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GO CHAMBER . THIRD QUARTER 2017


FROM THE CHAMBER Welcome to the Third Quarter GO Chamber!

this group going forward will ensure that

This edition we are featuring 40Under40

we grow when other communities our size

highlighting young people in our community

across the country are experiencing wage and

that we expect to lead us to a bright future.

population decline. We are on our way!

Why is it important for our Chamber to

These young leaders we are featuring span

participate in processes such as this? One

CANDANCE CASTLEN BRAKE President & CEO

of our Strategic Goals is to Develop and Connect Leaders for the Future of Greater Owensboro. We do this in many different ways including our Leadership Owensboro program, our partnership with the Regional Alliance for Education, our internships and the Chamber Young Professionals.

growing strong economic bases are the ones who understand the importance of

WADE JENKINS Board Chair

Some have already

held important leadership positions in the community. Others are on their way. But we feel it is a critical part of our role in the community to not only identify these individuals, but to support them in growing their professional careers and their avenues for civic engagement.

Communities across the country that are

our younger generations.

their 20’s and 30’s.

Our economy

continues to evolve in a way where jobs are following people. So building a community

Our future is bright! Candance Castlen Brake, Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce President & CEO

that is attractive and interesting to our Gen Ys and our millennials will pay dividends

Wade Jenkins, 2017 Chamber Board Chair,

for generations. And continuing to engage

Market President, Old National Bank

ON THE COVER: Special thanks to the friendly staff at Owensboro Convention Center for letting us stage our 40U40 honoree photo shoot on the third-floor balcony. Thankfully, the weather cooperated and the 7am morning sun shone brightly. Here are some behind the scenes facts about the 40U40 cover photo shoot and individual headshots: •

2 scouting photo shoots on first location, which proved logistically

add height so all faces could be seen. •

problematic (How do you safely lower

& 27) were photographed outdoors

40 people to the base of the cascading

before and after the group photo at the

fountain?) •

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GO CHAMBER . THIRD QUARTER 2017

opposite corner of the balcony.

1 more scouting shoot at Convention Center to secure location

Individual headshots (on page 26

Equipment used: Canon 5DS tethered

Time of photo shoot: 7:20am

to MacBook Pro with 1 640 Ws strobe

Group photo was shot from a ladder to

light modified with a soft box.


PUBLISHER/CREATIVE DIRECTOR Jason Tanner jason@tannerwest.com

FEATURES:

MANAGING EDITOR

Danny May danny@tannerpublishing.com

ADVERTISING SALES

Brock Quinton brock@tannerpublishing.com Robert Williams robert@tannerpublishing.com

COPY EDITOR

Ashley Gleason

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PASTOR OF THE PEOPLE

GRAPHIC DESIGN Jamie Alexander Jason Tanner Taylor West

3RD QUARTER 2017 8 16 18 26

THE CHAMBER REPORT MILLENNIALS IN THE WORKFORCE COMMUNITY VENTURES 40 UNDER 40 Meet the Young Leaders Who are Shaping the Culture of our Changing City

LAYOUT DESIGN

Andrea Roberson

PHOTOGRAPHERS Jamie Alexander David Grinnell Taylor West

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WORK, LIFE, MOM BALANCE

PRINTING

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2017 BUSINESS OF THE YEAR SPOTLIGHT

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EXPERT ADVICE FROM FINANCIAL PLANNERS

Greenwell Chisholm Owensboro, Kentucky

Special Advertising Section

CONTACT INFORMATION:

Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce 200 E. 3rd St., Owensboro, KY 42303 (270) 926-1860 chamber.owensboro.com

TANNER PUBLISHING CO.

Go FAME

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CYP: ENGAGING THE COMMUNITY

46

10 QUESTIONS

50

THE FINAL ANALYSIS

Daniel Hewlette

Jaclyn Graves

DID ? YOU

KNOW Which Chamber member drove Harrison Ford on a motorcycle in the movie Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull? FIND OUT ON PAGE 49 7

GO CHAMBER . THIRD QUARTER 2017


THE CHAMBER REPORT

MEET THE

CHAMBER STAFF

ROLE AND TITLE: Receptionist. I answer the phone and get the mail. But there will be more responsibilities soon. I look forward to learning more about the members. HOMETOWN: West Newton, Pennsylvania. The one thing I’ve found about Kentucky is everybody is basketball oriented. Where I grew up, around Pittsburgh, it was football! I am a Steelers fan through and through! I’ve noticed there are quite a few Steelers fans in Owensboro. COLLEGE: Kentucky Wesleyan. That’s how I came to Owensboro. My parents were afraid that if I did not venture out I would not ever move away. Once I got here, which was in 1969, I’ve stayed here ever since. FAVORITE MOVIE: Gone with the Wind NETFLIX OR THEATER? Netflix. I don’t like sitting in the theater. Not to sound ugly, but my living room is nicer (laughs).

LYDIE BOONE

FAVORITE BOARD GAME? Yahtzee HOBBY? I like to knit. BEST VACATION EVER? This past year, four of my sorority sisters and I took a train ride from Chicago out to the Grand Canyon. It was a 30-hour trip. That was a lot of fun.

CHAMBER AFTER HOURS WITH NEW WKU PRESIDENT, DR. TIMOTHY C. CARBONI

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PHOTOS BY DANNY MAY

BEST CONCERT YOU’VE EVER SEEN? Cher. She put on a fabulous concert. I’ve also seen Garth Brooks. BEST THING ABOUT WORKING FOR THE CHAMBER? Working with this group of people is fabulous. This is my third job. I retired the first time after teaching in Hancock County for 28 years. I got that job over the phone, actually. I called them on a Friday afternoon and they asked if I could be there Monday, so I packed up my things from Pennsylvania and drove back down. Then I worked for Owensboro Public Schools for 15 years and retired from there last year. Now I’m working for the Chamber. People make fun of me and ask me how many times I’m going to retire. (Laughs.) I work through the school year, which is nice. I asked Candance if she would recommend me for another job and she said, “I think I’ve got something for you here.” So here I am. FAVORITE CHAMBER EVENT TO WORK? Well, the Golf Classic is coming up, but I’ve honestly never played golf, so that will be interesting. But I’d have to say the Rooster Booster Breakfast. I think it’s so much fun and so informative. HOW DO YOU LIKE WORKING DOWNTOWN? It’s very nice. We live by Shively Park but I’ve told my husband I would love to move downtown because I think it would be nice to be able to walk to things and walk to dinner.


“20 UNDER 40” WHERE ARE THEY NOW?

ON THE RECORD

In January of 2004, the Owensboro Messenger Inquirer recognized 20 Leaders Under 40 to watch. For this 40Under40 issue of GO Chamber, we caught up with some of those recognized in 2004 to see what they were up to now and asked if they could share a bit of wisdom with the new honorees.

Of the 20 young leaders under 40 recognized by the Messenger-Inquirer in 2004, perhaps none of them have found themselves in such an unexpected future as J. Todd Inman. Not long after President Trump appointed Elaine Chao to his cabinet as Secretary of Transportation, Inman got a phone call asking him to serve under Secretary Chao as Director of Operations. Inman is an insurance salesman by trade, but since being named 20Under40, he became involved in local politics (once running for mayor) and worked on logistics for national campaigns and conventions. He says his current role is a culmination of 15 years of networking. “What happens is people get to know you and then ask you to take on other roles, which is what happened here. I would have never fathomed even nine months ago that I’d be in this position today. I never even expected it after the President won, but it has truly turned out to be amazing.” Although the transition meant leaving the business he built here in Owensboro, it was an opportunity he couldn’t turn down. “Tomorrow I meet with the Governor of Nebraska; then I’ll go to Alaska to mile marker zero, the northernmost point of the U.S. Not bad for a guy born and raised in Calvert City, Kentucky,” Inman said during a phone interview from his office on the top floor of the Department of Transportation headquarters. His new apartment in D.C. has a nice view of the U.S. Capitol dome, but he still sees Owensboro as home. “I do my banking in Owensboro and my doctor is still there. I will always consider Owensboro my home. I look at this as just being gone for a little while.” Not long after he accepted the position, Inman was able to set up some meetings with the delegation from Owensboro during the Chamber’s DC Fly-In, which was a full-circle moment for Inman because the connections that eventually led him to his job in Washington D.C. can be traced back to his involvement in the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce. After joining the Chamber, Inman was a Chamber Ambassador for two years and even served as Chamber Board Chair. “My ability to build my business is a direct result of the time I invested in the Chamber,” Inman recalled. “The people I met and the networking opportunities to meet government officials as Board Chair proved to be invaluable. It gave me the groundwork to be where I am today. That was a turning point for me.” For example, Inman booked the head of EPA and the president of Makers Mark to deliver the keynote at the annual Chamber Celebration during his tenure as Board Chair. He also has a neat memento in his office back in Owensboro from his time as board chair: a metal “Future I-69 Spur” sign that was placed on the Audubon Parkway. Now, that spur is about to become a reality. One of the challenges Inman recognizes in his role with the Transportation Department is not getting wrapped up in major projects to the point of losing sight that even smaller projects (like the Owensboro sign on I-64) make a huge impact on those communities. “I think it’s important to stick up for the little guys because people find government has become too distant from them. I’m not going to lose that. I hear Secretary Chao say every day that we can’t forget rural America.” As for his role in facilitating some meetings for the Fly-In group, Inman says, “You don’t forget where you came from.”

“What’s easy is not always what’s right.” J. Todd Inman

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS, SECRETARY OF THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

“ALWAYS REMEMBER WHAT YOU BELIEVE IN, ALWAYS.” Sara Hemingway

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, MARILYN AND WILLIAM YOUNG CHARITABLE FOUNDATION

“A SETBACK IS MERELY ANOTHER LEARNING EXPERIENCE.” Jeremy Edge

FINANCIAL CONSULTANT/VICE PRESIDENT, HILLIARD LYONS

“Do what you enjoy; life is short.” Scott H. McCain

VICE-PRESIDENT COMMERCIAL BANKING DIVISION, INDEPENDENCE BANK

“SEPARATE WHAT IS AND ISN’T IN YOUR POWER.” Nicholas Brake, Ph.D.

SUPERINTENDENT, OWENSBORO PUBLIC SCHOOLS

“Remember to never forget who you are.” Christopher L. Gaddis Ed.D.

DIRECTOR OF TRANSPORTATION, DISTRICT ATHLETICS, & ENERGY MANAGEMENT,OWENSBORO BOARD OF EDUCATION

“Golf is a blessing, family when often” Jim Ed Oberst

“PUT YOURSELF IN THE PLACE OF MOST POTENTIAL.”

TERRITORY MANAGER FOR REPUBLIC SERVICES.

Jennifer Wright

DIRECTOR OF MEDICAL STAFF SERVICES & PUBLIC POLICY, MEMORIAL HEALTH (GA)

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THE CHAMBER REPORT

ANTHEM

AUTHOR: AYN RAND

Overview: Anthem explores the power of what makes each of us individual and unique and how the failure to unearth our own individualism could cause potentially disastrous consequences for not only ourselves, but also, mankind at large.

THE

READING LIST

Reviewed By: Allie Englert Head Daviess County High School

The Takeaway: The collectivist society that determines the way in which the main character, Equality 7-2521, experiences the world is at odds with the world we as American readers are familiar with today. In Rand’s world, one has no choice when it comes to choosing a career or even a spouse. Instead, one’s “identity” is found not through individual interests, self-exploration, or relationships, but rather through assigned roles that the “Brothers” believe will positively affect society as a whole. In Anthem, the needs of the group are ultimately far more important than the desires and beliefs of the individual. However, the story Rand tells is one of angst and desperation as the audience is privy to the thoughts of the main character who does not buy into the propaganda of the group at large, and instead, dares to pursue knowledge alone. This decision ultimately leads him down a path of self-discovery that forever changes his world and, presumably, the world of his descendants for the better. Although the world in which Equality 7-2521 lives is not real to us, the struggles that he faces relate to

many dilemmas we all encounter throughout our lifetime. In the workplace, it is often easy to stick with the status quo. Regardless of one’s profession, we all have responsibilities that we are required to complete or abide by. However, if we only focused on doing exactly what our coworkers or superiors expected us to do, we would fail to progress and grow. Without progress and growth, our world cannot change and improve. As a high school English teacher, I work diligently to design lessons and assessments with clear expectations. When students meet these carefully laid out expectations, I am pleased. However, when students go above and beyond the call of duty by creating something that surpasses my expectations, I am thrilled. These students who think outside the proverbial box ultimately pursue knowledge that can impact their world and the world of others. Through this process, my hope is to cultivate independent thinkers who can carry this trait into their future educational experiences and careers. Rather than settling for simply what is expected of them and instead embracing their individualism and creativity, students are better equipped to impact our world on a grand scale.

H A N D - P I C K E D Who has been your most influential mentor? MY GRANDFATHER, HAROLD K. OSBORNE. HE TAUGHT ME TO WORK HARD AND BE NICE TO EVERYONE. -Brad Osborne

HANK HANCOCK. REPRESENTATIVE FROM FRANKLIN COUNTY. TAUGHT ME THAT THE BEST GOVERNMENT WAS ONE OF COMPROMISE.

VICE PRESIDENT, MORTGAGE BRANCH MANAGER,

-Judge/Executive Al Mattingly

COMMONWEALTH BANK & TRUST COMPANY

DAVIESS COUNTY FISCAL COURT

NOT ONE BUT MANY, UNIQUE AND PRECIOUS, GUIDING AND ENCOURAGING! OUR LIFE MENTORS ARE MORE POWERFUL THAN THEY MAY EVER KNOW.

JESTINE JESSIE MENA, MY MOTHER AND FIRST TEACHER.

-Rosemary Conder

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, CASA OF THE OHIO VALLEY

-Sylvia Coleman

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, OWENSBORO HUMAN RELATIONS COMMISSION

MY FATHER BOB ANDERSON, WHO’S KEEN BUSINESS SENSE AND FULL HEART HAS INSPIRED ME. -Frank Anderson

PRESIDENT, SUN WINDOWS

BOB STEELE, TERRY WOODWARD, BOB DARRELL, WAITMAN TAYLOR, JOEL UTLEY AND MANY OTHERS. EACH OF THEM PROVIDED GUIDANCE IN UNIQUE AREAS. -Kirk Kirkpatrick

BOARD MEMBER, FRIDAY AFTER 5

WALTER LEE: EVERY KID MATTERS. BRIAN CRALL: INTEGRITY. -John DeLacey

PRINCIPAL, OWENSBORO HIGH SCHOOL

RICHARD “DUFF” RUND, RESTAURANT ENTREPRENEUR. HE TAUGHT ME THE SKILLS TO SUCCEED WHEN THINGS GET TOUGH. -Chris Poynter

TELECOMMUNICATIONS SUPERINTENDENT,

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OMUFIBERNET

MY PARENTS, WHO TAUGHT ME A STRONG WORK ETHIC. -Mark Martin

VP RATES AND REGULATORY AFFAIRS, ATMOS ENERGY CORPORATION


PHOTOS BY JAMIE ALEXANDER

SMALL STEPS TO WELLNESS

HEALTH FAIR AFTER ROOSTER BOOSTER

MY DAD WHO TAUGHT ME TO “MAKE MY PLAN AND WORK MY PLAN!”

OTTO RANNEY, ARCHITECT - NOTABLE DESIGN OFTEN LIES WITHIN THE QUALITY OF ITS DETAILS.

HELEN MOUNTJOY, SHE’S THE QUEEN.

UNITED WAY OF THE OHIO VALLEY

SR. PROJECT DIRECTOR, AXIOM

YOUNG CHARITABLE FOUNDATION

-Kathy Oliver

-Aaron Nacey

-Sara Hemingway

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, MARILYN AND WILLIAM

ARCHITECTURE

JOE HANCOCK – MY FATHER, BOSS, AND FRIEND. HE TAUGHT ME EVERYTHING I KNOW. -Adam Hancock

SARAH SMITH, MY YOGA TEACHER, WHO TAUGHT ME TO BE UP TO SOMETHING BIGGER THAN MYSELF.

MANAGING SHAREHOLDER/PRESIDENT,

-Rebecca Bickett

RINEY HANCOCK CPAS PSC

OWNER AND CREATOR OF POSSIBILITY,

MY FATHER, A WATCHMAKER, TAUGHT ME NOT TO FORCE THINGS TO WORK. -Chris Arnold

BRANCH MANAGER, US BANK

270 POWER YOGA

MY FATHER, DR. GARY SINGER, WHO TOLD ME I COULD BE ANYTHING.

AS ALWAYS, MY “DAD”. HE TAUGHT ME TO TRY AND WORK WITH PEOPLE BASED ON THEIR CHARACTER.

DENTIST, NORRIS & ROWLAND

MARKET PRESIDENT, OLD NATIONAL BANK

-Dr. Janet Rowland FAMILY DENTISTRY

-Wade Jenkins

JOHN BICKEL, MY PERSONAL AND CORPORATE ATTORNEY FOR 35 YEARS. HE HELPED ME BE A BETTER GENTLEMAN, KINDER PERSON AND TO BE A BETTER DEAL MAKER! -Jack Wells

OWNER, WELLS HEALTH SYSTEM, ENTREPRENEUR

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THE CHAMBER REPORT

ADAM HANCOCK KEEPS AN EYE ON THE CLOUDS AS JASON TANNER PREPARES RED TAPE FOR LEIGH ANN KUEGEL AND JIGNA WILSON (OFF CAMERA.) PHOTO BY DAVID GRINNELL. GOVERNOR MATT BEVIN POSTED A SCREENSHOT OF HIMSELF READING THE RED TAPE ARTICLE IN GO CHAMBER.

GOCHAMBER

WINS AWARD By Danny May

Y

ou know what they say about the best-laid plans of mice and men, right? Well in the magazine business, I’ve noticed that sometimes when Murphy’s Law strikes, the result turns out better than the original plan, which I find very annoying if I’m being honest. But I’m starting to realize it’s almost a necessary part of the creative process. I say that because putting together this magazine is a true collaboration that sometimes takes unexpected twists. As we tried to show you in the Behind the Scenes feature in our second quarter ‘17 issue of GO Chamber, it takes several brainstorming sessions to make each issue what it is. The Chamber staff and Tanner Publishing staff are constantly on the lookout for ideas for eye-catching layout designs and engaging topics for articles, which we all “bring to the table” for content meetings to get the project rolling. The idea for the cover is always the most difficult piece of the whole puzzle and usually takes the most mental work. Sometimes it’s not until plan B or C (or, let’s be honest, D) until we get it just right, but in the end, the result is something we can all be proud of. Here’s a perfect example. We needed a cover image for our third quarter ‘16 issue of GO Chamber. I honestly can’t even remember what our first idea was. But our second mock-up version was a drone shot that we had, which was pretty cool, but just not quite cover-worthy. Then, the day before we were supposed to upload the issue to the printer, Candance (Brake, Chamber CEO and President) threw out the idea to do something with governor Matt Bevin’s Red Tape Initiative program. To which Jason (Tanner, owner of Tanner Publishing) said: “we should wrap some people up in red tape on the cover and then have them break out of it in the inside article.” A couple of phone calls later and Jigna Wilson (Wilson Family Pharmacy), Adam Hancock (Riney Hancock CPAs), and Leigh Ann Kuegel (Kentucky Farm Bureau) agreed to be depicted on the cover. We packed our gear in the van, secured a location (the Kentucky mirror mosaic under the bridge), and coordinated the photo for 7 am so the cover models could be at their jobs on time the next morning. Again, the shoot was the DAY WE WENT TO PRINT! But that last-minute scrambling earned GO Chamber a

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“Communications Excellence Award” for our Red Tape Reduction cover. The Communication Excellence Award is presented annually by the Association of Chamber of Commerce Executives to celebrate exceptional work in advertising and marketing. We were told a panel of communications and marketing executives from chambers across North America evaluated all submissions and selected top entries to receive the recognition. But those judges don’t know the rest of the story. As we were setting up the lights and taking practice shots to get the lighting and camera settings right, Adam Hancock was the first to arrive at the photo shoot, which meant we spiraled him with red tape first. Bright red duct tape, by the way, right across his very nice suit and tie. Gray clouds started rolling in as Leigh Ann Kuegel arrived to get taped. Jigna Wilson, on the other hand, had a hard time navigating all the one-way streets downtown and had to circle a few times to find the right side street to access the parking lot. Hancock, who was Board Chair at the time, was a great sport about the whole ordeal, but the poor guy was stuck in tape in the middle of a parking lot in plain view of Blue Bridge traffic for a good 30 minutes. And just as we got the three situated and snapped a few practice shots, the first rain drops began to fall, leaving Jason just enough time to take a few photos before the cover models started ripping off their tape and the downpour unleashed, sending everyone scurrying to their cars without a proper goodbye. But none of that made it on camera, so it didn’t matter. When the issue came out, the cover created quite a buzz in the community. Governor Matt Bevin posted a picture of himself reading the article in his office, and the Chamber staff received phone calls and emails from across the state commenting about the cover. Now we can say GO Chamber is an award-winning magazine, which is a true testament to the collaboration, hard work, and dedication that takes place in so many ways across Chamber membership.


BY THE NUMBERS

MILLENNIAL CONSUMER TRENDS

HOW DO MILLENNIALS SPEND THEIR MONEY? SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES

60% of millennials use subscription video on demand (Hulu, Netflix, etc.)

EXPERIENCES SHOPPING

STORE FRONT

Millennials value experiences and discovering the world over tangible objects

2 in 3 use mobile apps while shopping in the store

78% are more likely to select a brand with a loyalty/reward program than a brand without

54 Wine & Spirits 270 Power Yoga Summit Obstetrics & Gynecology, PSC Norris & Rowland Family Dentistry Klutch Barbers A Special Event Rental Frozen Tundra

ONLINE CONCERTS

BRAND LOYALTY

NEW CHAMBER MEMBERS

45%

Service Master by Nelson Services, LLC The Women’s Hospital

spend more than 1 hour per day shopping online

Movement Mortgage LLC

MEALS

Higginson Orthodontics NextHome Realty Experts

40%

OF MEN

33%

Gerling Law Offices

OF WOMEN

wish they could buy everything online

TRAVEL

FINDING DEALS

8 in 10 are value seekers and are more likely to use coupons than their parents

Angela Clark, Tony Clark Realtors Vector Engineers, Inc Elevator Solutions, Inc. Balance Health + Body Center For Cosmetic and General Dentistry

Millennial spending is big business. Currently the largest generation in the U.S., millenials have a purchasing power of $1.68 trillion. Recent research reveals that millennials are changing the rules of brand marketing, redefining purchase habits, and revolutionizing the shopping experience as we know it. Along with changing ideologies in technology, privacy, and social interaction, millennials are forcing retailers to reevaluate how they attract and communicate with consumers.

Evansville Thunderbolts Hockey Horn & France Insurance

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THE CHAMBER REPORT

MEMBERS IN THE NEWS CROSSFIT RUGRATS On June 22, four athletes from CrossFit Rugrats, after qualifying earlier in the year, headed to Atlanta, Georgia for the 2017 USA Weightlifting Youth Nationals. CrossFit Rugrats took 13-year-old Timothy Davis in the 62kg division, 13-year-old Kylie Strehl in the 58kg division, 11-year-old Isiah Boarman in the 35kg division, and 11-year-old Mallory McClure in the 31kg division. These athletes have been training very hard, some days twice a day, for this competition. At the end of the day, CrossFit Rugrats had a national champion, Timothy Davis, who got gold in the snatch, gold in the clean and jerk, and a gold medal in total. Kylie got a bronze in the clean and jerk and fifth place overall, Isiah received a bronze in the clean and jerk and fourth place overall, and Mallory McClure won a sixth place in the clean and jerk, fifth place in snatch, and a sixth place overall. TRAVIS CHANEY ACHIEVES AMERIPRISE “CIRCLE OF SUCCESS” RECOGNITION Travis Ray Chaney, CFP™, CMC®, a Franchise Consultant with Ameriprise Financial, has qualified for the company’s Circle of Success annual recognition program and was honored for this achievement as a Premier Franchise Consultant at the 2017 Achiever’s Conference in Nashville, Tenn. To earn this achievement, Chaney established himself as one of the company’s top Franchise Consultants, achieving high levels in leading advisors in production, client service and client satisfaction. Only a select number of high-performing Ameriprise Franchise Consultants (10) earn the Premier Franchise Consultant distinction. Chaney has been affiliated with Ameriprise Financial for 22 years. Chaney has been a two-time winner of the prestigious Franchise Consultant of the Year Award and coaches the latest two winners

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GO CHAMBER . THIRD QUARTER 2017

(2015 and 2016). Chaney is also CEO of Dynamic Directions, a firm that specializes in coaching and consulting independent advisors with clients in 33 states; partner in the financial planning firm Align Wealth Management; and partner in Inner Circle Entrepreneur, a consulting firm specializing in developing seasoned entrepreneurs. He is also president and founder of Kidcentric Sports and secretary and co-founder of Kids Football League. Chaney graduated from Kentucky Wesleyan College and received his Certified Master Coach designation from the Behavioral Coaching Institute. OWENSBORO TRACK AND FIELD UNVEILED Representatives from Owensboro Public Schools, Owensboro Health, and Kentucky Wesleyan College officially opened the new state-of-theart Owensboro Track and Field (located between OMS North and South campuses on South Griffith Avenue) with a ribbon cutting August 16. The Owensboro Middle School and Owensboro High School track and field teams needed a new facility because the former track was not in condition to host regional meets. The OMS football and soccer teams also needed a new facility. Likewise, Kentucky Wesleyan College needed a place to practice and host meets for their newly formed track team. And Owensboro Health wanted a facility where they could host community health events that would also have some public hours where people could walk and run on the track for those in the community. The three parties involved with the project identified a need for a new track for the city of Owensboro, then put their financial resources together and made it happen. INDEPENDENCE BANK NAMED 2ND IN NATION The American Bankers Association announced that Independence Bank ranked 2nd in the nation among 238 mid-sized

banks with assets between $2 billion and $10 billion. The American Bankers Association mentions that a common denominator among the top contenders is that they are “unafraid to invest in growth.” This is evident with Independence Bank as they continued to expand their footprint in 2016 throughout Kentucky. Independence Bank broke ground on new locations in Frankfort, Louisville, Madisonville, Mayfield, as well as a new operations center in Owensboro. They continue to invest in new markets, as well as in the customers and communities they serve: Independence Bank gave back over $1 million dollars to various local organizations and projects in 2016. Chief Executive Officer, Chris Reid said, “Our focus has always been on hiring the best people and giving them the tools and support they need to take care of their customers and the communities we serve. We believe if you do these things the bottom line will take care of itself. This award is confirmation that this strategy can be successful.” DAVIESS COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS’ NEW LOGO Daviess County Public Schools unveiled their new logo at Opening Day ceremony festivities August 7. The logo, designed by Tanner+West, depicts the district’s commitment to put kids first in everything they do. ALERIS RECEIVES FORD Q1 STATUS Aleris welcomed several representatives from Ford Motor Company to its facility in Lewisport, Kentucky to celebrate Aleris’ recent distinction as a Ford Q1 Award recipient, a recognition granted to Ford suppliers for their demonstration of good quality and delivery scores, maintaining third-party certifications, and receiving endorsements from all customer plant locations, Manufacturing Planning and Logistics, along with Purchasing and Supplier Technical Assistance. By achieving and maintaining Q1 status, Aleris will be classified as a preferred supplier to Ford and will be considered for


both new and incremental business in the future. The delegation from Ford presented Aleris with a plaque and joined the company in raising a Ford Q1 flag at the facility formally acknowledging its supplier status. KENTUCKY WESLEYAN COLLEGE ANNOUNCES PARTNERSHIP WITH WESTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY GORDON FORD COLLEGE OF BUSINESS A new collaborative partnership will assist students from Kentucky Wesleyan College to achieve a graduate degree in accounting, applied economics, or earn an MBA from the Gordon Ford College of Business (GFCB) at Western Kentucky University. Students will be able to effectively coordinate their academic plans to obtain the bachelor’s and master’s degrees through this partnership. Advising staff and faculty from the GFCB will assist students to clarify their academic path to graduate school through regular visits to the Kentucky Wesleyan campus. Additionally, the colleges have established the “WKU-Kentucky Wesleyan College Scholars” program, allowing the GFCB to provide up to two Graduate Assistantships to Kentucky Wesleyan College graduates attending graduate school. As a “Preferred Partner Program,” Kentucky Wesleyan will actively promote GFCB graduate programs on its campus. Kentucky Wesleyan President Barton D. Darrell joined GFCB Dean Jeff Katz, GFCB Associate Dean for Graduate Studies and Research Bob Hatfield, and Dean of the WKU Graduate School Scott Lyons to sign a Memorandum of Agreement on Friday, Aug. 4.

DIOCESE OF OWENSBORO NAMES FLAHERTY SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS The Diocese of Owensboro is pleased to announce that Ann Flaherty has accepted the position of superintendent of Catholic Schools effective August 1, 2017. Flaherty was originally named interim superintendent following Jim Mattingly’s retirement announcement. Mattingly retired as superintendent on July 31, 2017, after 13 years of service.

Flaherty has 33 years of teaching and leadership experience, 26 years in Catholic schools and seven years in public schools. She has taught middle school in the areas of math, science, religion and as a K-12 Title I math and reading and EBD K-8 teacher. The majority of her time in the field of education was spent at Owensboro Catholic High School as the head guidance counselor and then assistant principal. She was principal at Owensboro Catholic Middle School for four years before serving as assistant superintendent for the past five years for the Diocese. SYMPHONY HOSTS 30TH CONCERT ON THE LAWN On August 5, 2017, US Bank Home Mortgage presented the 30th consecutive Owensboro Symphony Concert on the Lawn at Kentucky Wesleyan College. The annual casual outdoor evening performance by Owensboro’s Symphony is a great opportunity to gather with friends, family, and co-workers. Recently appointed music director, Troy Quinn, and the Owensboro Symphony performed Hollywood film music, featuring favorites from Hans Zimmer’s Pirates of the Caribbean, the Imperial March from Star Wars, and John Williams’ Tribute to Film Composers, a medley never performed before outside Hollywood. “This is always a great evening for Owensboro,” said Dan Griffith, CEO of the Symphony. “We are extremely appreciative of the support US Bank Home Mortgage has provided over these past 30 years. It’s been a great partnership!” OWENSBORO HEALTH JOINS CANCER RESEARCH NETWORK Owensboro Health announced a new partnership with the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center by becoming a part of a research network which will allow Owensboro Health to extend the benefit of clinical trials to patients. Owensboro Health is now the sixth hospital in Kentucky to join the research network. Dr. Tim Mullett, Medical Director of the

Markey Cancer Center, says research is the only way to fight cancer and a team-based approach is the key to making an impact. “We’ve found that the more we engage multiple leaders within our cancer care areas the better opportunity we have to deliver good care to a patient. ... By linking together specialists from each area (surgery, treatment, rehab, nutrition, etc) and sharing research from clinical trials physicians can make better decisions for treatment.” Increasing communication between the six hospitals in the Markey Center research network means patients get the benefit of “best practice” information being discussed. TANNER+WEST WINS TWO EMMY AWARDS Tanner+West, an advertising and design agency based in Owensboro, received two Ohio Valley Chapter Regional Emmy® Awards at the 53rd Annual awards ceremony held at the Lawrenceburg (IN) Events Center outside Cincinnati, Ohio. Jason Tanner received an Emmy® in the lighting category for a video produced for a TV spot for State Representative Matt Castlen’s campaign. It was the first Emmy for Tanner+West. Jason Tanner and David Grinnell also received an Emmy® in the commercial category for a TV spot produced for Glenn Family Services called “Between the Lines.” The storyline for “Between the Lines” portrays one couple’s love story spanning 60 years which required using a full cast, wardrobe coordinator, set design, and special effects. Tanner+West is a full-service advertising and design agency based in Owensboro, Kentucky, known for advertising, branding, graphic design, website development, photography, and video production.

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MILLENNIALS’ ABILITY TO ADAPT IS A STRENGTH IN THE WORKFORCE M

illennials tend to get a bad wrap — often pegged as lazy, bored, job-hoppers. But the stereotypes don’t necessarily ring true in Owensboro. Local employers and leaders have positive things to say about the generation, seeing their differences as strengths and focusing on their embrace of technology. While there’s no hard and fast date on what defines the millennial generation, it’s widely accepted that the term pertains to those born from 1980 to the mid-90s. According to Green River Area Development District (GRADD), 65% of workers in Kentucky fall in the age range of 18-34. With that large number of millennials employed in the state, the generation is certainly making its mark on the workforce. President of window and door manufacturer, Sun Windows, Inc., Frank Anderson, said his company has 132 employees and 26 of them are millennials. The company works with the GO FAME apprenticeship program, the Owensboro branch of Kentucky Federation for Advanced Manufacturing Education, which allows students to earn a degree as they gain work experience. Anderson said he is extremely impressed by the students who come through the program. “We used to hear and think that millennials were lazy, spoiled, afraid to work and have no soft skills,” he said. “We have found the exact opposite to be true.” Anderson said it’s been a breath of fresh air to interview hundreds of local students for the program and find they have a strong work ethic, passion and are eager to learn. He said that the generation easily and readily adapts to newer technologies, such as robotics, better than previous generations, since they’ve grown up using technology from an early age.

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by Jacqueline Jordan

Helen Mountjoy, Interim President/CEO of the Economic Development Corporation, and former director of education and workforce development for the EDC, echoed that sentiment. “Our organization, in partnership with several others, hosted some employer roundtables last year,” she said. “One of the topics that came up in each group was millennials and how they fit into the workplace. There was agreement that the younger workers were a lot more tech savvy than their predecessors.” Mountjoy said they found that millennials also worked very hard, especially on tasks that interested them. She noted that the two millennials in the EDC office are creative, sociable and bring fresh eyes to every project. Another local business embracing millennials is US Bank. Patty Millay, Assistant Vice President with Mortgage Servicing, works with Employee and Community Engagement. The group provides multiple functions for US Bank’s business line, including new employee onboarding and mentorship. They act as a conduit for community and volunteer engagement and provide a leadership development platform for employees. “Our workforce is a multi-generation blend,” Millay said. “We have employees in their second career — post retirement — and employees that come to us immediately after graduation.” “At U.S. Bank, we draw strength from diversity,” she said. “It’s part of our culture and critical for business. Our differences, when championed, embraced and given voice, make us a stronger, more innovative company... and a great place to work!” Millay echoed the praise of millennials’ ease and adaptation to new technology and added that the group is solution-driven. “Their creativity


and broad lens help us to leverage new approaches to better serve our customers and our communities,” she said. Like many others in leadership roles, Millay said she’s noticing the trend of millennials taking the option to work from home. And its benefits are numerous. “Effective use of this opportunity allows for increased productivity for the employee and creates a positive solution from traditional office based personnel,” Millay explained. “Advantages include the elimination of the work commute, flexible work hours and a strong work/life balance. We are experiencing high talent dividends in this arena.” She believes other employers should be open-minded in their approach to working with this generation. “Millennials are highly skilled and can be a catalyst for continuous growth and improvement,” she said. ”Embracing their strategic approach creates opportunities to talent share. In a progressive organization, this can unite broad cross sections of personnel.” Helen Bennett, Lead Recruiter at Gorman Recruiting — a business focused on finding employers well-suited hires — said millennial use of technology also changes the way the generation communicates. “Prior generations are more comfortable with building relationships face-to-face and millennials are very comfortable using technology [such as social media, blogs, video conferencing, etc.] to achieve the same level of relationship,” she said. “Millennials are empowered by their technology proficiency,” she added. “They have great influence on our culture, marketing trends and buying behaviors of other generations.” With their big voice, Bennett said, they make a big impact with their media time — tiring of Facebook, watching less television and making their own entertainment. But differences and generation gaps are nothing new. “Every generation is different,” Bennett said. “Each generation has its values, beliefs, and characteristics. It’s important to try to understand the differences and always be respectful toward one another.” For employers ready to embrace a new generation, Frank Anderson said the GO FAME and GO CAREERS earn-and-learn programs are the best method of reaching out to the millennials entering the workforce.

THE GO FAME PROGRAMS FOR ADVANCED MANUFACTURING TECHNICIANS, COMPUTERIZED MANUFACTURING AND MACHINING ARE MANUFACTURING ORIENTED. HOWEVER, GO CAREERS PROGRAMS ARE AVAILABLE NOW FOR BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SYSTEMS AND MEDICAL ASSISTANTS, AND OTHER PROGRAMS SUCH AS ENGINEERING, FINANCE AND IT ARE IN THE WORKS. “The collaborative efforts of our local Economic Development Corporation, OCTC, and area employers to develop these programs is unprecedented,” Anderson said. “My recommendation is to get involved and learn more about these programs, as they are a winning combination for our community, individuals, and employers. It’s a win, win, win, situation!” One thing everyone seems to agree on is the need to get along, despite differences. Said Millay of US Bank: “From baby boomers to millennials, our future is brightest when we work together!”

MILLENNIALS BRING SEVERAL STRENGTHS TO THE WORKFORCE Interpersonal Relations

Tech-Savvy

Creative Energy

Willingness to Impress

Encourage and Welcome Mentorship

HERE’S HOW TO COMMUNICATE THOSE STRENGTHS IN THE WORKPLACE. OR MORE IMPORTANTLY, TO FUTURE EMPLOYERS. Be Prepared This includes researching the company and leadership team, bring a pen and paper to take notes, and bring several copies of your resume.

Overdress If you are interviewing for a job in a creative industry then fashion trends are great, otherwise overdress in standard business attire, i.e. if the company is casual, you should dress business casual.

Be Prompt Arrive 10 minutes early and be nice to everyone you meet.

Be Personable Give a firm handshake, maintain eye contact, and SMILE. Also, be ready to answer the question “Tell me about yourself ” in 1-2 minutes. This often sets the tone for the rest of the interview.

Be Yourself Relax, you and the interviewer want to know if this is a good fit and that can not be determined if you are not being yourself. If you realize this job is not for you, do not pretend it is, you will not be happy and neither will your new employer.

Ask Questions Prepare 3-5 relevant questions you have of the interviewer (other than salary and start date). If they are answered through the course of conversation, take notes of other questions you may have throughout the interview.

Follow Up Ask for your interviewer’s business card and later that day send a follow-up email thanking them for their time and expressing your continued interest in the position. This is a lost art and will set you apart. Sponsored by Gorman Recruiting // (270) 215-1159 Info@GormanCompanies.com // GormonRecruiting.com

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COMMUNITY VENTURES By Danny May

From his office on the third floor of the Greater Owensboro Commerce Center, Ron Burkins wonders who has Owensboro’s next great idea and how Community Ventures can help bring that idea to fruition.

But it’s getting out of the office and into the field that Ron enjoys most about his job, where he gets to put his accounting and business finance degrees directly to work. “I’m a numbers guy, but I’m also out in the trenches and I like that,” Ron said. “I hear the stories. I see the passion in people who have come up with a great idea but they just need an extra push financially, and I can provide that through Community Ventures. It’s very rewarding.” Community Ventures (CV) is a nonprofit organization that helps people start businesses and own homes through affordable financing regardless of race, income, or social status. Take a quick glance at the website and you’ll see that CV grew out of one office in 1982 and now has a presence in 50 locations across the state. As Assistant Vice President of the Western Kentucky Region, Burkins spans a wide territory. “But my office is located in Owensboro for a reason. We’re looking to expand our footprint in Owensboro because this is a great market with a lot of growth and energy right now.” Ron grew up in Union County, Kentucky and now lives in Henderson by way of Terre Haute, Indiana. He is PHOTO BY JAMIE ALEXANDER

very open about growing up in an environment that was

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less than affluent, which he now uses as an advantage in his role with Community Ventures. “I know what poverty looks like. I understand it. I know what it sounds like. I’ve been on both sides.” It also puts context to his personal mission: to break the back of poverty, which aligns perfectly with


Community Ventures’ focus on serving the underserved. CV is a Community Development Financial Institution and is one of the few SBA approved lenders in Kentucky. But beyond loans, they also increase financial literacy and provide technical assistance to people in underserved populations who have a great idea and are trying to develop a business. “We work with both the bankable and nonbankable, even if it’s just to work with people who are not bankable until they are bankable. However, we do help people transform their ideas into something tangible that can be utilized by the public.” To do that, CV relies on a network of community partnerships. Here in Owensboro, Burkins works closely with the Small Business Development Center to provide assistance with drafting business

COMMUNITY VENTURES ALSO OCCASIONALLY PROVIDES FREE CLASSES TO THE PUBLIC. FOR EXAMPLE, THEY RECENTLY HOSTED A GUERRILLA MARKETING TRAINING IN MUHLENBERG COUNTY EXPLAINING SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING CAMPAIGNS.

plans and the Kentucky Innovation Network to utilize more resources for clients. He also lists the Chamber of Commerce and government officials as crucial partnerships. “I see my role as being part of the team. We all do our part. If folks are willing to let you take their hand and walk alongside you, it’s exciting because we have a lot of success stories with business ownership and home ownership.” A few examples of the business success stories Burkins has been a part of through the Western Kentucky office range from launching restaurants, including a food truck, to a sports performance training

“IF YOU FIND SOMETHING YOU LOVE TO DO, SOMETHING YOU ARE GOOD AT, AND SOMETHING YOU CAN GET PAID FOR - WHERE THOSE THREE THINGS OVERLAP - THAT’S WHEN YOU KNOW YOU HAVE SOMETHING.” - Ron Burkins

program and a dog kennel. “What I love is seeing the passion because you can’t teach that. I can help you with a loan and we can help with a business plan, but that passion - I call it your ‘why’ - is what gets you out of bed in the morning. If you can revisit your passion - your ‘why’ - you can stick to it and achieve your dreams.” CV is also an option for existing businesses who are looking to expand. “Sometimes you have to start small and then grow,” Ron explains. “At Community Ventures, we grow with clients. We can work with business owners in the beginning stage and then help later on when they need bigger loans too.” Micro-loans through Community Ventures range from $500 to $50,000, but there are also programs allocating higher loan amounts when needed. According to its website, the greater mission of CV is to strengthen communities by helping people achieve their dreams of greater economic opportunity. “All it takes is one good idea to change your life,” Ron concluded. “Just one. Not everybody may see it immediately, but sometimes it starts that way. My job is to help coach you to get you to that place of success, whether it’s financial independence, time freedom, or creating income to sustain others.”

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PASTOR of the

PEOPLE

FR. SUNEESH MATTHEW KULATHANAPATIKAL, 34 YRS OLD.

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BY NICK HARDESTY

. PHOTO BY JAMIE ALEXANDER


F

r. Suneesh Matthew – he typically drops his last name to make things easier for people – always wanted to be a priest. Growing up in Kerala, India, the monuments to ancient Christianity were all around him. Tradition has it that St. Thomas, one of Jesus’ twelve apostles, brought the Christian faith to India when he landed at Kerala in 52 AD. Many of the churches in Kerala were built hundreds of years ago. Of all the states in India, Kerala has the largest population of Christians. Fr. Suneesh remembers it as a nurturing place for his faith. “I grew up in a very Catholic family,” he said. “My parents and grandparents were all Catholic. I had an uncle who was also a great inspiration to me.” As a boy, he was an altar server. As he and the other servers prepared for Mass, the priest would often say, “Some of you are going to be priests one day!” That planted a seed in his mind, and the priesthood became his only career ambition. For five years now, that seed has been bearing fruit in an unlikely place almost 9,000 miles away: Owensboro, KY. To most people that would be an extraordinary relocation, but to Fr. Suneesh it was simply a matter of answering the call to go where he was needed. Fr. Suneesh is a member of the Heralds of Good News, a clerical missionary society that sends priests all over the world, wherever there is a shortage of priests. After four years as a priest at an extremely poor, rural parish on the border with China, he got the call from his Superior: the Diocese of Owensboro needed priests, and the society was sending him. He came to the Diocese of Owensboro in 2012 and, after a year of, again, helping out wherever he was needed, he became the associate pastor at St. Stephen’s Cathedral in Owensboro. Last year he was made the pastor at Precious Blood parish, also in Owensboro. As with any transition to a new culture, there were a few bumps in the road. His greatest difficulty was with the language barrier, even when he was speaking the same language as his parishioners. “When Indians speak English, we speak it very fast,” he informed me. “In India, if you can speak English very fast, it means you are learned. But, when I came to America, I had to learn to slow down.” When he read the Gospel reading at Mass for the first time, he went so fast that the pastor thought he was reading it in Hindi! Even today, five years later, Fr. Suneesh has to remind himself to speak slowly and enunciate. “Sometimes, when I get into the homily, the Spirit moves me and I forget, so I have to apologize and slow down again.” American English idioms and phrases were also confusing to him. In India, they take the English language literally, which caused some confusion in the beginning of his ministry here. For example, Fr. Suneesh joyfully remembers the first time he visited a nursing home. “I thought a nursing home was a home where girls stayed while they were studying to be nurses. So, when I went to a nursing home for the first time, I thought, ‘Wow, these nurses are really old!’” He told me, only half-joking,

that phrases like “break a leg” or “burning bridges” would be downright dangerous in India. “If you say ‘break a leg’ in India, you might get your leg broken!” he exclaimed. “And burning bridges? Who burned the bridge? What was wrong with it?” So, our different manner of speaking took some getting used to. But, Fr. Suneesh hesitates to call any of them real challenges, because of the great people he has met along the way. “When you’re far from home, your parish becomes your home, and the people become your friends. Everyone here has been so welcoming and appreciative. There’s a lot of involvement here, a lot of dedication and ownership of the parish. I find it joyful here.” To Fr. Suneesh, his priesthood is for the people, and being with them means everything to him. “Being with people, celebrating the Eucharist, to be somebody in people’s lives, to help them, to hear confessions, that’s what I like the most about being a priest,” he said. “I am very extroverted, I like to be with people, so definitely that ministry of being with people, taking the Eucharist to people, visiting with them, visiting the Catholic schools, I love it.” It follows from this that his goals in life are pretty simple. “I just want to be a priest until my dying breath,” he said. “My goal is to try to be the best priest I can be, to try to reach out to other people. Also, I want to choose every day to be happy. Happiness is a choice and I choose to be happy.” Of course, like any religious person, heaven is the ultimate goal, but the journey is very important to him too. “Every day I want to be thankful,” he said. “I try to get rid of the stress that pushes me down. I try to be happy and just do the best I can.” That’s a goal worth having, no matter where you’re from.

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WORK, LIFE, MOM

BALANCE BY ASHLEY SORCE

. PHOTO BY JAMIE ALEXANDER

For

Jennifer Tinius, owner of Embellish, it was never a question if she would return to work after having

either of her daughters, Miller, now 2, and Lily, just 6 weeks. “I love my daughters, and I love my business, so the only question was how am I going to do both,” Jennifer said. Jennifer graduated from WKU with a degree in textile, apparel and merchandising, with the ultimate dream of owning her own boutique. She and her husband Jeff opened the store in 2010 at the initial 18th Street location. In 2015, they made the move to their new Frederica location. “This was an important step for us because it gave us more square footage and the opportunity to bring in more merchandise so that we could better service our customers,” Jennifer said. And while the new store means more inventory and therefore a heavier workload, Jennifer loves having her daughters in the store with her. After Miller was born, Jennifer brought her to work for the first 10 months. She now relies on her family support system to help watch Miller. But since Lily was born,

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Jennifer is once again bringing her daughters to work.

“I had gone from being 100% hands on in every aspect of running

“I kind of have the best of both worlds, I get to be a working mom

the business and knew I had to delegate and get a staff and system in

but also spend the amount of time with them that a stay at home

place to do so,” Natasha said. “I already had a great team and I hired

mom would have,” Jennifer said.

an assistant manager. I’m so blessed to have such amazing young

And while newborn schedules are quite demanding, Jennifer says

women work for me and help me grow my business. By the time my

she is lucky to have flexibility and understanding employees that

maternity leave started, everyone and everything was in place.”

allow her to run her business and care for her daughter as needed.

It was never a question of going back to work for Natasha. “My

Jennifer admits that the toughest part for her is time. “There are a

business is so important to me and feels like it’s a part of who I

lot of things owning a business requires that a normal 9-5 job does

am,” Natasha said. “It gives me a sense of purpose and pride. I love

not,” Jennifer said. “It can be difficult sometimes balancing the time

interacting with my customers. I’ve made lifelong relationships and

I need to spend on the business with the time I want to spend with

friendships because of Bella Ragazza and will continue to do so.”

my kids. It’s very fulfilling though to be able to raise my children and

And while daughter Sloan is only two weeks old, Natasha is looking

grow my business at the same time.”

forward to getting back to the store and bringing her daughter with

Christy Chaney, owner of Studio Slant, says balance has been the

her whenever possible.

hardest thing for her as a working mom as well.

“I think that Sloan will appreciate how hard I work at something

“There are days it is just not going to happen, sometimes it’s work,

I’m so passionate about,” Natasha said. “I was raised by a hardworking

sometimes sports, sometimes just life in general gets in the way,”

mother that did everything to make sure she did what was best for

Christy said.

us, all the while being there as a supportive mom. I want to mirror

Mom to son, Ryland, 13, and daughters Lucy Jagoe, 8, and Stone,

that as much as I can. I respect all moms, stay at home and working

1, Christy says having three kids so far apart in age makes things

moms. I’m lucky to have both the passion for my job as well as my

difficult. But she says that the team she has in place at Studio Slant

child.”

makes her job of being a mom easier. But that doesn’t mean she can

Sarah Ford, manager of the Owensboro division of Hartz

make it to everything.

Contracting, is expecting baby number three in October, a tie

“I find it makes those moments where all the stars align even more

breaker, she says after daughter, Sutton, 4, and son, Wynn, 2. Along

special, but the best part is that I get to do something I am passionate

with overseeing the Owensboro operations, Sarah is also highly

about, raise children to the best of my ability and include everyone

involved in the accounting department for the entire company, Scott,

in the journey,” Christy said. “I am teaching them self-worth, work

Murphy & Daniel.

ethic, and the joy of accomplishing things on your own.”

When Sarah returned to work after the birth of both of her

Christy got to see that work ethic lesson every day when her son,

children, she admits she struggled with second guessing her choice

Ryland, came to work at Studio Slant this summer. When he asked

to return to work.

about a summer job, Christy suggested mowing lawns, but Ryland

“Ultimately I knew I was going back to work,” Sarah said. “But it

wanted to work with his mom. Putting in 10 to 20 hours per week,

was by far one of the hardest things I have ever had to do. Many

Ryland did it all – took out the trash, wrapped presents, made sales,

days, I wouldn’t even be able to concentrate being away from them.

and built and installed furniture.

So if possible, I would bring them with me to work when they were

“Let’s be frank, sometimes he did not like it at all because he could

infants, in the morning or afternoon. It helped me get adjusted to

be out with his friends but for the most part he enjoyed participating

eventually leaving them with the sitter.”

in the business, and it has helped him appreciate entrepreneurship

And while her children do not accompany her to work regularly,

and really get a feel for it. It was a wonderful way to incorporate a

Sarah says sometimes when she cannot find a backup babysitter, she

hands-on approach to one of our household buzz words,” Christy

or husband, Neel, will bring them to work.

said.

“I love for them to know where I am when I am away and see what

And when asked, Christy had this advice for working moms:

I do every day,” Sarah said. “I can remember doing the same thing at

“Dishes can wait, dust bunnies can be named and viewed as adorable

my parents’ offices, so it brings back a lot of memories for me.”

pets and precious time should not be wasted making sure everything

Like the other moms, Sarah cites balance as her most difficult

is perfect. Be silly, play the video games, swim with them, cook with

lesson. She gives her work her complete attention until the end of

them, craft with them, learn all the words to their favorite rap song.”

the day and then that focus turns to her family. “The most rewarding

Bella Ragazza owner Natasha Stanley has been a mom for just two

is knowing that I can do both -- be a mom and work,” Sarah said. “I

weeks but quickly learned the need to delegate during her pregnancy.

absolutely adore how excited my children are to see me every day

Taking maternity leave sooner than expected due to doctors orders,

when I walk in the door. It is the ultimate reward to a hard day’s

Natasha missed being at her store every day.

work!”

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Chamber Young Professionals:

ENGAGING THE COMMUNITY

As its name suggests, Chamber Young Professionals is open to 21-40-year-olds who are interested in educating themselves about opportunities to make a difference in Greater Owensboro. And hey - while you’re doing that, you might as well have fun and meet new people too, right?

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W

ith a new name - Chamber Young Professionals - and a rebranding, the group now known as CYP was reformed in January of ‘16 when Candance Brake and (then Chamber Board Chair) Adam Hancock saw a need to revive the group. With an Executive Committee in place, CYP started planning events and adding members in the spring. In the year and a half since, CYP has grown to 150 members. CYP Executive Committee Chair, Andrew Howard, attributes that growth to the efforts of the Executive Committee and the support of the membership. “The Executive Committee is very proactive. They have great ideas and come up with various events and activities. But they are also constantly reaching out to the membership for new ideas as well.” The result is a dynamic, open line of communication between CYP membership and the Executive Committee that results in a full slate of social gatherings, networking opportunities, and philanthropic events. Now that CYP is firmly established with leadership in place and faithful support from members, the group seems to have found its identity in a healthy mix of interesting activities that are both fun and informative. To give a quick overview, there is a lunch meeting every other month where a sponsor provides lunch and a guest speaker comes to engage the group in conversation. Past speakers include Mayor Tom Watson, County Judge Executive Al Mattingly, and Convention & Visitor’s Bureau President, Mark Calitri. In addition, there is a social event at least once a month and a philanthropic event once or twice a quarter. “We constantly try to do something new and I think that’s the key to the growth we’ve seen in the last year,” says Chair-Elect, Dave Kirk. “I think in Owensboro people get so comfortable with what you know, so we try to offer things members can’t normally do. Hopefully, that first-time event turns into something that not just CYP can enjoy but the whole community.” CYP has done everything from visiting O.Z. Tyler Distillery and taking a behind-the-scenes tour of Haley McGinnis Funeral Home at Halloween to serving in a soup kitchen and working on a Habitat House. People are still talking about “Yappy Hour,” where members brought their dogs with them to dinner on the

Miller House patio. But the bigger picture of CYP goes well beyond fun social events and service opportunities. “I see CYP as vital to the future growth of Owensboro, especially in terms of recruiting for employers,” Howard said. For example, if a company is recruiting younger employees, Howard says an organization like CYP could be a real selling point for someone looking to relocate because it provides a way to feel connected and get educated on non-profits and other areas of civic engagement.

“I CAN’T THANK THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE ENOUGH FOR PUSHING THIS AND THE MEMBERSHIP FOR GETTING ON BOARD. CYP WOULD NOT BE WHERE IT IS TODAY WITHOUT THOSE TWO PARTS COMING TOGETHER.” – Andrew Howard

Meeting and networking with other members is another advantage of involvement with CYP, and the Executive Committee is intentional about mingling opportunities, like assigned seating at meetings. Maintaining a welcoming atmosphere is a priority too. “You don’t have to be a lawyer from downtown to be in CYP. Let’s think big picture. If you’re 21-40 years old, and you live in Owensboro we want you,” Kirk says. “The best ideas come from different people with different backgrounds.” Beyond Owensboro, CYP leadership has networked with other young professional groups in chambers across the region. For example, YPAL (Young Professionals of Louisville) in Louisville. “Getting ideas from Louisville was fun but it was also neat to share ideas with them that they can try.” They’ve also reached out to Paducah, who will host the next statewide young chamber summit. As for the future, Kirk hopes to see more CYP members joining boards across the community. “Having more of an advocacy component is one of my biggest goals for the future of CYP. I don’t want people to see CYP as a group of people who meet; I want them to see CYP as a group of young people who are doing.”

Interesting fact: Long term Chamber members may remember CYP’s former name, “Connecting Young Leaders of Owensboro.” But before that, the group was originally known as Chamber Young Professionals as well. So this new re-branding was actually a return to the original.

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26

MAT T CASTLEN

MAT T MASON

SUZANNE CECIL WHITE

BROOKLYN MAPLE

ELIZABETH GRIFFITH

JACOB CALL

ANDREW HOWARD

PABLO GALL ASTEQUE

JENNIFER KELLER

DREW KIRKL AND

HARRY PEDIGO, JR .

KAITLYN MOORE

JASON TANNER

RICK SEARCY

KATIE KELLER

ADAM HANCOCK

SHANNON RAINES

BRANDON GENTRY

JOSH MEYER

DAVE ROBERTS

GO CHAMBER . THIRD QUARTER 2017


KYLE GORMAN

HANNAH THURMAN

JESSICA KIRK

DAVE KIRK

LOUISE MURDOCK

KATHERINE TAYLOR

REBECCA MCQUEEN

JACLYN GRAVES

JESSICA MCKINLEY

BETH BENJAMIN

SARAH FORD

NEEL FORD

JOE BERRY

CARLEY BEAN

L AURA RUTH EDGE

BETSY JO MULLINS

JOEY CONNELLY

KEVIN DORTH

J.D. WINKLER

DANIEL HAYDEN PHOTOS BY JAMIE ALEXANDER

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 2017 GREATER OWENSBORO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 40UNDER40 HONOREES. The following forty individuals were nominated for 40U40 based on their leadership and potential to influence our community. Each nominee was recognized as hardworking, daring, innovative, and going above and beyond to affect change in the workplace and in the community. They are executives and directors of foundations and non-profits. Principals and professors. Some are second and third generation business owners while others are entrepreneurs and pioneers. All are shaping the future of Owensboro in their unique way. After nominations were received, each nominee was sent a packet. Those applications were carefully reviewed by an anonymous panel of judges on a selection committee that was independent of the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce staff and board members. Final selections were made by that independent committee based on the nominee’s experience, contributions, and essay answers. 27

GO CHAMBER . THIRD QUARTER 2017


BRANDON GENTRY, 35

AVP, BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT OFFICER, REPUBLIC BANK

Republic Bank would like to congratulate Brandon Gentry, Assistant Vice President and Business Development Officer on being named 40Under40. Brandon began his banking career ten years ago when he was first trained as a teller/customer service representative. During his time at Republic Bank, Brandon has been promoted several times over seven years. Brandon is hard working with an outgoing personality that makes him excellent as a business development officer because he is committed to building and maintaining relationships with clients both over the phone and in person. His approachable demeanor puts clients at ease and his professionalism gives both business and personal clients confidence that Brandon can find a way to make their banking experience smooth and efficient. “We are extremely proud of Brandon’s accomplishments both at Republic Bank and in the community, and feel that this recognition is well deserved,” stated

BETH BENJAMIN, 39

PRINCIPAL, OWENSBORO INNOVATION ACADEMY

Scott Godthaab Senior Vice President and Direct of Retail Banking of Republic Bank. He was raised in Owensboro and loves to be involved in the community. Brandon serves as board chair of FridayAfter 5 and treasurer on the board of directors for Hospice of Western Kentucky. He is also a committee member for Daniel Pitino Shelter and Aid the Homeless fundraising event and attends Immaculate Parish with his family. Brandon is also very involved in the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce. He is a 2011 graduate of Leadership Owensboro and is an active member of the Chamber and Chamber Young Professionals. At Republic Bank, Brandon has received several awards and promotions for sales performance and continues to strive to improve and make banking easier for our clients. Congratulations, Brandon. We are proud of you.

J.D. WINKLER, 39 LIEUTENANT, OPD

JESSICA MCKINLEY, 32 OWNER,BLOSSOMS BOUTIQUE

Dahl & Groezinger would like to congratulate Drew on his 40 under 40 selection. Drew started at D&G in 1995 and joined the family business full time in 2003 after earning his MBA from the University of Alabama. “It’s an honor to be nominated and selected. I want to recognize Will Helwig and John Kirkland, who are also deserving. I’d also like to thank Bill Conley, Bill Helwig, and Drew Kirkland for the opportunity to work in our family business and the guidance they’ve provided us. Thanks to our co-workers for all your hard work and to our customers for your business. We’ve been very blessed to serve this region for five generations.” Founded in 1885 by Phillip Dahl and George Groezinger, D&G has the distinction of being Kentucky’s oldest family-owned scrap iron and metal recycler. We recycle scrap steel, copper, brass, stainless, aluminum (and more) from both industrial and residential customers. (www.1885dg.com)

DREW KIRKLAND, 39 CO-OWNER, DAHL & GROEZINGER

LAURA RUTH EDGE, 33

OWNER/INTERIOR DESIGNER, LRUTH INTERIOR DESIGNS

DANIEL HAYDEN, 28 OWNER/MANAGER, HAYDEN FARMS

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JACOB CALL, 39

MASTER DISTILLER, O.Z. TYLER DISTILLERY

To say he was born with whiskey in his veins may be a stretch, but distilling bourbon has been in Jacob Call’s family for three generations. A seventh-generation Kentuckian (born and raised in Bardstown), Jacob graduated from Murray State University with a degree in business administration. He started his career in banking, rising in the ranks to Chief Operating Officer before the familial call of the spirits business became too strong. His grandfather and father had spent many years working at Jim Beam and his father went on to become Master Distiller at Florida Caribbean Distillers, where Jacob joined the team in 2007. At Florida Distillers, Jacob held various senior management positions in purchasing, bulk sales, and distillery operations. Jacob joined Terressentia Corporation in the fall of 2014 to oversee renovations of the former Medley Distillery in Owensboro. The 26acre facility has produced great bourbon since 1885, but it had been dormant for many years until Terressentia purchased it. The company

named the facility after O.Z. Tyler, the co-inventor of the company’s patented fast filtration technology, and opened it in 2016. As Master Distiller and Operations Manager of the O.Z. Tyler Distillery, Jacob oversees a staff of 40 (most under 40!) and manages all aspects of whiskey production, warehousing, and renovations at the facility that just expanded from producing 18,000 barrels of bourbon to 70,000 annually. Since opening to the public last year, the Distillery has hosted private and public events and toured many visitors around its historic campus. Occasionally, lucky visitors will find themselves with the Master Distiller himself as their private tour guide! NOTE: Tours are offered Monday – Friday at 11am and 2pm and on Saturday at 11am, 1pm, and 3pm ($10 fee includes samples of several O.Z. Tyler brand whiskey products).

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SUZANNE CECIL WHITE, 37 DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS, CECIL FARM PRODUCE

Suzanne Cecil White is an integral piece to Cecil Farms, who both motivates and inspires others daily. She has made “Cecil Farms” a recognized name in Owensboro through extensive involvement in community organizations and the local schools, public speaking, on-farm events, and a home delivery subscription service. Suzanne’s positive attitude, vision, innovative spirit, compassion for others and relentless faith make people want to be a part of what she is doing and work with her. She creates an inviting environment that has played a key role in connecting the local consumer with their food. With her strengths in public speaking, she has provided many educational opportunities for local and state business community members to experience their own “aha” moments on the farm learning about commercial agriculture and the fresh produce industry. Suzanne always remembers that she is a consumer as well as a farmer and conveys her passion and experiences in a relatable manner. Suzanne sees the value and importance of partnerships with others and pulling multiple interested entities together to achieve a common purpose, which in return creates larger impacts and benefits on our community and state as a whole. She is always concerned with how her decisions will impact or affect others. We greatly value that Suzanne is always generating new ideas to carry our business forward. She thinks “outside of the fence rows” and is a risk-taker. She has continually proven to develop new revenue streams for our business by reaching out into new audiences in ways we hadn’t explored before. Suzanne embodies our true mission here at Cecil Farms by continually striving to contribute to the greater good of our society and we truly value having her on our team.

Kyle is a visionary with a passion for helping our city succeed and progress. This is demonstrated in every one of the businesses Kyle leads; from NEXT Services, helping job seekers to be better prepared; to Employer Blueprint, coaching and supporting businesses; as well as Gorman Recruiting, hiring the best-talented employees for small businesses. Kyle strives to see small business owners succeed because he is one. Congratulations, Kyle, for an award well deserved. Gorman Recruiting serves as an extension of your organization by helping recruit and hire professional employees that have a significant impact on your business. Our goal is to reduce the amount of time, money, and stress associated with the recruiting process by identifying the right people for the right positions.

DAVE KIRK, 29

PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICER, OWENSBORO PUBLIC SCHOOLS

KATHERINE TAYLOR, 30 MANAGER, STUDIO SLANT

Katherine brings light and frivolity to Studio Slant. With her artists eye for style and all things awesome she is a force to be reckoned with as our fearless curator. Every step of the way for 7 years she has helped guide the style of the store, recently ushering in a new era of wedding registry and home decor. Katherine is a social media wizard, gifted in the art of customer service and has a genuine authenticity that radiates through out Studio Slant. We are proud of her and all of her accomplishments and look forward to the future that is unfolding before her. Thank you for the journey of keeping Owensboro “Slanted” from one Sister of Slant to the other!

KYLE GORMAN, 36

OWNER/GM, GORMAN COMPANIES

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KATIE KELLER, 30

MARKETING DIRECTOR, INTERNATIONAL BLUEGRASS MUSEUM


SARAH FORD, 34 VP, HARTZ CONTRACTING

Five years ago, a great partnership was formed when after 34-years Hartz Construction strengthened its professional capacity and ability when Scott, Murphy & Daniel established Hartz as its permanent Owensboro division. With the establishment of this new but continuing entity, Sarah Murphy Ford was appointed Vice-President and General Manager to lead this venture into great economic times. From the inception of this continued successful and proven business, revenues and employment opportunities have multiplied substantially within five years resulting in being awarded the 2015 Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce BUSINESS OF THE YEAR. Besides leading this successful organization and its local group of managers, field supervisors, and professional craftsmen, Sarah is an active member of many local organizations including Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors, Greater Owensboro Economic Development Board of Directors, Diocese of Owensboro Finance Council Member, Immaculate Parish Planning

Committee, Daniel Pitino Shelter Board of Directors, Riverpark Center Board of Directors, Owensboro Health Foundation Board of Directors, and Owensboro Women’s Guild Member & Secretary. Her most important responsibility is being mother of two (#3 arriving soon) very active preschoolers who recharge her good attitude and drive her each and every day. Besides the above duties mentioned, she really enjoys quality time with her husband Neel. Sarah received her Bachelor of Business Administration degree in Marketing and Finance in 2005 from the University of Kentucky. She obtained her Master’s in Business Administration from Western Kentucky University in 2010, where she was honored with The Outstanding College Graduate Award in Graduate Studies. Sarah has been involved in the family business all the way back to her Junior High School days and brings a modern and fresh business atmosphere into the 40-year business.

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JASON TANNER, 34 OWNER, TANNER+WEST OWNER, TANNER PUBLISHING CO.

HARRY PEDIGO, JR., 35

DIRECTOR, ST. BENEDICT’S HOMELESS SHELTER

ADAM HANCOCK, 35

PRESIDENT, RINEY HANCOCK CPAS

PABLO GALLASTEQUE, 33

SENIOR SOFTWARE ENGINEER , RED PIXEL STUDIOS

Carley Bean is an interior designer with LinGate Hospitality/Crown Designs. Her professional career began in commercial interior design in Nashville, TN. She then moved back to Owensboro to continue her professional career with posts at Mattingly Ford Title & Closing, Welborn’s Floral & Events, and Owensboro Convention Center. Carley graduated from Western Kentucky University with a Bachelor’s in Design, Merchandising, and Textiles: Interior Design and a Minor in Entrepreneurship. She is active locally in Impact 100, Riverpark Center, Campbell Club, Cathedral Preschool, Chamber Young Professionals, Girls Inc., and Immaculate Catholic Church. Carley resides in Owensboro with her husband Brad and daughters Sutton and Everly. It’s no surprise to us that Carley was named to this distinguished group. Her skill set, keen eye, and modern ideas drive many of the design features in our hotel projects. We are honored to have Carley on our team and congratulate her on this achievement.

What started out as one publication six years ago has grown into Tanner Publishing Company (which now publishes Owensboro Parent, Owensboro Living, GO Chamber Magazine, and Henderson Family ) and Tanner+West, an award-winning design and advertising agency. A product of Kentucky Wesleyan College, Jason has assembled a team of creatives who design magazines, videos, websites and ad campaigns for clients across the region. “Any success we have is because of the amazing group of clients and advertisers who have trusted us with their brands and products,” Jason explained. “With Tanner+West, we get to do what we love every day in the city we love. It’s a huge blessing.” Jason is a family man (married with four kids) who is involved in his church and in the community and looks forward to expanding the reach of his businesses.

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CARLEY BEAN, 33

INTERIOR DESIGNER, LINGATE HOSPITALITY GROUP

RICK SEARCY, 37

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, H.L. NEBLETT CENTER

JENNIFER KELLER, 33

REGIONAL SALES COORDINATOR, AFLAC, KELLER AND ASSOCIATES

BETSY JO MULLINS, 36 DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT, URSULINE SISTERS OF MOUNT ST. JOSEPH


PHOTO PROVIDED BY KENTUCKY LEGEND

BROOKLYN MAPLE, 29 BRAND MANAGER, KENTUCKY LEGEND

It isn’t easy for anyone to seamlessly lead a 102 year-old business into the new era, but one took the challenge and is driven to embed a “legendary” stamp all over the city of Owensboro. Brooklyn Maple is the powerhouse behind the movement of the household brand, serving as the Brand Manager for Kentucky Legend®, a division of Specialty Foods Group, LLC. She directs all marketing strategies, overseeing the consumer and marketing activities, advertising, and brand awareness. Following obtaining her BBM from Barry University in 2009, Brooklyn sought to advance her career in the city of Miami with Royal Caribbean International Limited, ranging from managing onboard marketing and communications to overseeing the creation of cruise ships in St. Nazaire, France.

Creative Director Michelle Perry from Incite Visual Communications, LLC writes, “I have had the privilege of working with some smart and innovate marketers. Many have worked for Kentucky Legend’s parent company Specialty Foods Group. Brooklyn easily ranks in the top of those marketers, for her fresh perspective and dedication. She always has a clear vision and easily communicates what she is looking for. Not only is she encouraging and engaged with the people on her team, she is also forward leaning with an ever present focus on the desired result. She is strategic in where the company spends their marketing dollars, oversees new product development that continues to grow national brand recognition for Kentucky Legend, and even appears as the company spokesperson for various events. Her energy and enthusiasm are contagious.”

Brooklyn has always been passionate about the world of marketing, but long desired to return to her roots in Evansville, but found herself planted in Owensboro, Kentucky. With a creative mindset, she was able to make the transition and proceeded to advance into her current role, spearheading the company into a whole new direction, catching the eyes and interest of existing customers and new millennials.

“During her tenure at Kentucky Legend, I have found her to be a passionate and tireless leader who has taken a deep personal ownership stake in her department even as we traipsed through a difficult transition period. Her interpersonal and team building skills are superlative and appreciated by everyone who works with her,” said Ric Herrera, Vice President of Sales and Marketing for Kentucky Legend®.

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HANNAH THURMAN, 27 ACADEMIC OUTREACH SPECIALIST, WKU OWENSBORO

Shannon has enjoyed working with money since she was a child. She has created ways to make money going back as far as she can remember. While she was still in elementary school, it was not unusual for her to convert her parents’ driveway to lemonade stand or to find her going door-to-door selling vegetables from the garden. Since early on, Shannon has always had that entrepreneurial spirit. Early on, she discovered she had a passion for numbers. This passion lead her to earn a Bachelor’s degree in Finance from the University of Kentucky and an MBA from Murray State. She paid her way through college working for a Lexington brokerage firm. It was this job that opened her eyes to the finance industry and allowed her to express her passion with numbers by working with individuals and business owners to help them realize their financial dreams. She enjoys helping her clients plan for retirement so they have the financial freedom to do what they what, WHEN they want, without worry. Starting her career as an advisor, Shannon specifically saw a need for financial advisors with deep knowledge and experience in retirement plans. While she spends much of her time working with individual clients, she also specializes in retirement plans for businesses. She strives to simplify complex options into simple choices so clients are more likely to realize their retirement goals. Shannon is comfortable presenting complex financial data to senior executives and implementing investment strategies with all employees.

KEVIN DORTH, 31

COORDINATOR OF STUDENT SERVICES, WKU OWENSBORO

Shannon has worked with Hilliard Lyons for more than eight years. She loves working for a Kentucky-based investment firm that offers investment counseling to grow, protect, and manage wealth for multiple generations. Whether your needs are funding education, retirement, business succession, or estate planning, Shannon can help you move from where you are to where you want to go.

You make us proud at WKU Owensboro. As Hilltoppers, we live by the motto “The Spirit Makes The Master.” To each, the saying may mean something different, but to all, the spirit is the passion we exert as we pursue a life of excellence.

JOE BERRY, 34

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, GO-EDC

GO EDC congratulates Joe Berry, our Executive Vice President, for being named 40 Under 40! We already knew how valuable he is and will be to this community and now everyone else will know, too! We are proud to work with him. Joe is a great choice to serve as our “Chief Innovation Officer.” Like the successful entrepreneurs he works with, he is creative, hard-working, flexible, and committed to finding solutions to the problems that arise in any project. He is much more interested in getting the job done than in claiming responsibility for its success. A native of Owensboro who came back home to make a difference, Joe has worked on the revitalization of downtown, has served on the boards of TWO and RiverPark Center, volunteers with the Wendell H. Ford Government Education Center, and can be found assisting, advising, and encouraging other groups all over town.

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SHANNON RAINES, 38 FINANCIAL ADVISOR, HILLIARD LYONS


JACLYN GRAVES, 35

MEMBERSHIP DEVELOPMENT MANAGER, GO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Jaclyn Graves Cecil is the Membership Manager for the Chamber of Commerce. She spent her early years in West Tennessee, before moving to Mayfield, Kentucky. Jaclyn is a graduate of Western Kentucky University and a proud Hilltopper. After graduating from college, Jaclyn settled here in Owensboro. Her love of country music and community involvement led her to an eightyear gig as a DJ for a local radio station. Through that position, Jaclyn grew to know and love this Owensboro community and she found her way to the Chamber. Her extensive work with St. Jude’s Children Hospital is an inspiration to everyone who knows her. She and her colleague Chad Benningfield actually rode bicycles all the way to Memphis to raise money for the children of St. Jude’s. Talk about passion and tenacity! Jaclyn is a mom, an avid football fan, a vocalist.. and she is an emcee for many local events including ROMP and the Big O Music Fest. She truly embodies a team attitude in everything she does and is extremely passionate about issues impacting the less fortunate and the every day working people who make our community great. She is also civically engaged and stays on top of local issues. She will be part of good things happening in Owensboro and will continue to bring a different perspective to Greater Owensboro.

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JESSICA SHELY KIRK, 27 PROGRAM AND EVENTS MANAGER, GO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Jessica Shely Kirk, the Chamber’s Talent Programs Manager and Executive Director of Leadership Owensboro was born and raised in Lexington, KY. She is a graduate of the University of Kentucky where she earned her Bachelors in Political Science with a minor in Philosophy. After graduating from UK in three years, Jessica moved from Lexington to be with her husband, Owensboro native Dave Kirk, Public Information Officer for Owensboro Public Schools. She is a Board Member for CASA of the Ohio Valley, is a 2015 graduate of Leadership Owensboro, and serves as the staff liaison for Chamber Young Professionals, a group that has grown to 150 members. Jessica’s new professional challenge will be to staff the Regional Alliance for Education, a group dedicated to connecting business and education in order to enhance economic and community growth. Jessica brings a perspective of “fresh eyes” to any situation. She researches other community’s best practices and is always contributing “what ifs?” to discussions and plans. This talent is of great use in our organization and to our community at large. She asks the questions and she steps up to work. No one will out work Jessica. Her future is full of promise and Owensboro will be better because she has made it her home.

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She Promotes Building Homes and Building Self-Esteem Atlanta native, Louise Murdock, is very much at home in Owensboro where she serves as Social Media/PR Coordinator for award-winning builder, Jagoe Homes. The University of Alabama graduate oversees all Social Media accounts and contributes to marketing endeavors. When not giving her all to promote the Jagoe brand, Louise enjoys giving back to her community. She especially loves volunteering on behalf of Girls Inc., an Owensboro not-for-profit. Louise explains, “It’s about empowering young girls and women to seek their highest aspirations. I’ve spoken to girls about the dangers of social media, and how to deal with issues on the internet. It’s important to be aware of what you are putting on the internet and knowing nothing truly goes away. They need to know when something is wrong and to seek out a responsible adult to address any issue they have.”

DAVE ROBERTS, 36 GM, UNIFIRST

Dave Roberts is General Manager of Distribution for UniFirst Corporation. Dave’s career at UniFirst began as Plant Engineer a decade ago when he and his wife decided to build and grow their family in Owensboro. He moved into the Engineering Manager role a couple years later and assumed the role of General Manager of Distribution six years ago. His primary responsibilities include strategy, business and financial planning activities, facilities, operations, and oversight of UniFirst’s Distribution network which includes the national distribution center in Owensboro. UniFirst employs approximately 450 people in Owensboro and over 13,000 across the globe. The company ships nearly 18 million garments annually from the national distribution center. One of the firm’s most recent projects includes a $13 million expansion of our Owensboro facility which is scheduled to be complete in late 2017. Dave is a graduate of Murray State University where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration. He also completed graduate study at Ole Miss where he earned a Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree. Dave graduated from business school at the University of Mississippi at the top of his class. Further, Dave has undergone additional education and certifications in supply chain management, financial management and industrial engineering. Dave currently serves on the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce board where he is currently vice chair of administration and holds a seat on the chamber’s executive committee. He has also served on the Owensboro Health Foundation board since 2013 and currently serves as board vice chair. He is a graduate of Leadership Owensboro and a former member of the Chamber of Young Professionals. Dave and his wife, Rachael, are the proud parents of two beautiful girls, Gracie and Annie Kate. Rachael is a first grade teacher at Sutton Elementary and Gracie and Annie Kate are both students at Owensboro Public Schools.

LOUISE MURDOCK, 26

PUBLIC RELATIONS DIRECTOR, JAGOE HOMES

Don Moore Automotive has been serving the Owensboro since 1919. Kaitlyn is part of the 5th generation of the Moore Family to work at the dealership. We are excited about having her carry on the legacy of serving the community with all of their automotive needs. We are confident that Kaitlyn will help the business continue to grow and continue for several generations to come. Kaitlyn is a CPA and is a vital asset to our accounting department. We are proud of Kaitlyn as she strives to be a young leader in the Owensboro community. Congratulations Kaitlyn on being selected for Owensboro’s 40 Under 40!

KAITLYN MOORE, 27

CORPORATE ACCOUNTANT, DON MOORE AUTOMOTIVE

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JOEY CONNELLY, 38 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, KENTUCKY WESLEYAN COLLEGE

Joey Connelly is an associate professor of English at Kentucky Wesleyan College, where he has taught since 2010. He was been recognized twice by the student body as Teacher of the Year. Professor Connelly is a poet, and his work has appeared in numerous journals, including Southern Humanities Review, PANK, New Plains Review and others. He is active in the Owensboro nonprofit community and serves on the Owensboro/Daviess County Christmas Parade Board of Directors. He has also served on the New Beginnings Sexual Assault Support Services Board of Directors and was treasurer for two years. Professor Connelly earned a master of fine arts in creative writing from Ashland University and a bachelor of arts in English and religion/philosophy from Kentucky Wesleyan College. He holds a master’s certificate in nonprofit administration from Western Kentucky University. He received the Emerging Artist Award from the Kentucky Arts Council in 2016. He ran for the Owensboro City Commission in 2016.

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REBECCA MCQUEEN, 36

DEAN OF STUDENTS, KENTUCKY WESLEYAN COLLEGE

Rebecca McQueen is the dean of student services at Kentucky Wesleyan College, where she has been a staff member since 2014. She was previously responsible for the sophomore experience program at the College that increased sophomore-to-junior persistence by over 20 percent. She was recognized as Staff Member of the Year by the Student Government Association in 2015. She was also assistant dean of students and director of residence life at Pfeiffer University, an assistant director of residence life at Elon University and a resident director at Appalachian State University and Meredith College. Dean McQueen was a member of the 2014-15 Emerge Owensboro class. She earned a master of arts in college student development at Appalachian State University and a bachelor of arts in psychology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.


EM Ford would like to congratulate Neel Ford for this recognition. Prior to joining our family-owned agency in 2008, Neel worked at Indiana Insurance Company in Nashville following his graduation from the University of Kentucky. Neel is the immediate past-chair of the Independent Insurance Agents of Kentucky’s Young Agent Committee. In 2016, he was awarded as the organization’s “Outstanding Young Agent”. In addition to his professional accomplishments, his community involvement and service projects are many. He’s a board member of the Museum of Science & Natural History and Hospice of Western Kentucky. He volunteers at the Daniel Pitino Shelter and was a participant in the American Cancer Society’s “Real Men Wear Pink” campaign last year. Neel and his wife Sarah have two children and are expecting their third this fall. Congratulations, Neel! We’re proud of all that you do for us and the community.

NEEL FORD, 35

PARTNER/COMMERCIAL LINES MANAGER , EM FORD

The DCHS Panther Foundation of Alumni and Friends, Inc. would like to congratulate, Principal Matt Mason for being named to the 40 Under 40 List!

MATT CASTLEN, 31 OWNER, CASTLEN STEEL

State Representative (14th District) Matt Castlen grew up working on the family farm. After graduating from Daviess County High School, Matt put his American Welding Society welding degree from Owensboro Community and Technical College to work welding in a shop in his backyard. In 2009, Matt and his wife, Laura, formed Castlen Steel. Since then, they have diversified and expanded their company including a new 92-acre trans-loading facility on the former Green River Steel property on the Ohio River. Castlen takes pride in being heavily involved in the community. He currently serves on the Executive Board Member of Greater Owensboro Economic Development Corporation, Board Member for KY GO FAME, Community Board Member of Independence Bank, Member of the Huts for Haiti Mission Team, District 3 Representative for the Kentucky Corn Growers Association, and serves as a Deacon at Yellow Creek Baptist Church.

MATT MASON, 39

PRINCIPAL, DAVIESS COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL

Matt Mason was named principal of Daviess County High School in 2011, where he served as assistant principal of DCHS the previous two years. Mason received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. He completed a Master’s in Educational Administration at Western Kentucky University and is currently working on his Rank I certification in pupil personnel and supervision. He first taught at Hancock County High School before coming to Daviess County High School. Mason taught social studies at DCHS for eight years prior to serving as assistant principal. Other leadership positions held by Mason at DCHS include athletic director, assistant athletic director, head softball coach, assistant baseball coach, founder of the Daviess County High School Panther Foundation and current member of the board of directors. Matt was in the class of 2013-2014 for Leadership Owensboro and currently serves on the business advisory board for Owensboro Dance Theatre Matt and his wife Marlys, have two children, Kate and Jack.

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ANDREW HOWARD, 29

COMMERCIAL LOAN OFFICER, INDEPENDENCE BANK

It takes great employees to make a great bank and Andrew Howard is just one example. Andrew graduated from OCHS in 2007. While attending Brescia University, he joined the bank as a part-time employee in March 2009. Andrew moved into a full-time roll upon graduation in May 2011. Today, Andrew is a valued member of Independence Bank’s commercial lending team. Building strong relationships and a commitment to community investment have propelled Independence Bank into one of the premiere community banks in the nation. Andrew embraced both and has excelled in each. Some of his community leadership includes: • President of the Chamber Young Professionals • Chamber of Commerce Special Director • Treasurer and Board Member of YMCA and Home Builders Association • Leadership Owensboro Class of 2015 • Past Chair of Friday after Five • 2015 Top 20 under 40 News4U Magazine We are proud to have Andrew as a part of our team.

ELIZABETH GRIFFITH, 25 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, WENDELL H. FORD GOVERNMENT EDUCATION CENTER

When Elizabeth Griffith came to the Wendell Ford Government Education Center two years ago we were immediately taken by her enthusiasm for our mission and by her knowledge of government acquired through her work on a Masters in Public Administration. Learning about the political process and the importance of cooperation, civility, and compromise are not topics that typically rate high on a high school student’s list of priorities. Yet, since becoming the director of the Ford Center, she has grown the program to nearly 200 students, and brought the energy of youth to our work. By embracing technology and social media and enhancing our programming, Elizabeth is spreading the word about the Center’s mission, helping us to have a more prominent presence in our community. She is a shining example of her generation taking a sincere and unselfish part in educating our youth about the dignity and honor of public service. -Diane Ford & Bruce Kunze

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Josh, a native of Owensboro, Kentucky graduated from the University of Louisville with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration in 2003 and a Master of Accountancy in 2004. He began his accounting career at Chilton & Medley, returning to Owensboro in 2007 with his wife Melissa. Josh then began working at Ebelhar Whitehead, PLLC, quickly moving up the ranks and ultimately becoming a partner of the Firm in 2013. Josh specializes in corporate, partnership and individual tax accounting and serves a wide variety of clients. He is known not only for his accounting expertise, but also for his excellent client service. He currently serves as Treasurer for the Owensboro/ Daviess County Regional Dental Clinic, is President of the Owensboro Lions Club and is Past President of the Owensboro Estate Planning Council. Josh and his wife Melissa have two children, Drew and Sadie.

JOSH MEYER,36

CPA/PARTNER, EBELHAR & WHITEHEAD, PLLC


PAID ADVERTISEMENT

CREDENTIALS = CAREER OPPORTUNITIES AND THE WORK READY KY SCHOLARSHIP CAN HELP By: Dr. Scott Williams, President, Owensboro Community & Technical College

You do not always need four years or more of college to find a career with

for welding, heating, ventilation and air conditioning, and electrical

a family sustaining wage in our region. There are hundreds of job openings

technologies. The IIC will support training in robotic welding, pipe welding,

in Kentucky that are going unfilled, and many of these jobs require less than

geothermal heating and cooling, and building automated systems as well.

a bachelor’s degree. The career options vary around the state, but it is clear

that training and knowledge beyond the high school diploma is necessary.

Prospective students must first apply for federal financial aid before they

Owensboro Community & Technical College (OCTC) is ready to help.

are eligible to apply for the Work Ready Kentucky Scholarship through the

The Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS)

Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA). For more

recently conducted research with 3,000 Kentuckians from all parts of the

information on KCTCS programs that qualify, visit WorkReadyKentucky.

state. It showed a large number of working age people have no interest in

com then select the “college contacts.” You can select Owensboro and OCTC

college classes. The research indicates that the two largest barriers preventing

Work Ready Programs for a complete list. Feel free to stop by the Main

people from enrolling in college are the time required to complete the

Campus at 4800 New Hartford Road and visit the START Center to apply to

credential and the cost of tuition.

OCTC. Our Financial Aid Office will help you navigate the FASFA and the

The state of Kentucky is helping remove those barriers with the Work

Work Ready KY application.

Ready Kentucky Scholarship program. The scholarship targets high growth

Dr. Jay Box, President of KCTCS, commented in a recent op-ed, “The

industry sectors that need employees. These sectors include business/

Work Ready Kentucky Scholarship is an important initiative the state is

information technology, transportation/logistics, construction, advanced

investing in. It’s an investment in people, communities and the economy. We

manufacturing, and healthcare. Kentuckians who qualify can go to college

applaud lawmakers and the administration for their commitment to higher

tuition free and earn credentials in these five in demand sectors.

education and making cost-saving options available to Kentuckians.”

There are no income or age limits tied to the Work Ready Kentucky

scholarship program. It covers up to 32 hours for anyone who has not yet

of a college credential—tuition free. It promises to help employees upgrade

earned a college degree. Kentucky residents pursuing a qualifying certificate

their skills and employers to find qualified workers. It may even spark the

or diploma in one of the five sectors are eligible. The only educational

student’s interest in pursuing a degree beyond the certificate or diploma.

requirement to apply is a high school diploma or GED.

There is little doubt that it is an investment that will pay dividends for years

Some of these jobs are tied to our work and learn GO FAME programs,

to come.

in which students attend class and work for a local company. It’s a win-win

In order for this program to realize its full potential we need the help

situation as students get hands-on experience while earning a paycheck—

of employers and business leaders. By encouraging employees, family,

and employers get the educated workers they need.

friends, neighbors, and colleagues to apply for the scholarship you will be

OCTC’s new Industry Innovation Center (the second phase of the

helping to transform their life. Furthermore, supporting them to complete

Advanced Technology Center) is scheduled to open in January 2018, thanks

their credential will not only improve the quality of their life, but that of

to broad community support. The new facility will expand offerings for

our workforce and community. Working together we can move Kentucky

students in these high demand sectors by expanding student lab space

forward.

Over 140 students have applied for the Work Ready Kentucky scholarship.

The Work Ready program is a wonderful opportunity to reap the benefits

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GO CHAMBER . THIRD QUARTER 2017


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SPOTLIGHT

EDUCATION AND WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM OF THE YEAR

GO FAME GO FAME is the Greater Owensboro chapter of KY FAME (Kentucky Federation for Advanced Manufacturing Education), an Advanced Manufacturing Technician (AMT) program adopted from Toyota’s nationally-recognized training program. AMT allows participating students to earn an industry-recognized, multi-craft technician degree, and gain valuable experience while working in a manufacturing setting. “We are a conglomerate of world-class organizations that have come together to try and solve a problem with workforce development due to senior workforce retiring, expansion, or a skills gap that needs to be solved,” explains GO FAME President, William Mounts. In as little as 18 months (five semesters), students receive an Associates of Applied Science degree in Industrial Maintenance Technology-AMT. Through the program, students attend classes two days per week at Owensboro Community & Technical College (OCTC) and work an additional 24 hours per week for a sponsoring employer. With the practical skills gained during their paid work experience, most students begin full-time employment with the sponsoring company after graduation. Others may decide to further their technical education to obtain a bachelor’s degree in engineering or business. Beyond hands-on technical training, students also take general ed courses, as well as courses in practical skills like public speaking. The result is that each participant graduates with professionalism instilled in them. Mounts recognized five advantages employers gain from GO FAME: • Value – $12/hr is a relatively low training cost, but the knowledge the students are gaining is valuable to sponsoring organizations. • Ability to shape behavior of the workforce to match organization expectations. • Developing a loyal workforce – As the students go through the

program, they realize that the organization has put their faith and loyalty into the student by sponsoring them. Competitive advantage – Instead of waiting until someone graduates, we are hiring them and investing in them from the start. Once they graduate, the expectation is that they remain with their sponsoring companies. Perception of community involvement by investing in students and partnering with OCTC.

When the inaugural GO FAME class completed its first academic year, the class finished with one of the highest average GPA’s of all the Kentucky chapters at 3.5. The Owensboro GO FAME chapter was also the first chapter in the state to add programs outside AMT, such as CMM (computerized manufacturing and machining). The board is now exploring ways to implement the program in finance, medical, engineering, and information technology fields, which is known as GO-Careers. “We could not do this without the partnership of Owensboro Community and Technical College and Greater Owensboro Economic Development Corporation. They are helping us in every way they can because they see that this is going to help the community grow and make Owensboro a better place to live,” Mounts said in the Annual Celebration Award video. “Winning this award is a validation of what all of us who have worked together hold dear,” added Cindy Fiorella, VP of Workforce Development at OCTC. GO FAME eligibility includes a high school graduate (or equivalent) that is willing to participate in the program’s 40-hoursper-week, apprenticeship-style format. The individual must attend college two days a week while working three days a week at a sponsoring employer.If you or anyone you know is interested in GO FAME, contact OCTC or GO-EDC.

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GO CHAMBER . THIRD QUARTER 2017


FINANCIAL PLANNERS

EXPERT ADVICE FROM

NORTHWESTERN MUTUAL

SIX THIN GS YOU SHOULD K N OW A B OUT MU T UA L FU ND S

An estimated 90 million individuals own mutual funds — a number that has remained steady despite recent market ups and downs. To understand their enduring popularity, consider the following: 1. Theycomeinmanyvarieties.Therearethousandsofmutualfunds available in the marketplace. Each has its own investment approach, which is explained in the prospectus. All you need to do is find the one that meets your particular goals, risk tolerance and objectives. 2. They’reprofessionallymanaged.Whenyouinvestinamutualfund, you are hiring a full-time professional money manager to buy, sell and monitor your investments on your behalf. This day-to-day oversight can be valuable, especially during times of market volatility. 3. They provide broad diversification. Most mutual funds hold far more securities in their portfolios than individual investors can typically afford to buy on their own. This level of diversification helps limit the impact that a decline in the value of any one security may have on your overall portfolio performance. 4. They’re easy to track. Mutual funds offer you a spectrum of investments in one fund portfolio. Rather than following multiple individual securities, all you have to do is monitor the fund’s overall performance.

CASEY TAYLOR

F I N A N C I A L R E P R E S E N TAT I V E

5. They’reaffordable.Mostmutualfundsallowyoutobuyintoafund with a small minimum investment, often $1,000 or less, making it easy to get started. 6. They offer easy access to your money. You can redeem your shares at their net asset value (NAV) on any business day. Of course, the amount you receive may be more or less than your initial investment. What should you look for when selecting or evaluating a fund? While long-term performance is important, the following can also impact a fund’s success: • The fund’s sales charges, fees, and expenses. These can add up over time and eat into your returns. • Its turnover rate. A fund that frequently buys and sells securities may generate higher trading and capital gains costs. • The volatility of the fund. Generally, the more a fund’s performance bounces up and down from year to year, the greater the investment risk.

Article prepared by Northwestern Mutual with the cooperation of Casey Taylor. Securities are offered through Northwestern

Be sure to read the fund’s prospectus before investing. It provides detailed information that can help you decide whether a fund is right for you. Also, speak to a qualified financial representative, who can help you select suitable investments based upon your particular investment objectives, financial circumstances and risk tolerance.

Mutual Investment Services, LLC (NMIS), a wholly-owned company of NM, member of FINRA and SIPC. Casey Taylor is a Financial Representative with Northwestern Mutual, the marketing name for The Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company (NM), Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and its subsidiaries. Casey Taylor is based in Owensboro, KY. To contact Casey Taylor please call (270) 663-0607, e-mail at casey.taylor@nm.com, or visit caseytaylor.nm.com.

You should carefully consider the investment objectives, risks, expenses and charges of the investment company before you invest. Your Northwestern Mutual Investment Services Registered Representative can provide you with a prospectus that will contain the information noted above, and other important information that you should read carefully before you invest or send money. 

100 West 3rd Street Suite 301 // Owensboro, KY 42301 // Phone: 270-663-0607 // westernky.nm.com

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GO CHAMBER . THIRD QUARTER 2017


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

EM FORD INSURANCE AND FINANCIAL PLANNING Making decisions about investing can seem overwhelming, especially if you feel unsure about your investing knowledge. However, the following basic rules can help you make smarter choices regardless of your investing experience. Rule 1: Understand Your Time Horizon Your time horizon is the amount of time you have left until you plan to use the money you’re investing. Knowing your time horizon is important because it can affect how well your portfolio can handle the ups and downs of the financial markets. Someone who was planning to retire in 2008 faced different challenges during the financial crisis than someone who was investing for a retirement that was years away because the person nearing retirement had fewer years left to let their portfolio recover from the downturn. Rule 2: Know Your Risk Tolerance There are two aspects to risk tolerance. The first is your financial ability to endure a possible portfolio loss. If you expect to need your money in the next year or so, those needs reduce your ability to withstand even a small loss. However, if you’re investing for the long term, your ability to weather a portfolio loss may be higher. The second aspect of risk tolerance is your emotional ability to withstand the possibility of loss. Many people think they’re comfortable with risk, only to find out when the market takes a turn for the worse that they’re actually a lot less risk-tolerant than they thought. Often that means they wind up selling in a panic when prices are lowest.

RYAN MCDANIEL, CFP® A DVISOR | F IN A N CIA L S E RV I C E S

Rule 3: Don’t Put All Your Eggs in One Basket Your grandmother probably taught you this lesson when you were young and it still holds true today. Diversifying your retirement savings across different types of investments can help you manage the ups and downs of your portfolios. Different types of investments may face different types of risk. For example, when most people think of risk, they think of market risk – the possibility that an investment will lose value because of a general decline in financial markets. However, there are many other types of risks that your portfolio can be exposed to. There are countless variable to consider when investing. Using these three simple rules should provide a solid foundation toward smart investing decisions.  Give us a call at (270) 926-2806 and mention this article for a complimentary consultation to review your investment portfolio.

MORGAN FORD

A DVISOR | F IN A N CIA L S E RV I C E S

2100 Frederica Street // Owensboro, KY 42301 // Phone: 270-926-2806 // Fax: 270-683-4365 // rmcdaniel@moneyconcepts.com // mford@moneyconcepts.com All securities through Money Concepts Capital Corp. Member FINRA/SIPC. E.M. Ford & Company is not affiliated with Money Concepts Capital Corp.

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GO CHAMBER . THIRD QUARTER 2017


10

QUESTIONS

DANIEL HEWLETTE

Director of Visitor Experience O.Z. Tyler Distillery

BY DANNY MAY - PHOTO BY JAMIE ALEXANDER

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GO CHAMBER . THIRD QUARTER 2017


W H AT ’S A HOT I TEM ON YOUR BUCKE T LIST?

Hmm. Riding in one of the hot air balloons during the Botanical Garden’s Daylily festival right here in Owensboro. I’ve never been in a balloon and they fascinate me.

W H AT I S YOUR FAVOR I TE HOB BY OR WAY TO U N W I ND?

I’m a project guy, so I really enjoy doing things that have some sort of tangible result at the end. I might build a piece of (admittedly rough-looking) furniture, paint something, or draw up an idea for some new landscaping. A lot of times these projects develop out of a random need—something is broken or some task would be more convenient if I only had XYZ. If I can make something that solves that need, even if it takes some time, I consider it time well spent.

W H AT I S YOUR FAVOR I TE THI NG A BOUT OW E N S B OR O?

I grew up in Charleston, SC, and moved here in early 2016. Owensboro has been a great city to live in so far and seems to just keep getting better and better. Not only has everyone been so welcoming, but it’s clear people here care about the community and are invested in the city’s future (Just look at Rooster Booster each month—crazy high attendance for a city of this size). So my favorite part is probably that community spirit; the smalltown feel of the place.

W H AT E X PER I ENCES F R OM CHI L DHOOD L AT E R I NF LU ENCED YOUR CAR EER PAT H?

I grew up running little businesses: lawn mowing, pet sitting, car cleaning, etc. So those various experiences taught me a lot about economics and people in general, really stoking my interest in both solving problems and creating things people enjoyed and relied upon. I also grew up in a family that believed strongly in expanding horizons and experiencing new things, so

we traveled a lot. That led to a great deal of exposure to other cultures and parts of the country/world holding different values. Those sorts of experiences help you put things into different perspectives, think longer-term, and imagine opportunities where they might be soon instead of where they are currently. All that to say, these things opened me up to the idea of helping grow a tiny, promising company that was constantly adapting and defining itself instead of an existing major company that already had everything figured out. Where’s the fun in that?

WHO ME NTORE D YOU?

I’d probably be fired if I didn’t say my father (our CEO), so that’s where I’d start. Just kidding (on the firing thing), but he’s definitely been a great mentor and source of business inspiration for not just me personally, but many people within our company. He has built up, sold, and rebuilt several companies, in several different industries; fought in a major war; obtained both a MBA and law degree; and managed to raise a close-knit family. So he’s seen a thing or two. But more importantly, he’s got an ability to distill all of that experience down (see what I did there?) to wisdom useful for whatever task is at hand. That skill is incredibly useful, so it’s been great to work for him and try to learn and apply things like that in the real-world.

WHAT DO YOU LOVE MOS T ABOUT YOUR P OS IT ION AS DIRE CTOR OF VIS ITOR E X P E RIE NCE ?

I absolutely love sharing what we do with the public and illuminating some of the ‘behind the scenes’ processes that go into making great whiskey. There are so many fascinating elements to our industry that most people never think about or have a chance to see, so it’s incredibly exciting to offer tours, plan special events, and devise a number of other bourbonfocused experiences that really let visitors share in the fun of whiskey-making. And to be able to do that here, at such a historical facility, in a city with such great Bourbon history, is really special.

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GO CHAMBER . THIRD QUARTER 2017


W H AT ’S ONE THI NG YOU’R E PARTI CUL ARLY PR O U D O F ACCOMPL I SHI NG AT O. Z . T Y LE R S I N C E YO U CAME TO OWENSBOR O?

I’d say I’m proud of simply getting the facility open to the public as quickly as we did. During the first few months I was here it became quite clear how much excitement the community as a whole had for the facility just to be producing again—back then we hadn’t announced any plans for tourism-related activities at all (in fact, one of the first things we did after buying the property was stop hosting private events, the only public-facing thing this facility had done since 1992).

I KNOW YOU CAN’ T OFFICIALLY COM M ENT ON T HE KE NT UCKY BOURBON T RAIL , BUT IF ONE DAY O.Z . T Y LE R IS INCLUDE D O N T H E KBT, IN YOUR MIND, WHAT COULD T H AT ME AN FOR O.Z . T Y LE R AND OWE NS B O R O IN GE NE RAL?

It didn’t take long to realize the community really wanted more than to simply have another distillery around…they wanted access—to be a part of the process and to bring friends and family to when they visited.

While I can’t discuss specifics on timing, I can definitely tell you we would love to be a part of the Kentucky Bourbon Trail experience and are actively working towards that goal.

So I helped convince the company to invest in tourismrelated facilities a little earlier than intended and start getting our feet wet. We’ve developed a detailed, behindthe-scenes tour of the facility, came up with some great gift shop items, are getting back into hosting events, and are building out a cocktail lounge for people to enjoy before or after their tour. And we will keep expanding these things over the next couple of years.

YO U G U YS AR E THI NKI NG BI G AT O.Z . T Y LE R , H OW D I D THE I DEA TO B U I L D AN O N-S IT E H OT E L C O ME AB OU T?

Well, the hotel idea is still in an early stage—I’d even say a “pre-planning” stage. But the idea is just a natural extension of our plans to really make the O.Z. Tyler Distillery that western gateway to the Kentucky Bourbon experience. There are several experiences we could offer that would be enhanced if you could stay on-site for the evening (such as a meal with the Master Distiller). Additionally, it’s easier to convince people visiting distilleries in Bardstown or Louisville to drive the 200-mile round-trip if we can offer them a unique opportunity to stay the night on the grounds. Overall we think the idea of spending the night at a distillery might have this sort of romantic, mysterious draw that people would really enjoy. Our CEO enjoyed a long career in the hospitality industry before joining the Bourbon industry, so we’ve got a great deal of in-house expertise on the hotel side of things. But in this case we’d just be talking about a handful of rooms

48

for those guests that really want a unique, end-to-end Bourbon experience.

GO CHAMBER . THIRD QUARTER 2017

Let’s face it, most of the Kentucky Bourbon Trail stops are over 100 miles from Owensboro—so we want to create compelling bourbon-related experiences that will convince whiskey-lovers to make the trip to this great part of the state. Once we have those experiences in place, becoming a Kentucky Bourbon Trail stop will help us spread the word and be another example of how Owensboro continues to be a major part of the Bourbon industry. This will help bring in thousands of new visitors each month from all over the world and benefit everyone in our community. Ultimately, that’s what is most exciting to us: helping Owensboro get back in the Bourbon Whiskey spotlight.

WHAT LE GACY DO YOU HOP E O.Z .T Y L ER LE AVES FOR FUT URE GE NE RAT IONS? Our legacy isn’t going to be simply creating great local Bourbons but creating them in new and innovative ways. Our TerrePURE® technology is a great example of that and something you’ll only find in our distillery. The benefits of that technology are what enabled us to breathe new life into the distillery in the first place and are now fueling our expansion. Fifty years from now, if we can look back on our innovation and think “That’s where it really took hold—Owensboro, Kentucky,” that would really be something.


DID ? YOU

KNOW

CORRECT ANSWER:

OWENSBORO SYMPHONY DIRECTOR/CONDUCTOR TROY QUINN. FROM PAGE 7

“Spielberg was filming the movie in my hometown of New Haven, Connecticut and I was selected to be a stand-in for Shia LaBeouf during the film shoot. A stand-in is basically used to set up the camera angles and practice the scene from a technical standpoint before the actual actors come in and film. For whatever reason Shia was not ready to shoot so I had to rehearse driving Harrison Ford on a motorcycle. All the while I was thinking I was going to crash and injure him as I had never driven a motorcycle before. When Spielberg yelled action, Ford’s look was so intense I actually could not stare him in the eye. It was the coolest nonmusical experience I have ever had.”

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GO CHAMBER . THIRD QUARTER 2017


THE FINAL ANALYSIS JACLYN GRAVES

I

am a 35-year-old, college educated, single-parent head of my household, gets-done-what-needs-to-get-done female. I do my best to hold my own in every situation, no matter the circumstances; head held high, lip gloss perfectly placed and pride set aside. I mean no disrespect, but I feel that my peers and I tend to think we usually have the right way of doing things. We’re in a place in our careers that we’ve fought to be where we are, worked our way up, have perfected juggling deadlines and t-ball games and deserve the titles after our names. Maybe it’s our work ethic, maybe it’s the thrill of the win or the pure joy of proving others wrong, but something pushes us to strive for professional success. I think we may have forgotten something along the way, at least I feel that I may have. Someone instilled in us the belief that we could succeed. Someone showed us how to work hard. Someone paved the way. Someone made our successes possible. On August 4th, my Dad passed away from a short, but respectable battle with lung cancer. It’s funny how meetings, emails, and Outlook invites go from being your Grade A priorities to instantly forgettable when your world comes to a sudden halt. My Dad was a proud blue-collar guy; a hard worker, extremely dependable, did things without having to be told. A guy who didn’t always have a lot to say, but when he did everyone listened. A guy who didn’t need to hear someone say he did a good job. A guy who while I was cleaning out his place last weekend, somehow managed to remind me of how things

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GO CHAMBER . THIRD QUARTER 2017

Membership Development Manager

should be done. I bet I found memberships to at least five or six different professional organizations. Organizations that I would have sworn he didn’t even know existed. Turns out that he not only knew they existed, but he believed in their mission and showed his support in his own way. I found every card I’ve given him from the time my Mom could trace my hand to his Father’s Day card to this past June. And not just mine, but everyone else’s too. Birthday cards, newspaper clippings, get-well-soon cards; you name it, he kept it. He was a simple man who knew what he believed in, supported causes and organizations for the betterment of the community and made time for and put his efforts toward those he cared about. I look at the names of those that I am beside on this 40 Under 40 list and I am incredibly humbled. I can’t promise you that I will do anything personally to grow this community economically, but I can promise you this… I will support the organizations and individuals within this community for the betterment of us all. I will do my job without expectation of praise. I will remember what’s truly important. And, I will never let those who mean the most to me ever doubt how thankful I am for them. We have earned the right to be proud of where we are and what we’ve accomplished so far. But, in our continued strive for professional progress, let’s not forget how much we can learn from those who came before us.


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200 E 3rd St, Owensboro, KY 42303 (270) 926-1860 http://chamber.owensboro.com

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GO CHAMBER . THIRD QUARTER 2017

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID OWENSBORO KY 42301 PERMIT NO 420

GO Chamber Q3 2017