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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016


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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016


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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016


FROM THE CHAMBER CANDANCE BRAKE Dear Chamber Members: Welcome to our Q3 edition of the Greater Owensboro Business Magazine! Last edition, we featured many of our talent programs and initiatives. This edition, we feature many of the big picture initiatives and programs that we are working on every day. As we work on items such as our workforce development efforts or our advocacy initiatives like our Washington DC Fly-In, we continue to offer the traditional events and programs that our Chamber members deserve - events that allow them to celebrate one another and to grow their businesses by connecting with customers and new markets. We are close to 1,000 members strong.

A

s July ends, we begin the second half of the year which hopefully is filled with lots of sunny summer days. We are half way through 2016 and what an amazing list of accomplishments our Chamber has accumulated. As a person who enjoys dealing with numbers, I thought it was appropriate to quantify the Chamber activities thus far. The Chamber has organized and completed the following events: • 6 Rooster Boosters – total attendance 2,153 • 25 Ribbon Cuttings – total attendance around 500 • 2 Grand Openings – total attendance around 400 • 2 Business After Hours – total attendance around 125 • 1 Annual Celebration – total attendance over 500 • 1 Farm City Breakfast – total attendance around 400 • 1 Washington DC Fly-In – 22 people and 1,416 miles

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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016

President & CEO

Those members are people who believe in investing in our community. They are people who understand that a Chamber membership is more than just a path to network or to grow their individual business. It certainly is that. But it is much more. Each member adds strength to our ability to grow the economic capacity of our region, to advocate for commonsense policies and legislation.

Each member matters.

Thank you for reading our third

quarter publication. And thank you for the opportunity to serve you and your business. Sincerely, Candance

ADAM HANCOCK

Chairman

• 1 West Kentucky Night in Frankfort – total attendance over 400 • 1 Ag Expo – total attendance estimated over 500 • 12 Chamber Young Professional Events – total attendance around 430 • 1 Workforce Development Session with multiple topics – total attendance around 125 • 5 Leadership Owensboro Class Days – 27 Participants and roughly 10 presenters per session. • 1 Leadership Owensboro Graduation – total attendance around 100 • 1 Chamber Day in Lexington – total attendance around 1,000 Hopefully, as a Chamber member, you have taken advantage of the various networking and educational opportunities that are listed above. Please take some time to thank the staff for all of their hard work and dedication to the Chamber. They do an amazing job creating what I personally feel is one of the best Chambers in the nation.


PUBLISHER/CREATIVE DIRECTOR Jason Tanner jason@tannerwest.com

FEATURES:

3RD QUARTER 2016

MANAGING EDITOR Danny May

COPY EDITOR

Ashley Murphy

ADVERTISING SALES

Brock Quinton brock@tannerpublishing.com Robert Williams robert@tannerpublishing.com

GRAPHIC DESIGN

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GREATER OWENSBORO DELEGATION: DC FLY-IN

Taylor West

LAYOUT DESIGN

Andrea Roberson

PHOTOGRAPHERS David Grinnell Lucas Wiman AP Imagery

CONTRIBUTORS

Nicholas Hardesty Steven Wilson Jaqueline Jordan

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OWENSBORO RIVERPORT

PRINTING

Greenwell Chisholm Owensboro, Kentucky

CONTACT INFORMATION:

Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce 200 E. 3rd St., Owensboro, KY 42303 (270) 926-1860 chamber.owensboro.com

TANNER PUBLISHING CO.

30

RED TAPE REDUCTION INITIATIVE

8 16

THE CHAMBER REPORT

17 20 22 25 28 30 34 36

GREATER OWENSBORO DELEGATION: DC FLY-IN

INCREASING OUR ECONOMIC CAPACITY WITH A GLOBALLY COMPETITIVE WORKFORCE

RIBBON CUTTING DOS & DON’TS LEADERSHIP OWENSBORO GIVES PARTICIPANTS AN INSIDE LOOK AT CITY BUSINESS OF THE YEAR SPOTLIGHT

U of L School of Nursing, Fetta Specialty Pizza & Spirits

OWENSBORO RIVERPORT RED TAPE REDUCTION INITIATIVE THE VALUE OF AN INTERNSHIP 10 QUESTIONS Jack Wells

DID ? YOU

KNOW Can you guess which Chamber member scored seven points in one second during a high school basketball game? FIND OUT ON PAGE 38 7

GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016


THE CHAMBER REPORT

NEW MEMBERS •

A New Start, LLC

Affordable Roofing

All In Digital

Amy’s Fit Island

Arby’s - West Parrish Avenue

Bennett Insurance Agency, LLC

Ben’s Soft Pretzels

D.J. Johnson

Dale Carnegie of Tennessee

Fresh Ideas Management LLC

Great Harvest, 54

Hasgoe

Hunter-Douglas, Inc.

Krispy Kreme

Legacy Owensboro, Inc.

Meijer

Mighty Men of Valor, Inc

Ohio Valley Roofing

Ohio Valley Security

Owensboro Family Pharmacy

Painting With a Twist

Qk4, Inc.

Rehabilitation and Performance Institute,

BY THE NUMBERS OWENSBORO

PARKS & RECREATION 36

parks and recreational facilities

total acres

Rick Cummins •

The Ozone Lazer Tag

United Auto Glass

Wilson Family Pharmacy

HAND-PICKED

-Jenna Mitchell

SPECIALTY FOODS GROUP

TOM & JERRY

7

hot dogs served annually

5

fishing lakes

36,000

skaters per season at Edge Ice Center

BLOODLINE

-Drew Kirkland

DAHL & GROEZINGER, INC.

“5 episodes with my grandkids and Papa got to sit down for awhile!!“

BIG BANG THEORY

-Darrell Higginbotham

-Shirley Cecil

INDEPENDENCE BANK

GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016

basketball courts

2

pools

15

shelters/pavilions

8

baseball diamonds

playgrounds

10

soccer fields

32.3

miles of walking trails

A few of our favorite local leaders share the last TV show they binge-watched:

FRIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS

8

11

spray parks

swimmers per season

REMAX Professional Realty Group, Studio 105 Art & Frame Gallery

8,200

boxes/bags of popcorn served annually

21,000 9,000 14 softball fields

outdoor and indoor tennis courts

960 3

PSC •

42

-Tish Correa Osborne GIRLS INCORPORATED REPUBLIC BANK

ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK

THE UNBREAKABLE KIMMY SCHMIDT

GREATER OWENSBORO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

-Joe Berry

-Jessica Kirk

THE PEOPLE VS OJ SIMPSON

-Andrew Howard INDEPENDENCE BANK

GO-EDC

GAME OF THRONES

-Carl Greenwell

GREENWELL CHISHOLM PRINTING COMPANY

HOUSE OF CARDS -Mark Martin ATMOS ENERGY

-Jack Wells

WELLS HEALTH SYSTEMS, CANTEEN

AMERICAN PICKERS

-Wade Jenkins

OLD NATIONAL BANK


EXECUTIVE ANSWERS

ON THE RECORD

How have you been able to use your personal experience and ability to “dream big” to influence your organization to expand beyond the tradition way of thinking? RON BURKINS

JOE BERRY

“Your Dream. Our Mission,” is the maxim of Community Ventures, and built into the culture of the organization. Being a non-profit business sometimes means wearing multiple hats. My past experience as a field accountant has helped in the transition to being the Western Kentucky Business Development Specialist for CV. The responsibility of office administration and “field” duties creates a dynamic that can be less than seamless. Ultimately, bridging that divide helps meet customer needs in the most efficient way possible.

Growing up in the Owensboro community, I have been able to draw upon the experiences of family and friends (in both the public and private sector) who dedicated their time and energy to public service, to making the community, our home, a better place. These formal and informal mentors informed the philosophy I try to practice in my professional life—that public service is a privilege, the importance of humility and empathy, dedication to learning and personal growth.

ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT WESTERN KENTUCKY REGION COMMUNITY VENTURES

In order to challenge ourselves and the traditional way of thinking, I’ve introduced FinTech ideologies. We live in a process and data driven world. Growing businesses and opportunities requires as much administration as networking. For this reason, I requested a laptop versus a desktop, so that I can remain as mobile and streamline as possible. This strategy proved advantageous in expansion of organization efficiencies and improvement of client relations. I service a large territory of business and carry the idea that technology integration into everyday business practices increases the achievement of many. Whether it’s face to face, emails, or Skype, client contact is essential to a project’s success. Dream big is not simply a nicety; it is what we do when assisting entrepreneurs as well as existing business owners in the realization of their dream!

VICE PRESIDENT OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP GREATER OWENSBORO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

Fortunately, the organizations I have been involved with throughout my career have encouraged similar values. I am proud to be part of a professional team at GOEDC that focuses every day on “dreaming big”, thinking outside the box, and moving beyond traditional paradigms of economic development. Our team accomplishes this through challenging ourselves (daily) to practice creativity, candor, and to remain dedicated to our organizational mission. We are reminded every day that our profession requires playing the “long game” and positioning the Owensboro region for a competitive future.

SUZANNE CECIL WHITE DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS CECIL FARMS PRODUCE

I have always been one to push and test my limits, but I also desire to be a supporter and motivator, just as others have done for me. I learned early on that one can push much further than they expected, and that people are actually waiting for someone to push a little further. Unlike my partners in this business, my background is not in farming. Now, having been back home with the farm since 2011, I’ve been rocking the boat on a regular basis. Fortunately, our family and farming partners have been open to different ways of thinking, while at the same time maintaining the previously established strengths of the business. I am very much supported by our family and partners. Don’t get me wrong; this doesn’t mean they agree with me 100% of the time or are always confident in my attempts at new ideas; they just don’t hinder the thoughts or dreams. I’m on a team of dreamers and doers. They were dreaming and doing long before I ever even imagined I’d be joining the team. We love for things to be in constant motion. Sitting idle in this fast-paced, ever-changing world we are living in day-to-day will only put us behind. As I take on new ideas or endeavors, I ask myself “why not?” I have failed many times. But somehow it has not changed my drive to continue to try new ideas around here. I’ve always felt it is important to like yourself and be proud of who you are. If you like and respect yourself, others will like and respect you as well.

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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016


THE CHAMBER REPORT

EVENT SCHEDULE:

JULY EVENTS

CYP TOUR AND HAPPY HOUR Messenger-Inquirer July 21 // 5:30 – 7 p.m.

2017 LEADERSHIP OWENSBORO CLASS APPLICATIONS DUE July 29

AUGUST EVENTS

ROOSTER BOOSTER BREAKFAST Owensboro Convention Center August 4 // 7:30 a.m.

CYP BURGER NIGHT The Campbell Club August 11 // 5:30 – 7 p.m.

CYP GALLERY OPENING AND HAPPY HOUR

Owensboro Museum of Fine Arts August 18 // 5:30 – 7 p.m.

CHAMBER GOLF CLASSIC

Owensboro County Club August 19

BUSINESS AFTER HOURS South Central Bank on HWY 54 August 23 // 4:30 pm

SEPTEMBER EVENTS

ROOSTER BOOSTER BREAKFAST

Owensboro Convention Center September 1 // 7:30 a.m.

BUSINESS AFTER HOURS O.Z. Tyler Distillery September 1 // 4:30 pm

CYP LUNCHEON

Old National Bank Conference Room, Commerce Center September 8 // 11:30 am

LEADERSHIP OWENSBORO ORIENTATION September 15

CYP HAPPY HOUR

September 15 // 5:30 – 7 pm

CHAMBER EXPO

Owensboro Convention Center September 22 // 3 – 6 pm

*Events are added daily. See our website chamber.owensboro.com for an updated calendar of events.

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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016

CHAMBER BEHIND THE SCENES:

GOLF CLASSIC

A

long with the Annual Celebration, the Golf Classic presented by Owensboro Health is one of the Chamber’s premier fundraising events. Held at the Owensboro Country Club each August, the Golf Classic has established a long-standing reputation as an enjoyable day of fun and networking. But if you want to get in on the action, you’ve got to act early because tickets sell out quickly. Here’s why:

THE FREEBIES: • Official Golf Classic golf ball & visor • Gift from the Chamber (Past gifts included a golf towel, etc) • Refreshments at several holes • Some hole sponsors collect business cards for door prizes

THE FUN: • Members describe the Golf Classic as non-stop fun from start to finish. • Each hole has a sponsor, which provides refreshments, themed decorations, and fun challenges or activities. Players do the “fun shot” first and then golf the hole. • Sponsors go hole-to-hole with drink

carts to mingle with players. • Chamber staff and ambassadors act as “fun patrol,” cruising the course on golf carts to make sure everyone is having a good time.

THE FOOD: • The day starts with breakfast at the Country Club at 7:30 a.m. • In addition to refreshments at several holes, there are also three designated food holes throughout the course. (Chick-fil-A, for example.) • There are also drink carts along the course.

THE PRIZES: • At the closing ceremony, prizes are given to overall first and second place teams, plus random prizes for the thirteenth and twenty-second place finishers. • Plus, gift cards for: • Longest drive on hole 1 • Longest putt on hole 9 • Straightest drive on hole 10 • Closest to the pin on 13


THE FRIENDLY COMPETITION: • Shotgun start at 9 a.m. (Each hole tees off at same time). • 4-person scramble format (Each player tees off, then everyone plays from the best shot). Maximum of 2 putts. • Each player can purchase 2 mulligans.

SPONSORSHIP LEVELS: • Presenting Sponsor: Owensboro Health • Platinum Sponsors: Castlen Steel and Hartz Contracting • Team Photo Sponsor: Republic Bank - Each golfer gets a team photo. • Golf Ball Sponsor: Each golfer receives a golf ball with sponsor logo. • Gold Sponsor: Includes a 4-member team and hole sponsorship. Great for members who want to play and be a sponsor. Sponsors set up a booth at their sponsored hole with branding, refreshments, giveaways, decorations, etc. • Silver Sponsor: Includes 2-member team (1/2 team) and hole sponsorship. • Hole sponsorship: For members who want to sponsor a hole but not golf.

COST: • The cost for a full day of food, fun, and fellowship with other Chamber members is: • $150 – Individual • $600 – Team of 4 • $750 – All-inclusive team (includes 8 mulligans).

TIMELINE: • April/May – Jessica gathers information and begins contacting sponsors. • June 1-30 – Organizing teams, assigning holes to sponsors. • July Rooster Booster – Remaining sponsorships filled. • July – Logistics like ordering signs, banners, other details. • August – Teams are typically full, holes are typically sponsored • Morning of Event – Jessica shows up before sunrise to set up, ice down, and hang signs and banners. Country Club staff gets carts ready. Ambassadors escort sponsors to holes. 7 a.m. – Breakfast; 9 a.m. – Start; 3 p.m. – Closing ceremony and award presentation.

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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016


THE CHAMBER REPORT

MEMBERS IN THE NEWS Notre Dame in 1988 and a Doctor of Law degree

quality service,” said Mike Carroll, CFO of

(J.D.) from the University of Kentucky College of

Sterett Companies, who led the team pursuing

Law in 1991.

the acquisition. “We share Arlington Heavy

welcome

Sullivan was admitted to practice law in

Hauling’s commitment to hard work, honesty,

Benjamin P. Cole, AIA,

Kentucky in 1991; in U.S. District Court, Western

and reliability. We look forward to working with

LEED AP as a new architect

District of Kentucky in 1992; in the U.S. Court

Gary Ayers as we take the next step in realizing

in the Owensboro, KY

of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit in 1992; and the

our full potential in this market.”

office. He joins the Hafer

U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of

“Partnering with Arlington Heavy Hauling’s

Kentucky in 2005.

existing customer relationships is very exciting

where he worked at Perkins +

Sullivan has earned an AV Preeminent rating

for our organization and all of our partners,”

Will for many years and most recently

through the Martindale-Hubbell Peer Review

said Mr. Carroll. “Sterett understands Arlington’s

at VTBS Architects. His diverse and broad

Ratings – the highest level of professional

business and supports the integrity upon which

range of experience as well as his management

excellence. Sullivan served as special justice to

this company has been built.”

expertise will be a valuable asset to the firm. He

the Kentucky Supreme Court in Commonwealth

holds a Bachelor of Architecture from Southern

v. Davidson, 277 S.W.3d 232 (Ky. 2009). He has

California Institute of Architecture and is a LEED

been a member of the Kentucky Bar Association

Accredited Professional. Cole relocated with his

Board of Governors from 2007 to 2013. Sullivan

wife, Karyn, and 3 children, Hannah, Anthony,

served as vice-president in 2014 and president-

and Louis.

elect in 2015. He was a member of the Kentucky

HELEN MOUNTJOY RETURNING TO GO-EDC AS ITS DIRECTOR OF WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT AND EDUCATION

Bar Association Continuing Legal Education

The

OWENSBORO ATTORNEY R. MICHAEL SULLIVAN TO SERVE AS PRESIDENT OF THE KENTUCKY BAR ASSOCIATION

Commission from 1998 to 2004 and a member

Development Corporation (“GO-EDC”) is proud

of the Leadership Kentucky Class of 1998. He

to announce that former Kentucky Secretary of

served on the Board of Directors for the Greater

Education and Workforce Development, Helen

Owensboro Chamber of Commerce from 2002 to

Mountjoy, is returning to GO-EDC as its Director

Owensboro attorney R.

2006 and was chair in 2005. Sullivan has served

of Workforce Development and Education.

Michael

as legal counsel to Greater Owensboro Economic

“I am excited to return to the EDC and to

Development Corporation from 2006 to present.

lead its ongoing workforce development and

HAFER HIRES ARCHITECT, BENJAMIN P. COLE Hafer announce

is and

proud

to

team from Los Angeles

Sullivan

will

serve as president of the

Kentucky

Association

Owensboro

Economic

education efforts,” said Helen Mountjoy. “Access

Bar

STERETT HEAVY HAULING ACQUIRES ARLINGTON HEAVY HAULING

(KBA)

for a one-year term beginning, Friday, July

12

Greater

to quality, skilled employees remains the number one concern of existing and new businesses. The EDC and I are committed to working with our

1, 2016.

Sterett Heavy Hauling announced today that

partners to ensure that the Owensboro region has

An attorney with Sullivan,

it has acquired Arlington Heavy Hauling of

the educated and globally competitive workforce

Mountjoy, Stainback & Miller, P.S.C., Sullivan

Jacksonville, Florida. Arlington Heavy Hauling

necessary to meet the needs of our business

participated in swearing-in ceremonies during

is one of the largest specialized haulers in the

community.”

the 2016 KBA Annual Convention. He received

Southeast with expertise in the movement of

“Adding Helen to this already wonderful

his oath of office during the Annual Banquet on

large, oversized machinery and construction

team of economic development professionals is

Thursday, May 12.

equipment. In addition to their core business

a true honor. We are fortunate to have someone

The KBA Board of Governors oversees the

as a leading heavy hauler in the Southeast

of her experience and aptitude, not only in our

management of the KBA, an independent agency

and Florida, Arlington Heavy Hauling offers

community, but at EDC,” said Madison Silvert,

of the Kentucky Supreme Court. The board

additional

President and CEO of GO-EDC.

assists the Court in regulating the practice of

shipping in and out of Jaxport. These services

Mrs. Mountjoy co-chaired with County

law in Kentucky, including lawyer discipline and

include staging and storage, as well as equipment

Judge/Executive Al Mattingly the EDC’s original

continuing legal education. Additionally, it works

assembly and disassembly. Arlington services

efforts to certify Daviess County as the first

to promote the efficiency and improvement of

the entire United States, with a strong emphasis

“Work Ready Community” in the Common-

the judicial system in accordance with Supreme

on Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, South

wealth four years ago. Since then, Owensboro’s

Court Rules.

Carolina and North Carolina.

workforce was recognized as one of the best in

Sullivan’s areas of concentration include

The Vice President of Arlington Heavy

the South by Southern Business & Development

business

Hauling, Gary Ayers, is planning to continue

Magazine, and, working with the Owensboro

litigation, construction law, insurance defense,

working in the business.

Community and Technical College and a team

real estate law and personal injury.

“Arlington Heavy Hauling has a rich

of local businesses, the Greater Owensboro

He received a B.A. from the University of

heritage and a well-deserved reputation for

Federation of Advance Manufacturing Education

services,

GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016

employment

law,

civil

services

catering

to

customers


program was launched to much success.

of progressive-minded people that does forward-

member milestone:

Silvert said, “She laid the foundation for our

thinking things.

education and workforce successes, and, with

“I like that libraries are one of the entities within

UNIFIRST CELEBRATES 80 YEARS

Helen back on the team, I look forward to what we

the community that improves people’s lives,” Waller

can accomplish for our local economy in the years

said. “Whatever the community needs, we can be that

& workwear since it’s beginning in 1936 with only a

to come.”

for them whether it’s informing them, entertaining

handful of employees in a converted horse barn in

them, or enriching them in some other way.”

Boston, MA. Eighty years later, the business has grown

DCPL WELCOMES ERIN WALLER, DIRECTOR

to employ more than 12,000 employee Team Partners member milestone:

HARLEY’S AUTOMOTIVE CELEBRATES 30 YEARS

Erin is from Little Rock,

Arkansas by way of Nashville

accepting the position at DCPL in February. Waller

When it comes to cars, a lot has changed in the last 30 years, but for Darrell and Del Harley, who opened Harley’s Automotive Service and Repair in 1986, keeping customers happy is still the same. Their younger brother James also works at the shop, and Del’s daughter, Sarah is the office

says she’s most excited about working in a community

manager. Come see them at 430 Leitchfield Road.

(where she lived from 20002007). Since 2007, Waller was the Director of the Saline County Library in Arkansas, where she served from 2008 until

MEET THE CHAMBER STAFF

JACLYN GRAVES

Unifirst has been supplying professional uniforms

Role and Title at Chamber: Membership Development Manager. I am in charge of welcoming new members and keeping current members happy. For instance, a man came in today who is from Louisville and will be starting a brand new business. He didn’t even have a business license yet, but he said he knew this should be his first stop. So I was able to talk with him about Owensboro and welcome him to the city and give him some insight. Hometown: I grew up in Milan, TN, but we moved to Mayfield, KY, when I was in the fourth grade. So I’m a “Kennessean.” High School: Mayfield High School. We were the Cardinals. Tiny school, but a big football school. College alma mater: Western. Go Big Red! How long have you lived in Owensboro? Since 2006. I moved here after I finished at Western. You could live anywhere, what keeps you in Owensboro? I say I’m an import, but Owensboro has truly become my home. I like Owensboro because it’s ‘homey.’ It’s big enough that we have options for restaurants and entertainment, but it’s still got that small town feel. With my daughter, Carsyn (7), it’s nice to know she’s going to grow up in a place like this with a great education system. And downtown is just amazing. Favorite song to sing along to: I probably have 900 songs on my iPod, but the one song I always listen to is “Ramblin Man” by Waylon Jennings. I love it!

who serve 275,000 business customer locations from more than 225 facilities in North America and Europe.

The 32,000 square-foot Owensboro plant opened in

1998. At the time it was the industry’s most advanced, state-of-the-art

centralized

Distribution

Center.

Today, it serves as a central work apparel and uniform distribution hub for more than 200 UniFirst locations in the US and Canada. Meets World, so now I get to watch their kids with my kid. Best vacation you’ve ever taken: In December, one of my best friends and I took our kids to Disney. It was my first time at Disney, and it was really cool to experience that with Carsyn. Best concert you’ve ever seen: It’s a tie. I saw Garth Brooks when I was in the 7th grade. And I saw ‘NSYNC right before they ended when I was a freshman in college. It was awesome! Most famous person you’ve ever met: Dr. James Downing. He’s the President and CEO of St. Jude and I freaked out. I’ve met lots of country stars, like Blake Shelton, but seeing Dr. Downing was the only time I’ve “fan-girled” out like that. The things he’s done for St. Jude and cancer research in general are amazing. Netflix or theater? Theater. I’m terrible at technology. Favorite game to play with Carsyn: We love to pretend like we’re going on trips. She makes me keep all my airport tags on my luggage so she can pretend we travel. For example, this week she pretended we were going to Texas to be in a rodeo, so we had to “pack” our cowboy hat and boots. Last week she had a gymnastics meet, so we had to “pack” that stuff. Hidden talent the Chamber staff doesn’t know about you yet: I’m a laundry pro! I can get any stain out of any shirt.

All time favorite movie: Rom-coms like Sweet Home Alabama and Hope Floats. I’ve watched Hope Floats probably 500 times.

What is one thing you want Chamber members to know about you? That I truly enjoy being in Owensboro. I’m very excited that I get to be a small part of helping Owensboro grow. I enjoy helping people establish their businesses, and I’m genuinely excited to see their success. I like to watch stuff from the beginning and watch it grow.

Favorite Disney movie or show to watch with Carsyn: Anything on the Disney Channel. Right now, it’s Girl Meets World, which is nostalgic for me because we grew up with Boy

What are you looking forward to the most about working for the Chamber? The social aspect. I enjoy being in the community and meeting people.

13

GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016


THE CHAMBER REPORT

STRATEGIC DIVERSITY LEADERSHIP Overview:

toward

A strategic approach to activating change and

diverse

transformation to improve diversity and inclusion

The

The Takeaway: 1) Strategic Diversity Leadership provides the reader with the idea of a diversity framework. This book points out the pitfalls of failed attempts that many

THE

READING LIST

Reviewed By: Dr. Lewatis McNeal Associate Dean of Student Affairs, Owensboro Community and Technical College

AUTHOR: DAMON A. WILLIAMS

being and

breadth

more

inclusive. of

this

work does not allow for it to be sectioned off to a department or unit

to

complete.

A

strategy

to

higher education institutions hit by not taking a

successful

strategic approach to diversifying their campus

improve diversity must

environments. The diversity framework Williams

be comprehensive and inclusive.

refers to builds toward what he identifies as a twenty-first-century definition of diversity. He uses a comprehensive conceptual model that includes addressing conceptual, group identity, ideological and institutional perspectives that impact diversity. 2) The commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion

This book has reinforced my approach to improving diversity and inclusion at Owensboro Community and Technical College. We have worked to develop a comprehensive approach to creating and progressing an inclusive campus environment. From improving

must be a team effort. From the top leadership of the

workforce diversity to increasing student diversity

organization down to the entry-level staff member,

and building an inclusive, welcoming environment,

everyone plays a role in the organizational change

this text has been helpful in refining our approach.

DOWNTOWN IS LOOKING UP The next downtown development projects will be taking shape soon. Here is a look into the future at what to expect as new construction projects begin along Veterans Blvd and Second Street.

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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016

1


CYP E VE N T S C R AP B O O K

PHOTO BY ADAM PARIS

5 4 3 2

3. Bluegrass Museum & Hall of Fame 1. Woodward Building Corner of Veterans Blvd & St Ann St (Former American Legion) A 4-5 story building. Lower level = retail. Top floors = condos.

2. The Enclave at Riverfront Living Corner of Veterans Blvd & Frederica St (Former Toribio) Riverfront JAM Property Restaurant / Condo

Corner of W 2nd & Frederica (Former State Building) New home of International Bluegrass Museum and Hall of Fame, with concert venue, outdoor amphitheater and restaurant.

4. Proposed Parking Garage West of GRITS parking garage

5. Proposed Hotel Location not finalized

15

GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016


INCREASING OUR ECONOMIC CAPACITY WITH A

GLOBALLY COMPETITIVE WORKFORCE 2 Days : 4 Sessions : Up to 30 Business Leaders in Each Session By Danny May

On May 11 and 12, area business leaders participated in Workforce Development Sessions co-hosted by the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce, Greater Owensboro Economic Development Corporation, Owensboro Community and Technical College (OCTC), and Western Kentucky University-Owensboro. The goal was to recognize similar workforce issues facing regional employers with the end goal of defining clear action steps to address those challenges. The sessions were sector-specific, covering Health Care, Hospitality/Retail/Customer Service, Manufacturing/Skilled Trades, and Professional. “Our members have consistently identified workforce issues as the most critical issue impacting the ability to grow their businesses. It is imperative that we identify ways to address this issue in order to grow,” said Candance Castlen Brake, President and CEO of GOChamber. “Our workforce partners believed strongly that in order to genuinely attack the problem, we needed to involve our employers from the beginning.” “What we saw (during the Workforce Development Sessions) was such an astounding level of Helen Mountjoy participation by the people who came to these sessions. They didn’t come to sit and be lectured to. They came to talk. And what they had to say was very illuminating,” said Helen Mountjoy, Director of Workforce Development and Education for GO-EDC and former Secretary of Education and Workforce Development Cabinet for Governor Beshear. The sessions were facilitated by Diana Taylor, who has worked with the Kentucky Candance Castlen Brake Chamber of Commerce on similar projects. Most of the feedback was very specific, which is a great thing because it clearly brought some common concerns to the forefront. A full report will be issued. However, the following is a very general overview of several key issues recognized by employers during the Workforce Development Sessions: Soft Skills – Who is teaching soft skills? Is it the role of family? Schools? Or the employer? Employers need a workforce who is willing to come to work on time, work as part of a team, take initiative, problem-solve, and ultimately get the job done. The sense seems to be that too many employees may not understand that those kinds of skills are also part of the job requirement. Classroom Experience vs. On-the-Job Experience – How do we ensure that teachers, professors, and instructors understand the work environment outside the classroom, especially if they’ve been teaching

“IF WE AGREE THAT THE COMMUNITY SUCCEEDS WHEN EMPLOYERS SUCCEED, THEN WE HAVE TO FIGURE OUT WAYS TO HELP THEM DO THE BEST THEY CAN. AND WE HAVE TO FIGURE OUT A WAY TO HELP THE EMPLOYEES DO THE BEST THEY CAN AS WELL.”

“OUR WORKFORCE PARTNERS, EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS AND CITIZENS HAVE THE WHEREWITHAL TO ADDRESS THE WORKFORCE ISSUES AS A COMMUNITY. THIS REPORT AND OUR ACTION PLAN WILL DEFINE A PATH THAT WE CAN TAKE TO ACHIEVE THE SUCCESS THAT OUR EMPLOYERS AND OUR WORKFORCE DESERVE.”

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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016

for 10-20 years? How do we familiarize educators with current work trends in the workplace? And how effectively can we really train students for the work environment inside a classroom setting? Perhaps one answer could be internships, apprenticeships, and mentorships to give students more practical experience. Succession Planning – As current leadership and upper management approach retirement age, how do we ensure there are qualified personnel with the right combination of practical experience and soft skills (along with a working knowledge of the history and culture of the company) to replace them? Employer Training and Continuing Education – How do we adjust to the generational and cultural gap between senior leadership and younger employees? How do we enhance communication in the workplace? How do we address changing expectations within the younger workforce? “This initial process reinforced for the sponsoring partners what the issue are,” Mountjoy admitted, with a hint of realistic optimism in her voice. “But those issues are complex. It’s not as simple as a blanket statement.” The sessions were the beginning of what is intended to be an ongoing process. At present, a consultant is compiling the feedback from the listening sessions. Included in the final report will be a page of suggested next steps in addressing the issues.

MOVING FORWARD After the report is finished, each participant will receive a copy before it is released to the general public. That report will include a list of next steps along with an invitation to participate in any of the suggested activities in which employers are interested. The intent is to involve a wide range of stakeholders in developing responses to the issues that have been raised. Those suggestions may include things such as: • Organizing a Business/Education Partnership Council to address issues of concern to both business and education • Encouraging businesses to provide internships, apprenticeships, and mentorships to give students practical, hands-on experience in the work environment • Exploring ways to utilize local resources to more efficiently and economically find qualified applicants • Addressing the issue of improving soft skills • Developing a tool that can be used to help job seekers better understand what employers are looking for which would consequently help make applicants better candidates while at the same time allow employers to better communicate to potential employees. Long term, Mountjoy hopes the Workforce Development Sessions will be the impetus for a focused but on-going system in our community to address the issues that have been raised throughout the sessions. “I think it’s very important to realize this is a community-wide issue. This is going to be a collaboration. These issues can’t be solved by one entity. It’s going to take all of us to make sure this process works. The rollout of the report will be in late summer/early fall.


GREATER OWENSBORO DELEGATION

On April 27-29, a delegation of Chamber members and elected leaders embarked upon on a whirlwind trip to Washington D.C. Business owners, ag leaders, local and state government officials, entrepreneurs, and foundation directors flew from Mid America Jet to Dulles International Airport (DC) for two days of briefings, updates, and face to face meetings with Senators and Congressmen, including stops at the White House and United States Capitol Building.

BY DANNY MAY DESIGN BY AMANDA SHANKS

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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016


What the delegates experienced on the trip was best summarized by the delegates as

“eye opening, thought provoking, and inspiring - if not challenging.”

Chamber officials planned the trip to create coordinated access and advocacy for the

community. While Owensboro people may go to DC during the year regarding their own specific business or organization interests, there has not been a delegation of this size visit for the sole purpose of representing the community. Most other larger communities around the state make these trips together annually.

County Judge/Executive Al Mattingly led the delegation as the community’s chief local

elected official on the trip, while State Senator Joe Bowen and State Representative Tommy Thompson acted as the community’s bi-partisan state delegates.

It is important for Greater Owensboro to be seen as a community who is paying

attention to issues impacting us on a federal level.

A by-product of the trip was the community building that occurred. “The secondary

goal from the Chamber’s perspective was for our people to bond and gel over the course of the trip. Those relationships only make our community stronger” said CEO Candance Brake. “You have people from ag sitting next to people from banking, or entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. For two straight days, people from different business backgrounds had conversations and shared thoughts and ideas. Great things can come out of those connections.”

The Fly-In also demonstrates to the Senators and Congressmen that Owensboro is

paying attention and wants to be heard on important issues that impact our community.

The face-to-face meetings were held in a meeting room in the U.S. Capitol Building

that Majority Leader McConnell’s staff reserved for the group.

Several key staffers from each Congressional and Senate offices were also on hand. The

staff connections are extremely valuable to our community. Face-to-face meetings with them creates valuable dialogue in addressing issues in the future.

Steve Johnson, VP of Government and Community Affairs at Owensboro Health, said

having a meeting room in the Capitol made it convenient for the Kentucky Congressional delegation to attend. “It also made it much easier on the Owensboro delegation, not having

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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016

to travel from the House and Senate side for multiple meetings.​”


“SPENDING THREE DAYS WITH OTHER LEADERS WITHIN OUR COMMUNITY IS THE GREATEST BENEFIT OF A TRIP LIKE THIS. BEING IN THE FINANCIAL SERVICES INDUSTRY, UNDERSTANDING WHAT GOVERNMENT ROAD BLOCKS ARE AND WHAT BUSINESSES MUST DO TO OVERCOME THOSE OBSTACLES WAS ENLIGHTENING.” Michael F. Beckwith President and CEO, First Security Bank

“FOR ME IT’S WHAT’S OUR FEDERAL DELEGATION LEARNED FROM US RATHER THAN WHAT WE LEARNED FROM THEM. ANY TIME THEY GET DIRECT INPUT FROM BUSINESS PEOPLE AND LOCAL OFFICIALS OUTSIDE OF THE BELTWAY IT’S IMPORTANT. LISTENING TO US SHOULD BE CRITICAL TO THEM.” Senator Joe Bowen Bowen Tire

“I THINK THE TRIP WAS EXTREMELY BENEFICIAL AS WE GOT TO ENGAGE EACH MEMBER OF THE GROUP IN A RELAXED BUT MEANINGFUL WAY. BY DOING SO, WE GAINED A BROADER PERSPECTIVE CONCERNING THE MAJOR ISSUES CONFRONTING OUR CITY, COUNTY, AND THE COMMONWEALTH AS A WHOLE.” Bob Glenn Owensboro City Commissioner

MAJOR AGENDA ITEMS DURING THE TRIP INCLUDED: • A Priorities Briefing with Governor Bevin’s DC Director, Lee Ann Veach • White House Briefing with Jerry Abramson, Deputy Assistant to the President and several staffers • Capitol Hill briefings with Congressman Brett Guthrie, Senator Rand Paul, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, and Appropriation and Revenue Chairman Hal Rogers • Congressional Updates on Legislation, Transportation, and Trade Policy from United States Chamber Officials

By all accounts, the trip was incredibly successful. So much so that the Chamber

plans to continue to host a DC Fly-In every other April. “The trip was very well organized,” said Jack Wells. “I think the legislators appreciated our effort of time and costs to make the trip. We want them to think about the success of OwensboroDaviess County in the decisions they make.”

DELEGATION SNAPSHOT: • 6,691 - Combined Workforce • $69 million – Philanthropic Capacity • $368.9 million – Combined Payroll • Overall Economic Impact of $1.1067 billion

“AS BUSINESS LEADERS FROM ALL SPECTRUMS OF THE COMMUNITY, WE WERE GIVEN A PLATFORM TO SPEAK ON BEHALF OF GREATER OWENSBORO.” Matt Castlen President, Castlen Steel

“IN MORE THAN TWO DECADES OF WORKING AND/OR LOBBYING ON CAPITOL HILL, THIS VISIT WAS AMONG THE BEST. MOST NOTABLY, WHEN YOU ARE ABLE TO HAVE MEMBERS OF THE KENTUCKY CONGRESSIONAL DELEGATION IN THE SAME ROOM AT THE SAME TIME LISTENING AND DISCUSSING THEIR VIEWS WITH KEY MEMBERS OF THEIR CONSTITUENCY, A LOT GETS DONE.” Steve Johnson VP of Government and Community Affairs, Owensboro Health

“I WOULD RECOMMEND THE TRIP TO ANYONE. OUR GROUP CONSISTED OF FOLKS FROM DIFFERENT BACKGROUNDS AND OF DIFFERENT PROFESSIONS, BUT I BELIEVE THAT ALL WOULD AGREE THAT THE TRIP WAS WORTH THE TIME AND THE EXPENSE.” Mark Martin VP of Rates and Regulatory Affairs, Atmos Energy

“I WAS IMPRESSED THAT OUR LEGISLATORS AND THEIR STAFF TOOK THE TIME TO ANSWER EVERY QUESTION WE PUT FORTH TO THEM. THEY WERE VERY KNOWLEDGEABLE OF THE ISSUES AND CONCERNS OF OWENSBORO/ DAVIESS COUNTY.” Jack Wells Owner, Wells Health Systems CEO, Canteen Service Company

“THE STAFF OF THE GREATER OWENSBORO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE DID A MASTERFUL JOB OF ALLOWING THE PARTICIPANTS TO ADDRESS BOTH OUR COMMUNITY PRIORITIES, AS WELL AS THEIR RESPECTIVE INDUSTRY’S PRIORITIES, WITH OUR LEGISLATIVE DELEGATION. I BELIEVE THIS EFFORT WILL BENEFIT OUR COMMUNITY BOTH NOW AND IN THE FUTURE.” Sara Hemingway Executive Director, The Marilyn and William Young Charitable Foundation

“I WAS VERY IMPRESSED WITH THE INTEREST AND QUALITY OF THE DELEGATES THAT WERE ON THE TRIP. THEY REPRESENTED A BROAD CROSS-SECTION OF COMMUNITY ACTIVISTS WHO WERE ALL FOCUSED AND SPOKE WITH A COMMON VOICE IN ADVOCATING FOR OUR COMMUNITIES PRIORITIES.” State Representative Tommy Thompson

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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016


DOS & DON’TS

FROM YOUR RIBBON CUTTING SPECIALISTS AT THE CHAMBER

THE BASICS:

DO:

Chamber ribbon cutting programs are almost always scheduled from

cuttings are scheduled during the lunch hour, people will leave early

12:15-12:45 p.m., followed by mingling and networking.

to grab lunch if food is not provided at the ribbon cutting. There is no right or wrong; we see everything from finger food and snacks to

AGENDA: The business owner is given the opportunity to explain the business. Then elected officials and Chamber Ambassadors are introduced,

catered, hot food. •

Be there on time. Chamber Ambassadors arrive early to get everything ready for the 30-minute program. People expect to come,

followed by a plaque presentation and a small appreciation gift from

hear the program, network, eat and get back to work in an hour, so it’s

the Chamber.

important to start on time. •

Promote and market it on your own. Get the word out through social

GUIDELINES:

media. Your business is something to be excited about. Inviting friends

Chamber ribbon cuttings are primarily for announcing new members

and family usually brings in another 15-20 people, which makes for

as well as significant name changes, new senior management, major

a nice crowd. Having fliers out in the community and promoting

expansion or renovation (exceeding $100,000), and relocations or second locations.

WHAT TO SAY AT A RIBBON CUTTING:

20

Definitely have food. Having food = better crowds. Since ribbon

through radio ads is also very effective. •

Be creative. Putting your business’s personal touch on things makes the ribbon cutting more memorable for guests.

DO NOT:

Short overview of services

Quick history of the business

The reason for expansion/relocation/second location (if applicable)

the support of the Chamber and having met many other Chamber

Introduction of staff/officers/board members

members in the community.

GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016

Do NOT stress about your ribbon cutting. It’s supposed to be fun. Our goal is that you come away from your ribbon cutting feeling

PHOTO BY DAVID GRINNELL

RIBBON CUTTING


Do NOT go overboard. There’s no

cuttings. They get people excited for the

need to go above your means for a

weekend.

ribbon cutting. The important thing is

Outdoor photos are preferred. The best photo ops are in front of a logo, sign or

through the ribbon cutting. Fancy

marquee – the goal is to promote the

decorations and expensive food are not

business and brands do that best. In case

what matters in the grand scheme of

of inclement weather, indoor photos by a

things.

banner or logo work just fine.

Do NOT go all-out with the scissors.

Take full advantage of your Chamber

Sometimes if you give it too much force,

membership. Contact the Chamber for

the scissors will end up folding the

assistance in designing fliers, scheduling

ribbon without cutting it. They are heavy

radio ads, and other promotional

and sharp enough to cut the ribbon, so let

materials.

the scissors do the work. •

to introduce people to your business

During the actual photo, we do a practice

Do NOT forget about radio ads.

shot where everyone poses with big

Remember, we provide free radio ads

smiles and the scissors are held open over

on our Cromwell Radio partner stations.

the ribbon. That is followed by the “3-2-

They are very helpful in getting the word

1” countdown for the actual photo.

out.

Invite your neighbor businesses! We love member-to-member support.

OTHER HELPFUL TIPS: •

Fridays are a great day for ribbon

Shop local and shop Chamber Members. We believe in Owensboro.

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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016


LEADERSHIP OWENSBORO GIVES PARTICIPANTS AN INSIDE LOOK AT CITY By Jacqueline Jordan

T

he leadership development program, Leadership Owensboro, has been around since the 1980’s and has an alumni base of more than 1,000 participants — but what’s a year like in the

“Each day is a different look at the community,” said Jessica

Kirk, Executive Director of Leadership Owensboro. “You learn

long-running program?

what we do well and what we could do better. You’ve got this group

of passionate people, genuinely invested in making Owensboro

A partnership between the Greater Owensboro Chamber

of Commerce and Greater Owensboro Economic Development Corporation (EDC), Leadership Owensboro (briefly known as Emerge Owensboro) takes a group of 25-30 business and

better, looking at all of these angles that make up who we are.”

Kirk said two of the most talked about days are the human

needs and services day and the education day.

On human needs and services day, each participant is

community leaders from all sectors and ages, and immerses them

provided with a scenario for the day. Some are told they’re single

in an eye-opening 9-month program. Participants are chosen

parents, some have elderly parents in need of care, while others are

through an application process and announced at a Chamber Rooster Booster Breakfast.

second shift workers seeking child care. Each participant has an objective for the day, such as applying for a social service. The group eats lunch at the homeless shelters and they have to spend the day

The 2015-2016 class of 27 participants was announced in

getting around Owensboro on foot and by public transportation.

September, and have been introduced to different aspects of the

Kirk said it provides the opportunity to put themselves in someone

city through the program’s varied curriculum.

The program — which runs September to May — allowed

participants to leave their occupations one day each month to learn

else’s shoes.

“I’ve always thought that I fully understood what people

have to go through that are less fortunate than I. I had no clue,” said Dave Kirk, Owensboro Public Schools Information Officer. “When

about different facets of Owensboro. After orientation, class days

you’re literally homeless for a day, Owensboro becomes a different

focused on human needs and services, education, innovation and

place for you. I believe that our community goes above and beyond

growth, local government, healthcare, jail, crime and drugs, and quality of life and arts. There’s also a trip to the State Capitol to see legislation in progress.

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AN INSIDE LOOK

GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016

to help people in need, but there’s so much more that needs to be done.”

Education day was previously one spent listening to

speakers, but it’s much more immersive now. The group splits


up and goes to different schools for the first half of the day where

Daviess County Judge Executive, Al Mattingly, City Commissioner,

they observe and get to speak with the principals, teachers, students,

Bob Glenn and Chamber Board Chair, Adam Hancock.

resource workers and parents. Then the entire LO class then comes

together at lunch to share what they learned. The participants visit all

winner, put together by the group of Chris Arnold, Tina Lynch, Sarah

levels of schools, both city and county, and alternative education.

Clay Mardam-Bey, Lt. Gordon Black and Kaitlyn Moore.

“It’s eye-opening for a lot of people and it pulls on everyone’s

The outside judges chose the Homework Diner project as their

Homework Diner was a partnership with Tamarack

hearts,” said Jessica Kirk. She said participants witness hard truths such

Elementary School — a night where students and their parents could

as students not being ready to learn when they get to school because of

have dinner at the school and do their homework, while getting help

family issues that took place the night before.

from staff. Teachers spent time tutoring students and teaching parents

“You get a special insight into the city,” Kirk continued.

how to help with homework. For many, it was nice just to have a meal

“The class can see firsthand how education ties to crime and jails in

prepared for them while they spent time with their family. The students

Owensboro. You can learn more in nine months than your whole life,

and parents who stayed to the end of the homework session won prizes,

whether you’re new, or born and raised in Owensboro. It gives you

and enough prizes were donated that every student won something.

a new appreciation for everything. That is what is so unique about

The group received handwritten feedback from students and parents

Leadership Owensboro.”

who attended. Everyone said they believed it was beneficial, and want

to see it on a regular basis next year.

Chris Arnold of First Security Bank was born, raised and

educated in Owensboro, but felt the program had something to offer.

“There were many working parts of this community that I didn’t

one-on-one time with my mom, away from my sisters and brother,”

understand how they operated,” he said. “The overall experience was

and “I’m happy because I got to spend time with my dad who usually

very enlightening. Sometimes I laughed, was angered, and teared up

works late.”

all on the same day.”

stress-free dinner which enabled me to spend time with my kids,” and

Arnold said the program allows you to see things that the

general public often doesn’t have access to.

Some comments from students included: “It was nice to have

Comments from parents included: “It was great to have a

“It was fun to meet some of the other Tamarack parents.” The plan is to continue next year and extend into more schools.

GROUP PROJECTS

Lt. Gordon Black of the Owensboro Police Department said

There are several requirements for graduation from the

he enjoyed working with his classmates on the Homework Diner

program, including an interview, setting leadership goals, attendance

project. “Everyone was very passionate about what we were trying to

and participation at Rooster Booster, attending City and County

accomplish,” he said. “The staff at Tamarack Elementary embraced the

meetings and an Owensboro Police Department ride-along. There’s

project as well, volunteering time to help.” And the kids weren’t the

also the group project, where participants are placed in groups to

only ones who had a good night. “The most enjoyable part for me was

develop a project that would serve the community. The projects are

watching the students interact with their families and school staff. The

evaluated by outside judges as well as the class. The program often

parents in attendance seemed to enjoy the program as much as the

turns competitive for bragging rights.

students.”

Judges for this year were EDC Board Chair, Scott McCain,

The class chose another education-related project as their

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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016


winner: A Field of Opportunity – An Urban Student’s Role In

of many of the resources available for the citizens in Owensboro.

Agriculture. This project by Dave Kirk, Suzanne Cecil White, Laura

Owensboro is fortunate to have many leaders who are strong advocates

Chapman and Morgan Ford worked with Estes Elementary School and

for this community.”

Cecil Farms to teach students about the economic impact agriculture

has on our region. Students had the opportunity to visit a working farm and plant a school garden.

The group was surprised how few children growing up in this

agricultural region had actually visited a farm. That may not be the case for long, as other local farms have agreed to adopt schools and keep the program going.

“We hope the project will continue to grow and that

some initial partnerships we introduced between local farms and Owensboro elementary schools will become lasting friendships,” said Dave Kirk. “It was incredibly powerful to hear the support we got from teachers for our project.”

THE TAKEAWAY

Recent graduates of the program can’t sing its praises loud

enough.

Kaitlyn Moore, of Don Moore Corporate, said she had a great

experience with Leadership Owensboro and is constantly encouraging

24

Moore added that she enjoyed the bond formed with other

class members. “I felt by the end of the class we had all really gotten to know one another,” she said. “Our class had people with different backgrounds and experiences that all wanted to learn more about the community. I am excited to see the great things my classmates will do in the future for Owensboro.”

Suzanne Cecil White, of Cecil Farms, agrees. “Others should

participate because they don’t know what they don’t know,” she said. “We all tend to think we already know all about Owensboro, especially if we’ve been here for decades. However, we have no idea what we are missing in our knowledge base until we experience it. I also find a great value in the new friendships I developed in this class. I loved connecting with so many others that I might not have encountered on a personal level otherwise.”

Graduation from the program, presented by Western

Kentucky University – Owensboro, takes place in May and alumni are always invited to attend the ceremony. As the groups form tight

others to apply. “I enjoyed learning about the problems faced by our

bonds over the months they spend together and the lessons learned,

community, but the most rewarding aspect was learning about all

the ceremony is both a graduation and a reunion for alumni.

people and organizations in place already working to combat many

of the issues faced by our community,” Moore said. “I was unaware

contact the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce.

GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016

To learn more about participating in Leadership Owensboro,


SPOTLIGHT

EDUCATION AND WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

U OF L SCHOOL OF NURSING

The University of Louisville School of Nursing Owensboro Extension provides the option for students in the Greater Owensboro area to pursue a Bachelor degree of Science in Nursing (BSN) locally.

O

nly approximately a third of Registered Nurses in the

and program pre-requisites have been met. Aside from in-

region currently hold a BSN degree. The Institute of

class lectures, students receive hands-on experience in labs

Medicine has made the recommendation that a minimum

and in the community. Clinical settings providing these

of 80% of RNs in direct patient care hold a BSN degree by

hands-on interactive opportunities include Owensboro

the year 2020. Due to this recommendation, BSN prepared

Health Regional Hospital, clinics, schools, community

nurses are in high demand in health organizations across the nation. In working toward this goal, the UofL School of Nursing Owensboro Extension seeks to increase the baccalaureate attainment rate of the Greater Owensboro area. At this time, the UofL Owensboro BSN Program is the only traditional format option for local students to pursue a bachelor’s

non-profit organizations, and more. Through this local support, students can participate in patient teaching, health promotion, and preventative health care experiences.

GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

The ultimate objective of the program is to improve the

health of citizens in the region by training nurses ready to educate the community, provide a high level of quality

degree to become a Registered Nurse.

patient care, and take preventative measures to increase

Students in the program complete all nursing courses

positive patient outcomes.

in Owensboro once all general education requirements

From the students’ perspective, the objective is to provide

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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016


a local opportunity for students seeking access to an accredited and

Hospital, which has provided fiscal resources, physical facilities

Kentucky Board of Nursing approved BSN program.

and other support, including personnel expertise, and access to clinical sites and high fidelity simulation equipment.

100% SUCCESS RATE

To provide opportunities for student learning activities and

The UofL program has been successful in preparing BSN

experiences, the UofL School of

graduates who are functioning in a variety of health care settings in

Nursing has teamed with many

the community. Graduates work in hospitals, clinics, community

other

community

agencies and other areas where the health of the people of the

such

as

region can be improved. Of December 2014 graduates, 90% passed

Public Schools, Owensboro

the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX) to become

Public Schools, Green River Area Development District, Health

an RN on the first attempt. Ultimately, 100% of graduates passed

Department, the Boulware Mission, Pitino Shelter, River Valley

the exam and received licensure. In May 2015, 100% of graduates

Behavioral Health, Hospice, Wendell Foster Center and more.

passed the examination on the first attempt.

The program also works closely with OCTC, Brescia, and KWC

Daviess

agencies, County

STUDENTS RANGE FROM TRADITIONAL COLLEGE AGE THROUGH ADULTS RETURNING TO SCHOOL FOR A SECOND CAREER AFTER RETIREMENT.

to create local pathways into the program for students interested

COMMUNITY PARTNERS

in earning a BSN. Students at these institutions have access to the

Owensboro BSN admissions counselor and academic advisor to

The success of the program is partly due to multiple community

partnerships. A primary partner is Owensboro Health Regional

assist in the preparation for transitioning into the BSN program.

UOFL SCHOOL OF NURSING - OWENSBORO | 270-688-5112 1000 BRECKENRIDGE ST., SUITE 400 | OWENSBORO, KENTUCKY 42303

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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016


11-50 EMPLOYEES

PHOTO BY JASON TANNER

FETTA

SPECIALTY PIZZA & SPIRITS

S

ince Fetta Specialty Pizza and Spirits opened its doors in September of 2013, Fetta has built a reputation for excellent atmosphere, spectacular service, and interesting menu offerings featuring only the finest of ingredients. Specializing in hand tossed, brick oven baked pizza, Fetta is also known for salads, calzones, and their famous bread knots. Fetta, which is Italian for “slice,” offers indoor and outdoor seating with beautiful downtown views of the Ohio River and Smothers Park. Fetta’s niche is pizza by the slice, but they’re also known for bread knots and sensational salads. House favorites include Smother’s Park (meats), mashed potato, and pulled pork & mango, along with traditional favorites like veggie, Hawaiian, and BLT. Owners Tim Turner and Mike Baker expanded their downtown location at 118 St. Ann in 2015. The additional seating area upstairs is meant to feel like an indoor patio. It features vinyl windows that allow the dining area to be heated in the winter, air-conditioned in the summer, or rolled up when the weather is nice. Baker and Turner franchised a second location at Lake Forest Town Center on 54 in 2016. Whether dining downtown or out on 54, Fetta is proud to be Owensboro’s hometown pizzeria. You are guaranteed to leave full, yet craving more.

FETTA SPECIALTY PIZZA & SPIRITS | 118 ST. ANN STREET | 270) 926-0005

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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016


OWENSBORO

RIVERPORT CONNECTING O

COMMERCE TO THE WORLD BY NICHOLAS HARDESTY PHOTO BY ADAM PARIS

n March 29, 2016, it was announced that the Owensboro Riverport was chosen as one of six finalists for a Platts Global Metals Award in the category, “Physical Metals Service Provider of the Year.” These awards,

which are hosted annually in London, honor excellence and accomplishments in the global metals industry. Being recognized as a finalist or winner brings unparalleled recognition for the teams and individuals behind these outstanding achievements. While it might have come as a surprise to many to learn that a huge commodities firm in London had recognized anything from Owensboro, for Brian Wright, an Owensboro native and President/CEO of the Riverport, it just affirmed what he already knew: When it comes to the transportation and warehousing of metals, Owensboro, Kentucky is one of the most productive and strategically located regions in the nation, and the Owensboro Riverport is one of the premier inland ports in the Ohio River Valley. “A lot of the major companies rely on Platts for their market information in the metals industry and a lot of other industries,” says Wright. “Platts recognized us as a key player on the aluminum side. We have the London Metal Exchange designation as a ‘good delivery site’ (one of only 10 in the nation), we are a Homeland Security Port, we have the acreage, we reinvest in our infrastructure so that we can do more for others. This area produces and consumes a large amount of aluminum every year. Our employees are absolutely terrific. It’s extremely unique.”

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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016


IMPACT BEYOND OWENSBORO The primary purpose of the Owensboro Riverport is to provide for the taking in and sending out of bulk commodities (e.g. aluminum, grain, fertilizer, etc.) utilizing river, rail, and road. Our riverport’s location on the Ohio River, along with its connection both to a major rail line (the CSX main line) and Kentucky’s highways and parkways, means that the Owensboro Riverport can serve over 50% of the nation’s population. From

needs. “We’re here to find ways to support private industry,” Wright said. “We have several private manufactures in the region that benefit from the Riverport. Our goal is to provide a service that will help grow business and reduce the cost of transporting a commodity.” The Riverport’s tagline is “Connecting Commerce to the World.” Who would have thought that Owensboro, KY could have that kind of reach?

New Orleans, to the Great Lakes, and from Wichita, Kan. to Arlington, Va. goods can be distributed in a cost-efficient manner from the Owensboro Riverport. That means it stays pretty busy. “Last year we brought in almost 1 million tons of goods into the terminal and warehouse, primarily rail and river,” Wright said. “Our customers shipped those out to 160 different ship locations across the region and the Midwest.” Trucks are constantly moving in and out of the port as well. “On any given day we typically move 150-250 outbound trucks,” he added. “On any given point during the peak season for our fertilizer guys, they have 150 trucks coming in to pick up product a day.”

SUPPORTING THE LOCAL COMMUNITY The Owensboro Riverport has an almost nation-wide reach, as well as global recognition, but it does a lot for local industries and manufacturers as well. For example, sometimes local manufacturers need additional storage or choose to outsource their warehousing off site, so they utilize the massive warehouses at the Riverport. Altogether, the Owensboro Riverport has 7 warehouses that provide 500,000 square feet of storage space. The Owensboro Riverport also provides an avenue for farmers on this side of the county and other counties to deliver and sell their grain. “We give them the shortest path to make a turn,” Wright said (a ‘turn’ being the trip back to the port to pick up more product after you’ve already delivered some). “If you live on this side of the county and you need to deliver grain today because it’s raining and you only have one day to do it, you can make three to four turns in a given day and sell your grain off, and then go back to work in the fields the next day.” The Owensboro Riverport is also working with local officials to bring more manufacturers and businesses into the area. They have several acres of land on site that they are grading and preparing for the placement of future factories. “If a major company wants to relocate to the Owensboro area and they have to ship out their goods on railcars, or they have to bring in their raw materials on rail, we have the CSX main line that runs right through our property, so we can do that,” Wright said. Of course, there is also the benefit of being on the Ohio River, and having the capability right there both to unload the barges and store the product for however long the company

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# CUT THE TAPE

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE RED TAPE REDUCTION PROGRAM

What happens to regulations that become obsolete, or when different regulations conflict, or when a regulation simply is not needed any more? Currently, the answer is nothing. BY DANNY MAY - PHOTOS BY JASON TANNER

At

the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce July Rooster Booster Breakfast, we announced

that Governor Bevin has launched a new initiative entitled “Red Tape Reduction.” This initiative is an effort to attack the problem of excessive or unnecessary state government regulations. On July 6, The Governor’s office reported that more than 4,500 state regulations exist in our Commonwealth. Only 15 to 20 percent of those regulations have ever been reviewed for effectiveness or ongoing need. The Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce is

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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016

partnering with Governor Bevin’s Red Tape Reduction


L TO R: JIGNA WILSON OF WILSON FAMILY PHARMACY, ADAM HANCOCK OF RINEY HANCOCK CPAS AND LEIGH ANN KUEGEL OF KENTUCKY FARM BUREAU

program because we hear “red tape” concerns frequently

from our members. In fact, in our last membership

people of our Commonwealth and to promote economic

survey, excessive regulation was the second most

stability, outdated or excessive unnecessary regulations

pressing concern and impediment to doing business

increase the cost of operating and doing business, which

(right after workforce development). The members

ultimately hurts our community’s economic growth.

impacted are across the board. Small businesses, large

corporations,

agriculture…all

Governor Bevin says. “I constantly hear from business

sectors of our membership report this as an impediment.

owners that confusing government mandates and red

As a business owner, Governor Bevin understands

tape are huge challenges for them. This suffocating red

firsthand how difficult it can be for a new or growing

tape is a problem that must be fixed and, with the help

business to be aware of, understand, and comply with

of all Kentuckians, we intend to do just that.”

utilities,

education,

every government regulation.

While many regulations are necessary to protect the

“These costs all get passed through to the consumer,”

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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016


“Any person who has dealt with government at any level, may well have come across a regulation that just doesn’t seem to make sense.

RED TAPE ANNOUNCEMENT LUNCHEON AT THE GOVERNOR’S MANSION ON JUNE 27, 2016. PICTURED: GOV. BEVIN AND CHAMBER REPRESENTATIVES

SO, I INVITE ALL KENTUCKIANS TO CONTACT US WITH THEIR THOUGHTS AND IDEAS. WE NEED ALL HANDS ON DECK TO REDUCE THE AMOUNT OF GOVERNMENT RED TAPE IN THE COMMONWEALTH.” - GOVERNOR MATT BEVIN

A CASE STUDY The program was modeled after the British Columbia Reform Model. Laura Jones from the Canadian Federation of Independent Business met with professional, affiliated membership organizations including chamber executives from around the state explaining the success of the program. In response to the overwhelming success in British Columbia, the Canadian government actually passed a law stating that for every new regulation enacted, one must be removed.

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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016

Why Reduce Red Tape? Eliminating outdated and unnecessary regulations, associated rules, and laws will help: • spur job creation and investment • change the attitude of government from regulation makers • regulation managers (Customer Service) • and therefore help the general public because excessive regulation drives up the cost of the goods consumers buy The Process: The governor has already instructed cabinet secretaries to start a review of all government regulations currently on the books. He is also asking all state employees, including those who enforce these regulations, to offer suggestions for improvement. On a local level, Chambers across the state are partnering with the program, including the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce. How to report: The official website of the initiative is redtapereduction.com. A key feature of the website is the “Report a Regulation” form where the public can identify burdensome regulations and offer suggestions for improvement. Kentuckians are urged to visit the website, click on “Report a Regulation,” fill in the online form boxes, and hit “submit.” This is an excellent opportunity to be heard. The governor has asked for our help gathering input from not only business leaders but from all Kentucky citizens. Former Owensboro mayor and current Kentucky Chamber President, David Adkisson, called the initiative “a long time coming.” “I, on behalf of Kentucky businesses, could not be more pleased that this is taking place,” said Adkisson. “I, Governor Bevin, and our members will take an active role in identifying outdated or cumbersome regulations.” GO Chamber members, let’s cut some tape!


PAID ADVERTISEMENT TWO WAUPACA TECHNICIANS GAIN NEW HYDRAULIC SKILLS USING S TAT E- O F-T H E A RT E Q U I P M E N T D U R I N G A WO R K F O R C E S O LU T I O N S CUSTOMIZED, HANDS-ON, TRAINING COURSE.

OCTC’S WORKFORCE SOLUTIONS A WORLD CLASS TR AINING PA RTNER The old saying goes, “You’re never an expert in your own backyard.” But that’s certainly not the case for companies looking for state of the art training services in the greater Owensboro area! When choosing a training provider for a $350 million dollar expansion focused on changing its North America presence, Aleris Corporation turned to expertise closer to home. While many companies might have turned to a national consulting firm, Aleris selected Owensboro Community and Technical College’s Workforce Solutions division as its workforce development partner of choice. Why? For over twenty years, OCTC’s Workforce Solutions has provided cutting edge services to business and industry across the region, often bringing additional state funding support for projects. A skilled workforce is critically important to any organization’s bottom line which is why the Workforce Solutions team is proud to serve as an ongoing training partner to major corporations. Some of their corporate clients include Kimberly Clark, Domtar, Southern Star, Boardwalk, Owensboro Health, US Bank, GRITS, IBEW, Metalsa, Waupaca, Glenmore, Omico, and OMU. As Aleris’ training partner for its new CALP (Continuous Annealing Line with Pre-Treatment) expansion, OCTC’s Workforce Solutions team has provided extensive support for the company’s selection and training of the workforce for these new processes. The team takes pride in its ability to serve as an integral partner in the success of the CALP launch, as well as in

its ability to meet and exceed the company’s expectations of an external collaborator. Collaborations of this magnitude are not unusual for Workforce Solutions. Another signature project was the team’s landmark partnership with Owensboro Health to train their workforce in preparation for the Electronic Medical Record implementation in 2011-12. Ultimately, the Workforce Solutions team provided OH employees more than 4,900 hours of training with an additional 1,100 + hours of “Go Live” support. Serving approximately 400 companies annually, OCTC’s Workforce Solutions team is the largest and most comprehensive outreach division within the Kentucky Community and Technical College System. With a rich history of working “hand and glove” with economic development stakeholders, elected officials, CEOs, plant managers, as well as human resource and training directors, the Workforce Solutions team specializes in developing value-added solutions to upskill incumbent workers and address industry pipeline needs. The highly experienced Workforce Solutions team offers customized services that range from consultation, research and industrial training design, prehire and skill assessments, leadership/supervisory management/ team development, to hands-on skills training. Recognized for its flexibility and responsiveness, industry-relevant counsel, and ability to develop just-in-time solutions, the team offers services that far surpass typical vendor training partnerships. For further information on Workforce Solutions programs and services, contact Cindy Fiorella at 270-686-4446.

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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016


LUCAS WIMAN

DYLAN WILLOUGHBY

THE VALUE OF AN INTERNSHIP BY STEVEN WILSON AND DANNY MAY

I

n an increasingly competitive employment market, a college degree is

in their job search by expanding their professional network.”

sometimes not enough to set a job seeker apart from other candidates.

According to David, of the more than 20 undergraduate programs

To separate themselves from their peers in terms of qualifications, college

at WKU-Owensboro, only a few (primarily elementary education and

students know that an internship can be critical in helping them achieve

social work) actually require experiential activities. However, he has

their first position after graduation. This sentiment is backed by a 2015

made it his goal to make internships available to students in every

survey conducted by Looksharp, which owns and operates InternMatch.

field. And with the help of several local companies and organizations,

com, one of the largest internship websites in the nation.

including City of Owensboro, Kentucky Mavericks, and Friday After 5,

Of the 50,000 college students and recent graduates surveyed, 70.8

David is getting close to achieving that goal.

percent of students believed that internships should be a requirement

The Kentucky Mavericks took full advantage of their internship

when obtaining a college degree.

opportunities through WKU-Owensboro and Kentucky Wesleyan

With Brescia University, Kentucky Wesleyan College, WKU-

College, who placed six interns with the team operations during the

Owensboro, and Owensboro Community and Technical College,

school year. (The Mavs also used two high school interns.)

Owensboro is home to many college students, many of whom will soon

Miann Ferris, Director of Marketing, says her goal was to put those

be seeking a start to their careers. Fortunately for those students, our city

interns in real life situations. “Instead of following, I put them in a

offers many opportunities to gain an edge by interning with established

position where they would lead,” she explained. Mav interns were given

businesses and professionals.

hands-on roles in day-to-day operations or game-day operations. After

David Powers works as the Career and Workforce Development

their experience with the team, Ferris believes the interns became

Coordinator at Western Kentucky University, Owensboro Campus. In

“competitive candidates in the sports marketing field.”

that role, he serves as the career counselor, program coordinator, and

OHS grad Felicia Velotta has been interning with Friday After 5 this

internship course instructor for the campus. David champions the idea

summer before she starts at Kentucky Wesleyan College in the fall,

of interning, because as he put it, “For the student, it’s an opportunity to

where she plans to major in music education. Her primary responsibility

‘test drive’ a career path, gain experience in their field of study, earn a

is selling t-shirts on Friday nights and keeping up with inventory, but

professional reference for their resume, and possibly make the difference

Felicia has learned about much more than t-shirts. “I also get to see

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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016


how all the different stages are produced and how much work goes

way to address an elected official, even something as small as tri-

into that. And it’s been interesting to see the different kinds of music

folding a letter. What I’ve learned here, in my two brief summers,

(genres) that are represented at FA5. I’m learning a lot about music,”

I’ll be able to take with me regardless of where I go. On top of the

she said. During the week, Velotta also participates in group emails

workplace experience, the privilege to learn about Owensboro and its

with the FA5 board, where they discuss how the previous event went

community is amazing. I’ve lived here nearly my entire life and the

and what can be improved.

fact that I can come to work and learn something new about our area

Another internship offered here in Owensboro is a position with

everyday has made working at the Chamber that much better.”

the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce. This summer, that

At a small office on Highway 54, Lucas Wiman is interning

position is filled by Dylan Willoughby. Dylan is currently enrolled in

with Tanner+West and Tanner Publishing, where he assists with

his junior year at Western Kentucky University as a Political Science

photography. His photos have appeared in several magazine ads, lots

major. When looking for a summer internship, Dylan turned to

of OwensboroLiving.com posts, and he even took the cover photo for

Candance Brake, President and CEO of the Chamber, who informed

the July issue of Owensboro Parent Magazine. “It’s been interesting to

him of an opening for an intern in her office. In describing his

learn the business side of things,” he said. “And it’s been good for me

motivation for seeking an internship position, Dylan points to the

to see everything that goes into the process of designing ads.” Wiman

opportunities to gain practical experience and to determine if a

will be a senior at Georgetown College in the fall.

certain career field is the right fit.

Malcolm Bryant, President of the Malcolm Bryant Corporation, has

This summer, Dylan’s responsibilities include everything from

utilized interns in several capacities in the past, including customer

answering phones to helping plan ribbon cuttings and Rooster

service, finance, on the construction crew, and in hotel front offices.

Booster breakfasts. And whether it’s administrative assistance or event

“We have been honored to have interns from high school, college and

coordination, Dylan finds value in every aspect of his internship.

even after their formal education is complete,” Bryant said, adding that

When asked about the most valuable part of the experience, he

in his experience interns are serious about learning.

couldn’t narrow it down to just one. “To me, it has to be every single

As Bryant put it, the real joy for an employer is “watching interns

lesson I’ve learned, like how to write a professional letter, the proper

mature and seeing the adventures they realize through the years.”

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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016


10

QUESTIONS JACK WELLS

Business Leader & Entrepreneur

BY DANNY MAY - PHOTO BY LUCAS WIMAN

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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016


YO U S T I L L L I V E I N OWENSB OR O - WHAT H AS KE P T YOU HER E ?

WHO ME NTORE D YOU? / WHO FIRS T RE COGNIZ E D YOUR GIFTS ?

Owensboro will always be home. I’ve traveled

Two individuals that helped me professionally and

all over the world, but you’ll never find any nicer

became close friends are John Bickel, my personal/

people or a place safer to live in.

corporate attorney, and Eugene Hargis, my CPA/

AT T H E TI ME YOU G R AD UATED F ROM KE N T U CKY WESL EYAN COL L EG E - WHAT D I D YO U EXPECT TO B E D OI NG AT T HIS PO I N T I N YOUR CAR EER ? Oh, I knew exactly what my first career would be. I wanted to be a nursing home administrator, which led me to a 30-year career and creating the largest Long Term Care company during its time.

Accountant. Both individuals gave me guidance throughout my career.

WHAT S KILLS DID YOU DE VE LOP E ARLY ON T HAT YOU S T ILL US E E VE RY DAY AS AN E X E CUT IVE ? How to be organized. When you have several projects going on at the same time, you have to stay organized and focused.

W H I C H O F YOUR CU R R ENT B U SI NESS ES D O YO U THI NK YOUR COL L EG E SELF WO U L D B E MOST SU R PR I SED YOU’RE I N VO LVED I N NOW ?

WHICH E NT RE P RE NE UR OR BUS INESS MAN RE ALLY INS P IRES YOU ? AND WHY ?

I think that would be my Canteen/Conti Coffee

I’ve always admired Jack Welch, former CEO of

company. Selling millions of snacks, honey buns,

G.E. I admire him for his ability to motivate his

peanuts, candy, 1.5 million pounds of coffee, and 27

teams, create systems of success and his fairness in

million Coke/Pepsi products last year. I think that

treating people.

would be pretty funny to some of my professors.

W H AT E XPER I ENCES F R OM CHI L DHOOD L AT E R I NF LUENCED YOUR CAR EE R PAT H ? My father taught me my work ethic; work hard and you will be rewarded. My mother taught me that every day could be a sweet and kind day. My brother taught me how to do the right thing and to be nice to people.

WHAT ’S S T ILL ON YOUR BUCKE T LIS T ? Seeing the Egyptian Pyramids and riding in a bobsled.

WHAT LE GACY DO YOU HOP E RIVE RFRONT JAM LE AVES FOR FUT URE GE NE RAT IONS ? I loved my years in Long Term Care and creating an excellent company that cared passionately

D O YO U R EMEMB ER YOUR F I R ST PAYC H ECK? HOW DI D YOU EAR N IT ?

for individuals. But Riverfront JAM (downtown

My first paycheck was May 1970. I made $1.25 an

with buildings that our community will be proud

hour working in the laundry at Hermitage Nursing

of that promote living, working, and dining

Home.

downtown.

development) will leave downtown Owensboro

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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016


DID ? YOU

KNOW

CORRECT ANSWER: HILLIARD LYONS VICE PRESIDENT, JEREMY EDGE, SCORED SEVEN POINTS IN ONE SECOND DURING A HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL GAME.

FROM PAGE 7

How did he do it? You may not have known this, but back in Jeremy’s basketball days at Apollo, he had quite a shot, which came in very handy in this instance when he was fouled with one second left. He missed the shot but hit both free throws. While he was shooting those free throws, the opposing coach was called for

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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016

a technical, giving Jeremy two more foul shots, which he made again. (4 pts). Because of the technical foul, Apollo got the ball back, inbounding to Jeremy, who swished it from about half court for three more, totaling seven points in one second. The event made national press, including a mention by Paul Harvey.


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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016


200 E 3rd St, Owensboro, KY 42303 (270) 926-1860 http://chamber.owensboro.com

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GO BUSINESS . THIRD QUARTER 2016

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID OWENSBORO KY 42301 PERMIT NO 420

GO Business Q3 2016  

Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce

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