Cadence est un outil de perfectionnement professionnel pour les officiers du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets (CIC) ainsi que les instructeurs civils du Programme des cadets. Les destinataires secondaires comprennent tous ceux qui participent au Programme ou qui s’y intéressent. Le magazine est publié trois fois par année par les Affaires publiques - Chef – Réserves et cadets, au nom du Directeur des cadets. Les points de vue exprimés dans cette publication ne reflètent pas nécessairement l’opinion ou la politique officielle. Vous pouvez consulter la politique rédactionnelle et les numéros antérieurs de Cadence en ligne au www.cadets.forces.gc.ca/support.

Rédactrice en chef : Ltv Julie Harris, Affaires publiques Chef – Réserves et cadets

Directrice de la rédaction : Marsha Scott, Antian Professional Services

Renseignements Rédactrice en chef, Cadence Direction – Cadets & Rangers juniors canadiens Quartier général de la Défense nationale 101, promenade du Colonel-By Ottawa (Ontario), K1A 0K2

Courriel : marshascott@cogeco.ca CadetNet à cadence@cadets.net ou scott.mk@cadets.net

Téléphone : Tél. : 1 800 627-0828 Télécopieur : (613) 996-1618

Distribution Cadence est distribué par la Direction du service d’information technique et de codification (DSITC), Dépôt des publications, aux corps et escadrons des cadets, aux unités régionales de soutien des cadets et à leurs sous-unités, aux cadres et officiers supérieurs de la Défense nationale et des FC ainsi qu’à certains membres des ligues. Les corps et escadrons de cadets qui ne reçoivent pas Cadence ou qui désirent mettre leurs renseignements à jour aux fins de la distribution doivent communiquer avec le cadet-officier ou le conseiller des cadets de leur secteur.

Traduction : Bureau de la traduction, Travaux publics et Services gouvernementaux Canada

Direction artistique : Directeur - Produits et services d'affaires publiques CS06-0294 A-CR-007-000/JP-001

CADENCE

Numéro 20, Automne 2006


COURRIER LE PLAISIR D’ÊTRE RECONNU Je voudrais formuler quelques commentaires à propos de l’article intitulé « Reconnaissance des chefs du Programme des cadets » (Cadence, Hiver 2005). Le travail des officiers du CIC fait rarement l’objet d’une reconnaissance officielle, surtout à l’échelon national. Ainsi, une publicité pleine page parue dans un journal local le 11 novembre dernier, remerciait chaleureusement les réservistes servant dans le nord ouest de l’Ontario. Le nom de chacun des réservistes de Thunder Bay – exception faite des officiers du CIC – y figurait. Je comprends bien que nous ne sommes pas une force déployable et que nous figurons au bas de l’échelle des priorités des FC, mais il n’en reste pas moins que nous servons notre communauté. Le dernier article que j’ai lu à ce sujet, intitulé « Récompenser le travail bien fait » (Cadence, Printemps 2003), dressait la liste des titres et distinctions qui pouvaient alors être décernés à des officiers, or il semble que très peu de choses aient changé depuis. On peut probablement compter sur les doigts d’une main les officiers du CIC qui ont reçu ces marques de reconnaisances.

Malheureusement, les statistiques du site Web Décorations et titres honorifiques de la Direction – Histoire et patrimoine semblent indiquer que ce serait une perte de temps de recommander la nomination d’un officier CIC à une distinction nationale. Laissons d’ailleurs parler les statistiques : Médaille du mérite militaire : 1 999 récipiendaires depuis 1972, tous rangs et tous services confondus; Croix du service méritoire : 78 récipiendaires militaires depuis 1984; et Médaille du service méritoire : 135 récipiendaires militaires depuis 1991. Les statistiques tenues pour d’autres titres le confirment : un nombre négligeable de récipiendaires, avec des chances de succès quasi nulles pour les officiers CIC locaux. Alors, que peut-on réellement faire à l’échelon national pour remercier les officiers du CIC? Pourquoi pas une Médaille de service CIC au bout de six ans de service, sur recommandation du commandant d’unité ou de détachement? Et pourquoi six ans? L’officier se verrait alors reconnaître un travail bien fait, et ce, à mi-chemin de l’obtention d’une Décoration des Forces canadiennes (DC) – mesure pouvant donc inciter l’intéressé à demeurer en poste pour encore six ans.

Si une période de six ans paraît trop courte pour justifier une médaille accordée à des personnes qui, après tout, ne font « que leur travail », vous serez surpris de savoir que la Médaille du service spécial n’est remise aux Rangers canadiens qu’après quatre ans pendant lesquels ils n’ont fait « que leur travail ». Cette médaille va aussi aux personnes affectées à la SFC Alert après seulement six mois où celles-ci n’auront fait « que leur travail ». Je partage le point de vue exprimé dans les articles de Cadence, à savoir que nul officier du CIC n’est dans le Programme des cadets pour la gloire ou pour l’argent. Mais cela ne devrait pas empêcher le Gouvernement fédéral de remercier ceux qui font tout pour que le Programme prospère, en y dédiant au passage une bonne part de leur vie. Capt Shawn Wright Cmdt, Escadron 66 des cadets de l'Air Thunder Bay (ON) NDLR : La partie 3 de notre série d’articles sur les récompenses et titres honorifiques « Prenez le temps de procéder à une nomination » paraît à la page 32.

VOUS SOUFFREZ D’UN MANQUE D’ESTIME? L’un des moments les plus stimulants dans le travail d’un instructeur civil (IC) est certainement d’accompagner des cadets à un aérodrome pour leurs premiers vols de familiarisation en planeur. Il s’agit, pour de nombreux jeunes, d’un baptême de l’air, et il faut alors voir le sourire qui illumine leurs visages!

Comme l’affirme l’article de Cadence, il est vrai que le 2-33 n’est pas la Porsche des planeurs. En fait, bien des clubs civils ont remplacé ce vénérable appareil – jadis cheval de bataille des clubs du Canada – par des engins de formation plus performants et donc plus attrayants.

En apprenant l’annulation, faute d’instructeurs, du programme de familiarisation de l’an dernier dans la région de l’Atlantique (Cadence, Hiver 2005), j’ai réfléchi à la question et décidé de vous adresser cette lettre.

Toutefois, le manque d’estime dont pâtit le programme va bien au-delà d’un simple choix d’appareil. J’ai déjà entendu des cadets formuler des critiques acerbes sur le cours d'introduction à l’Aviation. On pourrait se demander si les cadets choisissent ce cours pour les mauvaises raisons. Pourquoi ontils l’impression que les cours de vol à voile sont moins exigeants (ou moins spectaculaires) que d’autres?

À notre escadron, j’assure la formation au sol des candidats aux bourses de formation de pilote. Je suis moi-même un ancien cadet de l’Air et poursuis toujours comme membre d’un club civil les activités de vol à voile débutées alors que j’étais cadet. J’ai atteint mes divers objectifs de navigation aérienne. J’ose croire que mon expérience du vol à voile dans un club civil et ma participation active au Programme des cadets me donnent ici une perspective quelque peu différente.

Peut-être que nous les instructeurs sommes un peu responsables de cette situation. Avonsnous perdu de vue l’importance du vol à voile comme discipline sportive? Avons-nous oublié que bien des cracks de l’aviation ont développé leur compréhension du « comportement

machine » et de la coordination durant leurs années de vol en planeur? Le fait que de nombreux anciens cadets de l’Air formés au vol à voile retournent un jour au Programme à titre d’instructeurs comme responsables des vols de familiarisation et de divers cours spécialisés , ne constitue-il pas la preuve indéniable d’un programme qui a réussi. En attendant, je suggère que le Programme des cadets encourage les chefs à promouvoir le vol à voile comme discipline digne d’intérêt et aussi comme sport d’aviation et de « plein air ». Ce programme devrait aussi inciter les officiers du CIC et les IC qualifiés à contribuer aux vols de familiarisation. À terme, j’espère que le Programme des cadets permettra aux intervenants d’apprécier davantage le programme de vol à voile. IC Sue Eaves Escadron 201 des cadets de l'Air Dorchester (ON)

Cadence se réserve le droit d’abréger et de clarifier les lettres. Veuillez vous limiter à 250 mots.

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

5


BLOC-NOTES

Un escadron du Québec s’attaque à un projet ambitieux Le travail d’équipe, la persévérance et la gestion du risque caractérisent l’ambitieux projet entrepris par l’Escadron 921 des cadets de l’Air à Québec, qui consistait à remettre un Beech Craft Musketeer (B-23) endommagé en état de voler! Ambitieux certes! Et tel est-il également de par son coût (98 000 $), les efforts requis (il a nécessité plus de 3 000 heures de travail) et la complexité du projet – les travaux ont été effectués par des cadets, sous la supervision de mécaniciens d’aéronef. « Trente cadets, 15 commanditaires et 12 bénévoles adultes ont pris part à cette initiative », nous apprend le Capt Denis

< Des cadets chargés de peindre l’aéronef font une petite pause.

<

Nouveaux logements pour le personnel à Albert Head

Le Beech Craft Musketeer, maintenant en condition de vol. Rousseau, commandant de l’Escadron. « Il nous a fallu six ailes pour obtenir deux ailes complètes; on a effectué plus de 350 tâches différentes et on a enlevé et ré-installé plus de 500 pièces d’aéronef. » Roger Robert, président du comité responsable, avait proposé le projet en 2003. Des partisans ont recueilli 25 000 $ et, un an plus tard, ils ont acheté un aéronef endommagé en Nouvelle-Écosse. Ils ont ensuite créé un organisme sans but lucratif pour gérer le projet et s’assurer que l’Escadron serait propriétaire de l’aéronef. Le conseil d’administration de l’organisme – JeuneAir Aviation Inc. – comprenait un représentant du comité responsable, un officier de l’escadron et deux intervenants locaux du domaine de l’aviation, ainsi que M. Robert, qui agissait comme président.

6

« Le dévouement des mécaniciens d’aéronef, qui ont bénévolement enseigné aux cadets et supervisé leur travail, a été l’un des principaux facteurs de la réussite du projet », souligne le Capt Rousseau. « A également grandement compté : l’effort d’équipe quand des problèmes sont survenus – tels que la rouille présente sur les deux principaux longerons des ailes, qui les a rendus inutilisables, les difficultés qu’on a eues à trouver des pièces et des commanditaires pour le projet, etc. » Vers la fin juin, l’aéronef a été mis en vol. Le projet a permis aux cadets d’acquérir une expérience d’apprentissage directe et des aptitudes concrètes qui leur serviront dans la vie. De plus, les membres de JeuneAir – dont la plupart sont des cadets – ont eu l’occasion de voler à un coût plus bas, précise le Capt Rousseau.

Un nouveau bâtiment pour le logement du personnel a remplacé l’ancien bâtiment datant des années 1940 et six roulottes temporaires vieilles de 20 ans dans l’aire d’instruction d’Albert Head à Esquimalt, en C.-B. Le nouveau bâtiment peut accueillir 67 personnes et comprend 30 chambres doubles et sept chambres simples. Pendant l’hiver, l’aire d’instruction devient l’École régionale d’instructeurs de cadets (Pacifique). Pendant l’été, elle sert de quartier général au Centre d’instruction d’été des cadets d’Albert Head, qui accueille environ 800 cadets de l’Air chaque année. La Réserve de l’Armée de terre, les Rangers canadiens et la Force régulière utilisent également l’aire d’instruction pendant l’année.

CADENCE

Numéro 20, Automne 2006


La base de données Fortress : un modèle de rapidité! « Il est souvent plus facile de se plaindre de ce qui ne fonctionne pas que de mentionner ce qui fonctionne. », précise le Capitaine Mario Marquis, commandant du Corps 2920 des cadets de l’Armée de terre à Gatineau, au Québec. Pour son corps, ce qui fonctionne est la nouvelle base de données conviviale Fortress, qui permet de stocker des données sur les cadets dans un même endroit et de les partager avec les détachements et les autres quartiers généraux. « Nous commençons enfin à récolter les fruits de notre travail de saisie de données dans Fortress », indique le Capt Marquis. Le système a fait ses preuves dès que le Capt Marquis a commencé à inscrire ses cadets aux camps d’été de 2006. Une heure avant une réunion de parents, le Capt Marquis a commencé à imprimer les formulaires CF-51 pour les cadets à Étoile verte. « En moins de 45 minutes, j’ai pu imprimer 63 formulaires CF-51, relate-t-il. Les parents avaient seulement à vérifier les informations, à remplir la partie médicale et à signer le formulaire. Cela a permis de réduire de 30 à 45 minutes la durée de la réunion. Qui plus est, les données figurant sur les formulaires étaient claires et concises. » « Je crois sincèrement que le temps passé à saisir des renseignements dans la base de données Fortress porte ses fruit et continuera de le faire », conclut-il. « Pour un organisme formé de bénévoles de notre envergure, Internet est un véritable miracle », constate le Maj Guy Peterson, coordonnateur national de la gestion de l’information pour le Programme des cadets. « Et nous avons de quoi nous réjouir parce que les régions ont accepté de financer pour tous les corps et escadrons – là où cela est possible – l’utilisation de l’Internet à haut débit. Cela permettra sans aucun doute aux quartiers généraux locaux de tirer profit des récentes améliorations apportées à Fortress, y compris la capacité de mettre à jour, en bloc, les dossiers de service et les feuilles de présence des cadets. »

Nouvelle autorité de gestion pour les IC

Boire mieux chez les cadets

Jusqu’à tout récemment, les dispositions de l’OAFC 49-6 régissaient les politiques d’emploi des Instructeurs civils (IC). L’application de ces politiques a maintenant été transférée à la Direction des cadets, un changement que souligne la nouvelle OAIC 23-05.

Voici matière à réfléchir. Le Capt Louise Zmaeff, commandant de l’Escadron 577 des cadets de l’Air à Grande Prairie, en Alberta, explique que les officiers préoccupés par le surplus de poids chez les cadets voudraient peut-être savoir que selon un reportage de CNN sur l’obésité chez les jeunes, une personne qui élimine une boisson gazeuse de son régime alimentaire par jour pourrait perdre 15 livres en une année.

Voilà qui est tout bénéfice pour l’Organisation des Cadets du Canada dont l’efficacité sera encore accrue.

« Peut-être que cela ne semble pas être beaucoup, mais pensez-y bien, précise-telle. Si vous aviez 30 livres à perdre, vous pourriez en perdre la moitié simplement en faisant un petit geste chaque jour. » Vous voudrez peut-être en informer vos cadets, ou en tenir compte lorsque vous commandez des boissons pour les activités des cadets.

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

La Gouverneure générale Michaëlle Jean a félicité l’Élof Cameron Hull, un instructeur du Corps 2822 des cadets de l’Armée de terre à Surrey, C.-B., pour la manière dont il a réagi lors d’un incident d’intimidation survenu en 2004. Pendant qu’il conduisait en compagnie de sa femme à Surrey, l’Élof Hull a vu trois garçons plus âgés s’attaquer à deux garçons plus jeunes. Il a stoppé sa fourgonnette, s’est assuré que les victimes allaient bien puis s’est lancé à la poursuite des agresseurs. La police, guidée par les victimes, a réussi à appréhender un des agresseurs, tandis que M. Hull a mis la main sur les deux autres. La lettre adressée par le Sous-secrétaire de la Gouverneure générale à l’Élof Hull disait, entre autres, « Vos gestes altruistes sont une source d’inspiration et représentent une forme élevée de civisme dont vous pouvez être très fier. » Cet honneur est décerné à des gens qui ont posé des actes d’altruisme et de bravoure exceptionnels en venant en aide à d’autres personnes.

<

En quoi cela vous affecte-t-il? Pour l’instant, vous ne constaterez que peu de changements. Cela dit, étant donné le nouveau mandat de la D Cad & RJC comme autorité de gestion, les mises à jour des règlements qui concernent les IC se feront plus rapidement.

Mention élogieuse suite à un incident d’intimidation

L’Élof Hull de Chilliwack, en C.-B., accepte son certificat de mention élogieuse de la part du maire de la ville Clint Hames, qui lui a remis le prix au nom de la Gouverneure générale du Canada.

7


BLOC-NOTES

Événements

Nouveau président national pour la Ligue des cadets de l’Air

11 au 18 mars 2007 : Championnat national de biathlon des cadets de 2007 à Whitehorse, au Yukon, dans le village des athlètes et sur le parcours de biathlon des Jeux du Canada. Le coordonnateur est le Capt Ken Gatehouse, à l'adresse gatehouse.kdh@forces.gc.ca.

Craig Hawkins est le nouveau Président national de la Ligue des cadets de l’Air du Canada. M. Hawkins est le directeur d’une école secondaire à Midland, en Ontario. Il s’est joint au Programme des cadets comme cadet-officier en 1975.

5 au 12 mai 2007 : Championnat national d'adresse au tir des cadets de 2007 à London, Ontario. Le coordonnateur est le Capt Peter Westlake, à l'adresse westlake.pj@forces.gc.ca.

Il pense que c’est un moment intéressant pour faire partie du Mouvement des Cadets du Canada.

<

« Dans l’année à venir, nous allons assister à la mise en œuvre du nouveau protocole d’entente entre les ligues et le ministère de la Défense nationale, à la première phase du nouveau programme d’instruction des Craig Hawkins cadets et à l’évolution du CIC en tant qu’entité distincte de la structure de la Réserve. Nous entrons également dans une période de consultation et de coopération significatives avec les industries canadiennes de l’Aérospatiale et de l’Aviation, ce qui promet de s’avérer une aide supplémentaire pour nos escadrons et camps d’été. » M. Hawkins ajoute : « L’importance de l’épanouissement professionnel et du développement est plus grande que jamais pour le CIC et les ligues. Par conséquent, les professionnels de ce nouveau partenariat se doivent, comme jamais auparavant, de saisir toutes les occasions pour échanger entre eux idées et meilleures pratiques. »

Maîtrise en Études sur la guerre pour un officier du CIC Le Ltv Allan Miller, ancien commandant du Corps des cadets de la Marine 79, à Trenton, en Ontario, a finalement obtenu son diplôme du Collège militaire royal (CMR) de Kingston, Ont. – 34 ans plus tard! En juin dernier, il a reçu une maîtrise ès arts en Études sur la guerre. Le Ltv Miller, qui est aussi un ministre ordonné de l’Église Unie du Canada, dit qu’il avait l’intention de fréquenter le CMR en 1968 mais qu’un problème médical l’avait amené à changer ses projets. Il a poursuivi ses études à l’Université de Toronto et est resté actif dans la Réserve. En cours de route, son pasteur – un ancien brancardier de la Première Guerre mondiale et aumônier de la Deuxième Guerre mondiale – l’a encouragé à entrer dans le ministère.

Le Rév. Miller est un officier du CIC depuis 1997. Il est actuellement à la recherche d’un corps de cadets au sein duquel évoluer. Pour plus de renseignements sur les diplômes décernés par le CMR, voir l’article intitulé « Cours universitaires pour les officiers du CIC » à la page 28.

8

<

Son premier contact avec les cadets a été comme aumônier réserviste pour un corps de cadets de la Marine d’un internat des Premières nations à St. Paul, en Alberta, de 1975 à 1977. Il était ministre provincial à cette époque.

Le Ltv Miller a reçu son diplôme le 24 juin dans le cadre de la convocation du Collège de commandement et d’état-major des FC à Toronto.

CADENCE

Numéro 20, Automne 2006


Enseignement innovateur Au cours de la dernière année, le Capt Roy Harten, commandant du Corps 2310 des cadets de l’Armée de terre , à Sault-SteMarie, en Ontario, a pris l’initiative d’informer ses cadets sur les efforts d’aide humanitaire déployés par les soldats des FC en Afghanistan. Par sa femme, déployée comme barbière civile pour les troupes à Kaboul, il a appris que des soldats canadiens, dans leurs moments libres, prêtaient main forte à des écoles et des orphelinats et aidaient à fournir de l’eau potable en Afghanistan. Afin de stimuler l’intérêt de ses cadets, il a demandé au Capt Tony Petrilli, un réserviste de l’Équipe provinciale de reconstruction à Kandahar et ancien cadet, de venir répondre aux questions de ses cadets au sujet du pays et de l’Opération. Le Capt Petrilli leur en a parlé en grands détails, abordant tous les sujets; du peuple afghan et de leur culture jusqu’aux

complications créées par la poussière dans les armes et les véhicules, en passant par les chameaux qui crachent! Cet exercice a mené à la publication d’un livret illustré de photos qui sera exposé dans le cadre du défilé annuel du Corps. « Nos cadets comprennent mieux le peuple afghan et les difficultés auxquelles il fait face après 25 années de guerre, constate le Capt Harten. Ils ont également appris beaucoup sur les efforts que déploient les FC pour aider le peuple afghan à reconstruire leur pays. » Le Corps – ainsi que d’autres corps et escadrons de la région – a vendu des rubans magnétiques où figuraient les mots « Support the troops » (appuyez nos troupes) pour voitures et réfrigérateurs eta envoyé les recettes de cette vente en Afghanistan pour financer l’achat de fournitures scolaires pour les enfants afghans.

Le Capt Harten encourage d’autres corps et escadrons à entreprendre des initiatives semblables. Il encourage aussi d’autres cadets à en apprendre plus long sur les FC en écrivant aux soldats ou en visitant le site Web du MDN (www.dnd.ca) et cliquer sur « Images », puis sur « Afghanistan » et visualiser des photos récentes de soldats canadiens déployés là-bas.

Photo par le Sgt Carole Morissette, Force opérationnelle en Afghanistan, Rotation 1, technicienne en imagerie

Enseignement innovateur et plus…

« Nous avons fait appel à des jeux de rôles pour enseigner », relate le Lt Zinchuk. Avant l’exercice, chaque participant s’est vu attribué un rôle à jouer, d’après les comptes rendus réels des événements survenus à cette époque. Munis d’un document d’information d’une demi-page, les cadets ont fait des recherches sur le personnage des années 40 qu’ils devaient jouer. Pendant cet exercice, la salle de réunion des cadets de l’Air est devenue une véritable

machine à voyager dans le temps qui a transporté les 40 cadets et leurs officiers dans les années 1940, pendant les bombardements de Londres. La pièce a été transformée en une station de métro souterraine qui servait d’abri contre les bombardements. La soirée a débuté par le récit véridique d’un membre local de la Légion royale canadienne qui était âgé de 14 ans quand les bombardements ont débuté. Ensuite, on a projeté le film intitulé Battle of Britain, suivi d’un bombardement et d’un incendie simulés, organisés par les services d’incendie et d’urgence de North Battleford. Les jeux de rôles, rehaussés de costumes d’époque, se sont poursuivis jusqu’à l’aube. Les cadets ont incarné des militaires, ainsi qu’un marchand de diamants juif allemand, un espion nazi, des infirmières et même un agent d’assurances qui vendait des obligations de guerre, pour n’en nommer que quelques-uns. Des cadets qui jouaient le rôle des bénévoles du Service féminin et de la Croix-Rouge ont installé une cantine avec des mets authentiques de l’époque et les réalités du rationnement. Le Capt Deb Nahachewsky, commandant de l’Escadron 38, était étonné de voir tous les plats qu’on avait concoctés.

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

Fait remarquable : l’exercice a contribué à rallier la communauté, dont le musée local, qui a fourni des casques authentiques pour la police militaire, la succursale locale de la Légion, et le groupe de théâtre amateur local, qui a fourni certains des costumes. « Ce genre d’exercice nous éloigne entièrement de notre programme d’enseignement qui met parfois trop l’accent sur les cours magistraux, mentionne le Lt Zinchuk. C’est aussi un exercice qui vise à stimuler l’intérêt des cadets et à les encourager à rester dans le Programme. »

Ryan Palmer, trafiquant du marché noir et espion nazi, est emmené par des cadets incarnant des policiers militaires et des gendarmes de Londres.

<

Le Capt Barb Kirby, commandant de l’Escadron 43 des cadets de l’Air à North Battleford, au Saskatchewan, a choisi de parler aux cadets de la participation du Canada et de ses Alliés dans la Deuxième Guerre mondiale. Pour ce faire, le Lt Brian Zinchuk, officier d’approvisionnement de l’Escadron, a préparé un exercice de simulation des événements survenus lors d’une nuit pendant les bombardements sur Londres. En plus des cadets de l’Escadron 43, des cadets du Corps 2537 des cadets de l’Armée de terre à North Battleford et de l’Escadron 38 des cadets de l’Air à Prince Albert, en Saskatchewan, ont également pris part à l’exercice.

9


ARTICLE VEDETTE

Marsha Scott

Le bien-être physique < Le Maj Ken Fells, Commandant Adjoint du CIEC Argonaut à Gagetown, N.-B. et ancien professeur d’éducation physique, entraîne les cadets lors d’un exercice matinal d’activité physique au camp. L’activité physique fait partie intégrale du programme du CIEC. (Photo, Affaires publiques, CIEC Argonaut)

Un esprit sain dans un corps sain Selon l’Agence de santé publique du Canada, plus de la moitié des enfants et des jeunes du pays ne mènent pas une vie suffisamment active pour favoriser une croissance saine; et les experts conviennent qu’un manque d’activité physique est un important facteur qui cause l’obésité. el qu’évoqué dans nos deux numéros précédents, l’obésité est une grande source de préoccupation au Canada et dans d’autres pays occidentaux. Les gouvernements tentent de contrer cette tendance en créant des programmes visant à promouvoir des modes de vie sains, et le Canada déploie des efforts pour sensibiliser les Canadiens aux bienfaits de l’activité physique. En ce qui concerne l’entraînement physique des adolescents âgés de 14 à 17 ans, le ministre canadien des Sports, Michael Chong, a dit qu’il espère en favoriser l’accroissement de 66 à 71 p. cent. Il veut également mettre en place un crédit d’impôt pour les jeunes qui pratiquent des sports ou d’autres formes d’activité physique comme des cours de danse ou des exercices de groupe.

T

Étant donné le temps que les jeunes passent à l’école, les efforts déployés au Canada portent tout particulièrement sur les programmes de nutrition et les cours d’éducation physique scolaires.

10

D’après un nouveau rapport intitulé Faire pencher la balance du progrès, publié par la Fondation des maladies du cœur, il faut considérablement augmenter le temps d’activité physique à l’école pour freiner la vague d’obésité chez les enfants et prévenir une explosion du nombre de Canadiens

Les corps et les escadrons cherchent à améliorer l’aptitude physique grâce à un éventail d’activités dont certaines, comme les sports récréatifs et le biathlon, seront communes aux trois éléments. atteints de maladies chroniques comme les maladies cardiovasculaires. Le rapport recommande que les programmes scolaires incluent au moins une heure d’activité physique structurée par jour pour les enfants de l’élémentaire et du secondaire.

Actuellement, les élèves du primaire ne font que 30 minutes d’activité physique par semaine et, dans la plupart des régions du pays, les cours d’éducation physique sont facultatifs après la 10e année. En fait, les Guides d’activité physique canadiens pour les enfants et les jeunes recommandent 90 minutes d’activité physique d’intensité modérée à vigoureuse par jour. Les organismes d’action en faveur des jeunes comme le Programme des Cadets peuvent contribuer à résoudre le problème de l’inactivité chez les jeunes. « Aujourd’hui, alors que les ordinateurs et les jeux vidéo sont omniprésents, les jeunes ont plus que jamais besoin d’activité physique, constate Susan Mackie, directrice des communications chez Scouts Canada. « L’exercice favorise la forme physique, la santé mentale et l’estime de soi; en encourageant nos jeunes à s’adonner à des activités de plein air, nous les aiderons à prendre de solides habitudes de

CADENCE

Numéro 20, Automne 2006


conditionnement physique qui leur permettront de s’épanouir et feront d’eux des citoyens productifs. La bonne forme physique et l’activité en plein air vont de pair dans tous les programmes de Scouts Canada. Efforts déployés dans le cadre du Programme des Cadets Le Programme des Cadets a depuis longtemps à coeur la promotion de l’aptitude physique et un mode de vie sains pour les cadets. Le conditionnement physique fait partie intégrante de l’instruction d’été des cadets; toutefois, chaque élément a sa propre approche en cette matière. Chaque année, tous les cadets de l’Armée de terre doivent subir un test d’aptitude physique. Dans le cadre de l’instruction obligatoire, des techniques de conditionnement physique sont enseignées et illustrées d’exemples d’activités pouvant améliorer la condition physique des cadets et promouvoir un mode de vie sain. Les cadets de la Marine, quant à eux, apprennent les principes de la nutrition et de l’exercice physique, d’après le Guide d’activité physique de Santé Canada.

Si l’objectif de ce Programme est atteint, les cadets auront compris l’avantage d’avoir une bonne forme physique et un mode de vie sain. Cette prise de conscience, alliée à une participation continue à des activités de conditionnement physique et à des sports récréatifs, les aidera à développer des attitudes et des comportements positifs qui leur seront profitables au-delà même de leur passage chez les cadets. Dans sa récente mise à jour, le programme intègre pour tous les éléments la bonne forme physique personnelle, le mode de vie sain ainsi que les sports récréatifs. L’approche sera la même pour tous les éléments, tout en respectant les particularités de chacun d’entre eux. Les corps et les escadrons cherchent à améliorer l’aptitude physique grâce à un éventail d’activités dont certaines, comme les sports récréatifs et le biathlon, seront communes aux trois éléments. Dans le cadre du nouveau Programme d’instruction d’été des Cadets, s’élaborent actuellement des cours sur l’aptitude physique et les sports qui seront enseignés par les trois éléments. On développe également des façons d’améliorer les activités hors programme qui ont lieu le soir et les fins de semaine.

En faisonsnous assez? Agissons-nous suffisamment pour promouvoir le bien-être physique des cadets? Bien que les avis soient partagés, beaucoup d’activités sont entreprises dans ce sens. Nous vous proposons les commentaires de certains officiers sur le sujet.

Le Capt Garnet Eskritt, commandant de l’Escadron 294 des cadets l’Air à Chatham, en Ontario, dit que certains cadets de l’escadron ont marché plus de 1 000 kilomètres cette année pour se préparer à la Marche de Nijmegen en Hollande en juillet. En tant que membres du contingent des FC, ils ont parcouru 160 kilomètres en quatre jours en transportant un sac à dos pesant 10 kilos.

Le programme de conditionnement physique des cadets de l’Air est fondé sur Jeunesse en forme Canada – un programme comportant six tests d’aptitude qui donnent un aperçu global de la condition physique du cadet. Des écussons sont octroyés en fonction des niveaux de réussite. Les cadets supérieurs qui ont atteint un certain degré d’excellence motivent les plus jeunes. Des spécialistes des « modes de vie sains » sont également invités à venir s’adresser aux cadets pour leur parler d’hygiène, de nutrition, de drogues et d’alcool. Bien qu’il n’y ait pas d’examen formel, les cadets doivent assister à ces présentations pour compléter leur 2e année d’instruction.

La marche a débuté en 1909 et visait initialement à améliorer la capacité de marche avec charge à porter sur de longues distances des soldats d’infanterie de l’armée des Pays-Bas. Elle a évolué pour devenir un prestigieux événement international auquel les FC participent depuis la Deuxième Guerre mondiale. Lors de cette dernière, les soldats canadiens ont libéré la région entourant Nijmegen.

Dans sa récente mise à jour, le Programme des Cadets définit plus clairement que jamais son objectif de promotion du bienêtre physique. D’après ses nouveaux paramètres : « le bien-être physique n’est pas un état de perfection, mais plutôt un processus permanent visant à développer un esprit et un corps en santé ».

Le contingent canadien est formé de membres des Forces régulière et de la Réserve, de cadets et d’anciens combattants venant des quatre coins du pays.

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

Selon un document d’information des FC, cette marche est difficile : il s’agit en effet d’une épreuve épuisante de conditionnement physique et d’endurance pour tous.

suite à la page 12

11


ARTICLE VEDETTE holistiques sur l’exercice et la nutrition. Ainsi, les cadets apprenaient tout, des modes de vie sains à la façon de faire des étirements et des exercices sans se blesser. En plus de cela, vingt cadets du corps ont pris part à une épreuve d’aptitude physique à la fin de l’année d’instruction – une course de bicyclettes de 500 kilomètres répartie sur quatre jours!

L’Aspm Richard Fortin, un instructeur du Corps des cadets de la Marine 37, COURAGEOUS, à London, en Ontario, dit que son corps organise des soirées sportives mensuelles après les rassemblements de cérémonies et offre aux cadets, pendant toute l’année, des cours de conditionnement physique holistiques pour chacune des phases de l’instruction. Un cadet supérieur qui avait complété le programme préparait les cours

La préparation à cette course était très rigoureuse et comportait, entre autres, des épreuves modérées et intermédiaires sur des pistes intérieures, ainsi que des épreuves à l’extérieur sur des distances de plus en plus grandes. Les cadets devaient compléter un nombre minimum d’épreuves préliminaires en vue de se qualifier pour la course principale. Ils devaient s’entraîner de huit à dix heures par semaine, en plus de leur instruction obligatoire/facultative en tant que cadets. « Loin de chercher à se dérober, les cadets voulaient au contraire participer au plus grand nombre d’épreuves possibles, nous

apprend l’Aspm Fortin. Ils débordaient d’énergie et d’enthousiasme. » Non seulement les cadets ont-ils amélioré leur condition physique tout en se divertissant, mais ils ont également appuyé la Fondation des maladies du cœur en Ontario dans les efforts qu’elle déploie pour combattre l’obésité chez les jeunes. Le corps a formé un partenariat avec la succursale de London de la Fondation pour la course marathon. Des représentants de la Fondation ont donné le départ de la course, et ont expliqué aux cadets quels étaient les modes d’alimentation sains et leur ont procuré du matériel pour des présentations. Pour leur part, les cadets ont recueilli des fonds pendant leurs épreuves préliminaires pour financer les activités de la Fondation. Le cadet qui a recueilli le plus d’argent s’est vu offert un ordinateur personnel. On a de plus offert aux commanditaires, et ce proportionnellement à l’importance de leur implication, la chance d’être officier de revue lors des rassemblements de cérémonie ou de l’inspection annuelle.

n’ont pas l’occasion d’y participer. « La popularité croissante du biathlon est phénoménale », dit-elle. Cependant, les petites choses font parfois toute la différence. À l’Escadron 531, les instructeurs encouragent les cadets à marcher et à courir autant que possible. Sur le site de vol plané, ils aident à lancer le planeur. Quand ils vont et viennent sur la piste, ils courent.

Le Lt Llora Brown, instructrice de l’Escadron 531 des cadets de l’Air à Trail, en C.-B., déplore le fait que tous les CIEC n’obligent pas leurs cadets à faire de l’entraînement physique le matin : certains transportent même leurs cadets en autobus vers l’endroit où ils prennent le petit déjeuner. Selon elle, les activités physiques auxquelles participent les cadets sont insuffisantes comparativement au temps qu’ils passent en classe; elle ajoute qu’il est dommage que tous les cadets intéressés par le biathlon

12

« Les cadets ont besoin d’un leadership positif, affirme le Lt Brown. Quand on les confie au personnel athlétique pour l’entraînement physique, alors que le personnel de leur propre vol/peloton/division est absent, ils ont le sentiment d’être les seuls concernés par l’activité physique. Nous devrions tous participer avec nos cadets – non seulement pour renforcer l’idée d’un style de vie sain, mais également afin d’en souligner l’importance pour le reste de leur vie. » Elle croit que si les cadets voient en leurs leaders des exemples de modes de vie sains, ils seront plus enclins imiter à ces derniers. « Pour nombre de cadets, les officiers du CIC et les instructeurs civils représentent les modèles les plus positifs, parfois même, les seuls référents adultes dont ils disposent. »

Le Maj Chris Barron, instructeur-chef et cmdtA du CIEC à Whitehorse, au Yukon, précise que les activités physiques variées et équilibrées offertes dans le cadre de certains cours à Whitehorse portent leurs fruits. « Je crois que la plupart des cadets retournent chez eux en meilleure forme physique qu’ils ne l’auraient été s’ils avaient passé tout l’été à la maison, poursuit-il. Les tests d’aptitude physique le démontrent. En effet les cadets ont obtenu de meilleurs résultats lors de la deuxième épreuve, à la fin du camp. »

CADENCE

Numéro 20, Automne 2006


sommes en train de préparer toute une soirée d’épreuves : des groupes de cadets passeront de 15 à 20 minutes par station pour apprendre divers types d’exercices et quelques notions de nutrition. »

La Capt Louise Zmaeff, commandant de l’Escadron 577 des cadets de l’Air à Grande Prairie, en Alb., aime promouvoir, par l’exemple, le conditionnement physique et les modes de vie sains auprès de ses cadets et de ses officiers. « Je ne réussis pas toujours, mais j’essaie certainement, dit-elle. Les statistiques sont pires qu’on ne le pensait dans la région du nord-ouest de l’Alberta, constate-t-elle. Trente-neuf pour cent de la population ont un surplus de poids et 22 p. cent sont obèses. On considère que près de 22 p. cent de nos jeunes ont un surplus de poids ou sont obèses. » Elle pense que beaucoup de gens croient à tort que l’actuel programme de conditionnement physique des cadets est une « participation au sport », alors qu’on devrait plutôt mettre l’accent sur un style de vie sain. « Dans notre escadron, dit-elle, nous

Une autre idée qu’elle aimerait voir mettre en œuvre dans le Programme des cadets est un « défi mince et en forme ». Les corps/escadrons de taille égale se mesureraient les uns aux autres et tout le monde (y compris les officiers) se feraient peser et se soumettraient au test d’aptitude physique de Jeunesse en forme Canada. Les résultats pourraient être envoyés à un site régional/provincial/national. Une deuxième pesée de contrôle suivrait quelques mois plus tard, et une autre à la fin de l’année d’instruction. « Cela viendrait suppléer aux cours sur les modes de vie sains, aux soirées sportives et aux défilés des commandants, ajoute-t-elle. Je pense que ce serait relativement facile si on établissait comme objectif, par exemple, de perdre 10 p. cent du poids total de son corps/escadron ». Pour commencer, elle aimerait lancer un défi aux autres corps/escadrons du nord-ouest de l’Alberta. Par considération pour ces efforts, selon elle, cela pourrait faire l’objet d’un article de fond dans Cadence. « Si on ne fait pas quelque chose bientôt à propos du style de vie – pas seulement parler de choix de vie saine – nos enfants et nos officiers auront de gros problèmes de santé », constate le Capt Zmaeff. Le Ltv Keith Nutbrown, commandant du Corps des cadets de la Marine 349 à Chilliwack, en C.-B., abonde dans le sens des experts, à savoir que le plus grand facteur de risque d’obésité chez les adolescents est le style de vie sédentaire des jeunes d’aujourd’hui. « La télévision, Internet et les jeux vidéos n’étaient pas aussi accessibles aux générations antérieures », dit-il. Il n’est pas convaincu que le programme actuel peut réellement résoudre le problème. Bien qu’il intègre le conditionnement physique au programme d’instruction de son corps de cadets, il dit que les neuf périodes ne suffisent pas pour améliorer de façon tangible le conditionnement physique, mais qu’elles constituent un bon début.

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

Le Maj JoAnn MacDonald, commandant de l’Escadron 583 des cadets de l’Air à Maple Ridge, en C.-B., reconnaît que : « La question de l’obésité chez les adolescents a été longuement débattue au sein de son escadron. » L’escadron organise une soirée sportive tous les deux mois, mais il en faut plus pour promouvoir un style de vie sain. « Une de nos solutions est l’Opération « Get Fit » - un exercice annuel où participent plusieurs escadrons et conçu pour permettre d’atteindre l’objectif d’aptitude physique chez les cadets », dit-elle. Initié par l’Escadron 861 des cadets de l’Air à Abbotsford il y a trois ans, cet exercice a pris de l’ampleur cette année et est devenu un exercice d’escadre, avec la participation de tous les escadrons de l’Escadre de la Vallée du Fraser. L’exercice s’est déroulé au cours de la longue fin de semaine de mai. Il était constitué d’épreuves de cyclisme, d’orientation et de tâches de leadership en plus d’une série de jeux inter-escadrons. Chaque segment de l’épreuve de cyclisme mesurait 47 kilomètres, et le parcours a été conçu pour que tous les participants y soient en sécurité. Pendant environ treize semaines avant l’exercice, les participants ont fait cinq heures de conditionnement physique par semaine – principalement de manière autonome. « Cela les a préparés mentalement et physiquement pour l’épreuve », relate le Maj MacDonald. Une course de vérification avant la fin de semaine a permis de s’assurer que les cadets et les bicyclettes étaient fin prêts pour l’épreuve. « C’était une merveilleuse occasion pour les cadets d’améliorer leur forme physique, de s’amuser et d’utiliser l’exercice pour accumuler des crédits en vue de l’obtention du Prix du duc d’Édimbourg », dit-elle.

13


MISE À JOUR DU PROGRAMME DES CADETS

Capt Catherine Griffin

Résultats pour les participants —

Mandat du Programme des cadets = But + mission + vision + résultats pour les participants

La question demeure : « Qu’a-t-on actualisé dans le Programme des cadets? » Réponse : « Cinq points! » • Bien qu’il soit resté le même, le but du programme a été détaillé de manière être plus clair. • L’énoncé de mission constitue un élément nouveau dans le programme. • La vision a été actualisée. • Nous avons dressé une série de résultats précis pour les participants; en d’autres termes, la liste des avantages que le programme offre aux cadets. • De manière collective, le but, la mission, la vision et les résultats pour les participants correspondent à ce qu’on qualifie de mandat du Programme des cadets – nouvelle terminologie à laquelle il faudra se faire puisqu’elle constitue autant une orientation stratégique que la base d’un langage commun pour tous les intervenants appelés à collaborer au Programme des cadets. Dans le dernier numéro de Cadence, nous avons traité du but amplifié. Le présent article inclut les énoncés de mission et de vision, de même que les résultats pour les participants. On trouvera à ce propos des renseignements détaillés dans la nouvelle OAIC 11-03, parue en mai dernier. Au cours des prochains mois, les divers éléments du mandat du Programme des cadets seront publiés sous diverses formes, notamment sur des affiches et sites Web traitant du Programme des cadets. Le Capt Griffin est officier d'état-major du développement de l'instruction à la Direction des cadets.

14

Mission — Le cap sur le présent! La mission définit la raison première d’une entité ou d’un programme – le pourquoi de son existence, sa raison d'être. Une mission célèbre, celle de Star Trek : « To boldly go where no one has gone before (L’audace au service de la découverte [Traduction libre]) ». Mission du Programme des cadets : « Contribuer au développement et à la préparation des jeunes en vue de leur transition de l’adolescence à l’âge adulte, en les préparant aux défis de la modernité, grâce à un programme social qui soit dynamique. »

Vision — Le cap sur l’avenir!

Avantages pour les cadets (compétences, connaissances, attitudes et comportements) durant ou après la participation au programme. 1. Bien-être émotif et physique. Les cadets acquièrent les capacités suivantes : • Avoir une bonne estime de soi et des qualités personnelles positives; • Relever les défis physiques en adoptant un mode de vie sain et actif. 2. Sociabilité. Les cadets acquièrent les capacités suivantes : • Contribuer efficacement en qualité de membre d’une équipe; • Être responsable de ses actes et de ses choix; • Faire preuve de jugement; • Démontrer un sens de l’entregent et de la communication. 3. Capacité cognitive. Les cadets acquièrent les capacités suivantes : • Résoudre les problèmes; • Penser de façon créative et critique; • Avoir une attitude positive face à l'apprentissage

La vision permet de visualiser ce à quoi une entité ou un programme devrait idéalement un jour ressembler – ce vers quoi on devrait tendre. Ainsi, chez General Electric, la vision d’entreprise a déjà été : « We bring good things to life“. (De belles choses auxquelles donner vie [Traduction libre]) ». Vision du Programme des cadets : « Organisation de développement des jeunes, pertinente, crédible et proactive, offrant un programme de choix aux jeunes du Canada, en les préparant à devenir les leaders de demain au moyen d’activités agréables, sûres, bien organisées et comportant des défis. »

4. Sens civique proactif. Les cadets acquièrent les capacités suivantes : • Personnifier les valeurs positives; • Participer pleinement à titre de membre estimé de la communauté; • S’engager envers la collectivité. 5. Compréhension des FC. Les cadets acquièrent les connaissances suivantes : • Histoire des FC; • Contributions des FC en tant qu’institution nationale.

CADENCE

Numéro 20, Automne 2006


Ltv Shayne Hall

Changements apportés au cadre de travail du Programme des cadets Le projet de mise à jour du Programme des cadets a entraîné des changements dans le cadre de travail pour tout ce qui touche la façon dont les programmes et les activités des trois éléments seront catégorisés. e cadre de travail actuel, qui a évolué au fil des ans, est formé de plusieurs catégories qui se recoupent. Ils comprennent l’instruction au quartier général local, l’instruction d’été, l’instruction obligatoire, l’instruction de soutien obligatoire, l’instruction dirigée facultative, l’instruction facultative, ainsi que des activités dirigées précises.

L

Le nouveau cadre de travail permettra de mieux prendre en compte l’évolution continue du Programme des cadets. Le nouveau cadre de travail comprend quatre grandes catégories : • Programme des corps/escadrons • Activités dirigées par les régions • Programme de Centres d’instruction d’été des cadets (CIEC) • Activités dirigées à l’échelle nationale Programmes des corps/escadrons

< Le conditionnement physique et les sports font partie des cours communs à tous les éléments au CIEC. (Photo du Capt Elisabeth Mills, Affaires

Le programme des corps/escadrons, essentiel au Programme des cadets, a d’abord pour but de fournir à tous les cadets l’instruction et les possibilités relatives au développement de leurs connaissances et de leurs habiletés dans divers domaines, tout en les initiant à des activités spécialisées. On peut trouver une description complète de ce programme, désormais divisé en deux sous-programmes (instruction par phases/ programme Étoile/instruction selon le niveau de compétence et instruction facultative), dans l’article intitulé Cadets 2012 à la page 16.

Actuellement, les corps/escadrons effectuent principalement l’instruction par phase, par grade ou selon le niveau de compétence. Dans certains cas, d’autres établissements (tels que les centres régionaux d’enseignement de la navigation à voile pour l’entraînement des cadets de la Marine) offrent cette instruction qui est entièrement soutenue par le ministère de la Défense nationale. Les corps/escadrons peuvent aussi offrir une formation facultative financée par une source extérieure au MDN (par exemple, un commanditaire local). Activités dirigées par les régions En plus de superviser les programmes des corps/escadrons et du CIEC, les quartiers généraux régionaux peuvent décider, à l’échelle locale, de créer des activités dirigées afin de renforcer les programmes des corps/escadrons et du CIEC. Le but de ces activités est également de soutenir l’intérêt des cadets et de permettre au quartier général régional d’adapter l’ensemble de son programme aux intérêts de sa région, afin d’en tirer le meilleur profit. Par exemple, à l’occasion du drill et du cérémonial, une région peut choisir de mener des concours de drill. De même, lors d’activités de sports récréatifs, elles peuvent choisir d’organiser des compétitions sportives entre les corps et les escadrons. Programme des CIEC Le programme des CIEC – qui est incorporé au Programme des cadets – vise d’une suite à la page 38

publiques, CIEC Whitehorse)

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

15


MISE À JOUR DU PROGRAMME DES CADETS

Capt Rick Butson

Activités complémentaires

(Photo de l’IC Wayne Emde, Affaires publiques, CIEC Vernon)

Les cadets de 2012 Chacun des corps et escadron de cadets possède un album photo des cadets des années antérieures en train de faire ce qu’ils ont toujours su faire – s’amuser tout en apprenant. epuis mes lointains débuts chez les cadets, il m’a été donné d’assister à trois évolutions du Programme des cadets de l’Armée. Aujourd’hui, au sein de la Direction des cadets, je contribue à la conception du prochain programme devant être mis en application entre 2007 et 2012.

D

En 2012, les photos de nos cadets seront passablement semblables à celles d’aujourd’hui; on les verra en train de savourer la nouveauté et heureux de faire de belles découvertes. Il se pourrait cependant que le contexte entourant ces instants précieux ait changé. Les officiers de 2012 emploieront en effet un autre langage lorsqu’ils parleront du Programme des cadets. Nous devrons donc, nous « les vieux de la vieille », actualiser notre discours pour pouvoir communiquer avec eux. Commençons par une vue d’ensemble. Les corps et escadrons de 2012 offriront davantage d’instruction, mettant en place un programme en cinq parties, nommé (selon l’élément) Phase, Étoile ou Compétence.

16

Ce programme se déroulera sur plus de trente soirées de rassemblement en semaine (d’une durée unitaire et de trois périodes de 30 minutes, qualifiées de « séances ») et 10 journées avec soutien en fin de semaine. Bien que le concept d’une cinquième partie de programme pour les cadets supérieurs soit assez nouveau, surtout chez les cadets de l’Armée et ceux de la Marine, la durée prévue pour l’instruction demeure pour l’instant inchangée.

Programme Phase/ Étoile/Compétence En 2012, ce programme comprendra deux types d’activités – les obligatoires et les complémentaires. Activités obligatoires Ces activités représenteront les deux tiers de la matière structurée qui est au programme de l’instruction, ainsi chaque corps ou escadron de cadets devra procéder de manière identique à l’instruction de cette partie du programme.

Celles-ci constituent le dernier tiers de la matière structurée. Elles proviennent d’une série d’options adaptée au corps ou à l’escadron concerné. Ainsi, certains corps de cadets de l’Armée pourront favoriser davantage le drill (exercices), alors que d’autres préféreront les camps d’hiver. De ce choix dépendra la nature de l’instruction durant les séances ou les journées avec soutien en fin de semaine. C’est, en quelque sorte, le principe du restaurant-minute, où chacun peut commander un hamburger simple dans le cadre de son assortiment Combo 1, mais avec la possibilité de choisir entre un certain nombre de suppléments.

Options En 2012, un corps ou un escadron pourrait opter pour des activités extérieures au programme Phase, Étoile ou Compétence. Dans la mesure où ces activités cadrent néanmoins avec la structure globale prévue à l’intention des cadets, et à condition que le répondant soit prêt à en assumer la totalité du coût d’instruction, le corps ou escadron pourra ajouter cette matière à son programme, à titre d’option. Exemples : une fanfare ou un voyage à Ottawa. Pour revenir au cas du restaurant-minute, l’instruction facultative c’est comme le chili – vous pouvez toujours vous en faire servir avec l’assortiment Combo 1, dans la mesure où vous en avez vraiment envie et êtes prêt à en payer le prix. Peut-on dire qu’une unité de cadets de la mouture 2012 sera radicalement différente d’une unité du millésime 2006? Je crois que la meilleure façon de répondre à cette question réside en la comparaison d’une photo de « mon époque » avec celles figurant sur le site national www.cadets.ca. On constatera que si certaines choses ont bel et bien évolué, les cadets ont néanmoins toujours bien du plaisir à apprendre! Le Capt Butson est l’officier d’état-major chargé de développer le programme des cadets de l’Armée à la Direction des cadets.

CADENCE

Numéro 20, Automne 2006


Capt Andrea Onchulenko

Activités du Programme des cadets orsqu’on nous demande « Qu’est-ce que les cadets? » ou « Que fait-on chez les cadets? », le plus simple est de répondre en décrivant certains de nos programmes et activités. Peut-être parlez-vous alors aux parents d’un jeune qui souhaiterait se joindre au mouvement, ou encore à un adolescent qui souhaite en savoir plus sur le programme. Selon l’élément dont vous faites partie et selon vos préférences personnelles, vous pourrez répondre en donnant des détails sur la voile, les expéditions ou le vol, ou encore décrire diverses activités du corps ou de l’escadron dont vous faites partie, notamment le drill, le leadership et le tir à la carabine.

L

La nouvelle leçon [connaissances générales] a été conçue de façon à ce que les cadets qu’ils soient de la Marine, de l’Armée ou de l’Air, consacrent un temps d’étude identique à la théorie, tout en découvrant un contenu et des applications spécifiques à leur élément. L’Actualisation du Programme des cadets (APC) a eu entre autre importance de revoir le fondement des activités pour chacun des programmes associés à un élément des FC et évaluer comment procéder à la mise à jour. L’objectif n’est nullement de supprimer ce que nous faisons, mais plutôt d’assurer que les activités les plus agréables – et les plus réussies – demeurent parties intégrantes de notre programme. Résultat : une liste optimale d’activités communes et trois listes d’activités spécifiques à chaque élément.

Activités communes

Les activités communes s’appliquent à l’ensemble des programmes des trois éléments. Comme vous pouvez le constater à la lecture de la liste de ces activités (se reporter à l’encadré), leur grand nombre peut surprendre. Dans le cadre de l’APC, ces activités ont été actualisées de manière à unifier l’apprentissage au sein des trois éléments. Exemple parlant, les Connaissances générales du cadet, qui traitent notamment de la manière de porter l’uniforme. La nouvelle leçon a été conçue de façon à ce que les cadets qu’ils soient de la Marine, de l’Armée ou de l’Air, consacrent un temps d’étude identique à la théorie, tout en découvrant un contenu et des applications spécifiques à leur élément. À l’heure actuelle, ce contenu est placé sous différentes rubriques dans chacun des trois éléments – « Servir dans un corps de cadets de la Marine » (Force maritime), « Formation élémentaire » (Force terrestre) et « Connaissances générales » (Force aérienne). Le temps consacré à l’enseignement varie donc, même si la théorie diffère peu d’un élément à l’autre.

-

Connaissances générales Exercice et cérémonial Leadership Techniques d’instruction Service à la collectivité Éducation culturelle et voyages Citoyenneté Forme physique et mode de vie saine Sports récréatifs Tir à la carabine à air comprimé Musique – Musiques militaires et corps de cornemuses et tambours - Biathlon d’été et d’hiver - Programme PHAC - Premiers soins

Activités du Programme des cadets de l’Armée

Que le Programme des cadets offre des activités communes tombe évidemment sous le sens. En actualisant ces secteurs d’activités, nous pouvons conserver ce que nous faisons le mieux et nous assurer que tous les cadets, quelque soit leur élément, en fassent une expérience également plaisante! Le Capt Onchulenko est l’officier d'état-major affectée à l'élaboration du Programme des cadets de l'Air à la Direction des cadets.

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

Expédition • Instruction en campagne • Navigation • Randonnée • Leadership pour les activités en plein air Tir à la carabine de cible Familiarisation avec les milieux de plein air de l’Armée et des collectivités civiles

Activités du Programme des cadets de l’Air -

Aviation – Pilotage Aviation – Techniques au sol Aérospatiale Survie pour équipage de vol Familiarisation avec les milieux de la Force aérienne du Canada ainsi que de l’aviation et de l’aérospatiale civiles

Activités du Programme des cadets de la Marine -

Matelotage (câbles et cordages) Voile Usage des petites embarcations Opérations sur un bâtiment Familiarisation avec les milieux de la Marine du Canada et de la marine civile

17


MISE À JOUR DU PROGRAMME DES CADETS

Apprentissage interactif à l’intérieur comme à l’extérieur de la classe < Le Ltv Aaron Bean du Centre de voile de Hamilton, Ont., donne un cours de voile aux cadets du Corps des cadets de la Marine 65 IRON DUKE à Burlington, Ont., lors d’une fin de semaine de formation réservée à ce sport. Avec la mise à jour de la Phase I du Programme, les cadets auront l’occasion de participer à au moins deux fins de semaine de voile ou d’opération de petites embarcations.

18

Le printemps dernier, nous avons posé la question suivante à la conférence CadetNet dans la revue Cadence : « Quel est le principal défi auquel vous ou les instructeurs devez faire face dans votre corps ou escadron de cadets ? » ’Ens 1 Cory Thibodeau, officier d’instruction auprès du Corps des cadets de la Marine 122 MONCTON et officier des normes auprès du Corps des cadets de la Marine 292 COVERDALE, deux corps établis à Riverview (N-B), a répondu que « dans chaque communauté de par le Canada, nous éprouvons des difficultés à garder les cadets pendant plus de trois ans. Selon lui, cela tiendrait surtout à la manière dont se fait l'instruction. « Trop souvent, les cadets sont à l’école toute la journée, vont de classe en classe et suivent des cours magistraux dans des domaines qui, malheureusement, ne les intéressent pas vraiment. Par la suite, ils se retrouvent dans un corps ou un escadron de cadets, où ils doivent encore assister à trois heures de cours magistral ». L’Ens 1 Thibodeau estime que la seule façon d’accroître les effectifs serait de sortir de la salle de classe

L

traditionnelle en ayant recours à de nouvelles méthodes d’enseignement susceptibles de faire participer les cadets. « Chacun sait que si nous les faisons participer au processus, ils risquent d’apprendre davantage, de s’amuser et donc de demeurer dans le programme plus longtemps », estime-t-il. L’Ens 1 Thibodeau sera heureux d’apprendre que la mise à jour du Programme des cadets nous permet désormais de prendre le taureau par les cornes. En voici quelques exemples. Cadets de la Marine Le Ltv Hall est l'officier d'état-major responsable de l'élaboration du Programme des cadets de la Marine à la Direction des cadets (D Cad). Il estime que certains instructeurs s’en tiennent à une instruction de type magistral faute d’avoir reçu la formation ou l’expérience nécessaire faisant appel à d’autres méthodes d’enseignement, ou encore plus probablement, parce que leur vie à l’extérieur du milieu des cadets ne leur laisse pas le temps nécessaire à la planification et à la préparation de cours dynamiques susceptibles de créer un milieu réellement propice à l’apprentissage. « Afin d’améliorer la situation, nous procédons actuellement à la création de guides d’instruction exhaustifs pour toutes les leçons destinées aux membres des corps

et escadrons de cadets, affirme-t-il. Ces guides offrent aux instructeurs des outils leur permettant de s’éloigner des formules classiques, type cours magistral. »

« Un cadet peut-il apprendre la randonnée en classe? Probablement, mais il n’en demeure pas moins qu’un sentier de randonnée constituerait un lieu plus approprié pour une telle formation. » À l’heure actuelle, les cadets de la Marine reçoivent, à longueur d’année, une instruction en salle de classe portant sur la navigation à voile et sur l’usage des petites embarcations. Ils ont ensuite la possibilité de participer à une fin de semaine de voile. Dans la nouvelle phase un du programme, ils pourront avoir au minimum deux fins de semaine consacrées à la navigation à voile et à l’usage des petites embarcations. Dans ce domaine, les périodes d’instruction au sein du corps des cadets seront limitées à deux séances, mettant l’accent sur les attentes des cadets et sur l’équipement dont ils auront besoin alors. Résultat : l’instruction se déroule dans un contexte optimal, à savoir à bord d’une embarcation.

CADENCE

Numéro 20, Automne 2006


DÉVELOPPEMENT DES OFFICIERS

Cadets de l’Air Aujourd’hui, les cadets de l’Air reçoivent l’essentiel de l’instruction concernant la survie dans les airs en classe, sous forme de cours magistral. Le programme modifié leur permettra de suivre un seul cours traditionnel (portant sur l’équipement personnel nécessaire à un exercice en campagne), faisant usage de l’enseignement par démonstrations. Par la suite, toute l’instruction sera offerte en campagne, selon un mode pratico-pratique et participatif. Autre exemple qui illustre bien cette nouvelle approche : au lieu d’infliger aux cadets de première année la description physique des lieux (bureaux de l’escadron, terrain de rassemblement, toilettes, cantine, etc.), les instructeurs seront conviés à faire la tournée des locaux avec les cadets. « Cette démarche concrète est plus efficace, affirme le Capt Andrea Onchulenko, officier d'état-major affectée à l'élaboration du programme des cadets de l'Air à la Direction des cadets; de la sorte, les jeunes sont plus susceptibles de se rappeler des personnes et des locaux visités. » Cadets de l’Armée « Un cadet peut-il apprendre la randonnée en classe? s’interroge le Capt Rick Butson, officier d'état major, Développement du programme des cadets de l'Armée à la Direction des cadets. Probablement, mais il n’en demeure pas moins qu’un sentier de randonnée constituerait un lieu plus approprié pour une telle formation. » Et c’est exactement ce que préconise le nouveau programme Étoile verte destiné aux cadets de l’Armée : « Participation à une randonnée d’un jour ». L’activité inclut l’instruction concernant l’étiquette sur le sentier, la prévention des accidents, les techniques de marche, les pauses, les rations et l’eau. « Cela ne constitue qu’un exemple parmi tant d’autres de la manière dont le programme modifié permettra de sortir les cadets de la salle de classe pour les amener à faire l’expérience réelle de l’instruction », conclut le Capt Butson.

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

19


FORMATION DES CADETS

Réagir aux comportements

problématiques en Dans notre numéro de Printemps-Été, nous avons vu comment les instructeurs pourraient appréhender les différents problèmes de comportement affichés par les cadets dans les salles de classe du corps ou de l’escadron. Nous nous pencherons ici sur d’autres comportements posant problèmes ainsi que sur la bonne façon de les résoudre.

oici quelques suggestions pour mieux appréhender le cas de cadets qui se montrent bavards, dissipés, retardataires, endormis ou nerveux en classe.

V

Les bavards Ces cadets aiment bien les petites conversations parallèles durant le cours. Celles ci peuvent être liées ou non au sujet traité en cours. Elles constituent un problème en ce sens qu’elles distraient leurs camarades. Vous ne pouvez tolérer la présence de ces conciliabules dans la salle de cours. L’erreur classique consiste alors à pointer du doigt et à réprimander publiquement ces cadets bavards. Des techniques plus subtiles, notamment le passage à des activités de groupe ou la modification des équipes constituées, peuvent contribuer à diminuer ces conversations parasites. Il pourrait aussi s’avérer utile de poser des questions soit au perturbateur soit aux cadets auxquels il s’adresse. Si de telles mesures n’aboutissent à rien, ayez une conversation privée avec le cadet.

La meilleure solution est d’en parler en privé avec le cadet, en insistant sur le comportement que vous attendez de lui. Vous pouvez même mettre au point un petit « contrat de travail » qui incitera le cadet à respecter ses engagements.. Par ailleurs, l’attribution de certaines tâches physiques à ces cadets (par exemple, la distribution de documents à leurs camarades) peut leur permettre de retrouver leur concentration. Il est aussi bon de se tenir à côté du cadet lorsqu’on lui donne des instructions, de le regarder dans les yeux et de l’encourager à bien se conduire.

[Les endormis] manquent peut-être de confiance en leurs capacités d’apprentissage, ou ont tout simplement besoin de repos. La fatigue découle des activités du cadet ou d’un problème physique dont il serait bon de déterminer l’origine.

Les dissipés Ceux ci posent des questions qui s’écartent du sujet traité. Ils interrompent souvent la leçon. Ils sont faciles à distraire et sont peu concentrés sur le cours. Ils risquent donc d’agacer leurs camarades, ainsi que vousmême. Ils cherchent à attirer l’attention parce qu’ils souffrent peut être d’un manque d’estime, ou éprouvent des difficultés à suivre la leçon. N’en faites pas une affaire personnelle. N’y soyez pas indifférent, mais ne lui accordez pas une trop grande importance, qui risquerait de l’encourager.

20

Les retardataires Ils arrivent tard en classe, ou reviennent tard de leurs pauses. Il peut s’agir d’un retard occasionnel ou systématique. En l’absence de réaction, ce comportement risque de se distraire toute la classe. Il est possible que ces cadets recherchent l’attention ou qu’ils manquent de confiance en eux. Ils ne se sentent peut-être pas en sécurité, ou bien sont indécis. Il est déconseillé d’interrompre la leçon pour discipliner ces cadets car cela pourrait

CADENCE

Numéro 20, Automne 2006


classe causer de plus grandes perturbations. La dépréciation ou l’humiliation publique de ces jeunes est susceptible de créer une ambiance malsaine en classe et de favoriser un certain manque de respect. Elle pourrait aussi provoquer des retards constants, par rancune.

S’il s’agit d’un retard isolé, cherchez-en la cause puis poursuivez la leçon. Dans le cas de retards chroniques, cherchez-en la cause, signalez au contrevenant que toute récidive sera inacceptable et gérez la situation au mieux. Commencez chaque leçon comme si vous attendiez l’arrivée du cadet. Placez les copies sur son pupitre afin de réduire au minimum les interruptions. N’interrompez pas le cours. Attendez une bonne occasion, notamment une activité de groupe, pour parler en privé avec le cadet. Rappelez-lui ses responsabilités.

<

Une bonne façon de régler le problème consiste à s’assurer que les participants sont bien conscients de l’heure. Faites de la ponctualité une règle commune.

Cherchez à mettre un terme à ce comportement; toutefois, évitez d'interrompre votre cours ou d'embarrasser le cadet. La somnolence ne peut être traitée comme un simple problème de discipline. Cherchez à savoir pourquoi le cadet dort en classe.

Rendez [les nerveux] conscients de l’effet de leurs actions sur le reste de la classe. Tenez-leur tête tout en leur permettant de s’exprimer et de dire ce qu’ils ont sur le coeur.

Les endormis Certains cadets s’assoupissent et finissent même par s’endormir en classe. Ils se cachent parfois derrière leurs livres ou rêvassent. Éveillés, ils affichent parfois un manque d’intérêt et un ennui manifeste. Cela constitue un problème pour leurs camarades, et peut avoir une influence négative. Un tel comportement discrédite l’ensemble de votre leçon. Ces personnes manquent peut-être de confiance en leurs capacités d’apprentissage, ou ont tout simplement besoin de repos. La fatigue découle des activités du cadet ou d’un problème physique dont il serait bon de déterminer l’origine.

De la manière la plus discrète possible, réveillez le jeune. Parlez-lui en privé, à la pause ou à la fin du cours, et essayez d’obtenir une explication. Par ailleurs, remettez aussi en question votre leçon ou la manière dont vous la donnez. Faites varier le volume, le débit, le ton ou la hauteur de votre voix. Changez les activités ou modifiez la disposition des sièges. Cela pourrait signifier que vous n’avez pas assez diversifié vos activités et votre façon d’enseigner.

Les nerveux Ces cadets sont déconcentrés. Ils ne répondent pas aux questions, ne participent pas, grimacent quand on leur parle, gribouillent en classe, écrivent des lettres ou lisent des livres ou des documents sans rapport avec le cours. L’instructeur doit réagir le plus vite possible afin de rétablir la concentration de ces cadets.

Adresser rapidement les problèmes de comportements, qui surviennent en cours, vous permettra de créer un environnement positif lequel favorisera chez les cadets le plaisir d’apprendre.

Là encore, n’en faites pas une affaire personnelle, mais n’ignorez pas ce comportement non plus. Durant les activités, désignez-les comme leaders. Même si cela peut s’avérer frustrant par moments, donnez-leur la possibilité de participer au cours. Une discussion en privé avec ces cadets peut s’avérer bénéfique. Rendez-les conscients de l’effet de leurs actions sur le reste de la classe. Tenez-leur tête tout en leur permettant de s’exprimer et de dire ce qu’ils ont sur le coeur. Adaptation du cours de formation professionnelle qui sera ultérieurement offert aux officiers du CIC.

Si un seul cadet éprouve ce problème, placez-le près d’une fenêtre ou confiez lui des tâches physiques en classe.

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

21


FORMATION DES CADETS

Capt Peter Westlake et Maj Phil Lusk

Si l’on pense des cadets qu’ils sont un secret bien gardé au Canada, que dire du mystère qui entoure les exercices d’orientation chez les cadets?

Orientation

Que vous a-t-elle appris? < Le Capt Mike Wionzek observe une équipe d’unité en orientation à la ligne d’arrivée de contrôle.

ais, peut-on encore aujourd’hui parler de mystère à ce sujet?

M

Cela n’est plus un secret pour qui que ce soit dans la région du Centre, plus particulièrement le secteur du Centre de l'Ontario (SCO). En effet, celle-ci a été le site de courses d’orientation annuelles depuis 2002. Cette activité a fortement progressé, ses effectifs passant de 42 cadets la première année à plus de 150 cadets l’an dernier. Ce franc succès à amené notre région à organiser des courses d’orientation dans les quatre secteurs, à compter de cet automne. Il nous a aussi donné l’idée de partager les connaissances acquises. Ce succès tient, pour une grande part, au partenariat solide qui nous unit à l’organisation Orienteering Ontario. Leurs bénévoles nous sont d’une aide précieuse en mettant en place les parcours, en distribuant les cartes, en organisant les inscriptions et en tenant à jour les statistiques de la compétition. Lorsque la RCO organise ces courses d’orientation, les corps et escadrons locaux en font la promotion, mais aussi offrent l’appui logistique nécessaire, notamment pour les préinscriptions, l’organisation des repas, la sécurité des moyens de transport, et la mise à disposition d’un personnel de soutien. Depuis deux ans, la région fourni

22

les médailles et les plaques, et le détachement à renforcé son soutien dès la deuxième année, consciente des valeurs transmises par cet exercice. Fort du succès des précédentes années, la région du Centre s’inspirera de ce modèle pour les trois autres secteurs et nommera, pour chacun, des coordinateurs chargés de recruter le personnel qui organisera et dirigera les compétitions. Ce faisant, elle permet aux quatre courses de se dérouler dans les mêmes conditions, et aux équipes et candidats gagnants de se qualifier pour le premier championnat régional d’orientation, qui se tiendra annuellement à partir du mois d’avril 2007. Autres secrets Quels autres secrets d’orientation avonsnous percés? • Il existe des différences notables entre la course d’orientation et la navigation militaire. En effet, alors que ces deux activités se déroulent habituellement en temps limité et font appel, à proportion égale (50 % / 50 %), à des plans et des compas, l’orientation comprend plutôt 95 % de lecture de carte et 5 % d’utilisation de boussole. Dans l’orientation, les officiers du CIC et les cadets comptent donc beaucoup trop sur leur

carte et leur boussole, perdant ainsi un temps précieux à rester immobiles au lieu de progresser vers leur repère de contrôle. • L’orientation constitue une excellente activité pour les trois éléments des FC. La navigation est une technique enseignée dans les trois. Bien que le cours d’instructeurs en Orientation proposé par les écoles régionales pour instructeurs de cadets s’adresse uniquement aux officiers de l’Armée et de la Force aérienne, la plupart des écoles ont permis aux officiers de la Marine d’y participer, en autant qu’il existe une volonté de créer ou de maintenir en place un programme d’orientation au sein de leur corps ou centre d’instruction. Nos courses d’orientation incluent des activités tant individuelles que collectives, auxquelles tous les cadets peuvent choisir de participer. Ces activités s’adressent tant aux novices qu’aux cadets expérimentés. Nous incitons chaque corps et escadron à présenter au moins une équipe. Ceux qui ne sont pas en mesure d’envoyer une équipe, peuvent présenter des candidats individuels qui pourront prétendre participer au championnat régional.

CADENCE

suite à la page 38

Numéro 20, Automne 2006


POLITIQUES

Col Robert Perron

Les nouvelles politiques: un impact positif! Il circule actuellement plusieurs nouvelles politiques qui auront un impact positif sur le Programme des cadets et, en particulier, sur le Cadre des Instructeurs de Cadets (CIC). ’aimerais vous parler de certaines de ces politiques, en prévision de l’arrivée des nouvelles Ordonnances sur l’administration et l’instruction des cadets (OAIC).

J

Nouvelle composante du CIC Le plus important changement est sans aucun doute le fait que le Conseil des Forces armées a recommandé la création d’une composante séparée des FC pour le CIC. Combien de fois vous êtes-vous senti frustré lorsqu’en consultant les procédures et règlements des FC, vous avez constaté que certains règlements ne s’appliquaient pas ou qu’une exception devrait être créée pour le CIC? La nouvelle composante du CIC relèguera ces frustrations dans le passé. Les répercussions de la création d’une nouvelle composante du CIC se font déjà sentir. Les FC ont récemment émis de nouveaux règlements concernant l’universalité du service – le principe voulant qu’en plus des tâches qui leur incombent en vertu de leur occupation militaire, les membres des FC doivent effectuer des tâches militaires générales ainsi que des tâches communes liées à la défense et à la sécurité. Cela suppose d’être en bonne forme physique, apte à l’emploi et « déployable » pour des fonctions opérationnelles générales. Par le passé, le CIC devait demander des exceptions à ces règlements. Les nouveaux règlements ont été élaborés en tenant déjà compte du fait qu’en tant que specialistes des jeunes, ils n’ont pas à être déployés.

Par conséquent, les officiers du CIC ne sont plus tenus de répondre aux exigences liées à la forme physique. De nouvelles normes fondées sur leurs fonctions de spécialistes des jeunes sont en train d’être élaborées spécifiquement à leur intention.

La nouvelle composante du CIC est la mesure la plus positive qui ait jamais été prise pour améliorer le CIC en ce qui a trait au service. Jamais auparavant on n’a eu l’occasion d’examiner chaque aspect des règlements et de les adapter en fonction de nos exigences.

Sélection améliorée De nouvelles politiques seront bientôt mises en œuvre pour le CIC. La vérification actuelle de la fiabilité n’est pas considérée comme étant suffisamment approfondie pour les adultes qui travaillent avec le « secteur vulnérable », qui représente les enfants de 12 à 18 ans – notre population de cadets. Tous les officiers du CIC devront se soumettre à une vérification de leurs antécédents judiciaires, ainsi qu’à une vérification spécifique au travail avec des personnes vulnérables. Cette vérification devra être renouvelée tous les cinq ans. Cette politique est actuellement mise en oeuvre afin de s’assurer que nos cadets sont protégés et que nos exigences en matière de fiabilité correspondent à celles de la plupart des autres organismes canadiens qui s’occupent des jeunes.

Souvenez-vous que la meilleure façon de prédire l’avenir est de participer à sa création. Deux voies s’offrent aux officiers du CIC qui veulent se faire entendre. Vous pouvez passer par la chaîne de commandement ou, si vous préférez, vous pouvez contacter le représentant régional du Conseil consultatif de la Branche du CIC. Vous en trouverez les coordonnées sur CadetNet. Le Col Perron est Directeur des Cadets et des Rangers juniors canadiens.

Modernisation de l’instruction des officiers Afin de préparer les officiers du CIC à remplir leur rôle unique de spécialistes des jeunes, nous sommes en train de moderniser leur programme d’instruction pour y inclure l’instruction militaire ainsi que l’instruction spécialisée pour les jeunes dont les officiers du CIC ont besoin pour bien faire leur travail.

< De nouvelles normes de conditionnement physique, basées sur l’exigence qu’ils soient spécialistes des jeunes, ont été spécifiquement élaborées pour les officiers du CIC. Le Lt Llora Brown, qui interagit ici avec le cadet-cadre du CIEC Whitehorse, le Sgt Ian Lin, doit agir en tant que spécialiste des jeunes, et ce au camp comme à son escadron local à Trail, C.-B. (Photo du Capt Elisabeth Mills, Affaires publiques, CIEC Whitehorse) Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

23


RECRUTEMENT

Michael Harrison

L’automne est à la porte et le Programme des cadets détourne son attention des camps d’été pour se concentrer maintenant sur le recrutement.

Stratégies de recrutement dans les écoles a majorité des officiers du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets sont conscients que le temps des jeunes est aujourd’hui la scène d’une concurrence croissante que se font les organisations de jeunes, les fournisseurs d’emplois à temps partiel, les services communautaires, les sports organisés et les activités parascolaires. Par conséquent, vous devez agir de façon plus stratégique dans nos efforts de recrutement.

L

Pour recruter des jeunes, vous devez avoir accès à eux. Puisqu’ils passent la majorité de leur journée à l’école, nous avons écrit cet article afin d’établir quelques stratégies pour entrer en contact avec les écoles, rencontrer leur personnel, et afin de souligner les nombreux avantages que les jeunes peuvent avoir à devenir des cadets. Avant de commencer, il vous faut connaître la clientèle d’élèves que vous recherchez. Profil du jeune à recruter Les élèves que l’on recherche pour le Programme des cadets ont de 12 à 13 ans et sont normalement en 7e et en 8e année. Habituellement, ce sont des élèves du niveau élémentaire, même si dans certains cas ils fréquentent déjà l’école secondaire.

24

Le programme des écoles élémentaires est fondamentalement différent de celui des écoles secondaires, en ce sens que les élèves des écoles élémentaires suivent un programme, alors que ceux des écoles secondaires suivent des cours qui font partie d’un programme permanent.

Présenter le Programme des cadets d’une manière telle que le directeur puisse se convaincre que la participation de ses élèves à ce programme améliorera son école. Dans ce groupe d’âge, les étudiant qui fréquentent l’école élémentaire sont les plus âgés, possèdent le plus d’expérience, et ils sont souvent les leaders dans leur école alors que les élèves qui fréquentent une école secondaire sont les plus jeunes et les plus petits et sont noyés dans une population étudiante beaucoup plus importante. La première année du secondaire est considérée comme l’année la plus stressante, celle qui cause le plus d’anxiété chez les élèves qui viennent de faire le saut de

l’élémentaire. Chez eux, il y a un puissant désir d’appartenance, une volonté farouche de se fondre avec ses pairs. Les adolescents éprouvent de l’anxiété au sujet de leur apparence physique, appréhendent les situations nouvelles, se préoccupent de ce que pensent les autres (pairs et adultes) et se soucient de ce qui menace leur estime de soi et s’inquiètent de ce qu’ils vont entreprendre dans le futur. Établir un lien Mon expérience de directeur et d’enseignant m’a appris que le Programme des cadets est pratiquement inconnu des adultes de nos communautés, particulièrement dans nos écoles. Je crois qu’en mettant en valeur ce que vous faites bien et en augmentant régulièrement la visibilité de vos jeunes cadets, vous favoriserez le recrutement de nouveaux candidats. Pour mener à bien un effort de recrutement, les officiers du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets doivent considérer les avantages et les gratifications qu’apportent l’appartenance aux cadets avec les besoins des élèves et les buts et les attentes des écoles locales en plus de ceux des ministères de l’éducation.

CADENCE

Numéro 20, Automne 2006


Par exemple, les objectifs et les valeurs essentielles du Programme des cadets sont très proches des initiatives du ministère de l’Éducation de l’Ontario, telles que la santé et le bien-être, la reconnaissance de l’existence de cas d’intimidation et de victimisation, de harcèlement et d’abus ainsi que la formation des élèves et du personnel dans la manière de les gérer, la formation technique, la formation dans les métiers et le service communautaire. Comment une école ne saurait-elle pas appuyer les quatre valeurs essentielles du Programme des cadets que sont la loyauté, le professionnalisme, le respect mutuel et l’intégrité? Ou comment une école ne saurait-elle pas reconnaître certains des avantages les plus importants à devenir cadet, tels que la confiance en soi, l’autodiscipline et la conscience de soi? Accès aux écoles et aux écoliers Avoir accès aux écoles et aux élèves est une partie essentielle de notre programme de recrutement. Vous devez bien vous informer au sujet des écoles locales et êtes également bien préparés lorsque vous devrez rencontrer leur personnel ou des groupes de parents. Que vous faut-il savoir? Les faits ci-dessous au sujet des écoles de l’Ontario peuvent vous en donner une idée : • Il y a aura une diminution de l’enrôlement dans la province dans un avenir immédiat. Cela veut dire qu’en Ontario, la cohorte des 12 à 13 ans que vous ciblez va aussi diminuer dans la prochaine décennie. • Pratiquement, tous les directeurs et directeurs adjoints de nos écoles sont des femmes, tout comme le sont les enseignants. Cette tendance devient encore plus prononcée dans les écoles secondaires. • Le service à l’occasion du Jour du souvenir est le seul qui est célébré dans les écoles publiques. • Les fusils ou armes de poing (faux ou réels) – exposés ou utilisés dans le cadre d’une cérémonie – ne sont pas autorisés dans les écoles élémentaires et dans la plupart des écoles secondaires en raison

des politiques de tolérance zéro. Les directeurs, les enseignants et les parents ne se doutent pas du caractère indépendant du Programme des cadets par rapport à l’armée. • Les directeurs sont souvent à l’extérieur de l’école pour assister à des réunions. • Les directeurs consacrent la majeure partie de leur journée aux affaires concernant le personnel, les parents et les écoliers. Rencontrer le directeur Certains des faits énumérés ci-dessus peuvent s’avérer utiles pour votre localité, d’autres pas. Toutefois, lorsque vous recrutez, voici certains comportements à adopter avant et pendant votre rencontre avec un directeur d’école : • Ne vous présentez pas à une école locale sans y être attendus. Prenez d’abord rendez-vous et ne prévoyez pas une visite de plus de 15 à 20 minutes. • Apprenez à connaître l’école – visitez son site Web ou celui du conseil scolaire pour vous renseigner. • Cherchez à connaître la composition ethnique de la population des écoliers, ou si l’école a des classes pour enfants à besoins spéciaux; ce qui intéresse principalement école; les grands événements qui s’y préparent.

célébrations de la Fête du drapeau et aux célébrations d’anniversaire de l’école? Peut-être, pourront-ils agir comme bénévoles lors d’événements sportifs et d’excursions scolaires, placer des drapeaux sur les lieux d’une assemblée et participer à des concerts ou à des assemblées? Ils pourraient même parrainer ou diriger un club robotique ou une compétition de robotique. L’important est de chercher les occasions de mettre en valeur les cadets dans les écoles. Presque jamais ils ne vous laisseront tomber. Et le recrutement n’en sera que plus facile! Michael Harrison a travaillé comme spécialiste de l’éducation pour deux conseils scolaires pendant près de 40 ans. Ancien enseignant, directeur, directeur adjoint, il a travaillé pour le ministère de l’Éducation pendant six ans. Il est actuellement administrateur de réseau au Conseil scolaire d’Ottawa-Carleton et professeur à temps partiel à la Faculté de pédagogie de l’Université d’Ottawa. M. Harrison présentera dans notre prochain numéro quelques idées pour accroître la visibilité des cadets dans votre localité.

• Soyez prêts à bien établir le type d’élèves que vous voulez rejoindre, pour combien de temps; ayez en main des copies de votre exposé. • Présenter le Programme des cadets d’une manière telle que le directeur puisse se convaincre que la participation de ses élèves à ce programme améliorera son école et que les élèves cadets rehausseront la réputation de l’école dans la communauté. • Essayer de découvrir certaines activités scolaires où les cadets peuvent jouer un rôle, et rappelez-vous qu’en Ontario, au moins, toutes les heures fournies à titre de bénévole comptent dans les crédits scolaires. Peut-être, les cadets pourrontils devenir brigadiers scolaires, faire la lecture à de plus jeunes ou participer au service du Jour du souvenir, aux

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

25


RÉTENTION

Lt David Jackson

Maintien en poste des nouvelles recrues < Même s’ils n’ont pas leur uniforme, inviter les nouvelles recrues aux cérémonies auxquelles prennent part vos cadets, par exemple à celle du Jour du souvenir.

os corps et escadrons de cadets disposent chacun de leur chaîne de commandement avec grades à la clé pour identifier les devoirs et responsabilités de chacun. Pour une nouvelle recrue, toutefois, trouver sa place exacte au sein d’un corps ou d’un escadron peut s’avérer difficile. L’une des clés de la rétention des nouvelles recrues est de leur communiquer un sens d’appartenance. Nous vous proposons ci-dessous quelques suggestions afin de créer ce sens d’appartenance et aider les recrues à se situer dans ce nouvel environnement.

N

Création d’une escadrille, d’une division ou d’un peloton distincts pour les recrues Cette formule convient aux corps ou escadrons qui accueillent de nombreuses recrues à l’automne. Par exemple, lorsqu’elles sont placées dans une escadrille distincte et peuvent suivre de près l’exercice militaire qui se déroule sur le terrain de parade la recrue peut alors voir ce à quoi elles peuvent aspirer. Cela leur permet aussi de pratiquer le drill ensemble – ce qui génère un esprit d’équipe et leur rappelle qu’ils font partie d’un tout.

26

Placement d’un cadet supérieur et d’un cadet subalterne à la tête des recrues Cela permet à deux cadets-chefs de pratiquer leur leadership et d’enseigner le drill aux recrues. Comme il s’agit de pairs, ces deux cadets serviront de premiers points de contact : transmissions des messages destinés à l’effectif, incitation à participer aux manifestions à venir et résolution des problèmes éventuels.

Uniforme ou non, incitez les recrues à participer aux évènements! Tenue d’une journée d’entraînement spéciale pour les recrues Il s’agit d’une activité ayant lieu le samedi, qui permettra aux nouveaux de pratiquer le drill, de se mettre au diapason des Connaissances générales dont ils auraient manqué les classes, et de mettre l’accent sur certains aspects comme la préparation de l’uniforme, le cirage des bottes, le salut militaire et la chaîne de commandement. Ils pourront également s’exercer à préparer un plan de leçon, l’instruction, et même faire l’objet d’une évaluation ce même jour.

incitez les recrues à participer aux évènements! Si vous prenez part à une manifestation publique où l’uniforme est de rigueur, comme le défilé commémorant la Bataille d’Angleterre ou l’Armistice, invitez les recrues à être des vôtres, uniforme ou pas. Demandez-leur de s’habiller comme il faut, avec chemise-cravate et jupe ou pantalon soigné. Vous déciderez vous-même de les faire défiler ou participer à l’exercice. Dans tous les cas, ils seront de la fête et pourront voir les autres cadets en action, ce qui les motivera à faire de même l’année suivante. Organisez une soirée de bienvenue officielle Entre la mi-novembre et la fin-janvier, le corps ou l’escadron de cadets devrait tenir une soirée de bienvenue officielle pour ses recrues. Tous les nouveaux devraient alors avoir leur uniforme. Invitez à cette occasion un dignitaire, un représentant provincial de la ligue et les parents des jeunes. Ça sera, pour vos recrues, l’occasion de faire le serment d’allégeance; d’être affectés à leur escadrille, peloton ou division à demeure; de recevoir les coordonnées de leurs nouveaux commandants ainsi qu’une marque de reconnaissance pour leur entrée

CADENCE

Numéro 20, Automne 2006


L’une des clés de la rétention des nouvelles recrues est de leur communiquer un sens d’appartenance. En faisant travailler les recrues ensemble, en leur affectant des pairs comme points de contact, en les informant promptement, en les incitant à participer aux manifestations organisées, et en tenant en leur honneur un défilé spécial, vous êtes assuré de les mettre à l’aise et de favoriser l’éclosion d’un sens de l’appartenance. Ils sauront ainsi qu’ils

<

En décembre dernier, l’Escadron 810 des cadets de l’Air d’Edmonton a tenu un rassemblement de fin de cours pour ses recrues, lors de la revue de l'officier commandant et en présence d’un dignitaire. Les recrues ont alors été assermentées et affectées à leur escadrille; elles ont également reçu leurs certificats d’entrée dans l’escadron. Un repas multiculturel dit « Taste of 810 » a aussi été organisé par le répondant officiel de l’escadron et apprêté par les parents. Ce repas incluait des mets multiculturels illustrant bien la diversité du patrimoine et de la culture de l’escadron. Les cadets ont ainsi pu déguster des plats d’origine indienne, sri-lankaise, coréenne, allemande, ukrainienne, russe et, bien entendu, canadienne. La soirée s’est conclue par une séance d’information sur les cours d’été.

officielle dans le mouvement des cadets. On dissout alors l’unité provisoire (escadrille, peloton ou division de recrues) jusqu’à l’année d’instruction suivante. Toute nouvelle recrue arrivant après cette date sera automatiquement affectée à une escadrille, un peloton ou une division à caractère permanent; un cadet-chef sera nommé pour la mettre au même niveau que ses camarades.

Le cadet de l’Air Daniel Schenker reçoit son certificat d’entrée à l’escadron des mains du 2Lt Kyla Ewasiuk, officier d'instruction adjoint chargé des recrues à l’Escadron 810 des cadets de l’Air. comptent pour leur corps ou leur escadron. Ils y auront donc trouvé leur place et entrepris de nouer de nouvelles relations… Ce qui est clé dans la rétention. Le Lt Jackson est l’officier d'administration auprès de l’Escadron 810 des cadets de l'Air à Edmonton.

Le cadet de l’Air 1 Donavin Kavich et la recrue Connor Oranchuk apprécient manifestement les petits plats servis dans le cadre d’un partage multiculturel à la fortune du pot baptisé « Taste of 810 », une manifestation qui permet aux recrues de se sentir vraiment chez eux.

<

Des initiatives qui renforcent le sens de l’appartenance

L’Escadron 504 des cadets de l’Air d’Edmonton organise au mois de janvier un défilé en l’honneur du « Loyal Order of the Chinthe ». Rappelons que le chinthe est une créature mythologique birmane et bouddhiste, mi-lion mi-chien, mascotte de l’escadron – c’est d’ailleurs la même mascotte que celle de l’unité de la Force régulière à laquelle l’escadron est affilié, à savoir l’Escadron 435 de transport et de sauvetage. Au bout de deux ans de service à l’Escadron 504, les cadets reçoivent un médaillon blasonné du chinthe, avec au verso le nom et numéro de l’unité ainsi que le numéro du médaillon. Le détenteur du médaillon devient membre du « Loyal Order of the Chinthe » et s’engage à respecter la charte, le règlement, qui y est associé.

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

27


DÉVELOPPEMENT DES OFFICIERS

Capt Carl Choinière

Cours universitaires pour les officiers du CIC Cesse-t-on d’apprendre? Parvient-on un jour au constat suivant : « Ça y est, j’ai la tête trop pleine, je ne serai jamais plus capable de rien assimiler »? Bien sûr que non. Le Collège militaire royal (CMR) et, plus précisément, sa Division des études permanentes (DÉP) est l’endroit où s’adresser pour qui désire poursuivre des études formelles dans le confort de son foyer ou de son bureau.

râce à l’apprentissage à distance (AD), la DÉP offre des cours du premier cycle et des cycles supérieurs, des certificats du premier cycle, plus le Programme d'études militaires professionnelles pour les officiers (PEMPO). La majorité de ces formations sont offertes dans les deux langues officielles et sont ouvertes à tous les membres des FC.

G

La bonne nouvelle c’est que si le PEMPO [Programme d’études militaires professionnelles pour les officiers] vous intéresse, les cours qui le composent sont dispensés à titre gracieux! La bonne nouvelle c’est que si le PEMPO vous intéresse, les cours qui le composent sont dispensés à titre gracieux! À moins d’avoir déjà suivi le même cours et de devoir le reprendre, il n’y a aucuns frais de scolarité à régler, et les livres vous sont

28

même envoyés gratuitement. Si ce sont les programmes du premier, du deuxième et du troisième cycles qui vous intéressent, ils ne sont pas offerts gratuitement mais vous payerez beaucoup moins cher que ce qu’on peut trouver dans n’importe quelle université (environ 350 $ pour un cours du premier cycle, 710 $ pour les cycles supérieurs, livres en sus). Le PEMPO Le PEMPO vise l’optimisation de la réflexion critique et l’élaboration de solutions nouvelles en faisant en sorte que les officiers subalternes possèdent tous un même fonds de connaissances (les connaissances communes) reliées à la profession militaire. Les officiers subalternes de la Force régulière sont tenus de suivre ce programme pour être admissibles à une promotion au grade de major ou de capitaine de corvette; tous les autres membres des FC peuvent par contre suivre ces cours pour accroître leur connaissance de ces sujets dans un contexte militaire. Il existe actuellement six cours, couvrant chacun un

CADENCE

Numéro 20, Automne 2006


domaine particulier jugé essentiel à la charge d’officier : gestion de la défense, droit militaire, histoire militaire, instruction civique et politique, leadership et éthique, et enfin application de la technologie militaire à des opérations militaires. Pour toutes informations supplémentaires au sujet du programme du PEMPO ou pour vous y inscrire, visitez le site www.opme.forces.gc.ca/ .

Pour des informations supplémentaires au sujet du programme du PEMPO ou pour vous y inscrire, visitez le site de la DÉP: www.rmc.ca/academic/ continuing/. Les frais de scolarité figurent sur le site www.rmc.ca/academic/ registrar/allfees_f.html . Diplômes du premier cycle Comme la plupart des universités canadiennes, le CMR offre des baccalauréats échelonnés sur une période de trois ans (trente cours d’un trimestre chacun). Ces programmes s’articulent autour d’un noyau de cours auxquels pourront se greffer certains cours au choix, jugés pertinents et dûment approuvés. Trois disciplines sont proposées : Baccalauréat militaire ès arts et sciences (BMASc), Baccalauréat ès arts (BA) et Baccalauréat ès sciences (BSc). Baccalauréat militaire ès arts et sciences Le BMASc repose solidement sur des éléments de la profession militaire, ce qui en fait un programme unique pour les FC. Bien qu’il présente la même durée que les diplômes conventionnels de trois ans, il a été en fait conçu pour une période prolongée, en intégrant l’instruction militaire professionnelle (comme les cours du PEMPO) à des disciplines universitaires courantes ou spéciales, reconnaissant ainsi le besoin d’une formation de type universitaire pour la profession des armes. Un programme spécialisé existe également pour les étudiants désirant poursuivre des études supérieures dans ce domaine.

Baccalauréat ès arts Ce programme est offert comme baccalauréat général, ou avec mineure ou avec concentration. Concentrations et mineures peuvent se faire dans les domaines suivants : Administration des affaires, Histoire, Psychologie, Anglais, Français, Sciences politiques ou Économie. Les militaires ayant entrepris un baccalauréat général ou un baccalauréat avec mineure conservent toujours la possibilité de s’inscrire à une concentration. Baccalauréat ès sciences Le programme BSc se décline comme BSc général ou comme baccalauréat avec mineure. Si l’on retient la formule de la mineure, il faudra suivre une formation en Chimie, en Physique, en Mathématiques ou en Informatique. Autres sujets considérés comme sciences : algèbre, algorithmes et calcul, mécanique, optique, etc. Comme dans le cas du programme du BA, on pourra toujours s’inscrire à la mineure même une fois le programme BSc amorcé. Études supérieures Maîtrise ès arts sur la conduite de la guerre Le programme MA(WS) est consacré à l’étude du phénomène de la guerre et de la paix. Les militaires qui s’y inscrivent ont le choix entre deux formules : sans mémoire (cinq cours de deux trimestres chacun) ou avec mémoire (trois cours de deux trimestres chacun. plus travail de recherche). L’obtention d’un baccalauréat spécialisé (« honours ») de quatre ans, en Arts, en Science ou en Génie, constitue un préalable à l’admission. Maîtrise ès arts en gestion et politique de défense Ce programme est axé sur les questions du monde contemporain des affaires et de la gestion. Les intéressés ont le choix entre trois formules : cours uniquement (douze cours d’un trimestre chacun), travail dirigé (dix cours d’un trimestre, plus travail dirigé), et recherche (six cours d’un trimestre, plus mémoire). L’obtention d’un baccalauréat spécialisé (« honours ») de quatre ans constitue un préalable à l’admission.

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

Certificats du premier cycle Certificat en gestion avec applications à la défense Ce certificat vise l'acquisition d'une compréhension de base relativement à la gestion dans le contexte de la défense. Il couvre des sujets comme les principes de gestion, les méthodes, la commercialisation, les systèmes d’information, la comptabilité, le processus décisionnel et la psychologie humaine. En outre, les dix cours d’un trimestre suivis pour ce certificat seront crédités pour le BA et le BMASc offerts par la DÉP. Certificat en protection environnementale Ce certificat contribue à la concrétisation de la Stratégie de développement durable du MDN en offrant au personnel les compétences, techniques et connaissances nécessaires pour prévenir la pollution et préserver l’environnement. De plus, les neuf cours d’un trimestre (y compris un projet de recherche) suivis pour ce certificat seront crédités pour le BA et le BMASc offerts par la DÉP. Le Capt Choinière est l’officier chargé du développement de didacticiel du CIC à la Direction des cadets.

29


CONSEIL CONSULTATIF DE LA BRANCHE

Lcol Tom McGrath

Un porte-parole national Le mandat du Conseil consultatif de la Branche (CCB) du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets (CIC) est de représenter les quelque 7 500 officiers du CIC, de faire valoir leurs préoccupations d’ordre professionnel et de leur assurer une voix lors de l’élaboration des politiques qui touchent la Branche. e CCB est une unité conseil regroupant des officiers supérieurs du CIC, dont le mandat recouvre la définition et l’étude des préoccupations de ces officiers, en plus de conseiller la Direction des cadets. Cela étant, le CCB ne se substitue nullement à la chaîne de commandement des FC et ne peut en aucun cas appuyer les griefs ou doléances de type personnel.

Nous touchons aux thèmes les plus divers, allant des uniformes et attributs à une multitude de questions propres à la gestion des ressources humaines. Les officiers du CIC peuvent être assurés que le Conseil est engagé à fond dans le projet de Structure des groupes professionnels militaires (SGPM) du CIC.

Votre CCB se fait le porte-parole national de vos préoccupations professionnelles collectives.

• Adoption d’un rôle de catalyseur pour l’introduction d’un régime de retraite pour officiers du CIC et une augmentation du nombre de jours de congés payés;

L

Le Conseil regroupe sept représentants (un représentant de chaque région et un pour la classe B). Le Directeur général Réserves et cadets nomme le président du CCB. Chacun des six conseillers régionaux dirige un Conseil de représentants CIC issus de leurs régions respectives. Depuis sa réforme en l’an 2000, le Conseil a traité un très grand nombre de dossiers concernant les politiques CIC. Le CCB sert de « champion » à la Branche : deux fois par an il rencontre le Directeur des cadets et des Rangers juniors canadiens pour discuter des préoccupations de la Branche. De par la complexité géographique et organisationnelle de cette entité, on peut dire qu’elle représente les opinions des officiers régionaux.

30

Au cours des dernières années, le Conseil a pris les mesures suivantes :

• Rétroaction sur les politiques touchant les promotions ainsi que les récompenses et titres honorifiques au CIC; • Incitation proactive à une reconnaissance de la Branche par le Conseil de liaison des Forces canadiennes (CLFC); • Rétroaction sur des barèmes de dotation; • Élaboration, en équipe, du sondage omnibus du CIC et du prochain sondage de sortie du CIC; • Étude des avantages que présenterait l’inclusion éventuelle des militaires du rang au sein du CIC, ainsi que de la nécessité de gérer certaines iniquités touchant les possibilités d’emploi en région. En outre, le Conseil continue de se faire le champion des questions pratiques, à l’écoute des besoins en vêtements additionnels et commentaires concernant la

tenue vestimentaire pour formuler des recommandations à l’intention du Directeur des cadets. Récemment, le Col Robert Perron, Directeur - Cadets et Rangers juniors canadiens, apportait une valeur ajoutée au rôle du CCB en incluant sa présidence dans toutes les conférences D Cad/Cdt URSC (Directeur des cadets/Commandant de l’Unité régionale de soutien aux cadets). Le renforcement des rapports avec les Cdt URSC aura permis d’obtenir un soutien accru avec prises de décision concernant les principaux thèmes CIC. En fin de compte, votre CCB se fait le porte-parole national de vos préoccupations professionnelles collectives. Nous pouvons faire office de banc d’essai pour toute nouvelle idée et vous servir de champion en promouvant les intérêts qui sont les vôtres. Nous vous incitons donc à nous faire part de vos réflexions. L’ex-président, le Lcol Roman Ciecwierz, résume très bien les succès remportés : « D’abord et surtout, le CCB continue à accroître sa valeur ajoutée en servant de lien direct entre le QG national et les QG régionaux. Une nette évolution se fait sentir au sein de cette entité conseil très proactive, qui ne craint pas de prendre les devants dans les dossiers pertinents. » Le Lcol McGrath est le nouveau président du CCB du CIC. Visitez le site CadetNet pour obtenir des renseignements supplémentaires, ses coordonnées ou celles de votre représentant régional.

CADENCE

Numéro 20, Automne 2006


DÉVELOPPEMENT DES OFFICIERS

Ltv Tom Edwards

Rapport d’évaluation des cadets Titres honorifiques, postes supérieurs et postes d’instruction d’été… comment un corps ou un escadron opèret-il ses sélections et, surtout, comment les justifie-t-elles à partir des données réelles dont il dispose sur les cadets? l s’agit d’un véritable dilemme pour de nombreux officiers et intervenants des corps et escadrons placés, d’année en année, devant de tels choix. In 1996, à titre de commandant de l’Escadron 237 TRUXTON des cadets de la Marine, basé à Lawn, T.-N., j’ai constaté qu’il devrait exister une meilleure façon de procéder pour le choix des cadets destinés à des titres ou à des postes divers.

cadet, information qui est par la suite envoyée aux parents du jeune. Les officiers notent les cadets chaque semaine, en se servant d’une grille d’évaluation, où l’on marque le pointage pour la tenue vestimentaire et le comportement. Cette information s’avère précieuse au moment de procéder aux sélections. La participation concrète du cadet à des activités constitue un autre facteur important dans le processus de sélection. Si le cadet a participé (ou tenté de participer) à diverses activités comme le tir à la carabine, l’art oratoire et les compétitions de drill, on en tiendra compte.

I

En 1997, on jetait donc les bases d’un système permettant de documenter les prestations de chaque cadet tout au long de l’année. Ce système allait servir lors des évaluations en vue de la remise de titres honorifiques et de l’attribution de postes au centre d’instruction d’été. Au fil des ans, le système a évolué de manière à répondre aux attentes nouvelles du corps de cadets. Au cœur de ce dispositif, est une politique écrite qui a évolué et a été adoptée sous forme d’Ordres permanents. Par exemple, tous les cadets doivent avoir un taux d’assiduité d’au moins 85

<

À l’époque, notre système de sélection consistait en un bref échange entre officiers du corps à propos d’un titre en particulier, avant de passer au vote pour en choisir le récipiendaire. Peu d’information venait étayer la décision. Résultat pratique : immanquablement, les autres cadets et leurs parents remettaient en cause les choix qui avaient été faits. En réalité, si une contestation sérieuse avait été formulée, nous n’aurions jamais disposé des éléments de transparence et de responsabilité nécessaires pour la contrer.

Le Ltv Edwards peut documenter toutes les décorations qu’il demande. pour cent pour être admissibles aux titres. En outre, tout officier qui siège sur le comité de sélection doit lui aussi démontrer d’un taux d’assiduité de 85 pour cent. Par souci d’équité, il a été décidé que nul ne pourrait recevoir plus d’un titre, à moins qu’il ne s’agisse de compétences particulières, comme le tir à la carabine. Nous invitons aussi un représentant de notre répondant à assister au processus de sélection, ce qui contribue à rendre la démarche plus responsable. Lorsque le comité de sélection se réunit, le commandant remet à chaque officier une liste des candidatures en lice. Le commandant doit alors s’assurer que tous les candidats satisfont aux exigences de la politique établie ainsi qu’aux critères fixés pour l’attribution des titres. Les membres du comité sanctionnent ensuite les candidats en se servant d’un barème de pointage. Le candidat ayant obtenu le plus de points hérite du titre. Le comité étudie l’information qui figure dans le rapport d’évaluation annuelle du

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

La préparation de ces rapports d’évaluation a prouvé son utilité pour notre corps de cadets. Les données consignées permettent un processus décisionnel complet et bien étayé. Et, plus important encore, ce système nous responsabilise et permet d’être prêt à répondre à d’éventuelles remises en question. Tout cela est bien beau, mais encore faut-il que la structure utilisée soit transparente. Facteur clé de notre démarche, notre politique de la porte ouverte. Nous avisons les parents et les incitons à participer aux prestations du cadet. Nous les invitons à venir visiter le corps des cadets au moment qui leur convient le mieux, notamment afin de discuter des préoccupations qu’euxmêmes ou leur enfant pourraient avoir. Il ne fait aucun doute que tout cela vient alourdir la charge de travail de nos officiers. Cependant, disposer de dossiers exhaustifs sur les prestations des jeunes nous permet de mieux fonder les décisions que nous prenons à leur endroit. Un peu comme si l’on disposait déjà de tous les reçus pertinents au moment où les agents de Revenu Canada se pointent chez nous pour procéder à une vérification fiscale. Enfin, peut-être pas vraiment, mais dans le même ordre d’idée...

31


Capc Gerry Pash

Récompenses et titres honorifiques Prenez le temps de procéder à une nomination e 26 octobre 1977, le commandant de l’Escadron 296 des cadets de l’Air était décoré, par le Gouverneur général Jules Léger, Membre de l’Ordre du Canada. Le Maj Glenn Drinkwater était ainsi reconnu pour ses longs et loyaux services à la collectivité, avec pour citation : « Un pompier ayant offert d’innombrables heures de service communautaire aux scouts, aux cadets de l’Air, à l’Ordre de St-Jean, au YMCA, à sa paroisse et aux personnes atteintes de déficience mentale, qui a ainsi contribué à faire de la collectivité de Cambridge un milieu où il fait bon vivre pour les jeunes et les moins jeunes. » [Traduction libre]

L

Trente ans plus tard, le processus en vertu duquel on peut être reconnu comme membre méritant d’une collectivité demeure le même qu’en 1977 : quelqu’un doit prendre le temps de procéder à une nomination. Glenn Drinkwater n’avait que 35 ans lorsqu’il a été nommé Membre de l’Ordre du Canada, un ordre relativement récent alors en pleine évolution. La décoration, octroyée dans la catégorie « Bénévolat », englobait clairement plus que le seul cadre de ses activités en tant que Cadre des instructeurs de cadets des FC. On peut penser que plusieurs membres de sa communauté ont appuyé sa mise en nomination. Trente ans plus tard, le processus en

32

vertu duquel on peut être reconnu comme membre méritant d’une collectivité demeure le même qu’en 1977 : quelqu’un doit prendre le temps de procéder à une nomination. André Levesque, à la Direction de l’Histoire et du patrimoine, a la responsabilité d’administrer le programme des ordres, décorations et médailles des membres des FC. Il confirme que les officiers du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets (CIC) sont également admissibles à la longue liste de récompenses et titres honorifiques du Canada. Selon lui, il n’existe aucun préjugé défavorable à l’endroit des officiers du CIC. L’ensemble des membres des FC, qu’ils soient de la Force régulière ou de la Réserve, sont en effet admissibles à ces récompenses et titres selon des critères d’admission identiques pour tous. À preuve, l’Ordre du mérite militaire (OMM), remis annuellement à un millième de l’effectif des FC pour l’année révolue. Les titres sont donc décernés en fonction du nombre de militaires (Force régulière et Réserve) dans la chaîne de commandement de sept recommandeurs. Les autorités à la source des recommandations incluent l’ancien groupe du Sous-chef d'état-major de la Défense (SCEMD), le vice-chef d'état-major de la Défense (VCEMD), le Chef d'état-major de la Force maritime (CEMFM), le Chef d'état major de la Force terrestre (CEMFT), le Chef d'étatmajor de la Force aérienne (CEMFA), le Chef, Personnel militaire (CPM), et le

Sous-ministre adjoint, Matériels (SMA [Mat]). Pour la plupart des membres du CIC, les nominations passent de leur commandant régional respectif au chef d’état-major responsable de la région. Ainsi les nominations faites pour les régions Pacifique et Atlantique doivent-elles passer par le CEMFM, celles des régions de l’Est et du Centre par le CEMFT, celles de la région des Prairies par le CEMFA, pour approbation et sélection. Enfin, la nomination des officiers employés par la Direction des cadets est confiée au VCEMD. Les autorités ayant pouvoir de recommander pourront sélectionner autant de réservistes qu’elles le souhaitent dans les limites qui leur seront prescrites. Ainsi, toutes les nominations OMM au sein d’un même groupe pourraient théoriquement aller à un réserviste. Il est intéressant de noter que les récipiendaires de l’OMM comptent habituellement au moins 20 ans de service. Par ailleurs, le titre ne sanctionne pas seulement les réalisations militaires, puisque les critères de sélection englobent l’ensemble de l’apport social à la collectivité ainsi que les activités ayant un sens civique en général. « Il serait impossible de préciser combien de candidats sont des officiers du CIC, signale M. Levesque. Il est probable que, parmi les rares membres de longue date issus de l’effectif de 7 000 officiers du CIC, certains pourraient se qualifier pour l’obtention de ce titre. Mais ils devront au préalable être mis en nomination à l’échelon local, nomination qui devra passer par

CADENCE

Numéro 20, Automne 2006


la chaîne de commandement et franchir toutes les étapes prescrites avant de parvenir aux autorités émettant les recommandations. » Il est par ailleurs malaisé de faire le décompte distinct des récipiendaires réservistes (CIC ou Première réserve) car l’OMM englobe la « force totale ».

Être un proposant devient, en soi, un acte altruiste puisqu’il faut alors oublier son propre ego afin d’œuvrer allègrement à la gloire d’un autre, tout en sachant que cet effort ne sera pas forcément couronné de succès. « Le manque de reconnaissance et de titres n’a rien de spécifique aux officiers du CIC », indique M. Levesque. Tous les échelons des FC sont en quête de moyens susceptibles d’augmenter les nominations menant à divers titres. La décoration pour service méritoire (Croix du service méritoire, Médaille du service méritoire) constitue un bel exemple de titre national sous-utilisé, et ce, malgré l’absence de contingentement annuel et l’usage de critères plutôt généraux. À l’évidence, il faudra toujours prendre le temps de procéder à une nomination.

Les instructeurs du Programme des cadets sont-ils dûment reconnus? L’auteur de ces lignes se contentera de noter qu’au cours des dernières années, plusieurs instructeurs en Colombie Britannique ont reçu, en plus de la DC, la Mention élogieuse du

La mise en place et l’usage optimal des titres honorifiques nationaux n’est pas une mince tâche. À l’occasion du 10e anniversaire de l’Ordre du Canada, on a demandé à Maxwell Cohen, 1000e membre de l’Ordre, de rédiger un essai sur la question. Voici un extrait de son document A Round Table from Sea to Sea : « Une médaille constitue un message – plutôt que la marque du surhomme, c’est la preuve tangible d’un mérite savamment cultivé. Bien entendu, il existe toujours le risque d’avoir un système fondé sur le mérite qui sonne faux. Il faut choisir. Lorsque quelqu’un demande « Pourquoi X et pas Y? », même le meilleur des Conseils consultatifs ne pourra affirmer devant le (ou la) Gouverneur(e) général(e)... que nulle erreur de jugement n’a pu être commise. » [Traduction libre] La partie la plus ingrate du travail dans le domaine des titres et récompenses incombe assurément au comité de sélection. Quant à la partie « facile » du processus, c’est généralement la plus négligée – il faut d’abord que quelqu’un ait pu observer des gestes exemplaires ou une contribution notoire sur une période prolongée. Le proposant doit faire son travail comme il faut et rédiger une soumission par laquelle il devra convaincre la chaîne de commandement. Être un proposant devient, en soi, un acte altruiste puisqu’il faut alors oublier son propre ego afin d’œuvrer allègrement à la gloire d’un autre, tout en sachant que cet effort ne sera pas forcément couronné de succès. Rappelons-nous que si les membres d’un groupe ne soumettent aucune nomination, aucun d’eux ne sera reconnu. La question de savoir si les instructeurs du Programme des cadets reçoivent la reconnaissance qui leur est due n’aura sa réponse que le jour où les intervenants à tous les échelons du programme soumettront les nominations envisagées. Le Capc Pash est l'officier des affaires publiques régionales au sein de l'Unité régionale de soutien des cadets (Pacifique).

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

Prix d’excellence du CIC Le Prix d’excellence du CIC a été créé en 2005 par l’École régionale des instructeurs de cadets (Est) à l’occasion de son 30e anniversaire, pour commémorer celui-ci et rendre hommage aux officiers du CIC. Depuis 2005, le Prix est décerné annuellement à un officier du CIC qui fait preuve d’innovation et d’initiative quant à l’application sur le terrain des concepts appris en cours. L’innovation ou l’initiative doit avoir un impact positif sur l’ensemble du Programme des cadets ou sur l’une de ses composantes. Le prix se veut un encouragement à l’excellence. Cette année, le Capt Jean-Guy Boudreau, un instructeur du Corps 2768 des cadets de l’Armée à Grande-Rivière, Québec, est devenu le premier récipiendaire de ce prix. Notre prochain numéro consacrera un article sur le projet qui lui a valu ce Prix d’excellence.

<

Bien sûr, certains officiers du CIC consacrent une bonne part de leur vie au Programme des cadets. Les statistiques concernant les Décorations des Forces canadiennes (DC) sont révélatrices : en 2005, non moins de 22 des 42 troisièmes agrafes DC ont été remises à des officiers CIC; en 2004, on en dénombrait 24 sur 51; et en 2003, 14 sur 25. Or, si l’on affirme souvent que la remise de ces titres contribue au maintien des effectifs, on est en droit de se demander pourquoi les officiers du CIC quittent en moyenne après seulement 5,4 années de service – donc avant d’avoir donné la moitié du temps nécessaire à l’obtention de la DC initiale.

CEMFM, le certificat Bravo Zulu du commandant de formation, l’Ordre de StJean et la Mention élogieuse du ministère des Anciens combattants.

Le Capt Jean-Guy Boudreau, au centre, reçoit le premier Prix d’Excellence du CIC décérné par le Maj Yves Leblanc, Commandant de l’École régionale des instructeurs des cadets de l’Est, à gauche et le LCol Marcel Chevarie, ancien commandant de l’Unité régionale de Soutien aux cadets (Est).

33


Ltv Julie Harris

Sondage Ipsos-Reid —Et maintenant? Quelle est l’impression que notre programme laisse dans l’esprit des jeunes Canadiens et de leurs parents? elle était la question à laquelle le ministère de la Défense nationale et la maison Ipsos-Reid se sont proposé de répondre, grâce à un sondage effectué l’an dernier auprès des cadets, des jeunes du grand public et des parents et/ou tuteurs des cadets et jeunes non cadets interrogés. Il s’agissait en fait de creuser un certain nombre de questions concernant le Programme des cadets. Qui en connaît l’existence? Comment est-il perçu? Quels en sont les points forts et les faiblesses? Que pense-t-on de l’instruction qui y est offerte? Autant de questions assurément pertinentes pour le programme.

T

Suivent ici certains résultats de ce sondage, ainsi que la liste des défis qui en découlent.

< Nombreux sont les jeunes qui sont attirés par le Programme des Cadets en raison de ses caractéristiques militaires, en particulier l’uniforme, de la tête aux pieds!

Bon nombre de cadets signalent des problèmes d’horaires, surtout en conflit avec les travaux scolaires. Connaissance du Programme des cadets et impressions à son endroit Les jeunes inscrits au Programme des cadets, ainsi que leurs parents et les membres du grand public, ont une opinion nettement favorable à l'égard du programme dans son ensemble, malgré le manque de familiarité en ce qui en concerne les modalités exactes. • Pour les parents et les jeunes en général, le principal moyen de s’informer sur le

34

programme demeure le bouche à oreille, auprès des parents et amis. • Le principal motif que les cadets donnent pour se joindre au mouvement est la présence de parents ou amis au sein du programme. • Le principal motif que les parents invoquent pour inscrire leurs enfants est la volonté exprimée par ces derniers d’adhérer au programme. Notre défi : Accroître la visibilité du programme, surtout auprès des principaux intéressés, les jeunes. De nouvelles méthodes de marketing, comme le bouche à oreille organisé, pourraient s’avérer judicieuses. La réputation d’un programme est, de loin, le principal moteur de décision dans le public; et, selon le sondage, cela serait particulièrement vrai du Programme des cadets! Dans un marketing axé sur ce phénomène, les avocats de la cause (des inconditionnels du programme) pourraient être mis à contribution pour « répandre la bonne nouvelle » dans leur cercle social. La puissance de ce mode de diffusion s’avère quasi infinie. Théoriquement, si vous passez le bon message à la bonne personne, celle-ci le transmettra à dix amis, qui le relaieront à dix autres intervenants, et ainsi de suite, jusqu’à atteindre le chiffre de 100 millions d’initiés! Inconvénients du programme Bon nombre de cadets signalent des problèmes d’horaires, surtout en conflit avec les travaux scolaires. Rien de bien surprenant à cela, vu que près des deux tiers

CADENCE

Numéro 20, Automne 2006


Grandes lignes des résultats du sondage Familiarisation et impression • • • • •

des sondés affirment participer à des activités parascolaires autres que le Programme des cadets. Autre inconvénient auquel le grand public se montre sensible : le programme serait trop militariste et exigerait trop de discipline, en plus de demander le port d’un uniforme qui semble déplaire aux jeunes.

Tir, techniques de brousse et de survie, leadership, voici les éléments d’instruction qui semblent plaire le plus aux cadets. Le grand public perçoit le Programme des cadets plus militaire qu’il n’est. Les personnes sondées, à l’extérieur du programme sont donc portées à mentionner les techniques de survie et les éléments spécialisés du programme comme faisant partie des principaux avantages, alors que les cadets eux-même, mieux placés que quiconque pour le juger invoquent plutôt l’esprit de leadership et les expériences uniques comme principaux avantages. Il serait, par contre, malvenu de minimiser l’affiliation militaire du programme vu que celui-ci attire une bonne partie des cadets justement du fait de sa composante militaire.

suite à la page 36

Avantages et inconvénients du Programme des cadets Principaux avantages • • • • •

Leadership Expériences uniques Exercice de l’autodiscipline Confiance en soi Rencontre de nouveaux amis

Principaux inconvénients • • •

Conflits avec les travaux scolaires Coût en temps (50 %) Caractère répétitif des activités

Attitudes envers le Programme des cadets • • •

90 % des cadets sont fiers de l’être 74 % des cadets apprécient leur uniforme Seule la moitié des personnes sondées estiment que le programme constitue une préparation à la vie militaire Très peu de cadets (8 %) pensent que le programme est trop militariste

Activités ayant la cote • • • • •

Tir Techniques de brousse Leadership Drill Sports et conditionnement physique

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

<

Notre défi : Faire en sorte que les initiatives en communication et marketing mettent l’accent sur les valeurs fondamentales du programme afin que les jeunes y voient

Seuls 5 % des sondés se disent familiers du Programme des cadets Quelques 11 % ont déjà été des cadets La plupart ont pris connaissance des cadets par le biais du bouche à oreille ou bien en contexte scolaire La majorité des gens qui connaissent l’existence du Programme des cadets ont depuis une opinion positive du Programme. Les jeunes qui se sont joints au mouvement l’ont fait car certains de leurs parents sont (ou ont déjà été) des cadets; car des amis en sont membres; car c’est une activité amusante et qu’ils recherchent des expériences nouvelles 94 % des sondés recommanderaient le programme à des amis, des parents ou d'autres jeunes Une fois entrés dans le programme, la plupart des jeunes (70 %) persévèrent

Les sports et activités de conditionnement physique sont les plus populaires du Programme des Cadets.

35


l’intérêt de le choisir et de l’intégrer à leur horaire déjà chargé. La valeur d’une activité tient à la perception qu’on se fait des avantages, de son niveau d’excellence, de son utilité ou de l’importance que celle-ci nous procurera si on s’y engage activement. En réalité, on cherche à répondre à la question : qu'est-ce que cette activité pourrait m’apporter ? Nous devons donc communiquer que le Programme des cadets facilite et optimise les réalisations scolaires, plutôt que de mettre l’accent sur la somme de travail susceptible d’en découler. L’effort de communication et de marketing devrait donc porter sur les expériences uniques qui sont offertes par le Programme des cadets et qui enseigne aux jeunes des techniques dont la pratique va bien au-delà du contexte militaire. Avantages du programme • Tir, techniques de brousse et de survie, leadership, voici les éléments d’instruction qui semblent plaire le plus aux cadets. • Aucun problème ou élément particulier ne s’avère source d’insatisfaction envers le programme. • Cela étant, on note que l’enthousiasme à l’endroit du programme et le sentiment d’avoir encore des choses à en apprendre déclinent avec l’âge du participant. Notre défi : Rendre le programme aussi pertinent et stimulant pour tous les cadets quel que soit leur âge. Nous avons aujourd’hui la possibilité de revoir notre stratégie marketing. Le Programme des cadets est une organisation formidable, qui met l’accent sur les perceptions et attitudes positives. Comme l’illustrent les résultats du sondage, nous sommes dans la bonne voie, même si notre programme peut sembler quelque peu mystérieux au profane. Le Ltv Julie Harris travaille pour Affaires publiques - Chef Réserves et cadets

36

Peut-on catégoriser nos cadets? Dans le cadre de son sondage, la maison Ipsos-Reid a regroupé les cadets selon un certain nombre d’attitudes communes. L’échantillon s’est avéré hétérogène, produisant cinq grandes catégories.

Les enthousiastes énergiques (32%) Avec les cadets fonceurs, ces participants sont les plus positifs à l’endroit du programme. Toutefois, l’aspect spécifiquement militaire des cadets ne les attire pas autant, et ils sont tenus fort occupés par leurs travaux scolaires et activités parascolaires.

Les cadets fonceurs (30%) Ces cadets, qui ont très peu l’expérience du programme, sont particulièrement attirés par l’uniforme et les autres aspects militaires. Leur ferveur actuelle risque de se dissiper au fur et à mesure qu’ils avancent dans le programme

Ceux qui vieillissent et passent à autre chose (15%) Ces cadets ont le plus d’ancienneté dans le programme; même s’ils expriment à son endroit des sentiments très positifs, ils sont prêts à passer à d’autres expériences et à reléguer au rang de beaux souvenirs la vie de cadet.

Les réformateurs sociables (16%) Ces cadets sont attirés par les occasions sociales que leur ouvre le programme; ils sont généralement très positifs à son endroit. Toutefois, ils n’ont pas autant d’enthousiasme que leurs camarades et ne profitent pas autant qu’eux des activités d’instruction locale. Ils souhaitent retirer un maximum du programme, mais n’y trouvent pas, du moins dans sa version actuelle, de quoi les stimuler réellement.

Les « non-conformistes » (7%) Ce sont là les cadets les moins positifs à l’endroit du programme; ils sont particulièrement critiques en ce qui a trait à la composante militaire du mouvement, surtout l’uniforme. Ils sont le plus enclins à dire qu’ils sont là simplement parce que leurs parents l’exigent; il y a fort à parier qu’on ne les retrouvera pas chez les cadets à l’issue de la saison en cours. CADENCE

Numéro 20, Automne 2006


POINT DE VUE

Ltv Catherine Pichette et Lt(LN) Pierre Beaupré

e Corps des cadets de la Ligue Navale pourrait s’avérer être notre relève. Leur programme ressemble au nôtre, à cette différence que, n’étant pas financés par le ministère de la Défense Nationale, ils doivent s’autofinancer pour, entre autres, préparer des activités intéressantes pour les jeunes qui en font partie. La proximité d’un Corps des cadets de la Marine près de leur secteur d’entraînement peut donc grandement les aider.

L

En effet, le Corps des cadets de la Marine peut leur apporter un soutien en personnel, en matériel et côté recrutement. Partager les ressources est un bon moyen de créer des liens solides entre les deux corps de cadets. L’échange profite ainsi tant aux cadets du Corps des cadets de la Ligue Navale qu’à ceux du Corps des cadets de la Marine. Le Corps des cadets de la Ligue Navale peut également nous donner un bon coup de main au niveau du recrutement. En effet, faire connaître les cadets de la Marine aux

cadets de la Ligue Navale est un très bon moyen de favoriser le recrutement, lequel peut augmenter de plus de 50 % sur l’année; les officiers du Corps des cadets de la Ligue Navale peuvent nous aider à bien des égards; enfin, lors d’activités conjointes, les adultes étant plus nombreux, la supervision des cadets des deux corps n’en est que meilleure.

Le Corps des cadets de la Marine peut leur apporter un soutien en personnel, en matériel et côté recrutement. Cette entraide n’est possible que grâce à une collaboration étroite entre les commandants des deux corps de cadets, celui de la Ligue Navale et celui de la Marine. Vous avez certainement une bonne idée des difficultés et avantages liés à la collaboration, mais savez-vous comment on s'y prend pour créer une relation positive et durable ?

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

Éviter et résoudre les conflits Les conflits découragent la collaboration. Ils peuvent être évités si les commandants des deux corps de cadets se tiennent informés l’un l’autre. Pour favoriser la collaboration, particulièrement lors d’activités conjointes aux corps des cadets de la Marine et à celui de la Ligue Navale, l’information peut être transmise par écrit sous forme d’ordre d’opération et/ou lors d’une réunion préalable à l’événement. De plus, afin d’améliorer les relations, il est important de partager tout commentaire positif ou négatif, d’en discuter et ainsi aplanir les conflits au fur et à mesure.

<

Collaboration entre les corps des cadets de la Marine et de la Ligue Navale

Le Corps des cadets de la Marine et le Corps des cadets de la Ligue navale ont servi de garde d’honneur au Lieutenant gouverneur de Québec, Madame Lise Thibault, lors de sa visite à Repentigny, au Québec, en avril dernier.

Partage des ressources Lorsque la communication est bien établie et que les deux commandants ont établi une relation de confiance, il devient alors plus facile de partager les ressources. suite à la page 38

37


Collaboration entre les corps des cadets de la Marine et de la Ligue Navale ...suite de la page 37

Les officiers CIC peuvent aider les officiers du Corps des cadets de la Ligue Navale à approfondir leur formation, et les outiller d’avantage. Les Corps des cadets de la Ligue Navale étant autosuffisants, ils peuvent venir à manquer de fonds en ce qui a trait à la formation des officiers. L’aide apportée par les officiers CIC peut palier ce manque en leur donnant des séances de formation – prévues à l’avance avec les officiers commandants du Corps des cadets de la Ligue Navale. De plus, si vous disposez de cadets-cadres possédant de bonnes aptitudes en techniques d’instruction, vous pourriez les utiliser d’avantage pour aider à l’enseignement des cadets de la Ligue Navale lors de leurs soirées d’entraînement. Des sessions d’information sur le programme des Cadets de la Marine peuvent être offertes au Corps des cadets de la Ligue Navale. Lors d’activités autres que les soirées de formation, ces mêmes cadets peuvent être invités à venir participer à vos activités et ce, accompagnés de leurs officiers. La collaboration entre le Corps des cadets de la Marine et le Corps des cadets de la Ligue Navale est fort bien envisageable. Bien sûr, cela ne se fera pas du jour au lendemain. Mais, il faut la développer d’avantage et surtout ne pas abandonner à la première embûche. Les Corps des cadets de la Ligue Navale ont le même but que nous et travailler ensemble nous aide à nous faire connaître, à donner aux jeunes la passion des cadets et surtout à faire vivre à ces derniers des expériences inoubliables. Ltv Pichette est Cmdt du Corps 240 AMIRAL LEGARDEUR des cadets de la Marine à Repentigny, Qc., Le Lt (LN) est le Cmdt du Corps 106 LE QUÉBEC de la Ligue navale à Repentigny.

38

<

Si ces dernières sont d’ordre matériel, vous pouvez mettre sur pied, un système de prêt de matériel et établir une entente afin de ne pas avoir de problèmes lors du retour du matériel.

Annette Van Tyghem, Orientation Ontario, à gauche, et le Maj Kimberly O’Leary, Officier d’instruction régional des Cadets, de la région du Centre, à droite, avec l’équipe d’orientation gagnante du Corps des cadets de l’Armée. Orientation. Que vous a-t-elle appris? Il est désormais évident que l’orientation est une activité à la fois amusante et stimulante. Notre objectif est essentiellement de stimuler l’amour pour ce « sport », et d’encourager les cadets à se dépasser d’année en année.

Le Capt Westlake est l'officier de l'instruction, région du Centre; le Maj Lusk est conseiller régional des cadets pour la SRO et instructeur d’orientation principal auprès de l’école régionale d'instructeurs de cadets (Centre).

Changements apportés au cadre de travail du Programme des cadets part à fournir aux cadets sélectionnés l’instruction et les moyens pour parfaire leurs connaissances et habiletés dans des activités spécialisées et, d’autre part, à former des instructeurs/chefs pour ces activités. Le programme des CIEC offre aussi à ces cadets des occasions supplémentaires d’employer les connaissances et les habiletés générales acquises lors du programme des corps/escadrons. Chaque élément du programme des CIEC est formé de cours communs (par ex., cours d’éducation physique et de sports et cours de musique) et de cours qui leur sont propres. Activités dirigées à l’échelle nationale Le quartier général national peut choisir de créer des activités dirigées à l’échelle nationale pour enrichir d’autres programmes. Ces activités ont pour but d’aider à entretenir la motivation des cadets et de permettre au quartier général national d’adapter l’ensemble du programme aux intérêts des éléments et de tirer profit des

...suite de la page 22

...suite de la page 15

ressources nationales et internationales. Par exemple, dans le domaine culturel, de l’éducation et des voyages, le personnel national peut décider d’organiser des échanges internationaux ou, dans le domaine d’activité du tir à la carabine à air comprimé, d’organiser des championnats nationaux. Comme on peut le constater, certains termes et définitions ont été éliminés de notre cadre de travail et d’autres y ont été ajoutés, tandis que certains sont restés les mêmes ou n’ont subi que peu de changements. Ces termes et définitions forment la base d’un langage commun a tous ceux d’entre nous. De nouvelles Ordonnances sur l’administration et l’instruction des cadets, ainsi que d’autres documents donnant tous les détails de ce cadre de travail, seront distribués cet automne. Le Ltv Hall est l’officier d’état-major chargé de l’élaboration du programme d’instruction des cadets de la Marine à la Direction des cadets.

CADENCE

Numéro 20, Automne 2006


2006 2