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GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017


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GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017


FROM THE CHAMBER CANDANCE CASTLEN BRAKE Welcome to the Greater Owensboro Chamber Quarterly Magazine. This issue we are focusing on women in the Chamber and in our community. When we first set out to spotlight women in one of our issues, we knew we wanted an image to capture the depth of women in our community who are making a difference. The deeper we got into it, the more we learned. There were hundreds of women who would need to be in the photograph! This exercise caused me to reflect on the changes I have seen here just in my lifetime. The number of women owning businesses here and running organizations began to dramatically increase in the past few years. The number of young women developing and emerging as leaders has truly inspired me. There are other areas where women still are not as visible here in Owensboro. Most every other community around Kentucky has had female mayors. And many counties have women on the fiscal court. Our feature articles this quarter spotlight several notable organizations and grassroots

President & CEO

initiatives that were led by women. And we also touch on women’s professional and work roles in our community. There is so much to celebrate here! Our 2017 Board Chair, Wade Jenkins, mentions in his column below that this year we are going to make extra efforts to communicate to our membership. Members will receive their annual membership materials including the 2017 Owensboro Magazine, the 2016 Annual Report, your Member Decal, and a detailed listing of marketing and advertising opportunities. We appreciate you proudly displaying your member decal. The decal tells each person walking through your door that you are an investor in the community. It says that you believe our community’s economic vitality is created when we come together and work for goals bigger than just ourselves. Thank you for that commitment. Know that we take it seriously and that we are honored to be the Chamber Staff working for you.

WADE JENKINS We are just into the beginning of 2017 and what an amazing start it has been! The Chamber Annual Celebration, Rooster Booster, the Commerce Building gets a new look, new member breakfasts, trips to Frankfort scheduled with Leadership Owensboro and legislative policy work. I’m having so much fun, and I am already amazed at the level of member-focused activity. One of the things that I have known, but now I am truly experiencing, is the talent on our board. It is comprised of business leaders and entrepreneurs living each day to make their business relative and successful and bringing those ideas back to the Chamber as board members. The ability to ask each board member what our business community needs to be successful is invaluable. Equally as important, is the community focus each board member has that makes Owensboro the envy of our state. I am so very proud to play a small part in the continued success of the Greater Owensboro Chamber. This year, one of our board’s objectives is to

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GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017

Board Chair

“tell our story” in a way that communicates to the members what they receive for their investment in the Chamber of Commerce. The Chamber staff works tirelessly for the membership always exploring ideas to make your membership more valuable. And we want to make sure we identify ways to communicate this work to you. You belong to an association that has close to 1,000 members that have common goals to succeed - not to mention the work to connect to our local, state and even national government by spotting trends and regulations that could affect your profits. This year we will continue to focus on our workforce and talent development, two of the most critical issues facing our region. This is a major issue facing all communities nationwide, so we are not unique in this challenge. We are, however, a community that works together and as one voice. And we will identify ways to address this challenge. As the past board chair, Adam Hancock did an excellent job leading the Chamber in 2016. It is my hope that we continue the momentum.


PUBLISHER/CREATIVE DIRECTOR Jason Tanner jason@tannerwest.com

FEATURES:

MANAGING EDITOR

Danny May danny@tannerpublishing.com

ADVERTISING SALES

Brock Quinton brock@tannerpublishing.com Robert Williams robert@tannerpublishing.com

COPY EDITOR

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CALLED TO SERVE: ELECTED OFFICE HOLDERS

Ashley Gleason

GRAPHIC DESIGN Taylor West

LAYOUT DESIGN

Andrea Roberson Jamie Alexander

PHOTOGRAPHERS David Grinnell Taylor West Jamie Alexander

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WOMEN IN HEALTHCARE

PRINTING

Greenwell Chisholm Owensboro, Kentucky

CONTACT INFORMATION:

Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce 200 E. 3rd St., Owensboro, KY 42303 (270) 926-1860 chamber.owensboro.com

TANNER PUBLISHING CO.

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ATHENA AWARD RECIPIENTS

1ST QUARTER 2017 8 18

THE CHAMBER REPORT

21 22 24 26 30 46

IMPACT 100

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THE FINAL ANALYSIS

CALLED TO SERVE: ELECTED OFFICE HOLDERS

WOMEN IN HEALTHCARE ATHENA AWARD RECIPIENTS A LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN PROFILES OF OWENSBORO Special Advertising Section

10 QUESTIONS

Helen Mountjoy, Director of Workforce Development and Education, Greater Owensboro Economic Development Corporation

Jaclyn Graves

DID ? YOU

KNOW Can you guess which female Chamber member also has mad skills behind the wheel of a semi truck? FIND OUT ON PAGE 49

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GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017


THE CHAMBER REPORT

THE HUNDRED DRESSES Overview: This is the story of a little girl’s journey in learning about courage and kindness. The Takeaway: 1) Kindness is always right. 2) Within our hearts, we all know “right” from “wrong.” We comfort ourselves with the thought that we would always have the courage to confront our enemies, but often discover that it takes even more courage to confront our friends – and ourselves.

THE

READING LIST Reviewed By: Lora Wimsatt Public information officer Daviess County Public Schools

This gentle narrative, written in 1944, tells the story of a little girl named Maddie whose friends make fun of a classmate who is very poor, has a funny name and lives in a rough part of town. One day, Wanda Petronski surprises everyone by announcing that she has a hundred dresses at home. “All colors,” she says. “All lined up in my closet.” Nobody believes her; Wanda wears the same faded blue dress to school every day. The girls make fun of Wanda and tease the lonely, quiet child without mercy. Maddie knows it is wrong. She never joins in the torment and aches to stand up to the careless cruelty demonstrated by her friends. But Maddie also wears hand-me-downs and fears the crowd would turn against her if she defended Wanda, so she remains silent. Their teacher announces a drawing contest, which everyone is sure Peggy will win. Peggy is the most popular girl in the class, wears the most beautiful clothes, and is Maddie’s friend. She is also the main instigator of meanness toward Wanda. On the day of the contest, the children are amazed to find the walls of their classroom

AUTHOR: ELEANOR ESTES covered with drawings of dresses, beautiful dresses … all colors, all lined up. But Wanda is not at school that day, and the children learn that the Petronski family has moved away to escape the taunts of their classmates and neighbors. Now Maddie is overcome with anguish and regret. She wishes she had defended Wanda and promises herself she will never again stand by in silence when she sees someone being treated unfairly or unkindly. She longs to apologize to Wanda and is devastated to realize she will live forever with the regret of cowardice. The story closes with an unexpected gesture of kindness and forgiveness, which reminds us that nobility of spirit transcends all barriers. Although a simple children’s story, the lessons from this book have stayed with me from the time I first read it as a little girl. There really can be no difference in who we are “personally” and who we are “professionally.” Therefore, when asked to name the book that has been most influential in the way I approach my job, this is the book that comes to mind. I hope I never forget the message of “The Hundred Dresses”: “She was never going to stand by and say nothing again.”

THE BIG PICTURE The Greater Owensboro Commerce Building gets

A FRESH LOOK What difference can a new sign make? Displays the partnership between the Chamber and EDC. If you are driving across the Blue Bridge, visiting from another community or have lived in Owensboro your whole life… Now you’ll know where we are. Shares accolades for community recognition. It creates excitement and encourages people to do something different. It’s energizing and engaging to young and old(er)professionals.

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GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017


EXECUTIVE ANSWERS

ON THE RECORD

Life can be a juggling act between family/personal and professional responsibilities. What morning ritual or routine helps keep you grounded when preparing to face the office each day? JOANNA SHAKE

NAHEED S. MURTAZA, JD

CINDY FIORELLA

Since mornings are bit ahem…chaotic, my morning “rituals” start the previous afternoon. I never leave the office without first devising the next day’s “to do” list on an index card (a borrowed practice from a favorite former colleague). That evening, I’ll select a suit (it really simplifies things when your wardrobe is all gray, navy and black) and I’ll pack my lunch.

Each day of life always brings new challenges, struggles, opportunities, and blessings. It can most certainly be a daily juggling act between family/ personal and professional responsibilities. Thankfully, we all have our morning routine to help us in our daily endeavors.

Once the buzzer sounds in the morning, I am off and running! I’m usually at the office between 7:15 and 7:30 and as the last one of the squad to arrive, I make sure to greet each team member and ask about what’s on their respective plates for the day. These early morning exchanges really do set the tone for my day and I’m grateful to each of them for the motivation and energy they provide.

I am told that those who pray are under the protection of God for the whole day, and that performing an extra prayer in the morning is better than the world and whatever is in it. With prayer and the remembrance of God, I am forced to focus on not just myself and my family, but also my community.

I truly believe that there are two types of women in this world of work. There are those highly organized gals who can do it all…..and then…there are the REST of us! The first group of admirable sisters seemingly balance every aspect of life without ruffling a lock of hair. Their organizational skills put Covey’s to shame, managing major projects while planning the office potluck. (Seriously, their sign-up sheets are something to behold!) At home, their Christmas shopping is completed by the Fourth of July and wrapped Martha Stewart-style no later than Labor Day. They are unquestionably in charge of their universe!

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GREEN RIVER AREA DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT

The most important piece of my morning routine, however, happens once I land at my desk. I keep a daily devotional next to my computer titled “Grace for the Moment” by Max Lucado. Most mornings it’s the first thing I read. It inspires me to reflect, express gratitude and gives me an extra boost to conquer my day.

DIRECTOR OWENSBORO HUMAN RELATIONS COMMITTEE

As a Muslim female, what helps me start my day on a fresh, positive, and grounded note is my prescribed daily morning prayer.

With this beginning, I feel that I am generally more capable of the undertakings of each day, regardless of what it may bring. I find that my focus also shifts away from seeing certain things as disappointments, but rather an opportunity to work harder to affect positive change. This is my grounding force--my morning prayer. It is my daily compass. It is the most important means to my beginning, middle, and end of each day. It has helped me attain my daily end goal: a meaningful day in the life of a very busy female, mother, wife, attorney, teacher, and human being.

VICE PRESIDENT OWENSBORO COMMUNITY & TECHNICAL COLLEGE WORKFORCE SOLUTIONS

As for me, I am a member of the other half, a.k.a. the WANNA BE! We truly want to be in charge of our universe, facing each day with a clear sense of priorities and a carefully color coded “to do” list. A Wanna Be, however, will happily consider the morning a success if she makes it to the office without sloshing coffee on her clothes. Now please don’t let me misrepresent the contributions of my Wanna Be sisters. We are sticklers for punctuality. We meet our deadlines. We most definitely add value to our teams. But everyone understands that we might be a bit breathless upon arrival or have a smudge of whatever was served at the potluck on the margin of our report. So after decades of straddling the rather messy divides between home and work, my morning ritual is simple: just go, roll with whatever comes up, and hope that your shoes match. However you get there, it’s all good!

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GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017


THE CHAMBER REPORT

CHAMBER BEHIND THE SCENES:

ANNUAL CELEBRATION “THE FACT WE HAD A RECORD CROWD THIS YEAR IS AN INDICATION THAT OUR COMMUNITY IS MOVING FORWARD AND THAT PEOPLE ARE EXCITED. WHEN THERE IS SUCCESS, PEOPLE WANT TO BE A PART OF IT.” - Kirk Kirkpatrick, emcee

BY THE NUMBERS: 47

Nominees for Business of the Year Awards

618 Attendees 49 Community partners to make the

event possible (sponsors)

12 Ambassador volunteers 8 Bars 65 Cigars 11 Awards 17 Elected Officials in attendance 29 Floral centerpieces 8 Chandeliers 9 Dessert options 771 Professional photos taken 437 Coats checked 10

GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017

CHAMBER CELEBRATION VIDEOS: 14 hours

spent filming award winner videos

22.5 hours spent editing award winner videos

2 hours 21 minutes 30 seconds of total video footage

15 minutes 40 seconds length of final edited video

5 takes to get Adam & Wade’s video


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GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017


THE CHAMBER REPORT

MEMBERS IN THE NEWS CORNERSTONE INFORMATION SYSTEMS, INC. WELCOMES JASON WRAY HOPKINSVILLE, KY – Cornerstone Information Systems, Inc. is pleased to welcome Jason Wray to the company as a Senior Networking Technician. Jason was hired in June and primarily serves Owensboro, Kentucky and surrounding areas. He has over 20 years of experience in the IT industry including a focus on designing managed services that meet specific customer needs. With Jason’s addition, Cornerstone has also opened a new Owensboro office at 920 Frederica St., Suite 1002 (in the Midtown Building). Philip Tillman, CEO, said, “Our customers have already found Jason to be approachable and attentive to infrastructure, security and general desktop and server support needs. We anticipate growth in the Owensboro area as we can now offer local, high level technical resources with a focus on customer satisfaction. We are glad Jason chose to bring his skillset to Cornerstone and our customers.” SPECIALTY FOODS GROUP INC. INTRODUCES EXPANSION PLAN Specialty Foods Group, Inc. is pleased to announce that the main facility in Owensboro, KY will receive a $2 million upgrade to the lunchmeat line in early 2017. The company has been gaining attention for their community efforts alongside the Daviess County School Board, Owensboro Symphony Orchestra and title sponsorship of the International BBQ Festival. The new expansion project will allow for the addition of roughly 6 to 8 million pounds of product to be produced within the year, thus creating new employment opportunities to the city of Owensboro. “As we expand our ham business we are excited about the continued growth and development of our unionized workforce. This expansion will allow us the opportunity to invest in our community with the use of local talent to fill the newly created positions,” said Human Resources Manager, Kevin Clark.

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GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017

Ricardo Herrera, VP of Sales and Marketing, states, “This expansion will allow the company to expand its presence in key categories that are essential to meet the consumers’ demands while driving our long term vision.” FIRST SECURITY INC. ANNOUNCES THE HIRING OF KAREN GLENN AS OWENSBORO MARKET EXECUTIVE First Security Bank, Inc., has named Karen Glenn as the Owensboro Market Executive. “I am very excited that Karen will be joining the First Security team. Karen has nearly 30 years of banking experience that will be instrumental in moving us forward in Owensboro,” stated Kevin Carrico, Senior Vice President and Chief Market Officer. Karen recently served as President and CEO of First United Bank and Trust Company, and was named by American Bankers Magazine as one of the “Top 25 Women to Watch” in banking in September 2016. She also served as Chief Financial Officer for Kentucky Trust Bank for 14 years. “Karen has a wealth of experience in day-to-day operations, business development, and strategic planning, and has proven herself as a leader. Not only that, but her enthusiasm and passion for banking and customer service set her apart and will be a tremendous addition to our team,” stated Mr. Carrico. SPECTRA BY COMCAST SPECTACOR, THE PROVIDERS OF VENUE MANAGEMENT, FOOD SERVICES & HOSPITALITY AND TICKETING & FAN ENGAGEMENT FOR THE OWENSBORO CONVENTION CENTER AND THE OWENSBORO SPORTSCENTER, IS PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THE PROMOTION OF LAURA ALEXANDER TO THE POSITION OF ASSISTANT GENERAL MANAGER. Alexander is currently the Director of Sales & Marketing and oversees the sales and marketing team in their efforts to recruit conventions, meetings and other events to both facilities. In her new role, she will continue to perform her duties as Director of Sales & Marketing as well as assist the

General Manager in the daily operations of both facilities. Alexander, a graduate of Western Kentucky University, started her career with Comcast Spectacor as a Sales Manager in 2012 at the Owensboro Convention Center prior to its opening. Alexander was quickly promoted to Director of Sales & Marketing and has been in that position since 2013. Alexander was tasked with placing Owensboro back in the rotation for much of the state’s association business, and has been exceeding the number of conventions booked each year compared to the feasibility study prior to opening. KENTUCKY WESLEYAN COLLEGE ANNOUNCES PARTNERSHIP WITH UNIVERSITY OF LOUISVILLE BRANDEIS SCHOOL OF LAW Kentucky Wesleyan College announces an exciting partnership with the University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law. A new innovative 3+3 Accelerated Law Program will allow Wesleyan students to obtain a juris doctorate no more than six years after their high school graduation. Students in the following academic majors will enroll as undergraduates at Wesleyan through their junior year: accounting, business administration, criminal justice and criminology, English, history, legal studies or political science. In their fourth year of study, those admitted to the Brandeis School of Law will fulfill their senior year of undergraduate study and earn their bachelor’s degree by completing their firstyear of law school. Two years later, they will receive their juris doctor degree from UofL. The program allows a student to receive both their undergraduate and law degrees with one less year of coursework and expense than is typical, allowing them to begin their legal careers one year sooner. GIRLS INC. NAMES OWENSBORO NATIVE TO NATIONAL BOARD Sue Napper, an Owensboro native and


MARCH ROOSTER BOOSTER KICKS OFF

former member of the board of trustees at Girls Inc. of Owensboro-Daviess County, has been selected to serve on the national Girls Inc. Board of Directors. Other members of the national

COMMUNITY CONVERSATION The Chamber of Commerce is proud to welcome Dr. Bertice Berry as the keynote

board include ABC Television President Rebecca

speaker at our March Rooster Booster Breakfast.

Campbell and honorary chair Michelle Obama.

With 25 years of lecturing experience,

Operating in Owensboro since 1969, Girls Inc. is a nonprofit youth organization dedicated to inspiring all girls to be strong, smart, and bold.

Dr. Bertice Berry has touched the hearts and minds of people from all walks of life and inspired thousands of corporations, healthcare

OPS NAMES NEW FINANCE OFFICER

organizations,

Owensboro Public Schools has selected

through lectures and team-building workshops.

John David Sandefur, CPA to lead its financial

She is an award-winning entertainer and

department. Sandefur currently serves as the

comedian as well as a best-selling author of

chief financial officer for Hausner Hard-Chrome Inc. “I’m honored to serve as OPS’ new finance officer.

colleges,

and

associations

11 critically acclaimed books. Throughout her career, Dr. Berry has been featured on “The Oprah Winfrey Show,” “The Tonight Show with

It’s a position that holds

Jay Leno,” ABC’s “20/20” and more recently on NPR’s “Tell Me More” with

great responsibility. I look

Michel Martin.

forward to embracing and

On Thursday, March 2, 2017, Dr. Bertice Berry will bring her uplifting

contributing to the district’s motto of tradition, innovation, and excellence. It’s extremely fulfilling to know that the work I’ll do every day will ultimately benefit the students

and encouraging message to our members at the March Rooster Booster breakfast. Carrie Blackham, Chief Executive Officer of Wendell Foster, saw Dr.

who I work for,” said John David Sandefur, OPS

Berry at a conference and recommended her to the Chamber. “Dr. Bertice

finance officer-elect.

Berry is a thought provoking speaker with a motivating message for both

OPS chief finance and operations officer Paula

community leaders and ordinary citizens,” Blackham said. “I believe her

Roberts is retiring at the end of June. Roberts has worked for OPS in a variety of ways as a teacher, principal, assistant superintendent of instruction, finance officer, and

words will inspire the Owensboro community to stand together, recognize our many strengths, and help us along our journey to become a model community.”

operations officer.

Immediately after Rooster Booster, the Chamber, Wendell Foster,

Sandefur holds a Bachelor of Science degree

and several groups throughout the community will host a community

in accounting from Kentucky Wesleyan College.

conversation focusing on our strengths and how to build a Greater

He’s also a licensed Certified Public Accountant. Prior to working for Hausner Hard-Chrome, Sandefur worked for Community Health Centers of Western Kentucky and before that was an audit

Owensboro in the 21st Century. “We hope to have a wide range of people from all over the community participate,” says Candance Castlen Brake, President and CEO of the

manager for Riney Hancock CPAs. Sandefur will

Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce. “Owensboro has much to

start training with Roberts on March 6.

feel good about. Our people are our greatest asset. And finding ways to

“Mr. Sandefur has nearly 20 years of

connect each of us to the broader community will make Owensboro even

experience in finance in the public, non-profit and private sector. What really stood out to us is his experience with school audits and his overall collaborative leadership style. I’m confident he’ll

better.” This event, set to begin at 9 a.m. is free and open to the public. Community Conversations will take place in the Riverview Room at the

continue to lead OPS to a successful financial

Convention Center. Please contact the Chamber at 270-926-1860 to reserve

future,” said Dr. Nick Brake, OPS superintendent.

your spot. 13

GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017


THE CHAMBER REPORT TITLE/ROLE AT CHAMBER: Business Manager. I take care of all financial accounts. I first came to the Chamber in 1991. But I took a break for about three years and came back in 2005. So I’ve been here a long time and met a lot of people.

MEET THE CHAMBER STAFF

SUSAN HIGH

HOMETOWN: I was born in Ohio. Grew up in Chicago and graduated in Indianapolis. I lived in Louisville , Charleston, WV and Owensboro. WHAT BROUGHT YOU TO OWENSBORO? My husband, Joel, bought a business here so we moved to Owensboro in 1991. About three months later I got the job here with the Chamber. ALL TIME FAVORITE MOVIE: Joel says every movie is my favorite. I like a lot of old movies. One of my favorites is In Harms Way; it’s a John Wayne war flick. I love westerns. But I also love Ryan Gosling! Especially The Proposal. BEST VACATION: Hawaii! I love it so much. I’m not a cold weather person, so I love to get away in February after all the taxes are filed. Hawaii’s my favorite place to go. I love everything about it. The weather. The people are great. And the food is terrific. BEST CONCERT YOU’VE EVER SEEN: Celine Dion at Ceasar’s Palace in Vegas. That stage they built for her is gorgeous. MOST FAMOUS PERSON YOU’VE EVER MET: I got a kiss from Elvis once. In 1972, when I was living in Charleston, our friend was the concert promoter, so he got us front row tickets. The stage was way up high, and all these other women were rushing up to the stage, but all I could do was barely reach my hand up on the stage. Elvis walked to the edge of the stage and said: “You’ll have to do better than that.” Then he asked one of the security guards to pick me up, so this cop lifted me up on his shoulders and Elvis leaned over, kissed me, and put his scarf around my neck. That was actually on my birthday, too. I have a picture of it. I will always remember that.

HAND-PICKED -Suzanne Cecil White CECIL FARMS PRODUCE

WATER BOTTLE

-Beth Benjamin OWENSBORO INNOVATION ACADEMY

LIPSTICK

-Candice McCloud HAMPTON INN BY HILTON OWENSBORO-SOUTH

MY MAC

-Jennifer Keller AFLAC KELLER ASSOCIATES

COMFORTABLE SHOES -Lora Wimsatt

DAVIESS COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS

A PEN

NETLIX OR THEATER? Theater. I like TV, but I’d rather go to the theater. FAVORITE BOARD GAME? Monopoly. WHICH CHAMBER EVENT IS MOST FUN TO WORK? I really do love working at the Chamber. I love to go to work every day but I would say the Golf Classic is absolutely the most fun event we do. Probably because it’s outside. We usually have great weather. And everybody has a good time. WHAT DO YOU THINK ABOUT THE NEW DESIGN FOR THE OUTSIDE OF THE BUILDING? I do like it. A lot. At first I thought, “Oh, I’m not sure.” But it grew on me. And so many times people will call and ask where we’re located. This way, they’ll know exactly where we are, and that’s a great thing. WHAT IS LIVING IN OWENSBORO LIKE FOR SOMEONE WHO GREW UP IN MUCH LARGER CITIES? I’m flabbergasted when I think about what Owensboro was when I moved here in 1991 compared to now. The difference is worlds apart. It’s grown so much that I don’t really miss anything about the big city now. Especially with the Riverpark Center and now the Convention Center. The riverfront is beautiful. I love walking downtown. I’m so proud of Owensboro today and all that’s been accomplished.

JAGOE HOMES

LIP BALM

OWENSBORO CONVENTION CENTER

INDEPENDENCE BANK

-Laura Alexander

CELL PHONE

-Collette Carter OWENSBORO HEALTH HEALTHPARK

DALE CARNEGIE’S GOLDEN BOOK

-Sarah Murphy Ford HARTZ CONTRACTING

-Louise Murdock

POST-IT NOTES

GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017

ON SATURDAY, I’M MOST LIKELY... Chilling out. I work out. Do some projects maybe. But Saturday is a day to do whatever I want.

What is the one thing that you always have in your bag that you carry to work each day?

PINK POCKET KNIFE

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WHAT’S THE BEST THING ABOUT WORKING FOR THE CHAMBER: When I first came to Owensboro I knew no one, so I’d say working at the Chamber was the best thing for me because I was able to meet so many people and establish relationships through Rooster Booster and other events. I still work today with people I met years ago.

- Minga Trogdlen

MY READING GLASSES -Sara Hemingway

MARILYN AND WILLIAM YOUNG CHARITABLE FOUNDATION


NEW CHAMBER MEMBERS Daviess County Community Early Childhood Council Owensboro Human Relations Commission

LIBRARY USAGE

The Sturdy Hinge Owensboro RoofPRO

BY THE NUMBERS

BNI - Tuesdays with Money D AV I E S S C O U N T Y P U B L I C L I B R A R Y

Gambrinus Libation Emporium

DCPS COMMUNITY SURVEY 2015

75,859 681,388 377,140 304,248 registered DCPL users

library visits in 2014

of those were physical visits

of those were online visits

OF 1,691 PATRONS POLLED:

91% reported occasionally, monthly, or weekly use of the library

85%

44%

access reading materials (books, magazines)

access movies

Shelby’s Wheel and Tire Thacker, Hodskins, and Knight L.L.P., Nick Volk Atty Out of the Blue

24%

20%

conduct research

attend children’s programs

Thomika J. Page, Attorney Casey’s General Store Owensboro Center Timesavers KY, LLC BFD Enterprises, LLC.

N AT I O N A L S TAT I S T I C S PEW RESEARCH CENTER, SEPTEMBER 2016

64% of library users ages 16 and older who checked out a book in the last 12 months

29% of library-using Americans 16 and older said they had gone to libraries to use computers, the internet, or a public Wi-Fi network

61% of tech resource users do so for research for school or work

49% of those who have visited a public library website in the past year accessed the site by handheld mobile devices (such as smartphones or tablets)

Wendell H. Ford Government Education Center Johnston Automotive AmeriFirst Home Mortgage Huddle House Wingfield Inn and Suites

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GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017


(Back Row L-R): Tish Correa-Osborne, Executive Director, Girls Inc.; Mary Bryan Hood, Director, Owensboro Museum of Fine Art; Dr. Ashley Johnson, Director of Analytical Services, Kentucky BioProcessing; Sr. Barbara Jean Head, Ursuline Sisters of Mount St. Joseph; Carrie Blackham - CEO, Wendell Foster; Cindy Fiorella, Vice President, Owensboro Community & Technical College Workforce Solutions (Front Row L-R): Deborah Nunley, Real Estate Investor/Former Chamber Board Chair; Jennifer Keller, Regional Coordinator, Aflac; Naheed Murtaza, Attorney; Margaret Ann Huston, LCSW, Counseling Associates; Louise Murdock, Social Media Manager, Jagoe Homes; Sara Hemingway, Executive Director, The Marilyn and William Young Charitable Foundation

SHE CAN. SHE DO 16

SHE WIL

GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017


(Back Row L-R): Sylvia Coleman, Executive Director, Human Relations Commission; Stacey Davis, Director, Right to Life of Owensboro; Leanne Musick, Owner, Musick Studios; Dr. Courtney Crews, Pediatrician, Owensboro Pediatrics; Helen Mountjoy, Director of Workforce Development and Education, Economic Development Corporation (Front Row L-R): Suzanne Cecil White, Director of Operations, Cecil Farm & Produce; Jane Noble, Convention Visitors Bureau Board Member, Travel Authority Independent Counselor; Sarah Murphy Ford, Vice President, Hartz Contracting; Kayla Morris, Manager, Pure Barre; Kasey Kirk, Chef, The Miller House; Cing Vung, Student, Owensboro High School

ES.

L.

THE

face of leadership in Owensboro is changing. Today, women are out front and leading in various sectors across our community. This photo represents the vast number who play influential roles in their respective fields.

Leaders. Innovators. Visionaries. Risk-takers. Entrepreneurs. Business owners. Directors and executives. Doctors, lawyers, educators and everything in between. These faces represent the hundreds of trailblazers and thousands of future history-makers of Greater Owensboro. “When we started this project and began thinking of women across our membership who are out there every day making a difference, we realized there are literally hundreds who should participate in this photo shoot,” explains Candance Castlen Brake, Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce President and CEO. “The women in this photo represent where we have been, where we are now, and where we are headed. And with the talented young women I have come to know since I have been with the Chamber, I can state unwaveringly, our future is bright.” For this issue of GO Chamber, the articles on the following pages feature several female Chamber members who are leaders in healthcare, in civic leadership, and in the community.

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GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017


RACHEL PENCE FOSTER

CALLED TO

SERVE Elected Office Holders BY JACQUELINE JORDAN

. PHOTO BY TAYLOR WEST

B

eing a community leader means many things — making big decisions, listening to others, and being accountable for your choices. Often, being a woman

in a leadership role means piling those duties onto already busy schedules of juggling kids and career. Not to mention the challenge of just being viewed as equal to male counterparts. For several Owensboro leaders, that’s just part of the job. Seventh District State Representative Suzanne Miles says being in public service is about seeing a need and fulfilling it. “Many years ago, I was looking at different churches to see if another had more to offer than my church. My preacher told me I needed to look for the church that needed me, not the church I wanted. To this day, I’m still a member of the church I grew up in,” she said. It’s that mentality that’s kept her working to represent the public since her start as a field representative for U.S. Congressman Brett Guthrie in 2009. Miles worked in retail after college, owning and operating Town and Countrywear for nearly 16 years. Her time in retail taught her the many sides of customer service: professional

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GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017


listener, untrained therapist, creative mind reader, and

Coalition in order to

even mediator. That experience launched her next journey,

monitor legislative issues

working for Congressman Guthrie, where she’s been able to

and formulate some local

help people when they need it.

discussions

“My path to becoming a state representative solely is a

important

result of an opportunity and a need,” she said. “There was

Several

no plan. I sometimes say I don’t think I was paying attention

from the coalition — a

when they signed me up. Surely no one in their right mind

clearinghouse for resumes

would put their self through the attack ads ... Then you really

of women interested in

have to do some soul searching to ask why. If not me then

serving on local boards

who? I can’t ask someone else to do something I’m not willing

and commissions, women

to do myself,” she said.

supporting some of the

When it comes to being a female leader, Miles just wants

earlier candidacies of women for office. It was slow but steady

to focus on her accomplishments. “When I walk into the

progress,” she said.

chambers, I don’t think of myself any different or special than

The efforts made a difference that can be seen by the

anyone else. I want to be judged on my merits, use my talents,

number of women in office today.

and value what I can contribute to the world.”

Miller practiced law in Owensboro for 26 years before

Miles said women are expected to be all things to all people,

becoming an Administrative Law Judge in the Labor

but that responsibility and obligation is often placed on

Cabinet. She accepted the appointment of the Governor

themselves.

to an Administrative Law Judge position in 2010. The role

“I didn’t encounter a belittling work environment until I

requires hearing workers compensation cases across the

arrived in Frankfort. It was also a good lesson for me to see

state, although her office remains in Owensboro. She travels

what things look like from the perspective of the self-entitled.

the state to decide cases where an injured worker and their

My purpose of being [there] became even more clear to me.

employer seek legal solutions.

We desperately need to change the environment in Frankfort,”

“Having worked for the Attorney General in Consumer

she said. “There is still a generation or group out there still

Protection in the past, I realized a lawyer has unique skills to

believing women are less than men. Unfortunately, it’s not

assist those who cannot help themselves. Indeed, it was the

only men that think this way.”

reason I decided to go to law school. Women are particularly

Miles said sometimes it’s hard to grin and bear it, but she

disadvantaged in our economy. Attaining leadership positions

doesn’t let it stop her.

is crucial to assisting future generations.

Jeanie Owen Miller, Administrative Law Judge (appointed

support women. It is particularly difficult for women to attain

by the Governor), also believes in the power of women in

state-wide or national elective offices, but the efforts must

leadership roles.

continue. After all, it takes a village,” she said.

Miller graduated law school in 1984. It was then that

Part of that village is Nancy Eskridge, who has been serving

she and her husband returned to Owensboro to raise their

the community through the Owensboro Board of Education

children and begin careers.

since 1991. She’s currently vice chair.

“It was a bit of a culture shock to realize that there were very

Her friend, the late Pat O’Connor, inspired her to seek the

few women in private law practice and even fewer in elective

governor-appointed position.

office,” Miller said.

“I used to discuss with her about things I was concerned

“Several women formed the Owensboro Women’s

about in our schools. I believe school board service is one

on to

issues women.

actions

grew

SUZANNE MILES

Women must

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GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017


Female Elected Officials: MELISSA DECKER

Owensboro Board of Education

NANCY ESKRIDGE

Owensboro Board of Education

RACHEL FOSTER

Daviess County Property Valuation Administrator

HON. JULIE HAWES GORDON Family Court Judge

HON. LISA JONES

Daviess County District Judge

SUZANNE MILES

State Representative

SUSAN TIERNEY

Daviess County Circuit Court Clerk

PAM SMITH-WRIGHT

City Commissioner

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GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017

of the most important jobs in town. We

Administrator, she said she strives to

impact the lives of our children,” she said.

set a good example for all young adults,

Eskridge said for many women it’s

but especially girls. “I am a mother of

harder to be in leadership because they

two girls and I want to show them that

have children, jobs and households to

anything is possible when you work hard

manage as well. “The time devoted to

to achieve any goal.”

an elected position of any kind must be squeezed into an already very busy schedule. In my case it takes evenings away from family to attend school events, and daytime meetings used to interfere with my job,” she said, adding that she’s now retired. Her

advice

to

women

in

the

community who are considering taking

Unsure of what she wanted to do after college, Foster began working in her father’s land surveying business full time. She’d worked part time previously, and this knowledge helped her apply for a job at the PVA office. She then knew that she could be the Property Valuation Administrator, so she began making

on leadership roles is to go for it. “Service

contacts and working toward that goal.

to your community in any area is very

Foster said the mentality of women in

fulfilling. I think we have a different

leadership roles is changing.

perspective to offer,” she said.

Said Foster: “The way has been paved

Rachel Pence Foster agrees. As

for you, go take advantage of it and never

Daviess County Property Valuation

give up on your dreams.”


IMPACT 100 To date, Impact 100 Owensboro has contributed 2.37 million dollars to our local non-profit agencies. By Shannon Erickson

In September 2001, Wendy Steele from Cincinnati Ohio had the idea of forming a women’s giving circle. Her notion, brilliant in its simplicity, was based on collective giving. Pooled charitable contributions from women in the greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky area could be combined and then invested in worthy non-profit organizations in the community. That idea grew and eventually gave birth to Impact 100. In Owensboro, Marianne Smith Edge learned of Impact 100 through a sorority sister and was intrigued. While the concept of women giving circles was new, it was slowly spreading in other parts of the country. At a Leadership Kentucky conference, Marianne and Martha Clark discussed the possibility of an Impact 100 Owensboro organization. Together they recruited 14 additional women. Those women, in turn, enlisted others and as word spread the idea was embraced with enthusiasm and generosity. In 2006, Owensboro Impact 100 was officially launched, and the inaugural membership included 150 women. Interest continued to swell and Impact 100 Owensboro now counts over 200 participants.

HERE’S HOW IT WORKS:

A woman makes a contribution of $1,000 for a full membership or a contribution of $500 for a half membership. A woman may join at any time of the year, but the membership drive takes place from January through March. The number of women joining during the membership drive determines the amount of money to be given for that particular year. In March, Impact 100 oversees a grant writing workshop for non-profit agencies in the greater Owensboro area. Those agencies interested in applying for the grants are strongly encouraged to attend. Participants learn guidelines for grant qualifications as well as effective grant writing skills. Qualified applicants must serve across one or more of five focus areas: culture, education, environment and recreation, family, and health and wellness. On June 1st, grant applications are due and the review process begins. At the end of the review process, finalists are selected. Members of Impact 100 hear a presentation from each finalist at the annual October meeting. The members cast their ballots and the two applicants receiving the most votes are awarded individual grants of $100,000. After the two $100,000 grants are awarded, residual funds in the pool are divided equally between the next three

finalists. It should be noted that 100 percent of membership dollars go directly into the grant fund. Impact 100% Owensboro seeks to empower the women of our area. Historically, women have not been the main community philanthropists. As women become more independent in their own right, many look for ways to share their gifts of time, talent, and financial gain. They find, through their involvement, that there is real power in collective giving. The joint donations of Daviess County women are improving lives and making a difference. To date, Impact 100 Owensboro has contributed $2.37 million to our local non-profit agencies.

TWO EXAMPLES

The 2016 grant recipients were the Help Office and The Owensboro Daviess County Regional Dental Clinic. The Community Dental Clinic’s current location is set for demolition, so the Impact 100 endowment will assist them in their move to a new building. It will also allow them to add two additional treatment chairs to more efficiently serve our community’s at-risk population. Before being awarded the 2016 grant, the Help office had no means of picking up donations. They relied on donors bringing food and other goods directly to the office. With the Impact 100 endowment, the Help Office purchased a van as well as made much-needed repairs to the 80-year-old building. They’ve been able to purchase new refrigeration units and remodel the pantry as well. Woody Woodward, the Help Office director, says it best. “The Help Office is extremely grateful to the leadership and members of Impact 100 Owensboro for granting our request and making it possible for us to serve the least fortunate of our community in meaningful and compassionate ways.” These grants are transformational. They provide very real solutions to the needs of the organizations and the people they serve. Women participating in Impact 100 are transformed as well. They see first hand the inner workings of non-profit agencies through our community. Lives on both sides are forever changed by these ordinary women making an extraordinary difference. For more information on Impact 100 Owensboro visit: www.IMPACT100owensboro.org.

THERE ARE THREE LEVELS OF PARTICIPATION: • A member may choose to donate money only. • A member may choose to come to the meetings and vote on the annual grant recipients. • A member may become actively involved in all aspects of the program, participating in focus groups, site visits, and grant applications.

2016 FINALISTS:

• Community Dental Clinic: Healthy Smiles Improvement, Outreach, and Expansion Project • Foundation for Daviess County Public Schools • Exploration Station • Help Office of Owensboro, Inc. • Help Office of Owensboro, Inc. Renovation/Expansion of Services • OCTC Foundation, Inc. • Impacting Lives through the Humanities • Owensboro Family YMCA Facility Improvements Project

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GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017


BY ASHLEY SORCE

A

22

ccording to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, only about

healthcare industry.

one-third of all women participated in the paid labor

Dr. Jennifer Martin, a Nurse Practitioner at HealthQuest,

force in 1950, while approximately 60 percent did by 2004.

says she knew from age 6 she wanted to be a doctor. Jigna

Researchers attribute this to many factors, including the

Patel-Wilson, Pharm-D, a pharmacist at Wilson Family

elimination of legal barriers to gender-based employment

Pharmacy, can trace her calling back to age 9, when her

and pay discrimination. Additionally, the percentage of

mother lost her eyesight in her right eye. “I was born

women in the labor force with a college degree has tripled

in a third world country and healthcare was not on par,

since 1970, rising at twice the rate for men. Today, the

which also made me choose a career in healthcare,” Wilson

U.S. Department of Labor reports that an astounding

explained.

74.2 percent of the healthcare practitioner and technical

“I feel like I was born knowing that I was meant to be

occupation field is comprised of women. That can certainly

a nurse and to care for people,” says Tabatha Roberts,

be supported in Owensboro, where you will find many

APRN-C, a Nurse Practitioner at Gateway Primary Care.

abundantly qualified and well-respected females within the

She says that was partly because of the care and concern she

GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017


JIGNA PATEL-WILSON, PHARM-D, WILSON FAMILY PHARMACY. PHOTO BY TAYLOR WEST.

felt for her baby brother, who had asthma and allergies to the point of hospitalization. “My mom told me a story of when he was in the hospital after having his tonsils and adenoids removed, and he refused to open his mouth to eat or drink. So I hopped

TABATHA ROBERTS, APRN-C GATEWAY PRIMARY CARE PHOTO BY TAYLOR WEST

up in the bed and coaxed him into taking his medication. He would only open his mouth for me, so I had to stay and make sure he took his meds and continued to drink.” Dr. Shanna McGinnis, a Pediatrician at Owensboro Health, says her parents can remember her talking about being a doctor at age 10, but her calling became more evident as she grew older. “I really enjoyed science in high school and decided to pursue a degree in Biology in college. I started doing some shadowing and volunteer work in healthcare and decided to make a career of it.”

THE CHANGING FACE OF HEALTHCARE “The role of women in healthcare has increased ten fold since I was a young girl,” says Jigna Wilson, whose family moved to the United States so they could raise their daughter to have a successful career. “Both my parents knew that they would have to move to a place that had respect and opportunities for women being that we were in a third world country that lacked both at that time.” Wilson credits her parents, her loving husband, and supportive family members and friends who have all helped - and continue to help - develop her successful career. Tabatha Roberts says women have made huge advancements in healthcare since she became a Registered Nurse at 19. “I can remember as a child any time I would go to the doctor, you would have female nurses, but the physicians were mostly men. Now it is very common to find female physicians and female nurse practitioners are even more common.” For example, by the time Shanna McGinnis attended the University of Louisville School of Medicine, there were more female students than male. In 2013, a woman was named dean of the medical school.

“I AM TRULY GRATEFUL FOR THE FEMALES BEFORE ME THAT HAVE PAVED A PATH IN THIS FIELD FOR ME AND MANY OTHER FEMALES TO HAVE THE OPPORTUNITIES THAT WE CURRENTLY HAVE. ” - Tabatha Roberts, APRN-C

Dr. Martin has also noticed a remarkable increase of women in healthcare over the past 20 years. In her recollection, women initially started in the OB/GYN field, “but now women are in all specialties and excelling!” For good reason, it does seem that female medical professionals are more likely to work part-time than their male counterparts. Says Dr. McGinnis, “For me, I have to balance my work as a physician with my role as a wife and mother. Moving forward though, I think we will need to have discussions regarding how we can continue to meet the healthcare needs in our communities and still meet the needs for our families as wives and moms.”

FUTURE GENERATIONS If 16 seems young to become a Certified Nursing Assistant, as was the case with Tabatha Roberts, it’s because she began taking college courses through Owensboro Community & Technical College while still in high school, which allowed her to apply and be accepted into Nursing School her senior year of high school. Roberts says she hopes to pave the way for young women professionals. “I want my daughter to follow her dreams; whether that is a cosmetologist, teacher, nurse, doctor, engineer; I want her to do what makes her happy. But if she does want to work in healthcare I want her to have every opportunity that a man has. I feel that in the near future more women will hold administrative roles in healthcare than men and the gender pay gap will disappear.” Wilson agrees, “In the future, women will have even more opportunities than (we do) today. They will be able to achieve their dreams and goals in various different healthcare fields.”

SHANNA MCGINNIS, MD, FAAP OWENSBORO HEALTH PHOTO BY CHARLES MAHLINGER

A RECENT HARVARD STUDY DEMONSTRATED THAT PATIENTS TREATED BY FEMALE PHYSICIANS HAD LOWER MORTALITY RATES AND LOWER READMISSION RATES.

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GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017


“NEVER, EVER GIVE UP; NEVER ACCEPT SECOND BEST; KNOW THAT YOU ARE AS GOOD AS, BUT NO BETTER THAN ANYONE ELSE; BE COMPASSIONATE AND READ, READ, READ--AND THINK ABOUT WHAT YOU READ. BE INDEPENDENT AND ABLE TO TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF. AS THE NATIVE AMERICAN ADAGE GOES-WOMEN HOLD UP HALF THE SKY--WE ARE INDISPENSABLE.” – Aloma Dew FROM LEFT: ALOMA DEW, TYLESE CROWE, ADDYSANNE STOUT PHOTOS BY JAMIE ALEXANDER

ATHENA AWARD RECIPIENTS H

osted by the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce and Girls Incorporated of Owensboro-Daviess County, the Athena Award recognizes and celebrates not only the contributions of women, but more importantly, those individuals who opened doors and enabled other women to be selfsufficient and to reach their full potential. Beginning in our community 19 years ago, the Athena Award has been given to several notable Owensboro women, including City Commissioner Deborah Nunley, Habitat for Humanity Executive Director Virginia Braswell, and the Ursuline Sisters of Mount St. Joseph. Chair of the Athena Award event, Sue Napper, explains that members of the community are invited to nominate individuals for this award. The nominee or their nominator must then complete an extensive application that outlines their career, civic engagement and influence on women. The applications are then reviewed by a confidential panel outside of the Owensboro community to determine the award recipient. The 2016 recipient, Aloma Dew, is a retired Kentucky Wesleyan College history professor and environmental activist. “Receiving the Athena Award was the greatest honor I have ever received,” Aloma Dew commented. “It was a validation of my life’s work.” Coming from a family of strong women, which undoubtedly helped make her who she is today, Dew has made a significant and meaningful impact in Owensboro. “I was always taught that I could do anything,” Dew said. And that she has. Among her lengthy list of accomplishments are President of the Owensboro League of Voters and Owensboro Women’s Coalition; member of the American Association of University Women; deacon at First Christian Church (Aloma is very proud to point out that her church has female deacons and elders); Chair of the Kentucky Environmental Quality Commission and Chair of the Kentucky Commission on Women; and conservation organizer for the Sierra Club. She is currently working on a biography of Josephine Henry, a Kentucky suffragist and she co-authored Owensboro: The City on the Yellow Banks and Daviess County Bicentennial History.

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GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017

By Ashley Sorce

“I had a wonderful career although I never made much money. But I have been able to follow my passions--women, the environment, working with youth, and writing, and I was able to be home with my children as they were growing up,” Dew said. When Dew received her award in February of 2016, she said in her acceptance speech, “As I listened to all of the names of the women who could have or should have won, I think this is probably just part of the luck of my life, that I lucked out today.” Tish Correa Osborne, Chief Executive Officer of Girls Incorporated of Owensboro-Daviess County, says that it is important to note those selected to receive the Athena Award are referred to as recipients as opposed to award winners because the language could suggest that the other nominees are not as qualified or worthy of the award. “We believe that anytime a community takes the time to recognize and honor the contributions of its citizens, in our case particularly the women, then the entire community wins,” Correa Osborne said. “Rarely do you find someone that strives to emulate or aspires to be something that is not valued in a community. When girls see women getting celebrated for their accomplishments and how they too are part of what makes the world great, they start to dig deeper within themselves to find their own ‘greatness!’” Having been with Girls Inc. for 34 years, Correa Osborne has many favorite moments from past Athena Awards. “I can’t count the number of times I have cried while listening to a Girls Inc. girl tell her own story,” she said. “I could swear I see them growing stronger right before my eyes. That sudden realization they are important and valued no matter what they have been through is mesmerizing to watch unfold. I also love what happens after the luncheons when girls tell me they are in awe of the award recipients and want to know what they can do now as 9-10-11-year-olds to turn out to be like ‘them.’” One of those girls is 17-year-old Addysanne Stout, a senior at Henderson County High School. Addysanne has been a member of Girls Inc. for ten years and spoken at the Athena Awards five times. So committed to Girls Inc., Addysanne has continued to attend even after moving to Henderson during her sophomore year.


PAST AWARD RECIPIENTS 1999 LAMONE MAYFIELD 2000 JEAN WELLS 2001 BRENDA CLAYTON 2002 DEBBIE NUNLEY 2003 HELEN SEARS 2004 JANE NOBLE “Girls Inc. has shaped who I am today,” Addysanne said. “I was troublesome when I first started and didn’t really want to participate a lot. But through my years I was offered opportunities to help and volunteer. I have taught my own programs, such as Lego Robotics and BuildIT. And one of my first real jobs was as a Teen Staff at Girls Inc.” During the 2016 award ceremony, three local Girls Inc. members were surprised with scholarships collectively totaling $42,000. Addysanne was one, receiving a national Girls Inc. scholarship for $20,000. Addysanne says that Girls Inc. has had such an impact on her life that she plans to attend Murray State University in the fall, where she intends to study Non-Profit Management. “I want to be the next CEO like Mrs. Tish.” “If you think your investment doesn’t matter, I want you to stop and think about these girls,” Correa Osborne said after making the announcement about the scholarships at the 2016 ceremony. “Without you and what you’re doing, this would not be possible. You are truly changing lives, real lives that many times go pushed to the side and not taken seriously. They’ve been taken seriously, and I guarantee you we’re going to be seeing and hearing about them in the future.” Tish commends this community for stepping up to make the Athena Awards, a celebration and cultivation of such an important part of our workforce, possible. She says it is sponsorships, ticket sales and attendance by the key leaders from local companies that make the event a reality. But moreover, she adds, it is businesses allowing time for employees to mentor one another, mentor girls and young women, host workshops, encourage participation in nonprofits and allowing the time required for leadership on various boards, that makes the community excel. Dew notes that with strong female leadership within the Chamber of Commerce, she is confident that women in local business and industry will continue to be supported; however, she does admit that Owensboro could do better, specifically referencing the fact Owensboro has not seen a female mayor or county judge or county commissioner. “I have seen many women progress and excel in our community,

but there is still much to do,” Dew said. “My advice is to never forget that it takes ALL of us to make a strong, progressive, productive community. The days of men being the ones in charge and holding all the power should be gone. Let us utilize all our gifts and talents and then our community and world will be the ideal about which we all dream. Treasure the differences and savor diversity!” The 2017 Athena Award Ceremony will be March 9 at the Owensboro Convention Center. Tickets are $50 each and tables can also be reserved. Sponsors for the event are also welcomed. All proceeds from the event go to general operating costs of Girls Inc. While past keynote speakers have included state governors, state lieutenant governors, and CEOs, Correa Osborne is excited that the 2017 keynote speakers will be the girls of Girls Inc. Members of Girls Inc. have always taken an active role in the luncheon program, according to Sue Napper, event chair and past Girls Inc. Board President. “Frankly, they steal the hearts of the audience,” Napper said. “Standing in front of a crowd of some 250 people, they tell their stories and aspirations with confidence and humor. In many ways, they are reflective of what Athena is about. These young girls, because of the paths cleared by our Athena honorees, have a greater chance to succeed and follow their dreams.” Girls Inc. also hopes to distribute the first scholarship from the Tish Correa Osborne Scholarship Fund at the 2017 ceremony, a fund established in honor of the current CEO for her commitment to the girls, her passion for her work and the mission and to celebrate her 34 years of service of positive outcomes for the girls of this community. “We are seeing more and more movies and real life accounts of individual women and the combined efforts of women that have been forgotten or never recognized or celebrated for the contributions they have made to world in so many different ways,” Correa Osborne said. “Girls and women and men, all get excited to learn about and see what women do to create, support, and nurture leadership and create so much positive energy around them to help others grow and succeed as well. Our luncheon is a way to bring the contributions of our own local shining stars to light and for others to be inspired by them.”

2005 MARTHA CLARK 2006 MARIANNE SMITH EDGE 2007 JACKIE ADDINGTON GLOVER 2008 VICKI STOGSDILL 2009 URSULINE SISTERS OF MOUNT ST. JOSEPH 2010 VIRGINIA BRASWELL 2011 PATTI RAYBURN 2012 CHERRI LOLLEY 2013 HELEN MOUNTJOY 2014 MARGARET BRITTON 2015 DEBORAH FILLMAN

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GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017


HEALTHY OWENSBORO 5K

A LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN The Junior League is a group of women that are committed to women, committed to community, and committed to leadership. BY MELODY WALLACE

K

atie Tillwick Burlew was just 23 years old and fresh out of college when she was offered a company management position that would take her

nine hours from Omaha, Nebraska northeast to Owensboro, Kentucky. Katie soon found herself in a new state, a new town, and knowing no one. Looking for ways to connect with others, someone suggested that she join Junior League. Katie says, “If you want to meet people in town, Junior League is a great place to do it.” Now, over eight years later, Katie is the current JLO president and has since built many relationships through Junior League, including meeting her loving husband of two years through another Junior Leaguer. Initially, the term Junior League may conjure up visions of the privileged stay-at-home wives from the movie “The Help.” While the Junior League may have a reputation for being a group of doctors’ and lawyers’ wives, Katie says that has now become the exception, rather than the rule. The modern day Junior League is actually made up of many strong, single and married working women who hold positions in such fields as accounting, law, nursing, and real estate. Junior League is also much more than a social club for those of stature; it is a group of women who desire to be stronger leaders in their community. By volunteering to assist and empower other women and children throughout the community, Junior League members are able to develop as individuals as well as role models.

26

GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017


KIDS UNDER PARACHUTE AT FUN RUN JUNIOR HOSTS AT ST. BENEDICT’S

“Through JLO, I formed relationships with extraordinary women while working on various committees. Being involved in our community enabled me to see the number of people who have financial and physical need. As a neonatal nurse, I work with mothers and babies who need assistance and support; because of Junior League I know who can serve them and help meet their needs.” SHELIA JONES KINGSLEY, RN/BSN, ACTIVE MEMBER FOR 7 YEARS, SUSTAINING MEMBER FOR 8

The Junior League was originally founded in 1901 by nineteen-

many organizations throughout Owensboro in order to invest

year-old New York debutante Mary Harriman, and includes

in the health and well-being of the women and children in the

such notable members as Eleanor Roosevelt, Nancy Reagan,

community. One of the most popular Junior League sponsored

and Katherine Hepburn. Harriman believed that young women

events has become “Kids in the Kitchen.” During the summer

of privilege “had the opportunity and responsibility of making

months (and Spring and Fall Break), parents and children are

an important contribution” in their community. There are now

invited to the Owensboro Museum of Science and History to learn

150,000 Junior League members in 293 Junior Leagues throughout

how to make fun and delicious snacks and meals, while being

four different countries.

educated in healthy eating habits. JLO also works with the Edge

Established in 1937 as The Cotillion Club, the Junior

Ice Arena to host a special Christmas party for children in need,

League of Owensboro joined the Association of Junior Leagues

complete with free snacks, hot chocolate, and a complimentary

International in 1974 and currently has 236 members, 64 active

book. Another mission that is near and dear to the hearts of Junior

and 172 sustaining. Sustaining members are members who have

Leaguers is the layette drive for the Green River District Health

contributed seven or more years of active service and continue to

Department. The ladies work diligently collecting essential baby

pay dues and maintain all of the privileges of membership, yet do

items that visiting nurses can distribute to mothers in need. These

not have the obligation of holding office or attending meetings.

are just a few of the many ways that the Junior League contributes

Although sustaining members may still attend and support

to the community throughout the year.

Junior League events, they are encouraged to take the skills they

have learned out into the community and incorporate them into

Charity Ball, which is held the first Saturday of March. The Charity

various roles of leadership.

Ball is the Junior League’s way of preserving and carrying on the

The Junior League’s primary mission is to support their

old-fashioned Southern traditions of the debutante ball from

“signature project,” Healthy Owensboro. JLO collaborates with

the Cotillion Club days, as well as a means of welcoming Junior

The most popular Junior League event by far is the annual

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GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017


Hosts and Hostesses to society. Composed of the children of Junior Leaguers, male hosts dress in formal wear, while beautiful young hostesses stand out in gowns and gloves of white. The Junior Hosts and Hostesses serve as ambassadors of the ball, graciously welcoming

please email info@jlwensboro.org

The

throughout the community and affirm a whole

Conference will be held on March 11th in the

new generation of young Owensboro leaders.

Winchester Center at the Kentucky Wesleyan

interested in helping you to discover your true leadership potential. They are always looking to develop and encourage young women who have skills in the areas of business, finance, public relations, and grant writing. More importantly, they are looking for women who care about helping and empowering other women. If you

GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017

For more information or to receive an invitation,

WOMEN’S EMPOWERMENT CONFERENCE

and volunteer work, then the Junior League is

28

Saturday, March 4, 2017, Hines Center

recognize their contributions and acts of service

twenty-one, with a passion for your community

KIDS IN THE KITCHEN

Junior League Charity Ball

patrons to the event. This is also an evening to

If you are a young woman, over the age of

JUNIOR HOSTS AND HOSTESSES HYGIENE PRODUCT DRIVE FOR LOCAL HOMELESS SHELTERS

UPCOMING EVENTS

JLO

Women’s

Empowerment

Campus. Sign-in begins at 10:30 a.m. and will last until 3 p.m. This event is open to women of high school age and older and will include motivational and informational guest speakers covering topics such as: personal finance, continuing education, buying a home, maintaining a healthy lifestyle, as well as resume writing and interview skills. Local businesses and organizations will also have booths set up to promote opportunities for women in the community. Lunch will be provided to those

are interested in joining Junior League, you can

attendees who R.S.V.P. via the Junior League of

download an application from their website at

Owensboro Facebook page. Please come join us

jlowensboro.org/join/.

for this uplifting event!


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CLINT MORRIS, OCTC GOFAME STUDENT AT CASTLEN STEEL.

OCTC PSYCHOLOGY PROFESSOR, DR. ED MORRIS LECTURES ONSITE AT US BANK.

EDUCATION & INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIPS BUILD A STRONGER WORKFORCE Authored by: William K. Mounts, Vice President of Operations/Purchasing, OMICO Plastics and Dr. Scott Williams, President, Owensboro Community & Technical College For business and industry to flourish in today’s competitive environment a

Working for their sponsoring employer 3 days a week allows students to

well-trained workforce is essential. In fact, the Greater Owensboro Economic

put into practice what they learn in the classroom. Students who struggle

Development Corporation (GOEDC) and Chamber of Commerce have

with a traditional educational pathway have excelled with the GOFAME

made workforce development a top priority. In partnership, the Greater

model. The results are astonishing. The first GOFAME student cohort

Owensboro Federation of Manufacturing Education (GOFAME) chapter,

of 15 students is set to graduate in May, 2017, with the highest GPA (3.6)

GOEDC and Owensboro Community and Technical College (OCTC) have

and retention rate (100%) in the state!

embarked on a unique training program to help address regional workforce

- William K. Mounts, President, GOFAME.

needs. This transformative work and learn model allows participating students

Now in its second year, the GOFAME chapter has added new members,

to earn an industry recognized technical degree in eighteen months.

a second cohort of AMT students, and a cohort of Computerized Machining

Students in this model must be willing to participate in the program’s 40 hour

& Manufacturing students. Under the umbrella GOCAREERS, the chapter

per week, apprenticeship-style format. Students attend college two days, and

was the first in the state to expand the work and learn concept into a non-

work three days per week at their sponsoring company. After completing the

manufacturing sector.

program, students earn an Associate in Applied Science degree, in addition

In September 2016, GOFAME, OCTC, and GO EDC partnered with

to gaining valuable skills during their paid work experience. The GOFAME

US Bank to launch GOCAREERS focusing on the business sector. The

work and learn model is changing how we train and educate employees.

initial class of 20 students attend classes 8 hours a week and work at US

Through this industry-education partnership, OCTC and GOEDC

Bank, never leaving the US Bank campus. The college classes are taught on

work with the regional employers in the GOFAME chapter to develop

location making it more convenient for the employees to earn a Business

the collaborative educational model that benefits both students (future

administration degree in an accelerated format.

employees) and employers. Through the industry driven FAME model,

Finally, OCTC is in the initial stages of collaborating with Owensboro

OCTC and the GOFAME chapter businesses work together to create

Health to implement a medical assisting program based on the GOFAME

relevant curriculum and learning outcomes that align with the needs of each

model.

industry sector. This creates an experience in which students are immersed

in both learning and work environments. The transformative model delivers

employers, and the community benefit when industry and education

many benefits as outlined by William K. Mounts, President of the GOFAME

organizations work hand in hand to provide workplace technical and

chapter.

behavioral skills. This innovative model is a win-win for all.

GOFAME has changed the workforce paradigm for Advanced

Students gain valuable work experience, technical and soft skill training,

Manufacturing Technicians (AMT) since its inception in March of 2015.

at an economical rate, reducing student debt. Employers gain experienced

This program actively recruits people who want to have a meaningful career

employees who are vetted and trained based on their technical needs. The

but may lack experience or financial means. Due to its design, GOFAME

community benefits by building a skilled workforce pipeline.

allows students to get an education, get real world experience, get paid for

working at the sponsoring company, and get half of their tuition paid by the

in the greater Owensboro region are ensuring a bright future. A future where

sponsoring company.

employees are prepared to live, work and grow in our community.

In all these cases the common thread is the fact that the college, students,

By working together, as never before, the industry and educational sectors

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

GO Chamber Magazine would like to recognize these member businesses and organizations in a unique way by putting faces to the company name. This Profiles of Owensboro special advertising section is our way of showcasing the people behind the businesses that support this community so well. Please thank them with your patronage.

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GLENN FUNERAL HOME & CREMATORY L. RUTH INTERIOR DESIGN S ETTLE GROUP OF HILLIARD LYONS HALEY MCGINNIS FUNERAL HOME & CREMATORY SHOE STOP, INC. OWENSBORO COMMUNITY & TECHNICAL COLLEGE LIL BIT SASSY BOUTIQUE KENTUCKY WESLEYAN COLLEGE KIDSTOP CHILDREN’S BOUTIQUE LINGATE HOSPITALITY EM FORD BELLA REGAZZA BOUTIQUE CHAMPION FORD LINCOLN MAZDA MELLOW MUSHROOM PIZZA BAKERS

GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION PROFILE OF

Your family care Team

GLENN FUNERAL HOME & CREMATORY 900 Old Hartford Road . Owensboro, KY 270-683-1505 . www.glennfuneralhome.com

Meaningful Farewells... Uniquely personal tributes honoring the stories of a lifetime.

You, your family, and your friends are our guests. As your hosts, we are here to welcome you and care for you to the very best of our ability. From prearrangement to meaningful farewells to continuing care in the days following, you’ll find your family care team to be knowledgeable professionals fully committed to our policies of straight talk, honest information, direct answers, and never ever any pressure. It takes a team to provide exceptional care for you and your family. We take the time time to read between the lines to craft uniquely personal tributes honoring the stories of a lifetime. You have our promise.

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Interior design L. RUTH INTERIOR DESIGN 1115 Tamarack Rd. Suite 100 . Owensboro, KY . 270-240-4932 . www.lruth.com When you see a beautiful or efficiently functioning space that we at L. Ruth Interior Design have created, we hope that you first feel the personality or the brand of the person’s home or business you are standing in. We strive to deliver interiors that are not only backdrops for their day to day lives, but that they provide a pleasant environment. Based on the

quality of the space, we intend for our audience to assume we created it or that our customers are raving about us! Our family atmosphere at L. Ruth is like no other. Our team and our clients feel that work and working with us is an experience and we intend to always keep it that way.

Laura Ruth Edge, Owner, Certified Interior Designer Larissa Lewis, Interior Designer Anne Jones, Operations Manager Megan King, Bookkeeper/Purchasing Agent Tina Hires, Administrative Assistant Christy Hayden, Project Assistant Not Pictured: Judy Shelton, Office Assistant Madeleine Edge, Marketing Manager Anne Elizabeth Edge: Office Assistant

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Wealthmanagement

THE SETTLE GROUP OF HILLIARD LYONS 1035 Frederica St., Suite 100 . Owensboro, KY . 270-926-4747 800-588-1598 . www.settlegroup.hilliardfc.com Whether you are saving for a child’s education, building a business, or preparing for retirement, you have important financial choices to make. You don’t have to make those choices alone. The Settle Group of Hilliard Lyons wants to earn your trust as your long-term financial partner. We want to be the first place you turn when your life – or financial goals – change. We collaborate with you, your CPA, and attorney as you build, manage, protect, and transition your wealth. Integrity, commitment, objectivity, and trust are paramount in serving our clients. We will take both your fears and your dreams seriously.

From Left to Right: Jenny Wathen, Registered Client Service Associate Mitch Settle, Senior Vice President, Chartered Wealth Advisor, Financial Consultant Tara Estes, Registered Client Service Associate Shannon Raines, Chartered Retirement Plan Specialist, Financial Associate Securities offered by J.J.B. Hilliard, W.L. Lyons, LLC Member NYSE, FINRA & SIPC

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Storytellers Megan Everly Morris, Vice President Nathan Morris, Managing Funeral Director

HALEY-MCGINNIS FUNERAL HOME & CREMATORY 519 Locust Street . Owensboro, KY . 270-684-9891 . www.haleymcginnis.com Life is often beautiful and is sometimes tragic. Everyone has a story about that, a story that deserves to be told. In the end, we all want to be known, want to be remembered. At Haley-McGinnis Funeral Home & Crematory, remembering you and your loved ones is what we do. Remembering you means we tell your story, honor your life, grieve your death, and lift up your legacy as the miracle that it is for all the world to see. It means we will carry you with us always. It means that you are never forgotten. Because you deserve that.

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footwear

SHOE STOP, INC. 4650 Frederica Street . Owensboro, KY . Phone: 270-686-7508 . Fax: 270-683-7259 Founded in 1999, Shoe Stop, Inc. specializes in branded family footwear from baby shoes to work boots, as well as the “fashion right” items of the season. We also have certified pedorthists on staff for prescription footwear, custom orthotics, or anyone who experiences foot pain. In addition, as new brands emerge across the country we want to be

on top of our game and offer you the hottest and trendiest product assortment “on time” that you would normally only find in bigger cities. We have intentionally tried to develop additional brands in our store to offer a unique menu to choose from. For example Ugg, Brooks, Keen, Jack Rogers, Dansko, Alegria, On-Running, Merrell, Chaco, Ecco, Vionic, Mephisto, and Olukai; there is either no distribution or limited distribution on these brands in Owensboro.

From Left to Right: Geri Merritt, Accounts Payable Kyle Bartlett, Shipping and Receiving Samantha Steckler, Sales Associate Chase Fisher, Sales Associate Hunter Cavender, Certified Shoe Fitter Sarah Reeves, Assistant Manager Julie McDonald, General Manager Samantha Ringham, Accounts Receivable Mark Shively, Owner Lexus Aldrich, Cashier Chris Thomas, Assistant Manager Lexie Spier, Assistant Buyer

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

OWENSBORO COMMUNITY & TECHNICAL COLLEGE 4800 New Hartford Rd. . Owensboro, KY . 270-686-4400 . 1-866-755-6282 . www.owensboro.kctcs.edu Developing a world-class, competitive workforce for the Greater Owensboro region, is OCTC’s Workforce Solutions number one priority. Recognized by industry partners for its responsive team of skilled professionals and an impressive menu of value-added services, Workforce Solutions offers customized solutions ranging from mobile manufacturing training to leadership and organizational development. The highly experienced Workforce Solutions team offers personalized services such as consultation, research, training design, pre-hire and workforce assessments, management and team development, and specialized

Sheri Plain, Director, Workforce Services Keith Boarman, Director, Technical Training Katie Vincent, Special Initiatives Manager Cindy Fiorella, Vice President, Workforce and Economic Development Vicki Boyd, Director, Workforce Services John Bryenton, Director, Creative Services Jackie Smith, Business Development Manager

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GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017

technical and professional skills training. Its extensive workforce assessment services include licensure and industry-specific certification testing such as CompTIA and ASE - Automotive Service Excellence, as well as a variety of local and national workforce assessments. The team is equally adept at developing interactive computer-based solutions through their FlexTrain option that provide “real time” delivery of training when and where employees need it, while minimizing time away from work. If you are looking to invest in the productivity of your workforce, Workforce Solutions is the right choice for you.


PROFILE OF

The Workforce Solutions Team

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TheWesleyan Way Back row: Dr. W.L. Magnuson, Professor of Chemistry Senior Katie Laughlin, Communication Arts Beth Demunbrun, Assistant Professor of Theatre Ashley Gendek, Assistant Professor of English Dr. Kyle Besing, Assistant Professor of Mathematics Senior Logan O’Bryan, Criminal Justice and Criminology Front row: Senior Katie Bell, Political Science and Legal Studies Sophomore De’Vante McFarland, Art and Graphic Design Senior Erin Dorn, Biology and Chemistry Senior Jacob Snodgrass, Accounting Lisa Clark, Assistant Professor of Music Raju Chenna, Associate Professor of Accounting

KENTUCKY WESLEYAN COLLEGE 3000 Frederica St. . Owensboro, KY 42301 . 800-999-0592 . kwc.edu We are doctors, educators, attorneys and corporate leaders. Our graduates score higher on the CPA exam than graduates from any other school in Kentucky.  It’s no secret why, in 2016, Kentucky Wesleyan was recognized as the 13th Best Regional College in the southern United States by U.S. News and World Report and the only regional college in Kentucky to earn designation as a Best Value School.  Washington Monthly also named Wesleyan the top institution for a bachelor’s degree in Kentucky.  Our students graduate with not just a career, but a career with a calling. 

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION PROFILE OF

KidsFashion

LIL BIT SASSY 125 W 2nd St. . Owensboro KY . 270-852-0555 Follow us on Facebook & Instagram

Lil Bit Sassy opened in June 2016. We are locally owned and operated at 125 W. 2nd St in historic downtown Owensboro on the corner of St. Ann and 2nd Street. Inside you will find everything you need from Pageant dresses, flower girl dresses, & christening gowns, and school uniforms with sizes ranging from premie-10/12 boys and premie-14/16 girls, tweens/misses/womens, small, medium and large. We also carry childrens shoes, a completely stocked hair BOW bar with every size and color you would ever need, small gift items, toys, and jewelry for women and children.

Left to Right: Sarah Yeckering, Bashful

Store hours are Monday - Saturday 10 a.m.- 5 p.m. Delivery options are available and we even offer PRIVATE SHOPPING by appointment after hours. Please take a moment and enjoy shopping the way it should be, where customer service is first.

Allison Yeckering, Sweet Lisa Johnson-Miles, Bossy Presleigh Smeathers, Sassy

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hospitality Mark McClure, General Manager, Courtyard by Marriott Owensboro Ruth Ann Dearness, General Manager, Holiday Inn Owensboro Riverfront

Glenn Higdon, Founder and CEO, LinGate Hospitality

Mary Higdon, Hotel Design, LinGate Hospitality

LINGATE HOSPITALITY 1401 Springbank Dr. . Owensboro, KY . 270-683-1555 LinGate Hospitality, headquartered in Owensboro, has been serving the hospitality industry in hotel ownership, development, and management since 1986. Currently, LinGate has fourteen hotels in its portfolio with three additional under development. LinGate is a local company with multi-state reach representing Marriott, Hilton, and IHG hotels in Kentucky, Tennessee, Indiana, Ohio, Texas, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Arkansas, and New Mexico. Locally, Ruth Ann Dearness is the general manager of the Holiday Inn Owensboro Riverfront located in downtown Owensboro and Mark McClure is the general manager of the Courtyard by Marriott Owensboro located on HWY 54.

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GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION PROFILE OF

EverythingKids

KIDSTOP CHILDREN’S BOUTIQUE Wesleyan Park Plaza . 2660 Frederica St. . Owensboro, KY . 270-926-6433 Find us on Instagram & Facebook Dedicated to dressing your children like children and letting them play like children. We offer an extensive and unique selection of timeless, classic, practical and yes, even fun apparel, shoes, accessories, gifts, toys, dolls and books for baby to pre-teen, as well as the new mom to be. Encouraged and inspired daily by the families that have filled our store and our hearts over generations, as well as our newcomers, we are committed to carefully assisting our customers with all of their shopping needs from selecting that first pair of walking shoes to the perfect gift. With baby and birthday registry, free gift wrap and local delivery, gifting is easy and always beautifully wrapped. We have and always will be here to outfit your child.

Jeanne Clark, owner Cecilia Clark Strawn, owner

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Employee benefits

Clay Ford, Partner Jonathon Estes, Employee Benefits Advisor Maria Daugherty, Account Manager Not pictured: Summer Gilliam, Account Manager

EM FORD 2100 Frederica St. . Owensboro, KY 42301 . 270-926-2806 . www.emford.com

90 years in business has helped us better understand how hard you have worked to build your business. You constantly face risks that could hinder your success, including the health of your employees and your ability to recruit and retain high-quality team members due to the cost of your benefits plan. EM Ford will help guide you through today’s complicated environment using our 5-step risk management process. Through an in-depth, consultative approach to learn more about your business, we help clients find opportunities to improve their employees’ lives while keeping their costs down. Our extensive education process encourages employees to appreciate their benefits package. Contact us today to begin improving your risk profile, your employee benefits program, and your confidence in the future of your business.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION PROFILE OF

Fashion

BELLA RAGAZZA BOUTIQUE 120A W. Second St. . Owensboro, KY . 270-926-9546 Bella Ragazza Boutique joined the landscape of downtown Owensboro in 2013. The store was designed to welcome our customers with an elegant and beautiful design. The grand chandelier greets you when you walk in, but the atmosphere is laid back and comfortable. Our friendly staff awaits to shop with you like your best friend or give you space to relax and do your own retail therapy. Bella Ragazza Boutique is a boutique for every woman. No matter your age, size or budget, there is something for you. We have a wide selection of unique apparel, shoes, and accessories that all of your friends will be complimenting. Follow us on social media for new arrivals showing up daily.

Maddy Baker, Intern/Fashion Blogger Micah Swift, Customer Assistant Natasha Stanley, Owner Kim Lodzik, Customer Assistant Katie Westerfield, Assistant Manager

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Professionalism in Automotive

CHAMPION FORD LINCOLN MAZDA 140 Southtown Blvd. . Owensboro KY . 270-684-1441 . 800-737-1771 . ChampionOwensboro.com

Champion Ford Lincoln Mazda enters their 26th year of business in Owensboro offering Better Prices, Better Service, Better Selection. Since 1990, Champion has relocated to Southtown Blvd. and branched into a second location, Champion Ford Reo in Rockport Indiana, as well as ChampionShip Used Vehicle center on Highway 54. “We believe the key to our growth is our people. We have employees that are truly engaged with the customers

44

and each other. Our customers trust the Champion Experience, where people are waited on by a friendly sales staff and treated with respect. Our MVP (Market Value Price/Most Valuable Player) deals set the stage for a first class buying experience. We try to set ourselves apart in our marketing as well.� says Duke Brubaker President/General Manager.

Truck bed left to right:

Front of truck left to right:

Jim Monanteras,

Jerry Maggard, New Vehicle Sales Manager

Andrew Davis, Sales

Used Vehicle Sales Manager

JB Schultz, Sales

Michael Bradfield, Inventory Management

Ernie McCollam,

Sherry Oliver, Quality Control Manager

Bo Oliver, Sales/Fleet

2016 Salesperson of the Year

Basil Deveaux, Sales

David Logsdon, Business Manager

Duke Brubaker, General Manager

Scott Saye, Sales

Linda Chancellor, Business Manager

GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION PROFILE OF

pizzaLove

MELLOW MUSHROOM PIZZA BAKERS 101 West Second Street . Owensboro KY 42303 270-684-7800 . mellowmushroom.com/store/owensboro

Our mission is to provide delicious food in a fun and creative environment. We are originators of classic southern pizza, and our unique and flavorful crust is a true original. We began from humble roots, born out of the free-wheelin’ hippy culture of the 1970’s. The idea back then was the same as it is now, to make the most delicious, craveable slice of pizza on the planet. The Mellow founders dreamed of a world where happiness could be found in the simplest things; like a mouthwatering slice of pizza and an ice cold beer. Come see us and enjoy the experience.

Front center: Bob Holderfield, owner Left to right: Lindsey Weinfurtner, Server; Candice Berry, Bartender/Server; Lauren Russell, Hostess/ To-Go; Jennifer Pearl, Server; Matt Holderfield, General Hospitality Mgr. Back row: Nate Roberts, Asst Kitchen Mgr./Pizza Guru; Cody Anderson, Bar Mgr/Beer wizard; Brett Cobb, Kitchen Lead/Pizza Guru; Michael Hays, Front of House/Catering Mgr.; Grace Harrison Bartender/Server

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GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017


10

QUESTIONS

HELEN MOUNTJOY

Director of Workforce Development and Education Greater Owensboro Economic Development Corporation BY DANNY MAY - PHOTO BY TAYLOR WEST

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GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017


W H AT I S YOUR FAVOR I TE VACATI ON D ES T I N ATI ON? Jesse, my husband, and I have enjoyed visiting Puerto Vallarta each year for almost two decades. The weather is almost always perfect, the pace is definitely relaxed, and we can enjoy activities (think snorkeling, for example) that aren’t possible here.

W H AT I S YOUR FAVOR I TE HOB BY OR WAY TO U N W I ND? Jesse and I both read voraciously. If our house were to suddenly collapse, it would be due to the accumulated weight of all our books.

WHAT S KILLS DID YOU DE VE LOP E ARLY ON T HAT YOU S T ILL US E E VE RY DAY AS AN E X E CUT IVE ?

Probably the most important skills I’ve learned are mindsets: don’t ask anyone else to do tasks you’d be unwilling to do yourself if you had the time and skill to do them yourself; worthwhile things are rarely accomplished by one person acting alone; there’s no substitute for doing your homework; thanking people for their help is one way of verbalizing your respect for them.

WHAT IS S OME T HING YOUR COLLE AGU ES AT GO-E DC WOULD BE S URP RIS E D TO KNOW ABOUT YOU?

I’d like to ride a camel - preferably in Egypt. I’d like to piece a quilt. I’d like to finally organize and identify all the family photos we have taken and inherited over

I am a has-been athlete. Believe it or not, I lettered in three sports in high school. And, in my pre-Title IX days in college, I was active in intramural athletics. A friend and I were even the Vanderbilt women’s doubles badminton champs two years in a row -- and,

the years.

yes, there were other entrants in the tournaments!

D O YO U R EMEMB ER YOUR F I R ST PAYC H E C K? HOW D I D YOU EAR N I T ?

YOU’ VE WORKE D ON T HE S TAT E LE VE L , WHAT BROUGHT YOU BACK TO OWE NS BORO?

W H AT ’S STI L L ON YOUR BUCKET LIS T ?

How could you ever forget the thrill of a first paycheck? Mine was in the princely sum of $20 in payment for two week’s work as a junior counselor at our church’s summer camp.

W H O MENTOR ED YOU? I was really “mentored” by my high school’s culture. I attended a girls’ school in Chattanooga where we were all expected to meet high academic standards and go to college. We were expected to assume responsibility for ourselves and our actions. And we were expected to contribute to “the common good.” We also learned that there was no good reason to set limitations on our hopes for ourselves and the future.

Although I worked at the state level, I never really left Daviess County. For the 15 years I was in the State Board of Education, I was away a few days a month, but most of the work was accomplished through phone calls and email. The two years I was Cabinet Secretary I drove to Frankfort late on Sunday or early on Monday and came home on Friday. I never really thought of that time as moving away.

WHAT DRIVES YOUR PASS ION FOR WORKFORCE DE VE LOP ME NT ? I believe workforce development is the key to successful

employees,

successful

companies,

successful communities. Like it or not, the world

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is changing rapidly. Technology and instant communication affect everything

“IT SEEMS TO ME THAT IF WE TRULY EMBRACE THE NOTION OF MOVING FORWARD TOGETHER, THERE IS NOTHING WE CANNOT ACCOMPLISH.”

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GO CHAMBER . FIRST QUARTER 2017

we do -- and that includes how we work!

Manufacturing, retail, health

care, education, service industries and professions, you name it -- all are operating differently than they were just 10 years ago. This makes life-long learning important for everyone. Making sure people have opportunities to improve their skills or learn new ones to help them advance or find new work means we make it possible for them to achieve success. Partnering

AS YOU T HINK ABOUT T HE FUT URE GROWT H OF OWE NS BORO, WHAT ARE YO U MOS T E XCIT E D ABOUT ? Owensboro is a place I’d like to move to if I didn’t already live here! The look and the vibes of the downtown area are terrific. The arts are alive and well. More and more organizations and educational institutions understand that by working together they can leverage each other’s strengths. Our three school systems are all strong.

with employers to ensure they have well-

There’s a healthy volunteer spirit here that

prepared applicants for their positions

other cities can only envy. Younger adults

means we have enhanced their chances

are moving into significant leadership

for success. And all of that means that

positions across the community. It seems

together we are building a vibrant, resilient

to me that if we truly embrace the notion of

community. For me, it just doesn’t get any

moving forward together, there is nothing

better than that.

we cannot accomplish.


DID ? YOU

KNOW

CORRECT ANSWER: FIRST SECURITY BANK SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT & CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER, AMY JACKSON .

FROM PAGE 7

Growing up on a family farm, Amy had experience driving a semi to haul hay and cattle. Those skills were called upon in a very public way when Amy once drove a semi pulling a full-size flatbed trailer float in the homecoming parade at Kansas State University. Amy recalls, “I remember being nervous because there was one really tight turn, but I didn’t hit anything and didn’t stall the engine, so I made it through just fine.” And the best part: the semi was K-State purple!

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THE FINAL ANALYSIS JACLYN GRAVES

T

here seems to be a pattern nowadays when a certain word has its moment to shine. It will take over our conversations, headlines, and hashtags for a while, then dissipate when the next trending word takes over. The word empower seems to rightfully be in the spotlight right now, especially for us women. I try to look at things with popularity on a national scale and see how it relates to my life. When empower gained traction, my mind and my heart were quick to jump onboard. It didn’t take long for me to realize how empowered I feel, just by taking a look around.

EM*POW*ER

· give (someone) the authority or power to do something · make (someone) stronger and more confident, especially in controlling their life and claiming their rights. Of these two definitions, it’s the second that grabs my attention… to make someone stronger and more confident, especially in controlling their life and claiming their rights. Wow. What an incredible responsibility that puts on us all. I don’t know about you, but I can instantly think of those who have empowered me… My great-grandmother who could whip up a meal for 25 fit for kings at any given

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Membership Development Manager

moment with a smile on her face; a dear friend gracefully picking up the pieces of her life when she was dealt an extremely unfair hand; a sorority sister successfully balancing motherhood, a full-time job, being a stellar wife and completing her doctorate with style; those with every excuse to quit, but refusing to; someone who marches to their own beat not to prove that they can, but just because they are; those who walk away from a bad marriage, work environment or lifestyle habit when they are terrified but determined; my go-to-girl getting the promotion she more than deserves at work; and my mom, who through it all, gave everything she had to us growing up, even when we didn’t appreciate it. And, you know what…if it weren’t for all of you, I don’t know if I would have been strong enough to make the decisions and changes I’ve made in my life. You see, I don’t need a celebrity, politician, or whatever is trending on Twitter to give me the strength I need to progress and neither do you. Take a good look inside, look at where you come from and the foundation that you’re hoping to leave and I promise you that you are the ultimate source of empowerment. Even when you’re scared, feeling vulnerable, or doubting yourself, know that what you have within is enough.


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200 E 3rd St, Owensboro, KY 42303 (270) 926-1860 http://chamber.owensboro.com

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PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID OWENSBORO KY 42301 PERMIT NO 420

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