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GO CHAMBER . SECOND QUARTER 2017


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FROM THE CHAMBER CANDANCE CASTLEN BRAKE Welcome to the Food Edition of our GO Chamber! We wanted to craft this edition to demonstrate the many ways that our members put food on tables across Owensboro. From the farmers and their workers who grow our food, to the truck drivers who transport, the manufacturers and grocery workers who get the goods to our table to those who prepare and then serve us, our economy is driven by food production. Just think of all of the jobs in our local economy related to food! We wind up this edition celebrating one of our own that we lost, Rick Kamuf. We had selected Rick

President & CEO

when we were first working on the edition to do the 10 Questions feature that we do in each edition. We knew that Rick would not feel comfortable talking about himself, but we also knew he would not say no to helping us! Rick suddenly passed away the weekend before the interview. So we were even more determined to share his essence. We are doing it in the words of others. We hope you enjoy this edition. And we ask that the next time you sit down to a meal, think of all of the lives that touched the one plate. It is truly moving to contemplate.

WADE JENKINS Like always, the Chamber has been very busy lately. As I look back at the past few weeks, there are several accomplishments that make me very proud of the work our Chamber does. The 2017 Leadership Owensboro class just finished up, which is always a reason to celebrate. But this year the Chamber got a nice “pat on the back” for the Leadership Owensboro program when Alorica called the Chamber and asked Jessica and the staff to do a similar experience for the Alorica leadership team. So, of course, the Chamber staff got right to work, like they always do, and pulled together a four-day training. The Alorica leadership was so impressed by the program they asked for several more days. That’s not something that made headlines, but I saw it as a great success. To bring a company that size to town is huge for our community, but for our Chamber to engage them into the community that quickly was something I am truly proud of.

Board Chair

Just before that, the Chamber once again embarked on a DC Fly-In where we had a few nice wins. During the Fly-In, we met with Secretary of Transportation, Elaine Choa, and J. Todd Inman to secure an “Owensboro” sign at the 231/I-64 Dale exit, and we continued to discuss a sign for the Interstate Spur. I feel those two things alone made the Fly-In worth the time and effort of our trip. In the meantime, we continued to chip away at the City budget proposal and our One-for-One initiative. Although there was still a tax increase from 1.39% to 1.78%, when we started the process, it was just over a 2% proposed increase. We believe our efforts to make that process more transparent brought public attention to the tax increase, and any decrease was victory for the Chamber and the hard working people of Owensboro. I continue to be amazed at the work our Chamber can accomplish when we all work together. -Wade Jenkins, 2017 Chamber Board Chair Market President, Old National Bank

ON THE COVER: “The hands that feed us: farm to table.” Billy Reid (L), representing the farm and agriculture sector of our membership, hands produce to Chef Buddy McCarter, representing the food and beverage sector of our membership.

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GO CHAMBER . SECOND QUARTER 2017


PUBLISHER/CREATIVE DIRECTOR Jason Tanner jason@tannerwest.com

FEATURES:

2ND QUARTER 2017

MANAGING EDITOR

Danny May danny@tannerpublishing.com

ADVERTISING SALES

Brock Quinton brock@tannerpublishing.com Robert Williams robert@tannerpublishing.com

COPY EDITOR

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BISCUITS, BACON & BAR-B-Q

Ashley Gleason

GRAPHIC DESIGN

8 18 23

THE CHAMBER REPORT

28 34 36

A SLICE OF OWENSBORO PIZZA HISTORY

42

10 MEMORIES

46

THE FINAL ANALYSIS

Taylor West

LAYOUT DESIGN

Andrea Roberson Jamie Alexander

PHOTOGRAPHERS David Grinnell Taylor West Jamie Alexander

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LIKE FAMILY

PRINTING

Greenwell Chisholm Owensboro, Kentucky

CONTACT INFORMATION:

Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce 200 E. 3rd St., Owensboro, KY 42303 (270) 926-1860 chamber.owensboro.com

TANNER PUBLISHING CO.

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A PLACE TO MEET

IN THEIR WORDS 2017 BUSINESS OF THE YEAR SPOTLIGHT Dalisha’s Desserts Independence Bank

PRODUCE DELIVERY FLAVOR PROFILES Special Advertising Section

Rick Kamuf; A Life of Service, Kindness and Encouragement

Jaclyn Graves

DID ? YOU

KNOW Owensboro is a food town. Can you guess the economic impact of the International Bar-B-Q Festival? FIND OUT ON PAGE 45 7

GO CHAMBER . SECOND QUARTER 2017


THE CHAMBER REPORT

SETTING THE TABLE

THE

READING LIST Reviewed By: Patrick Bosley 3rd Generation Owner, Moonlite Bar-B-Q Inn

AUTHOR: DANNY MEYER

Overview: A modern parable on customer service based on a mix of common sense and autobiography. (Push through the first chapters; it picks up steam around Chapter 4).

Moonlite agree

The Takeaway: 1) Danny points out, it’s human nature for people to take precisely as much interest in you as they believe you’re taking in them.

employee level,

2) There is no stronger way to build relationships than taking a genuine interest in other human beings and allowing them to share their stories. When we take an active interest in the guests at our restaurants, we create a sense of community and a feeling of shared ownership.

job skills, but

that this must happen not just at the manager level, but at the too. Hiring the right people for not just their also their fit into the restaurant family, is important. Try asking your customer where they are from or what brought them in today. The opportunity to make someone feel special is all around you, just look under the rocks.

Being a family owned business, Moonlite really gets this. Our customers often talk about the restaurant as if it is theirs. They can’t wait to share it with their friends. It is more than just the food, it is about them feeling important and a part of something. Danny Meyer and

Remember to listen, it can make a connection. Hospitality can exist only when there is human dialogue. Don’t just greet; be a part of their community and they will be a part of yours.

BY THE NUMBERS OWENSBORO REGIONAL

FARMERS’ MARKET SATURDAYS APRIL - OCTOBER 8AM - 1PM (TRIPLETT LOCATION) WEDNESDAYS MAY - AUGUST 1:30-5PM (OWENSBORO HEALTH REGIONAL HOSPITAL)

35

booths on average during peak season (June-July) with guest vendors, food trucks, student groups and community organizations.

100,000+ 30

pounds of produce

vendors

28 50+ 1000s Saturdays from April - October

varieties of produce

of visitors

Located at 1205 Triplett Street, Owensboro Regional Farmers’ Market is a community supported farmer’s market that provides local access to farm fresh products, a resource for a healthier lifestyle, and education concerning food and sustainable agriculture.

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FOOD FOR THOUGHT

ON THE RECORD

As a national brand, how do you keep a local feel in your Owensboro franchise? BEEF ‘O’ BRADY’S

“We strive to make our Owensboro Beef ’s feel like a local neighborhood hangout. My husband, Barry, and I are Owensboro natives and we wanted to provide people in our community with a place ‘where everybody knows your name,’ like an extension of our own home.

>>

SABRINA STOERMER

We don’t have much staff turnover so our guests may have the same server over and over again for years and our staff gets to know our guests and their kids so well that they don’t even have to order because we already know what they want. We have glass table tops that our guest can stick pictures of themselves and their kids under which makes them feel like that is “their” table and they want to sit at that particular table every time they come in to eat. And of course, nothing brings people together like sports and during UK basketball games; it’s like a party at your friend’s house with the whole place cheering on the Wildcats!” -STACY BRATCHER, OWNER

<< CHICK-FIL-A

“We at Chick-fil-A are very community minded. We not only invite the community into our store, literally, with backstage tours, we participate in school events, such as Milk Day, All Pro Dads, sporting events, and to come in the near future, a Leadership Academy sponsored completely by Chick-fil-A. We also participate in local community events such as Cruise Ins with Sunset Cruisers, the Air Show, as well as plan and execute events for our community, such as our Daddy-Daughter Date Nights, Mother-Son Date Nights, 50’s nights, Touch a Truck events, and Kids Nights at various times throught out the year. Some of these events are suggested by corporate and materials given, but we put our own Owensboro flair on each opportunity to share that emotional connection and of course our tasty food.” -DANA GOODLETT, MARKETING DIRECTOR BEN BRUMLEY

JARED TAYLOR

GREAT HARVEST BREAD COMPANY

>>

“That’s an easy one for us, because Great Harvest operates as a ‘freedom franchise.’ We source our wheat through Great Harvest that comes from local farms in Montana but everything else we do is a local decision. We decide what breads we’ll make everyday, what our sandwich and salad recipes are, where we get our produce, and what coffee we serve - all designed to fit local tastes and desires. Our two locations were designed by us to be part of Owensboro. Every Great Harvest is unique to its own community across the country. That’s what makes us special and really a local kind of franchise.” -GREG GARRARD, OWNER

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THE CHAMBER REPORT

CHAMBER BEHIND THE SCENES:

MAKING THE MAGAZINE

GO Chamber is the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce’s quarterly publication that is published by Tanner Publishing Co. The issue is unveiled at Rooster Booster breakfast in the last month of each quarter: March, June, September, and December. Ever wonder what goes into each issue?

• •

Articles submitted to editor Magazine layout and design begins

3 WEEKS OUT • •

Final photos, infographics, and columns assembled Cover photo shoot

2 MONTHS BEFORE PRINT DEADLINE

2 WEEKS OUT

• • •

10 DAYS OUT

First content meeting (held in Candance’s office) to brainstorm ideas for content Decide on articles Plan “theme” for issue Pitch a few ideas for cover photo

7 WEEKS OUT • •

Feature articles assigned to freelance writers Ad sales begin

6 WEEKS OUT •

Regular content compiled by Chamber staff and Tanner Publishing

5 WEEKS OUT •

Photos scheduled for feature articles

4 WEEKS OUT • •

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Follow-up meeting to finalize any remaining details Planning begins for cover photo

GO CHAMBER . SECOND QUARTER 2017

Proof sent to Chamber for edits, changes, and suggestions Final changes made to proof

8 DAYS OUT •

Magazine uploaded to Greenwell-Chisholm for printing

1ST THURSDAY OF THE LAST MONTH OF EACH QUARTER •

Magazine unveiled at Rooster Booster

CONSTANT/NEVERENDING •

Jessica and Danny get inspiration and ideas from other magazines, publications, blogs, conversations... really anything and everything that could potentially lead to an interesting idea for GO Chamber.


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THE CHAMBER REPORT

MEMBERS IN THE NEWS

MITCH SETTLE IN OWENSBORO For the seventh consecutive year, Mitch Settle was named to Barron’s list of top financial advisors. Settle, a Financial Consultant in Hilliard Lyons’ Owensboro branch, is also a Senior Vice President and a member of the firm’s CEO Council. He ranks # 3 on Barron’s list of top financial advisors in Kentucky (up from # 8 last year). Settle and his team offer financial planning, retirement planning, and estate planning for businesses and individuals.

to encourage our students to engage in their community and solve problems through means of civil discourse, cooperation, and compromise.” The Wendell H. Ford Statesmanship Academy is a non-partisan program for local area high school students who have an interest in public service and developing their leadership skills. The Academy strives to teach students about the issues facing their community, state, and nation, as well as the three principles by which Senator Wendell Ford conducted his work: civil discourse, cooperation, and the willingness to compromise. Ford was chosen out of hundreds of applicants from across Kentucky’s 16 regions. “I humbly accept this award on behalf of the many people whose efforts have made this program a success,” Ford stated. “Our current director, Elizabeth Griffith, our former director, Bruce Kunze, our partners at the EDC, Chamber and local school systems, our board, our students, and the entire Ford family have played vital roles. Of course, Wendell remains our inspiration to continue helping students become more informed and prepared citizens who will be ready to make their communities a better place to live.” As the 2017 statewide winner, Ford will be presented a plaque and $1,000 to go toward resources for the Wendell H. Ford Government Education Center during the KHSAA Men’s Basketball Sweet 16 Tournament in Lexington, KY on Thursday, March 16, 2017.

DIANE FORD NAMED 2017 OUTSTANDING CIVIC EDUCATION LEADER On behalf of the Secretary of States office, Diane Ford has been named the 2017 Outstanding Civic Education Leadership Award Winner. This award highlights and rewards individuals for their extraordinary efforts to promote civic engagement among Kentucky students. Ford was nominated for this award for her time and service spent working with students in the Statesmanship Academy at The Wendell H. Ford Government Education Center. “This is such an honor for the Ford Center and wonderful recognition of the accomplishments of our incredible students,” said Diane Ford. “I am proud to be involved in a program whose mission is

OLD NATIONAL NAMED 2017 ONE OF WORLD’S MOST ETHICAL COMPANIES BY THE ETHISPHERE INSTITUTE Old National Bank (NASDAQ: ONB), has been recognized by the Ethisphere Institute, a global leader in defining and advancing the standards of ethical business practices, as a 2017 World’s Most Ethical Company®. Old National has been recognized for six consecutive years and is one of only three in the Banking category and one of only two US banks underscoring their commitment to leading ethical business standards and practices.

LOUISVILLE-BASED HILLIARD LYONS HAD TWO OF ITS ADVISORS NAMED TO BARRON’S ANNUAL “AMERICA’S TOP 1,200 FINANCIAL ADVISORS” One in Kentucky and one in Tennessee. These rankings are based on data from thousands of the highest-performing financial advisors in the United States. “We are thrilled to see two of our outstanding financial consultants recognized again this year,” said Jim Allen, Hilliard Lyons’ Chief Executive Officer. “Since Hilliard Lyons opened its doors 163 years ago, providing high-quality service to our clients has been a vital part of the foundation of our firm. These advisors represent an elite group and are true industry leaders. They exemplify the exceptional quality and service that all Hilliard Lyons advisors continually strive to deliver.”

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GO CHAMBER . SECOND QUARTER 2017

“The fact that Old National has now earned this distinction every year since 2012, during a time of incredible scrutiny for banks and the financial industry, further demonstrates Old National’s commitment to ethics and transparency,” said Bob Jones, Old National Bank Chairman and CEO. “We are truly honored to receive this award for the sixth consecutive year.” Twenty-seventeen is the eleventh year that Ethisphere has honored those companies who recognize their role in society to influence and drive positive change, consider the impact of their actions on their employees, investors, customers and other key stakeholders, and use their values and culture as an underpinning to the decisions they make every day. “Over the last 11 years we have seen the shift in societal expectations, constant redefinition of laws and regulations, and the geo-political climate. We have also seen how companies honored as the World’s Most Ethical respond to these challenges. They invest in their local communities around the world, embrace strategies of diversity and inclusion, and focus on long termism as a sustainable business advantage,” explained Ethisphere’s Chief Executive Officer, Timothy Erblich. “Congratulations to everyone at Old National for being recognized as a World’s Most Ethical Company.” MOVERS, SHAKERS, AND HEADLINE MAKERS Kentucky’s small businesses were celebrated recently in the Capitol Rotunda in Frankfort during Kentucky Celebrates Small Business. The Kentucky Small Business Development Center and the Kentucky District Office of the U.S. Small Business Administration presented the awards ceremony. The Miller House Restaurant was one of ten Kentucky Small Businesses who received the Pacesetter award. The Pacesetters were chosen based on how they are changing Kentucky’s economic landscape by introducing innovative products, increasing sales and/or production,


boosting employment and serving their communities. Photo caption: Larry and Jeanne Kirk (center) accept the Pacesetter award. Also pictured are (L-R) Secretary of State, Alison Lundergan Grimes, and Lieutenant Governor Jenean M. Hampton. THE MALCOLM BRYANT CORPORATION NAMED MADISON SILVERT, PRESIDENT AND CEO OF GREATER OWENSBORO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP., AS THE COMPANY’S NEW PRESIDENT. Bryant, who co-owns the company with his wife, Sally, will remain as CEO. Silvert has been with the Greater Owensboro Economic Development Corp. since 2007, serving as Executive Vice President and Interim President before being named the President/CEO in October 2013. “Madison Silvert has a passion for greatness that is a perfect match with us,” said Bryant. “We love his curiosity, compassion, work ethic and most importantly that people matter most. And for all of us, the most important ingredient is that he loves the Owensboro region.” “The Malcolm Bryant Corporation has long been a tremendous example of corporate leadership and citizenship in Owensboro,” said Silvert. “I’m proud to have the opportunity to continue the ‘people first’ culture that has been built with the company’s employees, partners, and customers.” In his new responsibilities, which will begin in June, Bryant said Silvert will “lead the company in fulfilling its vision for genius products and services for its customers and communities while cultivating enterprising team members.” RIVERPARK CENTER CELEBRATING 25TH ANNIVERSARY SEASON The RiverPark Center unveiled its 25th anniversary season in April. Executive Director, Roxi Witt, said during the last 25 seasons, the RiverPark Center has served 4 million patrons at 10,000 events and 2,500 performances while serving 800,000 kids. “None of that would ever be possible without this community and the investment they have made in the RiverPark Center,” Witt said at a press conference in the RPC

lobby. Owensboro BB&T Market President, Bob Turok, announced the BB&T 25th Anniversary Broadway Series at the RiverPark. “It’s unique for a sponsor to have a 25-year history,” Turok said. “We feel it’s part of our mission at BB&T to make our city a better community to live and work and we feel that our community sponsorship of the RiverPark Broadway series embodies that mission.” RiverPark Board Chair, Rick Hobgood, explained that a task force was assembled to book the entertainment for the 25th Anniversary Season. “That task force recommended to the board that we put a spotlight on all that has happened at the RiverPark Center by celebrating 25 events throughout our 25th season,” Hobgood said. OWENSBORO INNOVATION ACADEMY PARTNERS WITH BRESCIA UNIVERSITY Thanks to a partnership with Brescia University announced this morning, Owensboro Innovation Academy (OIA) students can earn an Associate Degree from Brescia while still in high school. The incoming junior class at OIA can begin taking courses at Brescia this fall. Options include an Associate of Arts in Integrated Studies, Associate of Science in Integrated Studies, Associate of Science in Health Science, and Associate of Science in Engineering Studies. The partnership will also allow all OIA students to use the new health complex that is currently under construction at Brescia.“Our students will get to use brand new facilities as part of a comprehensive wellness plan for each student. This ensures that our students are not only getting a quality education in STEM fields, but will hopefully improve their overall health,” said Beth Benjamin, OIA principal. “When the Owensboro Innovation Academy presented this partnership to us, we felt it to be a perfect fit. Our institutions share the same intimate, one-on-one learning experience that caters to the educational needs of each student,” stated Father Larry Hostetter, President of Brescia University. “We admire the innovative educational approach that OIA provides students, and we are honored to be an extension of that

educational experience. By taking classes at Brescia University, our hope is that the students at OIA will benefit from direct learning at the collegiate academic level that will allow them to seamlessly transition into college and find success in their lives,” added Father Larry. INDEPENDENCE BANK RANKED #8 IN ANNUAL BEST PLACES TO WORK IN KENTUCKY AWARD WINNERS The Kentucky Chamber of Commerce and the Kentucky Society for Human Resource Management (KYSHRM) have announced the rankings for the 12th Annual Best Places to Work in Kentucky list, presented by Kentucky Career Center and the State Information Data Exchange System (UI SIDES). The competition is a multi-year initiative designed to motivate companies in the Commonwealth to focus, measure, and move their workplace environments toward excellence. Independence Bank was honored at an awards dinner Wednesday, April 26, 2017, at Heritage Hall at the Lexington Convention Center where the final rankings for the top 100 companies in the state were announced for Best Places to Work in Kentucky. Independence Bank was ranked #8 among 29 companies in the medium-sized category consisting of 150-499 employees. President, Darrell Higginbotham said, “We have created a family here at Independence Bank. Taking care of each other, our customers, and our community are part of our everyday routine. Being selected as a Best Place to Work in Kentucky acknowledges what we as employees already know.” This is the ninth year that Independence Bank has been a finalist in the Best Places to Work in Kentucky program. Independence Bank was also named a Best Bank to work for in the nation according to the American Bankers Association in 2016, finishing 1st in the state and 14th in the nation overall.

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GO CHAMBER . SECOND QUARTER 2017


THE CHAMBER REPORT

HOMETOWN: Morganfield, KY

MEET THE CHAMBER BOARD CHAIR

COLLEGE ALMA MATER: UK. Go Cats!

WHAT IS YOUR ROLE AS BOARD CHAIR? I help provide leadership and offer suggestions and direction to our board about important things related to the business community. Part of my role is to provide a voice for the membership on the local, state, and federal level.

WHAT BROUGHT YOU TO OWENSBORO? Old National Bank. I’ve worked here my entire adult life. I started as a college co-op and never worked for anybody else. I worked in Evansville for 13 years and then they promoted me to Market President here in Owensboro.

MOST FAMOUS PERSON YOU’VE EVER MET? Mohammed Ali. We were in a restaurant in Louisville and he was eating in the back. After he was done he shook hands and took pictures with anyone who wanted to. I admire his ability to stand up for what he believed in.

HIGH SCHOOL & MASCOT: Union County Braves

THAT’S UNUSUAL TO STAY IN THE SAME FIELD AND SAME COMPANY FOR 20+ YEARS… Old National is a great place to work. It was started in 1834 and has been going strong ever since. It’s been good to me, and I love what I do, so I never saw any reason to go anywhere else. WHAT DO YOU LOVE ABOUT BANKING? Honestly, the people aspect. I like meeting people and I think getting to know people and creating a bond is a skill set I have. I like numbers too, so banking was enough of a blend of the two.

WADE JENKINS HAND-PICKED

WHY IN THE WORLD WOULD YOU WANT TO BE BOARD CHAIR? Old National is big on values, and community service is a big part of my life. Whether it’s being on the board of the YMCA, the Owensboro Symphony Orchestra, Economic Development Committee or the Chamber, I have always believed you need to give back to the city where you live. Ultimately, my wife and I have a fifth grader and a freshman and I feel I should be a part of the community so it’s better for them. If they go to college and decide to come back here to live in Owensboro, then I want to know I did everything I could to make this a great community for them to raise their own family. I’m enjoying being board chair. The Chamber staff is great to work with!

“THE LARGEST, HEARTIEST RIBEYE ONE COULD FIND, COOKED TO A WKU-O PERFECT MEDIUM WITH SAUTÉED “BEING FROM IL, I HAVE TO GO WITH MUSHROOMS, ASPARAGUS AND CHICAGO DEEP DISH PIZZA FROM BAKED POTATO. SERVE THAT WITH A GIORDANO’S. GO CUBS!” CRISP GREEN SALAD AND SEND ME -Mark Martin ON MY WAY!” ATMOS ENERGY -Dr. Gene Tice

“GRILLED CHEESEBURGER, FRIED CHICKEN, OR MEATLOAF” -Wade Jenkins

OLD NATIONAL BANK

“SALMON BLT AND MAYBE A CUP OF GUMBO” UNIFIRST CORP

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GO CHAMBER . SECOND QUARTER 2017

WHAT SONG ON THE RADIO RIGHT NOW REALLY GETS YOUR TOES TAPPING? I cannot tell you one single song on the radio today. But I love the 80’s. I like the Cars, Fleetwood Mac, Van Halen, Led Zeppelin… those kinds of bands. I grew up with them! NETFLIX OR MOVIE THEATER? Theater. Definitely. I’m a popcorn and diet coke guy! HIDDEN TALENT NOT EVEN YOUR BANK EMPLOYEES KNOW? For some reason, I can still recite my entire fourth grade 4-H speech. I also won “Dancing with Our Stars” in 2014. It was the scariest two minutes and 45 seconds in my life! FAVORITE CHAMBER EVENT? The Chamber Annual Celebration is the most fun because it involves anyone in the community that wants to be a part of it. I don’t take myself too seriously so I enjoyed being in the skit Adam Hancock and I did. But I really enjoyed the DC Fly-In and I’m looking forward to going again. It’s interesting being in a very small room with some of the most powerful politicians in the country answering questions and telling you what they think about current events in the United States and beyond.

If you were stranded on a desert island and could have only one dish, what would it be?

“A TROPICAL FRUIT SMOOTHIE”

-Dave Roberts

ALL TIME FAVORITE MOVIE: I’m gonna go Caddy Shack on this one. As far as a serious movie, it’s Shawshank Redemption.

- Andrew Howard INDEPENDENCE BANK

“GRAETER’S SINGLE BATCH RASPBERRY CHOCOLATE CHIP ICE CREAM” - Glenn Taylor GLENN FUNERAL HOME

“MOST DEFINITELY BANANA’S FOSTER FROM BRENNEN’S”

“HOT DOGS AND SAUERKRAUT WITH MASHED POTATOES AND PEAS. MY STAPLE MEAL GROWING UP WITH - Scott Williams KCTCS 2 BROTHERS. TODAY, I CANNOT GET ANY OF MY DAUGHTERS TO “HANDS DOWN MY ONE DISH WOULD APPRECIATE IT LIKE I DO!!” Wright BE DENISE’S UPSIDE DOWN COCO- -Brian OWENSBORO RIVERPORT NUT CAKE. DON’T TELL HER BUT I’VE HAD SOME FOR BREAKFAST! “PIZZA” HOPEFULLY THE DESERTED ISLAND -Shelly Nichols WOULD PROVIDE ALL THE COCONUT OASIS SHELTER I WOULD NEED TO SUSTAIN ME UNTIL MY RESCUE! :)” “CRAB CAKES, OF COURSE!”

- Darrell Higginbotham, INDEPENDENCE BANK

-Al Mattingly

DAVIESS COUNTY JUDGE EXECUTIVE


NEW CHAMBER MEMBERS Gregory Insurance Group JJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizza Thruston Wireless Express Owensboro Dance Theatre, Inc. Lapekas HR Consulting, LLC Advance LEDs, LLC Trinity High School All About You Salon & Spa

THE BIG PICTURE

Karen Pannell, Realtor, Home Realty, Inc.

DC F O O D P RO DUCT ION IN DAVIESS COUNTY THERE ARE ANNUALLY APPROXIMATELY:

60,000 70,000 1,500 acres of corn produced yielding

acres of soybean produced yielding

million bushels valued at

million bushels valued at

10.8 3.15

37.8 31.42

million dollars

10,000 head of beef cattle

800 active farm businesses

million dollars

2

remaining dairies

million pounds valued at

6

million dollars

12

commercial turkey houses

3,000+

names associated with agricultural land ownership

Crossfit Vox Riverside Care and Rehabilitation Center Rhoads & Rhoads, PSC

600

acres of burley tobacco acres of dark air tobacco produced yielding produced yielding

3

Red Wing Shoes

1.62 million bushels valued at

4

million dollars

800

acres of commercial mixed produce

50

commercial broiler houses

Owensboro Commercial Capital Group, LLC Home Sweet Home Care New Beginnings Sexual Assault Support Services Bath Fitter Alorica Brandon Scott Mullins Memorial Foundation Central Screen Printing Maui Teeth Whitening Superior Environmental Solutions Cherokee Millwright and Mechanical A Quality Inn Just Chill Sears Hometown Stores R. Wathen Medley Jr., MD

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GO CHAMBER . SECOND QUARTER 2017


THE CHAMBER REPORT

EVENT SCRAPBOOK:

100 MEN WHO COOK

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GO CHAMBER . SECOND QUARTER 2017


IN THEIR WORDS

During a night on the town in Owensboro, we may be greeted by the Maitre D’, seated by a host or hostess, and served by the wait staff who brings our favorite dish to the table. But have you ever gotten to know the masterminds that create all that deliciousness? For this special food issue of Go Chamber, we decided to take you inside the kitchen to hear the stories behind the passion these Chamber members share for preparing great food.

KASEY KIRK

JARED BRADLEY

My grandmother was a big influence for my love of cooking. I was able to spend a lot of time with her growing up, and many times we spent our time together cooking. Traveling has also influenced my desire and love for food and cooking. Being able to taste new flavors and see where they came from has always been fun for me. I’ve been lucky and have had the opportunity to travel a lot in the United States and in Europe. I find myself often referring back to meals I had in different places to get inspiration.

My mother is a good cook, but growing up my father did most of the family cooking. So naturally if dad did it, I wanted to do it. From there, with some base knowledge, I found influence from tv chefs...namely Emeril Lagasse. I watched him daily, learned from his flavor combinations, experimented on my own (and made a LOT of bad food lol). This very young experience and desire to create allowed me to learn a lot about flavors, what works, what didn’t. I’ve never been afraid to try something. You never know until you know.

CHEF, THE MILLER HOUSE

I love how food brings people together. Whether celebrating or just meeting with friends or family, food and sharing a meal seems to be the way to go. Being a chef I can do what I enjoy while helping to provide good experiences and memories for others.” I can’t say I have one favorite dish to make. I enjoy cooking everything. I’d have to say right now my favorite dish to make is whatever my son, River, wants. I make a lot of grill cheeses and peas.

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GO CHAMBER . SECOND QUARTER 2017

CHEF, FAMOUS BISTRO

I love being able to create dishes. Period. It’s the closest thing to being an alchemist. I get to take ingredients that most people have never heard of, or never seen, and make FOOD out of it. Sustenance. There’s nothing like it. I’ve strived over my career to NOT be known for any one thing, but to be known for good food. If I’ve felt that I’m lacking in a certain area, then that’s the area that I’m working on. Years ago, I felt I was lacking knowledge in fish, so I starting bidding in the Honolulu Fish Auction, different fish every week for a year. I worked through hundreds of species to get a better grasp on all the different kinds. A good chef knows their education is never complete. So my favorite dish to make is whatever I’m in the mood for this week!


PHOTOS BY TAYLOR WEST

BEN SKIADAS

MATT WEAFER

My earliest memories of cooking are with my grandmothers. I was always interested in how they made my favorites, and they were always happy to teach me. I learned a lot more than just their recipes and techniques. They taught me math and fractions through their recipes, patience for something to be finished, how you can make something your own with a small change in ingredient or measurement, and that food is always better when it’s prepared with love.

From the time that I was 16, I have worked in restaurants. I studied English and professional writing in college. Then I worked as a journalist and freelance writer for a few years, but I mostly sat at my desk daydreaming about food. It wasn’t until I was laid off from one of my jobs that I realized I was wasting my time in the wrong industry anyway. My passion was food. And it had been there all along.

RESTAURANTEUR, LURE SEAFOOD AND GRILLE

Taking care of people is one of the most fulfilling things you can do, and I’m obsessed with all things food and drink. It’s just what comes natural to me. I was born into it, and I’m incredibly fortunate that I love everything about it. I love seeing the joy that a good meal can bring. I love all the work that goes into preparing a menu to please many different palates, diets, and budgets. It’s so rewarding to hear the “mmmmm” when someone takes their first bite of something we have prepared. It’s an intimate relationship to prepare something that nourishes someone’s body and fills their spirit. My favorite dish to make will probably be a different answer every day. Right now I’m in love with a dish I developed with my friend Bobby Edge. The High Lonesome Catfish, named after his brewery, is a Catfish Roulade with fresh Chorizo and Adobo Sauce served with fresh Cucumber Relish, Black Rice, Lime wedges, and Micro Cilantro. It’s just a party of flavors and freshness.

CHEF, THE CAMPBELL CLUB

I was probably only 8 or 9 and I wanted to fix breakfast for the whole family... I grabbed eggs, all the colorful spices I could reach, crackers, instant rice, and cheese. I whisked the eggs together just like I’d watched my mom and dad do, crumbled up some crackers and cheese in them, and put it in a giant cast iron pan with rice and God knows what spices. It congealed into a fragrant orange blob. My parents actually ate it, though, and claimed that they liked it. I love experimenting with different ingredients. It’s a never-ending learning process that culminates in creating something that hopefully someone will enjoy. The second thing is the connections I get to make with people. That’s really what it’s all about. Getting to know and serve customers something they’ll like, working and teaching the staff, and building relationships with the farmers that raised the food I’m going to cook.

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BISCUITS, BACON &

BAR-B-Q BY GAIL E. KIRKLAND

. PHOTO BY JAMIE ALEXANDER

T

he warm, familiar aroma of bacon, sausage, and freshly baked biscuits greeted me as I walked through the spacious parking lot and into Ole South Bar-B-Q. Once

inside, the warmth magnified with friendly faces of families and friends sipping coffee, laughing and talking over a plate full of scrambled eggs, hash browns, smoked ham, maple syrup pancakes, biscuits and country gravy—anything but your average morning breakfast. Sitting at their favorite table, close to the buffet and kitchen, four “regulars” allowed me to pull up an extra chair and learn why Ole South is their go-to place for breakfast. Whether ordering off the menu or going through the $7.95 buffet, this foursome—Raymond M. Smith, Ken Hoffman, Homer Barnett and Steve Newcom—has been having breakfast together at Ole South for years. Identifying themselves as the second shift (7 a.m.) of breakfast, Homer said they almost need a referee when Raymond gets wound up; hearty laughter erupts easily as I visit with them at their corner table in this nearly 100-seat capacity breakfast destination. “We come eat, visit, review the news and what is going on with our families,” Homer said, with Steve adding, “I never thought I’d be the old guy who hangs out at the restaurant and drinks coffee, but here I am. It seems like my day doesn’t get

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GO CHAMBER . SECOND QUARTER 2017


started unless I come here first.” They clearly see Ole South as the best breakfast in town—with its friendly, hometown atmosphere thrown in for good measure. The breakfast crowd includes business people, retirement groups, construction workers and Bible study groups. “Most of the workers here have become our friends,” Raymond said. “If you’re not here a day, they worry why you’re not here. One time I missed two days, and they called me at home!” A 12-year employee and server, Erica Payne, is an obvious favorite of this group. She tells them they need to learn to make their own coffee so that she can sleep in; this group is sometimes in the parking lot when she arrives at 5:45 a.m. Darting from table to kitchen at light speed, Erica converses and laughs with patrons along the way. She oversees large

MORNING FIX

breakfast catering orders, prepared for upwards of 200 people. What does

Sometimes we need a little perk on the way to work. Maybe a cup of

Erica like about working at Ole South? “When you walk in the door, I

coffee or a sweet treat to jumpstart your day. Danny (GO Chamber

already know your order for your drinks; I’m putting them on the table. I always tell them, if you’re going to change, you need to hurry up and tell me. Some tell me to just give them their regular, and they don’t even know

editor) and Josh (intern) went on a morning coffee/donut/breakfast run to eight Chamber Member establishments that make perfect morning destinations.

what it is—but I do!” No wonder. She works 55-60 hours a week. Although Ole South opened in 1995, Greg Floyd became its owner in

7:45 AM: KRISPY KREME

2012, entering the restaurant business for the first time. Greg said he, too,

We started our morning drive at Krispy Kreme

enjoys the regulars, but also likes the new faces. “We have to have a mixture

for a quick sugar fix and Danny’s first cup of

of both.” With a breakfast buffet open from 6 – 10:30 a.m., some of the

coffee. As we walked in, there were two lines of

kitchen crew arrives as early as 4 a.m. His role is to manage, oversee and problem solve the whole operation. He saw “potential” in Ole South. “You put yourself in the customers’ shoes and ask, ‘What do they want’? There’s a combination of things, not necessarily in any particular order: a clean place, really good food, a price that is right, a comfortable atmosphere— they are all important. You’ve got to have them all,” Greg said. A breakfast

donuts on the conveyor system. But on a superbusy day (or the weekend) they can run up to six rows of donuts at a time. Did you know you can order donuts by the 3-pack, 6-pack, or dozen? The 6-pack I took back to the office made a great mid-morning snack for my co-workers.

8:03 AM: CHICK-FIL-A

buffet was already in place when he gained ownership, but he extended it

You might not think “chicken” for breakfast,

to seven days a week. Greg credits the sustained growth and increased

but Chick-Fil-A has an entire breakfast menu

popularity of Ole South to word of mouth, location (being on Hwy 54) and good product. How does a BBQ restaurant become a breakfast destination?

including seven meals. Danny tried the Egg White Grill: grilled chicken, eggwhite, and cheese on an English muffin, which was fantastic. Josh ordered the standard Chick-n-

“Owensboro doesn’t have a lot of breakfast buffet options; ours even has

minis: chicken nuggets on biscuits. The scrumptious

pulled pork on the buffet [and fried chicken on Sundays]. I just took the

chicken helped balance our sugar intake, which was a good thing

breakfast buffet and made it consistent,” Greg said. “The drive-thru for

because there were more sweets at our next stop.

breakfast helps, which also opens at 6 a.m.” Quite a few people call in their breakfast orders, and all the breakfast sandwiches come on your choice of a bun, toast or biscuit. Some breakfast menu offerings are named after Greg’s three children—Wake Up Sleepy Head, Luke the Duke, Good Golly Miss Molly, Alex the Great—and range from $3.95 to $6.95.

8:36 AM: GREAT HARVEST BREAD CO. Heading north on Frederica, our next stop was Great Harvest, which of course is known for sandwiches. But if you hit it early like we did, you get the bonus of sampling steaming-hot bread fresh out of the oven. Their cinnamon rolls, which are baked

After a walking tour of Ole South’s kitchen prep area, I savored my

on Friday and Saturday mornings, are their best-

steaming-hot fried apple-sausage-bacon-home fries-scrambled egg

selling breakfast item, and for good reason:

breakfast, which would have only been better if shared in the company of

they were delicious! And the cranberry scone

“the regulars.”

we tried was so good we bought the last one. Chocolate Raspberry was the featured coffee of the day, but Josh opted for a juice.

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9:03 AM: DUNKIN’ DONUTS Walking into Dunkin’ creates a dilemma because everything in your brain is telling you “I’ll take one of everything!” But we tried to show some restraint and pace ourselves, since we still had four more stops to go. Josh had never tried a croissant-donut before, which is a must at Dunkin’, so Danny ordered one of those to split. Flaky goodness! Josh went with the chocolate pretzel donut, which was almost too pretty to eat. But of course we did anyway. The sweet and saltiness were a perfect mix.

9:18 AM: STARBUCKS Coffee #3 of the morning. The jitters begin but we’re pushing through. This is a quick trip. Danny orders his all-time favorite, vanilla latte, while Josh finishes the chocolate pretzel donut in the car. Fun fact: while waiting for the latte, the barista says the Frederica Starbucks served 650 beverages the previous day, 340 of which were coffee drinks. She also claims the bacon gouda on sourdough is their most popular breakfast item.

9:31 AM: THE CRÉME Now it’s time for Josh to order his all time favorite: “Temptation,” a white chocolate coffee drink. He’s right. It’s delectable, and it will now be my go-to drink at the Créme. While we wait for Josh’s drink, we peruse the muffins, bagels, cinnamon rolls, and other breakfast goodies on the counter.

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GO CHAMBER . SECOND QUARTER 2017

9:46 AM: ANOTHER BROKEN EGG Baked bacon: our minds our blown! Baked is the only way they serve bacon at Another Broken Egg, which really brings out the smokey flavor and preserves the texture of the meat. It’s a beautiful thing. We sit and talk with manager, James Decker, as we sample food and discuss the breakfast menu, how to make the perfect bacon sandwich at home, and just life in general. James does some quick math and tells us that Broken Egg served 750 omelets last month, which equals roughly 2,600 eggs. By the way, Another Broken Egg makes the perfect spot to schedule a breakfast meeting.

10:21 AM: ROLLING PIN DONUTS It’s time for Josh to be back in class so I (Danny) drop him off at school and head to the last stop of the morning. Our coffee/ donut/breakfast run would not be complete without stopping by the Rolling Pin. Even though they have 25 varieties of donuts, I know exactly what I want: one of those famous chocolate frosted long johns. The workers are busy even though it’s mid-morning, but owner, Cathy Farmer, takes time to tell me they prepare 20,000 pounds of chocolate icing a year. The closely guarded family recipe has been a staple at the shop since it opened in 1947.


SPOTLIGHT By Josh Kelly

PHOTO BY DAVID GRINNELL

DALISHA’S DESSERTS EMERGING BUSINESS

Opening a business is much harder than it seems.

staff can make a wedding cake with modern flair, or the

Doing so means you need to know about marketing, taxes,

carved groom’s cake that looks just like his favorite sports

hiring and firing employees, and many other factors. Alisha

team or food or the cake your five-year-old has dreamed of.

Hardison knew nothing about these when she first opened

At the center of the business is the way she treats her

Dalisha’s Desserts. Hardison says she knows everything about the kitchen, but she says she had “no idea” about the business side of it all. Regardless of her knowledge outside of the kitchen, Hardison opened up shop. At the beginning, Hardison served sandwiches, and still does, along with her desserts. “We started out making two types of sandwiches on the front counter two and a half years ago,” Hardison says.

Since then Dalisha’s has grown into much more blooming

into a full-service café. With the food industry being extremely visual, she tries to appeal to her customers. Social media posts range from sandwich of the week to a wedding cake that was made the week before. “Word of the mouth has

customers; Hardison wants each customer to feel the exact same, whether they are coming in for a chocolate chip cookie or a $1,000 wedding cake. One method they use is immediately welcoming customers as they walk into the building. They try to greet them with a smile and a hello and, if possible, their name.

The customer service doesn’t just stop at the counter. The

café also has an open window that allows the customers to see what is happening inside the kitchen. Staff members have also given curious children a quick kitchen tour or let them ice their own sugar cookie.

Hardison says that it is “extremely humbling” to win the

possibly been the most valuable in growing our customer

award for Emerging Business of the year. “I feel like we’re just

base,” says Hardison.

a restaurant and there are several other restaurants that just

Dalisha’s Desserts is constantly at work in the kitchen.

as great as we are and would be just as deserving,” Hardison

Making birthday cakes take up 75% of the work week. The

concludes.

LOCATED IN THE CENTRE FOR BUSINESS AND RESEARCH AT THE CORNER OF 11TH AND ALLEN | 270.663.1258

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By Josh Kelly

Independence Bank, IB, does not just measure their success

PHOTO BY AP IMAGERY

in the number of accounts they have, but in their community involvement. The bank is one of the fastest growing banks in the Commonwealth reaching twelve counties. Each county has their own President and its own board committed to the surrounding community. In Daviess County, IB joined the Chamber in 1997. Darrell Higginbotham, President of IB, says the focus of the bank is the customers and the community. “That’s how banks did business a long time ago,” Higginbotham added. As a whole IB has 375 employees and 176 of those are in Daviess County locations. When you walk into the bank you will be greeted with a big “hello” and a smile. IB focuses on knowing the customers by name and making them feel welcome immediately when they walk in. IB also tries to be as accessible to the customer as possible, with online real-time banking, cash management online, mobile banking and check deposit, and instant issue debit cards. Outside of the bank, you can find community involvement in several different places in Daviess County. “We don’t just write a check. Employees get involved and many earn leadership positions within these organizations,” marketing director Bridget Reid said. “Eighty five percent of our community involvement is after hours,” Higginbotham said. The ColorBlast 5K, East Bridge Arts and Musical Festival, Pitino Shelter, and many more are all events and causes that employees have a leading hand in.

INDEPENDENCE BANK 50+ EMPLOYEES

In Habitat for Humanity, there is at least one house built (almost entirely by employees) in seven of the 12 counties that the banks serve, the first nowhere other than Daviess County. The Bank sponsored the Greater Owensboro Chamber Shop Owensboro initiative as well. IB’s motto for business is “Everyday Excellence,” meaning they want to provide extraordinary service to their customers, coworkers, and communities every day. Higginbotham says the Business of the Year Award is as much deserved for the company’s loyal customers and dedicated employees as it is for their community involvement. “Want to know what truly makes Independence Bank unique? We are not asked to serve; we ask how can we serve,” Reid says.

2425 FREDERICA ST. - 270.686.1776 | 2465 PARRISH AVE. - 270.689.1696 | 3228 HIGHWAY 54 - 270.689.1979

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GO CHAMBER . SECOND QUARTER 2017


PAID ADVERTISEMENT

OWENSBORO COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE’S ECONOMIC IMPACT

By Scott Williams, Ph.D., President, OCTC

For 30 years Owensboro Community and Technical College (OCTC) has

in the region. Direct student spending while in school added $738,100 to the

been dedicated to meeting the needs of our community. While we can count

regional income. Total economic impact in 2015-16 was over $173 million,

the number of students we have served—78,000 and counting—we have

accounting for 3% of the region’s GRP. Looking at it in another way, there

never really measured the economic impact of OCTC. So we commissioned

would be 3,167 fewer jobs in the region if OCTC did not exist.

an economic impact and investment analysis study to determine the impact

The investment analysis compared the costs and returns, as illustrated

OCTC has on Daviess, Hancock, McLean and Ohio counties.

in figure 2. Collectively students spent $25 million in educational costs in

The research was conducted by Emsi, a labor market advisor to leaders

2015-16. Based on future earnings of graduates, those alumni, over a 30 year

in higher education, business and community development for more than

period, would create $163.1 million in future earnings (after discounted to

15 years. Emsi has provided studies to organizations such as the University

present dollars) to spend in our region. This results in $6.50 realized for

of North Carolina System and the Greater New Orleans Regional Economic

every $1 spent on their education—a 22.6% return on their investment—

Development Inc.

outpacing any savings or stock market investment a student could make.

Emsi conducted three studies using the most recent full year of data

From a taxpayer’s perspective, state and local taxes used to support OCTC

available. These included an economic impact analysis study that measures

cost taxpayers $8.2 million in 2015-16. Over a 30 year period that generates

how an institution affects the local economy, an investment analysis study

$60.4 million in additional tax revenues for a benefit/cost ratio of $7.40 of

that compares the costs and benefits of an institution to determine the return

additional tax revenue for every $1 of taxes spent to fund OCTC. This means

on investment, and the projected impact of the new Industry Innovation

a 21.4% rate of return to taxpayers. It is clear to see that every student and

Center being constructed on the OCTC campus. We are pleased to share

taxpayer investment in OCTC is multiplied many times in additional alumni

these recently released findings.

income and tax revenue.

It is important to characterize OCTC and its service area (Daviess,

Finally, the new Industry Innovation Center will have a significant

Hancock, McLean and Ohio Counties) to put the results in context. In

economic impact on our region. The new building will help to produce

2015-16, OCTC served approximately 4,000 credit students and over 600

more than 1,700 new alumni by 2035 that we would not have otherwise

non-credit students. OCTC had a 2015-16 payroll of approximately $15.4

been able to serve. The increased productivity and earnings of these highly

million. Ninety-two percent of students were from the service region and

trained alumni will add approximately $23 million in income to our service

91% of the students remain in the region after leaving OCTC. The service

area by 2035.

area has a gross regional product (GRP) of $5.8 billion, supporting 76,450

Clearly OCTC has and will continue to have a clear impact on the

jobs. The average earnings by educational level are presented in figure 1.

prosperity and quality of life for the citizens in our service area. Without

As shown, Associate degree holders make on average $10,100 more and

question, any investment in OCTC is a major investment in our community,

Bachelor degree holders $24,500 more than high school diploma only

which leaves no doubt that when it comes to higher education “It’s Smart 2

holders.

Start @ OCTC”. Therefore, as we move into our 31st year we are even more

The economic impact analysis describes three areas of impact: direct

dedicated to continuing to improve the economic vitality and quality of life

College, alumni, and student spending. Direct spending by OCTC and its

in our region by providing the highest quality education and training at the

ripple effects added $19.1 million in regional income in 2015-16, supporting

lowest tuition rate in the state. We are committed to continue our Race 2

435 jobs. The tens of thousands of OCTC alumni who had higher average

Success and serving this rich community far into the future.

earnings and increased profits in their businesses, plus the ripple effects of

If you would like to see the entire economic and investment analysis report

spending, resulted in $153.7 million in added income supporting 2,714 jobs

please contact Bernie.Hale@kctcs.edu.

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GO CHAMBER . SECOND QUARTER 2017


Like

FAMILY

H O W D I N E R S S T I L L S U R V I V E I N A FA S T F O O D W O R L D BY DANNY MAY

. PHOTO BY TAYLOR WEST

With the popularity of TV food shows like Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives, local diners seem to be as popular as ever. Here in Owensboro, even with the recent redevelopment of downtown and the surge of new restaurants on 54, there is still a loyal customer base in greater Owensboroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s diners. What is it about local diners that help them thrive in a world dominated by the convenience of fast food or the ambiance of upscale restaurants? 26

GO CHAMBER . SECOND QUARTER 2017


In

the back corner of J.D.’s Restaurant sits a single, large

In most diners, the compact distance between the grill, ticket

community table. Owner Steve Ash affectionately calls

window, and kitchen is by design. “We have a pretty good

it the “liar’s table” because you never know what story you’re

idea of how things are going just by that ten-foot area,” Steve

going to hear around it. Rather than a single barstool at the

explained. “We can focus on a very small area, the grill and the

counter, a table for two, or a family booth, the chairs at the

tickets in the window (to the kitchen), and know what’s going

community table are a completely different experience. There

on just by those two places.”

may be two or three parties around the table, and if there’s an open seat or two, they’ll quickly be filled by the next person

QUALITY FOOD AND QUICK SERVICE

through the door. “Sit there long enough and you’re sure to hear

Since diner food is made-to-order, the food is fresh. At J.D.’s,

a story,” Steve says. “Whether it’s true or not is anyone’s guess.”

for example, the prep-cook comes in at 2 a.m. to start preparing

When the diner’s interior was completely renovated two years

for the 5 a.m. opening. “Everything we serve every day is made

ago, the liar’s table was the only table that was not replaced. It has

from scratch that day. In most diners you’ll find that,” Jansen

become part of the legacy at J.D.’s. One reason the community

said. “The hard labor and time we put into it are why people

table stays full is that it’s usually hard to find an empty seat in

want to eat at diners.”

the restaurant. And as fast as the service is, it’s not uncommon to see people standing at the door waiting for a table.

CUSTOMER LOYALTY

Steve and his wife, Lisa, bought J.D.’s Restaurant 19 years

Compared to most national chains, the lower price point at

ago from Martha and J.D. Greer. It’s the same building that was

diners undoubtedly has something to do with their popularity.

built on the original location in 1984 and contains most of the

Because they recognize a substantial amount of their customers

original equipment.

are on fixed incomes, Steve and Lisa have only raised prices four

Lisa’s son, Jansen Lenzi, has been hanging around J.D.’s since

times in 19 years.

he was 13 and started working on the weekend and summers as

Yet, the customer base is a wide cross section of society. On

soon as he was old enough to bus tables. He worked in various

any given day you might see business owners, doctors, lawyers,

restaurants during his college years at EKU but decided to

city officials, police officers, lawn care workers when it’s raining,

return to the family business after graduation. He is now the

and a healthy portion of retirees. According to Jansen, “Terry

manager at J.D.’s.

Woodward eats here, and we also feed a homeless guy every

From Steve’s perspective, it was nice having Jansen back

once in a while. I think it’s really neat that so many people come

for three reasons: 1) he knew the customers, 2) he knew

here no matter what class in society they come from.”

the business, and 3) they could trust him. “If we had hired

Now, after 30+ years in business, J.D.’s is experiencing second

somebody new we would have had to teach them the business

and third generation customers. Steve says some of the most

and train them to take care of the customers the way we want

faithful customers even eat for breakfast and lunch some days.

them to be treated. So it was a nice fit for all of us, and we were

“We have the best customer base I’ve ever been a part of,” Jansen

comfortable working with him,” Steve explained.

admits. “Our servers get flooded with gifts at Christmas time.

That might be part of the recipe for success at J.D.’s, but what

They’ll send stuff to the funeral home for servers when there’s a

are the other key ingredients to success for a local diner?

tragedy in the family. It’s unbelievable.”

DINERS HAVE CHARACTER

TREATING WORKERS WELL

No other eating establishment has the atmosphere of a diner.

Employee turnover is a problem in the restaurant industry

It’s the sizzle of the grill; the rattling of plates and silverware; the

as a whole, but J.D.’s has been blessed to retain employees long

murmur of chatter and laughter; the smell of bacon that greets

term. One employee recently retired after 25 years. Of the nine

you in the parking lot; and the servers buzzing here and there,

currently on staff, the majority have worked there between 10-

refilling your coffee before it’s even half empty.

20 years. Not working nights and weekends definitely helps,

“Organized chaos” is what Steve Ash calls the fast-paced

but in Jansen’s opinion, it has a lot to do with Steve and Lisa’s

action of the grill cooks and servers, which plays out in plain

management style. Between the three of them, there’s not a job

view of every patron. Somehow the workers walk that fine line

in the restaurant they haven’t done themselves. “My philosophy

between fun and stressful with a smile. “For me, I seem to calm

is I should be the hardest working person here,” Steve says. “The

down when things get hectic,” Jansen says. “The longer I’ve

pace of the leader sets the pack. Our employees are working

done this, the less the pace gets overwhelming. You learn how

hard and I’m a firm believer that if you’re not willing to work,

to manage it and prevent it.”

then you’re not respecting what your employees are doing.”

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GO CHAMBER . SECOND QUARTER 2017


A SLICE OF OWENSBORO By Danny May - Photos by Jamie Alexander

Pizza

HISTORY

OWENSBORO MAY BE KNOWN AS THE “BARBECUE CAPITAL OF THE WORLD,” BUT OUR LOVE FOR PIZZA GIVES BBQ A RUN FOR ITS MONEY. ONE THING’S FOR SURE, WHATEVER YOUR PIZZA PREFERENCE, THERE ARE ENOUGH PIZZA PLACES IN OWENSBORO TO KEEP US ALL SATISFIED. AS CINDY TONG PUT IT, “THERE’S ALWAYS A PLACE FOR LOCAL SHOPS. IF YOU GO TO BIGGER CITIES, THE LOCAL ONES ARE THE ONES THAT ARE THRIVING. TO GET THE LOCAL TASTE, THE LOCAL PERSONALITY, LOOK FOR THE INDEPENDENTS.” DID YOU KNOW: In 1905, Gennaro Lombardi applied to the New York City government for the first license to make and sell pizza in this country in what was then a thriving Italian-American neighborhood. Approximately 3 billion pizzas are sold in the U.S. each year. There are approximately 61,269 pizzerias in the United States. Each person in America eats about 46 pizza slices a year.

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GO CHAMBER . SECOND QUARTER 2017

‘60 S:

T H E G LO R Y D AY S Bob Leucht started PizzAroma on December 15, 1963, back in the days when pizza was reffered to as “pizza pie” and was largely an unknown oddity in Owensboro. According to Leucht, the concept took some convincing. “People in their mid-30s and above thought it was some greasy concoction from New York. But in about three years we started selling more. (In the early days) it was kids and grandkids bringing the parents in, the college crowd, and people who were in the service.” In fact, the first time Bob tried pizza he was in the service. PizzAroma was not actually the first pizza place in Owensboro. That distinction belonged to Pizza House. But that shop was only open briefly while PizzAroma is still thriving fifty-four years later, making them the unrivaled godfather of the pizza market in Owensboro.

‘60 S AND ‘70S :

The late 60s and early 70s were a gold rush for pizza places. Long-time Owensboro residents might remember names such as Ceasar’s, Pasquale’s, Guido’s and Shirley’s from that first wave of pizza shops. The interesting thing was that those early pizza shops helped boost sales collectively. “Competition helped promote the product,” Leucht explained. “When those other shops opened, our sales went up. Then when each of them closed, our sales really went up.”

MID – L AT E ‘70S :

T H E A R R I VA L O F NATIONAL CHAINS

The same was true when national chains starting opening in Owensboro in the mid to late ‘70s. As the national chains came to town, their commercials on TV and other advertising helped local shops by presenting a visually appealing image of pizza to the masses. As new concepts and innovations in the pizza industry flourished, Leucht beat the national chains to the punch on delivery by being the first pizza shop in Owensboro to offer delivery service. PizzAroma also introduced wings back in ‘84 after Leucht met a man from Buffalo, New York, at a pizza convention.

‘8 0S :

COMMUNITY SHOPS

During that same time period, small community shops began establishing themselves in outlying communities, such as JJ’s Pizza in Lewisport. Small community shops continue to thrive because they offer locals a convenient and affordable family meal when they don’t want to “drive to town.” Joann Shyver, whose family opened JJ’s in the mid 80’s, says another reason she believes community-based pizzerias are popular is because “the sky is the limit when it comes to pizza. You can make it anything you want: taco, steak, BLT. You can do all that.”


“THERE’S NEVER BEEN A NATIONAL CHAIN BEAT A GOOD LOCAL. THE LOCALS ALWAYS SURVIVE. PEOPLE LIKE TO DO BUSINESS WITH PEOPLE THEY KNOW AND LIKE.” – Bob Leucht, PizzAroma

SLICES L TO R: PIZZAROMA JJ’S PIZZA 54 PIZZA EXPRESS F E T TA S P E C I A LT Y PIZZA M E L LO W MUSHROOM PIZZA BAKERS

Jared Bradley said with a laugh. “Our recipe is tried and true.”

In January of 2017, Shyver took the opportunity to bring JJ’s to the Thruston area when another existing shop was looking to sell and approached Shyver. “It’s been great having another shop a little closer to Owensboro,” she said, explaining that a lot of plant workers in Lewisport commute from Owensboro. “Now they don’t have to drive out to Lewisport and we already have a customer base (near Thruston).”

L ATE ‘ 8 0 S

PIZZA COMES TO 54

Capitalizing on the downtown revitalization, Fetta Specialty Pizza and Spirits opened its doors in September of 2013, just before Smothers Park reopened, in a brand new building on St. Ann. of somebody and seeing them enjoy it.” Tong says she opened on 54 because she believed 54 was the logical place for Owensboro to grow. At the time, 54 Pizza Express was the first pizza shop on 54, hence the name. She credits the success of her shops to listening to her customers. When sandwiches got more popular, she added more options. When they asked for a location on the west end, she opened the Parrish Starlite location. “Our customers are the best, and we try to give them what they want.”

Meanwhile, Owensboro native Cindy Tong was educating herself in the world of pizza by working for a national brand as a franchise consultant. But before that, she got her start by working for Grecian Pizza as a teenager here in Owensboro. After returning to Owensboro, Tong opened 54 Pizza Express in February of 1988 with a menu consisting of pizza, three sandwiches, and drinks.

Like Leucht, Tong acknowledges the local shops strengthen one another. “We support each other, that’s what local business is all about. If we all support each other, we stay strong.”

“Pizza is what I know,” Tong says, 30 years after opening and still running 54 Pizza Express at the original location on 54 and the Starlite/Parrish location since 2000. “I enjoy doing it. I’ve been blessed to do what I love. One of the most enjoyable things about my job is putting a plate of food in front

Famous Bistro has been serving pizza downtown since George Skiadas opened the Bistro in 1993. Skiadas began making pizza with family recipes in the ‘70s and implemented pizza into the menu at the Greek and Italian infused Bistro on 2nd Street. “I run the restaurant, but I don’t touch George’s recipe,” Chef

TODAY:

PIZZA FEEDS ON THE ENERGY D OWN TOWN

“We were going for the ‘wow’ factor,” Owner Tim Turner said. “We wanted them to see our building and think ‘wow.’ Then walk inside and try our food and think ‘wow.’ “ Fetta, which is Italian for “slice,” offers indoor and outdoor seating with beautiful downtown views of the Ohio River and Smothers Park. Fetta’s niche is hand tossed, brick oven baked pizza by the slice, but they’re also known for bread knots and salads. With the increase of foot traffic and visitors downtown after the revitalization, owners Tim Turner and Mike Baker expanded in 2015. A few blocks down, Mellow Mushroom opened its groovy pizza franchise in September of 2016 at 101 West 2nd Street. The restaurant invites guests to explore its far out design and décor, indulge in the delectable menu, and seek out the captivating art adorning the walls throughout the unique restaurant. Owners Bob and Catherine Holderfield say the downtown revitalization prompted them to open the Owensboro Mellow. When they saw the 101 building, which had been renovated by Terry Woodward and needed a bottom floor tenant, they found their site.

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COLBY’S FINE FOOD & SPIRITS

A PLACE TO MEET THE MACQUARRIES LO OK BACK ON 30 YEARS BY ASHLEY SORCE - PHOTOS BY JAMIE ALEXANDER

COLBY’S FINE FOOD & SPIRITS HAS BEEN A PILLAR OF DOWNTOWN OWENSBORO FOR ALMOST 30 YEARS. IT’S HIGHQUALITY FOOD AND INTIMATE ATMOSPHERE HAVE MADE IT ONE OF THE MOST POPULAR EATING ESTABLISHMENTS IN THE COMMUNITY, A DREAM THAT OWNERS COLBY AND CAROLE MACQUARRIE LOOK BACK ON WITH PRIDE. 30

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RECOGNIZED POTENTIAL When the MacQuarries were introduced to downtown Owensboro in 1986, they had spent the previous five years establishing multiple restaurants with much success. (See sidebar on next page.) After they returned from their trip to Owensboro, the MacQuarries approached their business partners at the time to see if they wanted to expand to Owensboro. Satisfied with their two current restaurants, the partners declined. So the MacQuarries sold their shares in the company and moved north to Owensboro. “We just really had great faith,” Carole said. “The energy at that time seemed to flow. We were young and so excited about everything. We moved to Owensboro and renovated a restaurant, renovated a home, and I was pregnant.” They moved to Owensboro in July 1987 and opened Colby’s at 204 W. 3rd in downtown Owensboro in November 1987 with the


help of new partners. The building, previously occupied by Weir’s, needed some work. “When we walked in, we could just tell that this would be a good facility,” Colby said. “It just had the feeling. And it was a great corner, a great building. It had so much potential. Because even though it was old, you could see through all of that. The floors were original. The ceiling was original.” The front façade was redone with the help of Downtown Owensboro Inc., who provided design assistance to bring it back to its original time period. What is now the Colby’s bar was once a processing center for Central Bank. The MacQuarries decided the dining room wasn’t large enough, so they built the arched entries into the next building to tie the two spaces together. “I remember a time when a former Owensboro judge

came into the restaurant and said, ‘boy, sure is going to look empty in here with no one sitting in the chairs,’” Colby said. Carole added, “Yeah, I remember someone saying, ‘not going to make it – no parking.’”

CRUNCHING THE NUMBERS When opening Colby’s, the MacQuarries did their research. They located a downtown study, measuring the business climate and what was on the drawing board for the future. “At that time, there were 3,500 people that worked downtown each day,” Colby said. “Can we get 5 – 8% of those folks? Can we do a really good job at lunch time so they come back at night or try us on the weekends?” Turns out, they could. “Our lunches probably carried us for the first several 31

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WHAT BROUGHT THE MACQUARRIES TO OWENSBORO? 1980 – Colby & Carole met in Florida, where they both worked for Pillsbury Corporation, opening Steak and Ale restaurants throughout the South. Carole worked with the front of the house, training the floor staff while Colby worked with the back of the house, establishing vendors, hiring staff and rolling out menus. 1981 – The MacQuarries married. Colby was looking for a change that would provide more of the life he and Carole wanted. An opportunity arose to open and run Rafferty’s in Bowling Green. 1983 – The MacQuarries, along with new partners, opened Bartholomew’s, a

casual

dining

restaurant

that

blossomed in small-town Hopkinsville. “That entrepreneurial spirit just kept coming out. We wanted to learn, but we wanted to be independent and be in charge of our lives.” Colby said. “What do we need to do to be independent? That was our goal.” Later that year, they expanded their company to open 32nd Avenue in Nashville, a bistro-style, white tablecloth menu. 1986 - An employee invited the MacQuarries to see her hometown. When they saw the downtown area, they recognized saw great potential for their next move.

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years,” Colby said. But within a year Colby’s moved to being open all day. It wasn’t long before Colby’s became a hit, even cultivating a great customer base from Indiana. The greatest asset to Colby’s was the opening of the RiverPark Center in 1992, which brought large crowds downtown in the evenings and on weekends. And most recently the downtown revitalization has transformed the atmosphere, only benefiting Colby’s.

LEARNING EXPERIENCES But not every venture the MacQuarries took proved to be as successful as Colby’s. In July 1990 the MacQuarries expanded Colby’s, opening a location in the St. Matthew’s area of Louisville. With a much higher cost of business cutting into profits, the MacQuarries were forced to close the doors in July 1993. They opened Colby’s Deli just a block north from the Owensboro restaurant in July 1992. And they attempted to expand again in June 1998 in Henderson, renovating the first floor of a downtown hotel, but they soon found the Henderson customers’ patterns of eating out took them to Evansville, creating a lack of business that eventually forced the MacQuarries to close their doors once again. “In order for us to grow, we always felt like we needed to incur debt. So every project that came around, instead of saying we need to be debt free first, we just didn’t do that,” Colby said. “We felt like we were on a good growth pattern with this [Owensboro] restaurant and we felt like it could stand on its own. But when multiple projects come under the same umbrella, somebody has to pay when there is a shortfall in another. Unfortunately, that kept coming back to this store [Owensboro], because this one was doing so well and was set up well.” That rapid expansion left the MacQuarries in nearly $900,000 of debt both professionally and personally. “We never had the sense that we would give up. We just said, we got here, and Lord willing, we will get out. We made some changes,” Carole said. “And the beautiful

thing is that you try. And if it doesn’t work out, it doesn’t work. But if we didn’t at least try, we would never know. But because we did at least try, we learned so much more than if we hadn’t done it at all. So for me, it was a big expense, but it wasn’t so big that we couldn’t learn from it and we weren’t going to run from it. It was an awesome learning opportunity – both professionally and personally.” With a lot of hard work and cutting expenses, the two became debt free professionally in December 2009 and personally in January 2015. “It was one of the greatest learning curves with a blessing at the end that I have ever encountered in my life,” Carole said. “Realizing where we are is a good thing, and we do not need to continually develop new projects. The hardest thing was to say, ‘We are in a good spot’ and not to take on more.”

BACK TO BASICS Carole further explained that they began to realize that what they started out doing – the original Colby’s Owensboro location – is what they did well. They reevaluated other efforts, like catering and delivery and decided to stick with what was working, the original restaurant as it was when they first began and the deli, which has proven its worth over time. “We learned not to be all things to all people,” Carole said. Despite the uneasy times, one thing was always true – Colby’s in Owensboro always had faithful customers and employees. “The loyalty we have seen is incredible. And I don’t know if we deserve it to be perfectly honest,” Colby said, telling a story of a cook who has worked for the restaurant longer than he has not. And that same loyalty is not only with employees, but with customers alike. The MacQuarries happily reflect on seeing how customers have grown over the last 30 years – job successes, retirement, children growing up. The restaurant owners have been proud to offer a place where customers are confident they will receive an excellent meal, served by staff


they have come to know well, and often times don’t even have to order because the server just knows what they want. “You’ve built a relationship with those folks. That’s in and above just business,” Colby said. “For us, that’s what keeps us focused and enjoying our work.”

THE NEXT GENERATION Perhaps another reason Colby and Carole MacQuarrie can enjoy their work is being able to share their family business with their children, Collin, 29, who co-manages Colby’s Deli and Molly, 26, who helps manage Colby’s. “They are more appreciative of the business today and what we have done than any other time. They understand the business now,” Colby said. But more than just a business, Colby’s has been and remains an integral part of Downtown and the community. When the MacQuarries opened the restaurant in 1986, they began with the slogan “A Place to Meet.” “I would really like for Colby’s to remain that place where people want to meet,” Carole said. “Come and eat and enjoy family.” Colby added, “People say, ‘Well how much longer are you going to do this?’ and I say as long as I can. Why does it have to end?”

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PHOTO BY DREAM COPY PHOTOGRAPHY

PROD UCE DE L I VE RY B R I N G I N G T H E FA R M E R S ’ M A R K E T TO YO U R F RO N T D O O R

In

By Danny May

the past 25 years, Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) has become popular in larger cities, especially with the whole foods and clean eating movements. CSA programs allow consumers to buy fresh, locally grown, seasonal food directly from farmers. Typically, a CSA is a membership service where farms deliver a weekly or monthly box of vegetables as well as any other farm products they wish to include. That structure provides year-round marketing for farms and a steady stream of cash flow. For the consumer, it’s like bringing a farmers’ market right to your front door. Consumers also get the advantage of knowing exactly where their food is grown and enjoy the health benefits of eating ultra-fresh, locally grown food packed with flavor and vitamins. Spearheaded by Suzanne Cecil White of Cecil Farms Produce, a group of agriculture leaders in Greater Owensboro has partnered to provide a CSA program to bring fresh vegetables, meat, milk, berries, and other products to Greater Owensboro. “The idea behind starting our CSA was to provide a way for products from the Owensboro Regional Farmers’ Market to be delivered right to your doorstep,” Suzanne Cecil White explained. “We partnered with Blueberries of Daviess County, peaches from local orchards, and meat from Hillview Farms. It grew from there.” The CSA is now in its seventh year and has steadily grown every year since it began in 2011. For example, a new product offering this

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GO CHAMBER . SECOND QUARTER 2017

year is an add-on option featuring pre-packed ingredients for meals, including sauces and seasonings. Those pre-packed meals will be prepared by Matt Weafer, Executive Chef at the Campbell Club, who says he’s excited to provide a way to bring a fresh, home-cooked meal to the family table. “Any way that we can encourage families to spend more time in the kitchen cooking food from scratch with fresh, local, healthy ingredients is essential,” Weafer said. ”By delivering all the ingredients you need to your door and offering simple step-by-step recipes, these meals will be a breeze.” When it’s done right, a CSA program should not take people away from the Farmers’ Market. “It’s really just expanding the reach of the Market because people who want to go to the Market can’t always get there. Plus, if they enjoy what we bring, they’re likely to go back to the Market when they can,” White explained.

THE INSPIRATION The two primary suppliers for products to the CSA are Cecil Farms Produce and Hill View Farm Meats. In the western edge of Daviess County, Cecil Farms has raised produce for over 40 years. Gary and Ryan Cecil (father and son) have grown a variety of fruits and vegetables on both a commercial and local level. When Suzanne Cecil White came back home to join the family business, she focused on expanding into Community Supported Agriculture, using


her network of ag friends at the Owensboro Regional Farmers’ Market. Hillview Farms was one of the first people Suzanne approached about joining the CSA. “Hillview is a great partner and immediately came on board with the idea to begin delivering variety boxes of farm-fresh produce and meats to local homes, businesses, restaurants, and schools on a weekly basis throughout the harvest season,” White said. The Gilles family, who operate Gilles Farms and Hill View Farm Meats, has been farming in western Daviess County for four generations. “The CSA seemed like a good fit for us from the beginning,” Jim Gilles said. “We decided to assist by offering locally-raised meat options so that the CSA could provide a full meal in a box delivered right to your home.” When it joined the CSA five years ago, Hill View Meats initially supplied premium Angus beef. Since then they have added pork (raised by a neighboring farm) and this past year Hill View began raising chickens, which can be added to the boxes as well. Gilles says being included in the CSA has been extremely beneficial to both Gilles Farms

and Hill View Meats. “The CSA allows us to reach a customer group that we may not have reached through the Farmers’ Market or found us online. And those new customers now can find us at the Farmer’s Market or come to the (storefront) Market at Hill View Farms. It has been mutually beneficial.”

GETTING STARTED Anyone interested in signing up for the CSA delivery service can sign up through the website at

www.cecilsfarmspd.com,

email

CSA DELIVERY INCLUDES PRODUCT OFFERINGS FROM:

Reid’s Orchard Lakeview Orchard Trunnell’s Farm Market Cisnero’s Berries Blueberries of Daviess County Hillview Farms Meats Yeckering Eggs

hello@

cecilfarmspd.com or call 270-929-1445.

For

more info about Hillview Farms Meats, visit www.hillviewfarmsmeats.com. There are several payment and delivery options, and you can also choose the seasonSpring, Summer, or Fall growing season. There’s even the option to start a co-op with friends, neighbors, or other groups. The co-op then chooses a central delivery point, usually someone’s house, and all save 10% on orders. Or Cecil’s will donate that 10% back to the church, school, or non-profit of your choice.

PLEASE SUPPORT THESE LOCAL RESTAURANTS WHO TRY TO USE LOCAL CSA PRODUCE WHENEVER POSSIBLE:

Campbell Club Bill’s Restaurant Famous Bistro Great Harvest Niko’s

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GO CHAMBER . SECOND QUARTER 2017


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

GO Chamber Magazine would like to recognize these member restaurants in a unique way by putting faces to the company name. This Flavor Profiles special advertising section is our way of showcasing the people behind the businesses that support this community so well. Please thank them with your patronage.

k GANGNAM KOREAN BBQ REAL HACIENDA MELLOW MUSHROOM OLE SOUTH BAR-B-QUE GENEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HEALTH FOOD

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION FLAVOR PROFILE OF

Fine Fresh Authentic Korean Food GANGNAM KOREAN BBQ 3332 Villa Point . Owensboro KY 42303 . 270-240-2976

My name is Joe Kim and I personally invite you to experience the fresh taste and healthy benefits of food served at Gangnam Korean BBQ. It’s our passion to introduce the city we love to the Korean food we love. That’s why we serve authentic Korean food prepared

and flavored the same way it has been for 600 years. It’s our goal that every one of our customers leave happy every time. Try something different for a change. We’re confident you’ll love it at first bite, but if don’t, we’ll find something else you do like.

From Left to Right: Arthur Kim Kisha Cardones Sarah Kim Joesph Kim Chris Muffet

F l av o

r

s Profile 37

GO CHAMBER . SECOND QUARTER 2017


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION FLAVOR PROFILE OF

Mexican food

REAL HACIENDA

3023 Highland Pointe Dr . 4820 Frederica Street . 270-684-5595 . 270-685-5950

Owner, Armando Ortiz, came to Owensboro from Mexico in 1995. With the idea that South Frederica could support a Mexican restaurant, Armondo originally opened under the name La Fiesta. Since 1996, Armando’s vision is to provide Mexican cuisine at fair prices with good portions and great service in a nice atmosphere. In 2003, the restaurant changed names to Real

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GO CHAMBER . SECOND QUARTER 2017

Hacienda and relocated to Southtown Boulevard. In 2005, Real Hacienda opened a second location on 54 at Highland Pointe. Real Hacienda has been embraced by the community and is consistently a customer voted favorite. Stop by either location and you’ll see why.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION FLAVOR PROFILE OF

pizzaLove

MELLOW MUSHROOM PIZZA BAKERS

101 West Second Street . Owensboro KY 42303 . 270-684-7800 . mellowmushroom.com/store/owensboro

Our mission is to provide delicious food in a fun and creative environment. We are originators of classic southern pizza, and our unique and flavorful crust is a true original. We began from humble roots, born out of the free-wheelin’ hippy culture of the 1970’s. The idea back then was the same as it is now, to make the

most delicious, craveable slice of pizza on the planet. The Mellow founders dreamed of a world where happiness could be found in the simplest things; like a mouthwatering slice of pizza and an ice cold beer. Come see us and enjoy the experience.

F l av o

r

s Profile 39

GO CHAMBER . SECOND QUARTER 2017


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION FLAVOR PROFILE OF

A Party in your Mouth

OLE SOUTH BAR-B-Q 3523 Highway 54 East . Owensboro, KY 42303 . Phone: 270-926-6464 Whether you’re looking for a country-style breakfast buffet, a hearty lunch or dinner buffet, a sandwich or burger off the menu, or barbecue takeout, Ole South Bar-B-Q has you covered. We’re trying hard to no longer be Western Kentucky’s best-kept secret. Our loyal customers keep spreading the word and we make new

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GO CHAMBER . SECOND QUARTER 2017

customers with our catering fleet that can meet the needs of any size party or gathering. If you haven’t visited us in a while, follow the smokey aroma to Ole South Bar-B-Q and let us make a believer out of you.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION FLAVOR PROFILE OF

Organic morsels

GENE’S HEALTH FOOD

1738 Sweeney St . Owensboro, KY 42303 . Phone: 270-684-5052 Gene’s Health Food has been providing healthy options for Owensboro since 1980. When siblings Andrew Keller and Karissa Costello took over Gene’s Health Food several years ago, they set out to extend the availability of fresh healthy, delicious food to the community. It’s their passion to deliver what healthy food

really can be. Pushing flavor combinations to cross the line between what’s good for you and what tastes good. We extend an invitation to you to visit and see what Gene’s has to offer whether in our deli or at our Fresh. by Gene’s food truck.”

F l av o

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10

MEMORIES OF RICK KAMUF

A Life of Service, Kindness, and Encouragement

BY DANNY MAY

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At the content meeting to discuss this issue, we decided to convince Rick Kamuf to be featured in the “10 Questions” since this was the food issue and Rick embodied the agriculture community so well. We knew he would never do it because the last thing Rick ever wanted was to put himself in the spotlight, but we tried our best to convince him to oblige. Unfortunately, Rick unexpectedly passed before he was able to answer the questions. Then we had a better idea. We would continue the article, except we would make it a tribute to 10 things we loved most about Rick. As the responses poured in, it was evident that Rick touched so many people’s lives, not only in the farming community but also across every sector of the Greater Owensboro area. We heard story after story of Rick’s giving nature, enormously humble heart, and humor. Suzanne Cecil White (Cecil Farms Produce) summarized it beautifully: “Rick’s passing made me recognize that he was always forgiving as the Bible teaches us to be. He loved the unloving as it is written in the scriptures. This realization was profound for me. He lived to help others. It was never about him. 2 Philippians 2:3-11: Do nothing from rivalry or conceit, but in humility count others more significant than yourself. Let each of you look not only to his own interest, but also to the interests of others. To me, those words defined Rick Kamuf.” Since we couldn’t narrow it down to 10, here are 11 more things that defined Rick:

A D I F F E RENT PER SPECTI V E I N DI FFICULT T I MES Rick and I farmed together for a lot of years. When things were rough, he’d just say, “Look, if we are not having fun then we don’t need to be doing this (farming) anymore.” But his favorite thing to say was, “We’ll make it work.” If I found it difficult to figure out a situation, he’d say “We’ll make it work.” When someone else needed help: “Tell ‘em we’ll make it happen.” Anytime he told someone “We’ll make it work,” he always found a way. - Gary Cecil

P UT T ING OT HE RS FIRS T Rick would drop anything to help a friend. I was working with him one day when the Bishop called and said his water line had busted. Rick dropped everything to go fix it right then. During the ice storm, he drove to Bowling Green to purchase two generators. He took one to a friend’s house whose wife was sick and they had several kids. He got it hooked up so they had electricity. But he gave the other one away too and did without power himself. - Keith Riney

ALWAYS HAD A S OLUT ION Rick was always willing to give a helping hand and wanted nothing in return. My dad and I farm in the Newman area. About 20 years ago, it was around Thanksgiving and threatening to snow, but we still had our beans out in the fields. Rick showed up with his combine to help us harvest the beans. We were so thankful for his good deed. In 2000 our corn fell down and we had no choice but to harvest wet corn. We had no dryers to dry it but Rick let us use their dryer so we didn’t get docked at the scale. - Neil Rudy

ALWAYS RE ADY TO HE LP On the afternoon of January 3, 2000, our family was hit by the tornado going through Owensboro. We had damage to our house and lost over a dozen barns and other buildings. After taking my family to relatives, I stopped at Kamuf ’s shop trying to figure which way to go. He told me to get in his truck and we would figure this out. On the way to our farm he told me we would bounce back, we just had to keep going and move forward. That night he helped us get a generator hooked up for a little power that he supplied. The next morning he already had his help lined up to come over and start the cleanup process and was there every day to help himself. Not only did he help us but he organized groups of people to help other neighbors clean up their fields and damage. We all have friends, but Rick Kamuf was a good friend to me and all. So as Rick would say, hang in there, keep going and move forward. He will always be with us. - Jerry Fischer

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“HE LOVED THE UNLOVING AS IT IS WRITTEN IN THE SCRIPTURES. THIS REALIZATION WAS PROFOUND FOR ME. HE LIVED TO HELP OTHERS. IT WAS NEVER ABOUT HIM. ” -Suzanne Cecil White

B R AG G I NG ON OT HE RS ; NEV ER HI MSE LF

P HONE CALLS

Rick would often check in a couple times a year and just kind of pump me up. He would always brag on our tobacco and let us know we’re doing a good job. When my brother and I received the Burley Coop’s Outstanding Grower of the Year Award at their annual meeting, Rick Kamuf was the first person to call and tell me he was proud of us. -Brad Stephens

Rick. The last time I spoke with Rick on

ALWAYS POSIT IVE

spoke in a board meeting, everyone listened.

board members knew how proud he was of the Chamber staff. Rick was a visionary. A big-picture guy with a great intuition on what needed to be next, whether it was business or a community decision. He just knew. He could communicate in a common sense way everyone could understand. When Rick He made us better.

BI G HEART

sure every child had their own watermelon.

HAR D WOR KI NG AND HUMBLE Some people talk a big game, but not Rick. He was all action, a man of his word, hard working, and his heart was always to help others. The first thought that comes to my mind when you think of Rick is humble and ready to lend a helping hand. He left behind big boots that will be hard to fill. -Matt Hayden

GO CHAMBER . SECOND QUARTER 2017

the phone he called to make sure his fellow

Rick always had something positive to say. Even when communicating about something that might not be positive, he would always end it with something nice. My favorite memory of Rick was him going with us on our board retreat. He was a huge contributor and had outstanding ideas for the future of the Chamber. He will be missed profoundly. - Adam Hancock

Rick will be remembered as a giving, humble man who was respected most by people who knew him best. He had a heart as big as the watermelons he raised. Rick would help anyone in need and never expected praise or recognition. He certainly made a difference in my life and I’m sure he made a difference in many people’s lives, especially in the farming community. - Charlie Kamuf

44

We all have stories of phone calls from

-Candance Castlen Brake

A MAN OF FAIT H Rick was a humble, sincere, and loving man. His heart went out to those who were hurting for any reason. He was one of my strongest supporters at the Pitino Shelter. He provided fresh vegetables in the summer and made Rick valued his Catholic faith. He never missed Sunday Mass. He preached loud and clear without using words, but by example. - Father Ed Bradley

S IMP LY T HE BES T When my mom got sick, Rick started to come each morning at 6am to help me feed cattle so that I could have more time with her. He came each morning for a month. I told him he didn’t have to continue to do that and he said, “I just wanted you to know I cared!” Rick didn’t die from a heart attack, he died because he gave all his heart away. . . I try to live my life better because of the example Rick Kamuf lived. He was simply the best guy I ever knew. - Rod Kuegel


DID YOU ?

KNOW

PHOTO BY AP IMAGERY

CORRECT ANSWER:

$200,000 FROM PAGE 7

In 2015, International Bar-B-Q Festival Co-chair Sharon NeSmith estimated the economic impact of the Festival to reasonably be $200,000. (That figure covered the amount the cooking teams spend locally on supplies plus the amount the Festival spends on events and entertainment.) And that does not include the amount attendees spend on hotel rooms, meals in local restaurants, or in shops while theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here.

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THE FINAL ANALYSIS JACLYN GRAVES

I

sn’t it interesting that we allow the opinions of naysayers to affect our mindset and question our purpose? We may hear 99 positives, but it’s the one negative that echoes the loudest. Sitting down at my desk after our last New Member Breakfast, I surprisingly felt rejuvenated. Although I see it every day, I was reminded of why the work we do here is important. I needed to see the faces of the thirty plus people in attendance who were excited to be a member of our organization. I needed to be revived and know that it’s ok to take it personally when someone tells me they don’t see our value. And, I needed to remember that there’s nothing wrong with knowing you have a great product and being proud of it. We all put our heart and soul into our professional life. We spend more time with our co-workers than we do with our families. We stress out over deadlines, orders and building our client base. We strive to uphold the integrity and productivity of the expectations placed upon us. And, why? Why do we allow what we do professionally to affect our personal lives so much? Because it is personal.

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Membership Development Manager

Because we believe in what we do and who we work with and know that what we offer is a quality product. I can promise you that when you get your box of fresh produce from Cecil Farms, sit down to another delicious dinner at The Miller House or take the first sip of your go-to pick-me-up from Starbucks, you can trust that it was proudly made with you in mind. And, I can promise you that when your Chamber staff goes to work for you and your business every day, we are proud of the partnerships we have with our members and are confident in our abilities to improve the Greater Owensboro business community. Be proud of what you do and the hard work you put into your craft. Be confident that what you offer and the efforts you exert are valuable. Hold your head high, continue to do things the right way and soon, those echoes you hear will turn into whispers and your doubts into fuel to further your deserving success.


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200 E 3rd St, Owensboro, KY 42303 (270) 926-1860 http://chamber.owensboro.com

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PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID OWENSBORO KY 42301 PERMIT NO 420

GO Chamber Q2 2017  
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