Page 1


IN THIS ISSUE 18

Professionalism when dealing with parents Advice from the field on how to deal effectively with parents who are angry, overzealous, uninvolved, unrealistic, or questioning the rules.

26

Future training aimed at professionalism Professionalism is “the skill or qualities required or expected of members of a profession.” By Maj Serge Dubé

18 27

27

Local smoking ‘policy’ teaches damaging lessons If we teach cadets that a rule can be ignored, they will start ignoring rules.

26

By Maj Stephen Case

33

Clarification on fees, dues and other assessments No child will be turned away from the Cadet Program—or otherwise be disadvantaged— because their family is not able or is unwilling to pay a league or sponsor-initiated assessment. By Col Robert Perron

33

2

CADENCE

Issue 17, Fall 2005


UPCOMING 10 A specialized application of the CF profession Canadian Defence Academy head explains how ‘military professionalism’ applies to CIC officers.

11 Where does CIC professionalism start? 12 Making your ‘work’ relationships run smoothly Training specialist Mary Bartlett of New York explains how to respond appropriately to difficult behaviours to create better working relationships.

14 Point your moral compass in an ethical direction “Moral ambiguity is fine if you are cooking hamburgers, but not if you are leading youths,” says London, Ont., lawyer and university instructor Philip King.

16 Remaining competitive

It is becoming more difficult each year to find qualified gliding instructors to train cadets. In our next issue, regional cadet air operations officers give reasons why and advise on how local officers can help. Also, a variety of cadet summer training centre commanding officers discuss their staffing problems and potential solutions. By the time our Winter issue is published, a year will have passed since CIC officers were included in the national computerized pay system for Reserve officers. Our next issue will look at the transition. The Winter issue will also provide a forum for CIC officers from across the country to express their views on our awards and recognition program. Are we doing enough or could we do more?

Adapting to the needs of our cadet ‘clientele’. By LCol Pierre Labelle

17 Communicate more effectively Military-style discipline lends itself to a one-way form of communication; however, when used exclusively, it becomes redundant and ineffective. By Maj Paul Tambeau

22 Conflict resolution skills enhance professionalism The escalation of conflict is like a tornado—the stronger it gets, the more damage it can cause. Your success in helping cadets handle conflict more efficiently will depend on your inherent leadership skills. By Denise Moore

24 Learning from mistakes

Don't miss these articles and more—including an article on the value of competitive shooting for young people—in our next issue of Cadence. Copy deadlines are Nov. 30 for the Winter issue, published in January 2006 and Jan. 21 for the Spring/Summer issue, published next April. Please advise the editor in advance at (905)468-9371, or marshascott@cogeco.ca, if you wish to contribute an article.

28 Online trials of first new courses Unit administration officer and supply officer course trials underway. By Lt(N) Paul Fraser

FRONT COVER

29 Officers to benefit from new training organization 30 Communicating with cadets Recent work in the field of neuropsychology shows youths and adults use different parts of their brain to take in and process information. By Capt Catherine Griffin

31 Cadet Program Update Project January 2007 target for updated first-year training activities for corps and squadrons. By Maj Russ Francis

32 Joint recruiting reaps rewards Corps and squadrons in Thunder Bay, Ont., enjoy cadet recruiting benefits from tri-service promotion of the Cadet Program. By Capt Daniel Guay

In the 1970s, Jonathan Livingstone Seagull became a symbol of the quest for perfection. As we strive for professionalism as leaders of youth, we—like Jonathan—“can learn to fly excellently.”

34 Retrospective—schools for CIC officers Two CIC officers look back more than 30 years.

IN EVERY ISSUE 4 Opening notes

5 Letters

6 News and Notes

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

36 Viewpoint

3


OPENING NOTES

By Marsha Scott

Whatever you do, do it as a professional rofessionalism is ‘hot’ these days, particularly as it relates to health-care providers, lawyers, teachers, the military and other careers of public interest. Professions everywhere, including the Canadian military, are striving to define and foster professionalism within their ranks. Some are even teaching and measuring professionalism.

P

Can professionalism apply to the Cadet Instructors Cadre, when, for most CIC officers, their work with the Cadet Program is a “calling”, rather than the full-time career that earns their living? The seagull on this issue’s cover represents Jonathan Livingstone Seagull—the main character in a book of that same name by Richard Bach, first published in 1973. Jonathan quickly became an icon for the tireless pursuit of an ideal. For Jonathan, that ideal was his perfection of flight. For CIC officers, an ideal worthy of pursuit is professionalism, leading to ever higher standards and higher levels of performance in a program that provides an important service to Canada and its youth. This issue examines professionalism in the CIC—how it applies to officers, where it starts, its values and behaviours, including willing compliance with the highest ethical standards. It discusses professionalism in communications, conflict resolution and interactions with parents. In one article, seven CIC officers who are also educators share their expertise

4

on dealing effectively with parents in a variety of common local situations. In addition, a civilian specialist discusses how we can work on four behaviours in particular to improve the professionalism of our ‘work’ relationships. For all Cadet Program leaders, an understanding of proper professional behaviour is essential to fostering respect and trust among cadets, parents and society. In another take on professionalism, an officer from Eastern Region talks about enhancing our professionalism by taking a client-service approach to our cadets. One article, entitled “Local smoking ‘policy’ teaches damaging lessons” invites us to think closely about what we might be teaching our cadets and junior officers; others provide updates on new online courses and the new CIC training organization. For those readers who also like to look back, we carry a retrospective on schools for CIC officers—told from the perspective of two CIC officers who witnessed the beginning of the Cadet Instructor Training System in 1974.

Issue 17 Fall 2005 Cadence is a professional development tool for officers of the Cadet Instructors Cadre (CIC) and civilian instructors of the Cadet Program. Secondary audiences include: senior cadets; sponsoring, parent and civilian committees; members of the leagues; and CF members, including CIC officers working at the regional and national levels. The magazine is published three times a year. We welcome submissions of not more than 1000 words and in line with the editorial policy. We reserve the right to edit all submissions for length and style. We encourage the submission of photos that relate to articles submitted or that represent the leaders of the Cadet Program. Views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect official opinion or policy. The editorial policy and back issues of Cadence in electronic version are available online at www.cadets.forces.gc.ca/support.

Contact information Regular mail: Editor, Cadence Directorate Cadets National Defence Headquarters 101 Colonel By Drive Ottawa ON, K1A 0K2

Email: cadence@forces.gc.ca, or marshascott@cogeco.ca

Phone: Tel: 1-800-627-0828 Fax: 613-996-1618

Distribution Cadence is distributed by the Directorate Technical Information and Codification Services (DTICS) Publications Depot to cadet corps and squadrons, regional cadet support units and their sub-units, senior National Defence/CF officials and selected members of the leagues. Cadet corps and squadrons not receiving Cadence or wanting to update their distribution information should contact their Area Cadet Officer/Cadet Adviser.

Editorial staff Editor:

When researching professionalism, we found that it is common to consider the concept of altruism or “calling” as core to it. Certainly, in that context, professionalism in the CIC cannot be questioned. In that same context, we ask you to view each issue of Cadence as an additional call to develop the frame of mind that whatever you do in the Cadet Program, do it as a professional.

Marsha Scott

Managing editor: Capt Ian Lambert Chief Reserves and Cadets—Public Affairs

Published by: Chief Reserves and Cadets—Public Affairs, on behalf of Director Cadets

Translation: Translation Bureau Public Works and Government Services Canada

Art direction: ADM (PA) Directorate Marketing and Creative Services CS05-0234 A-CR-007-000/JP-001

CADENCE

Issue 17, Fall 2005


LETTERS PROUD OF CIC CAP BADGE I have always been proud of my cap badge. I believe that the maple leaf is an excellent symbol that best describes what is best about the CIC and our proud heritage. Our cap badge is the only cap badge in the entire CF that is distinctively Canadian; however, I am always slightly disappointed to see that some of the senior officers appointed to work, direct or command the CIC and the cadet movement do not wear our proud cap badge. Although I understand that these senior officers may not be CIC by trade, I think that wearing our proud cap badge would allow for better recognition as our branch represen-

tatives, directors and commanding officers at National Defence Headquarters. It would enhance our pride and branch recognition. SLt Paul Simas Executive officer 139 Sea Cadet Corps ILLUSTRIOUS Brampton, ON. Maj Roman Ciecwiercz, CIC Branch Adviser, responds: Pride is a great thing—the cornerstone of the CIC and the whole Cadet Program. The thing to remember is that the cap badge is representative of one's branch and many of our senior officers are Regular or Primary Reserve officers, not CIC officers.

As such, they are not entitled to wear the CIC cap badge. Having these officers as guiding partners in our organization lends great strength and credibility to all that we do. Every individual who works in support of cadets, at any level, brings their own expertise and passion to the table. I have seen many Regular Force retirees re-badge as CIC officers when they come to the Cadet Program. However, pride, recognition and credibility go far beyond what we wear on our hats, and it is clear to me that if these didn't exist in the extremes that they do at all levels, the Cadet Program would not have survived all these years.

ONE OF THE MOST INTERESTING JOBS IN THE CADET MOVEMENT When someone enrols as a CIC officer, it’s because they want to get involved or continue working with young people in the cadet movement. This is equally true of pilots, who want to continue flying as well. And there’s no better way to do this than by getting involved at various flying locations during the year and teaching at the gliding schools across Canada during the summer. When it comes time for summer camp, most officers holding pilot’s wings get involved in the gliding schools. For them, it’s a bit like coming back home, since it was at camp that they earned their pilot’s licence as cadets. The flying instructor has one of the most interesting and demanding jobs there is. On occasion, a beginning flying instructor will be a civilian who is still in the process of enrolling. And not that long before,

that same instructor was himself working towards a pilot’s licence. At the start, he knows the flying manœuvres but still hasn’t gained the necessary experience to teach them. He takes his Glider Instructor Course and acquires the skills he needs to effectively teach the cadets who will be our future pilots. So a lot of preparation is needed before an instructor can do the job properly. I find this work commendable because in addition to teaching in the air and on the ground, these flying instructors must constantly be aware of the activities going on around them. After a few lessons, the cadet will pilot the aircraft, but the instructor must maintain vigilance concerning air traffic and manœuvres, properly correcting and guiding the cadet. The instructor must also display good judgment; in other words, he

must know the right moment to take over the controls. And I’m not referring only to safety here but also to maturity and responsibility. No matter what their experience and years of seniority, flying instructors must have quick minds that will enable them to intervene at the proper time. This is a major responsibility. Having seen them at work at various flying sites, I can confirm that they are passionate about their jobs and always work as a team. They know that their mission is important, since they are moulding the next generation of pilots! The work of the flight instructor is, in my opinion, one of the most interesting jobs offered by the cadet movement. Capt Evelyne Lemire Public affairs Regional Gliding School (Eastern) St-Jean, QC.

Cadence reserves the right to edit for length and clarity. Please restrict your letters to 250 words.

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

5


NEWS AND NOTES REAL LIFE REINFORCES TEACHING POINTS There’s nothing like a practical demonstration to reinforce a teaching point. But the practical demonstration that 12 CIC officers received while taking wilderness first-aid training at the Cadet Summer Training Centre (CSTC) in Cold Lake, Alta., in June was completely ‘accidental’.

A mock accident scenario ended the officers’ wilderness firstaid training on July 2. Here, from left, Capt Luke Persaud, SLt Gene Slager, Lt Laura George and 2Lt Ron Arnold apply first aid to 2Lt Matt Paslawski—a ‘hiker’ with ‘possibly a broken leg’. (Photo by Capt Undiks)

The 12 CSTC staff members and Fred Tyrell, a wilderness first-aid instructor for the province of Alberta, were actually on their way to lunch when they received the first-aid demonstration—just metres away from where they had been training.

Jean Jeoffrion had been out riding his dirt bike on the recreation trails of 4 Wing Cold Lake when he lost control and flew off his bike. A passing jogger saw the accident and stopped to help. Immediately after, so did the CIC officers and their instructor. “The jogger was already assisting the victim when I arrived, so I helped assess the injuries and apply first aid, says OCdt Jamie Blois, one of the ‘students’ and the summer camp’s sports officer. “He had an injured shoulder and some minor abrasions across his chest. The military police responded shortly after we arrived and took over from there.” According to Mr. Tyrell, his students experienced first-hand what should happen upon arrival at an accident scene. Submitted by Capt Judy Undiks, CSTC Cold Lake public affairs

NEW FRENCH-LANGUAGE SQUADRON IN ONTARIO Retired CWO Gilles Arpin, a member of the French Language School Board in London, Ont., was the driving force behind the stand up in September of a new French-language air cadet squadron in Ontario. As far back as 2000, Mr. Arpin saw a need in the London area for a French-

language squadron that would allow the many unilingual French and French immersion youths there to receive their training entirely in French. There were not enough cadets at the time to create a separate squadron, so a francophone flight was created within an already existing squadron—27 Air Cadet Squadron. When the flight grew from 12 cadets to 42, it was decided to create a separate squadron—599 Air Cadet Squadron. Mr. Arpin was on the sponsoring committee for 27 Squadron for two years and will now chair the new squadron’s sponsoring committee. The new squadron is named after astronaut Dr. Marc Garneau, currently president of the Canadian Space Agency.

Sgt Jake Clark and LAC Bobby Genest brief new recruits to the new 599 Squadron. (Photo by L'Action London)

6

Capt Al Szawara, Area Cadet Officer (Air) with Regional Cadet Support Unit (Central), Detachment London—

and a course-mate of Dr. Garneau at the CF Command and Staff College in Toronto in 1982—asked Dr. Garneau if he would consent to the squadron’s use of his name. Dr. Garneau said he was honoured by the request. According to Mr. Arpin, London received bilingual status in 2001. In 2003, a statistical profile of the francophone population in the London area showed that 7095 youths between 10 and 19 could carry on a conversation in either English or French. Canadian Parents for French, an organization dedicated to having children learn two languages, is the squadron’s official sponsor. “With their assistance, we recruited quite a few cadets from the French immersion system,” says Mr. Arpin. “The parents are excited that their children will have an additional opportunity to use their French.”

CADENCE

Issue 17, Fall 2005


‘FOWL PLAY’—NOT! Lt Ken Holden, training officer with 514 Air Cadet Squadron in St. John’s, Nfld., believes his squadron has developed an innovative way to build life skills among cadets and raise funds at the same time. For the past three years, the squadron’s Cadets Acting and Performing (CAP) team has organized and produced plays for the public. This year’s performances of two plays, entitled Murder Most Fowl and Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs Local 412 involved 24 cadets in the roles of director, cast and backstage support. “What’s amazing is that about

half of the CAP team are junior cadets,” says Lt Holden. Maj Bob Nolan, Area CIC Officer (Air), described the activity as an innovative, fun optional activity to teach cadets communication, team building, problem solving, time management and a host of other life skills, as well as build their confidence and self-esteem. The inspiration for the CAP team grew from the creative minds of two squadron cadets—the team’s creative director WO2 Teresita Tucker and Danielle Price.

Cadets from 514 Squadron's CAP team build life skills and raise funds during a performance of "Murder Most Fowl". Capt Roger Miller, squadron CO, says the successful program will continue as it “just keeps getting better and better as each year passes.”

REGION FOCUSSES ON CADET RETENTION LCol Marcel Chevarie, commander of Regional Cadet Support Unit (Eastern), recently met with the region’s corps/squadron COs. His main message was on the need to improve cadet retention.

training should deal with the concepts of flexibility and adaptability as they relate to the Cadet Program and the concept of risk management relative to the challenges and enjoyment we offer cadets.

In particular, he highlighted the following objectives for the region:

• An ongoing information campaign: throughout the year, send out information, ideas on initiatives and suggestions to improve the program

• Adequate CIC officer training:

and activities offered in corps/ squadrons. The RCSU(E) website, www.cadets.net/est, will become a major communications tool. • Tailor-made support and advice: Headquarters personnel and detachments will offer customdesigned support and guidance aimed at meeting the specific needs of each corps/squadron.

NEW ARMY CADET HISTORY WEBSITE After 10 years of research, the Army Cadet League has an army cadet history website. The website covers 126 years of history, says league historian Francois Arseneault in Calgary. Mr. Arseneault invites leaders and cadets to visit www.armycadethistory.com for a wealth of information. At the end of August, the site included histories of 227 corps and photos from 34 corps. It also includes information on summer camps, shoulder flashes and hat badges—including many rare preFirst World War and Second World War badges—biographies of key individuals, trophies, medals, archived news stories, expeditions, exchanges and much more.

The new army cadet history website covers 126 years of history. Here, the 323 (Provencher School) Army Cadet Corps rifle team in 1950 after winning the Earl Roberts Imperial Cadet Trophy competition. (Photo courtesy Army Cadet League)

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

7


NEWS AND NOTES NEW WAVE IN COMMUNICATIONS

GUIDE TO MANAGING A CADET MUSIC ENSEMBLE

The Navy League has launched a new electronic newsletter called @ the helm. Its intent is to reach more members for less money with national, branch and division news. Printed copies of the newsletter will still be available by calling the national Navy League office at 1-800-375-NAVY.

Proper management of both human and material resources at corps/squadrons will improve not only the operation of the ensemble, but more importantly, will greatly benefit the musicians.

Although the newsletter’s primary audience is Navy League members across the country, CIC officers, sea cadets and their parents are also encouraged to subscribe and send in their story ideas. To subscribe, visit the Navy League website at www.navyleague.ca.

IMPROVED VOLUNTEER SCREENING PROGRAM The Navy League has introduced a new volunteer screening program that will greatly enhance cadet safety. The key new feature is a photo identification (ID) card, which league volunteers must display at local corps. This empowers corps officers and cadets to ensure that any Navy League member working with the corps has been approved by the league and is cleared to work with cadets. If a league volunteer does not have an ID card, then they will have

to be supervised by a corps officer or by another screened league volunteer, just like any other corps guest. Further enhancing their program, the Navy League has teamed up with the Army Cadet League, and is negotiating with the Air Cadet League, to develop a common approach and establish informationsharing for volunteer screening. This will prevent individuals that have been dismissed by one organization from joining another league or sponsoring committee anywhere in the country. The new program is being rolled out nationwide. Formerly screened members are required to renew their screening status. More detailed information is available at www.navyleague.ca.

One doesn’t have to be a music specialist to administer and run a band. Assigning key positions and duties will assist any band officer. Some regions have developed music ensemble management guides—available from regional cadet music advisers, through the appropriate conferences on CadetNet, or through regional cadet websites.

HIGH SCHOOL CREDITS FOR CADETS If you want to help your cadets pursue high school credits for their cadet experience, visit www.aircadetleague.com, click your language of choice and then click on Cadets, followed by Education Credits. For the first time, says Grant Fabes, chair of the Air Cadet League’s national education and high school credits committee, this one-stop resource provides an overview of the high school credit situation across Canada, a summary of the current status in each province/territory and a summary of web-based resources for further information. The site lists the number of credits cadets can obtain and application procedures. An email contact is also provided for each province/territory.

LOOKING FOR CADET STORIES Stephanie Williams, a civilian instructor (CI) with 2051 Army Cadet Corps in Edmonton is collecting cadet stories for a book she hopes to publish. “I recently read a book titled Stand by Your Beds, written by a former cadet,”

8

says CI Williams. “At the end of the book, the author commented on how it would be wonderful if there was a collection of cadet stories available for others to read. I would like to take this task on.”

She asks that other Cadet Program leaders not only submit their own cadet stories, but also encourage their cadets to send stories to her at cadet_stories@hotmail.com.

CADENCE

Issue 17, Fall 2005


STAFF CADET PAY Cadet Program leaders who were not involved in summer training this year may be interested to know that staff cadet pay rates are now tied to the basic pay rate of Reserve Force officer cadets. Staff cadet pay rates were once tied to the pay rates of Reserve Force privates and corporals; then, when incentives disappeared and staff cadet pay adjustments became more difficult, they were tied to the average pay of students taking part in the government’s student employment program. This past summer, staff cadet daily rates of pay varied from $60 to $81. Those rates were based on a fixed percentage of a Reserve Force officer cadet’s basic pay. For instance, a petty officer, 1st class (warrant officer/flight sergeant) received a daily pay of $71, while a chief petty officer, 1st class

(chief warrant officer/warrant officer, class one) received a daily pay of $81, based on a higher percentage of the Reserve Force officer cadet’s pay. According to Maj Paul Dionne, staff officer cadet policies at Directorate Cadets, the new system is administratively easier. By no longer being tied to the student summer employment program, cadet staff pay adjustments will occur automatically in line with Reserve officer cadet basic pay changes, rather than requiring yearly Treasury Board approval. Current pay rates can be accessed by visiting www.forces.gc.ca/hr/engraph/ pay_e.asp and following the appropriate links.

Staff cadet summer pay rates are now a fixed percentage of the basic pay rate of Reserve Force officer cadets. Here, a staff cadet gives a knots lesson to a cadet at Vernon CSTC. (Photo by CI Wayne Emde, public affairs)

CIC BRANCH ADVISORY COUNCIL NEWS Two members of the CIC Branch Advisory Council (BAC) have received Chief Reserves and Cadets certificates of appreciation for their efforts and contributions on behalf of the branch. Recipients are Maj John Torneby, former Prairie Region adviser, and LCdr Nairn McQueen, former Central Region adviser.

The new regional advisers are Maj James Barnes, Prairie, and Maj Harry McCabe, Central. Other current BAC members are LCdr Ben Douglas, Pacific; Maj Steve Daniels, Northern; Maj Hratch Adjemian, Eastern; and LCol Tom McGrath, Atlantic.

The council has agreed to accept CIC officer requests for employer support. According to Maj Ciecwiercz, the CFLC website at www.cflc.forces.gc.ca should be a CIC officer’s point of reference when looking for employer support information. The CFLC will provide basic advice and send out information packages, if requested. The advisory

LCdr Nairn McQueen

EVENTS

OTHER BAC NEWS CIC Branch Adviser Maj Roman Ciecwiercz has met with the Canadian Forces Liaison Council (CFLC) chair to clarify its support to the CIC.

Maj John Torneby

council intends to review these packages and recommend the inclusion of CIC-specific components into them. The BAC is reviewing ongoing policy issues and providing guidelines for future promotion policy and such issues as universality of service, fitness, medical and educational standards related to the Military Occupational Specification Change Management Project. By sitting as a member of the new training management board, it is also offering advice on the new CIC training structure.

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

50th anniversary reunion HMCS ACADIA: In Cornwallis, N.S., from Aug. 4 to 6, 2006. Registration will begin in January 2006. Anyone interested can go to www.acadiareunion.ca for further information. 18th annual tri-service Cadet Ball: This approved cadet activity, sponsored by 706 Air Cadet Squadron in Ottawa, is usually attended by cadets from across Canada, according to Capt Jake Banaszkiewicz, squadron CO. This year’s event will be held on Dec. 29 at the Congress Centre in Ottawa. For more information, visit www.cadets.net/est/706aviation.

9


PROFESSIONALISM IN THE CIC >

A specialized application of the CF profession Can military professionalism apply to the Cadet Instructors Cadre? “

es,” says MGen Paul Hussey, commander for the past year of the Canadian Defence Academy (CDA) in Kingston, Ont. The CDA champions professional development and lifelong learning in the CF and among other things, oversees the Canadian Forces Leadership Institute (CFLI), charged with strengthening the foundations of CF leadership and military professionalism.

Y

But how can the ‘profession of arms’ and ‘military professionalism’ apply to CIC officers when they don’t bear arms? For CIC officers, the unwritten contract of unlimited liability does not apply as it does to the Regular Force and Primary Reserve and according to MGen Hussey, CIC officers are not developed with the same kind of discipline and fighting spirit required for military operations. Instead, they are developed to train, administer and supervise cadets. This may pose a quandary to some, but from MGen Hussey’s unique perspective—not only in his current position but also in his former position as Director General Reserves and Cadets—‘military professionalism’ does apply to CIC officers in a somewhat limited but very important way. Residents of Vernon, B.C., would likely see CIC officer Capt Graham Brunskill in the same light as any CF member. (Photo by CI Wayne Emde, public affairs, Vernon CSTC)

10

“The CIC is a very specialized application of the CF profession,” says MGen Hussey. “The government of Canada has handed the CF the job of running its only federally sponsored youth organization. The CF does that through its CIC officers— the key functionaries of the federal youth movement in this country. And I would expect—as would any parent in the country—a degree of professionalism within the CIC.”

MGen Hussey says there was logic in making the CF responsible for the Canadian Cadet Movement. The CF is responsible for remaining closely connected with Canadian society and is linked to communities in many ways. Because the CF didn’t have all the local infrastructure it needed to run a national youth organization, however, it counted on the help of its partners—the leagues. CIC officers are the military representatives in that partnership and in their contact with the many local sponsors and community organizations that support cadet corps and squadrons. In many cases, CIC officers are the only CF presence in a community and must therefore demonstrate the standards of professionalism required of CF members. “CIC officers wear the same ranks and the same uniform, says MGen Hussey. “To the public, a different hat badge means nothing.” He adds that CIC officers use some military training methodology—drill, for instance— to develop in youth such life skills as teamwork and self-discipline. CIC officers also represent and try to teach youth many of the CF values (particularly those grounded in the Defence ethics framework) to make them good citizens. “There’s nothing wrong with that, especially since CF members are striving to be model citizens, as well as model soldiers,” says MGen Hussey. “But this affects the public perception of the CIC. The public says, ‘They dress the same, they must be the same’. And you can imagine what expectations and perceptions that generates, however incorrectly.” Continued on page 15

CADENCE

Issue 17, Fall 2005


Where does CIC professionalism start? The CIC ethos states that “CIC officers are youth development practitioners with high standards of professionalism.” n recent years, many Cadet Program changes—particularly those related to training CIC officers—have aimed at enhancing the professionalism of the CIC. But where does professionalism start?

I

For CIC officers, professionalism starts with adhering to both the Canadian military ethos and the CIC ethos. Ethos is described in the new CIC basic officer training course (BOTC) as, “The character, disposition, or basic values peculiar to a specific people, culture or movement. It derives from a sense of belonging and reflects the principles in which a group believes. Ethos is also defined as a set of convictions, which guide and dictate the behaviour of a group and individuals which make up the group.”

For CIC officers, professionalism starts with adhering to both the Canadian military ethos and the CIC ethos. Military ethos During the new BOTC, candidates are familiarized with the CF military ethos—beliefs and expectations about military service; Canadian values, which distinguish us as a people; and the Canadian military values of duty, loyalty, integrity and courage. As CF officers, CIC officers must be mindful of the military ethos and aware that they are part of the larger CF community.

CIC ethos

CIC officers impart in Canadian youth a sense of community involvement during local and summer training. Cadets at Blackdown CSTC this past summer built a walking bridge span for the Ganaraska Hiking Trail—used by more than 4000 hikers and families in the area.

The CIC ethos is part of the CIC’s raison d’etre and contains several guiding principles for CIC officers striving for high standards of professionalism. Though not yet approved, the new CIC occupational training course gives us some insight into what a description of CIC ethos might look like: CIC officers are members of an occupation that renders a service to Canadian society. As leaders of sea, army and air cadets, they ensure their safety and well-being and develop in them leadership, citizenship and physical fitness, while stimulating an interest in the CF. CIC officers impart in Canadian youth a sense of community involvement, promote life skills and moral character and enable them to develop social values and ethical standards. CIC officers are the military representatives in the partnership between the CF, the leagues and the many local sponsors and community organizations that support cadet corps and squadrons. They assist leagues and local sponsors in recruiting cadets and adult leaders. They also assist in promoting corps, squadrons and the Cadet Program as a whole.

of Canadian society, without regard to cultural, ethnic, religious or socioeconomic background. CIC officers are youth development practitioners with high standards of professionalism. They satisfy the high societal expectations that are naturally imposed on an individual responsible for the well-being, support, protection, administration, training and development of our nation’s most precious resource: Canada’s youth. In many cases CIC officers are the only CF presence in communities and therefore demonstrate the standards of professionalism required of members of the CF, reflecting credit on the CF and the Cadet Program. CIC officers bring to the Cadet Program varied backgrounds in terms of education, skills and experience. CIC officers undergo formal occupational training and ongoing professional development, which provides the structure for their employment. Adhering to these guiding principles will go a long way towards ensuring high standards of professionalism in the CIC.

CIC officers promote acceptance and respect for others, both within the movement and within society in general, as the Cadet Program recruits from and reflects the broad diversity

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

11


PROFESSIONALISM IN THE CIC >

By Mary Bartlett

Make your ‘work’ relationships run smoothly In his book, The Four Agreements, Don Miguel Ruiz gives us direction about what we can do to respond appropriately to difficult behaviours and make our work relationships run smoothly.

e advises us to adopt four essential codes of conduct, which appear simple, but are rather difficult. However, with mindful and diligent practice, they are utterly effective.

H

You can use mindfulness (our capacity to be aware of our behaviour) to watch yourself and catch yourself in the act of making assumptions, taking things personally, stretching the truth, putting forth a half-baked effort. Be impeccable with your word Nothing brings out the ‘gators’ more at work than someone who says one thing and does another. So yes, of course, you’re not going to lie, cheat, steal, gossip, backstab, or rummage through someone’s desk—are you? But, this agreement goes deeper than that. It also means honour your word literally. Being mindful of the words you speak means making statements in the positive, being who you say you are and letting go of any fake persona you may be presenting to the world. When your colleagues know you are on the ‘up and up’, that you’re willing to own up to your mistakes, ask

12

questions and be who you say you are, they are more willing to hear you out and work through any real or imagined slight or conflict. You’re someone who people want to stay in relationship with, and they're willing to do the work to do so when it gets a little rough. Don’t take anything personally While none of us likes to admit it, most of us think we’re the centre of the universe. When something negative happens, our first thoughts relate to something we said or didn’t say, did or didn’t do that caused the negativity or conflict. We replay the mental ‘tape’ to find out if we’re to blame. In the process, we forget our learning from Psychology 101, which says that when someone reacts negatively to us, or to a situation, it is a mirror of some unresolved issue that person is dealing with themselves. But what if a colleague’s negative behaviour is meant as a personal assault? All the more reason to not take it personally! A case in point: A newly hired trainer I once worked with worked for months with a colleague who did everything possible to make his life miserable. The colleague gave unhelpful feedback, undermined him in front of trainees and shot down all his ideas. But the new trainer just smiled and focussed on the positive. He didn’t react because he

knew his colleague was angry and threatened that he had been hired. And the colleague was a good trainer with mastery of the content that the new trainer was learning.

Nothing brings out the ‘gators’ more at work than someone who says one thing and does another. Did it resolve the conflict? Well, they never became friends, but they were able to work together productively after about six months. By not reacting, the new trainer made the most of a difficult situation. Even more to the point, he didn’t make it worse. And today, that trainer is able to rest confident that he behaved well, rather than doing something he regrets. Make no assumptions We usually assume the worst, and because our thoughts create our moment-to-moment reality, we act as though our assumptions are the truth. We all know not to, but do we ever consciously try to catch ourselves making assumptions and correct them? To understand the impact of assumptions on conflict, we have to ask ourselves where assumptions come from and why we make them. When we assume, we’re working only with the data we have in our own mind, and quite frequently that data is incomplete—if not flat out

CADENCE

Issue 17, Fall 2005


< When something negative happens, we replay the ‘mental tape’ to find out if we’re to blame. We take it personally, but chances are, it has nothing to do with us.

<

You wouldn’t lie, cheat, steal, gossip, backstab or rummage through someone’s desk while they are away, would you?

wrong. And because that data leads us to assume a conflict, we imagine a conversation directed at clarifying that data as one leading to a conflict. So, we avoid the conversation, and behave as if our incomplete and unverified data is reality. This is another case of ‘thought creating reality’, even when that reality could be radically altered by a different (more complete) data set. How simple this could be, but how risky to admit to and initiate the conversation. You might be surprised at how receptive people can be to someone who—from a genuine place of "here’s what I was thinking"—is willing to admit to their assumptions and be willing to move on. I once worked with an organization where a managing leader was making some rather negative and wrong assumptions about the staff. During a staff debriefing—when these assumptions came to light and the staff had a safe place to discuss it— the manager was able to apologize and gained new respect from her staff. Will it always turn out this way? Probably not, but who are we to assume? Why not just ask? Always do your best When we put forward our best effort, and our colleagues know they can rely on us, they are much more likely to hear us out. When we’re doing our best, we are fully engaged in our task, we have passion for the work and best of all, it doesn’t even really feel

like work! Doing our best brings out the best in others and that’s a sure-fire recipe for innovation. How to get there from here If you have roadblocks lurking around every corner you may think it’s impossible or even naïve to practise these four behaviours. And it may be true that all four—all at once—is a pretty big stretch. So how about taking it one at a time? You can use mindfulness (our capacity to be aware of our behaviour) to catch yourself in the act of making assumptions, taking things personally, stretching the truth and putting forth a half-baked effort. Focus on one behaviour for one day. When you catch yourself—and you will—take a mental step back and think, "In what ways might I remedy this situation?" Sometimes, it’s a relatively simple thing to adjust your behaviour. As you become more proficient in your behaviour change, you might be amazed to notice all those difficult, conflict-filled time wasters becoming fewer and fewer and your productive, innovative, idea-generating sessions becoming greater and greater. Better yet, it gives you something productive to do: rather than trying to change the other person (good luck!), you’re able to make an impact on something you can really change. You.

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

And to that we say a genuine “good luck!” Mary Bartlett is an independent trainer and consultant in training design, facilitation and program development. She has studied extensively in the areas of group process, stress management, communication skills and conflict management and resolution. She lives in rural central New York.

13


PROFESSIONALISM IN THE CIC >

Point your moral compass in an ethical direction ‘Professionalism’ in the Cadet Instructors Cadre requires officers at every level to point their moral compasses in an ethical direction. Morality and ethics are inextricably linked to professionalism—which, along with loyalty, mutual respect and integrity, is one of the Cadet Program’s core values.

thics are important in any kind of professional leadership situation, be it Cadets, business, or even within a family or group of friends, says Philip King, a London, Ont. lawyer and instructor in business law at the University of Western Ontario. “In any organization, members look to the top for moral cues,” says King, “and there is a certain pride in adhering to a set of well-enshrined values.”

E

The Cadet Program has a clear statement of values, and all CF members, Regular and Reserve, are subject to the Canadian Defence Code of Ethics. Ethics is discussed in current basic officer training and in even more detail, on the future basic officer course.

“In any organization, members look to the top for moral cues and there is a certain pride in adhering to a set of well-enshrined values.”…Philip King The Canadian Defence Ethics pocket card outlines our ethics principles, obligations (such as integrity, loyalty, courage, honesty, fairness and responsibility), how to deal with ethical dilemmas and so on. “I am a proponent of setting out your beliefs and values in writing,” says Mr. King. “It gives more certainty, more predictability and better consistency, and this, in turn, makes beliefs and values more accessible and easier to embrace.” Organizations benefit tremendously from having shared beliefs and values, he says, and the stronger they are shared, the stronger the organization’s

14

CADENCE

Issue 17, Fall 2005


Dealing with ethical dilemmas culture. “I think that people—being social by nature—gravitate towards organizations with strong culture. And they are happier when they know the rules and what is expected of them.”

Moral ambiguity is fine if you are cooking hamburgers, but not if you are leading youth. This being said, carrying the Defence ethics card in your pocket will not ensure you behave ethically; it is simply a reminder that you have a choice regarding the kind of organizational behaviour you spawn. King cautions that leaders must not just talk ethics. “They must also walk ethics. You must be seen by your people embracing ethical values as intrinsic to your organizational values and you must have lots of time to observe,” he says. “If all you do is talk about it (posting codes of ethical conduct, giving workshops on ethics, scolding people for unethical behaviour), the people you lead will figure out that these are not real shared values, but rather values which are expected of some and not others.” King adds that you can’t lead if you don’t embrace your organization’s beliefs and values. People will spot it—maybe not immediately and maybe not everyone, but enough people will spot it over time. “That will weaken your integrity as a leader and the integrity of the Cadet Program,” he says. “Moral ambiguity is fine if you are cooking hamburgers, but not if you are leading youths.”

An ethical dilemma is a situation in which: • the right thing to do is not clear from the circumstances; • two or more values compete or are in conflict; or • or, some harm will result, no matter what you do. When faced with an ethical dilemma, use this guide: • Ethics is about right and wrong and doing what is right. • Consider your obligation to act. • Ask yourself, “What are the issues? What are the facts?” • Weigh the options, including ethical principles and obligations. • Choose the best option with due consideration for rules, consequences, values and care for others. • If unsure, talk to others—those you trust: friends, superiors, or authorities. Someone is prepared to listen and help. • Accept responsibility for your actions. How can we all improve ethical behaviour? • Ensure that decisions and actions are ethically acceptable. • Speak out when you recognize manifestly unlawful or inappropriate orders, since you are not required to obey them. • Speak out and act when you are a witness to, or being victimized by, unethical behaviour. How do leaders foster an ethical environment? • Make expectations very clear. • Provide opportunities to discuss ethical concerns. • Do what is necessary to deal with ethical risks. • Ensure confidentiality and a reprisal-free environment.

A specialized application of the CF profession …Continued from page 10 Clearly CIC officers are not the same. Although they share a number of values and beliefs in common with full-time military professionals and are expected to perform their duty honourably, this does not extend to a 24/7 commitment and full awareness that they are subject to being ordered into harm’s way anywhere in the world. Still MGen Hussey believes CIC officers are an important part of the CF team with a specialized role that must be communicated and carried out with professionalism. “By doing things to add to their own individual professionalism, CIC officers will add to the collective professionalism of the CIC,” he says. In his words, “Professionalism is a component of running any efficient and effective organization and the Canadian Cadet Movement is no exception as it strives for excellence.”

Adapted from the Canadian Defence Ethics pocket card.

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

15


PROFESSIONALISM IN THE CIC >

By LCol Pierre Labelle

Remaining competitive Adapting to the needs of our cadet ‘clientele’ These days, young consumers are seeking products and services tailored to their needs. Every day, it is brought home to us through advertising that the choices open to us are increasingly varied and accessible. he Cadet Program is not the only program to offer activities, challenges and adventures for young people between the ages of 12 and 18. Competition is fierce and this client group now has free access to all sorts of new activities and experiences designed to give them a good shot of adrenaline.

T

We also know that our customer base has changed substantially over the past few years. One could, in fact, call it a total transformation. Young people have both the capacity and the desire to do a number of things at the same time. When they are very young, they are exposed to an array of stimulating challenges. So just “being a cadet” is no longer sufficient. We see this same phenomenon among candidates who want to become CIC officers, civilian instructors and volunteers.

We must also improve the way we serve our serviceproviders—officers, civilian instructors and volunteers. Values relating to motivation, results, independence and balance between work/home force us to ask the question: How can we remain competitive to attract the interest of young people and keep them in the program? The response to this challenge can be found in a single action: adaptation. We can no longer base our management of the program and its related activities on tradition. We must immediately give corps/squadrons the tools they need to select and implement stimulating activities that pose

16

challenges adapted to specific age groups and community values. And we must put greater or lesser stress on certain activities depending on where they take place—the city or the country. Adapting to our clientele also means understanding and accepting the possibility that a young person may be interested in the Cadet Program while participating in other activities or working at the same time. Consequently, we should avoid overloading our cadets’ schedules and instead introduce a healthy dose of flexibility. It is becoming increasingly important for us to give cadets (particularly those 15 and older) enough time to do other things.

To produce results, the client-centred approach should value the concepts of adaptation, flexibility and continuous information. We must pay close heed to our target audiences and be able to fulfill their needs; most importantly, however, we must honour our promises. By adapting this approach, the Cadet Program will be capable of meeting the needs of its young people while at the same time preserving its aims and objectives. LCol Labelle is the chief of staff, Regional Cadet Support Unit (Eastern).

Adapting to our clientele also means listening to the cadets’ primary caregivers. For parents, we offer training, activities and development services. If we want to gain their confidence and support, we will have to consult them regularly concerning their expectations. We should never forget that they constitute a key element in retention. We must also improve the way we serve our service-providers— officers, civilian instructors and volunteers. This means adequate and continuous training, an effective and fully accessible internal communications network, and support and coaching based on individual corps/squadron needs. In short, this means promoting a feeling of belonging and showing our concern and ability to adapt.

We should avoid overloading our cadets’ schedules to give them (particularly those 15 and older) enough time to do other things—other youth activities, part-time jobs and schoolwork.

CADENCE

Issue 17, Fall 2005


By Maj Paul Tambeau

Communicate more effectively To be effective communicators, we need to develop a broad repertoire of communication behaviours appropriate to the type of discussion at hand. he interactions between staff, parents, cadets, sponsors, and the many other movement stakeholders demand a much more flexible approach. Just as one style of leadership does not serve every task, neither does one style of communication. We can increase our professionalism by choosing the appropriate style.

T

The military-style discipline of the cadet world lends itself to this ‘oneway’ form of communication; however, when used exclusively it becomes redundant and ineffective. When individuals speak to one another they are acting on an interpersonal level, so as the term suggests, interpersonal communication is communication between people. In one sense, all communication happens between people, yet many interactions don’t involve us personally. Sometimes we don’t acknowledge others as people at

<

Behavioural scientists have studied communication for the past several decades, and countless articles and books have been published in an attempt to provide us with a better understanding of what constitutes effective versus ineffective communication. Nonetheless, many of us continue to regard communication as a process of ‘I speak, you listen’ or vice versa, with little regard for the ‘interpersonal’ aspect of the interaction and what is going on against the backdrop of words, body language, and emotions.

all, but treat them as objects; they bag our groceries, direct us around highway construction, and so forth. So it is the desire to enrich our communication beyond merely speaking and listening that sets interpersonal communication apart from merely exchanging or acting upon information.

Through all life's stages, our self-esteem is shaped by how others communicate with us. Some of the key principles that should guide our communication with others include: • Maintaining or enhancing selfesteem. Through all life’s stages, our self-esteem is shaped by how others communicate with us. We want others to respect us, and we want to respect ourselves. Selfesteem can be fragile, especially in many young people, and since we can’t take back what we say, our goal in communicating should always be to consider the impact our words may have on the listener. • Engaging in a dual perspective. This requires the ability to understand both our own and another

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

person’s perspective, beliefs, thoughts, or feelings. To meet another person in genuine dialogue, we must be able to realize how that person views himself or herself, the situation, and his or her thoughts and feelings. Put another way it means keeping our own biases and perceptions in check.

Self-esteem can be fragile, especially in many young people. We should always consider the impact our words may have on the listener.

• Self-monitoring. This capacity to observe and regulate our own communication is important. Low self-monitors use inner beliefs and values in deciding how to communicate, likely reverting to the communication style they are most comfortable with; on the other hand, high self-monitors tend to monitor their surroundings and choose the communication style that is most appropriate for the situation at hand. Keeping these principles in mind will enhance the professionalism of any of our communications. Maj Tambeau is the CO of 27 Air Cadet Squadron in London, Ont. He is a former Regional Cadet Adviser in Central Region and recently retired from teaching in the management studies program at Conestoga College in Kitchener, Ont.

17


PROFESSIONALISM IN THE CIC >

Professionalism when dealing with parents Demonstrating professionalism when interacting with parents is vital to the credibility of CIC officers entrusted with developing their children. e approached seven CIC officers who, as educators, have developed expertise in parent interactions. The officers include Maj Don Duthie of Trenton, Ont., Capt Kel Smith of Virden, Man., Capt Natalie Hull of Waterloo, Ont., Rob Vanderlee of Canmore, Alta., Paul Dowling of Oromocto, N. B., Lt(N) Arnold Wick of Prince Rupert, B.C., and Lt(N) Ryan Graham of Dryden, Ont. All have local and summer CIC experience.

W

The challenge is not to get caught up in the emotion of the moment. We asked these instructors how they would deal effectively with: • the parent who approaches you in anger; • the overzealous parent who wants to talk to you every parade night;

18

• the parent who doesn’t get involved; • the parent who thinks his/her child can do not wrong; and • the parent who questions the enforcement of regulations. The parent who approaches you in anger This is potentially one of the most of the most stressful situations at local corps and squadrons, says Lt(N) Graham. It may come out of nowhere, or it may relate to a commanding officer’s decision. In the latter case, he adds, irrefutable documentation is key to justifying why decisions were made. Most of all, he says, parents want to voice their concerns and know that someone is willing to listen to their problem. “The barrage of questions that parents can ask sometimes is quite numbing and intimidating,

especially when they are agitated. The challenge is not to get caught up in the emotion of the moment. Answer questions honestly, understanding that parents want what is best for their child and more often than not, proof of equitable treatment.” On initial contact with an angry parent, Maj Duthie recommends lowering your voice and staying calm when you speak—this usually helps defuse the anger. He also offers the following advice: Reassure the parent that you too are concerned and that you fully want to understand what has transpired to make the parent angry. If there is an audience, explain that the place and time to discuss the matter might not be appropriate. Offer to go to a more private location, or set up a convenient time and place to sit down and calmly discuss the matter.

CADENCE

Issue 17, Fall 2005


Our Advisers Maj Don Duthie: 35 years as an elementary and high school teacher; 25 years as a CIC officer; currently CO designate of 123 Air Cadet Squadron in Bowmanville, Ont.; and Regional Cadet Adviser, Central Region, for four years.

Capt Natalie Hull: a teacher for eight years and currently teaching special education in Kitchener, Ont.; 13 years as a CIC officer; an instructor with Regional Cadet Instructors School (Central); and a volunteer instructor with 1596 Army Cadet Corps in Kitchener, Ont.

Capt Paul Dowling: Retired after 32 years as a teacher and principal in Oromocto, N.B.; CIC officer for 26 years; Area Cadet Officer (Air) New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island Detachment, Atlantic Region.

Suggest that to give the matter full credence, you would like more details and an opportunity to investigate. Suggest that you would like to sit down together when you have as many facts as possible. Let the parent talk. If they become agitated again, speak softly, let the parent know that you really do want to listen. However, if the parent continues to shout or be abusive, terminate the discussion. Be firm, but not challenging. Do not patronize the parent. To them, this is very important and involves their child.

Maj Rob Vanderlee: A teacher for nine years and currently teaching Grades 7 and 8 in Canmore, Alta.; training officer with 878 Air Cadet Squadron in Canmore; 19 years as a CIC officer; and selected by the Air Cadet League in 2004 as the top CIC officer (air) in Canada.

Capt Kel Smith: 35 years as an educator in Virden, Man.; 34 years as a CIC officer; currently supply officer, unit information officer and sports officer with 2528 Army Cadet Corps in Virden.

Lt(N) Arnold Wick: 34 years as an elementary school teacher in Prince Rupert, B. C.; 26 years as a CIC officer. Currently CO of 7 Sea Cadet Corps in Prince Rupert.

Do not make rash/hasty decisions or promisesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;you have to live with these after. Make sure you respond to the parent after you investigate. If you find the parent was justified in being upset, apologize for the upset and let the parent know you are taking steps to

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

Lt(N) Ryan Graham, fourth year as a highschool teacher in Dryden, Ont.; 14 years as a CIC officer; CO of the Kenora Sail Centre; and after two years with 2072 Army Cadet Corps, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trying to restart a sea cadet corps in Dryden.

19


for the upcoming year. At that time, they identify together what activities need outside funding and parent involvement in one way or another.

ensure this particular situation does not occur again. Thank the parent for bringing it to your attention. Even if your investigation shows that the parent was totally out of line and misinformed, you must still speak to the parent and explain why the situation occurred and was correct. This should come across in a win/win manner. Capt Hull adds, “Remember that most parents are passionate about their children and they get angry because they care about them. They also tend to get only one side of the story, and if you had heard what they had heard, you probably would be angry too.”

The overzealous parent who wants to talk to you every parade night Capt Hull believes these parents are often in need of involvement. They may want to learn more about what their child is doing and increase involvement in their child’s life. Parents showing this level of interest—even though it may be misdirected interest that is taking your time away from tasks—can help the unit and at the same time, answer many of their own questions. When a parent is noted as repeatedly needing to talk to you, suggest they watch opening parade or help with supervision of the canteen at break times so they can see for themselves what is going on. In this way, they will have less need to talk to you.

20

The parent who doesn’t get involved If Maj Vanderlee sees a parent who isn’t getting involved, the first question he asks is “Why?” “I find that a parent who doesn’t get involved usually has some pretty decent reasons for it. Find out what you can about the parent,” he says. “Perhaps they don’t want to get involved because they don’t want to leave their other children at home, or feel they can’t bring them along to activities. Or, maybe you just need to adjust how you or the corps/ squadron is perceived. Many parents just don’t understand. Communicate with them.” As a teacher, Maj Vanderlee tends to know more about families and can sometimes better explain their situation to the commanding officer or sponsor, clarifying that these are not ‘deadbeat’ parents and that they really just don’t have the time, or whatever, to help. What about the parents who just don’t seem to want to get involved? In these cases, Maj Vanderlee spends a little more personal time with them, calling them more often and informing them of the many options for getting involved. “Calling or visiting them gives me the opportunity to apply subtle persuasion,” he says. “When I have done this, I have found that once they get involved, they stay involved.” Lt(N) Wick’s proactive strategy for parental involvement works well— particularly for fundraising. He calls on his Navy League partners early each summer to go over the program

He invites league representatives to his first two major events in September—the introductory night for former cadets and parents; and a couple of days later, registration night for new cadets where parent attendance is mandatory. This way, the league has full access to every parent to ask for help and specific parent commitments, while providing all options and timeframes available. The league asks parents outright, “Which activities would you like to sign up for?” “It’s seldom that a parent refuses,” says Lt(N) Wick. “Perhaps because it’s a public commitment, it has a cascading effect.” Also, the league calls every parent before an event to remind them of their commitment. If the parent says during the call that they cannot fulfill the commitment, they are asked to exchange places with another parent at a later date. The parent who thinks his/her child can do no wrong. Being confronted by unrealistic parents is difficult and requires a great deal of skill to handle, says Capt Dowling. He advises not to “break their bubble” in the opening minutes of the meeting. If you do, you could ruin any chance you might have at arriving at a successful conclusion. He explains that these parents are usually very defensive and will tell you right up front that their child did not do something. “You have to be careful not to get into a verbal battle with them over the issues, making it a “you” versus “them” situation. The important thing to keep in mind is that whatever the accusations are, the parent will more than likely look at it as a personal attack on their parenting.

CADENCE

Issue 17, Fall 2005


Keep strictly to the facts, he says, avoid innuendos and unsubstantiated accusations. “Your goal is to bring the parent around to recognizing that both of you are on the same side and that they, as parents, are not to blame.” Guide them through the facts so that they conclude that your evidence does indeed prove that their child did whatever. The operative word here is “they”. They must come to the conclusion themselves; you cannot impose this decision on them.

Being confronted by unrealistic parents is difficult and requires a great deal of skill to handle. Don’t “break their bubble” in the opening minutes of the meeting. Finally, ensure the parents that their child is not a bad individual, but has just made a bad decision and that you understand it is natural for them to stick up for their child. Then add that supporting our children can require “tough love”—teaching them to take responsibility for their actions. “In my experience, even the most defensive parent will eventually come around when you take this approach,” says Capt Dowling. “By treating the parent with respect and keeping in mind that parents cherish their children, you can reach a successful conclusion to a difficult situation.

on paper so I can be specific. The face-to-face meeting would take place at my request.” If a parent questions regulations, says Capt Smith, inform the parent that the cadet has been warned twice that their dress was not part of a cadet’s regular dress. Then advise that if the cadet wants to belong to the unit, he/she must follow Cadet Program rules and regulations. “Explain the importance of these to the operation of a corps/squadron and that letting the cadet wear what he/she wants could lead to a breakdown of corps/squadron discipline,” he adds. “Rules cannot apply to some cadets and not to others.” Perhaps more importantly, however, explain that the Cadet Program uses discipline as a teaching process. Rules, limits and realistic consequences help young people develop the self-discipline they need to cope with the challenges they will face in life and to persevere until their goals are accomplished. Self-discipline is important in everything from studying for an exam to doing a good job. It may help to add that choosing to follow regulations will allow the cadet to continue to enjoy cadet activities. Understanding this bigger-picture perspective can help a parent convince their child of the value of following rules and regulations, he points out.

The parent who questions the enforcement of (dress) regulations This interaction would take place after the cadet has had two verbal warnings not to wear chains, rings, excess makeup or a specific hairdo to Cadets, says Capt Smith. “The verbal warnings would be recorded

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

Ombudsman: Try to resolve disputes locally Since the Department of National Defence/CF ombudsman’s office was created seven years ago, it has received 19 complaints from cadets or their family members. The majority of the disputes have been between parents and CIC officers regarding decisions that officers have made, says the office. Complaints vary from abuse of power to training (including the selection process for summer camps) and harassment. “CIC officers have the power to resolve disputes at the earliest stages,” says Yves Côté, the new ombudsman appointed in August. “Carefully listening to parents and responding to their concerns in a clear and complete manner will enable CIC officers to effectively explain the reasons behind their decisions.” He believes that through their leadership, officers can do a lot to resolve issues locally and defuse situations before they escalate to his office. He adds, “However, if issues are brought to us, I assure you that we will deal with them fairly and diligently.” Mr. Côté brings almost 30 years of public service experience to the ombudsman’s office. He began his career as a military legal officer in 1977 and until he left the military in 1981, he provided opinions and advice on a wide range of issues concerning military law and discipline. Before accepting this new position, he was counsel to the Clerk of the Privy Council. For more on the ombudsman’s office visit www.ombudsman.forces.gc.ca, or call 1-888-828-3626 toll free.

21


PROFESSIONALISM IN THE CIC >

By Denise Moore

Conflict resolution skills Professionalism requires CIC officers to use various interpersonal skills—among them, conflict resolution skills. n the past, the Cadet Program has taken a reactive approach to conflict —dealing with conflict case by case. Now, the program is taking a systemic approach—using a model that incorporates all possible approaches to conflict resolution. It’s a more practical tool that will help cadets handle conflict more efficiently. The success of this system will depend on the inherent leadership skills of CIC officers, who will be responsible for supporting the cadets to ensure the system is working the way it is supposed to. More on this will be discussed in future issues of Cadence.

I

The conflict resolution spectrum ranges from formal to informal approaches. The Department of National Defence/CF approach is to

The escalation of conflict is like a tornado— the stronger it gets, the more damage it can cause.

try and deal with conflicts at the lowest and earliest possible level if possible. Alternative dispute resolution (ADR) techniques are best used at this more informal level. ADR requires dialogue about the conflict situation, with the parties working together to understand each other’s concerns before working towards a common solution. Nature of conflict Understanding the nature and causes of conflict can help officers identify, assess and determine the best approach to resolving it. It is important to understand how conflict arises, escalates and influences our perceptions of other people. How conflict arises Sources of conflict within the work environment include unprofessional behaviour; gossip/rumours/office politics; the lack of acceptance of ‘differences’ in culture, gender, race,

Sources of conflict…include unprofessional behaviour; gossip/rumours/office politics; the lack of acceptance of ‘differences’ in culture, gender, race, age, language and workplace ethics; a lack of respect, poor planning or ineffective management; and breakdowns in communication. age, language and workplace ethics; a lack of respect; poor planning or ineffective management; and breakdowns in communication. Escalation The escalation of conflict is like a tornado—the stronger it gets, the more damage it can cause. Characteristics such as relationships, values, structures, facts (information)

Hurt before being hurt ‘Group think’ and scapegoat Beliefs feed observation Assume deliberate action from the ‘other’ Draw pre-conceived conclusions Make assumptions Shift to competitive environment Co-operation

22

CADENCE

Issue 17, Fall 2005


enhance professionalism and interests (what motivates you) can contribute to the shift from a cooperative to a competitive work environment. People are quicker to make assumptions and draw pre-conceived conclusions. At this point, actions from the ‘other’ are viewed as deliberate. Our belief system feeds our observations, and we begin to develop ‘group think’ or even identify scapegoats. At this point the conflict is out of hand as we focus on hurting before being hurt. Perceptions of others Although we observe through our five senses, not everyone has access to the same information. As a result, we interpret through our ‘filters’–our personal experiences, our culture, religion, gender and so on. The conclusions we draw about others have impacts on us. We evaluate them without reliable data. We blame them rather than consider their contributions and our own. Development of ADR communication skills Role-playing is a great way to learn what ADR techniques work well for you. It also helps to identify areas you need to spend more time working on. You can hone your ADR skills, knowledge and mindset through dialogues with your peers, chain of command or even staff at Dispute Resolution Centres.

By developing a working knowledge of conflict theory and interest-based communications, you could acquire the necessary confidence to solve conflicts at the lowest level possible in a win-win manner. Look for an approach encouraging honesty of participants and avoiding confrontations that could potentially wound the dignity of those involved.

Understanding the nature and causes of conflict can help officers identify, assess and determine the best approach to resolving it. Some tips • Try to see both sides of conflict, the positive—the opportunity for positive change, as well as the negative—unpleasantness, disruption and so on. • View conflict as a potential opportunity for collaboration, rather than as a call to adversarial struggle or avoidance. • Recognize signs of conflict before it reaches an unmanageable or escalated stage. • Develop skills to handle a variety of conflict styles. • Acquire a measure of comfort and confidence in dealing with conflict.

Take the initiative—it’s your responsibility Develop the skills, knowledge and confidence to help those around you solve their conflicts in an interestbased fashion. It is the responsibility of officers to deal with conflicts when they arise. Demonstrate professionalism by taking ownership of a situation and handling it to the best of your ability. Ask for assistance Often, a conflict situation has many components to it. You may be able to help resolve some of these components but not all. Another skill is determining when to ask for help and when it is appropriate to refer the conflict situation up the chain of command. ADR is the preferred approach to resolving conflict; however, it is important to understand how ADR complements other more formal resolution mechanisms, such as the DND/CF grievance process or the harassment policy. For more information about the conflict management program, see http://www.forces.gc.ca/hr/adr-marc/ Denise Moore, a senior mediator with Director Cadets, represents the conflict management program for Director General Reserves and Cadets.

• Acquire a genuine curiosity and enthusiasm about turning conflict around. It’s an opportunity for creativity!

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

23


PROFESSIONALISM IN THE CIC >

Learning from mistakes Do you consider mistakes as

learning opportunities or

failures?

eadership experts agree that our own mistakes (and the mistakes of others) can provide significant learning opportunities if we know how to deal with them. One way is to avoid “learning traps” that can prevent us from learning from mistakes. Another is to know what we should and should not do when mistakes are made.

L

The Canada School of Public Service website at www.myschoolmonecole.gc.ca/research/publications/html lists these learning traps: • Mistakes are not discussible. When someone makes a mistake, we just assume they learn from it and do not discuss it openly. When the team makes a mistake, we sometimes have a post-mortem meeting, but that is about all. And when the supervisor makes a mistake, no

24

one acknowledges it—including the supervisor. People are more worried about creating unproductive tension and resentment. • People avoid blame for mistakes. Team members express dissatisfaction when mistakes are made. There is a lot of pressure not to make errors. Everyone recognizes when mistakes are made, but the tendency is to avoid blame and criticize others for erring. • Mistakes are buried. There is a fear that mistakes will hurt a person’s career or the team’s reputation. Mistakes tend to be covered up, or treated as unimportant. These mistakes sometimes build up and create a crisis later on. Or they surface and become an irritant. • Mistakes are discussed, but no one gets to the root cause. Mistakes are

discussed, but they seem to happen again. This makes everyone frustrated. There is a tendency not to see when mistakes are just symptoms of deeper problems. No one wants to take the time to delve deeper and discover the root causes of mistakes.

Everyone recognizes when mistakes are made, but the tendency is to avoid blame and criticize others for erring. Avoiding these traps may be easier if you follow these useful do’s and don’t’s in dealing with mistakes, as set out in “Leadership Passages: The Personal and Professional Transitions That Make or Break a Leader”, by David Dotlich, James Noel and Norman Walker.

CADENCE

Issue 17, Fall 2005


the mistake. You may even convince yourself that you had nothing to do with it. Blaming others discourages self-examination and the acceptance of responsibility—two critical leadership traits. Avoid this blaming reflex and absorb the blame. Admit what you did wrong, explain the context for the mistake and make a commitment not to let it happen again.

The worst thing you can is dwell on the mistake and beat yourself up for whatever mistake you made (or think you made).

Three don’t’s in dealing with mistakes 1. Don’t let your mistake define you as a person. Separate the event from who you are. Even if you made a stupid mistake, you aren’t stupid. The worst thing you can do is dwell on the mistake and beat yourself up for whatever mistake you made (or think you made). After you acknowledge your mistake and accept responsibility, let go of it and move on. Making a mistake is natural and predictable. Refuse to allow your mistake to dominate how you lead. 2. Don’t seek scapegoats. Realistically and naturally, most leaders react defensively to mistakes. However, if you respond defensively, you’re likely to waste this teachable moment. If you blame someone else, you’re not likely to examine your own role in

3. Don’t limit your thinking to the event itself. Even though it’s important to learn from what went wrong and act differently if the same circumstances present themselves in the future (external learning), it’s also important for internal learning. Ask yourself what it says about you as a leader that you did X instead of Y. Consider how your approach or values may have caused you to contribute to the mistake. Did your arrogance, or mercurial nature contribute to making it? Four do’s in dealing with mistakes 1. Examine your decisions that catalyzed the mistake. More specifically, look at your attitudes, as well as your actions, that may have caused, or influenced it. Ask yourself why you decided what you decided. Were you afraid of taking a risk? Were you taking too much of one? Were you too stubborn and didn’t listen to your team’s advice? 2. Talk to a coach, mentor, or trusted adviser about the incident. Many people cannot discuss their mistakes. This type of swagger is not leadership; it is denial. Discussing how things went wrong is painful and it requires courage to expose your vulnerabilities. You don’t want someone to think less of you. However, these conversations allow you to obtain feedback, examine your assumptions and come to terms with yourself and your role. You

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

need the benefit of an outside perspective—it can offer insight about who you are as a leader, and how you need to develop.

If you respond defensively (to a mistake), you’re likely to waste this teachable moment. 3. Reflect on what you might do differently in the future. After you analyze why you did what you did and talk about it, reflect on how you might respond in a more effective way when facing a similar situation in the future. Consider what you have learned from the mistake that might serve you well in other positions and when you are faced with other decisions. To help you reflect on what you’ve learned, ask yourself the following questions: If you encountered exactly the same situation in the future, what would you do differently? What would have to change inside you to do it differently? Would you have to adopt new values, become more flexible, change your traditional approach? 4. Summon the energy to persevere. Mistakes can leave you feeling defeated, but great leaders obtain the psychological resiliency that comes with this passage. There’s no secret to acquiring this resiliency—it’s simply a matter of digging deep inside yourself and deciding you’re not going to be defeated. Focus on the job that needs to be done. Discipline your thinking to avoid dwelling on your mistakes or the mistakes of others. Give yourself a pep talk. By avoiding learning traps and applying these do’s and don’t’s, you can learn from your mistakes and become a more successful leader.

25


PROFESSIONALISM IN THE CIC

By Maj Serge Dubé

Future training aimed at professionalism As defined by the Canadian Oxford Dictionary, professionalism is “the skill or qualities required or expected of members of a profession.” he occupational specification for the CIC states that “CIC officers are youth development practitioners with high standards of professionalism. They satisfy the high societal expectations that are naturally imposed on an individual responsible for the well-being, support, protection, administration, training and development of our nation’s most precious resource: Canada’s youth.”

T

The CIC training being developed as part of the CIC Military Occupational Specification Change Management Project is integral to high standards of professionalism within the CIC. When CIC officers from the field and headquarters were asked during the project what they did in their jobs, their answers varied depending on the job they were performing at the time.

But a common theme of their responses was the need for more training in the areas of youth development and leadership. Based on these responses, officers from all levels of the organization wrote job descriptions, and training was created to prepare CIC officers for these jobs. Care was taken to ensure that entry-level officers will receive the tools they need to properly lead and understand youth (cadets) early in their careers, as opposed to receiving them over a three- to four-year period. This is expected to help them lead more professionally. Here are some of the subjects incorporated into future entry-level training: adolescent development, the

Officers, such as SLt David Lang who instructed at Regional Gliding School (Eastern) this past summer, will receive the tools they need early in their careers to properly lead and understand youth.

CIC officer’s responsibility for cadet supervision and leadership development, mentoring and coaching, developing cadets through coaching, identifying barriers to learning, addressing cadets’ personal concerns and aiding in the resolution of rudimentary interand intra-personal conflicts.

(Officers from the field have identified) the need for more training in the areas of youth development and leadership. In addition to the training officers will receive when they join the CIC, another course is currently being developed to prepare them for the increased responsibilities they will have on promotion to captain or lieutenant (navy) and entry into Developmental Period (DP) 2. This training will take the skills and knowledge gained during DP 1 to an even higher level. Job-specific training to be delivered when personnel require it is also being developed. For instance, when you are appointed training officer you will take your training officer course, or when you are appointed platoon commander at a cadet summer training centre, you will take your platoon commander course. This method of qualifying officers when they actually require it—not years before—will ensure they receive the most up-to-date information. This in itself will make them more professional members of the branch. Keep your eyes open and your ears to the ground for updates on the new CIC training program. Maj Dubé is the staff officer responsible for CIC professional development at Directorate Cadets

26

CADENCE

Issue 17, Fall 2005


OFFICER DEVELOPMENT

By Maj Stephen Case

Local smoking ‘policy’ teaches damaging lessons While visiting a local unit, I was stunned as the sergeant beamed at me proudly. When asked the question, “What is the best thing about being a senior cadet?” he immediately responded that once you’re a senior cadet, you are allowed to smoke during breaks at Cadets. he sergeant was very proud of his rank and the privileges it brought. In his unit, junior cadets were not allowed to smoke, but senior cadets were. When an inquiry was made as to why the unit had this ‘policy’, an officer cadet explained the reasoning—the senior cadets were leaders, so were allowed to smoke as officers do. Besides, the officer explained, it was good for morale: kids worked hard to become senior cadets so they could have the privileges of leadership.

T

When a senior cadet is granted a privilege unavailable to others, it should be to recognize and use the cadet’s greater responsibility, experience and judgment. The officers were convinced that their method was sound. Not only did it reward senior cadets and encourage juniors to excel, but it also solved the smoking problem. The officers reasoned that the cadets were going to smoke whether they were allowed to or not. With this local ‘policy’, the seniors would police smoking because it was their privilege. The staff did not have to worry about junior cadets smoking because the seniors would not let them smoke. The problem was in what this hopefully isolated local ‘policy’ taught the cadets. The junior cadets learned that if they worked hard and followed the

rules, they would not need to follow them later. They learned that orders are relative to rank—a very dangerous and undesirable idea to develop. It is also natural for junior cadets to emulate those they admire—in this case, the senior cadets. If being senior cadets meant they could smoke, I would argue that the senior cadets were actually encouraged to smoke—not only to fit in with those that did, but also to assert their new privilege. The sergeant learned that the higher the rank, the less rules apply; orders lean more towards suggestions as your rank goes up; promotion is not about gaining more responsibility, but gaining more advantage; and rank is not about what cadets can do for the unit, but what they get for themselves. As senior cadets develop the impression that rank alleviates accountability to orders, other orders will come into question. If we teach cadets that a rule can be ignored, they will start ignoring rules. Perhaps the people who learned the most damaging lessons in this situation were the junior officers, who learned that this is how a unit is run, or how leadership is built in young people. These officers will not only allow such behaviours in their own corps and squadrons, but will also migrate the ideas to others thinking it is the right thing to do. Should senior cadets have privileges that recruits and juniors do not? Of course they should, but those privileges should be in line with the aims

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

and policies of the Cadet Program and encourage positive character development. When a senior cadet is granted a privilege unavailable to others, it should be to recognize and use the cadet’s greater responsibility, experience and judgment. Maj Case is the Regional Cadet Adviser (Air) with Regional Cadet Support Unit (Central).

27


OFFICER DEVELOPMENT

By Lt(N) Paul Fraser

This fall, the new online unit administration officer and supply officer courses are being trialled!

Online trials of first new courses hese are the first two courses under the CIC military occupational structure change management project to become available online. Trials are being conducted through regional cadet instructor schools across the country using CadetNet. Course details are available through your regional school and officers should consult regional directives on how to apply for these courses.

T

Course content and all training references/resources will be available to anyone having a CadetNet account; however, you need to be loaded on a course to access the course conferences, chats and assignments. In the Spring/Summer 2005 issue of Cadence, we provided a basic outline of how these courses will be conducted. As they are being delivered

28

through CadetNet, officers wishing to take a Distributed Learning (DL) course will require a CadetNet account to access the training. Each corps/squadron has been allocated 14 accounts for its staff. If you plan to take CIC training in the future and do not already have an account, talk with your commanding officer about setting one up. You will access this training through the Cadet Instructors Cadre Learning Centre portal (conference) on CadetNet. Course content and all training references/resources will be available to anyone having a CadetNet account; however, you need to be loaded on a course to access the course conferences, chats and assignments. The conferencing and chats will be available only to candidates who have registered through their CadetNet Client. Course content will be provided in an HTML format for easier accessibility.

The CIC Learning Centre will become a unique tool for local officers to gain access to training; as well, it will act as a resource for documents and references used by the Department of National Defence/CF to administer and deliver the Cadet Program. DL will give local officers the ability to attend courses without having to travel to a training school and the flexibility to complete training, while accommodating personal schedules. However, officers will still be expected to complete course assignments within course timelines. In most cases, assignments will be due by midnight on Mondays (in your time zone). Pay for these courses will not be issued until they have been completed successfully. More information on DL will be available in the future through Cadence and the CIC Learning Centre within CadetNet. LT(N) Fraser is the staff officer for CIC DL development at Directorate Cadets.

CADENCE

Issue 17, Fall 2005


Officers to benefit from new training organization Our last issue updated readers on the new CIC training organization that stood up in September. In this issue, LCol Tom McNeil, responsible for CIC training at Directorate Cadets, answers some additional questions.

Q: The new training organization seems to have fewer resources devoted to delivery and more resources devoted to oversight. Will this affect training quality? A: The premise of the question is flawed. There will not be fewer resources dedicated to delivery. There will be fewer full-time staff officers at each regional cadet instructors school and more staff officers to develop and update training and the tools instructors require. As leaders of a youth development program, it is important that we provide the most up-to-date training possible. We believe that training quality will increase. We will have succeeded in maintaining the student-instructor ratio while dedicating more resources to development. Ensuring that instructors have the tools and support necessary is key to delivering a high-quality product.

critiques and several specialist courses running in multiple locations—all under-loaded! Over time, a national training plan will eliminate such duplication and inefficiencies. By eliminating duplication in our development of distributed learning, for example, we will be able to offer local instructors an increased selection of online courses more quickly. Q: Was there not already a CIC training cell at Directorate Cadets? A: In theory, yes; however, insufficient resources—three officers only— made it ineffective. In the absence of staff offering timely information, the regions—to their credit—did it themselves. They had to act independently to get on with training. The future organization will ensure that the regions no longer have to “improvise” in this way.

Q: Can you provide some examples of duplication and how training will become more efficient?

Q: You say that you will “finally have standardized training that is transportable”. Wasn’t it always this way? Did regional variances really make that much difference?

A: Distributed learning was being developed for the same course in two regions simultaneously. We had five different systems of course

A: Training was not always transportable and in some instances, regional variances made an acute difference. Some regions would not

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

recognize the training officers received in another region because of safety concerns. One region that appointed its commanding officers (COs) decided not to offer the CO’s course because it felt the course wasn’t needed. That meant that an officer from that region would have a problem becoming CO in another. Q: You said that when the new organization stood up, officers would see “very little”. Does this mean little will change? A: Our goal is to make all of this as transparent as possible to local officers. These changes should not be a source of distraction to local instructors. They should be aware of what is happening and need to know that ultimately these changes will result in better training for them. As a member of the CIC, I would not be leading this change if I did not feel that the CIC would benefit. The changes will become more obvious when we begin to roll out the new training over the next few years—new courses and training plans, new training aids and instructor guides. All of this will take a lot of work and co-ordination.

29


OFFICER DEVELOPMENT

By Capt Catherine Griffin

Communicating with cadets Have you ever communicated something to a cadet—something you felt was very important—but the cadet did not respond in the way you expected? he cadet was probably not defying or ignoring you. More likely, it was a simple case of miscommunication.

T

Recent work in the field of neuropsychology has shown that youths and adults use different parts of their brain to take in and process information. This means that what you think you are communicating and what your cadets think you are communicating can be very different. The good news is you can take steps to ensure that you and your cadets are ‘on the same page’. Adult brains and teen brains—distinctly different Lt Ken Russell ensures that a cadet understands exactly what he is communicating by being specific.

<

(Photo by CI Wayne Emde, CSTC Vernon public affairs)

In a recent study mapping the differences between the brains of adults and teens, Deborah Yurgelun-Todd (director of neuropsychology and cognitive neuroimaging at Mclean Hospital in Belmont, Mass.) used magnetic resonance imaging to monitor how adult and teen volunteers responded to a series of pictures.

Asked to interpret the emotions displayed on the faces in the pictures, all of the adults correctly identified fear, but many of the youths identified shock, anger, confusion or sadness. The adults and youths saw and interpreted different emotions. When examining the brain scans, Todd found that the adults had used the pre-frontal area of their brain (associated with executive or higherlevel thinking) to interpret the images, while the teens had used the emotional areas of their brain.

Teen brains respond differently than adult brains to the outside world. What can we learn from this? Teen brains respond differently than adult brains to the outside world. Dr. Yurgelun-Todd says the research suggests “…that the teenager is not going to take the information that is in the outside world and organize it and understand it the same way we (adults) do.” This poses a unique challenge to people who work with youth, but following these tips when communicating with your cadets may help: • Know your message. Ask yourself, “What do I want to pass on and why?” If you are unsure of your point, you may tend to overexplain. Giving too much unnecessary information can be confusing for a cadet, who may become frustrated and just stop listening. • Be specific. Include information that makes your point clear, such as dates, times, names or situations. Avoid being vague

30

or communicating in generalities. Remember, cadets won’t always interpret signals and nuances, like body language, as adults will. Assumptions lead to frustrations on both sides. • Review with the cadet what you have said. Ask the cadet to summarize your message or explain what he/she believes is expected as a result of this communication. This will inform you of the cadet’s ‘take’ on things and give both of you an opportunity to ask questions if necessary. • Listen actively. This involves hearing the cadet’s words and focussing on what is being said. Refrain from thinking about your grocery list or responding to an email on your BlackBerry. Use all of your senses to take in the information and respond as required. • Know your audience. The better you know your cadets, the better your chances are of communicating with them effectively. It helps to know that one cadet responds best if he/she takes notes when you communicate, while another responds best to simple verbal, rather than written, communication. • Just do it. Skill development requires practice. The more you communicate with your cadets, the more likely you are to discover what works best for everyone. Capt Griffin is the educational development staff officer at Directorate Cadets. This article includes information from an interview with Dr. Yurgelun-Todd at http://www.pbs.org/ wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/teenbrain/interviews.todd.html. If you would like to submit a youth-related article to Cadence (either your own, or one you have read), please contact Capt Griffin at griffin.cr@forces.gc.ca

CADENCE

Issue 17, Fall 2005


CADET TRAINING

By Maj Russ Francis

< Updating sea, army and air cadet training activities and defining “pathways” cadets will take as they progress through the Cadet Program is ongoing.

The project’s third phase—developing and deploying updated corps/squadron and summer training programs—will take place over the next five years from 2006 to 2011. Between January and the end of May 2006, and between each September and May thereafter, writing boards will convene to develop the updated training. These boards are made up of staff from D Cdts and other headquarters, as well as instructors from corps/squadrons and cadet summer training centres.

Cadet Program Update Project—

making progress Since 2003, the Cadet Program has been engaged in a significant renewal initiative—the Cadet Program Update Project. here do we stand right now with this three-phase modernization project? As previously reported, we completed the first phase with the development of cadet program parameters which were approved in May. A Cadet Administration and Training Order (CATO) outlining these parameters should be released during the 20052006 training year.

W

Now in the second phase of the project, we are developing a macro-level view of the cadet program—updating how it is organized and structured, updating the sea, army and air cadet training activities and defining “pathways” cadets will take as they progress through the six-year program. In essence, a blueprint for the cadet program is being created that incorporates the changes and other recommendations received over several years.

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

Hopes are to release (updated first-year training activities) to...corps/squadrons in January 2007 for implementation in September 2007. The first boards will develop firstyear training activities for corps/ squadrons. Hopes are to release these to regional headquarters and corps/squadrons in January 2007 for implementation in September 2007. The CPU Project goals are to improve the management and administration of the cadet program; improve connectivity between the sea, army and air cadet programs so that high quality training is sustainable within current resource levels; and to incorporate contemporary professional practices from the fields of education and youth development into the cadet program. Maj Francis is the staff officer responsible for cadet program development at D Cdts.

31


By Capt Daniel Guay

Joint recruiting reaps rewards For the past three years, six corps and squadrons in Thunder Bay, Ont., have conducted a joint triservice recruiting campaign that has helped them all increase recruit numbers over previous years. “By promoting the Cadet Program as a whole—instead of each individual corps/squadron—we have all come out winners,” says Capt Luis Santos, commanding officer (CO) of 84 Air Cadet Squadron. t the end of last year’s campaign, CIC officers from each unit noted increases, and although results were not yet available from this year’s campaign, officers were optimistic.

A

For the past two years, the campaign has consisted of a recruiting drive during the Canadian Lakehead Exhibition and Fair—three weeks before the return to school, as well as school recruiting drives. The fair offers an opportunity to promote the Cadet Program to the more than 10 000 people who attend it.

Capt Santos was project manager for the fair recruiting drive this year. His staff prepared and advanced the necessary paperwork to the region for event approval and ensured that each corps/squadron submitted their respective requests for authorization and certificates of insurance. The team also arranged for booth space, refreshments and set-up of the display/booth. Because of timing, the team’s greatest challenge was arranging for people to work the booth during the four-day event. The ideal was to have one CIC officer and two cadets in uniform at all times to answer questions. We emphasized the importance of promoting the Cadet Program and not their local corps/ squadrons, or specific elements, when answering questions. Each corps/squadron was responsible for providing officer and cadet volunteers, but because many were taking part in summer training, or had other summer commitments, volunteers were harder to find. As the campaign is tri-service, we used recruiting materials provided by Directorate Cadets. These included the newly designed pamphlets and posters, as well as the recruiting videos of each element that played continuously throughout

32

the fair. In addition, we used the fullsize wall backdrop, provided by Cadet Detachment Winnipeg. We also created a local handout to supplement national promotional material. It listed the six local units by name, address, contact number, and parade night, as well as offering additional information on a sea cadet corps in Nipigon, Ont., about an hour away. To ensure the handout’s effectiveness for its target audience, it was reviewed by the regional public affairs officer. After several renditions, it was approved, printed in colour and distributed—along with “The Cadet Experience” national information booklet. In any shared event—when everyone pulls together—the workload and costs are a lot easier to manage. We have been fortunate to have officers in these corps/squadrons that are willing to promote a complete program. This allows all of us to benefit from our recruiting effort. Recruiting is not the only joint effort for Thunder Bay’s corps and squadrons. “We stimulate esprit de corps and social interaction through a tri-service cadet ball, competitive sports and drill competitions,” says Capt Santos. “These stimulate cadets to excel individually and collectively and most importantly, showcase the Cadet Program in our community.” Capt Guay is the training officer for 2511 Army Cadet Corps in Thunder Bay, Ont.

CADENCE

Issue 17, Fall 2005


By Col Robert Perron

Clarification on fees, dues or other assessments

During the 2004-2005 training year, we received several telephone calls and emails from parents who did not understand why they were being asked to pay a fee to have their child in the Cadet Program when cadet websites and information brochures clearly stated that there was no registration fee or dues, or any cost for the cadet uniform.

hile there is no cost to join the Cadet Program, it is not correct to say that the program is “free”. Local sponsors need to raise funds to support the league/sponsor contribution to the program—to pay for accommodation, insurance, utilities, optional training equipment and training aids, as well as local transportation. In addition, for Air Cadets, local sponsors are required to contribute towards the airplanes and tow aircraft provided by the Air Cadet League for the gliding and flying programs. It is the sponsor’s prerogative as to how these funds are raised—whether by public fundraising activities, community service group sponsorships, or by a direct appeal to parents of cadets.

W

Furthermore, no child may be shown favouritism because of extra parental support. Any funds paid to the league or sponsors are a voluntary and freewill gift without obligation. Because the leagues and many of the local sponsors are registered charities, such donations may be eligible for a tax deduction depending upon the nature of the gift. Parents who are unable or unwilling to participate by way of cash support are encouraged to participate in fundraising activities by providing their time and talent. It is important for parents to understand that without their contribution—financial or otherwise—there would not be such an elaborate program.

While there is no cost to join the Cadet Program, it is not correct to say that the program is “free”.

That being the case, no direct appeal to parents can be characterized as a registration or enrolment fee where non-payment would preclude a child from joining the Cadet Program or participating in its activities. No child will be turned away from the program—or otherwise be disadvantaged—because their family is not able or is unwilling to pay a league or sponsor-initiated assessment. Certain discretion is left with the local unit commanding officer and sponsor for optional non-training activities where a cadet may be asked to contribute a small amount to cover costs that have not been fundraised.

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

It is important to ensure that youth joining the program and their parents do not lose interest because of misinformation. As such, you have a vested interest in correcting any information circulated contrary or inconsistent with the direction detailed above. Consequently, you must work with your local sponsor to ensure your unit’s website and any locally-produced parent information handouts reflect this common position. Similarly, parents are to be assured that there has been no negative change in CF support to the cadet organizations. In other words, the requirement to raise funds is not because of a drop in CF support. Any parent who requires further information regarding a league/sponsor assessment or tariff—or a sponsor’s contribution to the program— should be directed first to the local sponsoring committee and then to the appropriate supervisory league. Col Perron is the Director Cadets.

33


Retrospective—schools for CIC officers < Capt Mallette, right, correcting course papers this year, began teaching at RCIS (Eastern) in 1978.

On December 30, 1974, a National Defence Headquarters action directive, signed by the Deputy Chief of the Defence Staff, recommended that a Cadet Instructor Training System be established to train cadet movement officers.

P

ar Dévouement, a history of the CIC by Capt Marie-Claude Joubert, states that in 1974, Eastern Region was the only region with a school for Cadet Instructors List (CIL) officers. Courses had been conducted for CIL officers in Central Region in 1973 and 1974, but it was not until 1975 that the Central Region CIL School was formed. In 1976, Ottawa officially recognized regional cadet instructor schools, giving them training programs and standards. Other regional schools soon followed. Few officers are likely to know what CIC training was like more than 30 years ago, so we asked two CIC officers who were there from the beginning—Eastern Region’s Capt Pierre Mallette (a ‘pure’ CIC officer) and Central Region’s Capt Ray Fleming (a former Regular Force/Reserve officer)—for their perspectives. Coincidentally, both were cadets and both continue to be involved with the schools today. Two perspectives In 1970, two months after turning 18, Pierre Mallette took a Basic Instructor Course at the Quebec Citadelle with the goal of becoming a Cadet Service of Canada (CS of C) officer.

34

For two weeks, he studied leadership, instructional techniques, drill courses, officer protocol and behaviour—and even how to use a projector. “It was a lot of what I’d learned as a senior cadet, but with a different ‘vision’,” says Capt Mallette. “For many of us, it was our first contact with ‘regulars’, and being an officer cadet then was no easier than it is today.”

In 1976, Ottawa officially recognized regional cadet instructor schools, giving them training programs and standards. In 1971 in Montreal, he learned he was no longer a CS of C officer, but rather a CIL officer. “Our ‘reward’ was to leave the old 100 percent wool ‘battle dress’ behind and buy new uniforms for $60 (a lot of money for students then),” he says. “But we had an identity and learned that we were officers with a specialized task: leading teenagers.” Capt Fleming and other retired Regular Force and Primary Reserve officers affiliated with RCIS (Central) were also aware that CIL officers (later renamed Cadet Instructors Cadre (CIC) officers) were ‘CF Reserve officers with a difference’.

Beginning with his initial contact with the school in the mid-1970s and his work at the school, which began in 1982, Capt Fleming was impressed with the professionalism of long-time ‘true or pure’ CIC officers who had no Regular Force or Primary Reserve experience to fall back on. “These officers were from all walks of life and were able to pass on an extensive amount of knowledge and skills, using both their Cadet Program and civilian experiences,” he says. There were few pure CIC officers at RCIS (Central) in the beginning, however. “Most positions were filled, it seemed, using the ‘old boy net’— retired/released Royal Canadian Regiment personnel, including myself,” says Capt Fleming. That began to change in 1983 when a pure CIC was hired full time as the school’s resource officer. Full-time staff, says Capt Fleming, aimed training towards what was needed at cadet corps or squadrons, rather than towards what had been taught in the Regular Force or Primary Reserve. These people, he says, had to learn—just as he did— that while CIC officers were wearing the same uniform, they did not have the extensive training and background military knowledge the others

CADENCE

Issue 17, Fall 2005


had. The school’s first commandant was particularly concerned that CIC officers be taught things to help them lead, administer and train cadets at the pointy end, rather than things that would help them become sailors, soldiers or airmen.

(Instructors) had little guidance, produced their own teaching aids and used the teaching methods they were most comfortable with. Early courses Back in Eastern Region, when Capt Mallette qualified as a captain in 1978 and for many years after, the captain qualifying (CQ) course had four twoday sections: training, administration, supply and command. After the graduation parade, he was promoted and asked if he would join RCIS (Eastern) as an instructor. He started teaching the basic officer qualification course (BOQ) the next day! At that time, instructors managed their own courses, armed with only a course training plan. They had little guidance, produced their own teaching aids and used the teaching methods they were most comfortable with. As a rare bilingual instructor, Capt Mallette taught courses in both French and English—and once or twice, in both languages at the same time. He taught courses at all levels from 1978

to 1993, while helping cadet corps in the areas in which he lived.

The evolution of teaching aids

“The BOQ, lieutenant qualifying (LTQ) and CQ courses saw many changes in format and methodology over the years,” says Capt Mallette.

Capt Mallette claims that one of the biggest challenges over the years has been producing quality teaching aids. Teaching aids must follow the evolution of the message being taught,’ he says. “This adaptability is possible now because of the Internet and other electronic tools.”

“Since 1982, I think there have been at least six iterations of the training courses,” adds Capt Fleming. “Now courses have much more material packed into them, and we are expecting and getting, I think, a better CIC product as a result.” At one time, the only environmental exposure to sea, land and air was a two-day section of the LTQ course. Another thing that has changed is that there must now be more time in rank and experience between courses. Teaching standards In Eastern Region, the early 1980s were witness to the first Guides Pédagogiques, offering more specific teaching direction. Some perceived these as a direct intrusion into their own teaching styles and of no value, says Capt Mallette. “To understand the evolution of teaching within Eastern Region requires an understanding of the growth of this guide from a vague guideline to a means of assuring teaching/learning standards and a quality of instruction that were once unthinkable.” Until the early 1990s, says Capt Mallette, the majority of Eastern Region instructors were male and from the land element. He believes that the “better mix” today offers a better training program. Currently, the CIC officer of 33 years teaches mainly the CQ course in both languages—but never at the same time. He believes that the school now uses the “best quality control tools” that an organization can produce.

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

According to Capt Fleming, equipment for early training mostly revolved around a 35-mm overhead slide projector, the blackboard and a flip chart. “When I first started, I think the yearly budget on repairs and new equipment was about $5000 to $10 000,” he says. “That has risen quite a bit. We’ve come a long way from stick-on letters and slides for presentations. The original training aids and graphic art work required people with great talent and artistic sense. Now computers and clipart save hours of work.” The value of better CIC training Capt Mallette believes the instructor schools have provided officers with a menu of services and opportunities that have helped strengthen the quality of leadership that cadets receive. With increased expectations and better training, Capt Fleming says he has seen a vast improvement in CIC officers coming out of RCIS (Central) over the years. The challenge remaining, he concludes, is getting CIC officers to be proud of what they are. “They are leaders/mentors of youth—more prepared than any Regular Force or Primary Reserve member to lead, administer and train cadets. They/we should be justly proud of that fact.”

35


VIEWPOINT

By Terence Whitty

An Army Cadet League perspective on CIC professionalism When discussing CIC professionalism, the trend seems to be to do it in military terms—assessing an individual’s personal deportment, military credentials, and the ability to run a cadet corps or squadron. rom the perspective of the Army Cadet League, a professionalism standard is hard to define. While there are many opinions on how professionalism within the CIC can be improved, it is important to look first at the two elements that most influence the nature of what CIC officers do. First, cadet corps are composed of youths who are not members of the CF. Second, the operation of the Cadet Program is a CF responsibility.

F < CIC officer Maj Dan Davies, army cadet exchange co-ordinator, and Terence Whitty, right, have a cup of coffee at Cadet Summer Training Centre Connaught in Ottawa while discussing international exchanges.

Whether you have prior military experience, or were recruited right off the street, it is easy to see the challenges in operating a teen youth movement within a military framework. In the first element, leaders of the Cadet Program—above all—must be sensitive to youth. Not everyone is cut out to do this. For some members of the professional military that have become involved, this reality has required a major shift in how they approach the work. Cadets decide at the end of each training session on whether or not they will return, so there is the ongoing challenge to maximize local resources to maintain interest. The second element, management of the program, has been given to the CF simply because they are good at it and have the resources to do it efficiently. However, when it comes to the CIC, the time-tested management structure—the relationship between commissioned officers and non-commissioned members (NCMs)—becomes blurred. There are virtually no senior NCMs involved with the Cadet Program.

36

The officers do everything, and this affects the external perception of professionalism. There are a few senior NCMs enrolled in some cadet units, who wear the rank and uniform of their last unit and who are invaluable to their cadet corps. Their relationship has a magical impact on the cadets and the cadet corps. The diverse personal qualifications of CIC candidates also impacts the training the CF provides to new enrollees. Each individual must develop their personal style of military professionalism. No course can completely prepare either the oldhand or the new enrollee for the task of working with teenage cadets. Some form of mentorship can help, and here the affiliated units can play a major role. Where the cadet corps is located close to a unit, mentorship can be relatively easy. In rural areas it becomes problematic. In the end, CIC officers are and remain commissioned officers who willingly accept the charge from Canada to “diligently discharge their duty… to maintain good order and discipline”—in other words, to lead and provide an example. While CIC officers do have to come to terms with the military/civilian juxtaposition of the Canadian Cadet Movement, they do end up with the best of both worlds. They get the rewards of camaraderie, honour and the satisfaction—as well as the distinction—of serving as CF officers. Mr. Whitty is the executive director of the Army Cadet League. CADENCE

Issue 17, Fall 2005


DANS CE NUMÉRO 18

Le professionnalisme dans les échanges avec les parents Conseils d’officiers sur la manière d’approcher de façon efficace les parents en colère, zélés à l’excès, indifférents, irréalistes ou qui contestent les règles.

26

Formation future en matière de professionnalisme Le professionnalisme est la qualité de quiconque « exerce une profession avec une grande compétence ».

18

par le Maj Serge Dubé

27

27

26

Une « politique » locale sur le tabagisme inculque de regrettables leçons Si on enseigne aux cadets qu’il est possible de faire fi des règles, c’est exactement ce qu’ils feront. par le Maj Stephen Case

33

Clarification au sujet des frais, droits et autres cotisations Aucun jeune n’est chassé des cadets, ni autrement désavantagé, parce que sa famille n’est pas disposée à verser une cotisation demandée par une ligue ou un répondant. par le Col Robert Perron

33

2

CADENCE

Numéro 17, Automne 2005


NUMÉROS À VENIR 10 Une application spécialisée de la profession militaire Le chef de l’Académie de la défense du Canada explique en quoi le « professionnalisme militaire » s’applique aux officiers du CIC 11 Où débute le professionnalisme dans les FC? 12 Faire en sorte que les « relations de travail » soient sans accrocs La spécialiste de la formation Mary Bartlett, de New York, explique la façon de réagir adéquatement aux comportements difficiles afin de créer de meilleures relations de travail.

Il est chaque année plus difficile de trouver des instructeurs qualifiés en vol à voile pour former les cadets. Dans le prochain numéro, les officiers des opérations régionales des cadets de l’Air donneront les raisons pour cette difficulté et fourniront des avis sur la façon dont les officiers locaux peuvent leur venir en aide. De même, différents commandants de centres d’instruction d’été des cadets parleront de leurs problèmes de dotation et des solutions possibles.

14 Un azimut moral sûr Le « professionnalisme » au sein du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets exige que les officiers de tous grades se dotent d'un azimut moral sûr, c'est-à-dire celui de l'éthique.

Au moment de publier l’édition d’hiver, les officiers du CIC auront été couverts par le système informatique national de rémunération des officiers de la Réserve depuis déjà un an. Cette prochaine édition fera état de la transition.

16 Pour demeurer compétif Ou comment adapter nos services et nos activités au sein du programme des cadets!

Le numéro d’hiver constituera aussi un forum où les officiers du CIC du pays tout entier pourront exprimer leurs opinions sur le programme de prix et de reconnaissance des officiers du programme des cadets. En faisons-nous assez? Pouvons-nous en faire plus?

par le Lcol Pierre Labelle

17

Pour une communication plus efficace La discipline militaire se prête bien à une forme unidirectionnelle de communication mais, si on y recourt exclusivement, elle devient redondante et inefficace. par le Maj Paul Tambeau

22 Les compétences en résolution des conflits rehaussent le professionnalisme Les conflits croissent à l’image des tornades : plus ils prennent de force, plus ils peuvent faire de dégâts. Vous aiderez mieux les cadets à gérer leurs conflits si vous avez des compétences inhérentes en leadership. par Denise Moore

24 Tirer des enseignements de ses erreurs 28 Premiers essais en direct des nouveaux cours Les essais des cours d’officier d’administration de l’unité et d’officier d’approvisionnement ont présentement lieu. par le Ltv Paul Fraser

29 Les officiers tireront profit de la nouvelle organisation de l'instruction

Ne manquez pas ces articles et d’autres encore, y compris une mise à jour sur la valeur du tir compétitif pour les jeunes gens, dans le prochain numéro de Cadence. Les dates de tombée sont comme suit : le 30 novembre pour l’édition d’hiver, publiée en janvier 2006, et le 21 janvier pour l’édition printemps/été publiée en avril. Veuillez informer l’éditrice à l’avance, par téléphone au (905) 468-9371, ou par courriel, à l’adresse marshascott@cogeco.ca, si vous désirez soumettre un article.

PAGE COUVERTURE

30 Communiquer avec les cadets Des travaux récents en neuropsychologie démontrent que les jeunes et les adultes reçoivent et traitent l’information dans une région différente du cerveau. par le Capt Catherine Griffin

31 Projet de mise à jour du Programme des cadets Janvier 2007 est la date cible de mise en œuvre des activités renouvelées d’instruction des corps et escadrons de cadets. par le Maj Russ Francis

32 Le recrutement conjoint porte fruit Les corps et escadrons de cadets de Thunder Bay (Ontario) profitent des avantages, en matière de recrutement, de la promotion de trois éléments du programme. par le Capt Daniel Guay

34 Rétrospective : les écoles des officiers du CIC Deux officiers se souviennent 30 ans déjà.

Jonathan Livingstone goéland est devenu, au cours des années 70, symbole de la quête de perfection. À mesure que nous nous efforçons d’atteindre le professionnalisme à titre de responsables de jeunes, nous pouvons, tout comme Jonathan, « apprendre à voler – avec excellence. »

DANS CHAQUE NUMÉRO 4

Mot d’ouverture

5

Courrier

6

Bloc-notes

36

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

Point de vue

Afin de faciliter la lecture du magazine, le masculin sert de genre neutre pour désigner aussi bien les femmes que les hommes.

3


MOT D’OUVERTURE

par Marsha Scott

Quoi que vous fassiez, faites-le de façon professionnelle e professionnalisme est une expression à la mode ces temps-ci, surtout pour des métiers et professions tels les fournisseurs de soins de santé, les avocats, les professeurs, les militaires et d’autres carrières d’intérêt public. Partout, les professions, y compris au sein des Forces canadiennes, s’efforcent de définir et de promouvoir le professionnalisme parmi leurs rangs. Il en est même qui s’occupent d’enseigner et de mesurer le professionnalisme.

L

Or, peut-on parler de professionnalisme lorsqu’il s’agit du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets puisque, pour la plupart des officiers du CIC, le travail au sein du Programme des cadets est une véritable « vocation » et non pas simplement une carrière à plein temps qui leur sert de gagne-pain? Le goéland sur la page couverture de la présente édition représente Jonathan Livingstone, goéland – personnage principal du livre de ce nom par Richard Bach publié en 1973. Jonathan est vite devenu la personnification de la poursuite infatigable d’un idéal. Dans le cas de Jonathan, cet idéal était son acquisition du vol. Pour les officiers du CIC, le professionnalisme menant à des normes et niveaux de rendement de plus en plus élevés dans le cadre d’un programme offrant un important service au Canada et à la jeunesse du pays représente un idéal digne de poursuite. Ce numéro est consacré au professionnalisme au CIC – la manière dont il s’applique aux officiers, où il commence, quels sont les valeurs et les comportements qui s’y rattachent, y compris la conformité aux normes éthiques les plus élevées. Il aborde le professionnalisme dans le domaine des communications, du règlement de conflits et de l’interaction avec les parents. Dans l’un des articles, on rencontrera sept officiers du CIC qui sont également éducateurs. Ils partageront leur expertise à traiter de façon efficace avec les parents pour

4

Numéro 17 Automne 2005

résoudre tout un éventail de questions d’intérêt local. Un spécialiste civil nous apprendra par ailleurs comment cultiver quatre comportements de base, plus particulièrement en vue d’améliorer le professionnalisme dans nos relations de travail. Il est essentiel que tous les dirigeants du Programme des cadets comprennent qu’un comportement professionnel adéquat y est pour beaucoup à l’heure de promouvoir le respect et la confiance parmi les cadets, les parents et la société. Dans un autre commentaire sur le professionnalisme, un officier de la Région de l’Est parlera de renforcer le professionnalisme en adoptant une approche préconisant des services axés sur la clientèle, c’est-à-dire les cadets. Un article intitulé « Une ‘politique’ locale en matière de tabagisme inculque de regrettables leçons » nous invite pour sa part à réfléchir au message que nous transmettons à nos cadets et officiers subalternes alors que d’autres font le point sur les nouveaux cours offerts en direct et la nouvelle organisation adoptée pour l’instruction au CIC. Nous avons également songé aux amateurs d’histoire en proposant un regard rétrospectif sur les écoles pour les officiers du CIC – raconté par deux officiers du CIC qui ont assisté au lancement du Système d’instruction cadre des instructeurs de cadets en 1974. Dans nos recherches sur la thématique du présent numéro, nous avons constaté que l’on a tendance à assimiler le concept de l’altruisme ou de la « vocation » au professionnalisme. Il va de soi que nul ne saurait contester le professionnalisme du CIC dans un tel contexte. C’est aussi dans cet esprit que nous vous demandons de parcourir chacun des numéros de Cadence, en l’interprétant comme un nouvel appel à agir en professionnels, quoi que vous fassiez au sein du Programme des cadets.

Le magazine Cadence est un outil de perfectionnement professionnel pour les officiers du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets (CIC) et pour les instructeurs civils du Programme des cadets. Parmi les destinataires secondaires, on trouve notamment : les cadets supérieurs; les comités répondants, de parents et de civils; les membres des ligues; et les membres des FC, y compris les officiers du CIC travaillant à l’échelle régionale et nationale. Cadence est publié trois fois par année. Nous acceptons les textes de moins de 1000 mots qui se conforment à la politique rédactionnelle. Nous nous réservons le droit de modifier la longueur et le style de tout texte soumis. Nous vous encourageons à joindre des photos liées au sujet de l’article soumis ou qui représentent les dirigeants du Programme des cadets. Les points de vue exprimés dans cette publication ne reflètent pas nécessairement les opinions ou politiques officielles. Vous pouvez consulter la politique rédactionnelle et les numéros précédents en ligne à : www.cadets.forces.gc.ca/support.

Renseignements Par la poste : Rédacteur en chef, Cadence Direction – Cadets Quartier général de la Défense nationale 101, promenade du Colonel-By Ottawa ON K1A 0K2

Par courriel : cadence@cadets.net, ou marshascott@cogeco.ca

Téléphone : 1-800-627-0828 Télécopieur : 613-996-1618 Distribution : Cadence est distribué par le Directeur – Services d’information technique et de codification (DSITC), Dépôt des publications aux corps et aux escadrons de cadets, aux unités régionales de soutien des cadets et à leurs sous-unités, aux cadres supérieurs de la Défense nationale/des FC et aux membres sélectionnés des Ligues. Les corps et les escadrons de cadets qui ne reçoivent pas Cadence ou qui désirent mettre leur distribution à jour devraient communiquer avec leur conseiller cadet.

Personnel de la rédaction Rédactrice en chef : Marsha Scott

Éditeur en chef : Capt Ian Lambert Affaires publiques – Directeur général – Réserves et cadets

Publié par : Chef – Réserves & Cadets – Affaires publiques, au nom du Directeur – Cadets

Traduction : Bureau de la traduction, Travaux publics et Services gouvernementaux Canada

Direction artistique : Directeur – Marketing et services créatifs au SMA(AP) CS05-0234 A-CR-007-000/JP-001

CADENCE

Numéro 17, Automne 2005


COURRIER JE SUIS FIER DE MON INSIGNE DE COIFFURE J’ai toujours été fier de mon insigne de coiffure. Je pense que la feuille d’érable est un magnifique symbole qui décrit on ne peut mieux ce qu’il y a de meilleur dans le CIC et dans notre riche patrimoine. Notre insigne de coiffure est le seul dans toutes les FC à revêtir un caractère typiquement canadien; toutefois, je suis toujours un peu déçu lorsque je vois certains officiers supérieurs qui travaillent, dirigent ou commandent le CIC et le mouvement des cadets s’abstenir de porter notre fier insigne de coiffure. Je comprends que ces officiers supérieurs n’appartiennent pas au CIC sur le plan professionnel, mais il n’en demeure pas moins que le port de notre fier insigne de coiffure les désignerait beaucoup mieux comme représentants, directeurs et commandants de notre branche au Quartier

général de la Défense nationale. Cela ne ferait que renforcer notre fierté ainsi que la reconnaissance de notre branche. Slt Paul Simas Cmdt en second Corps des cadets de la marine ILLUSTRIOUS 139 Brampton, ON. Réponse du Maj Roman Ciecwiercz, conseiller de la Branche CIC : La fierté est très importante – c’est la pierre angulaire du CIC et de l’ensemble du Programme des cadets. Ce qu’il faut retenir, c’est que l’insigne de coiffure représente notre propre branche, mais que bon nombre de nos officiers supérieurs sont des officiers de la Force régulière ou de la Première réserve et non des officiers du CIC. Par conséquent, ils ne sont pas

autorisés à porter l’insigne de coiffure du CIC. Le fait que ces officiers soient des partenaires et nous guident au sein de notre organisation ajoute de l’importance et de la crédibilité à toutes nos activités. Toute personne qui participe au soutien des cadets, à quelque niveau que ce soit, apporte sa propre expertise et sa passion à notre mouvement. J’ai eu l’occasion d’observer la façon dont nombre de retraités de la Force régulière remplaçaient leur insigne par celui des officiers du CIC lorsqu’ils venaient travailler dans le cadre du Programme des cadets. Toutefois, la fierté, la reconnaissance et la crédibilité vont bien au-delà de ce que nous portons sur nos coiffures et je demeure convaincu que si ces éléments n’étaient pas présents aux plus hauts degré à tous les niveaux, le Programme des cadets n’aurait pas survécu toutes ces années.

UN RÔLE DES PLUS INTÉRESSANTS DANS LE MOUVEMENT DES CADETS Lorsque l’on s’enrôle comme officier dans le Cadre des instructeurs de cadets (CIC), c’est parce que l’on désire s’impliquer auprès des jeunes de ce mouvement. C’est aussi le cas lorsque l’on est pilote, mais il s’agit aussi d’une occasion de continuer à voler et pour ce faire, rien de mieux que de s’impliquer, tout au long de l’année, dans les différents sites de vol et à l’été, dans les écoles de vol à voile (EVV) à travers le pays. Quand arrive le temps des camps d’été, les officiers détenant un brevet de pilote s’impliquent, en grande majorité, dans les écoles de vol à voile. Pour ceux-ci, il s’agit en quelque sorte d’un retour au bercail puisque c’est ici qu’ils ont obtenu, à titre de cadets, leur licence de pilote. L’instructeur de vol a l’une des occupations les plus intéressantes et exigeantes qui soient. À l’occasion, un instructeur de vol qui en est à ses touts débuts est toujours civil mais en voie d’enrôlement. Il travaillait, il

n’y a pas si longtemps, à obtenir sa propre licence de pilote. Au début, il connaît ses manœuvres de vol mais ne possède pas encore toute l’expérience nécessaire pour les enseigner. Il suit alors son cours d’instructeur de vol à voile et acquiert les compétences nécessaires pour bien enseigner aux cadets qui seront nos futurs pilotes. Beaucoup de préparatifs sont donc nécessaires pour arriver à faire ce travail de façon adéquate. Je trouve ce travail louable parce qu’en plus de donner l’instruction en vol et au sol, les instructeurs de vol doivent en tout temps être attentifs à ce qui se passe autour d’eux. Après quelques leçons, c’est le cadet qui prend le manche mais l’instructeur doit toujours être vigilant à la circulation aérienne et être attentif aux manœuvres effectuées par le cadet afin de les corriger et d’orienter celui-ci de façon appropriée. Il lui faut aussi savoir

faire preuve de jugement. Autrement dit, savoir reprendre les contrôles au moment opportun. Il n’est pas uniquement question de sécurité mais bien de maturité et de responsabilité. Peu importe l’expérience et les années d’ancienneté, tous les instructeurs de vol doivent avoir la rapidité d’esprit pour intervenir de façon opportune. C’est là une importante responsabilité. Je peux dire, pour les avoir vus œuvrer sur les sites de vol, qu’ils sont passionnés et qu’ils travaillent toujours en équipe. Ils savent que leur mission est importante puisqu’ils forment la future génération de pilotes! Le travail d’instructeur de vol est, selon moi, l’un des emplois les plus intéressants qu’offre le mouvement des cadets. Capt Evelyne Lemire Affaires publiques École régionale de vol à voile (Est) Saint-Jean, (Québec)

Cadence se réserve le droit d’abréger et de clarifier les lettres. Veuillez vous limiter à 250 mots.

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

5


BLOCS-NOTES LA VIE RÉELLE RENFORCE LES MATIÈRES ENSEIGNÉES Il n’y a rien de tel qu’une démonstration pratique pour renforcer la matière enseignée. Cependant, la démonstration pratique à laquelle ont assisté 12 officiers du CIC lors de l’instruction en secourisme en nature sauvage, au Centre d’instruction d’été des cadets (CIEC) à Cold Lake, en Alberta, au mois de juin, a été tout à fait « accidentelle ».

C’est un scénario d’accident simulé qui a mis fin à l’instruction des officiers sur le secourisme en pleine nature, le 2 juillet, tout comme s’il s’était agi d’un véritable accident! De gauche à droite, le Capt Luke Persaud, l’Ens 1 Gene Slager, le Lt Laura George et le Slt Ron Arnold prodiguant les premiers secours au Slt Matt Paslawski – un soi-disant randonneur pédestre qui aurait peut-être une jambe cassée. (Photo du Capt Undiks)

Les 12 membres du personnel du CIEC et M. Fred Tyrell, instructeur en secourisme pour la province de l’Alberta, s’en allaient dîner lorsqu’ils ont eu une démonstration de secourisme, à quelques mètres à peine de l’endroit où ils recevaient leur instruction. Jean Jeoffrion faisait une randonnée en moto hors route sur les pistes de loisir de la

4e Escadre Cold Lake lorsqu’il a perdu le contrôle de sa moto et a été projeté en l’air. Un jogger qui passait à ce moment-là a été témoin de l’accident et s’est arrêté pour l’aider. Quelques instants plus tard, les officiers du CIC et leur instructeur en firent autant. « Le jogger était en train d’aider la victime quand je suis arrivé, de sorte que j’ai aidé à évaluer les blessures et à prodiguer les premiers soins », dit l’élève-officier Jamie Blois, l’un des « étudiants » et l’élève-officier des sports au camp d’été. « Il s’était blessé à l’épaule et il avait quelques éraflures mineures à la poitrine. La police militaire, arrivée sur les lieux peu après notre arrivée, prit la relève. » Selon M. Tyrell, ses étudiants ont pu constater directement ce qu’il faut faire en arrivant sur les lieux d’un accident. Présenté par le Capt Judy Undiks, Affaires publiques du CIEC Cold Lake.

NOUVELLE ESCADRE DE LANGUE FRANÇAISE EN ONTARIO L’Adjuc à la retraite Gilles Arpin, membre du Conseil scolaire de langue française de London, en Ontario, a été le promoteur de la mise sur pied d’un escadron de cadets de langue française en Ontario au mois de septembre. Depuis l’an 2000, M. Arpin avait reconnu le besoin dans la région de London d’un

escadron de langue française qui aurait permis à un grand nombre de cadets unilingues français et en immersion française de recevoir l’instruction entièrement en français. Le nombre de cadets n’était pas suffisant à l’époque pour justifier la création d’un escadron distinct, de sorte qu’une aile de langue française a été créée au sein d’un escadron existant, l’Escadron des cadets de l’Air 27. Lorsque cette aile est passée de 12 à 42 cadets, il a été décidé de créer un escadron distinct, soit l’Escadron des cadets de l’Air 599. M. Arpin, qui a fait partie du comité répondant de l’Escadron 27 pendant deux ans, sera désormais président du nouveau comité répondant de l’escadron. Le nouvel escadron de langue française a pris le nom du premier astronaute, Marc Garneau, qui est présentement président de l’Agence spatiale canadienne.

Le Sgt Jake Clark et le l’Avc Bobby Genest renseignent les récentes recrues au nouvel escadron 599. (Photo par L’Action London)

6

Le Capt Al Szawara, Officier des cadets du secteur (Air) au sein de l’Unité régionale de soutien aux cadets (Centre), détachement

de London, et compagnon d’études de M. Garneau au Collège d’état-major et de commandement des Forces canadiennes à Toronto en 1982, a demandé à M. Garneau s’il consentirait à ce que l’escadron prenne son nom. M. Garneau s’est dit honoré par cette demande. Selon M. Arpin, la ville de London a reçu son statut bilingue en 2001. En 2003, le profil statistique de la population francophone dans la région de London indiquait que 7 095 jeunes âgés de 10 à 19 ans pouvaient soutenir une conversation aussi bien en anglais qu’en français. La Canadian Parents for French, une organisation préconisant l’apprentissage des deux langues par les enfants, est le parrain officiel de l’escadron. « Grâce à son aide, nous avons pu recruter un bon nombre de cadets provenant du programme d’immersion française », dit M. Arpin. « Les parents sont enthousiastes à l’idée que leurs enfants vont avoir une nouvelle possibilité de pratiquer leur français. »

CADENCE

Numéro 17, Automne 2005


« MACHINATION » – PAS DU TOUT! Le Lt Ken Holden, officier de l’instruction à l’Escadron des cadets de l’Air 514 à St. John’s, T.-N., pense que son escadron a trouvé une façon originale de développer des habiletés en dynamique de la vie chez les cadets tout en parvenant à réunir des fonds. L’équipe de théâtre des cadets (Cadets Acting and Performing – CAP) a organisé et produit, au cours des trois dernières années, des pièces de théâtre à l’intention du public. Cette année, la présentation de deux pièces intitulées Murder Most Fowl et Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs Local 412, a exigé la participation de 24 cadets dans les rôles de directeur, d’interprètes et de personnel d’arrière-scène. « Ce

qui est surprenant, c’est que près de la moitié de l’équipe théâtrale est composée de cadets juvéniles », déclare le Lt Holden. Le Maj Bob Nolan, officier du CIC (Air), décrit cette activité comme novatrice, amusante et facultative, permettant d’initier les cadets à la communication, la mise sur pied d’une équipe, la résolution des problèmes et la gestion du temps, ainsi qu’à une foule d’autres habiletés en dynamique de la vie, tout en rehaussant l’assurance et l’estime de soi. L’idée de cette équipe théâtrale a germé dans l’imagination de deux cadets de l’escadron, la directrice artistique, le SOB2 Teresita Tucker, et Danielle Price.

Les cadets de l’équipe théâtrale de l’escadre 514 acquièrent des habiletés en dynamique de la vie et recueillent des fonds lors d’une représentation de « Murder Most Fowl » Le Capt Roger Miller, commandant d’escadron, déclare que ce programme fort réussi se poursuivra, car « il ne cesse de s’améliorer d’année en année ».

MAINTIEN EN POSTE DES CADETS DANS LA RÉGION Le Lcol Marcel Chevarie, commandant de l’Unité régionale de soutien aux cadets (Est), a récemment rencontré les commandants de corps/d’escadrons de cadets de la région. Son message a notamment porté sur la nécessité d’améliorer le maintien en poste des cadets.

• Instruction adéquate des officiers du CIC : l’instruction devrait porter sur les concepts de souplesse et d’adaptabilité en marge du Programme des cadets et sur le concept de gestion du risque en ce qui concerne les défis et les avantages que nous offrons aux cadets;

En particulier, il a mis en relief les objectifs ci-après pour la région :

• Campagne d’information permanente : tout au long de l’année, diffuser de l’information, des idées d’initiatives et

des suggestions afin d’améliorer le Programme et les activités offertes au sein des corps et escadrons de cadets. Le site Web de l’URSC Est est appelé à devenir le principal outil de communication. • Soutien et avis personnalisés : le personnel au sein du QG et des détachements offrira un soutien et une orientation adaptés aux besoins particuliers de chaque corps/escadron de cadets.

NOUVEAU SITE WEB CONSACRÉ À L’HISTOIRE DES CADETS DE L’ARMÉE Après 10 années de recherches, la Ligue des cadets de l’Armée du Canada compte désormais un site Web consacré à l’histoire des cadets de l’Armée. Ce site Web couvre 126 années d’histoire déclare l’historien de la ligue, M. François Arseneault, à Calgary. M. Arseneault invite les leaders et les cadets à visiter le site www.armycadethistory.com où ils trouveront une mine de renseignements. En date du 23 août, le site comprenait déjà des récits se rapportant à 227 corps de cadets et des photos se rapportant à 34 corps de cadets. Il comprend aussi des renseignements concernant les camps d’été, les insignes d’épaule et de couvre-chef, dont un grand nombre d’insignes rares datant d’avant la Première Guerre mondiale et la Deuxième Guerre mondiale, ainsi que les biographies de personnages marquants, des trophées, médailles, reportages archivés, expéditions, échanges, et beaucoup plus encore.

Le nouveau site Web sur l’histoire des cadets de l’Armée se penche sur 126 années d’histoire. Cette photo de la Défense nationale date du 26 septembre 1954. Elle est du Cadet Harry Plummer du Corps de cadets de l’Armée 7902 à Port Hope (Ontario). (Photo publiée avec la gracieuse permission de la Ligue des cadets de l’Armée)

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

7


BLOCS-NOTES NOUVELLE VAGUE EN MATIÈRE DE COMMUNICATIONS

GUIDE POUR LA GESTION D’UN ENSEMBLE MUSICAL DES CADETS

La Ligue navale vient de lancer un nouveau bulletin d’information appelé @ the helm. Ce bulletin vise à informer un plus grand nombre de membres à un moindre coût, en leur communiquant des nouvelles au niveau national, de la branche et de la division. On pourra aussi se procurer des copies papier du bulletin en appelant le bureau de la Ligue navale au 1 800 375-NAVY.

Une gestion adéquate des ressources humaines et matérielles au niveau des corps de cadets et des escadrons permettra d’améliorer non seulement le fonctionnement de l’ensemble mais, plus important encore, elle se révélera plus bénéfique pour les musiciens.

Bien que ce bulletin d’information vise surtout les membres de la Ligue navale dans tout le pays, nous encourageons aussi les officiers du CIC, les cadets de la marine et leurs parents à s’y abonner et à envoyer leurs suggestions pour ce qui est des récits. Pour les abonnements, veuillez visiter le site Web de la Ligue navale au www.navyleague.ca.

PROGRAMME DE CONTRÔLE DES VOLONTAIRES La Ligue navale vient d’adopter un nouveau programme de contrôle des volontaires qui viendra renforcer la sécurité des cadets. Le nouvel élément clé est la carte d’identité (ID) avec photo que les volontaires de la ligue doivent porter dans les corps de cadets locaux. Cela permet aux officiers et aux cadets du corps de cadets de s’assurer que tout membre de la Ligue navale travaillant au sein du corps de cadets a été approuvé. La nouvelle carte d’identité des volontaires a été approuvée par la Ligue navale et permet de travailler avec les cadets. Si un volontaire de la Ligue

Il n’est pas nécessaire d’être musicologue pour administrer et gérer un ensemble musical. L’attribution des postes et des fonctions clés serait de nature à aider n’importe quel officier de musique. Certaines régions ont élaboré des guides de gestion pour les ensembles musicaux, grâce à des conférences appropriées sur CadetNet ou sur les sites Web régionaux des cadets.

CRÉDITS AU SECONDAIRE POUR LES CADETS

n’a pas cette carte d’identité, il sera supervisé par un officier du corps de cadets ou par un autre volontaire de la Ligue ayant la carte, comme tout autre invité du corps de cadets. Pour renforcer son programme, la Ligue navale a fait équipe avec la Ligue des cadets de l’Armée et négocie avec la Ligue des cadets de l’Air afin d’élaborer une méthode commune et d’établir un système d’échange de renseignements pour le contrôle des volontaires. On empêchera ainsi les personnes renvoyées d’une organisation de se joindre à une autre ligue ou à un comité de parrainage n’importe où au pays. Le nouveau programme est présentement mis en application à l’échelle du pays. Les membres ayant déjà fait l’objet d’un contrôle devront renouveler leur statut de membre contrôlé. Pour plus de renseignements, veuillez visiter le site www.navyleague.ca.

Si vous désirez que vos cadets obtiennent des crédits au secondaire en raison de leur expérience chez les cadets, veuillez visiter le site www.aircadetleague.com, cliquez sur la langue de votre choix, puis cliquez sur Cadets et ensuite sur Crédits pour études. Pour la première fois, déclare M. Grant Fabes, président du comité des crédits de l’éducation nationale et du secondaire de la Ligue des cadets de l’Air du Canada, cette ressource à guichet unique donne un aperçu de la situation des crédits au secondaire dans tout le Canada, un sommaire de la situation actuelle dans chaque province/ territoire et un sommaire des ressources basées sur Internet permettant d’obtenir plus de renseignements. Le site indique le nombre de crédits qu’un cadet peut obtenir, les modalités de demande, etc. Un contact par courriel y figure aussi pour chaque province/territoire.

RECHERCHE DE RÉCITS DE CADETS Stephanie Williams, instructrice civile (IC) au Corps des cadets de l’Armée 2051, à Edmonton, recueille présentement des récits écrits par des cadets en vue d’un livre qu’elle espère publier.

8

« J’ai récemment lu un livre intitulé Stand by Your Beds, écrit par un ancien cadet », déclare l’IC Williams. « À la fin du livre, l’auteur dit à quel point il serait intéressant d’avoir un recueil de récits écrits par les cadets à l’intention des autres. J’aimerais entreprendre cette tâche. »

Elle demande aux autres responsables du Programme des cadets non seulement de présenter les récits de leurs cadets, mais de les encourager à lui envoyer leurs récits à l’adresse cadet_stories@hotmail.com.

CADENCE

Numéro 17, Automne 2005


SOLDE DES CADETS-CADRES Les leaders du Programme des cadets qui n'ont pas participé à l'instruction d'été cette année seraient intéressés à savoir que le salaire des cadets-cadres est désormais rattaché au salaire de base des élèvesofficiers de la Force de réserve.

section) recevait un salaire quotidien de 71 $ alors qu'un premier maître de 1re classe (adjudant-chef/sous officier breveté, 1re classe) avait droit à 81 $ en fonction d'un pourcentage plus élevé du salaire des élèves-officiers de la Force de réserve.

Le salaire des cadets-cadres était auparavant rattaché à celui des soldats et caporaux de la Force de réserve; lorsque les incitatifs ont disparu et que les redressements du salaire des cadets-cadres sont devenus plus difficiles, les salaires ont été rattachés au traitement moyen des étudiants participant au programme d'emploi d'été des étudiants du gouvernement.

Selon le Maj Paul Dionne, Officier d'état major – Politiques s'appliquant aux cadets, à la Direction des cadets, le nouveau système est plus facile à administrer. En n'étant plus rattaché au programme d'emploi d'été des étudiants, les redressements du salaire des cadets-cadres interviendront de façon automatique en fonction des changements au salaire de base des élèvesofficiers de la Réserve et n'exigeront plus l'approbation du Conseil du Trésor.

L'été dernier, le salaire quotidien des cadets-cadres variait de 60 $ à 81 $. Ce taux était basé sur un pourcentage fixe du salaire de base des élèves-officiers de la Force de réserve. À titre d'exemple, un maître de 1re classe (adjudant/sergent de

Les taux salariaux actuels sont accessibles en suivant les liens appropriés à partir du http://www.forces.gc.ca/hr/frgraph/pay_f.asp.

Pour leur solde d’été, les cadets-cadres perçoivent désormais un pourcentage fixe du taux de base destiné aux officiers cadets de la Réserve. Dans la photo, un cadet-cadre apprend l’art de faire des nœuds à un cadet au CIEC à Vernon. (Photo de l’IC Wayne Emde, affaires publiques)

NOUVELLES DU CONSEIL CONSULTATIF DE LA BRANCHE CIC Deux membres du Conseil consultatif de la Branche CIC (CCB) ont reçu des certificats du Chef – Réserves et cadets pour leurs efforts et contributions au nom de la branche. Les récipiendaires sont le Maj John Torneby, ancien conseiller de la Région des Prairies, et le Capc Nairn McQueen, ancien conseiller de la Région du Centre.

Les nouveaux conseillers régionaux sont le Maj James Barnes, région des Prairies, et le Maj Harry McCabe, Région du Centre. Les autres membres actuels du CCB sont le Lcdr Ben Douglas, Région du Pacifique; le Maj Steve Daniels, Région du Nord; le Maj Hratch Adjemian, Région de l’Est; et le Lcol Tom McGrath, Région de l’Atlantique.

AUTRES NOUVELLES DU CONSEIL CONSULTATIF DE LA BRANCHE Le Maj Roman Ciecwiercz, conseiller de la Branche CIC, a récemment rencontré le président du Conseil de liaison des Forces canadiennes (CLFC) afin de mieux préciser son soutien au CIC. Le conseil a accepté les demandes des officiers du CIC en vue d’obtenir un soutien de la part de l’employeur. Selon le Maj Ciecwiercz, le site Web du CLFC à l’adresse www.cflc.forces.gc.ca devrait être un point de référence pour les officiers du CIC qui recherchent des renseignements au sujet du soutien de la part de l’employeur. Le CLFC donnera des conseils de base et enverra des trousses d’information sur demande. Le conseil consultatif a l’in-

tention d’examiner ces trousses et de recommander l’inclusion de composantes particulières au CIC dans ces dernières. Le CCB examine les questions de politique qui se posent à l’heure actuelle et fournit des lignes directrices concernant la politique future en matière de promotions, tout comme il examine d’autres questions telles que l’universalité du service, le conditionnement physique, les normes médicales et de scolarité en rapport avec le Projet de gestion du changement de la structure des groupes professionnels militaires. Comme membre du nouveau conseil de gestion de l’instruction, il fournit aussi des avis sur la nouvelle structure de l’instruction au CIC.

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

Le Maj John Torneby

Le Capc Nairn McQueen

ÉVÉNEMENTS Réunion du 50e anniversaire du NCSM Acadia : les inscriptions seront acceptées à compter de janvier 2006 pour cette réunion qui aura lieu à Cornwallis, N.-É., du 4 au 6 août 2006. Les personnes intéressées peuvent consulter le site www.acadiareunion.ca pour de plus amples renseignements. 18e Bal annuel des cadets : cette activité approuvée pour les cadets, sous le parrainage de l’Escadron des cadets de l’Air 706 à Ottawa, accueille normalement les cadets du Canada tout entier, selon le Capt Jake Banaszkiewicz, commandant d’escadron. Le bal de cette année aura lieu le 29 décembre au Centre des congrès à Ottawa. Pour plus de renseignements, veuillez consulter le site www.cadets.net/ est/706aviation.

9


LE PROFESSIONNALISME AU SEIN DU CIC >

Une application spécialisée de la profession militaire Le professionnalisme militaire peut-il s’appliquer au Cadre des instructeurs de cadets? “

«

ui », répond le Mgén Paul Hussey qui a commandé l’année dernière l’Académie canadienne de la Défense (ACD) à Kingston (Ontario). L’ACD préconise le développement professionnel et l’apprentissage continu dans les FC et supervise, entre autres, l’Institut de leadership des Forces canadiennes (ILFC), qui a pour mission de renforcer les fondements du leadership dans les FC et le professionnalisme des militaires.

O

Comment le « métier des armes » et le « professionnalisme militaire » s’appliquentils dans le cas des officiers du CIC qui ne portent pas des armes? Dans le cas de ces officiers, le contrat implicite concernant la responsabilité illimitée ne s’applique pas comme il s’applique dans la Force régulière et la Première réserve; selon le Mgén Hussey, les officiers du CIC ne sont pas instruits avec le même genre de discipline et l’esprit de combat qui sont nécessaires pour les opérations militaires. Au contraire, ils sont formés pour donner l’instruction, administrer et superviser les cadets.

< Les résidents de Vernon (C.-B.), ne feraient vraisemblablement aucune distinction entre le Capt Graham Brunskill et tout autre membre des FC. (Photo de l’IC Wayne Emde, Affaires publiques, CIEC Vernon)

Cela peut poser un dilemme pour certaines personnes, mais du point de vue du Mgén Hussey – non seulement dans son poste actuel, mais dans son ancien poste de Directeur général des Réserves et des cadets – le « professionalisme militaire » s'applique aux officiers du CIC quoique d'une façon limitée mais tout aussi importante. « Le CIC est une application très spécialisée de la profession militaire », dit le Mgén Hussey. « Le gouvernement du Canada a confié aux FC la mission de diriger sa seule organisation de jeunesse parrainée au niveau fédéral. Les FC assument cette responsabilité par l’entremise des officiers du CIC qui sont les employés clés du mouvement de jeunesse fédéral dans ce pays. Je m’attends cependant – comme tout parent dans ce pays – à du professionnalisme au sein du CIC. »

Le Mgén Hussey déclare qu’il y a une certaine logique au fait de confier aux FC la responsabilité du mouvement des cadets du Canada. Les FC sont censées maintenir un contact étroit avec la société canadienne et elles sont reliées aux collectivités de nombreuses manières. Du fait que les FC n’avaient pas l’infrastructure locale nécessaire pour diriger une organisation de jeunesse nationale, elles ont fait appel aux ligues. Les officiers du CIC sont des représentants militaires dans le cadre de ce partenariat et de leurs contacts avec les nombreux parrains et organisations communautaires au niveau local, ceux-là mêmes qui apportent leur soutien aux corps et aux escadrons de cadets. Très souvent, les officiers du CIC sont la seule présence des FC dans une collectivité et ils doivent, par conséquent, mettre en évidence les normes professionnelles qui s’appliquent aux membres des FC. « Les officiers du CIC ont les mêmes insignes de grades et les mêmes uniformes, dit le Mgén Hussey. « Pour le public, un insigne de coiffure différent ne représente pas grand-chose. » Il ajoute que les officiers du CIC appliquent certains aspects de la méthodologie d’instruction militaire – les exercices, par exemple – pour transmette aux jeunes des habiletés de la dynamique de la vie, comme le travail d’équipe et l’autodiscipline. Les officiers du CIC représentent de nombreuses valeurs des FC qu’ils essayent de transmettre aux jeunes (en particulier celles qui ont trait au cadre de l’éthique de la Défense) pour en faire de bons citoyens. « Il n’y a aucun mal à cela, surtout lorsque les membres des FC s’efforcent de se comporter comme des citoyens modèles et comme des soldats modèles », dit le Mgén Hussey. « Cela est de nature à influer sur la perception qu’a le public du CIC. » suite à la page 15

10

CADENCE

Numéro 17, Automne 2005


Où débute le professionnalisme au sein du CIC? D’après l’éthos du CIC : « Les officiers du CIC sont des artisans du développement des jeunes tenus de se conformer à des normes élevées de professionnalisme » u cours des dernières années, plusieurs modifications apportées au Programme des cadets, notamment les changements touchant les officiers du CIC, ont eu pour but de rehausser le professionnalisme du CIC. Mais où débute le professionnalisme?

A

Pour les officiers du CIC, le professionnalisme débute par l’adhésion à l’éthos militaire canadien et à l’éthos du CIC. L’éthos est décrit, dans le nouveau cours élémentaire d’officier (CEO) du CIC, comme : « le caractère, la disposition ou les valeurs fondamentales propres à un peuple, à une culture ou à un mouvement donné. L’éthos découle d’un sentiment d’appartenance et reflète les principes auxquels croit le groupe. Il se définit également comme un ensemble de convictions qui guide et dicte le comportement d’un groupe ainsi que des personnes qui composent ce groupe » .

Pour les officiers du CIC, le professionnalisme commence par l’adhésion à l’éthos militaire canadien et à l’éthos du CIC. Éthos militaire Les candidats, au fil du nouveau CEO, se familiarisent avec l’éthos militaire des FC, qui est formé de croyances et de convictions au sujet du service militaire, des valeurs canadiennes qui nous distinguent en tant que peuple et des valeurs militaires canadiennes de devoir, de loyauté, d’intégrité et de courage. En leur qualité d’officiers des FC, les officiers du CIC doivent se soucier de l’éthos militaire

et garder à l’esprit qu’ils sont membres de la grande collectivité des FC.

Les officiers du CIC inculquent aux jeunes un sentiment d’engagement envers la collectivité dans le cadre de l’instruction locale et d’été. Des cadets du CIEC Blackdown ont construit, l’été dernier, un pont piétonnier pour le sentier de randonnée pédestre Ganaraska, qu’utilisent plus de 4 000 randonneurs et familles de la région.

Éthos du CIC L’éthos du CIC fait partie de la raison d’être du CIC et contient plusieurs principes directeurs à l’usage des officiers du CIC qui s’efforcent d’atteindre des normes élevées de professionnalisme. Bien qu’il soit toujours en attente d’approbation, le nouveau cours de formation professionnelle du CIC donne une idée de ce que peut être la description de l’éthos du CIC : Les officiers du CIC sont membres d'un groupe professionnel qui fournit un service à la société canadienne. En leur qualité de chefs des cadets de l'Air, de la Marine et de l'Armée, ils en assurent la sécurité et le bien-être et cultivent chez eux le leadership, le civisme et la bonne forme physique, tout en stimulant leur intérêt pour les FC. Les officiers du CIC inculquent aux jeunes Canadiens un sentiment d'engagement au sein de la collectivité et promeuvent chez eux les aptitudes à la vie quotidienne, leur permettant de cultiver les valeurs sociales et les normes de l'éthique. Les officiers du CIC sont les représentants de la gent militaire au sein du partenariat existant entre les FC, les ligues et les nombreux répondants locaux qui appuient les corps et escadrons de cadets. Ils viennent en aide aux ligues et aux répondants locaux dans le recrutement de cadets et de chefs adultes. Ils participent aussi à la promotion du corps, des escadrons et du programme des cadets dans son ensemble.

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

Les officiers du CIC promeuvent l’acceptation et le respect d’autrui, tant au sein du mouvement que dans l’ensemble de la société car le programme des cadets effectue un recrutement qui reflète la vaste diversité de la société canadienne, sans égard au contexte culturel, ethnique, religieux ou socioéconomique. Les officiers du CIC sont des praticiens du développement des jeunes tenus au respect de normes élevées de professionnalisme. Ils satisfont aux attentes sociétales élevées naturellement imposées aux responsables du bien-être, de l’appui, de la protection, de l’administration, de l’instruction et du développement de la ressource la plus précieuse du Canada : ses jeunes. Dans bien des cas, les officiers du CIC constituent l’unique présence des FC dans la collectivité et, par conséquent, ils incarnent les normes de professionnalisme exigées des membres des FC, ce qui est tout à l’honneur des FC et du programme des cadets. Les officiers du CIC apportent au programme des cadets des acquis divers en matière d’éducation, de compétences et d’expérience. Les officiers du CIC suivent une formation professionnelle structurée et un programme continu de perfectionnement professionnel qui structurent leur emploi. Le respect de ces principes directeurs contribue largement au respect de normes élevées de professionnalisme au sein du CIC.

11


LE PROFESSIONNALISME AU SEIN DU CIC >

par Mary Bartlett

Harmoniser ses relations de « travail » Dans son ouvrage intitulé , « The Four Agreements » (Les quatre principes), Don Miguel Ruiz nous indique comment réagir de façon appropriée aux comportements difficiles et ainsi harmoniser nos relations de travail.

l nous suggère d’adopter quatre codes de conduite essentiels qui, quoiqu’ils puissent sembler simples, sont plutôt difficiles à appliquer. Toutefois, avec une pratique consciencieuse et diligente, ils se révèlent extrêmement efficaces.

I

Vous pouvez utiliser votre conscience (la capacité d'être attentif à son propre comportement) pour vous surveiller et vous surprendre à faire des suppositions, à vous sentir attaqués personnellement, à déformer la vérité ou à offrir un effort moindre. Respectez toujours votre parole Rien ne saurait créer autant de ressentiment au travail qu’une personne qui dit une chose mais en fait une autre. Bien entendu, vous n’allez pas mentir, tricher, voler, raconter des ragots ou trahir, ni farfouiller dans le bureau de quelqu’un d’autre, n’est-ce pas? Ce principe va, cependant, beaucoup plus loin. Il implique que vous allez littéralement honorer votre parole. Le fait de respecter votre parole signifie que vous faites des déclarations positives, que vous êtes ce que vous prétendez être et que vous vous débarrassez de toute fausse personnalité que vous pourriez projeter auprès des autres.

12

Lorsque vos collègues savent que vous êtes « sans reproche », que vous êtes prêt à reconnaître vos erreurs, que vous posez des questions et que vous êtes ce que vous prétendez être, ils sont plus disposés à vous écouter et à résoudre toute vexation ou tout conflit réel ou imaginaire. Vous êtes quelqu’un avec qui les gens veulent entretenir des relations et ils se montreront prêts à faire des efforts pour les maintenir lorsque surviennent des situations difficiles. Ne prenez pas les choses de façon personnelle Bien que personne ne veuille le reconnaître, la plupart d’entre nous pensent être le centre de l’univers. Lorsqu’une situation négative se produit, nous pensons instinctivement à ce que nous avons ou avons omis de dire, à ce que nous avons ou n’avons pas fait qui aurait donné lieu à cette situation négative ou au conflit. Nous passons en revue notre « enregistrement » mental pour savoir si nous sommes fautifs. Ce faisant, nous oublions ce que le cours de Psychologie 101 nous a appris, c.-à-d. que lorsque quelqu’un agit de façon négative à notre égard, cela reflète un problème non résolu qui persiste dans l’esprit de la personne en question. Qu’advient-il lorsque le comportement négatif d’un collègue est une attaque personnelle? Raison de plus pour ne pas prendre la chose de façon personnelle! Un exemple : un instructeur récemment embauché, avec qui j’ai eu l’occasion de travailler, avait lui-même travaillé avec un collègue qui a tout fait pour lui rendre la vie impossible. Le collègue en question donnait de la rétroaction inutile, le critiquait devant les stagiaires et ridiculisait toutes ses idées.

Le nouvel instructeur se contentait de sourire et se concentrait sur les aspects positifs. Il ne réagissait pas, car il savait que son collègue était en colère et qu’il se sentait menacé parce qu’on l’avait embauché. Le collègue en question était un bon instructeur, qui maîtrisait la matière que le nouvel instructeur était en train d’apprendre.

Aucune action ne fait réagir les gens de façon aussi agressive en milieu de travail que lorsqu'une personne dit une chose et en fait une autre. Est-ce que cela a permis de résoudre le conflit? À vrai dire, ils ne sont jamais devenus amis, mais ils ont réussi à travailler ensemble de façon productive environ six mois plus tard. En refusant de réagir, le nouvel instructeur a fait de son mieux face à une situation difficile. Même plus, il ne l’a pas empirée. Aujourd’hui, cet instructeur demeure convaincu d’avoir bien agi et qu’il n’a rien fait qu’il aurait pu regretter. Ne faites pas des suppositions Nous pensons généralement au pire, et du fait que notre esprit crée de nouvelles réalités d’un instant à l’autre, nous agissons comme si nos suppositions étaient la vérité. Nous savons qu’il ne faut pas le faire, mais nous arrive-t-il de chercher consciemment à nous surprendre à faire des suppositions pour ensuite les corriger? Pour bien comprendre l’impact de nos suppositions sur le conflit, nous devons nous demander à quoi sont dues ces suppositions et pourquoi nous les faisons. Lorsque

CADENCE

Numéro 17, Automne 2005


< Quand quelque chose de négatif se produit, nous rejouons « l’enregistrement mental » dans notre tête pour voir si nous sommes fautifs. Nous en faisons une affaire personnelle, mais il est fort possible que cette situation n'ait rien à voir avec nous.

<

Vous n'oseriez pas mentir, tricher, voler, raconter des ragots, trahir ou farfouiller dans le bureau de quelqu'un d’autre, n'est-ce pas?

nous faisons des suppositions, nous ne travaillons qu’avec les données enregistrées dans notre esprit et, très souvent, ces données sont incomplètes lorsqu’elles ne sont pas carrément erronées. Du fait que ces données nous font penser qu’il y a un conflit, nous imaginons qu’une conversation visant à les clarifier pourrait donner lieu à un conflit. Ainsi, nous évitons la conversation et nous nous comportons comme si nos données, incomplètes et non confirmées, représentaient vraiment la réalité. Voilà un autre exemple de « réalité créée par la pensée », même si cette réalité peut être entièrement modifiée par un autre ensemble (plus complet) de données.

Toujours sous votre meilleur jour

Voilà qui serait simple, mais combien risqué à admettre pour entreprendre une conversation. Vous seriez surpris de savoir à quel point les gens peuvent se montrer réceptifs à l’égard de quelqu’un qui – faisant preuve d’une franche attitude en disant « voici ce à quoi je pensais » - est prêt à reconnaître qu’il a fait des suppositions et qu’il veut aller de l’avant.

S’il y a des obstacles à tous les coins, vous pouvez conclure qu’il est impossible ou même naïf de vouloir mettre en pratique ces quatre principes. Il se peut que les quatre principes – d’un même coup – constituent une tâche considérable. Pourquoi ne pas les prendre un à la fois?

À un moment donné, j’ai travaillé dans une organisation où l’une des principales gestionnaires faisait des suppositions plutôt négatives et erronées au sujet du personnel. Lors d’une réunion de débreffage du personnel – lorsque ces suppositions ont fait surface et que le personnel se sentait libre d’en discuter – cette gestionnaire a présenté des excuses, ce qui lui a valu un nouveau respect de la part de son personnel. En serat-il toujours ainsi? Probablement pas, mais qui sommes-nous pour faire ce genre de supposition? Pourquoi ne pas tout simplement poser la question?

Lorsque nous faisons des efforts sincères et que nos collègues savent qu’ils peuvent compter sur nous, ils sont plus disposés à nous écouter. Lorsque nous faisons de notre mieux, nous sommes entièrement absorbés par notre tâche, nous sommes passionnés par notre travail et, par-dessus tout, nous n’avons pas l’impression de travailler! En faisant de notre mieux, nous éveillons ce qu’il y a de meilleur chez les autres et c’est là la meilleure garantie qu’il y aura de l’innovation. Comment s’y prendre?

Grâce à un effort d’introspection (la faculté d’être conscient à l’égard son propre notre comportement), vous pourriez vous surprendre à faire des suppositions, à prendre les choses de façon personnelle, à étirer la vérité et à ne fournir que de moindres efforts. Concentrez-vous sur un seul comportement durant toute une journée. Lorsque vous vous surprendrez à faire des suppositions – et vous n’y échapperez pas – prenez du recul et pensez : « Comment puis-je résoudre cette situation? » Parfois, il est relativement simple de modifier votre comportement. Lorsque vous serez devenu plus compétent à modifier votre comportement, vous serez étonné de constater que toutes ces pertes de temps dues à des situations difficiles et à des conflits diminueront progressivement

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

et que vos sessions productives, novatrices et génératrices d’idées augmenteront de façon inversement proportionnelle. Mieux encore, cela vous permettra d’entreprendre quelque chose de productif : plutôt que d’essayer de changer l’autre personne (bonne chance!), vous serez en mesure d’influer sur quelque chose que vous pouvez réellement changer. C’est-à-dire vousmême. Dans ce cas, nous vous souhaitons sincèrement « Bonne chance! » Mary Bartlett est instructrice et consultante indépendante dans le domaine de la conception de la formation, de la facilitation et de l’élaboration de programmes. Elle a fait des recherches poussées dans les domaines du processus de groupe, de la gestion du stress, des habiletés en gestion et de la gestion et résolution des conflits. Elle réside dans la région rurale du centre de l’État de New York.

13


LE PROFESSIONNALISME AU SEIN DU CIC >

’éthique compte pour beaucoup dans toute situation de leadership professionnel, que ce soit parmi les cadets, en affaires, voire au sein d’un groupe de proches ou d’amis, affirme Philip King, un avocat de London (Ontario) et professeur de droit commercial à l’Université de Western Ontario. « Dans tout organisme, les membres se tournent vers leurs dirigeants pour obtenir une orientation morale, » ajoute-t-il, « et on éprouve une certaine fierté à respecter un ensemble de valeurs fermement enracinées. »

L

Un azimut moral sûr Le « professionnalisme » au sein du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets exige que les officiers de tous grades se dotent d'un azimut moral sûr moral, c'est-à-dire celui de l'éthique. La moralité et l’éthique sont indissociables du professionnalisme qui est au nombre des valeurs fondamentales du Programme des cadets, au même titre que la loyauté, le respect mutuel et l’intégrité.

Le Programme des cadets a un énoncé de valeurs clair et net et tous les membres des FC, qu’il s’agisse de la Force régulière ou de la Réserve, sont subordonnés au Code d’éthique de la Défense canadienne. L’éthique fait déjà partie de l’instruction de base des officiers, mais cette discipline sera enseignée plus en détail à l’avenir.

« Dans toute organisation, les membres du personnel se tournent vers leurs dirigeants pour obtenir une orientation morale et on éprouve une certaine fierté à respecter un ensemble de valeurs fermement enracinées. » …Philip King La carte de poche portant sur l’éthique dans la défense canadienne décrit nos principes éthiques et obligations morales (tels l’intégrité, la loyauté, le courage, l’honnêteté, l’équité et la responsabilité), la manière de résoudre les dilemmes d’ordre moral, et ainsi de suite. « Je suis partisan de décrire nos croyances et nos valeurs par écrit », précise M. King. « Cela donne plus de certitude, de prévisibilité et d’uniformité et ces aspects rendent à leur tour les croyances et valeurs plus accessibles et plus faciles à adopter. » Les organisations ont tout à gagner d’avoir des croyances et des valeurs en commun dit-il, et plus elles sont échangées dans un esprit d’union, plus la culture de l’organisation sera solide et bien établie. « Il me semble que, de par leur nature sociale, les

14

CADENCE

Numéro 17, Automne 2005


COMMENT RÉAGIR FACE AUX DILEMMES MORAUX gens ont tendance à graviter vers des organisations ayant une culture bien établie. Et ils sont plus heureux lorsqu’ils connaissent les règles et savent ce que l’on attend d’eux. »

L'ambiguïté morale, c'est parfait s'il s'agit de préparer des tourtières, mais non pas quand il s'agit d'encadrer des jeunes. Cela dit, il ne suffit pas de porter l’aidemémoire de l’Éthique de la Défense en poche pour garantir un comportement fidèle aux principes qui y sont énoncés; cette carte sert uniquement à rappeler que l’on a un choix et un rôle dynamique à jouer à l’heure de déterminer le genre de comportement organisationnel que l’on veut prôner. M. King avertit que les dirigeants ne doivent pas se contenter de parler éthique. « Ils doivent prêcher par l’exemple. Ils doivent être perçus par leurs gens comme adoptant des valeurs morales aussi intrinsèques aux valeurs organisationnelles tout en ayant le loisir d’agir en observateurs, » affirme-t-il. « Si vous vous contentez d’en parler (afficher des codes de conduite, organiser des ateliers sur l’éthique, reprocher aux gens toute conduite s’écartant de l’éthique), vos subordonnés finiront par en déduire qu’il ne s’agit pas là de véritables valeurs morales en commun, mais simplement de valeurs que l’on attend de certaines personnes seulement, et pas des autres. » M. King fait valoir que l’on n’est pas fait pour diriger si on est incapable d’adopter les croyances et les valeurs de l’organisation que l’on représente. Les gens s’en apercevront tôt ou tard – peut-être pas tous et peut-être pas de sitôt, mais ils seront assez nombreux à s’en apercevoir au fil du temps. « Cela ne fera qu’affaiblir votre intégrité en tant que dirigeant ainsi que l’intégrité du Programme des cadets, » préciset-il. « L’ambiguïté morale, c’est parfait s’il s’agit de préparer une tourtière, mais non pas quand il s’agit d’encadrer des jeunes. »

Un dilemme moral est une situation qui se présente comme suit : • on ne voit pas clairement ce qu’il faudrait faire face aux circonstances; • deux ou plusieurs valeurs s’affrontent ou sont en contradiction; • un tort sera causé, quoi que vous fassiez.

Devant un dilemme de ce genre, reportez-vous au guide ci-après : • l’éthique est une question de bien ou de mal et nous enjoint de bien agir; • considérez votre obligation d’agir; • posez-vous les questions : « Quels sont les problèmes? Quels sont les faits? » • soupesez les options, y compris les principes et les obligations en matière d’éthique; • choisissez la meilleure option sans perdre de vue les règles, les conséquences, les valeurs et la considération envers les autres; • en cas de doute, consultez ceux en qui vous avez confiance : des amis, des supérieurs ou des personnes en position d’autorité. Il y aura toujours quelqu’un prêt à vous écouter et à vous venir en aide; • acceptez la responsabilité de vos actions.

Comment améliorer notre comportement sur le plan de l’éthique? • Il faut s’assurer que nos décisions et nos actions sont acceptables du point de vue de l’éthique. • N’hésitez pas à parler lorsque vous remarquez que les ordres sont clairement illégaux ou inappropriés, puisque vous n’êtes pas tenu de les suivre. • N’hésitez pas à parler ou à agir si vous êtes témoin ou victime d’un comportement contraire à l’éthique.

Comment les leaders réussissent-ils à instaurer un milieu conforme à l’éthique? • Définissez les attentes de manière claire et précise. • Offrez la possibilité de discuter de préoccupations en rapport avec l’éthique. • Faites le nécessaire face aux risques en matière d’éthique. • Assurez la confidentialité et un milieu sans représailles.

Adapté de la fiche de poche Programme d’éthique de la Défense.

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

Une application spécialisée de la profession militaire …suite de la page 10 Le public pense : « ils s’habillent de la même manière, donc ils sont pareils ». Imaginez le genre d’attentes et de perceptions que cela peut susciter, même si cela ne correspond pas à la réalité. » Il est clair que les officiers du CIC ne sont pas comme les autres. Bien qu’ils partagent un certain nombre de valeurs et de croyances communes avec les militaires de carrière et que l’on s’attende à ce qu’ils s’acquittent de leurs obligations de façon honorable, cela ne se traduit pas par un engagement de 24 heures sur 24, 7 jours sur 7, ni par la conviction qu’ils peuvent recevoir l’ordre d’aller risquer leur vie quelque part dans le monde. Toutefois, le Mgén Hussey demeure d’avis que les officiers du CIC constituent un élément important de l’équipe des FC et qu’ils ont un rôle spécialisé à communiquer et à mettre en œuvre avec professionnalisme. « En participant à des activités qui viennent rehausser leur professionnalisme individuel, les officiers du CIC contribuent au professionnalisme collectif du CIC », dit-il. Voici dans ses propres mots : « Le professionnalisme est l’une des composantes du fonctionnement d’une organisation efficiente et efficace et le mouvement des cadets du Canada ne fait pas exception lorsqu’il s’efforce de tendre vers l’excellence. »

15


LE PROFESSIONNALISME AU SEIN DU CIC >

par le Lcol Pierre Labelle

L’approche client Ou comment adapter nos services et nos activités au sein du programme des cadets! De nos jours, les jeunes consommateurs recherchent des produits et services sur mesure et adaptés. À cet égard, la publicité nous montre chaque jour que les choix qui s’offrent à eux sont de plus en plus variés et accessibles. e programme des cadets n’est pas seul à offrir des activités, des défis et des aventures aux jeunes de 12 à 18 ans. La concurrence est féroce et cette clientèle peut maintenant s’offrir, à la carte, toutes sortes d’activités et d’expériences nouvelles qui lui procurera une bonne dose d’adrénaline.

L

Nous savons aussi que notre clientèle a beaucoup changé au cours des dernières années. On peut même parler d’une véritable transformation. Les jeunes sont capables et veulent faire plusieurs choses en même temps. Très jeunes, ils sont exposés à une foule de défis stimulants. Juste « faire des cadets » n’est donc plus assez. Le même phénomène est présent chez les candidats qui désirent devenir O CIC, instructeurs civils ou bénévoles. Les valeurs de défi, de résultats, d’autonomie et d’équilibre travail/vie privée nous obligent à nous poser la question : Comment demeurer compétitif pour intéresser et garder les jeunes au sein du programme?

Nous devons aussi améliorer notre façon dont nous desservons nos fournisseurs de service : les officiers, les instructeurs civils et les bénévoles. Ce défi trouve réponse dans une seule action : l’adaptation. Nous ne pouvons plus gérer le programme et ses activités selon la tradition. Il faut dès maintenant fournir à chaque unité les outils lui permettant de choisir et de mettre en œuvre des activités stimulantes et comportant des défis adaptés à chacun des groupes d’âges, selon ce que valorisent les communautés. Certaines activités seront davantage

16

primées selon que l'on se trouve en ville ou en région et vice-versa. S’adapter à notre clientèle veut aussi dire comprendre et accepter qu’un jeune puisse s’intéresser au programme des cadets et à la fois vouloir participer à d’autres activités ou tout simplement vouloir/devoir travailler. Il est donc important de ne pas surcharger l’horaire mais plutôt d’y introduire une bonne dose de souplesse. Laisser le temps aux cadets (particulièrement les 15 ans et plus) de faire autre chose est d'une importance grandissante.

continue pour produire des résultats. Il faut être à l’écoute des publics cibles convoités et être en mesure de répondre à leurs attentes mais surtout d'honorer nos promesses. Le programme des cadets peut offrir des activités stimulantes par le biais d'une approche adaptée et ainsi répondre aux besoins des jeunes tout en préservant ses propres buts et objectifs. Le lcol Labelle est le Chef d'état-major de l'Unité de soutien aux cadets (Est).

S’adapter à notre clientèle signifie aussi être à l’écoute des parents qui sont les premiers intervenants auprès des jeunes. Pour les parents, nous offrons un service de formation, d’activités et de développement. Si nous voulons obtenir leur confiance et leur appui, il faut les consulter régulièrement pour connaître leurs attentes. N’oublions pas qu’ils représentent un élément clé pour la rétention. Il faut aussi améliorer le service à notre clientèle cadre, c'est-à-dire les officiers, instructeurs civils et bénévoles, c’est-à-dire une formation adéquate et continue, un réseau de communication interne efficace et accessible à tous et un appui et des conseils (coaching) en fonction des besoins de chaque unité. En somme favoriser le sentiment d’appartenance et démontrer notre souci et notre capacité d'adaptation à l'égard des besoins de chaque unité.

Nous devons éviter de surcharger l’horaire de nos cadets afin de leur donner, particulièrement s’ils ont 15 ans ou plus, assez de temps pour faire autre chose, pour s’adonner à d’autres activités de jeunesse, pour occuper des emplois à temps partiel ou pour compléter leurs travaux scolaires.

L’approche client doit valoriser les notions d’adaptation, de flexibilité et d’information

CADENCE

Numéro 17, Automne 2005


par le Maj Paul Tambeau

Pour une communication plus efficace Pour communiquer de façon efficace, nous devons acquérir un large éventail de comportements appropriés à la discussion en cours. es interactions du personnel, des parents, des cadets, des répondants et des nombreux autres intervenants du mouvement exigent une approche beaucoup plus souple. Tout comme un style de leadership ne convient pas à toutes les tâches, il en va de même pour ce qui est du style de communication. Nous pouvons rehausser notre professionnalisme en adoptant le style approprié.

L

La discipline de style militaire du monde des cadets se prête à ce genre de communication « unidirectionnelle »; toutefois, le recours exclusif à une communication de ce genre rend celle-ci redondante et inefficace. Lorsque deux personnes discutent, elles agissent à un niveau interpersonnel; comme le terme l’indique, la communication interpersonnelle est une communication entre des personnes. Dans un sens, toutes les communications ont lieu entre des personnes; pourtant, de nombreuses interactions ne nous impliquent pas de façon personnelle. Parfois, nous ne considérons pas les autres comme des personnes, mais comme des

<

Les spécialistes du comportement ont étudié la communication au cours des dernières décennies et d’innombrables articles et livres ont été publiés dans le but de nous faire comprendre ce qui constitue une communication efficace, par opposition à une communication inefficace. Toutefois, nous sommes nombreux encore à considérer la communication comme un processus selon lequel « je parle, tu écoutes » ou vice-versa, sans tenir compte de l’aspect « interpersonnel » de l’interaction et de ce qui se produit derrière les paroles, le langage corporel et les émotions.

objets; ils emballent nos articles d’épicerie, nous font éviter les travaux de construction sur les autoroutes, etc. Ainsi, c’est notre désir d’enrichir notre communication audelà du simple fait de parler et d’écouter qui distingue la communication interpersonnelle du simple fait d’échanger de l’information ou d’agir face à cette dernière.

À toutes les étapes de la vie, l’estime de soi est influencée par la façon dont les autres communiquent avec nous. Plusieurs grands principes devraient s’appliquer à notre communication avec les autres, à savoir : • Maintenir ou améliorer l’estime de soi. À toutes les étapes de la vie, l’estime de soi est influencée par la façon dont les autres communiquent avec nous. Nous voulons que les autres nous respectent et nous voulons nous respecter nousmêmes. L’estime de soi peut se révéler fragile, en particulier chez de nombreux jeunes; du fait que nous ne pouvons pas retirer ce que nous avons dit, nous devrions toujours tenir compte de l’impact de nos mots sur notre interlocuteur. • Considérer les deux points de vue. Cela exige la faculté de comprendre aussi bien notre propre point de vue,

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

nos croyances, nos pensées et nos sentiments que ceux de l’autre personne. Pour entamer un véritable dialogue avec une autre personne, nous devons être en mesure de comprendre la perception que celle-ci a d’elle-même, de la situation, ainsi que de ses propres pensées et sentiments. En d’autres termes, nous devons pouvoir contrôler nos préjugés et nos façons de voir. • Maîtrise de soi. Cette faculté d’observer et d’infléchir notre propre communication revêt de l’importance. Ceux qui ont une faible maîtrise de soi se fondent sur leurs croyances et leurs valeurs pour décider de la façon dont ils vont communiquer, adoptant ainsi le style de communication qui leur convient le mieux; à l’inverse, ceux qui ont une forte maîtrise de soi ont tendance à considérer leur entourage et à choisir le style de communication qui convient le mieux dans chaque situation.

L'estime de soi peut être fragile, surtout chez de nombreux jeunes. Lorsque nous communiquons, nous devrions toujours tenir compte de l’impact de nos mots sur notre interlocuteur

En observant ces principes, nous réussirons à rehausser le professionnalisme de toutes nos communications. Le Maj Tambeau est le commandant de l’Escadron des cadets de l’air 27 à London, Ontario. Il a été conseiller régional des cadets dans la Région du Centre et il a récemment pris sa retraite comme enseignant du programme d’études en gestion au Conestoga College à Kitchener, Ontario.

17


LE PROFESSIONNALISME AU SEIN DU CIC >

Du professionnalisme dans les relations avec les parents Le professionnalisme dans les relations avec les parents est indispensable pour asseoir la crédibilité des officiers du CIC qui ont la responsabilité d’instruire leurs enfants. ous avons communiqué avec sept officiers du CIC qui, en qualité d’éducateurs, ont acquis de l’expertise dans les relations avec les parents. Il s’agit du Maj Don Duthie de Trenton (Ont.), du Capt Kel Smith de Virden (Man.), du Capt Natalie Hull de Waterloo (Ont.), de Rob Vanderlee de Canmore (Alb.), de Paul Dowling d’Oromocto (N.-B.), du Lt(M) Arnold Wick de Prince Rupert (C.-B.), et du Lt(M) Ryan Graham de Dryden (Ont.). Ils ont tous de l’expérience au sein du CIC au niveau local et dans les camps d’été.

N

L’idée c’est de ne pas se laisser emporter par les émotions du moment. Nous avons demandé à ces officiers la façon dont ils traitent efficacement avec : • le parent qui vous aborde en colère; • le partent trop zélé qui veut s’entretenir avec vous chaque soir de rassemblement;

18

• le parent qui ne s’implique pas; • le parent qui pense que son enfant ne peut rien faire de mal; • le parent qui remet en question l’application du règlement. Le parent qui vous aborde en colère. Il s’agit potentiellement d’une situation parmi les plus stressantes dans les corps de cadets et escadrons locaux, dit le Ltv Graham. Elle peut se produire spontanément ou elle peut être due à une décision du commandant. Dans ce dernier cas, ajoute-t-il, une documentation irréfutable est indispensable pour justifier les raisons qui motivent les décisions. Avant tout, précise-t-il, les parents veulent exprimer leurs préoccupations et ils veulent être sûrs que quelqu’un est prêt à écouter leur problème. « La série de questions que les parents peuvent parfois poser a de quoi laisser perplexe et intimider, surtout lorsqu’ils sont agités. L’idée c’est de ne pas se laisser emporter par les émotions du

moment. Il faut répondre aux questions de façon honnête et comprendre que les parents désirent ce qu’il y a de mieux pour leur enfant et, très souvent, recevoir la preuve qu’il fait l’objet d’un traitement équitable. » Lors du premier contact avec un parent en colère, le Maj Duthie recommande de baisser la voix et de parler avec calme – cela suffit habituellement à dissiper la colère. Il donne aussi le conseil suivant : Assurer le parent que vous êtes tout aussi préoccupé que lui et que vous aimeriez savoir ce qui a pu susciter en lui cette colère. S’il y a des gens présents, expliquez que l’endroit et le moment ne sont peut-être pas appropriés. Proposez un endroit plus discret ou convenez d’un moment et d’un endroit où vous pourriez vous rencontrer pour discuter calmement de la question. Précisez que vous considérez la question comme importante et que vous aimeriez recevoir plus de détails et avoir la possibilité de faire une enquête. Indiquez que vous

CADENCE

Numéro 17, Automne 2005


Nos conseillers Le Maj Don Duthie compte 35 ans d’expérience comme professeur à l’école primaire et secondaire. Officier du CIC depuis 25 ans, il est actuellement le cmdt désigné de l’Escadron des cadets de l’Air 123 à Bowmanville (Ontario) et conseiller régional des cadets, région centrale, depuis quatre ans.

Le Capt Natalie Hull enseigne depuis huit ans et se consacre actuellement à l’éducation de l’enfance en difficulté à Kitchener (Ontario). Elle est officier du CIC depuis 13 ans, instructeur à l’École régionale des instructeurs de cadets (Centre) et instructeur bénévole auprès du Corps des cadets de l’Armée 1596, aussi à Kitchener.

Le Capt Paul Dowling est à la retraite après 32 ans à titre de professeur et directeur d’école à Oromocto (N.-B.). Il est officier du CIC depuis 26 ans et officier des cadets du secteur (Air), Nouveau-Brunswick, détachement de l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard, région de l’Atlantique.

aimeriez avoir une rencontre dès que vous aurez réuni le plus de faits possibles.

Le Maj Rob Vanderlee enseigne depuis neuf ans. Il donne actuellement des cours à des élèves de 7e et 8e années à Canmore (Alberta). Il est officier d’instruction de l’Escadron des cadets de l’Air 878 à Canmore, officier du CIC depuis 19 ans et a été choisi, en 2004, meilleur officier du CIC (Air) au Canada par la Ligue des cadets de l’Air.

Laissez au parent la possibilité de parler. S’il devient de nouveau agité, parlez doucement et faites-lui savoir que vous voulez réellement l’écouter. Toutefois, si le parent continue de crier ou s’il devient abusif, mettez un terme à la discussion. Montrezvous ferme sans contester ses propos. Ne vous montrez pas condescendant envers le parent. Pour le parent, la question est très importante et elle implique son enfant. Ne prenez pas de décisions hâtives et ne faites pas de promesses irréfléchies – vous devrez tenir parole par la suite.

Le Capt Kel Smith compte 35 ans d’expérience en tant qu’éducateur à Virden (Manitoba) Il est officier du CIC depuis 34 ans, agit présentement à titre d’officier d’approvisionnement, d’information et des sports auprès du 2528 Corps des cadets de l’Armée à Virden.

Le Ltv Arnold Wick compte 34 ans d’expérience comme enseignant au primaire à Prince Rupert (Colombie-Britannique). Il est officier du CIC depuis 26 ans et est présentement cmdt du 7e Corps des cadets de la Marine à Prince Rupert.

Assurez-vous de communiquer avec le parent après votre enquête. Si vous estimez que le parent avait raison de se montrer bouleversé, présentez des excuses et faiteslui savoir que vous prenez des mesures afin que cette situation particulière ne se reproduise plus. Remerciez le parent de l’avoir portée à votre attention.

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

Le Ltv Ryan Graham vit sa quatrième année comme enseignant du secondaire à Dryden (Ontario). Il est officier du CIC depuis 14 ans et cmdt du Centre de navigation à voile de Kenora. Après deux années au sein du Corps des cadets de l’Armée 2072, il tente de reconstituer un corps de cadets de la marine à Dryden.

19


financement externe et de l’implication des parents d’une façon ou d’une autre.

Même si votre enquête révèle que le parent avait tout à fait tort et qu’il était mal renseigné, vous devez vous entretenir avec lui et lui expliquer pourquoi la situation s’est produite et qu’elle était normale. De cette façon, vous aurez tous les deux reçu satisfaction. Le Capt Hull ajoute : « Il faut se rappeler que la plupart des parents se montrent enthousiastes au sujet de leurs enfants et qu’ils se mettent en colère parce qu’ils s’intéressent à eux. Ils ont aussi tendance à n’écouter qu’une version des faits et, si vous aviez vous-même entendu ce qu’ils ont eux-mêmes appris, vous seriez vous aussi en colère. »

Le parent trop zélé qui veut s’entretenir avec vous chaque soir de rassemblement. Le Capt Hull pense que ces parents veulent souvent s’impliquer. Ils veulent en savoir plus au sujet de ce que leur enfant fait et s’impliquer davantage dans la vie de leur enfant. Les parents qui manifestent ce niveau d’intérêt – même si cet intérêt est déplacé et qu’il prend du temps que vous pourriez consacrer à vos tâches – peuvent aider l’unité, en même temps qu’ils trouvent réponse à leurs nombreuses questions. Lorsque vous remarquez qu’un parent ressent souvent le besoin de vous parler, suggérez-lui de surveiller le début du rassemblement ou d’aider à superviser la cantine pendant les pauses, afin d’observer les événements par lui-même. Ainsi, il aura moins besoin de vous parler.

20

Le parent qui ne s’implique pas. Dès que le Maj Vanderlee s’aperçoit qu’un parent ne s’implique pas, il commence par se poser la question : « Pourquoi? » « À mon avis, lorsqu’un parent ne s’implique pas, c’est qu’il a généralement de bonnes raisons pour cela. Voyez ce que vous pouvez faire pour le parent », dit-il. « Il se peut qu’il ne veuille pas s’impliquer pour ne pas laisser les autres enfants seuls à la maison, ou bien il pense qu’il ne peut pas les amener pour assister aux activités. Ou bien encore, vous devriez changer la perception qu’il a de vous ou du corps/de l’escadron de cadets. Nombreux sont les parents qui ne comprennent pas. Communiquez avec eux. » En tant qu’enseignant, le Maj Vanderlee comprend mieux les familles et il peut parfois mieux expliquer leur situation au commandant ou au parrain, précisez qu’il n’y a pas de « mauvais » parents et que ces derniers ne peuvent aider réellement par manque de temps ou pour toute autre raison. Qu’en est-il des parents qui ne semblent pas vouloir s’impliquer? Dans les cas de ce genre, le Maj Vanderlee leur consacre un peu plus de son temps personnel, en les appelant plus souvent et en les informant au sujet des nombreuses options qui s’offrent à eux de s’impliquer. « Le fait de les appeler ou de leur rendre visite me permet de les persuader de façon subtile », dit-il. « Après l’avoir fait, je m’aperçois, lorsqu’ils s’impliquent, qu’ils restent impliqués. » La stratégie proactive du Ltv Wick visant à impliquer les parents donne de bons résultats, en particulier lorsqu’il s’agit de réunir des fonds. Il fait appel à ses partenaires de la Ligue navale chaque été pour passer en revue le programme de l’année qui s’annonce. C’est à ce moment que l’on détermine les activités qui auront besoin de

Il invite les représentants de la Ligue à ses deux grands événements en septembre – la soirée d’introduction pour les anciens cadets et les parents et, quelques jours plus tard, la soirée d’inscription des nouveaux cadets avec la présence obligatoire des parents. De cette façon, la Ligue peut s’adresser librement aux parents pour demander de l’aide ou des engagements précis de leur part en même temps qu’elle leur indique toutes les options et les programmes disponibles. La Ligue pose cette question directement aux parents : « À quelles activités aimeriez-vous participer? » « Il est rare qu’un parent refuse », dit le Ltv Wick. « Comme l’engagement est public, il a un effet d’entraînement. » Par ailleurs, la ligue appelle les parents avant les événements pour leur rappeler leur engagement. Si, durant l’appel, un parent dit ne pas être en mesure d’honorer son engagement, on lui propose de changer de place avec un autre parent à une date ultérieure. Le parent qui pense que son enfant ne peut rien faire de mal. La confrontation avec des parents peu réalistes est pénible et exige beaucoup de doigté, dit le Capt Dowling. Il conseille de ne pas « leur enlever leurs illusions » dès les premières minutes de la rencontre. Si vous le faites, vous n’aurez plus aucune chance d’arriver à une heureuse conclusion. Il explique que ces parents sont habituellement sur la défensive et qu’ils vous diront sans aucune hésitation que leur enfant n’a rien fait. « Vous devez éviter toute confrontation verbale avec eux au sujet de quoi que ce soit qui créerait une situation du genre « vous » contre « eux ». Il ne faut pas perdre de vue que quelles que soient les accusations, le parent les considérera comme une attaque personnelle mettant en question son rôle en tant que parent. Tenez-vous en aux faits, dit-il, en évitant les insinuations et les accusations sans fondements. « Votre but consiste à convaincre le

CADENCE

Numéro 17, Automne 2005


parent que vous êtes tous les deux du même côté et que le parent n’est pas à blâmer. ». Exposez les faits aux parents, de sorte qu’ils puissent conclure par euxmêmes que vos preuves montrent clairement ce que leur enfant a fait. Le mot clé dans ce cas est « Ils ». Ils doivent conclure par eux-mêmes, vous ne pouvez pas leur imposer cette décision.

Il est difficile de se trouver confronté à des parents irréalistes et cette situation exige un degré considérable de doigté. Éviter d’arracher les parents à leur fiction dès les premiers instants de la rencontre. Enfin, rassurez les parents en leur disant que leur enfant n’est pas une mauvaise personne, mais qu’il a pris une mauvaise décision; vous comprenez qu’il est naturel pour eux de se ranger du côté de leur enfant. Puis ajoutez que pour aider nos enfants il faut faire preuve d’un « amour ferme », c’est-à-dire leur apprendre à assumer la responsabilité de leurs actes. « D’après mon expérience, même le parent le plus défensif se rendra à la réalité si vous adoptez cette approche », dit le Capt Dowling. « En traitant les parents avec respect, sans oublier qu’ils chérissent leurs enfants, vous parviendrez à une heureuse conclusion dans les situations difficiles. Le parent qui remet en question l’application du règlement (sur la tenue personnelle)

Si un parent remet en question le règlement, dit le Capt Smith, il faut lui préciser que le cadet a été averti à deux reprises au sujet de sa tenue personnelle, qui n’est pas la tenue réglementaire des cadets. Puis ajoutez que, si le cadet veut faire partie de l’unité, il doit se conformer aux règlements du Programme des cadets. « Expliquez l’importance que cela revêt du point de vue des opérations d’un corps/d’un escadron de cadets et du Programme des cadets et que si le cadet était autorisé à porter ce qu’il veut, cela pourrait causer un manquement à la discipline au sein du corps/de l’escadron de cadets » ajoute-t-il. « Le règlement ne peut s’appliquer qu’à certains cadets et non aux autres. » De plus grande importance cependant, expliquez que le Programme des cadets utilise la discipline dans le cadre de son processus d’enseignement. Les règles, les limites et les conséquences concrètes aident les jeunes à développer l’autodiscipline dont ils auront besoin pour relever les défis de la vie et à persévérer jusqu’à ce que leurs objectifs aient été atteints. L’autodiscipline est importante, qu’il s’agisse d’étudier pour un examen ou d’accomplir un travail comme il se faut. Il est utile d’ajouter que le fait de se conformer au règlement permettra au cadet de continuer à tirer profit des activités réservées aux cadets. Le fait d’avoir une image globale de la situation peut aider le parent à convaincre son enfant de l’intérêt qu’il y a à se conformer au règlement, fait-il remarquer.

Cette intervention doit avoir lieu après que le cadet ait été averti verbalement à deux reprises de ne pas porter de colliers, de bagues, de maquillage exagéré ou de coupe de cheveux particulière lorsqu'il se présente aux activités des cadets, dit le Capt Smith. « Les avertissements verbaux seront conservés par écrit, de sorte que je puisse m’y reporter de façon précise. L’entrevue face à face aura lieu à ma demande. »

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

Ombudsman : essayer de résoudre les conflits au niveau local Depuis que le bureau de l'Ombudsman du ministère de la Défense nationale et des FC a été créé il y a sept ans, il a reçu 19 plaintes de cadets ou de membres de leurs familles. Selon le bureau de l'Ombudsman, la majorité des conflits survenaient entre des parents et des officiers du CIC en raison de décisions prises par les officiers. Les plaintes comprenaient l'abus de pouvoir, l'instruction (y compris le processus de sélection pour les camps d'été) et le harcèlement. « Les officiers du CIC ont le pouvoir de résoudre les conflits au tout début », a déclaré Yves Côté, le nouvel ombudsman nommé en août. « En écoutant attentivement les parents et en répondant à leurs préoccupations d'une manière claire et exhaustive, les officiers du CIC pourront expliquer efficacement les raisons qui ont motivé leurs décisions. » Il estime qu'à l'aide de leur leadership, les officiers peuvent accomplir beaucoup pour résoudre les conflits au niveau local et désamorcer des situations avant qu'elles n'aboutissent dans son bureau. Il ajoute : « Toutefois, si des problèmes nous sont soumis, je vous assure que nous les traiterons équitablement et rapidement. » M. Côté apporte au bureau de l'Ombudsman près de 30 années d'expérience au sein de la fonction publique. Il a commencé sa carrière comme avocat militaire en 1977 et a quitté les Forces en 1981. Il a offert des avis et des conseils relatifs au droit militaire et à la discipline sur toute une gamme de sujets. Avant d'accepter son nouveau poste, il était avocatconseil du greffier du Conseil privé. Pour de plus amples renseignements sur le bureau de l'Ombudsman, consultez le site Web www.ombudsman.forces.gc.ca ou composez, sans frais, le 1 888 828-3626.

21


LE PROFESSIONNALISME AU SEIN DU CIC >

par Denise Moore

Les compétences en résolution de conflits Pour faire preuve de professionnalisme, les officiers du CIC utilisent diverses compétences interpersonnelles, notamment les compétences en résolution de conflits. ar le passé, le Programme des cadets adoptait une approche réactive aux conflits, traitant les conflits au cas par cas. Maintenant, le Programme préconise une approche systémique à l'aide d'un modèle qui incorpore toutes les façons possibles de résoudre les conflits. Il s'agit d'un outil plus pratique qui aide les cadets à faire face aux conflits plus efficacement. Le succès de ce système dépendra des compétences inhérentes en leadership des officiers du CIC qui seront chargés d'appuyer les cadets de façon à s'assurer qu’il fonctionne comme il a été conçu pour le faire. Nous aborderons le sujet plus en profondeur dans les prochains numéros du magazine Cadence.

P

La gamme des mécanismes de résolution de conflits comprend des approches officielles et officieuses. L'approche du ministère de la Défense nationale et des FC consiste à

L'aggravation d'un conflit est comme une tornade – plus il devient fort, plus il peut faire de dommages.

essayer de résoudre les conflits au niveau le plus bas et le plus rapidement possible. Les techniques du mode alternatif de règlement des conflits (MARC) sont mieux utilisées à ce niveau plus informel. Le MARC exige un dialogue sur la situation de conflit; les parties intéressées travaillent ensemble pour comprendre les préoccupations de chacun avant de trouver une solution commune. Nature du conflit Comprendre la nature et les causes du conflit peut aider les officiers à identifier, à évaluer et à déterminer la meilleure approche pour le résoudre. Il est important de comprendre comment un conflit naît, s'aggrave et influe sur notre perception des autres.

Les sources de conflits… comprennent le comportement non professionnel, le commérage/les rumeurs/les intrigues de bureau, le manque d'acceptation des « différences » relatives à la culture, au sexe, à la race, à l'âge, à la langue et à l'éthique en milieu de travail, le manque de respect, une mauvaise planification ou une gestion inefficace et la détérioration des communications.

Comment naît le conflit? Les sources de conflits en milieu de travail comprennent le comportement non professionnel, le commérage/les rumeurs/les intrigues de bureau, le manque d'acceptation des « différences » relatives à la culture, au sexe, à la race, à l'âge, à la langue et à l'éthique en milieu de travail, le manque de respect, une mauvaise planification ou une gestion inefficace et la détérioration des communications.

Aggravation L'aggravation d'un conflit est comme une tornade – plus il devient fort, plus il peut faire de dommages. Des caractéristiques telles que les relations, les valeurs, les structures, les faits (information) et les intérêts (ce qui nous motive) peuvent contribuer à faire passer un milieu de travail coopératif à un environnement de travail concurrentiel. Les personnes sont

Porter un coup avant d'en recevoir un Pensée de groupe et « bouc émissaire » Les convictions alimentent les observations Considérer l'acte délibéré de la part de l'« autre » Tirer des conclusions reçues Faire des suppositions Passer à un environnement concurrentiel Coopération

22

CADENCE

Numéro 17, Automne 2005


accroissent le professionnalisme plus rapides à adopter des hypothèses et à tirer des conclusions préconçues. Sur ce point, les actions de « l'autre » sont considérées comme des actes délibérés. Notre système de convictions alimente nos observations et nous commençons à élaborer une « pensée de groupe » ou même à identifier des boucs émissaires. Dès lors, le conflit est hors de contrôle parce que nous nous concentrons sur les coups à porter avant d'en recevoir nous-mêmes. Perceptions des autres Bien que nous observions au moyen de nos cinq sens, personne n'a accès à la même information. Par conséquent, nous interprétons par le biais de nos « filtres », c'est-à-dire nos expériences personnelles, notre culture, notre religion, notre sexe et ainsi de suite. Les conclusions que nous tirons au sujet des autres ont des répercussions sur nous. Nous évaluons les autres sans disposer de données fiables. Nous blâmons les autres au lieu de considérer leurs contributions et la nôtre. Perfectionnement des compétences en matière de communication selon le MARC Le jeu de rôle est une bonne façon d'apprendre les techniques du MARC qui fonctionnent bien pour vous. Il vous aide également à déterminer les volets devant faire l’objet d’une étude plus approfondie. Vous pouvez perfectionner vos compétences, vos connaissances et votre attitude relatives au MARC au moyen de dialogues avec vos pairs, avec la chaîne de commandement et même avec le personnel des centres de règlement des conflits.

En acquérant une connaissance pratique de la théorie des conflits et de la communication axée sur les intérêts, vous pourrez acquérir la confiance nécessaire pour régler les conflits au niveau le plus bas possible, de manière bénéfique à tous. Cherchez à vous équiper d’une approche encourageant l’honnêteté des participants et évitant les confrontations aptes à porter atteinte à la dignité des parties.

Comprendre la nature et les causes du conflit peut aider les officiers à définir, à évaluer et à déterminer la meilleure approche pour le résoudre. Certains conseils pratiques • Essayer de voir les deux côtés du conflit, le positif (possibilité d’un changement concret) ainsi que le négatif (déplaisir, dérangement, etc.) • Voir dans un conflit une occasion de collaboration plutôt qu’une situation d’adversité ou d’évitement. • Reconnaître les indices de conflit avant que la situation ne s’aggrave ou ne devienne impossible à gérer. • Apprendre des techniques utiles pour aborder des situations présentant divers styles de conflit. • Se sentir à l’aise et confiant face à un conflit. • Acquérir une curiosité et un enthousiasme réels face à la gestion des conflits. Il s'agit d'une occasion de créativité!

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

Prenez l’initiative – c’est votre responsabilité Acquérez les compétences, les connaissances et l'assurance pour aider ceux qui vous entourent à régler leurs conflits selon une communication axée sur les intérêts. Les officiers ont la responsabilité de régler les conflits quand ils surviennent. Faites preuve de professionnalisme en prenant le contrôle d'une situation et en la réglant au mieux de vos compétences. Demandez de l’aide Souvent, une situation de conflit a de nombreux éléments. Vous ne pouvez peut-être aider qu'à en résoudre certains. Il faut déterminer quand demander de l'aide et quand il est approprié de soumettre la situation de conflit à un niveau supérieur de la chaîne de commandement. Le MARC est l'approche de premier choix pour régler des conflits; toutefois, il est important de comprendre comment le MARC complète les autres mécanismes de résolution officielle tels que le processus de grief ou la politique de harcèlement du MDN et des FC. Pour de plus amples renseignements sur le programme de gestion des conflits, consultez le site Web : http://www.forces.gc.ca/ hr/adr-marc/ Denise Moore, médiatrice principale auprès du Directeur – Cadets, agit à titre de représentante du Programme de gestion des conflits pour le Directeur général – Réserves et cadets.

23


LE PROFESSIONNALISME AU SEIN DU CIC >

Tirer des leçons de nos erreurs Considérez-vous les erreurs comme

des possibilités d’apprendre ou

des échecs ?

es experts en leadership s’accordent pour dire que nos propres erreurs (et celles des autres) peuvent nous offrir de grandes possibilités d’apprendre si nous savons comment les aborder. L’un des moyens consiste à éviter les « entraves à l’apprentissage » qui peuvent nous empêcher de tirer des leçons de nos erreurs. Un autre consiste à déterminer ce que nous devrions ou ne devrions pas faire en cas d’erreur.

L

Le site Web de l’École de la fonction publique du Canada, à l’adresse : www.myschool-monecole.gc.ca/research/ publications/html, offre la liste ci-après des entraves à l’apprentissage, à savoir : • Les erreurs ne se discutent pas. Lorsque quelqu’un commet une erreur, nous supposons tout simplement qu’il a tiré une leçon de son erreur et nous n’en discutons pas ouvertement. Lorsqu’une équipe commet une erreur, nous avons parfois une réunion consacrée à l’analyse de cette erreur et c’est à peu près tout. Par ailleurs, si un superviseur commet

24

une erreur, personne ne la relève, y compris le superviseur lui-même. Les gens évitent de susciter des tensions improductives ou du ressentiment. • Les gens se gardent d’attribuer des blâmes en cas d’erreur. Les membres d’une équipe font part de leur insatisfaction lorsque des erreurs sont commises. De fortes pressions s’exercent afin d’éviter les erreurs. Chacun s’aperçoit des erreurs commises mais la tendance veut que l’on se garde de blâmer ou de critiquer les autres s’ils commettent des erreurs. • Les erreurs sont camouflées. On craint que les erreurs puissent compromettre la carrière de quelqu’un ou la réputation d’une équipe. On a tendance à camoufler les erreurs ou à les traiter comme si elles n’avaient pas d’importance. Ces erreurs finissent parfois par s’accumuler pour susciter une crise à un stade ultérieur. Ou bien, elles émergent au grand jour et deviennent un irritant.

• Les erreurs font l’objet de discussions, mais personne n’aborde les raisons profondes. Les erreurs font l’objet de discussions, mais elles semblent se répéter. Tout le monde est frustré. Il y a une tendance à ne pas considérer les erreurs comme des symptômes de causes plus profondes. Personne ne veut prendre le temps nécessaire et aller au fond des choses pour découvrir les raisons profondes des erreurs.

Chacun s’aperçoit des erreurs commises mais la tendance veut que l’on se garde de blâmer ou de critiquer les autres s’ils commettent des erreurs. Vous pouvez plus facilement éviter ces entraves en observant ce qu’il faut ou qu’il ne faut pas faire en cas d’erreur, d’après l’ouvrage « Leadership Passages: The Personal and Professional Transitions That

CADENCE

Numéro 17, Automne 2005


risquez probablement de rater une occasion d’apprendre. Si vous blâmez quelqu’un d’autre, vous risquez probablement de ne pas examiner votre propre rôle vis-à-vis de l’erreur. Vous pouvez même en arriver à vous convaincre que vous n’y étiez pour rien. Le fait de blâmer les autres décourage l’introspection et l’acceptation de la responsabilité, deux traits caractéristiques du leadership. Évitez ce réflexe de blâmer et assumez le blâme. Reconnaissez que vous avez commis une erreur, expliquez le contexte de l’erreur et engagez-vous à ne pas permettre que cela se reproduise.

Le pire que vous puissiez faire c’est de vous attardez sur l’erreur et de vous reprocher quelque erreur que ce soit que vous auriez commise (ou que vous pensez avoir commise).

Make or Break a Leader », de David Dotlich, James Noel et Norman Walker. Trois choses à ne pas faire en cas d’erreur 1. Évitez que votre erreur ne vous définisse comme personne. Établissez la distinction entre l’événement et ce que vous êtes. Même si vous commettez une erreur stupide, cela ne signifie pas que vous soyez stupide. Le pire que vous puissiez faire c’est de vous attardez sur l’erreur et de vous reprocher quelque erreur que ce soit que vous auriez commise (ou que vous pensez avoir commise). Après avoir reconnu votre erreur et accepté la responsabilité, oubliez-la et allez de l’avant. L’erreur est naturelle et prévisible. N’acceptez pas qu’une erreur détermine la façon dont vous exercez votre leadership. 2. Ne cherchez pas de boucs émissaires. D’un point de vue réel et naturel, la plupart des leaders réagissent de façon défensive lorsqu’ils commettent des erreurs. Toutefois, si vous réagissez de façon défensive, vous

3. Ne vous limitez pas à réfléchir à l’événement lui-même. Même s’il est important de tirer une leçon de l’erreur et d’agir différemment lorsque confronté aux mêmes circonstances (apprentissage externe), cela est tout aussi important pour l’apprentissage interne. Demandez-vous quel genre d’image cela projette à votre sujet en tant que leader, lorsque vous agissez de façon X plutôt que de façon Y. Réfléchissez à la façon dont vos méthodes ou vos valeurs peuvent vous avoir poussé à commettre l’erreur. Votre arrogance ou votre humeur inégale a-t-elle contribué à l’erreur? Quatre choses à faire en cas d’erreur 1. Passez en revue les décisions qui ont mené à l’erreur. Plus précisément, examinez vos attitudes ainsi que vos actions, celles qui peuvent avoir causé ou suscité l’erreur. Demandez-vous pourquoi vous avez pris les décisions en question. Craigniez-vous de prendre un risque? Preniez-vous un trop grand risque? Étiezvous trop entêté pour écouter les conseils de votre équipe? 2. Parlez à un guide, à un mentor ou à un conseiller de confiance au sujet de l’incident. Nombreux sont ceux qui ne peuvent parler de leurs erreurs. Ce genre d’assurance n’est pas du leadership; c’est un déni de la réalité. Le fait de discuter de ce qui a mal tourné n’est pas facile et il faut du courage pour exposer vos propres points faibles. Vous ne voulez pas que l’on vous considère moins bien. Toutefois, ces conversations vous permettent d’obtenir

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

une rétroaction, d’analyser vos perceptions et de vous accepter vous-même ainsi que votre rôle. Vous avez besoin des éléments qu’une perspective extérieure peut vous apporter; cette dernière peut vous faire mieux comprendre le genre de leader que vous êtes et la façon dont vous devriez vous améliorer. 3. Réfléchissez à ce que vous feriez différemment à l’avenir. Après avoir considéré pourquoi vous avez agi comme vous l’avez fait et en avoir parlé, réfléchissez à la façon dont vous pourriez répondre plus efficacement dans une situation similaire à l’avenir. Considérez ce que vous avez appris de votre erreur et qui pourrait vous être utile dans d’autres postes et lorsque vous serez appelé à prendre d’autres déci-

Si vous réagissez de façon défensive (à une erreur), vous risquez de rater une occasion d’apprendre. sions. Pour mieux réfléchir à ce que vous avez appris, posez-vous les questions suivantes : si vous vous trouviez dans la même situation à l’avenir, que feriez-vous différemment? En quoi devriez-vous changer pour agir différemment? Devrez-vous adopter de nouvelles valeurs, devenir plus souple, changer vos méthodes habituelles? 4. Montrez-vous énergique et persévérez. Les erreurs peuvent vous donner un sentiment de défaite, mais les grands leaders tirent leur ressort psychologique de ce genre d’événement. Il n’y a pas de secret quant à l’acquisition de ce ressort psychologique; vous devez tout simplement procéder à une introspection et décider que vous ne vous laisserez pas abattre. Concentrez-vous sur le travail à accomplir. Donnez-vous une discipline mentale pour éviter de trop vous fixer sur vos erreurs ou sur les erreurs des autres. Motivez-vous par vos propres moyens. En évitant les entraves à l’apprentissage et en observant ce qu’il faut et qu’il ne faut pas faire, vous pouvez tirer des leçons de vos erreurs et devenir un leader plus efficace.

25


LE PROFESSIONNALISME AU SEIN DU CIC

par le Maj Serge Dubé

Formation future en matière de professionnalisme Comme l’indique le Petit Larousse, le professionnalisme est la qualité de quiconque « exerce une profession avec une grande compétence ». a description du groupe professionnel militaire du CIC indique que « les officiers du CIC sont des artisans du développement des jeunes tenus de se conformer à des normes élevées de professionnalisme. Ils satisfont aux attentes sociétales élevées naturellement imposées aux responsables du bien-être, de l’appui, de la protection, de l’administration, de l’instruction et du développement de la ressource la plus précieuse du Canada : ses jeunes ».

L

L’instruction du CIC qu’élabore en ce moment le Projet de gestion du changement de la description du groupe professionnel militaire du CIC s’inscrit dans les niveaux élevés de professionnalisme qui règnent au sein du CIC. Quand on a demandé à des officiers du CIC, appartenant tant aux unités de campagne qu’au Quartier général, au cours du projet, ce qu’ils pensaient de leur emploi, leurs réponses ont varié selon l’emploi qu’ils occupaient à ce moment, mais un

thème s’est retrouvé partout : le besoin d’enrichir la formation dans le domaine du développement des jeunes et du leadership. En prenant appui sur ces réponses, des officiers de tous les niveaux de l’organisation ont rédigé des descriptions de travail et une formation a été montée dans le but de préparer les officiers du CIC à ces emplois. On a pris soin de s’assurer que les officiers de niveau d’entrée étaient dotés des outils nécessaires pour bien diriger et pour comprendre les jeunes (les cadets) dès le début de leur carrière, plutôt que d’acquérir ces compétences au fil d’une période de trois à quatre ans. Cela devrait les aider à diriger leurs cadets avec plus de professionnalisme. Voici certains des sujets intégrés à la future formation de niveau d’entrée : le développement des adolescents, les responsabilités des officiers du CIC en matière de supervision des cadets et de développement du leadership, le mentorat et l’encadrement, le

Les officiers, comme le Slt David Lang, qui a enseigné à l’École régionale de vol à voile (Est) l’été dernier, seront dotés des outils qu’il leur faut dès le début de leur carrière pour comprendre et diriger correctement des jeunes.

développement des cadets par l’encadrement, l’identification des obstacles à l’apprentissage, la réponse aux problèmes personnels des cadets et le soutien des cadets dans la résolution de leurs conflits interpersonnels et intrapersonnels simples.

(Les officiers ont identifié) le besoin d’enrichir la formation dans le domaine du développement des jeunes et du leadership. En plus de l’instruction que suivront les officiers lorsqu’ils se joindront au CIC, un autre cours, actuellement en voie d’élaboration, les préparera aux responsabilités qui leur seront confiées lors de la promotion aux grades de capitaine ou de lieutenant (de vaisseau) et de leur entrée dans la période de perfectionnement (PP) 2. Cette instruction portera à un niveau supérieur les compétences et connaissances acquises pendant la PP 1. L’instruction propre à l’emploi qui sera donnée quand le personnel en montrera le besoin est également en cours d’élaboration. Quand une personne, par exemple, sera nommée officier de l’instruction, elle suivra le cours d’officier de l’instruction ou, quand elle sera nommée commandant de peloton dans un centre d’instruction d’été des cadets, elle suivra un cours de commandant de peloton. Cette méthode de qualification des officiers appliquée au moment où ils ont besoin d’une formation donnée, et non plusieurs années auparavant, fera en sorte qu’ils jouiront de l’information la plus récente. En soi, cela en fera des membres plus professionnels de la Branche. Demeurez attentifs aux mises à jour du nouveau programme d’instruction du CIC. Le Maj Dubé est l’officier d’état-major responsable du perfectionnement professionnel du CIC au niveau de la Direction des cadets.

26

CADENCE

Numéro 17, Automne 2005


PERFECTIONNEMENT DES OFFICIERS

par le Maj Stephen Case

Une « politique » locale en matière de tabagisme inculque de regrettables leçons Lors d’une visite auprès d’une unité locale, j’ai été renversé de la réponse qu’un sergent m’a donnée en souriant fièrement. Quand je lui ai demandé ce qu’il y avait de vraiment bien à être cadet supérieur, il m’a immédiatement répondu qu’une fois cadet supérieur, on pouvait fumer pendant les pauses. l tirait visiblement une grande fierté de son grade et des privilèges qui l’accompagnaient. Au sein de son unité, il n’était pas permis aux cadets subalternes de fumer, mais les cadets supérieurs en avaient la liberté. Je me suis enquis de ce qui avait donné lieu à une pareille « politique » d’unité et un élève-officier m’a fourni le raisonnement suivant : les cadets supérieurs sont des leaders, aussi ont-ils la permission de fumer, à l’image des officiers. D’autre part, a-t-il ajouté, c’est bon pour le moral : les jeunes travaillent plus dur à devenir cadets supérieurs afin de jouir des privilèges du leadership.

I

Quand un cadet supérieur obtient un privilège que les autres n’ont pas, ce devrait être pour reconnaître le niveau accru de responsabilité de ce cadet, son expérience et son jugement. Les officiers avaient la conviction de recourir à une méthode saine. Non seulement leur politique récompensait-elle les cadets supérieurs et encourageait-elle les cadets subalternes à exceller, mais encore réglait-elle le problème du tabagisme. D’après leur raisonnement, les cadets fumeraient qu’on le leur permette ou non. Selon cette « politique » locale, les cadets supérieurs géraient le tabagisme puisqu’il s’agissait de leur privilège et l’état-major n’avait pas à s’inquiéter du tabagisme dans les rangs subalternes car les cadets supérieurs ne permettraient pas que l’on y fume.

Le vice venait de ce que cette « politique » d’unité, que j’espère isolée, enseignait aux cadets subalternes : s'ils travaillaient dur et suivaient les règles, ils seraient dispensés plus tard de les suivre. Ils apprenaient que les ordres diffèrent selon le grade, un concept dangereux qu’il n’est pas souhaitable de cultiver. Il est naturel, chez les cadets subalternes, de prendre pour modèles ceux qu’ils admirent – dans ce cas-ci, les cadets supérieurs. Si le fait d’être cadet supérieur s’accompagne de la permission de fumer, il me semble bien qu’ils sont, en fait, encouragés à fumer, non seulement pour s’intégrer au groupe des fumeurs, mais aussi pour faire valoir leur nouveau privilège. Le sergent avait compris que plus le grade s’élève, moins les règles s’appliquent, que les ordres deviennent en fait des suggestions, que la promotion n’a pas pour objet de se voir confier plus de responsabilités, mais bien de jouir de plus d’avantages et que le grade n’est pas tourné vers ce qu’un cadet peut faire pour l’unité, mais bien vers ce qu’il peut faire pour lui-même. À mesure que les cadets supérieurs acquièrent le sentiment que le grade atténue l’obligation de rendre compte de leur obéissance aux ordres, les ordres à venir sont remis en question. Si nous enseignons aux cadets qu’il est possible de faire fi des règles, c’est exactement ce qu’ils feront. Les officiers supérieurs sont sans doute ceux qui ont tiré les leçons les plus néfastes de cette situation car ils ont appris que c’est la façon de gérer une unité ou que c’est ainsi que l’on inculque le leadership aux jeunes gens. Ces officiers, en plus de permettre plus tard de tels comportements au sein de leur propre corps de cadets ou escadron, propageront aussi, croyant bien faire, cette façon de penser à autrui.

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

Les cadets supérieurs devraient-ils jouir de privilèges que n’ont pas les cadets subalternes? Évidemment oui, mais ces privilèges devraient correspondre aux buts et politiques du Programme des cadets et encourager la formation positive du caractère. Quand un cadet supérieur acquiert un privilège auquel les autres n’ont pas accès, ce privilège devrait servir à reconnaître le sens des responsabilités, l’expérience et le jugement de ce cadet, et à en tirer parti. Le Maj Case est le conseiller des cadets (Air) de la région attaché à l’Unité régionale de soutien aux cadets (Centre).

27


PERFECTIONNEMENT DES OFFICIERS

par le Ltv Paul Fraser

Cet automne, les nouveaux cours en direct d’officier d’administration de l’unité et d’officier de l’approvisionnement sont mis à l’essai!

Premiers essais en direct des nouveaux cours e sont les deux premiers cours du Projet de gestion du changement de la structure des GPM du CIC à devenir accessibles en direct. Les essais sont menés sur CadetNet par l’entremise des écoles régionales de cadets du pays tout entier. Les détails des cours sont accessibles par l’intermédiaire des écoles régionales et il est bon que les officiers consultent les directives régionales sur la façon de s’y inscrire.

C

La teneur des cours et toutes les références et ressources didactiques seront accessibles à quiconque a un compte CadetNet, mais il faut être inscrit au cours pour accéder aux conférences, clavardages et travaux. Dans le numéro printemps-été 2005 de Cadence, nous avons publié une description de base du mode de prestation de ces cours.

28

Maintenant qu’ils sont accessibles sur CadetNet, les officiers désireux de suivre un apprentissage à distance (AD) devront se munir d’un compte CadetNet pour y accéder. L’état-major de chaque corps ou escadron de cadets a droit à 14 comptes. Si vous prévoyez suivre à l’avenir une formation du CIC mais n’avez pas déjà de compte, parlez-en à votre commandant. Vous aurez accès à la formation par le biais du portail du Centre d’apprentissage (conférence) du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets, sur CadetNet. La teneur des cours et toutes les références et ressources didactiques seront accessibles à quiconque a un compte CadetNet, mais il faut être inscrit au cours pour accéder aux conférences, clavardages et travaux. Les conférences et clavardages ne seront accessibles qu’aux candidats inscrits via leur client CadetNet. Le contenu des cours sera fourni en format HTML afin d’en élargir l’accessibilité. Le Centre d’apprentissage du CIC deviendra un outil unique auquel pourront

recourir les officiers locaux pour accéder à l’instruction et il servira également de ressource pour les documents et références utilisés par le MDN et les FC pour administrer et donner le programme des cadets. L’AD permettra aux officiers locaux d’assister aux cours sans devoir se rendre dans un site d’instruction et il leur conférera la souplesse nécessaire pour terminer la formation, tout en s’adaptant à leur calendrier personnel. On continuera toutefois de s'attendre à ce que les officiers terminent leurs travaux dans les limites du calendrier du cours. Dans la plupart des cas, les travaux devront être remis avant minuit le lundi (dans le fuseau horaire de l’intéressé). La solde relative à ces cours sera versée seulement en cas de réussite. De plus amples renseignements sur l’AD seront publiés à l’avenir dans Cadence et dans la page du Centre d’apprentissage du CIC sur CadetNet. Le ltv Fraser est l’officier d’état-major de l’élaboration de l’AD du CIC au sein de la Direction des cadets.

CADENCE

Numéro 17, Automne 2005


Les officiers tireront profit de la nouvelle organisation de l'instruction Notre dernier numéro informait nos lecteurs de l’état de la mise sur pied de la nouvelle organisation de l'instruction du CIC en septembre. Dans le présent numéro, le Lcol Tom McNeil, responsable de l'instruction du CIC à la Direction des cadets, répond à quelques questions additionnelles. Q : La nouvelle organisation de l'instruction semble consacrer moins de ressources à la prestation de l'instruction et plus de ressources à la surveillance. Cela nuira-t-il à la qualité de l'instruction? R : La prémisse de la question est fausse. Il n'y aura pas moins de ressources affectées à la prestation de l'instruction. Il y aura moins d'officiers d'état-major à temps plein dans chacune des écoles régionales des instructeurs de cadets et plus d'officiers d'état-major pour élaborer et mettre à jour l'instruction et les outils dont les instructeurs ont besoin. Il est important que nous, en tant que chefs d'un programme de développement des jeunes, fournissions l'instruction la plus à jour possible. Nous estimons que la qualité de l'instruction augmentera. Nous aurons réussi à maintenir le rapport stagiaires-instructeurs tout en consacrant plus de ressources à l'élaboration du matériel. Il est nécessaire de s'assurer que les instructeurs ont les outils et le soutien nécessaires pour offrir un produit de haute qualité.

plusieurs cours de spécialistes qui étaient offerts à divers endroits et dont toutes les places n'étaient pas remplies! Avec le temps, un plan d'instruction national éliminera ces chevauchements et ces mesures inefficaces. En éliminant le chevauchement dans l'élaboration de l'apprentissage en ligne, par exemple, nous pourrons offrir plus rapidement aux instructeurs locaux une sélection élargie de cours en ligne. Q : N'y avait-il pas déjà une cellule d'instruction du CIC à la Direction des cadets? A : En théorie, oui; toutefois, des ressources insuffisantes (trois officiers seulement) rendaient la cellule inefficace. En l'absence de personnel capable de leur offrir de l'information en temps opportun, le personnel des régions, ce qui est tout à son honneur, s'arrangeait de façon autonome. Il devait agir seul afin de poursuivre l'instruction. L'organisation future veillera à ce que les régions n'aient plus à « improviser » de cette façon.

Q : Pouvez-vous fournir des exemples de chevauchement et des façons dont l'instruction deviendra plus efficace?

Q : Vous dites que vous aurez « enfin une instruction normalisée qui est “transportable” d'une région à l'autre ». Est-ce que ça n'a pas toujours été le cas? Les écarts régionaux étaient-ils si grands?

R : L'apprentissage à distance pour le même cours était élaboré simultanément dans deux régions. Nous avions cinq différents systèmes de critique de cours et

R : L'instruction n'était pas toujours « transportable » et, dans certains cas, les écarts régionaux présentaient une différence frappante. Certaines régions ne reconnaissaient

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

pas l'instruction que des officiers avaient reçue dans une autre région et ce, pour des raisons de sécurité. Une région qui nommait ses commandants (cmdt) a décidé de ne pas offrir le cours de commandant parce qu'elle considérait que le cours n'était pas nécessaire. Ce qui veut dire qu'un officier de cette région aurait de la difficulté à devenir cmdt dans une autre région. Q : Vous avez indiqué qu'à la mise sur pied de la nouvelle organisation, les officiers devaient s'attendre « à très peu » de changements. Cela veut-il dire que peu de changements seront apportés? R : Notre objectif vise à rendre tous les changements aussi transparents que possible pour les officiers locaux. Ces changements ne devraient pas être une source de distraction pour les instructeurs locaux. Ceux-ci devraient être au courant de ce qui se passe et savoir que ces changements auront comme résultat final de leur offrir une meilleure instruction. En tant que membre du CIC, je ne mènerais pas à bien ces changements si je ne jugeais pas que le CIC en tirerait profit. Ces changements deviendront plus clairs au moment de mettre en œuvre la nouvelle instruction au cours des prochaines années – nouveaux cours et plans d'instruction, nouveau matériaux didactiques et guides d'instructeurs. Tous ces changements exigeront beaucoup de travail et de coordination.

29


PERFECTIONNEMENT DES OFFICIERS

par le Capt Catherine Griffin

Communications avec les cadets Avez-vous déjà transmis à un cadet une information que vous considériez importante mais que le cadet n’a pas répondu comme vous vous y attendiez? elui-ci n’avait probablement pas l’intention de défier votre autorité ou de vous ignorer. Il s’agirait plutôt d’un manque de communication.

C

De récents travaux dans le domaine de la neuropsychologie ont révélé que les jeunes et les adultes utilisent différentes parties du cerveau pour saisir et traiter l’information. Cela signifie que votre façon de percevoir ce que vous communiquez et la façon dont vos cadets le perçoivent peuvent être très différentes. La bonne nouvelle, c’est qu’il vous est possible de prendre des mesures pour vous assurer que vos cadets et vous-même êtes sur la « même longueur d’onde ». Le cerveau des adultes et celui des adolescents sont très différents Lors d’une récente étude cherchant à relever les différences entre le cerveau des adultes et celui des adolescents, le Dr Deborah Yurgelun-Todd (directrice des services de neuropsychologie et de neuroimagerie au Mclean Hospital à Belmont, au Massachusetts), a utilisé l’imagerie par résonance magnétique pour observer la façon dont les adultes et les adolescents réagissaient à une série d’images. Le Lt Ken Russell veille à ce que ce cadet comprenne exactement ce qu’il lui dit en étant bien précis.

<

(Photo : IC Wayne Emde, Affaires publiques, CIEC Vernon)

Lorsqu’on a demandé aux adultes d’interpréter les émotions exprimées par les visages apparaissant sur les images, ils ont tous correctement perçu la peur, alors qu’un grand nombre d’adolescents percevait la surprise, la colère, la confusion ou la tristesse. Les adultes et les adolescents avaient perçu et interprété différentes émotions. En examinant les scintigraphies des

cerveaux, le Dr Yurgelun-Todd a découvert que les adultes avaient utilisé la région préfrontale de leur cerveau (siège de la réflexion responsable ou de niveau élevé) pour interpréter les images alors que les adolescents avaient utilisé les régions affectives de leur cerveau.

Les cerveaux des adolescents répondent différemment de ceux des adultes au monde extérieur. Quelle leçon pouvons-nous tirer? Le cerveau des adolescents réagit de façon différente de celui des adultes face au monde extérieur. Le Dr Yurgelun-Todd déclare que la recherche permet de conclure « …que les adolescents ne vont pas saisir l’information provenant du monde extérieur et l’organiser de la même façon que nous (les adultes) ». Cela constitue un défi de caractère particulier pour les personnes qui travaillent avec les jeunes; cependant, les quelques indications ci-dessous pourraient vous être utiles lorsque vous communiquerez avec vos cadets : • Connaissez bien votre message. Posezvous la question : « Qu’est-ce que je veux communiquer et pour quelle raison? » Si vous n’êtes pas très sûr de votre message, vous allez avoir tendance à donner de longues explications. Le fait de fournir trop d’information inutile peut dérouter le cadet, qui deviendra frustré et cessera d’écouter. • Soyez précis. Transmettez de l’information qui éclaircit votre message telle les dates, heures, noms ou situations. Évitez d’être vague ou de vous exprimer en termes généraux. Rappelez-vous qu’à l’inverse des adultes, les cadets ne saisiront pas toujours les signes et les nuances, comme le langage corporel. Le fait de présumer peut susciter des frustrations des deux côtés.

30

• Reprenez avec le cadet ce que vous avez dit. Demandez au cadet de résumer votre message ou d’expliquer ce qu’il ou elle perçoit comme attente à la suite de la communication. Cela vous permettra d’évaluer la perception des cadets au sujet des divers éléments et vous fournira, à tous les deux, la possibilité de poser des questions, le cas échéant. • Écoutez de façon attentive. Cela signifie qu’il faut faire attention aux paroles du cadet et se concentrer sur ce qui est dit. Évitez de penser à votre liste d’épicerie ou à la réponse que vous allez donner à un courriel sur votre appareil BlackBerry. Servez-vous de tous vos sens pour saisir l’information et répondre comme il faut. • Connaissez votre auditoire. Mieux vous connaîtrez vos cadets et meilleures seront vos possibilités de communiquer avec eux de façon efficace. Il est utile de savoir qu’un cadet ou une cadette répond mieux lorsqu’il ou elle prend des notes lors de vos communications, alors qu’un autre répond mieux aux communications orales plutôt qu’écrites. • Faites-le. Le perfectionnement des compétences requiert de la pratique. Plus vous communiquerez avec vos cadets et plus vous aurez de possibilités d’observer ce qui convient le mieux pour chacun. Le Capt Griffin est officier d’état-major du développement de l’instruction à la Direction des cadets. Le présent article contient de l’information provenant d’une entrevue avec le Dr Deborah Yurgelun-Todd, que l’on peut trouver à l’adresse http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/ frontline/shows/teenbrain/interviews.todd. html. Si vous désirez soumettre un article concernant les jeunes à Cadence (que vous soyez l’auteur ou que vous l’ayez lu), veuillez communiquer avec le Capt Griffin à l’adresse : griffin.cr@forces.gc.ca

CADENCE

Numéro 17, Automne 2005


INSTRUCTION DES CADETS

par le Maj Russ Francis

< La mise à jour des activités d’instruction des cadets de l’Air, de la Marine et de l’Armée de terre et l’établissement des « parcours » qu’empruntent les cadets au fil de leurs progrès au sein du Programme suivent leur cours.

La troisième phase du projet, qui consistera à élaborer et à déployer des programmes revus d’instruction des corps et escadrons de cadets, se déroulera au cours des cinq prochaines années, soit de 2006 à 2011. De janvier à la fin mai 2006, ainsi qu’au cours de chaque période subséquente de septembre à mai, des comités de rédaction se réuniront pour mettre à jour l’instruction offerte. Ils se composeront de personnel du D Cad et d’autres quartiers généraux ainsi que d’instructeurs des corps et escadrons de cadets et des centres d’instruction d’été.

Projet de mise à jour du Programme des cadets –

Progrès accomplis Le Programme des cadets travaille depuis 2003 à une importante initiative de renouveau : le Projet de mise à jour du Programme des cadets (Projet MàJ PC). ù en sommes-nous par rapport à ce projet de modernisation à trois phases? Comme nous en avons déjà fait état, nous avons terminé la première phase, qui comprenait l’établissement des paramètres du Programme des cadets approuvés en mai dernier. Une Ordonnance sur l’administration et l’instruction des cadets (OAIC) détaillant ces paramètres devrait être publiée au cours de l’année d’instruction 2005-2006.

O

Au cours de la deuxième phase du projet, où nous en sommes présentement, nous élaborons les grandes lignes du nouveau programme, au niveau macro, mettant à jour son organisation et sa structure, modernisant les activités d’instruction des cadets de l’Air, de la Marine et de l’Armée et définissant les « parcours » qu’emprunteront les cadets dans leurs progrès au fil de ce programme de six ans. Essentiellement, un plan du Programme des cadets intégrant les changements et autres recommandations reçues au fil de plusieurs années est à être mis sur pied.

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

Nous comptons diffuser ces documents (activités renouvelées d’instruction de première année) auprès des … corps et escadrons de cadets d’ici janvier 2007 en vue de leur mise en œuvre en septembre 2007. Les premiers comités élaboreront des activités quinquennales de formation des corps et escadrons de cadets. Nous comptons diffuser ces documents auprès des quartiers généraux régionaux et des corps et escadrons de cadets d’ici janvier 2007 en vue de leur mise en œuvre en septembre 2007. Le Projet MàJ PC vise à améliorer la gestion et l’administration du Programme des cadets; à améliorer la connectivité entre les programmes des trois éléments afin qu’une instruction de haute qualité puisse être offerte en fonction des ressources en place et à intégrer les pratiques professionnelles actuelles des domaines de l’éducation et du développement des jeunes au programme des cadets. Le Maj Francis est l’officier d’état-major responsable de l’élaboration du programme des cadets au D Cad.

31


par le Capt Daniel Guay

Le recrutement en commun, ça rapporte! Depuis trois ans déjà, six corps et escadrons de cadets de Thunder Bay (Ontario) mènent une campagne de recrutement interarmées qui les a aidés à augmenter le nombre de recrues par rapport aux années précédentes. « Par le biais d’une promotion du Programme des cadets comme un tout – plutôt que des corps ou escadrons de cadets faisant cavaliers seuls – nous en sommes tous sortis gagnants, » explique le Capt Luis Santos, commandant de l’Escadron 84 des cadets de l’Air. u terme de la campagne de l’an dernier, les officiers du CIC de chacune des unités ont pu constater une augmentation de recrues et, bien que les résultats ne soient pas encore disponibles pour la campagne de cette année, les officiers sont optimistes.

A

Au cours des deux années précédentes, la campagne de recrutement s’est déroulée dans le cadre de l’Exposition canadienne de Lakehead – trois semaines avant la rentrée, en plus des visites de recrutement dans les écoles. Cette exposition permet de faire la promotion du Programme des cadets auprès des plus de 10 000 personnes qui y assistent. Le Capt Santos a été le « gestionnaire de projet » de la campagne de recrutement dans le cadre de l’exposition de cette année. Son personnel avait préparé et fourni à l’avance

la documentation nécessaire à la région afin de faire approuver l’événement. Il a également veillé à ce que chacun des corps/ escadrons de cadets obtienne son autorisation et son certificat d’assurance respectifs. L’équipe s’est enfin occupée de réserver l’espace nécessaire, d’installer le kiosque d’information et de prévoir des rafraîchissements pour les visiteurs.

Nous avons également créé un dépliant local en guise d’appoint au matériel de promotion national. Il énumérait six unités locales en indiquant le nom, l’adresse, le numéro de téléphone de la personne-ressource et la soirée de rassemblement, tout en offrant des informations supplémentaires sur le Corps des cadets de la Marine à Nipigon, localité de l’Ontario à une heure de distance.

Les délais étant très serrés, le plus grand défi que l’équipe ait eu à relever était la dotation du kiosque pendant les quatre jours que devait durer l’événement. Idéalement, il aurait fallu disposer en tout temps d’un officier du CIC et de deux cadets en uniforme qui répondraient aux questions des visiteurs. Nous avons insisté sur l’importance de promouvoir l’intégralité du Programme des cadets plutôt que ses corps/escadrons de cadets locaux ou autres éléments concrets à l’heure de renseigner le public. Chacun des corps/escadrons de cadets devait se charger de fournir un officier et des cadets bénévoles. Or, comme ils étaient nombreux à suivre des cours ou à avoir d’autres engagements pendant l’été, les bénévoles faisaient défaut. Ainsi, les quelques bénévoles que nous avons pu trouver on dû fournir des heures supplémentaires pour parer à la situation.

Pour assurer que ce dépliant réussirait à atteindre nos auditoires cibles, il a été revu par l’officier des affaires publiques régionales. Après maintes révisions, il a été approuvé, imprimé en couleurs et distribué – simultanément avec le livret d’information national « L’expérience cadet ».

Comme il s’agissait d’une campagne interarmées, nous avons utilisé le matériel de recrutement offert par la Direction des cadets. Le matériel comprenait entre autres des dépliants et des affiches de conception inédite ainsi que des bandes vidéos de recrutement pour chacun des volets, qui ont été diffusés sans interruption pendant toute la durée de l’exposition. En guise de décor, nous avons arboré une toile de fond de grande dimension offerte par le détachement des cadets de Winnipeg.

32

Dans tout événement commun – quand tout le monde se rallie – le travail et les coûts sont d’autant plus faciles à gérer. Nous avons eu la chance de pouvoir compter dans ces corps/escadrons de cadets sur des officiers qui étaient prêts à promouvoir le Programme tout entier. Ainsi, nos efforts de recrutement nous rapportent à tous. Le recrutement n’est pas le seul effort en commun des corps et escadrons de cadets de Thunder Bay. « Nous favorisons l’esprit de corps et l’interaction sociale au moyen d’un bal de cadets interarmées, d’épreuves sportives et de compétitions lors des exercices militaires, » précise le Capt Santos. « Ces événements incitent les cadets à briller personnellement et collectivement et, surtout, aident à faire connaître le Programme des cadets dans notre localité. » Le Capt Guay est l’officier d’instruction du corps de cadets de l’Armée 2511 à Thunder Bay (Ontario).

CADENCE

Numéro 17, Automne 2005


par le Col Robert Perron

Clarification au sujet des frais, droits et autres cotisations Au cours de l’année d’instruction 2004-2005, nous avons reçu plusieurs appels téléphoniques et courriels de parents ne comprenant pas pourquoi on leur demandait de payer des frais pour la participation de leur enfant au Programme des cadets alors que le site Web et les dépliants du programme mentionnent clairement que celui-ci ne comporte aucun frais ou droits d’inscription, ni aucun coût pour l'uniforme.

ême si aucun coût n’est exigé pour prendre part au Programme des cadets, il serait faux de dire que le programme est « gratuit ». Les répondants locaux doivent recueillir des fonds pour compléter la contribution apportée au programme par la ligue ou un répondant en vue de payer les locaux, l’assurance, les services publics, l'équipement et le matériel pour la formation optionnelle ainsi que les frais de transport local. Par ailleurs, en ce qui concerne les Cadets de l’Air, les répondants locaux doivent défrayer en partie l'utilisation des planeurs et des avions remorqueurs fournis par la Ligue des cadets de l’Air pour les programmes de vol à voile et de pilotage. Il appartient au répondant de décider comment recueillir ces fonds. Il peut opter pour des activités publiques de financement, solliciter le parrainage de groupes de service

M

communautaire ou, encore, faire directement appel aux parents des cadets. Cela dit, aucune somme demandée aux parents ne peut être définie comme frais d’inscription ou d’adhésion, et le défaut de payer cette somme ne pourrait empêcher un enfant de devenir membre du Programme des cadets ou de participer à ses activités. Aucun enfant ne sera refusé au programme, ou désavantagé de quelque façon, parce que sa famille ne peut pas ou ne veut pas débourser une cotisation imposée par la ligue ou le répondant. Le commandant et le répondant de l’unité locale disposent d’une certaine latitude pour organiser des activités optionnelles ne relevant pas de l'instruction et pour lesquelles le cadet pourra être appelé à fournir un petit montant en vue de couvrir les coûts non assurés au moyen des campagnes de financement.

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

En outre, aucun enfant ne devra faire l’objet de favoritisme parce que ses parents procurent un appui additionnel. Toute somme versée à la ligue ou aux répondants constitue un cadeau donné de plein gré, sans obligation. Les ligues et de nombreux répondants étant des organismes de charité enregistrés, de tels dons peuvent donner droit à une déduction fiscale selon la nature du cadeau. Les parents qui ne peuvent pas ou ne veulent pas contribuer financièrement sont invités à participer aux activités de financement en offrant leur temps et leur talent. Les parents doivent absolument comprendre que sans leur apport, financier ou autre, nous ne pourrions leur proposer un programme aussi complet.

Même si aucun coût n’est exigé pour prendre part au Programme des cadets, il serait faux de dire que le programme est « gratuit ». Il est important de veiller à ce que les jeunes qui s’inscrivent au programme et leurs parents ne s’en désintéressent pas en raison d’une mauvaise information. Vous avez donc particulièrement intérêt à corriger toute information contraire ou non conforme aux directives susmentionnées. Par conséquent, vous devez travailler avec votre répondant local pour vous assurer que le site Web de votre unité et les documents d’information produits localement à l'intention des parents reflètent cette position commune. De même, les parents doivent être assurés qu’il n’est survenu aucun changement négatif en ce qui concerne le soutien des FC aux organisations des cadets. En d’autres mots, la nécessité de recueillir des fonds n’est pas attribuable à une baisse de l'appui des FC. Tout parent qui souhaite obtenir de l'information sur la cotisation ou les droits demandés par une ligue/un répondant ou sur la contribution d’un répondant au programme doit s’adresser d’abord au comité répondant local, puis à la ligue responsable concernée. Le Col Perron est le Directeur – Cadets.

33


Rétrospective – écoles pour les officiers < Le Capt Mallette, à droite, que l’on voit ici corrigeant les examens de cette année, a commencé sa carrière d’enseignant à l’ERIC Est en 1978

Le 30 décembre 1974, une directive d’exécution du Quartier général de la Défense nationale, signée par le Sous-chef d’état-major de la Défense, recommandait qu’un système de formation des instructeurs de cadets soit créé en vue de la formation d’officiers pour le mouvement des cadets.

D

ans son ouvrage intitulé Par Dévouement, une rétrospective au sujet du CIC, le Capt Marie-Claude Joubert rappelle qu’en 1974 la Région de l’Est était la seule à compter une école d’officiers pour l’ancien Cadre des instructeurs de cadets (CIC). Des cours avaient été donnés aux officiers de l’ancien CIC dans la Région du Centre en 1973 et en 1974, mais il a fallu attendre jusqu’en 1975 pour que l’école de l’ancien CIC de la Région du Centre soit créée. En 1976, Ottawa reconnaissait officiellement les écoles régionales d'instructeurs de cadets en leur assignant des programmes et des normes d’instruction. D’autres écoles régionales virent bientôt le jour. Peu nombreux sont les officiers qui savent ce qu’était l’instruction à l’ancien CIC il y a plus de 30 ans, de sorte que nous avons demandé à deux officiers de l’ancien CIC qui étaient présents depuis le début – le Capt Pierre Mallette de la Région de l’Est (un « pur » officier de l’ancien CIC) et le Capt Ray Fleming de la Région du Centre (ancien officier de la Force régulière/de la Réserve) – de nous faire part de leurs expériences respectives. Par pure coïncidence, tous les deux ont été des cadets et ils continuent de s’impliquer dans les écoles d’aujourd’hui. Deux expériences vécues

En 1970, deux mois avant son 18e anniversaire de naissance, Pierre Mallette a suivi un Cours de base des instructeurs à la Citadelle de Québec dans le but de devenir un officier du Service de cadets du Canada (CS of C).

34

Durant deux semaines, il a étudié le leadership, les techniques d’instruction, les cours de drill, le protocole et le comportement des officiers et il a même appris comment se servir d’un projecteur. « Cela ressemblait beaucoup à ce que j’avais appris comme cadet supérieur, mais avec une « vision » différente », dit le Capt Mallette. « Pour nombre d’entre nous, il s’agissait du premier contact avec les « réguliers » et ce n’était pas plus facile à l’époque d’être un élève-officier que ça ne l’est aujourd’hui. »

En 1976, Ottawa reconnaissait officiellement les écoles régionales pour instructeurs de cadets, leur donnant un ensemble de normes et de programmes d’instruction. En 1971, il apprit à Montréal qu’il n’était plus un officier du CS of C, mais plutôt un officier de l’ancien CIC. « Notre ‘récompense’ a été d’abandonner l’ancienne ‘tenue de combat’ en pure laine et de nous procurer de nouveaux uniformes au coût de 60 $ (une forte somme pour les étudiants à l’époque) », dit-il. « Mais nous avions une identité et nous savions que nous étions des officiers chargés d’une tâche spécialisée : diriger des adolescents. » Le Capt Fleming ainsi que d’autres officiers de la Force régulière et de la Première

réserve, affiliés à l’ERIC Centre étaient aussi conscients du fait que les officiers de l’ancien Cadre des instructeurs de cadets (plus tard appelés officiers de l’actuel Cadre des instructeurs de cadets (CIC)) étaient des « Officiers de la Réserve des Forces canadiennes, mais avec une différence ». Depuis son premier contact avec l’école au milieu des années 1970 et le début de son travail à l’école en 1982, le Capt Fleming a été impressionné par le professionnalisme des officiers du CIC de longue date, « les vrais ou les purs », qui n’avaient eu aucune expérience dans la Force régulière ou dans la Première réserve à laquelle pouvoir se reporter. « Ces officiers, qui venaient de tous les horizons, ont été en mesure de transmettre une quantité considérable de connaissances et d’habiletés, en s’inspirant à la fois du Programme des cadets et de leur expérience dans le civil », dit-il. Toutefois, il n’y avait qu’un nombre restreint d’officiers purs du CIC à l’ERIC Centre au début. « En apparence, la plupart des postes étaient pourvus grâce au ‘réseau des anciens’ – du personnel du Royal Canadian Regiment, dont moi-même, dit le Capt Fleming. La situation commença à changer en 1983 lorsqu’un pur du CIC a été embauché à temps plein comme officier des ressources de l’école. Selon le Capt Fleming, le personnel à temps plein s’est occupé d’axer l’instruction sur les besoins des corps ou escadrons de cadets plutôt que sur ce qui est enseigné dans la

CADENCE

Numéro 17, Automne 2005


utilisaient les méthodes d’enseignement qui leur convenaient le mieux. Étant l’un des rares instructeurs bilingues, le Capt Mallette a donné des cours en français et en anglais – et une ou deux fois dans les deux langues en même temps. Il a donné des cours à tous les niveaux entre 1978 et 1993, tout en apportant son aide aux corps de cadets dans les régions où il résidait.

du CIC Force régulière et dans la Première réserve. Ces personnes ont dû apprendre – comme il l’a fait lui-même – que les officiers du CIC portaient le même uniforme, mais qu’ils n’avaient pas reçu toute l’instruction ni les connaissances militaires de base que les autres auraient reçues. Le premier commandant de l’école était particulièrement préoccupé par la perspective de voir enseigner aux officiers du CIC des matières qui leur permettraient de diriger, d’administrer et d’instruire les cadets de façon très poussée, plutôt que de les aider à devenir des marins, des soldats ou des aviateurs.

Les instructeurs n’avaient pas beaucoup d’orientation. Ils préparaient leur propre matériel pédagogique et utilisaient les méthodes qu’ils connaissaient le mieux. Les premiers cours Dans la Région de l’Est, lorsque le Capt Mallette a reçu le grade de capitaine en 1978, et pendant de nombreuses années par la suite, le cours CQC comprenait quatre sections de deux jours chacune : instruction, administration, approvisionnement et commandement. Après le rassemblement de fin de cours, il a été promu et on lui a demandé s’il voulait devenir instructeur à l’ERIC Est. Il a commencé par donner le cours QEO pour officiers dès le lendemain! À cette époque, les instructeurs géraient leurs propres cours à l’aide d’un plan de cours. Ils recevaient peu d’orientation, produisaient leur propre matériel didactique et

« Les cours QEO, CQLT et CQC ont subi de nombreux changements quant au format et à la méthodologie au fil des années », dit le Capt Mallette. « Depuis 1982, je pense qu’il y a eu au moins six refontes des cours d’instruction », ajoute le Capt Fleming. « À présent, les cours comprennent beaucoup plus de matière et nous nous attendons à recevoir, à mon avis, un produit CIC amélioré pour cette raison. » À un moment donné, la seule exposition aux éléments Mer, Terre et Air était l’unique section de deux jours du cours CQLT. Un autre facteur qui a changé est l’obligation de demeurer plus longtemps dans le grade et l’acquisition d’une plus grande expérience entre les cours. Normes pédagogiques Dans la Région de l’Est, on a vu au début des années 1980 l’apparition des premiers Guides pédagogiques qui offraient une orientation pédagogique plus précise. Certains considéraient cela comme une intrusion, dénuée de valeur, dans leurs propres styles pédagogiques, dit le Capt Mallette. « Pour mieux comprendre l’évolution de l’enseignement dans la Région de l’Est, il faut bien saisir la transformation de ces guides, qui n’étaient que de simples lignes directrices plutôt vagues, en un outil qui a permis d’instaurer des normes pédagogiques/d’apprentissage et une instruction de qualité, jusque-là insoupçonnées. » Jusqu’au début des années 1990, selon le Capt Mallette, la plupart des instructeurs de la Région de l’Est étaient de sexe masculin et provenaient de la force terrestre. À son avis, la « meilleure combinaison » dont nous disposons aujourd’hui permet d’offrir un programme d’instruction amélioré. À l’heure actuelle, un officier du CIC âgé de 33 ans donne presque exclusivement le cours CQC dans les deux langues, mais jamais au même moment. À son avis,

Perfectionnement professionnel pour les leaders du Programme des cadets

l’école utilise à présent les « meilleurs outils de contrôle de la qualité » qu’une organisation puisse produire. Évolution du matériel didactique Selon le Capt Mallette, l’un des grands défis à surmonter au cours des années a été la production de matériel didactique de qualité. « Le matériel didactique doit suivre l’évolution du message que l’on transmet », dit-il. « Cette faculté d’adaptation est possible de nos jours, grâce à Internet et à d’autres outils électroniques. » Selon le Capt Fleming, le matériel didactique lors des premiers cours d’instruction consistait notamment en un rétroprojecteur de 35 mm, un tableau noir et un tableau à feuilles volantes. « Lorsque j’ai commencé, je pense que le budget annuel consacré aux réparations et au nouveau matériel était d’environ 5 000 $ à 10 000 $ par année », dit-il. « Ces montants ont sensiblement augmenté. » Nous avons beaucoup progressé depuis que nous utilisions des lettres autocollantes et des diapositives pour les présentations. Le matériel didactique et graphique de l’époque exigeait un personnel doué d’un grand talent et d’un sens artistique. À présent, les ordinateurs et les images prédessinées permettent d’économiser de nombreuses heures de travail. » Importance d’une meilleure instruction CIC Le Capt Mallette est d’avis que les écoles d’instructeurs ont offert aux officiers une grande variété de services et de possibilités qui leur a permis d’améliorer la qualité du leadership exercé auprès des cadets. Grâce aux plus grandes attentes et à une meilleure instruction, le Capt Fleming a pu observer une remarquable amélioration chez les officiers du CIC ayant terminé leurs cours à l’ERIC Centre au cours des années. Un défi demeure, selon lui, et c’est celui de rendre les officiers du CIC fiers de ce qu’ils sont. « Ils sont des leaders/des guides pour les jeunes, mieux préparés que tout membre de la Force régulière ou de la Première réserve pour diriger, administrer et instruire les cadets. De ce fait, nous-mêmes tout comme eux avons toutes les raisons de nous montrer fiers. »

35


POINT DE VUE

par Terence Whitty

Point de vue de la Ligue des cadets de l’Armée au sujet du professionnalisme au CIC Lorsqu’on discute de professionnalisme au CIC, on a tendance à le faire en termes militaires – évaluation des attitudes personnelles, des états de service et de la capacité de diriger un corps ou un escadron de cadets. elon la Ligue des cadets de l’Armée, il est difficile de définir une norme en matière de professionnalisme. Bien que les opinions varient quant à la façon dont le professionnalisme pourrait être amélioré au CIC, il est important de considérer les deux facteurs qui exercent la plus grande influence sur la nature du travail des officiers au CIC. En premier lieu, le corps de cadets se compose de jeunes qui ne sont pas des membres des FC. En second lieu, la mise en œuvre du Programme des cadets est du ressort des FC.

S < Le Maj Dan Davies, officier du CIC et coordonnateur des échanges des cadets de l'Armée de terre, et Terence Whitty prennent le café au Centre d'instruction d'été des cadets Connaught à Ottawa en discutant des échanges internationaux.

Que vous ayez ou non de l’expérience militaire ou que vous ayez été nouvellement recruté, vous ne tarderez pas à constater le défi que représente la gestion d’un mouvement de jeunesse dans un contexte militaire. En ce qui concerne le premier aspect, les leaders du Programme des cadets doivent – avant toute chose – être sensibilisés à l’égard des jeunes. Tout le monde n’a pas ce genre de faculté. Dans le cas de certains militaires de carrière qui se sont impliqués, cette réalité les a obligés à changer radicalement la façon dont ils envisagent le travail. À la fin de chaque session, les cadets décident s’ils veulent ou non revenir, de sorte qu’il y a un effort permanent en vue de maximiser les ressources locales destinées à maintenir l’intérêt. En ce qui concerne le second aspect, la gestion du programme a été confiée aux FC parce qu’elles sont compétentes sur ce plan et qu’elles disposent des ressources nécessaires pour bien le faire. Toutefois, lorsqu’il s’agit du CIC, la structure de gestion longtemps éprouvée – c.-à-d. la relation entre les officiers commissionnés et les militaires du rang (MR) – prend un caractère ambigu. Il n’y a pratiquement pas de sous-officiers supérieurs qui participent au Programme des cadets. Ce

36

sont les officiers qui font tout et cela influe sur la perception externe du professionnalisme. Certains sous-officiers supérieurs sont enrôlés dans des unités de cadets; ils portent les insignes de leur grade et l’uniforme de leur unité d’origine et leur apport est d’une grande utilité pour leur corps de cadets. Leurs relations ont un effet magique sur les cadets et sur les corps de cadets. Les diverses qualifications personnelles des candidats au CIC influent également sur l’instruction que les FC donnent aux nouveaux enrôlés. Chaque individu doit développer son style personnel de professionnalisme militaire. Aucun cours ne peut entièrement préparer les anciens ou les nouveaux enrôlés à travailler avec des cadets adolescents. Une certaine forme d’encadrement pourrait convenir et c’est à ce niveau que les unités affiliées peuvent jouer un rôle de premier plan. Lorsque le corps de cadets se trouve à proximité d’une unité, l’encadrement peut s’avérer relativement facile. Dans les régions rurales, cela pourrait cependant présenter certains problèmes. En définitive, les officiers du CIC sont et demeurent des officiers commissionnés qui acceptent volontairement la mission que leur confie le Canada de « s’acquitter de leurs obligations avec diligence … de maintenir l’ordre et la discipline » – en d’autres termes, de diriger par l’exemple. Bien que les officiers du CIC doivent s’habituer à cette juxtaposition du militaire et du civil au sein du mouvement des cadets du Canada, ils finissent par atteindre ce qu’il y a de mieux dans les deux mondes. Ils obtiennent comme récompense la camaraderie, l’honneur et la satisfaction – de même que la distinction – de servir comme officiers des FC. M. Whitty est le directeur administratif de la Ligue des cadets de l’Armée.

CADENCE

Numéro 17, Automne 2005

2005 2  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you