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Aloha and Welcome To Our Pacific Cup Friends • • • •

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COMMODORES’ MESSAGES

Lou Ickler Commodore Pacific Cup Aloha Nui Loa The Pacific Cup Yacht Club welcomes you to the 2008 race. With the help of our finish line hosts, Kaneohe Yacht Club and the Storm Trysail Club, this has become one of the best ocean races in the world. I want to thank all of the volunteers for the many hours of effort they have put in and for their enthusiastic help in making Pacific Cup a wonderful event. For sailors making their first ocean passage this will be the adventure of a lifetime. Nothing else that I know of captures the sense of individual responsibility for you, your fellow crew members and the safety of the boat. You will remember this the rest of your life! The Pacific Cup is a great opportunity for anyone who has always wanted to sail on the ocean to race on a carefully prepared boat with the help of knowledgeable sailors, inspected by experts, and with other boats in a fleet. Having daily radio communications during the race and a safe harbor waiting in Hawaii adds even more attraction to the race. For those who are doing the race again, you know the fun and the occasional moments of terror – the stuff the sea stories are made of. The beauty of the ocean, the incredible starry skies on a clear night, and the long downwind runs under spinnaker make this an intoxicating event that keeps many sailors coming back to do the race again and again. For families and friends of the racers we welcome you to Kaneohe Yacht Club where over 300 volunteers make the after-race celebrations a delightful vacation in Paradise. If we can do anything to make your visit here more fun please ask. For me, this race marks more than 20 years of participation in Pacific Cup races, from the organization of the Pacific Cup Yacht Club in 1987 and sailing in 6 races, to being honored to be the Commodore for 2008. I hope many of you will join me in keeping Pacific Cup one of the great ocean races for many years to come. Please join the Pacific Cup Yacht Club, volunteer for one of the committees in San Francisco or in Kaneohe, and get into the race in 2010. This year we are being sponsored by Richmond Sailing Foundation, Weems & Plath, Bluewater Sailing Magazine, Svendsen’s Boat Yard, Keefe Kaplan Maritime Inc. , Passage Yachts, Mount Gay Rum, Marina Village Yacht Harbor, Pineapple Sails, California Maritime Academy, and West Marine. Please thank them and give them your support.

Aloha, and welcome to Kaneohe Yacht Club, and to beautiful Kaneohe Bay with the Koolau mountains in the background; what a wonderful place to kick back and unwind after a challenging race across the Pacific. Whether your desires are to sip Mai Tai’s at the bar, play some tennis, or just lounge around the pool, the members and staff will do all that they can to make you feel welcome and enjoy our Hawaiian hospitality. While your host committees have planned a full week of events to keep you in the Hawaiian spirit, you would be remiss if you did not take some time to explore Kaneohe Bay, spend a day at the “sand bar,” or just drive around the picturesque windward side of our island. Should you need directions or some suggestions for a day trip, just ask at the Pacific Cup information desk located in the lounge area and they will be more than willing to help. While our island is small, there is much to see and do, and if you are still looking for some excitement, a short drive over the mountain will have you in Waikiki in less than half an hour. And if you haven’t had enough sailing, join the KYC Bulkhead Fleet for an exciting Thursday night race on the bay. Sign up in advance and our race committee will get you a starting time. The Commodores, Board of Directors, members and staff of Kaneohe Yacht club wish you a safe and speedy crossing, our escort boats will be at the finish line to guide you thru the reefs to a safe mooring, a lei greeting and appropriate adult beverages for those who choose to partake. We also look forward to sharing your exciting sea stories from the 2008 Pacific Cup Yacht Race. Aloha, Commodore Tom Clark Kaneohe Yacht Club

PACIFIC CUP 2008 3


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4 PACIFIC CUP 2008

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SCHEDULE OF EVENTS PACIFIC CUP 2008 June 20, 2008 - Deadline for completion of entries. Final valid rating certificate must be sent by this date July 3, 2008 - Inspection Deadline. Any inspections after this date incur late scheduling fee. July 9, 2008 - Marina Village party at Marina Village, Alameda July 12, 2008 - Skipper’s Meeting. Last day to submit Skipper’s Certification. Last day to correct inspection deficiencies. Official BonVoyage Party at San Francisco Yacht Club July 14, 2008 - Earliest Race Start (slowest-rating yachts). KYC open for racers and supporters - dining and music. July 19, 2008 - Latest Race Start (fastest-rating yachts). July 27-28, 2008 - KYC Dinner (Reservations Suggested) July 29, 2008 - Jazz Party, KYC July 30, 2008 - KYC Luau Advance reservations required July 31, 2008 - Mt Gay Rum Party at KYC Advance reservations required August 1, 2008 - Awards Ceremony at KYC Advance reservations required

Table of Contents Commodores’ Messages.................................................................................................. 3 Schedule of Events ......................................................................................................... 5 Acknowledgements for Outstanding Volunteer Contributions ....................................... 6 Special Recognition ........................................................................................................ 7 The History of Pacific Cup (by Lou Ickler) .................................................................... 8 Trophies & Fun Prizes .................................................................................................... 11 Weather Routing (by Stan Honey) ................................................................................. 12 Passing the Addiction (by Abner Kingman & Sean Doyle) ............................................. 18 Entering Kaneohe Bay (by Lou Ickler)............................................................................ 20 Navigation Map ............................................................................................................. 22 Pacific Cup 2008 Yachts & Crew ................................................................................... 26 2006 West Marine Pacific Cup Results ........................................................................... 35 1980-2004 Winners ....................................................................................................... 38

PACIFIC CUP 2008 5


Acknowledgements for Outstanding Volunteer Contributions

PACIFIC CUP YACHT CLUB

PACIFIC CUP YACHT CLUB OFFICERS, CHARLIE ROSKOSZ, Staff Commodore; LOU ICKLER, Commodore;

JIM GREGORY, Vice Commodore; MICHAEL MORADZADEH, Rear Commodore; KATHY MCGRAW, Secretary; BOBBI TOSSE, Treasurer

PACIFIC CUP YACHT CLUB DIRECTORS, JIM ANTRIM, MARY LOVELY, BOB GRAY, TODD HEDIN, PAT LOWTHER, JACK MCGUIRE

BON VOYAGE PARTY,

PAT LOWTHER, TODD HEDIN

DATABASE & WEB, WALT NIEMCZURA, LISA NIEMCZURA, MARGO NIEMCZURA, MICHAEL MORADZADEH ENTRANT COMMUNICATIONS, BOBBI TOSSE, MARY LOVELY, JIM QUANCI, JIM GREGORY INSPECTIONS, SKIP ELY, Chair; ELLEN BUCCI, MATTHEW COALE, CHARLES CUNNINGHAM, DEAN DANIELS, CLIFF DONOHO, JEFF DUVALL, PETER ENGLISH, NED FLOHR, GREG GILLETTE, BOB GRAY, JIM GREGORY, CHUCK HAWLEY, PAUL KAMEN, JACK MCGUIRE, MICHAEL MORADZADEH, DAVID NOTTAGE, PEPE PARSONS, MICHAEL WOOD

MEMBERSHIP, KIM ICKLER NEWSLETTER,

MICHAEL MORADZADEH

SEMINARS, SALLY RICHARDS, Chair; PAT LOWTHER, KATHY MCGRAW, MICHAEL MORADZADEH, MEGAN DWYER, CHARLIE ARMS SPEAKERS, JIM ANTRIM, Antrim Design; RANDY PAULLING, SV Alicante; LIZ BAYLIS/TODD HEDIN, SV E.T.;

KENT BENEDICT, MD; STEVE CHAMBERLIN, SV Surprise; JIM CORENMAN, SV Heart of Gold; SUE CORENMAN, SV Heart of Gold; KAME & SALLY RICHARDS, Pineapple Sails; PAUL KAMEN, RON ROMAINE, Romaine Electronics; JIM QUANCI/MARY LOVELY, SV Green Buffalo; CHUCK HAWLEY, West Marine; KIM DESENBERG, KKMI Rigging

PROTEST COMMITTEE, JOE COCHRAN, PRO; MICHAEL ROTH, TOM POCHEREVA PUBLIC RELATIONS, RAY SWEENEY, PAT LOWTHER, KATIE HELSPER, BARBY MCGOWAN RACE COMMITTEE, BOB GRAY, PRO; BOBBI TOSSE, BETTY GRAY RACE GUIDE, MICHAEL ROTH, Chair; RAY PENDLETON, DRAKE CHINEN, LOUIS ICKLER RADIO COMMUNICATIONS, JACK MCGUIRE, Chair; MICHAEL MORADZADEH, Communicatons Boat; GORDON WEST, Technical Adviser

SHIPPING, SKIP ELY, JIM GREGORY STANDINGS PROGRAM & BOAT TRACKING, JOHN CLAUSER, JIM GREGORY STARTING LINE, BOB GRAY, Chair; DOUG ASCHE, MARSHA ASCHE, KATHY MCGRAW, BOBBI TOSSE, P.J.SAXTON TECHNICAL COMMITTEE, JIM ANTRIM, Chair; JIM GREGORY, PAUL KAMEN

KANEOHE YACHT CLUB

KANEOHE YACHT CLUB CO-CHAIRMEN, GEORGE LOSEY, FRED HARPER AWARDS CEREMONY, KIM ICKLER COMMUNICATIONS, VALERIE OSSIPOFF, Chair DECKHANDS, BETTY BIRDSONG-MCDOWELL, President ESCORT BOATS, RON DODINI, Chair EVENTS, JULIE LAPLANT HENDERSON, Chair FINISH LINE BUOY, AARON PHILLIPS, Chair; RUSSELL MCRAE FINISH LINE, LYNDA JONES, Chair GREETINGS, TAIMI SMALL, Chair INFORMATION DESK, BECKY DODINI, Chair INSPECTIONS, DAVID NOTTAGE, Chair

6 PACIFIC CUP 2008


MOORING, RYAN ARFMAN, Chair PERMITS, IWALANI STONE, Chair STAFF DUTY OFFICER, BOB HURD, Chair

MAHALO

The Pacific Cup Yacht Club Board of Directors thanks the Berkeley Yacht All PCYC board meetings, most seminars, and gatherings are held at BYC.

Club for serving as the home of PCYC.

The PCYC also wishes to express our thanks to the board, members and staff of Kaneohe Yacht Club, including over 300 tireless and enthusiastic volunteers, for their time and effort in serving as the Finish Line host. They are our unsung heroes. A heartfelt thank you to division winners.

Weems & Plath, who generously made available the beautiful clocks presented to the

Thanks to this year’s communications boat, Valis, and its able backup, Acacia safety of our entrants and the peace of mind of their loved ones on shore.

Communications are vital to the

Special thanks go to the US Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco for their Helicopter SAR demonstration, and to the California Maritime Academy, Seattle Yacht Club, and Strictly Sail California for hosting Safety At Sea seminars. Out-of-area entrants are once again welcome at Marina Harbormaster Alan Weaver.

Village Yacht Harbor thanks to the special efforts of

The race could not exist without a starting and finishing line. Thanks to St. Francis Yacht Club for making available their superb race deck for the starts and to Kaneohe Marine Corps Base Hawaii for providing the finish line tower and general assistance. Capturing the fun of the Pacific Cup in this Race Guide would not be the same without the thoughtful submissions of casual race photos taken by the participants and members of the sailing media. Latitude 38 has long been a strong supporter of the FUN race to Hawaii. This year again they provided the Latitude 38 Performance award.

The 2008 Pacific Cup Race Guide is published for Pacific Cup Yacht Club by: Roth Communications 2040 Alewa Drive Honolulu, HI 96817 Ph: 808-595-4124 Fax: 808-595-5087 Email: rothcomm@lava.net Publisher ........................................................................................................................ Michael J. Roth Editor ............................................................................................................................. Ray Pendleton Contributing Writers ...................................................................................................... Stan Honey, Louis Ickler, Sean Doyle, Abner Kingman Contributing Photographers........................................................................................... Mariah’s Eye Photography, Leslie Richter, ................................................................................................................................... SFBAY IMAGES Sandra Cannon, ................................................................................................................................... Sean and Justin Doyle Print Consultant ............................................................................................................ Pat Meara Designer ......................................................................................................................... Goofyfoot Graphics On the Cover: Jim Dewitt original painting commissioned for Pacific Cup 2008. Cover insert photos. Left: Photo by Leslie Richter. Div. E start. Middle: Photo by Jim Gregory, Morpheus crew sailing 2006 Pacific Cup Right: Photo by Lisa Niemczura. Crew of Lightning receiving first Division and first overall trophy.

Special Recognition

MCBH LIAISON, MICHAEL OLSON


The Pacific Cup was born January 1979, after a meeting of the membership at the Ballena Bay Yacht Club. Hal Nelson approached Commodore Vytas Pazemenas with the idea of starting a low-key, fun race for fullycrewed boats from San Francisco to Hawaii. The first single-handed race to Hawaii had just been successfully completed the previous summer and the club had a nucleus of members interested in ocean racing, so the timing appeared right. Berthing space in Oahu appeared to be unavailable, Maui already had the Victoria-Maui race finishing at Lahaina, and Hanalei Bay on Kauai could not handle a large number of boats. The best compromise appeared to be Nawiliwili on the southeast corner of Kauai, and with the support of a small but enthusiastic group of volunteers from the Nawiliwili Yacht Club a finish line was found. It was a small group of six, who put the race together originally, but interest increased rapidly and more volunteers showed up. The first Pacific Cup started on June 15, 1980 with 40 yachts. In one of the roughest races to Hawaii, only 32 of the boats finished. The three Santana 35s in the race all had damage to their rudders during the first several days. Friendship was picked up by a Navy ship and Raccoon Straights returned to San Francisco with water pouring in a cracked rudder bearing, leaving Wild Hair the only Santana to finish in Hawaii. The 63-foot yawl Corsair retired from the race and was lost on a shoal on her way back. After the rough weather of the first few days, the winds diminished and only Merlin, the 67-foot Lee Custom, had the speed to outrun the high-pressure area, which moved down on the rest of the fleet. She reached Nawiliwili more than four days ahead of the rest of the fleet, to win first-tofinish as well as first-on-corrected-timing. In 1982, the competition intensified among the big boats, although the number of boats racing under the International Ocean Racing (IOR) rule had declined to eight boats from 13 in 1980. Merlin was there again and beat her previous record by 1 hour and 8 PACIFIC CUP 2008

28 minutes in elapsed time but was only able to place sixth on corrected time. The race was won by Temptress, a Swede 55, in the PHRF division and overall, with Zamazaan winning the IOR division. In 1984 Merlin again beat her old record and set a new record in elapsed time for the Pacific Cup of 9 days, 7 hours and 49 minutes. The winners on corrected time were Surefire in the IOR division and Magic Carpet in PHRF. In the newly added doublehanded division, Light’n Up won, arriving only six hours behind Magic Carpet. In 1986 Merlin again set a new elapsed time record of 8 days, 14 hours, 53 minutes, followed by Swiftsure III only 40 minutes later, and Charley less than 6 hours later. Magic Carpet won on corrected time in 11 days, 9 hours while Ghost, a Morgan 38, limped in with Lou Ickler and Randy Broman having had their first adventure on the open ocean, including a broken spinnaker pole and a rudder bent by hitting a 55 gallon drum of hydraulic oil. Sweet Okole won the IOR division. By the end of the 1986 race the Pacific Cup was well established as a race. The attraction of the Pacific Cup as a race for cruisers as well as racers, and as the only offshore race out of San Francisco, made it increasingly popular. The Ballena Bay Yacht Club was finding it more difficult to administer what was turning into a major event with volunteer help - especially in a club with a number of competing activities. The 1986 race had taxed the facilities of the Nawiliwili harbor and a number of sailors had begun to talk about some other finishing point in Hawaii. It began to look as if the race might fade away unless someone could organize a committed group to keep it going. At this point George Barrett got involved, and on August 4, 1987, he assembled a number of sailors, including the author of this article, in an organizational meeting at the St. Francis Yacht Club in San Francisco. With the support of some leading participants from prior races and the Ballena Bay Yacht Club, he drafted the Articles of Incorporation for a new club. The Pacific Cup

Yacht Club, whose function would be to take over the organization of the race, was born. One of the first items of business was the choice of a new finishing line. Talks with Kaneohe Yacht Club, one of the three principal clubs on Oahu that had handled the finish of the Transpac race from Los Angeles, led to the important and happy choice of Kaneohe as the new finishing line. George R. Barrett had sailed the race as the chartering skipper of Charley, a Holland 67, which won third place in 1986. Although he looked forward eagerly to doing the 1988 race, his health began to deteriorate and when the boat he wanted to charter was committed to another race, he ran the race from the shore. He ran it well. It was George that made the 1988 race the first with a major sponsor, West Marine Products, the first to be governed by a yacht club set up solely for the purpose of running this race, and the first to have Kaneohe Bay as a destination. George died in the fall of 1988, but the Pacific Cup continues as a living memorial to him. In 1988 winds were lighter than usual at 15 to 22 knots, and the seas were smooth. With the Pacific high pressure stretched out in an east-west oval, boats that started out on the rhumb line soon began to fear that they were too close to the high, and by fourth day most boats had turned more to the south. The winner on corrected time was Saraband, a Westsail 32 that had sailed a consistent pace for 14 days, 17 hours elapsed time, an amazing feat in relatively light winds. Second and third places went to the veteran boats Wild Goose and Magic Carpet, while Kathmandu took first in IOR after her competition got caught too far north and suffered from light winds. The 1990 race had generally nice conditions except for light wind the first few days. This race had a number of firsts, such as staggered starts over a four-day period and a record number of entries that peaked at 53 with 45 actually crossing the starting line. The idea of using staggered starts was to have most of the fleet sailing in the same weather con-


ditions and for all entrants to finish within a few days of each other. Hopefully this would result in a fairer, closer, and more fun race. All in all, the new format was a great success. Most entrants finished within three days of each other, and the first five boats overall represented all four crewed classes. In fact, the first three boats overall represented a complete range of sailboat types with first being an ultralight, second a medium displacement racer-cruiser, and third a heavy displacement cruiser. The first three boats overall in order of finish were Oaxaca (Santa Cruz 50), Heart of Gold (Schumacher 50) and Saraband (Westsail 32). The 1992 race continued to grow: 46 boats starting and 43 finishing. The first start was windy and the next starts were very slow. Overall, the race was relatively fast. It proved to be a rhumb line race because the high was quite far north. Some boats successfully chose a great circle route. The two largest boats in the race (ultralight 70’s) were doublehanded. The smallest boat in the fleet, Team Bonzi, a Moore 24, did a sweep, taking both the doublehanded and the Pacific Cup trophy. Fleet second place went to Ghost, a Morgan 38 from Kaneohe. The 1994 race saw records fall. First, an alltime high of 58 boats participated. Second, 52 finished, and third, Steve Rander’s Rage broke Merlin’s long standing elapsed time record of 8 days, 11 hours and 1 minute by finishing it in 8 days, 7 hours and 13 minutes. Probably another first was a proposal of marriage during one morning’s roll call. The small boats dominated the corrected time standings, with Bill and Melinda Erkelen’s home-built

Dogpatch 26, Moonshine, winning overall, Division B and the Double-handed class. Chimera, an Express 27, took second and the Olson 25, Siva, took third in the fleet.

Wildflower, proving that experience (over 25 ocean passages) does count, not only won the double-handed division but also came in first overall.

The starting conditions for the 1996 Pacific Cup were a repeat of 1992. The first day saw the boats blasting away from the coast, while the next three divisions were wondering if they would ever make it past the Farallones. Conditions were right for Rage, which broke her own record of 8 days, 7 hours set in 1994 with a new record of 7 days 22 hours. Not only did the speed record fall, a record 60 boats made it to Kaneohe. Among them was Illusion, a tried-and-true Californiato-Hawaii veteran Cal 40, sailed by Stan Honey and Sally Lindsay, who captured the overall corrected time honors and led a double-handed sweep of the fleet. The Moore 24 Kangaroo Court took second overall, followed by the Custom 27 Wildflower. In 1998 the speed record was demolished by Roy Disney’s boat Pyewacket as she took more than a full day off the record, finishing in 6 days, 14 hours, and 23 minutes. Pacific Cup veteran Bob Nance won first overall on handicap in Water Pik.

In 2004 the start was more nerve racking. The day before the first start the weather service issued gale warnings for the area of the Farallones, which proved overly pessimistic. The race was marked by uneventful weather after that, with the high filling in after the first two days, and making it a slow race. The overall winner was Winnetou, Division A was won by Ghost, the author’s Morgan 38 (18 years after her first Pacific Cup race) and Eyrie won doublehanded with an elapsed time of 14 days and 4 hours.

The 2000 race was slow – so slow that several boats floated around the Farallones for three days in the early part of the race and 27 of the 80 boats entered did not finish within the time limit. The winner was Octavia, a Santa Cruz 50, with a remarkable elapsed time of 10 days, 12 ½ hours. In 2002 the race was in more normal weather, with almost all the boats finishing within a few days of each other. Skip Allan on

In 2006 the race was a slow one again. The position of the high, and to where it was moving, made it a guessing game. Most boats tried a course close to the rhumb line, but after the first few days changed their minds and tried to go south. It took 9 to 12 days for most of the boats to finish, and after 15 days there were still 9 boats that had not finished. First place went to Lightning, with an elapsed time of 9 days, 3 hours, 5 minutes. ET, with a resident naval architect on board, was second. In a tribute to the handicappers, four of the five crewed divisions had a boat in the top ten finishers. California Girl won the prize for the first boat to sail the one million miles of Pacific Cup. It’s still too early to guess the weather for 2008, but a look at the list of entries makes it clear that from small to mega boats, and from heavy cruisers to sleds, this will be another great race with something for every entrant. Truly “THE FUN RACE TO HAWAII.”

Photo By: Leslie Richter, Rockskipper Photography PACIFIC CUP 2008 9


Photo by Billy Black

FLASH THEM SOMETHING VIVID TO REMEMBER. DO IT WITH VIVID, THE HARD ABLATIVE ANTIFOULING THAT COMES IN 24 BRIGHT COLORS PLUS THE WHITEST WHITE AND THE BLACKEST BLACK. BURNISH IT TO A HARD, FAST RACING FINISH AND NOT ONLY WILL YOU FLY PAST THEM, YOU’LL GIVE THEM A FLEETING YET MEMORABLE GLIMPSE OF YOUR WILD SIDE.

w w w. p e t t i t p a i n t . c o m

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Sailors of all skill levels sailing boats large and small participate in this major ocean race. Each sailor, whether they win a major trophy or not, is a winner. This “can do” attitude helps make the Pacific Cup the “Fun Race to Hawaii.” This year’s awards will be presented during the Awards Ceremonies at Kaneohe Yacht Club on August 1, 2008. The Pacific Cup is a bronze cup awarded to first place on corrected time among all PCR rating divisions. The 2006 recipient was Lightning, a Santa Cruz 52 skippered by Tom Akin. Past winners exemplify the diversity of the West Marine Pacific Cup fleet, from a double-handed 24 foot boat to fully-crewed cruisers and “fast-is-fun” surfers. 2006 Lightning, Santa Cruxz 52, Tom Akin 2004 Winnetou, Santa Cruxz 52, Martin Brauns 2002 Wildflower, Wylie Custom 27, Skip Allan & Tad Palmet 2000 Octavia, Santa Cruz 50, Shepard Kett 1998 Waterpik, Newport 30, Robert Nance 1996 Illusion, Cal 40, Sally Lindsay & Stan Honey 1994 Moonshine, Dogpatch 26, Bill & Melinda Erkelens 1992 Team Bonzi, Moore 24, Frank Ansak & Jim Quanci 1990 Oaxaca, Santa Cruz 50, Jim Ryley 1988 Saraband, Westsail 32, David King For each division, first, second and third place trophies are awarded.

The Fastest Passage Trophy is a perpetual trophy awarded for the shortest elapsed time without time allowance. For many years it was a Steuben glass sculpture. Unfortunately, the sculpture was broken in 2004, the year that Mari- Cha IV set a new elapsed time record. The new trophy is an etching on glass featuring a boat surfing a Pacific swell. 2006 Lightning 2004 Mari Cha IV 2002 Zephrus V 2000 Pegasus 1998 Pyewacket 1996 Rage 1994 Rage 1992 Mongoose

1990 Heart of Gold 1988 Kathmandu San Francisco to Kauai: 1986 Swiftsure lll 1984 Merlin 1982 Merlin 1980 Merlin

The Record Passage Trophy is a half-model of Merlin. It is awarded as a perpetual trophy for the fastest passage on record from San Francisco to Hawaii. The time to beat is Mari-Cha IV’s 5 days, 5 hours, 38 minutes and 10 seconds set in 2004 by Robert Miller. The Henri-Lloyd Pacific Cup Navigator’s Trophy is presented to the navigator that demonstrates the highest level of skill at the art of navigation by classical and modern methods. The winner is chosen based on logs and charts, submitted to the race committee, as well as on the finish position of the boat. The trophy is a Wempe Marine-Quartz Chronometer, mounted in a mahogany box. In, received this award. Prior winners were: 2006 2004 2002 2000

Cayenne, Spencer Fulweiler Punahele, Robert Stege Sonata, Doug Mahone Elan, Paul Kamen

1998 1996 1994 1992

The George R. Barrett Memorial Trophy is a teak sailboat awarded by the PCYC Commodore to an individual who exhibits outstanding seamanship as well as distinguished service, dedication and enthusiasm for the West Marine Pacific Cup race. George is remembered for his leadership in organizing the Pacific Cup Yacht Club, establishing sponsorship with West Marine, and establishing Kaneohe Bay as the finish destination. 2006 2004 2002 2000 1998 1996 1992 1990 1998

Jim Antrim Sue and Jim Corenman Lucie Van Breen, PCYC Chuck Cunningham, PCYC Bobbi Tosse, Bodacious Jim Quanci, Miramar Stan Honey, Mongoose Ned Flohr, Tin Man Ralph Wilson, Alpha

The Doug Vann Memorial Trophy, five silver dolphins leaping over a cresting sea, is awarded to an individual selected by Kaneohe Yacht Club who, through their enthusiasm and dedication, best exemplifies the spirit of the “Fun Race to Hawaii.” The 2006 recipients were Cheryl Hunt and Taimi Small. The 2004 recipients were Marcie Fleming and Genie Simeona. The 2002 recipient was Iwalani Stone. Honey and Kimo Corstorphine were the first recipients in 2000. The First Hawaiian Boat to Finish Trophy is a 3 foot high carved wooden statue of King Kamehameha. It is awarded to the first boat to finish on corrected time, skippered by a resident of Hawaii. It was presented for the first time in 2004 when the winner was Tony Miller on Ikaika. In 2006 the trophy was won by Dan Doyle on 2 Guys on the Edge. The Carl Schumacher Trophy is awarded to the first Carl Schumacher designed boat to finish on corrected time. In 2006 the winner was Jim Gregory on Morpheus. Additional trophies include: • The Latitude 38 Performance Trophy to the boat with the most convincing win relative to its own division • A Multihull Trophy to the first multihull to finish on corrected time • Storm Trysail’s Team Trophy. This is a trophy to be awarded to the team of three boats from the same yacht club with the best combined performance. The skipper or on-board owner must be a member of the club. • Blue Water Sailing’s Fastest Family Prize. This goes to the family effort with the best corrected time. There must be at least three related people on board, or two if double-handed.

Fun Prizes: For each boat, a prize is awarded for notable performance in one of a variety of special categories, some just for fun and some for serious accomplishments during the race. These prizes are announced at the Awards Ceremony.

Grey Eagle, Robert Woodford Sonata, Bill Myers Different Worlds, Craig Walker Ta Mana, David Sapiane PACIFIC CUP 2008 11


By Stan Honey Stan Honey has navigated in twentyone transpacific races, finishing first nine times. As navigator, Stan has set the single-handed, double-handed, and fully-crewed passage records for monohulls to Hawaii. In 1996, Stan and Sally (Lindsay Honey) won the Pacific Cup overall, sailing their Cal 40 Illusion doublehanded. Stan was the navigator on ABN AMRO ONE, which won the 2005-2006 Volvo Ocean Race around the world. Overall race structure and necessary decisions The primary feature that determines the tactics in a transpacific race is the Pacific High. Typically there is no wind in the center of the high, and increasing wind as you get farther south, up to a limit. The central question concerning course selection is: how close to sail to the high, or how many extra miles to sail to get farther from the high? In years when the Pacific High is weak (or weakening) and positioned well south, there can be strikingly more wind to the south. There have been transpacific races where yachts that are 10 miles to the south of competitors can experience one knot more wind. An ultra-light-displacement-maxi (sled), in one knot more wind will sail 1/2 knot faster, and therefore would gain 12 miles per day on the northern competitor. Smaller uldb’s will similarly gain from the additional wind. Although the gain is less for heavier boats, it is still a significant factor. This condition can persist for the entire middle third of the race. Note that all yachts in this middle third of the race are nearly fetching the finish on starboard pole, so the boats caught too far north cannot jibe out of their predicament without sailing a dramatically unfavored angle, and passing far astern of the competitors to the south. Occasionally, however, the Pacific High will be strong (or strengthening), and located far to the north. In these conditions, it IS possible to be too far south. The boats that sail closer to the high will not only get more wind, but will sail the shorter distance. Typically in these sorts of years, the wind stays “reachy” throughout the middle third of the race, so the boats that paid extra distance to get south cannot even “cash in” the southing and reach up in front of the northern boats, because everyone is reaching fast. The start and exit from the Bay Get a comfortable start. It is senseless to risk a foul or collision at the start of a 2000 mile race, so consider starting 15 to 30 seconds late. The start is generally scheduled for an ebb tide, so this discussion will make that assumption. Tack shortly after the start, and take long tacks across the center of the bay in order to stay in the favorable current. Pass under the bridge at mid-span. After clearing Seal Rocks the wind velocity will reduce and the wind will begin to veer. As you free your sheets you need to work out your overall race tactics; the course that you select for the first night and the next day will determine your tactics for the rest of the race.

12 PACIFIC CUP 2008

The three portions of the Pacific Cup: It is helpful to think of the Pacific Cup in three sections: 1. The windy reach to the ridge 2. “Slotcars” through the middle third; and 3. The run for the last third… The Pacific High nearly always has a ridge extending from its southeast corner. On the weather map this is visible as a “U” shape in the isobars on the southeast corner of the high. After leaving coastal waters, you will have a windy reach for a couple of days, depending on your yacht’s speed, but when you get to the ridge, the wind will lighten and veer very quickly. Within 6 hours after you initially set the spinnaker, the wind will lift and you will be running on your downwind polars in much lighter air. You just crossed the ridge. The most critical decision of the Pacific Cup is where to cross the ridge. The reason this is critical is, once you get to the ridge and the wind comes back, you can not get farther south. It never pays to sail lower than your polars, and you can not jibe (onto the dramatically unfavored port pole) without huge penalty. That is why the middle third of the race is called “slotcars.” As you left the coast you made your decision where you wanted to cross the ridge, you sailed there, and now you have to live with it for four or five days. If you are too far to the north, you will be slowly destroyed by the yachts to the south of you, and there is nothing that you can do about it; you cannot jibe (without huge penalty), and you should not sail lower than your polars. If you are substantially too far north, you will experience torture. As the wind gets lighter, your polars force you to sail higher and higher, until you “spin out” up into the high. If you have to jibe to avoid total calm, your angle on port pole will have you heading due south, far behind your competitor’s transoms. The “slotcars” leg ends when the wind eventually veers far enough so that both jibes are symmetrical around the course to the finish, allowing you to sail either jibe. The final third of the race is “the run.” This is why we sail Pacific Cups. The wind picks up as you approach the Islands, and you get to practice your helmsmanship surfing tradewind swells. Generally the right hand side of the course is favored in the final third of the race, because the wind slowly veers as you sail west. In the final third of the race the wind speed is generally even across the course. Oddly, the boats that get too far north in the middle of the race, and stew about it for 3-4 days, often jibe onto port as soon as they can, sailing to the south when there is no longer a wind speed advantage. These boats then miss the right shift in the last third of the race and lose even more. Instead, favor starboard pole until you can nearly lay the Islands, and then approach Oahu on port pole. Be sure to account for the fact that the wind will continue to veer, and do not overstand Kaneohe. One way to avoid overstanding is to plot a waypoint that is 60-100 miles directly upwind of the finish and jibe onto port pole when you can lay that waypoint. The wind will continue to shift to the right, so that when you actually cross the line that is upwind of the finish you may find that you are substantially closer to Kaneohe than your initial waypoint.


Approaching the Finish Arrange your final jibe or two so that you pass 10 miles due upwind of the finish. Then sail half the remaining distance on starboard pole, and then make your final 5 mile approach on port pole. As you approach the finish, plot your track on the chart, and take GPS fixes as well as periodic bearings with your hand bearing compass. The finish buoy is hard to see. The best technique is to plot your position and navigate to the finish, rather than expect to see the buoy. It’s not even worth looking for the buoy until you navigate to within about one half mile of it. In the daytime, take bearings on: 1. Mokapu (the turtle’s head) 2. The giant ping pong balls near Pyramid Rock (labeled “radomes” on chart) 3. Makapuu (the left edge of Oahu) 4. Pyramid Rock (white house with diagonal stripes on conical rock) At night, take bearings on: 1. Molokai light, range 28 miles, loom visible 60 miles (flashing 10s) 2. Makapuu light (occulting 10s) 3. Marine AeroBeacon, sometimes obscured (alt green/white or red/white) 4. Pyramid Light (occulting 4s, if you don’t know what “occulting” means then refresh your coastal piloting skills) Remember that the reef is only 0.8 miles beyond the finish line, so douse your spinnaker promptly. If for some reason you have trouble dousing your spinnaker, jibe onto starboard and sheet your mainsail hard. If you can maintain a beam reach, even with the kite flogging in the rigging, you will stay clear of the reef.

Squalls Typically, you will get tradewind squalls for the last three or four nights of the race. They only occur at night, starting about midnight and continuing and strengthening until dawn. If there is a moon, the squalls are visible for miles because of their incredible height. If there is no moon, you can often detect squalls behind you by watching for the absence of stars. If you have radar, squalls are easily detectable. Each squall on a given night will behave almost exactly like its predecessor, except it will be a little stronger. So “go to school” on each squall in order to sort out how to best take advantage of the next one. If one squall provided more fun than you really wanted, douse the kite and wing out a jib for the next one. If a squall is approaching, and you get rain before the wind, prepare for lots of wind. At dawn the squalls vanish, but leave calm zones around and particularly behind them. These calm zones are worth taking great care to avoid. The comments below assume normal right shifting squalls. Occasionally there will be a night of squalls with no wind shifts in them, or even with left shifts. The following characterizations are very typical, but the best prediction of what you will experience in a squall is the experience you had in the previous squall the same night. In contrast to popular perception, squalls do not generally work the way “catspaws” do. Catspaws have diverging wind in front of them. Surprisingly, tradewind squalls often have converging winds at their leading edge. The wind converges because there is an updraft in front of the squall. In addition, the average wind in the squall is generally veered about 15 degrees or so to the right of the prevailing surface wind, and the squall itself moves about 15 degrees to the right of the path of the surface wind. Behind squalls the wind Continues on p. 15 is light, particularly near dawn.

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14 PACIFIC CUP 2008


If you want to race aggressively, watch for squalls and jibe to get in front of them. As they overtake you, jibe to port pole. Stay on port pole during the squall, sailing as deep as you dare, and then jibe back to starboard only when the squall has passed completely over you and your wind speed and angle have returned to the prevailing conditions. If you jibe back to starboard pole too early, you run the risk of crossing behind the squall and getting into the light air in the wake of the squall. If you have the good fortune to be sailing on a sled, you can sail fast enough to stay in the accelerated wind in front of the squall for hours. This requires jibing back and forth in front of the squall, jibing about every 15 minutes. Each jibe “back” towards the squall will be at a horrible angle, because of the way that the wind “toes in” in front of the squall, but jibe back anyway. The additional wind velocity in front of the squall makes up for the horrible angle. If you are racing aggressively, you will jibe over 50 times in a Pacific Cup, with most jibes taking place at night in squalls. Port pole is more effective to avoid the calm behind a squall because the squall itself is moving to the right of the path of the surface wind, so port pole allows you to diverge rapidly from the light air area behind the squall. It is perilous to exit a squall on starboard pole because of the risk of getting becalmed behind the squall, particularly near dawn.

colleges have Meteorology courses. The next best sources of data are the surface analysis and surface progs which are also available via weatherfax. Satellite imagery via NOAA APT satellites is fun, but not really essential for a race in the tradewinds. Save this system for use in middle and high latitudes where there are lows and cold fronts to observe.

Weather Information The best source of information about the future position and strength of the high comes from the 500 mb progs via weatherfax. Interpreting upper level charts is beyond the scope of this article, but various

Finally Pick your strategy, and stick to it. Then whatever happens, make up your story for the bar in Kaneohe, and stick to it.

Author’s Disclaimers All of the above comments are relevant to typical Pacific Cups. There are unusual races in which you have to break the above rules to win. Pay attention to your boat’s polars. If you are racing a light displacement boat, it is worth sailing extra miles to get extra wind, because no matter how hard it blows, a light boat will sail still faster if you get more wind. On the other hand, if you are racing a heavy displacement boat, do not sail any extra miles in order to get more wind than necessary to reach hull speed. If you sail farther to get more wind, you will have more fun, but your average speed will not increase enough to pay for the extra distance. Watch for tropical depressions. The inverted troughs that extend north of a tropical depression can cause the tradewind direction to shift from normal. This can make a huge difference as you are picking your approach to the Islands.

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How would you prepare two teenagers for a 2,070-mile ocean race? The kids are both accomplished dinghy sailors, and have done a fair bit of inshore keelboat racing, but neither has ever sailed beyond the sight of land or spent a night at sea. You might try running into their rooms every hour, night after night, shouting rapid-fire commands and dousing them with water. Or having them subsist on nothing but peanut butter, Top Ramen, and warm water for a week. Or building an outhouse on springs with a 30-degree tilt and kicking it every time they try to go to the bathroom. Or blindfolding them and ask them to drive down a bumpy country road. All of it would be inadequate, however. There really is no way to prepare someone for offshore racing. The experience is entirely unique. You just have to do it. So this year Dan Doyle, a veteran of five doublehanded races from California to Hawaii, entered his 1D35 2 Guys on the Edge in the 2006 West Marine Pacific Cup with the intention of introducing his sons Sean, 18, and Justin, 17, to offshore racing. He shipped the boat from their home on Oahu to San Francisco in early June, and let the boys’ imaginations work overtime for a month until the start. While Sean and Justin knew 2 Guys well from sailing inshore races near home in Hawaii, most of the offshore preparations including weather routing, installing a watermaker, and stowing two weeks worth of food were totally new. The boys just kept their mouths shut while the old hands did the work. Bruce Burgess, Dan’s longtime sailing partner and the other “guy on the edge” for whom the boat is named, rode to San Francisco from the Sierra Nevada foothills on his Harley for a few days of practice before the start and dispensed some of his experience, but as Justin says, “There were still parts that I wasn’t expecting.” Dan, Sean, and Justin completed the race in 10 days, 20 hours, 50 minutes, 34 seconds, finishing seventh of eight in their division and smack in the middle of the 42-boat fleet. By the end, the boys were either going to love it or hate it. In this case, despite the fact they hadn’t slept more than an hour at a stretch the whole time, had been living in a cabin not much bigger (or better equipped) than a tent, and had subsisted on freeze-dried food, some of which tasted “kind of like vomit,” they were both ready to do it again. “I wasn’t really ready for the sleep deprivation aspect of it,” Sean says. “After the first two nights I was like, ‘Wow, I am so exhausted.’ But as we got closer I wanted to stay on watch longer. And at the end I just wanted to keep going.” In fact, Sean was so taken by the experience, he is formulating a plan to sail the Transpac from Los Angeles to Hawaii next year. He’s hoping to charter his father’s old boat, a Sonoma 30, and sail 18 PACIFIC CUP 2008

the race doublehanded with another teenage friend. To find out what hooked him so securely we had Sean provide a few excerpts from his race journal. SECOND NIGHT of the race, and I’m starting to wonder what I’ve got myself into. It’s freezing cold, and I’m taking a wave to the face every 10 minutes. There is nothing worse than crawling out of your warm bunk and into a pair of wet foulies. The waves are off our quarter, which is making for some fun reaching, but we’ve also had our fair share of broaches tonight. The moon hasn’t come out yet, and it’s frustrating when a bigger wave sneaks up on you in the dark and spins you out. We’ve been eating Pop Tarts and energy bars for the past day, and that’s getting old quickly. Everyone is too exhausted to cook freezedried food. An upside is that we’re doing 10-plus knots with the No. 4 jib up. Justin and I are sharing a two-hour watch schedule, alternating with my dad during the night. We just talked about pushing a little more north of where we’ve been heading. Our weather guy told us to go hard south because the Pacific High is so close to the coast, but after only one day and no way to receive further weather – as our computer won’t sync with the SSB – we are the southern-most boat in the fleet. You can tell we are still pretty close to the coast and some shipping lanes as we have passed by a good number of container ships close enough to wave to the guys on the bridge. You get so zoned in on your sailing; sometimes you don’t notice the ships until you are a half-mile away. DAY 3, 4 p.m., and the brand new symmetric kite just went back up. The rudder was acting non-responsive a half-hour ago and Justin saw what he thought to be kelp on the keel. We took down the kite and tried to back down to clear the kelp. No luck. So I volunteered


to dive over and clear the keel. I put on my board shorts and jumped in to find a fishing net about 40 feet long. I took the sharpest knife on the boat over with me, and cut the net away; it was wrapped very tightly around the prop. I had difficulty swimming in water so cold – it was hard to breath. I tried to bargain an extra hour of sleep for being the guy who jumped over the side, but Dad and Justin are too tired to even consider it. The sun is out, but the air is cold, it chills you down to your bones. It feels good to finally drive under the kite and dry the boat out. We had a good few hours of reaching, doing about 13 to 18 knots. We’re hoping to increase our position on the fleet. IT’S DAY 5 and the halfway party is later this afternoon. It feels lonely out here but the flying fish and the occasional boat sightings keep us sane. We’ve all settled into our new sleep pattern of one hour on and two off shifts. My dad finally got the computer to interface with the SSB radio and we can now receive weather maps from NOAA, but our strategy is already determined as we’re positioned farthest north in our fleet – exactly where we don’t want to be. We set out two lures last night and when we woke up this morning we pulled them both in to find the lure and about two feet of the leader line eaten. We think we caught a tuna and it was eaten by something higher up the food chain. I dropped the last lure and hand line in the water as I was retying it onto a winch. My dad and my brother are giving me a hard time about it. I’m buying everyone a nice fish dinner when we get back in.

WE BLEW UP our new kite tonight (Day 6). I ran up on deck and it was in tatters. It was only blowing about 15 knots. We put up the other big symmetric kite, and we’re underway again after a 30minute, middle-of-the-night sail change. We’re pretty far back in our fleet, so we’re pushing hard on every wave. The squalls started tonight too. Not too much extra wind, but a good amount of rain. Still got to keep the foulies on at night. ANOTHER 2 a.m. fiasco on Day 7. The spinnaker guy blew up in a squall and the spinnaker wrapped around the forestay. It was quite windy, but the jaws of the spinnaker pole are sharp and chafed through the guy. It took us 45 minutes to sort everything out. If you are off watch when something goes wrong, you have to jump out of your bunk and come up on deck ASAP. There is no time to even put on your jacket. You are still half asleep, and if there is no moon out, you get vertigo. Everything is black and if you go up to the foredeck, you have to be really careful because you are still so tired that losing your balance on one wave can mean going overboard. We should have been checking the chafe on the guy. Crew morale is a bit low as our position is only worsening and bad things have happened the past two nights. The wind has been under 10 knots and the only fun driving is in the squalls. IT’S DAY 8 and we’re into shorts and t-shirts. It’s so hot during the days you can’t sleep. There is no ventilation in the back bunk, and I never look forward to crawling back there on my off watch. There isn’t much wind and we’re trying to make the best of our position. Continued on p. 23

PACIFIC CUP 2008 19


Three very important points to begin with: • You should have, and should review, Kaneohe Bay Chart No. 19359, 13th Edition, dated 7/1/2007. This current chart reflects all daymark and buoy number changes made in Kaneohe Bay during 2003 and 2007. There were many changes – don’t use an old chart. • At 25 miles from the finish, call KYC Base and confirm your DRAFT and whether you want to enter the Sampan or Main Ship channels. If you draw 6 to 8 feet of water you may want to talk to the people on the escort boat about which channel is right for you after you finish. • Maintain radio contact with the escort vessel at all times after finishing. Talk to the finish line on VHF 71. After finishing, switch to VHF channel 68 to talk to your escort. If you have done this race before, you know that an escort boat will be on scene as you finish. The KYC Escort Committee will be able to assist you with getting through the channel of your choice and turning you over to the Mooring Committee at Kaneohe Yacht Club. The Escort Committee will be aware of the tides when you finish the race and will also know the most shallow depth of the Sampan Channel at mean low tide. At mean low tide, the Sampan Channel has a depth of about 7’ and is a sandy bottom. Our escort committee checks this by hand soundings before the race finishes. Should you request an escort, the escort vessel will stand by after you finish the race until you are ready to proceed. Please remember that all escort committee members are trained volunteers who take their duty seriously, but that you have the ultimate responsibility for your vessel and crew. You are not required to accept the assistance of an escort vessel; it is your choice to follow them into Kaneohe Bay or not.

After crossing the finish line, you may wish to continue sailing until entering the calmer waters inside Kaneohe Bay. The first one-third of the Sampan channel is often subject to swells of 2 to 5 feet. During the daylight hours, sailing in is preferred. However, arriving at night and never having made the trip before, it might be better to turn into the wind before entering the channel, drop sails, start your engine and follow the escort boat under power. If your yacht draws 7’ or less, you will probably come into the bay via the Sampan Channel. This will save you an hour or more time getting to KYC. The range marks coming down the channel are very easy to see at night…not so easy to see during the daylight hours. After passing R “2”, you will come down the channel on a magnetic heading of 208º M to the junction of Sampan and Main Ship Channels (passing between R ”8” and G “9”), just past GR C “S”, then bear left to 132º M until reaching R “26” (just left of Coconut Island). You will then take a heading of 138º M and will have about 15 minutes in calm, open water to make your final preparations for mooring. Drawing more than 7’ (and depending on the tide), you will probably come into Kaneohe Bay via the Main Ship Channel and it will take you approximately one to two additional hours to get to the Club. After crossing the Finish Line you will turn right about 80º and continue to sail on a magnetic heading of approximately 320º to get to RW “K-Buoy” off the entrance to the channel. Using the Main Ship Channel, your escort vessel will probably meet you at “K-Buoy”, rather than at the Finish Line off the Sampan Channel. The escort vessel will, however, be in radio contact with you immediately after you finish the race. You will proceed down the range marks (a six second flashing red above a quick flashing red) at 218º M, then turn left at the lower range mark (sitting on a piling in the middle of the channel) and proceed to R “14” at 160º M. As you pass G “15”, veer slowly left and pass G “17” on your left and then R “18” on your right. Bear left again and head 110º M to the junction of Main Ship and Sampan Channels at R “22” and G “23”. Continue as described above for Sampan Channel entry to the Bay. Have a safe and fun trip across the Pacific…we look forward greeting you!

Photo by: Mariah’s Eyes Photography 20 PACIFIC CUP 2008


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We need to make some more water as we are starting to get low. However, we can only make water on port jibe because of where we installed the through hull; and we have been on starboard for 95 percent of the race. I was driving in a squall tonight and blew up our last symmetrical kite. There wasn’t anything we could’ve done to prevent this. The kite material was just too old and it was about time. We had a bit of a scene with some tension and yelling at 2 a.m., but the small asymmetric is up and it’s fairly windy in the squalls. After three nights of gear failure, I was pretty bummed out. I was feeling depressed as the crew went back to sleep for a half hour before my shift was up. Right after they went down, a pod of 30 dolphins followed us until the end of my shift. It was such a relaxing, soothing feeling. It was almost as if something was watching over us. I woke my dad up for his shift and to show him the dolphins, but they left as fast as they had come. ON DAY 9 I had the best driving of the whole trip. The swells have finally gotten big enough to make for some good surfing. We have the big asymmetric kite up and are doing 15 knots for minutes on end. It’s still raining a lot in the squalls at night. My dad says it’s actually rare to get rained on, but after so much rain I’m having a hard time believing him. It’s been a good week spending some quality time with Dad and Justin. The moon has been rising later and later every night and it didn’t rise until 4 this morning. It’s so pitch black in the squalls you can barely see your hands on the wheel in front of you. There is no luck in seeing the waves, but after nine days of driving I’ve got

the feel of the boat. You have a death grip on the wheel, and I’ve actually never been so exhausted the whole trip. I’m just staring at the compass trying to keep 5 degrees on each side of our course. We’re reaching and the speedo hasn’t been below 12 knots for my whole shift. You focus so hard on the compass that you start to see double or your vision blurs for a minute. Luckily we bought a case of Red Bull when we were provisioning. We also had another spinnaker wrap in the middle of the night.

Photo by: Sean Doyle

“Passing the Addiction” from p. 19

THE LAST NIGHT of the race, and the lights of Oahu are visible off in the distance. I saw a small plane pass just over the tip of the rig in the middle of the night. He came by three more times with his lights on, and we attempted to call him on Channel 16. Later we saw two other planes flying some sort of pattern, most likely looking for somebody. I took an extra hour on my shift tonight, because truthfully I’m not ready to go home yet. It’s true you can leave your problems behind you, and for those two weeks nothing else matters but you, the boat, and the race. I’ve never felt such inner peace before, where everything seems to come together in this perfect way. There’s no way to really explain what happens out there.

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Photo by: Mariah’s Eyes Photography Photo by: Mariah’s Eyes Photography

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fuzz@sales.northsails.com

Photo by: Sean Doyle

Commodore Lou Ickler and his wife, Kim, wish to send their personal thanks to all the volunteers – over 300 of you – who make the Pacific Cup race one of the world’s great ocean races. Your hard work and dedication has made this, the 2008 Pacific Cup, another memorable and successful event. A special thank you to the Kaneohe Yacht Club, without which this race would not be possible. The KYC volunteers who host our finish make this an unique experience no matter how many times one has completed the race. We also want to thank the Berkeley, Richmond, San Francisco, and St. Francis Yacht Clubs for their contribution of facilities and services. 2008 marks the first year that the Pacific Cup race has had multiple sponsors. We would like to extend our gratitude to the Storm Trysail Club, Richmond Yacht Club Sailing Foundation, Bluewater Sailing Magazine, Svendsen’s Boat Works, Keefe Kaplan Marine Inc, Passage Yachts, Weems & Plath, Mount Gay Rum, Draper & Esquin Wine & Spirits, West Marine, and Oceana for their support and encouragement. We also want to thank Jim DeWitt, who did a great painting for our posters and Race Guide cover, and Alan Weaver who again offered berthing for our boats and a great party at Marina Village Yacht Harbor.

“Mahalo Plenty” and “Hana Hou” 24 PACIFIC CUP 2008


PACIFIC CUP 2008 25


26 PACIFIC CUP 2008

ACACIA

AZURE

Valiant 42

Cal 40

Sail No. 150

Sail No. 72

Hailing Port: San Francisco

Hailing Port: Alameda

Skipper: Bob Hinden

Skipper: Rodney Pimentel

Navigator: Neil Tangri

Navigator: Ted Floyd

Crew: Becca Hinden, Brett Culbert, Chris Parkman, Steve Deering

Crew: John Hemiup, Michael Andrews

ADA HELEN

BAR-BA-LOOT

Catalina 42

Moore 24

Sail No. 922

Sail No. 62

Hailing Port: Coyote Point

Hailing Port: Santa Cruz, CA

Skipper: Joseph Pratt

Skipper: Andrew Hamilton

Navigator: Matt Neumann

Navigator: Sarah Deeds

Crew: Scott Dickenson, Mark Neumann, Eric Morse

Crew:

ALTERNATE REALITY

BEQUIA

Express 27

Beneteau 411

Sail No. 18079

Sail No. 28757

Hailing Port: Seattle

Hailing Port: Vallejo, CA

Skipper: Darrel Jensen

Skipper: Dennis Ronk

Navigator: Duane Jensen

Navigator: Stephen Kennery

Crew:

Crew: Nick Vetter, Bill Rodriguez, Mike Caplan, Tom Morstein-Marx


BULLET

CIRRUS

Express 37

Standfast 40

Sail No. 40311

Sail No. 12711

Hailing Port: San Francisco

Hailing Port: Kaneohe, HI

Skipper: Michael Maloney

Skipper: Bill Myers

Navigator:

Navigator: Uli Steiner

Crew:

Crew: George Neill, Larry Wright, Howard Green, Chris Doutre

BUZZ OFF

COMPROMISE

Henderson 30

Elite 37

Sail No. USA 111

Sail No. 960276

Hailing Port: Kailua-Kona, HI

Hailing Port: San Francisco, CA

Skipper: Tom Fischer

Skipper: David Englehart

Navigator: Tom Fischer

Navigator: Sandy Englehart

Crew: Linda Rodriguez, James Clappier, Scott Garrett

Crew: Eliza Paulling, Leslie Thornley, John Sedgwick

CALIFORNIA GIRL

CRIMINAL MISCHIEF

Cal 40

R/P 45

Sail No. 6853

Sail No. X

Hailing Port: Richmond, CA

Hailing Port: San Francisco, CA

Skipper: Timm / Victoria Lessley

Skipper: Chip Megeath

Navigator: Timm “dEmO” Lessley Crew:

Betty “Boop” Lessley, Jeff “Branch Manager” Walter, Brad “Crazy Legs” Lawson, Chris “Maestro” Lemke, Davey Glander

Navigator: Jeff Thorpe Crew: Ian Klitza, Robin Jeffers

CHECKERED PAST

DART

Wyliecat 39

Peterson 34

Sail No. 03

Sail No. 23713

Hailing Port: Richmond, CA

Hailing Port: San Francisco, CA

Skipper: Chris Gibbs

Skipper: John Crutcher

Navigator:

Navigator: John Crutcher

Crew: Larry L. Gibbs, Geoff Ashton, Grant Donesly

Crew:

PACIFIC CUP 2008 27


28 PACIFIC CUP 2008

E.T.

GAVIOTA

Antrim 27

CAL 2-46, Jensen Marine

Sail No. USA 19

Sail No. 627

Hailing Port: San Francisco, CA

Hailing Port: Los Angeles, CA

Skipper: Todd Hedin

Skipper: Ralph Richards

Navigator: Crew, committee of three

Navigator: James Partridge

Crew: Tony English, Buzz Blackett

Crew: Adrienne Partridge, William Partridge, Casey McCann

ELISE

GIANT SLAYER

Express 27

Santa Cruz 27

Sail No. 101

Sail No. 59369

Hailing Port: San Francisco, CA

Hailing Port: Des Moines, WA

Skipper: Nathan Bossett

Skipper: David Garman

Navigator: Nat Criou

Navigator: Debra Lowell

Crew:

Crew:

FLASH

GREEN BUFFALO

Transpac 52

Cal 40

Sail No. 62152

Sail No. 8538

Hailing Port: Diablo, Ca

Hailing Port: San Francisco, CA

Skipper: Mark Jones

Skipper: Mary Lovely

Navigator: Gerry Swinton

Navigator: Jim Quanci

Crew: Will Paxton, Joe Penrod, Jody Taliaferro, Dave Keane, Skip McCormack, Peter Stoneberg, Dick Watts

Crew: Andrew Quanci, Stephen Quanci, Robert Nance, John Dillow

GAVILAN

HOLUA

Wylie 39

Santa Cruz 70

Sail No. 28439

Sail No. 97656

Hailing Port: San Francisco, CA

Hailing Port: Marina del Rey

Skipper: Brian Lewis

Skipper: Brack Duker

Navigator:

Navigator: Adrienne Cahalan

Crew: Bruce Nesbit, Marlene Benke

Crew: David Ullman, John Fuller, Brent Ruhne, Mike Herlihy, Keith Kilpatrick, Mark Sims, Sam Heck


HORIZON HUNTER

JAMANI

Hunter 466

J-120

Sail No. 52852

Sail No.

Hailing Port: Santa Cruz, CA

Hailing Port: San Francisco, CA

Skipper: Charlie Cooper

Skipper:

Navigator: Steve Antoine

Navigator:

Crew: Steve Antoine, Dan Muhoberac, Tim Barger, Mike Williams

Crew: Evelyn Packer, Jeff Mulvihill, Kim Mulvihill, Michael S. Mulvihill

HULA GIRL

KOKOMO

Santa Cruz 50

Sabre 425

Sail No.

Sail No. 2300

Hailing Port: San Francisco, CA

Hailing Port: Browns Point, WA

Skipper: Daniel Cayard Navigator: Paul Cayard

Skipper: Denny Flannigan Navigator: Gregg Reynolds

Crew: Alexandra Cayard, Cameron McCloskey, Morgan Gutenkunst, Mark K. Towill, Robert Kane

Crew: Jeff Kellar, Becky Flannigan, Will Lathrop, Bruce Campbell

HUMDINGER

LE FLYING FISH

Walter Greene 35 “Acapella” Trimaran

Moore 24

Sail No. 888 Hailing Port: San Francisco, CA Skipper: Larry Olsen Navigator: Larry Olsen Crew: Michael Donovan, Kurt Helmgren, Clifford Shaw

Sail No. 18095 Hailing Port: Alameda, CA Skipper: Navigator: Crew: Jean-Philippe Sirey, Stephane Plihon

J WORLD

LOW SPEED CHASE

J/120

Sydney 38

Sail No. 52582

Sail No. 38009

Hailing Port: San Francisco, CA

Hailing Port: San Francisco, CA

Skipper: Wayne Zittel

Skipper: Adam McAfee

Navigator: X

Navigator: James Bradford

Crew: Marty Czaraccki, Eric Devaney, Scott Prysi, Donald Henfling, R.C.Brown

Crew: Franci Fridell, Ron Young, Chris Smith

PACIFIC CUP 2008 29


30 PACIFIC CUP 2008

MIRAGE

MUSIC

Express 27

Nordic 44

Sail No. 8477

Sail No. 0319

Hailing Port: Brickyard Cove

Hailing Port: Bellingham, WA

Skipper: Terry Cobb

Skipper: John McCartney

Navigator: Steve Cobb

Navigator: Simon Walker

Crew:

Crew: Steve Jacobsen, Bob Peters, John Denny, Gord Irving, George Bean, Lesley Hesford

MOONSHINE

NEPTUNE’S DAUGHTER

Dog Patch 26

Pacific Seacraft Crealock

Sail No. 8398

Sail No. 318

Hailing Port: Richmond, CA

Hailing Port: San Francisco, CA

Skipper: Dylan Benjamin

Skipper: Earlinda Polkenhorn

Navigator: Orlando Montalvan

Navigator: Edward Polkenhorn

Crew:

Crew:

MOORE HAVOC

NO KA OI

Moore 24

Gibsea 43

Sail No. 135

Sail No. 28668

Hailing Port: RYC

Hailing Port: Brisbane

Skipper: Mark A. Moore

Skipper: Phil Mummah

Navigator: Rowan Fennell

Navigator: Phil Mummah

Crew:

Crew:

MORPHEUS

OCEANAIRE`

Schumacher 50

Tayana 47

Sail No. 51850

Sail No. 28839

Hailing Port: San Francisco, CA

Hailing Port: Vallejo, CA

Skipper: Jim Gregory

Skipper: Garrett Caldwell

Navigator: Bob Gregory

Navigator: Garrett Caldwell

Crew: Drake Sparkman, John Callahan, Chris Gregory, Rob Moore, Pete McCormick, Tim Parsons, Jonathan Livingston

Crew: Lissa Caldwell, Darren Doud, Phil MacFarlane, Edward Killeen, Charlie Watt


OHANA

RABIAN

Beneteau 45F5

J 35

Sail No. 0

Sail No. 50193

Hailing Port: Sausalito, CA

Hailing Port: San Francisco, CA

Skipper: Dean S. Hocking

Skipper: Vern Zvoleff

Navigator: Marika Edler

Navigator: Vern Zvoleff

Crew: Mariane Ferme

Crew: Ken Conour, Alex Zvoleff, Caitlin Zvoleff, Bob Adams

PACIFIC HIGH

RAGE

Catalina 400

Sunrise 70

Sail No. 154

Sail No. 69830

Hailing Port: San Francisco, CA

Hailing Port: Portland, OR

Skipper: Andre Skarka

Skipper: Steven Rander

Navigator: Jacek Kiluk

Navigator:

Crew: Andrzej Wilczynski, Michal Laster, Marek Bezek, Jerzy Kutalowski

Crew: Brian Barnett, John Rea, George Gacle, Jim Gullison, Dennis Demore

PEGASUS OP-50

RAINDROP

Open 50

Cascade 36

Sail No. 101

Sail No. 29274

Hailing Port: Honolulu, HI

Hailing Port: Portland, OR

Skipper: Philippe Kahn

Skipper: Joby Easton

Navigator: Richard Clarke

Navigator: Bill Huseby

Crew:

Crew:

PLUS SIXTEEN

RECIDIVIST

Olson 911

Schumacher 39

Sail No. 97707

Sail No. US 3510

Hailing Port: Richmond, CA

Hailing Port: Palo Alto, CA

Skipper: Paul Disario

Skipper: Ken Olcott

Navigator: Tony Porche

Navigator: Larry Ho

Crew:

Crew: Calvin Nguyen, Sean Doyle, Roscoe Fowler

PACIFIC CUP 2008 31


ROXANNE

SHAMAN

J-125

Cal 40

Sail No. 51517

Sail No. 5166

Hailing Port: Seattle, WA

Hailing Port: Alameda, CA

Skipper: Greg Slyngstad

Skipper: Steve Waterloo

Navigator: Bob King

Navigator:

Crew: John Sheppard, Steve Wright, Chuck Barrett III, Ian Martens

Crew: Paul Sinz, Tony Shaffer, Larry Duke, Addison Duke

RUBICON III

SLEEPING DRAGON

Contessa 33

Hobie 33

Sail No. 63163

Sail No. 69232

Hailing Port: Marina del Rey, CA

Hailing Port: San Francisco, CA

Skipper: Rod Percival Navigator: Chris Laubach Crew:

Navigator: Paul Martson Crew: Debi Cohn

SABRINA

SORCERY

Calkins 50

MULL 83

Sail No. 109

Sail No. USA 7177

Hailing Port: San Diego, CA

Hailing Port: Glen Cove

Skipper: Chris Calkins / Norm Reynolds Navigator: Fred Delaney Crew: John Laun, James Sakasegawa

32 PACIFIC CUP 2008

Skipper: Dean Daniels

Skipper: Brian Vanderspek/ John Walker Navigator: Joel Buffa Crew: Tyler Wolk, Max Starnitzky, Sebastien

Laleau, Kyle Vanderspek, Arturo Rovo, Chris Hackett, Andrea Nelson, Josh Russel, Phil Kling, DaveSantori, Eric Mehserle, Ryan Gannon, Trevor Daviscourt

SAPPHIRE

SUMMER MOON

Synergy 1000

Synergy 1000

Sail No. 38008

Sail No. 1001

Hailing Port: Richmond, CA

Hailing Port: Richmond, CA

Skipper: David Rasmussen

Skipper: Joshua Grass

Navigator: X

Navigator:

Crew: David Rasmussen III, Phil Krasner, John Gray

Crew: Ben Landon, Will Lowe, Huw Roberts


SWEET OKOLE

VALIS

Custom Farr 36

Pacific Seacraft 44

Sail No. 29000

Sail No. 16

Hailing Port: Richmond, CA

Hailing Port: Sausalito, CA

Skipper: Dean Treadway

Skipper: Paul Elliott

Navigator: Bill Keller

Navigator:

Crew: Pam Treadway, Alexis Monson Tucker, Helmar Sowick

Crew: Alan Beckman, John Clinton, Rich Jones, Michael Moradzadeh, Daniel Terhune

THE CONTESSA

VELOS

Swede 55

Custom 73’ Sloop

Sail No. 57476

Sail No. USA 22208

Hailing Port: San Francisco, CA

Hailing Port: Delaware

Skipper: Shawn Throwe

Skipper: Kjeld Hestehave

Navigator: Neil Weinberg

Navigator: Kjeld Hestehave

Crew:

Crew: Borg Hestehave, John Adriany,

Erica Adriany, Jim Beck, Kers Clausen, Jon Dekker, Tim Han, Dave Koenig, Ian Lawrence, Shala Lawrence, Chuck Skewes, Tom Gilbert

TIKI BLUE

X-DREAM

Beneteau 423

X-119

Sail No. 38423

Sail No. 42637

Hailing Port: San Francisco, CA

Hailing Port: San Francisco, CA

Skipper: Gary Troxel Navigator: Torben Bentsen Crew: Ryan Troxel, Ricky Driscoll, Judy Bentsen, Mike Warren

Skipper: Steen Moller Navigator: Crew: Tom Warren, Kevin Taylor, Charles Bohlig, Angelo Karas, David Cowen

URBAN RENEWAL

XL

J 35

Antrim 40

Sail No. 29204

Sail No. USA 45000

Hailing Port: Honolulu, HI

Hailing Port: Marina Del Rey, CA

Skipper: John Young Navigator: Les Vasconcellos Crew: John Stolp, Randy Reed, Don Brown, Larry Sweet

Skipper: Antony Barran Navigator: Nicholas Barran Crew: Harry Pattison,

Mike Hanna, Jim Antrim, Todd Best, Richard Barran, James Brown

PACIFIC CUP 2008 33


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��������������� 34 PACIFIC CUP 2008

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2006 PACIFIC CUP RESULTS

DOUBLE-HANDED Boat Name

Boat Type

Skipper

Elapsed Time

Corrected Time

Division Place

Overall

Division 1 (start: July 3 , 2006 @ 08:00:00 HST): TheContesa

Swede 55

Shawn Throwe

12:03:40:27

00:00:00:00

1

24

PlusSixteen

Olson 911

Paul Disario

14:19:29:54

00:10:20:57

2

30

Spirit

S&S

Ann Lewis

15:08:03:35

00:16:35:08

3

34

Slim

J-30

Loren Mollner

15:16:26:29

01:02:07:02

4

35

KeeliQuinn

Moore 24

Jeff Duvall

15:13:24:45

01:06:33:48

5

37

GiantSlayer

SantaCruz 27

David Garman

15:15:12:41

01:13:32:14

6

38

Celerity

Hobie 33

Peter Cosmann

14:07:58:23

01:13:32:14

7

40

Boat Type

Skipper

Elapsed Time

Corrected Time

Division Place

Overall

CREWED DIVISIONS Boat Name

Division A (start: July 3 @ 08:15:00 HST): CalifGirl

Cal 40

Donald & Betty Lessley

12:17:40:43

00:00:00:00

1

7

Hooligan

Westsail 11.8

Alice Martin

13:17:46:25

00:18:20:42

2

21

GreenBuffalo

Cal 40

Mary Lovely

13:14:30:43

00:19:41:00

3

22

Cirrus

Standfast 40

Bill Myers

14:04:38:02

01:11:31:49

4

32

Cassiopeia

Islander 36

Kit Wiegman

14:22:47:10

01:14:43:57

5

33

Cayenne

Passport 40

Michael Moradzedah

15:12:25:02

02:14:42:49

6

39

Sonata

Morgan 38

Neal Berger

DNF/D

Division B (start: July 3 @ 08:30:00 HST): TuttoBene

Beneteau 38s5

Jack Vetter

12:19:07:28

00:00:00:00

1

12

Locomotion

Express 34

Ted Morgan

12:19:52:36

00:04:12:08

2

16

IrishLady

Catalina 42 Mk II

Mike Mahoney

13:07:02:43

00:21:41:45

3

25

Bequia

Beneteau 411

Dennis Ronk

13:16:38:47

01:08:26:49

4

31

Bounty

S & S 52

Daniel Spradling

14:14:16:20

02:01:28:22

5

36

Valis

PaciďŹ c Seacraft 44

Paul Elliott

15:13:24:41

02:19:26:13

6

41

Compromise

Elite 37

David and Sandy Englehart

17:04:08:50

04:13:37:22

7

42

Division C (start: July 4 @ 09:10:00 HST): ET

Antrim 27

Todd Hedin

11:10:15:36

00:00:00:00

1

2

BasicInstinct

Eliott 10.5

Jan Borjeson

11:14:16:59

00:04:35:53

2

3

Auspice

Custom 40

James Coggan

11:23:06:54

00:07:06:18

3

8

SweetOkole

Custom Farr 36

Dean Treadway

12:01:02:00

00:07:52:24

4

9

Siderno

Beneteau 473

Fred Vitale

11:10:48:43

00:08:01:37

5

10

StrayCatBlues

J-35

Bill Parks

13:01:05:46

01:07:56:10

6

26

Relentless

Sydney 32

Arnold Zippel

13:07:02:51

01:13:53:15

7

29

PACIFIC CUP 2008 35


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36 PACIFIC CUP 2008

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2006 PACIFIC CUP RESULTS

Boat Name

Boat Type

Skipper

Elapsed Time

Corrected Time

Division Place

Overall

Division D (start: July 5 @ 10:10:00 HST): Synge

Synergy 1000

Mike Amirault

10:17:36:49

00:00:00:00

1

4

Recidivist

Schumacher 39

Ken Olcott

10:21:50:37

00:00:46:48

2

6

Sapphire

Synergy 1000

David Rasmussen

10:23:13:26

00:03:53:07

3

11

MureadasXL

ILC 40

Anthony Barran

10:04:50:56

00:07:21:37

4

14

Orizaba

J-130

John Hanna

10:20:14:55

00:10:41:06

5

17

Riva

J-46

Scott Campbell

11:07:40:45

00:14:03:56

6

19

2GuysOnTheEdge

1D35

Dan Doyle

10:20:50:34

00:14:09:15

7

20

Vanessa

Beneteau 57

Bill Deuchar

11:09:10:29

00:22:27:40

8

23

Division E (start: July 6 @ 11:15:00 HST): Lightning

Santa Cruz 52

Thomas Akin

09:03:05:20

00:00:00:00

1

1

Morpheus

Schumacher 50

Jim Gregory

09:16:58:28

00:06:59:08

2

5

Elixer

Santa Cruz 52

Skip Ely

09:15:24:51

00:12:19:31

3

13

Kyrnos

Barnett 56

Frederic Lafitte

09:20:14:09

00:14:16:19

4

15

Cipango

Andrews 56

Rob Barton

09:16:17:49

00:18:57:29

5

18

FreeRangeChicken

Perry 59

Bruce Anderson

10:04:58:31

01:12:14:11

6

27

Jam

J-160

John McPhail

11:02:06:57

01:13:49:37

7

28

Photo by: Mariah’s Eyes Photography

PACIFIC CUP 2008 37


1980-2004 WINNERS

DIV

VESSEL

TYPE

ELAPSED D:H:M:S

2004: West Marine Pacific Cup

1994 A

Siva

Olson 25

12:19:53:36

B

Moonshine

Dogpatch 26

11:09:35:10

A

Ghost

Morgan 38-2

14:09:51:41

C

Chimera

Express 27

11:17:27:38

B

California Girl

Cal 40

13:00:33:03

D

Sting

Soverel 33

11:00:11:31

C

Inspired Environments

Beneteau First 40.7

11:23:50:25

E

Tin Man

Barnett 46

10:23:28:00

D

Sensation

1D35

10:16:38:00

F

Oaxaca

Santa Cruz 50

9:10:01:51

E

Winnetou*

Santa Cruz 52

8:22:58:06

DH

Moonshine*

Dogpatch 26

11:09:35:10

F

Braveheart

Transpac 52

8:02:59:32

1992

DH1

Eyrie

Hawkfarm 28

14:18:04:05

A

Ghost

Morgan 38-2

12:03:06:36

B

Discovery

C&C 39

11:19:00:20

2002: West Marine Pacific Cup A

Spirit

S&S 34

12:11:10:33

C

Petard

Farr 36

12:06:23:35

B

Total Eclipse

Kalik 40

12:01:35:29

D

Promotion

Santa Cruz 40

10:23:24:10

C

Naughty Hotty

Cust. Wylie 38

10:20:46:05

DH

Team Bonzi*

Moore 24

11:19:30:00

D

E.T.

Antrim 27

11:00:50:54

1990

E

Octavia

Santa Cruz 50

9:15:08:38

A

Saraband

Westsail 32

14:07:49:59

F

City Lights

Santa Cruz 52

10:05:15:55

B

Glory Days

Pretorien 35

13:04:48:26

G

Alta Vita

Transpac 52

8:04:42:00

C

Tin Man

Barnett 48

11:17:48:50

DH1

Wildflower*

Wylie Custom 27

12:18:55:22

D

Oaxaca*

Santa Cruz 50

10:23:24:10

DH

Another Child

Hunter 35.5

13:17:08:58

2000: San Francisco to Kaneohe - 2070 nautical miles A

Dimished Capacity

Ranger 33

16:10:16:39

1988

B

Alicante

Sabre 38

16:01:59:58

A

Magic Carpet

Smith 42

11:09:40

C

Elan

Express 37

13:21:32:34

B

Saraband*

Westsail 32

14:16:53

D

E.T.

Antrim 27

13:09:56:06

IOR

Kathmandu

Santa Cruz 70

9:03:23

E

Osprey

Santa Cruz 40

12:14:35:15

DH

Sting

Soverel 33

12:06:06

F

Octavia*

Santa Cruz 50

10:12:35:44

1986 Pacific Cup: San Francisco to Nawilliwilli - 2126 nautical miles

G

Ingrid

Santa Cruz 52

10:19:22:22

PHRF

Magic Carpet

Smith 42

11:09:00:00

H

Rage

Wylie 70

8:15:55:52

IOR

Sweet Okole

Farr 36

11:12:07:00

DH1

La Diana

Contessa 35

14:16:03:08

DH

Sir Isaac

Burns 49

11:10:41:28

DH2

Punk Dolphin

Wylie 30

16:02:00:27

1984 PHRF

Magic Carpet

Smith 42

11:09:33:55

A

Water-Pik*

Newport 30 (Mod)

12:12:11:41

IOR

Surefire

Frers 36

11:20:40:15

B

Grey Ghost

Zaal 38

11:11:07:28

DH

Light’n Up

Express 27

11:20:40:25

C

Kurrewa

Farr 38 C&B

10:20:45:15

D

Kaimiloa

J-44

9:21:10:52

1982

E

Ripple

Riptide 35

8:18:39:26

IOR

Zamazaan

Farr 52

11:19:07:48

F

Pyewacket

SC 70 Turbo

6:14:22:20

PHRF A

Temptress

Swede 55

12:02:04:19

DH1

LowProfile

Moore 24

11:12:48:25

PHRF B

Duende

Cal 40

13:23:44:45

DH2

Azzura

Azzura 310

10:00:34:10

PHRF C

Apple 1

Hans Christian 38

15:01:25:24

A

Andante Island

Packet

12:04:09:02

IOR - I

Merlin

Lee Custom 67

10:04:51:52

B

Springbok

Hylas 42

13:02:05:20

IOR - II

Sweet Okole

Farr 36

14:21:34:45

C

Stop Making Sense

Soverel 33

12:03:50:45

PHRF - III

Timber Wolf

Farr 38

14:13:49:04

PHRF - IV

D

Recidivist

Schumacher 39

10:19:56:32

Kotick ii

Holstein 48

15:08:38:19

E

Roller Coaster

Santa Cruz 50

09:02:06:30

DH1

Illusion*

Cal 40

11:05:33:46

DH 2

Punk Dolphin

Wylie Custom

12:02:17:01

1998

1996

38 PACIFIC CUP 2008

1980

* Winning Overall


H AWA I I ’ S M O S T E X T R A O R D I N A R Y M A R I N A

At the Ko Olina Marina, you’ll enjoy world class features in a beautiful luxury resort setting.

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330 full service slips accommodating vessels up to 200 feet in length

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Bellingham floating concrete docks

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Minutes from Oahu’s prime fishing and diving grounds

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Transient slips available

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Electric, water, telephone and cable television at each slip

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Fuel dock with gasoline, diesel and pump-out services

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Shower and restrooms

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Laundry facilities

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24-hour gated entry

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Marina store and deli

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Barbeque and picnic areas

For information and leasing call our Harbor Master (808) 679.1050 Ko Olina Marina 92-100 Waipahe Place Honolulu, Hawaii 96707 N 21˚ 19.604' – W 158˚ 07.248 Phone: (808) 679.1050 Fax: (808) 679.1055 E-mail: info@koolinamarina.com www.koolinamarina.com n

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PACIFIC CUP 2008 39


The Phoenician, LLC Small Boat Repair Facility

Welcomes All Pacific Cup Yachts To Hawaii

The Phoenician, LLC is the newest and most modern, full service yacht and small boat repair facility in the state, including a trailer boat launch ramp. The five-acre facility, with cement paving and 24 hour security, features Hawaii’s largest mobile boat hoist accommodating vessels up to 300 tons, 150 feet in length and 32 feet in beam. The Phoenician provides high gloss and industrial coatings, complete machine shop, pipe fitting services, mechanical, sandblasting, electrical, welding, rigging and fiberglass repair, long-term boat storage and boat crating, including complete shipping services.

Full Marine Chandlery Coming Soon!

For all of your marine services, please contact The Phoenician, LLC 91-573 Malakole Road Kapolei, HI 96707 Ph. (808) 682-1961 Fax (808) 682-1983 www.thephoenician.net • e-mail: jgomersall@thephoenician.net

40 PACIFIC CUP 2008


2008 Pac Cup