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central florida times

WWW.CAICF.ORG | FOURTH QUARTER 2019 RECAP


Fourth Quarter 2019 Recap

contact information P.O. Box 941125 Maitland, FL 32794 www.caicf.org exdir@caicf.org 407-913-3777

thank you 2019 board of directors! 2020 Board of Directors Announced on Page 4!

Kenneth Zook, CMCA, AMS, PCAM, President Frank Ruggieri, Esq., Vice President Kent Taylor, CMCA, AMS, PCAM, Secretary Leslie Ellis, CPA, MSA, CGMA, Treasurer Lou Biron, Past President Suzan Kearns, CMCA, AMS, PCAM, Past President Chuck Strode, CAM Robert L. Taylor, Esq. Matt Vice

a message from the past president Hello to all of our Members and Friends and Happy New Year! We closed out another great year and we’re starting another decade. Now’s a great time to think about where the last year went and what you did in 2019. I certainly hope it was productive and no matter what challenges were thrown at you, you stepped up, took care of them and learned from them and hopefully had some fun in the process too. I want to let you know that this last year as President of CAICF has been truly a pleasure. Having the opportunity to participate and the privilege to be chosen as the Chapter President has been an honor. Thank you to the Board for believing that I was the person to keep the chapter moving forward. There was a lot accomplished during the last year, from policy creation and approval, posting board meeting minutes for our members on the CAICF website, and continuing to plan and bring educational content across all of our membership categories. The board also implemented their commitment to Community Managers to assist in fulfilling their continuing education needs at each meeting with education credit and free lunch. This initiative certainly adds value to our Homeowner Leaders who look to their managers as partners in running their communities. These things can only happen due to the amazing and continued support of our business partners. I can’t thank each of you enough for your never-ending support of this association! So, what does CAICF 2020 look like? The yearly CA DAY Trade Show is February 7th at Marriott World Center. Contact Reini for the most recent booth availability and be sure to visit CAICF.org to register as an attendee. Always a lot of fun, educational and a marvelous way to network and meet others. We kick off the New Year with our first lunch meeting on January 9th at Second Harvest Food Bank with the fabulous presenter Betsy Barbieux of Florida CAM School. Her presentation is “Stress Less” that will earn our managers 1 hour of CEU in HR. If you’re reading this newsletter and visiting our website, looking for information on vendors or even looking for some guidance with an issue you may be facing, please consider joining CAI. Our Chapter Executive Director is always willing to help by reaching out to our members and asking someone to follow up. The depth of professionals involved in CAI is unmatched by any other network organization in Central Florida. Educated members and access to professionals who understand the value of education and commitment to common interest living is what CAI is all about. As I finish my term as President, thank you to each of the dedicated board members and committee members who participated this past year! I also want to congratulate the new incoming board members who will commence on a three-year service

Michael Kulich, CMCA Tom Wheir 2

President’s message continued on next page


President’s message continued commitment to the CAICF Board and know that there is an entire network of folks who are available to you to act as a mentor when continuing the CAICF mission and strategic plan. Thank you to all our Business Partners, who without their support, would have made the task of President much more difficult. Our Community Managers who looked to CAI for education and networking and of course our Homeowner Leader Members who turn to CAI for education, networking and assistance for managing their communities and the issues that they face. Without each of you, CAI certainly would not be what it is today. Thank you again for allowing me the pleasure to be a part of it all! May your New Year be bright and warmest wishes to you and your families in 2020! Sincerely,

Ken Zook Kenneth Zook, CMCA, AMS, PCAM 2019 President, CAI Central Florida Chapter

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4T H QUART ER 2019 RECAP | CENT RAL F LO R I D A TI M E S

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a message from the ced Chapter Updates

REINI MARSH Central Florida Chapter Executive Director

2020 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

MEETING PRICING CHANGES

I am pleased to announce the 2020 Board of Directors: • President: Matt Vice of Vice Painting • Vice President: Chuck Strode, CAM of Premier Association Management • President Elect: Frank Ruggieri, Esq. of The Ruggieri Law Firm • Secretary: Kent Taylor, CMCA, AMS, PCAM of Leland Management • Treasurer: Leslie Ellis, CPA, MSA, CGMA of Glickstein Laval Carris, P.A., CPAs • Jarad Pizzuti of Sihle Insurance • Lynne Sadowski of ServPro of SW Orlando • Robert L. Taylor, Esq. of Becker • Tom Wheir of The Great Outdoors Community • Ken Zook, CMCA, AMS, PCAM of Waterford Lakes Community Association

For the first half of 2020, the Chapter has decided to change up the pricing structure of monthly meetings for CAI Central Florida Chapter members. Manager members and Homeowner Leader members (HOA Board Members) will be able to attend the monthly breakfast or luncheon meetings free of charge. Business Partner members will pay a flat $30 fee per meeting (the chapter will absorb the Eventbrite fees). It is the goal of the Chapter to focus on the continued education of our members at the monthly meetings, so each presentation will be for CEU credit. Check out the slate of topics scheduled thus far on page 6 and save the dates to join us for breakfast or lunch this coming year!

PMDP IN OUR AREA Designed exclusively for community association managers, CAI’s Professional Management Development Program (PMDP) features the most comprehensive education curriculum for professional managers seeking to increase their skills, knowledge, and job opportunities. Our chapter is hosting this course soon!

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in advance. Visit www.caionline.org/m100 to register.

» For additional resources on opportunities for professional growth and education, visit the CAI Career Center at www.caionline.org/ CAICareerCenter.

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CE N TRAL F L O R I D A T I M ES | 4 TH Q UARTER 2 0 1 9 R ECAP

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4T H QUART ER 2019 RECAP | CENT RAL F LO R I D A TI M E S

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central florida chapter update 2020 calendar of events More details regarding upcoming events will be posted to caicf.org under the “Events” tab. Check back regularly for the most up-to-date information. CAICF Board Meetings will be held before or after each of the Monthly Meetings. Please be sure to register for all events in advance, as we need an accurate head count for space and food purposes prior to the event. Thank you for your help! • January 9th: Monthly Luncheon Meeting: Stress Less CEU

• April 16th: New Member Breakfast

presented by Betsy Barbeiux of Florida CAM Schools at Second Harvest Food Bank. (Please bring along a non-perishable or

• May 7th: Monthly Luncheon Meeting: Anatomy of a

canned food donation for the food bank!) Registration begins at

Community Project CEU presented by Garfinkel Whynot.

11:30am and the meeting begins at 12pm. Click here to register.

Registration begins at 11:30am and the meeting begins at 12pm.

• February 7th: CA Day & Trade Show: Movie Night Honoring the Stars of the Association at the Marriott World

• May 21st: Spring Social

Center in Orlando. CA Day is an annual trade show bridging the gap between Homeowner Leaders (board members), Community Managers, and the Business Partners that support them. Each booth will be participating in best booth designs and visitor engagement competitions. All of this is aimed at bringing a movie viewing type of experience to our annual trade show. There will be FREE Education Classes available to registered attendees from 9am-3:30pm, 129 vendor expo booths to visit from 1:30pm-5:30pm, thousands of dollars in raffle prize giveaways, and the After Party from 5:30pm-9pm. For more information, to become a sponsor of this awesome event, purchase a booth, or register to attend at caicf.org! See pages 26-29 for more details! • March 5th: Monthly Meeting: Legal Update CEU presented by Frank Ruggieri of Ruggieri Law Firm. • April 2nd: Monthly Meeting: Sitting for a Deposition CEU presented by Burg Simpson.

• June 4th: Monthly Meeting: Panel Before and After the Storm presented by Negar Sharifi and Tara Munoz. • July 16th: Meet the Managers from 4pm-7pm. • August 6th: Monthly Meeting: Drones & Communities CEU presented by Arias Bosinger. • August TBD: Educated Business Partner Event • September 3rd: Monthly Meeting • September TBD: 10th Annual Golf Tournament • October 1st: Monthly Meeting: Legal Panel • November 5th: Monthly Meeting • December TBD: Annual Meeting, Gala & Fundraiser

SPONSOR AN UPCOMING CHAPTER MEETING IN 2020! Each sponsor for the Chapter Meetings receive face time in front of the membership with the microphone to talk about your company. You will also be able to put give-away items and collateral on all the tables. Space is also provided for our sponsors to display their marketing materials. Every sponsor is important to our chapter and your generous donation goes directly to off set the costs of the program. Only 3 sponsors are permitted per program. Please consider sponsoring today! Click the links below to register as a sponsor at one of the upcoming meetings!

Jan 9th | Mar 5th | Apr 2nd | May 7th | Jun 4th | Aug 6th | Sep 3rd | Oct 1st | Nov 5th

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CE N TRAL F L O R I D A T I M ES | 4 TH Q UARTER 2 0 1 9 R ECAP


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4T H QUART ER 2019 RECAP | CENT RAL F LO R I D A TI M E S

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taxes BY MARC WHITFIELD, CPA, STROEMER & COMPANY, LLC

FAQs FAQs MY ASSOCIATION IS A NOT FOR PROFIT, ARE WE TAX EXEMPT? Associations are typically incorporated under Florida Statutes 617 as a not for profit. This is not a federal designation, and the Internal Revenue Service deems association’s as a taxable entity and expects to receive a tax return for them. Exempt organizations are 501(c)(3) entities, which are typically charitable, religious or educational industries.

DOES MY ASSOCIATION HAVE TO FILE AN ANNUAL TAX RETURN? WE ARE A NOT FOR PROFIT AND DON’T MAKE ANY MONEY. Yes, all associations are required to file a tax return, regardless of the amount of revenue or tax due. The association is considered by the Internal Revenue Service as a corporation that is required to file a tax return annually. The Association can file a form 1120 or if they qualify an 1120-H. Most associations file the form 1120, however the form 1120-H may be filed by the Association if they meet the 4 requirements, which most do.

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE 1120 AND 1120-H? With an 1120, income is split into member and non-member categories along with corresponding expenses. Member and nonmember net profit is then taxed at graduated tax rates starting at 15% up to 39%. The association can make an election to avoid taxation on its excess member income by either refunding it to members or carrying over the excess to the following year’s assessments, however, certain requirements must be met. With 8

CE N TRAL F L O R I D A T I M ES | 4 TH Q UARTER 2 0 1 9 R ECAP

an 1120-H, income is split into exempt and non-exempt categories and the net is taxed at a flat 30% tax rate less a $100 exemption. The Association must meet the four criteria test in order to file an 1120-H.

WHAT IS REVENUE RULING 70-604? This is an IRS revenue ruling that allows the Association to avoid taxation in its “inadvertent” excess member income by either refunding it to members or carrying over the excess to the following year and reducing operating assessments. This is a single year election and if made, the association should show a loss in year 2 equal or greater than the excess member income in year 1. The excess in year 1 would not be taxable, but if the loss in year 2 is not equal or greater than the loss in year 1, the excess would be taxable. An election under 70-604 to transfer any excess member income to reserves does not exempt its treatment as taxable income.

HOW DOES THE ASSOCIATION MAKE THE REVENUE RULING 70-604 ELECTION? The election should be made by the members in the form of a resolution and ratified by the Board. The dollar amount does not have to be specified, and the election should be made before the filing of the return, include the extension.

Mark Whitfield is a CPA with Stroemer & Company, LLC Certified Public Accountants / Consultants. For more information, visit stroemerspa.com.


4T H QUART ER 2019 RECAP | CENT RAL F LO R I D A TI M E S

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budget planning BY KAREN MARTINEZ, CEO OF ASPM-SAN​ DIEGO

Tips to Take Charge of Your HOA’s Budget Planning Process

Y

our association’s budget impacts the financial and physical health of the community and residents’ property values. The budget is the first, crucial step to restoring aged, oncebeautiful communities to their former glory, and it determines the enjoyment residents will derive from their community. Association boards can take several steps to optimize their operating budget to save money and improve the community. Get started with these 10 steps.

are established line items that remain from year to year. Items to improve the community or satisfy the residents will differ annually, so arrange them in rank order for budgeting purposes.

2. DETERMINE ASSESSMENTS One of the purposes of drafting an annual budget is to determine what the annual assessment will be. How the assessment is allocated to each unit (ownership basis or equal division) and payment frequency (monthly, quarterly, annually) will be specified in the governing documents.

1. SET GOALS In reviewing the association’s budget each year, it’s critical that boards plan for long-term goals and challenges to avoid maintenance and financial issues that could cause unreasonable hardship for residents. As well as addressing prevention, long-term planning is an opportunity to substantially upgrade the community and increase property values, with the added benefit of increasing residents’ quality of life. The community should answer the following questions: • What expenses must the association cover? • What other expenses could it cover to improve the community or satisfy residents? This list will become the line items in the association’s budget. Expenses that must be covered—utilities, taxes, maintenance— 10

CE N TRAL F L O R I D A T I M ES | 4 TH Q UARTER 2 0 1 9 R ECAP

In some communities, the basic equation for determining association assessments is as simple as totaling your total operating expenses and the annual reserve contribution, then dividing by the percentage of ownership. Instead of starting with your income first and then planning for expenses, an association must estimate costs first and then determine their revenue source, most of which is made up of assessments. To start with income first may create a budget shortfall the next year and, ultimately, require levying a special assessment to cover costs. Once you determine your annual assessment, examine the number. Is it the same or close to the same as what you charged last year? If so, that’s a good sign for your budget. If not, it’s time to make revisions to your assessments or budget.


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4T H QUART ER 2019 RECAP | CENT RAL F LO R I D A TI M E S

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budget planning cont. • Replace dilapidated or broken gates, fencing, and retainer walls • Repair damaged stucco or wood throughout the exterior • Replace faded, torn, or stained poolside cushions • Consistently enforce resident violations that degrade common area and exterior aesthetics of the property

6. SPEND MONEY TO SAVE MONEY Many cost-saving measures require an investment in newer or improved systems or materials. Long-term planning becomes important, especially if the investment is to be spread over several budget cycles. Always keep residents informed about the decisions behind cost cutting, and cut wisely.

3. LOOK FOR TRENDS IN PAST BUDGETS In addition to a current year’s budget, boards should examine each line item cost in their association’s budget within the past five years. Note any trends. This will help anticipate future costs that may impact the operating budget and reserves beyond the current year.

4. REVIEW COLLECTIONS PROCEDURES Closely examine your collections policies. Reducing bad debt, such as delinquencies, can save your community money. However, collection expenses and legal fees to pursue bad debt create a line-item expense in the budget, and that expense is integrally tied to estimating bad debt—that is, the less spent on collections, the more delinquencies the association can expect. Watch for a tipping point where collection costs approach the amount to be recovered. Ideally, your delinquency rate should not exceed 5%. If it does, be sure late fees are being charged consistently, and consider tightening your collections policies.

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Your community might consider conducting an energy audit to identify inefficiencies and implement energy-saving practices. Many communities, for example, have been converting commonarea lighting from incandescent and fluorescent bulbs to LEDs. A few other ideas include: • Water and Landscaping. Gradually change out waterintensive vegetation in favor of water-wise landscapes. These will not only require less water but also require less maintenance, which can significantly reduce landscape maintenance costs. • Smart Pool Systems. If your community has a pool and spa, consider converting to a smart system to operate systems automatically to reduce cost and manual management time and expense. • Solar. Installing solar panels can reduce the cost of lighting and electrical features, as well as pool and spa operations. • Bundle Services. Internet, cable, and waste removal vendors often offer reduced pricing at community bulk rates.

7. INVEST IN SMART PROJECTS In your community’s long-range plans and goal-setting, you should be thinking about any capital improvements that enhance residents’ lives and boost property values.

5. DON’T DEFER MAINTENANCE

Capital improvements are typically large, expensive projects, and sometimes members must approve them. Reserve funds cannot be used to pay for a capital improvement unless a reserve fund was established specifically for the project.

Attaining top market values and ensuring residents’ quality of life requires that the community be well-maintained and aesthetically pleasing. Allocate a portion of the operating budget for regular housekeeping items, such as: • Rotating exterior painting to keep the exterior fresh and vibrant

Many communities, for example, are installing electric vehicle charging stations. As electric vehicles become more popular, associations will need to accommodate the trend—whether due to owner demand or legislative requirements. Some states and companies offer rebate programs for charging stations. Do your research.

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8. KEEP AN EYE ON YOUR FUNDS

10. CONSULT THE EXPERTS

Strive to maintain three months of budgeted operating expenses. This should include housekeeping tasks like painting, repair, and landscape and lighting conversions. There is no need to allocate reserves for these when they can be addressed in the operating budget.

Your community manager, accountant, reserves specialist, attorney, and other business partners can help boards develop and fine tune their budgets. They can help you set affordable goals for the property, bolstered by realistic, comprehensive fiscal and maintenance schedules.

9. RAISE ASSESSMENTS OR LEVY A SPECIAL ASSESSMENT Don’t hesitate to raise monthly assessments to set your community on a permanent path to fiscal and physical integrity.

Ultimately, however, the board needs to understand what they’re doing, how, and why. The board has the responsibility for the association’s finances. It has a fiduciary duty to review, monitor, and follow the budget.

Failing to raise assessments to cover actual expenses is a breach of fiduciary duty on the board’s part. It’s also a breach of contract with owners who expect the board to protect their assets.

Reprinted

with

permission

from

Community

Assocation

Institute’s

HOAResources.com, which explores questions and comments from community

You might consider minimal annual assessment increases, about level with inflation. By increasing assessments 2–5% per year— rather than 10–15% in two to five years—the increases are spread out over the time of ownership. Special assessments should always be a last-resort funding option, not a stopgap for budget shortfalls.

association members living in condominiums, homeowners associations, and housing cooperatives. We then assemble trusted experts to provide practical solutions to your most commonly asked, timely questions. We never use real names, but we always tackle real issues. For more information, visit HOAResources.com or contact Laura Otto at LOtto@caionline.org.

4T H QUART ER 2019 RECAP | CENT RAL F LO R I D A TI M E S

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4T H QUART ER 2019 RECAP | CENT RAL F LO R I D A TI M E S

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Items Below Subject to Change without Notice

Set Design - Decor Sponsor

After Party Sponsors

$ 2, 00 0 - 1 AVAILAB LE

$3 ,000 - 1 O F 2 AVAI L ABL E

» Logo and company name on select promotional materials, Chapter website, and select Chapter emails » 1/2 page, full color ad in the Trade Show program » Logo on the CAICF Trade Show ad in the Florida Community Association Journal » One (1) free parking pass for day of show » Highlighted as sponsor in the Trade Show program » Sponsor signage at the front entrance and at the Decor area » Sponsor recognized at the monthly Chapter meetings » May provide material to insert in approximately 1,200 Trade Show bags » Sponsor signage in booth

» Logo and company name on select promotional materials, Chapter website, and select Chapter emails » Full page, full color ad in the Trade Show program » Logo on approximately 17,000 mailers/tickets that are distributed via mail and delivered to board members and CAMs » Logo on the CAICF Trade Show ad in the Florida Community Association Journal » Two (2) parking passes for day of show » Highlighted as sponsor in the Trade Show program » Sponsor signage at the front entrance and at the After Party » After Party wristbands to be printed with sponsor’s logo » Privilege of providing beverage napkins with company logo at the After Party event » Sponsor recognized at the monthly Chapter meetings » May provide material to insert in approximately 1,200 Trade Show bags. » Sponsor signage in booth

Executive Producer Sponsors $500 - 10 AVAI L ABL E » Logo and company name on select promotional materials, Chapter website, and select Chapter emails » Business card size, full color ad in the Trade Show program » Highlighted as sponsor in the Trade Show program » Signage at the front entrance » Sponsor recognized at the monthly Chapter meetings » May provide material to insert in 1,200 Trade Show bags » Sponsor signage in booth

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Items Below Subject to Change without Notice

Cinematographer Photo Booth Sponsor

Bar Sponsors $1,2 00 - 4 AVAI L ABL E

$ 1 , 5 0 0 - 1 AVA ILA B LE » Logo and company name on select promotional materials, Chapter website, and select Chapter emails » 1/2 page, full color ad in the Trade Show program » Logo on the CAICF Trade Show ad in the Florida Community Association Journal » One (1) parking passes for day of show » Company name on all photos » Highlighted as sponsor in the Trade Show program » Sponsor signage at the front entrance and at the photo booth » Sponsor recognized at the monthly Chapter meetings » May provide material to insert in approximately 1,200 Trade Show bags » Sponsor signage in booth

Classroom Sponsors

» Logo and company name on select promotional materials, Chapter website, and select Chapter emails » 1/2 page, full color ad in the Trade Show program » One (1) free parking pass for day of show » Highlighted as sponsor in the Trade Show program » Signage at the front entrance and at the Bar area » Privilege of providing beverage napkins with company logo at the Trade Show Bar » Sponsor recognized at the monthly Chapter meetings » May provide material to insert in approximately 1,200 Trade Show bags » Sponsor signage in booth

Concession Sponsor Classroom Snacks $2 ,2 00 - 1 AVAI L ABL E

C la s s ro o m P r e se nte r : $8 0 0 Leg al Pa n e l Sp o ns o r : $9 0 0 C E U S p o n s o r : $9 0 0 B oa r d Ce r t i f i c ati o n S p o n s o r : $1,3 00 » Exclusive company specific » Business card size, full color ad in the Trade Show program » Ability to leave marketing material at each seat » Five minutes to introduce your company at the beginning of class » Highlighted as sponsor in the Trade Show program » Signage outside of classroom space » Sponsor recognized at the monthly Chapter meetings » May provide material to insert in approximately 1,200 Trade Show bags » Sponsor signage in booth

» Greet attendees in the Lobby Area outside the classrooms » Five minutes to introduce your company at the beginning of class » Logo and company name on select promotional materials, Chapter website, and select Chapter emails » 1/2 page, full color ad in the Trade Show program » One (1) free parking pass for day of show. » Highlighted as sponsor in the Trade Show program » Signage outside of classroom area » Privilege of providing beverage napkins with company logo at the Concession Snack area » Sponsor recognized at the monthly Chapter meetings » May provide material to insert in 1,200 Trade Show bags » Sponsor signage in booth

Register for at caicf.org 4T H QUART ER 2019 RECAP | CENT RAL F LO R I D A TI M E S

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board transition BY SPERLONGA DATA & ANALYTICS

Assisting a New HOA Board During Transition

B

eing a board member may be a volunteer position, but a vital one that helps maintain the health, appearance and property values of your community.

Many homeowners associations having annual meetings in the fall, so the early winter is spent with newly minted directors “getting their feet wet” learning their responsibilities. As members, especially if they have attended meetings already, most directors know a small part of “the drill,” such as posting announcements and holding quarterly board meetings, but the intricacies involve a lot more than what is on the surface in a meeting agenda. This is why it is vital for new directors to obtain as much information from the property manager, current board members, and retiring directors. Previous members of the board of directors will no doubt spend the first quarter of their retirement being besieged by questions from new directors. It, therefore, helps that the retired directors have as much documentation at the ready, as well as to give the newly elected director the property management company’s website URL to be able to view detailed responsibilities of each member of the board.

DOCUMENTS PROVIDING CONTINUITY Along with providing a website URL to learn the basics, incumbent 18

CE N TRAL F L O R I D A T I M ES | 4 TH Q UARTER 2 0 1 9 R ECAP

board members who are transitioning out of their positions on the board should compile, during their tenures, a digital (if possible) folder of documents and correspondences over their tenure with regard to contracts with vendors, a list of preferred vendors, invoices, minutes and meeting agendas, and other letters and emails between members and directors or members and the property manager having to do with complaints, fees and/or maintenance issues. Executive session documentation is confidential and should be kept between the directors and property management. Don’t forget the most basic source of information and community structure: the community CC&Rs. These are vital for learning how to govern the HOA, from assessments to fees, reserves, board meetings, agendas, and elections.

FINANCIAL AND SECURITY INFORMATION Those who are transitioning into the role of board treasurer should discuss financials and receive a copy of at least 2-3 years of the association’s budget from either the outgoing treasurer or the property manager. If the HOA has low reserves, the beginning of the new directors’ term is a good time to learn why funding is lacking, and what is being done to address it. It’s a good idea for a property management accounting employee with bank documents to attend the HOA annual meeting so that new


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board transition continued are regarding projects and how they affect the members of the community, the more effective they will be at their jobs. Property managers will usually have a comprehensive list of preferred vendors for their communities: plumbers, electricians, handymen, security specialists, and landscapers. In addition, they should have a list of contacts at City Hall when assistance is needed with permitting, trash disposal, tree removal or other items requiring city approvals or permits. In the event of afterhours emergency when immediate help is needed, 24-hour vendor information is extremely important to have at hand.  

SEEK EDUCATIONAL SOURCES

directors can become signatories and bills remain paid in a timely manner. Be sure to also obtain the latest reserve study. In general, depending on your governing documents or state, reserve studies are conducted yearly or every other year. If there are any keys to secure areas such as phone wiring boxes, security systems, gates, pool houses, or fire extinguisher boxes, they should be turned over to the new director(s). New directors should also download cell phone apps with access to security system camera if applicable.  

Directors - in fact, most homeowners - are extremely busy people, and as such can’t always be present to assist fledgling board members with questions. With this in mind, there are many alternatives. First, property managers are invaluable sources of information. They will possess a broad knowledge of your property’s history and how various issues are handled. They may also have seminars or webinars available for new directors. They should also be able to provide new directors with outside source material on other websites, such as for the state, or other informational sites specific to the state that contains statutes and advisories on how to implement those statutes. Being a board member is work that carries with it serious fiduciary responsibilities, so while the becoming a director offers an excellent opportunity to get to know your neighbors and community better, it ultimately means diplomacy and sobriety are necessary. The job may be a volunteer position, but a vital one that helps maintain the health, appearance and property values of your community. As a new member, you’ll appreciate the time and effort other directors put into making your living space a better place.

BASIC INFORMATION: NEIGHBORS AND VENDORS As a director, it’s important to keep the lines of communication open with your fellow members, hence one of the first bits of information to obtain is a complete list of homeowners (and renters) in your community. Absentee landlords should be able to share renter names and phone numbers with renter permission. In case of emergencies or other issues that may cause inconvenience, it’s important to have both phone numbers AND email addresses. If, for example, your parking lot security gate will undergo maintenance between specific hours, it’s important to get the word out so that residents can park their vehicles elsewhere. Likewise, if a sewer issue requires immediate attention and residents’ water must be turned off temporarily. The more informed directors 20

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Disclaimer: This article is intended for general information purposes only and does not necessarily represent the thoughts, views or opinions of Sperlonga Data & Analytics and should not be construed as legal advice. For more articles like this one, please visit www.sperlongadata.com/blog.


Creating complete customized insurance programs for community associations. www.assuredpartners.com

NEGAR SHARIFI

Senior Vice President P: (407) 440-0928 negar.sharifi@assuredpartners.com

PHIL MASI

Senior Vice President P: (407) 278-1627 phil.masi@assuredpartners.com

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welcome new members! BUSINESS PARTNERS Affinity CPA, P.A. Mr. Michael Demare

ProGreen Services, LLC Ms. Maria Nielsen Renovia Mr. Chris Hall

All American Water Restoration, Inc. Mr. Roberto Supertino Dueall Construction Mr. Paul Melville

Securitas Security Services USA, Inc Ms. Lauren Winter Sperlonga Data & Analytics Systems, LLC Mr. Edmund LaFrance, CMCA

EagleHawk Mr. Mark Kramer

Westwood Exterior Solutions, Inc Mr. Ryan Lolly

Fahrner Asphalt Sealers Mr. Jacob Stockwell Five Star Claims Adjusting Mrs. Chelsee Camero Goliath Protective Services, LLC Mrs. Monica Rendon Green Bay Decking LLC Mr. Gary J. Daley

ZeroDelinquency.com The Association Resource Mr. Josh Bateman

MANAGER MEMBERS Mr. Lee E Graffius Mr. Ryan Kerlin

Ms. Kaitlin Marshall Leland Management, Inc. Mrs. Sabrina Hughes, CMCA Leland Management, Inc. Ms. Lauren Wheeler Leland Management, Inc. Ms. Tatiana Anderson Vesta Property Services, Inc.

VOLUNTEER LEADERS Mr. Stephen Kloth, Jr. Mr. John Hepp The Lemon Tree -1 Condominium Association, Inc.

Mr. David Pierce

Mr. Brian Humphries The Lemon Tree -1 Condominium Association, Inc.

Mr. Hamid Medrano Community Management Professionals-Orlando

Mr. Husain Jaffer The Lemon Tree -1 Condominium Association, Inc.

Kris Konstruction, Inc. Norkus Solutions Mr. Joshua David Newman

Mr. Jason Edward Stahl, CMCA KW Property Management and Consulting

Introducing a NEW CAI benefit

Information and tools for condominium and homeowners association leaders VISIT WWW.HOARESOURCES.COM TO GET: z Practical advice on HOA & condo issues z Resources to share with residents z New content updated regularly Share www.HOAresources.com with your neighbors, friends, family, and co-workers today!

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maintenance BY ADAM ROBINSON, CO-OWNER OF ARK MANAGEMENT

Tips for Fixing Aging Fences

F

ences provide privacy, boost safety and security, and can add just the right aesthetic touch to the landscape. But they also require maintenance, repair, and replacement. Fencing can be an ongoing problem for all associations, especially as communities age.

The existing wrought iron fence was installed in 1990, and originally was painted with two-part epoxy paint that lasted for approximately nine years. Subsequently, the fence was painted in 1999 with Frazee Aro-Plate paint, which did not last as long and is currently failing.

Associations must budget for the care of these integral structures. Deciding when and how to repair your fencing, replace worn down or rotting parts or hire someone to handle maintenance can mean the difference between meeting or exceeding your annual budget.

The association sought to find a long-term, sustainable process for managing its fence maintenance and repair budget. With the assistance of its management company, the association conducted a study and analysis to review the fencing asset and refurbishing project. The association was using a deferred maintenance-only approach for the community’s 28,000 linear feet of fencing, which comprises approximately 2,600 four-by-four wooden posts and nearly 3,200 iron panels. The fence was being repaired only when there was noticeable damage or paint erosion, which is often costly and inefficient.

When faced with aging fencing and the high costs of replacement, associations have to form a strategic plan of action to ensure a costeffective use of operating funds, while employing an effective use of reserve funds.

FINDING A FIX A community of approximately 700 single-family homes located in North San Diego, Calif., was recently faced with the challenge of developing a long-term strategy for managing its fences. Like many communities, this particular association had been allocating resources for fencing only through reserve funds, and solely on the basis of major component replacement and repair. 26

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Under the deferred maintenance and replacement approach, which was dictated by a previous reserve study, fencing was broken into four categories: phase one, phase two, phase three and pool fencing. All fencing components had a remaining life of two to seven years with a total replacement cost of more than $1.6 million. All the wrought iron fencing was slated for painting costs of $180,000 every five years using


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maintenance continued reserve funds. Until recently, the association did not incorporate into the operating budget a proactive annual maintenance component to coincide with strategic designations of reserve capital. Previously, when a homeowner submitted a request for fence repairs near or around his or her home, the process from initial review of the request to completion usually took two months or more. To begin to resolve the inherent problems in that approach, the association needed to investigate the costs related to a broader scope of fence overhaul and repairs. The association collected three bids to bring the fence to like-new condition using reserve capital and then budget funds from the operating account for ongoing maintenance. The association’s reserve study analysts deemed the funding strategy acceptable upon the premise that the maintenance program would be reviewed on an annual basis.

In addition, the association allotted $100,000 every eight years in the reserve funds as a strategic designation of capital that allows for catastrophic fence failure or other needs. In total, the association will designate approximately $1.6 million for fence repairs over the next 30 years. This new program shares the cost between the reserve funds and operating budget. It’s the most cost-effective and desirable way to maintain the fence for the life of the homeowners association. The new, ongoing fence maintenance program addresses several major issues that the association had been facing. The program allows for improved service to residents by greatly reducing the need for delayed emergency repairs, and it will save the association more than $500,000 in maintenance costs over 30 years. Finally, by allocating fence repair and maintenance costs to both operating and reserve funds, rather than the previous reserve funded-only “major component and repair” line item, this program has raised the association’s reserve funding level more than 30%.

PROBLEM SOLVED The association started using an immediate portion of reserve funding—approximately 25% of the $1.6 million estimated for complete replacement—to update its fences. The association allocated enough reserve funds to add a buffer to all of the contractor bids. It wanted to allow enough room in case there were rising costs. In addition to the earmarked funds to replace the fencing, all of the bids included quotes to maintain the fencing in a like-new condition for an indefinite period of time.

Reprinted

with

permission

from

Community

Assocation

Institute’s

HOAResources.com, which explores questions and comments from community association members living in condominiums, homeowners associations, and housing cooperatives. We then assemble trusted experts to provide practical solutions to your most commonly asked, timely questions. We never use real names, but we always tackle real issues. For more information, visit HOAResources.com or contact Laura Otto at LOtto@caionline.org.

Be sure to update

your board’s member names, titles (President, Vice President, Treasurer, Secretary, and Board Member), and contact information to ensure your board members receive all the latest CAI member benefits!

Update today: ONLINE at www.caionline.org EMAIL addresschanges@caionline.org MAIL to CAI, P.O. Box 34793, Alexandria, VA 22334-0793

Have your community association board members changed since last year? 28

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CAI CENTRAL FLORIDA CHAPTER MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS In addition to the many perks associated with a National CAI Membership, your local Central Florida Chapter offers even more value and engagement to its members:

HOMEOWNER VOLUNTEERS

COMMUNITY MANAGERS

If three members from the same board join the chapter, your first year of membership dues are FREE

CAICF will pay for HALF of your manager tuition fees for required education credits

MANAGEMENT COMPANIES

BUSINESS PARTNERS

Company recognition & networking Maximize business brand opportunities with current & recognition & enjoy exclusive potential clients, as well as face-to-face networking industry-specific business partners opportunities with potential clients

LOCAL CHAPTER EDUCATION AND NETWORKING EVENTS Quarterly Board Certification classes CEU credit hours at specified luncheon events Participation opportunity at the Annual Golf Outing Invitation to the Summer Social & Annual Gala Admission and exclusive perks at one of the best community association tradeshows in Central Florida

Opportunity to attend and speak at panels, Q&A sessions, education classes, and Business Roundtable events Participation & sponsorship opportunities at the Annual Golf Outing Invitation to the Summer Social & Annual Gala Admission, exclusive booth vendor pricing, and sponsorship opportunities at one of the best community association tradeshows in Central Florida

Professional Designations & Certifications Local Professional Management Development Program Classes Quarterly Board Certification classes CEU credit hours at specified luncheon events

ACCESS TO SPECIALIZED COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION SERVICE PROVIDERS Online service directory Personal interaction at monthly events Panels and Q&A sessions

SPONSORSHIP & MARKETING OPPORTUNITIES In addition to brand recognition, sponsors enjoy benefits like a free booth at the trade show, advertising opportunities, first consideration at speaking events, discounted pricing for future sponsorships and events & advertising on the chapter website Inclusion in the Service Directory

INCLUSION IN ONE OF THE LARGEST CHAPTERS IN THE US ENCOMPASSING OVER 7,500 HOA & CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATIONS IN MARION, VOLUSIA, SEMINOLE, ORANGE, BREVARD, OSCEOLA, POLK, LAKE & SUMTER COUNTIES!

Interested in joining the CAI Central Florida Chapter? For assistance or more information, reach out to the Executive Director by calling 407-850-0106 or e-mailing at exdir@caicf.org. To join now, visit www.caionline.org for membership categories and dues. Prior to joining online you will be prompted to log in or create an account. Membership dues are non-refundable. 30

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Some say first impressions are everything. We say it’s the lasting ones that count. Be confident about the message your landscape sends. Partner with our team of landscape experts whose tailor-made solutions, dependable service and consistent results ensure your resident’s first experience is never their last. Susan Chapman 407 702 4929 Susan.Chapman@brightview.com

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Do you want to become

a better board member? We’ve got you covered! Robert Riddick, the Foundation’s President-Elect, is a volunteer board member in his community and has relied on Foundation Best Practice Reports to navigate the good, bad, and ugly situations that have developed over the years in his own association, all while improving the quality of his neighborhood.

Or earn your PCAM? Former Educator of the Year Paul Grucza, also a Foundation board member, shares that Best Practice Reports are an important component of CAI’s education curriculum.

Then, check us out at www.foundation. caionline.org where you can access our free reports and show off your

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Donate to the Foundation’s Big Picture campaign with a gift as little as $40 and your peers, colleagues, and clients will know that you make decisions based on factual data that has already been tested, vetted, and approved!

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An INNOVATIVE approach can yield truly AMAZING results. At Cogent Bank, we believe the human side of technology is as important as the technology itself. Come experience state-of-the-art banking with a human touch.

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interested in getting more involved? join a caicf committee! If you are interested in getting more involved in the chapter, joining a committee is a great thing to consider. Below are the different committees that we currently have active. Please feel free to contact any of the following committee chairs: CA Day/Trade Show Committee Gina Holbrook Premier Association Management gina.holbrook@premiermgmtcfl.com Chuck Strode Premier Association Management chuck@premiermgmtcfl.com Communications Committee Benjamin Isip Towers Property Management, Inc. ben@towerspropertymgmt.com Education Committee Gary van der Laan Leland Management gvanderlaan@lelandmanagement.com Phil Masi Assured Partners pmasi@assuredptr.com

Gala Committee Lou Biron Sihle Insurance Group lbiron@sihle.com

Membership Committee Jason Martell Martell & Ozim jmartell@martellandozim.com

Golf Committee Scott Pollock Sentry Management spollock@sentrymgt.com Legislative Committee Lou Biron Sihle Insurance Group lbiron@sihle.com

Jessica Cox Leland Management jcox@lelandmanagement.com Social Committee Tara Munoz Your Private Adjustor tara@yourprivateadjuster.com

Meet the Managers Committee Chuck Strode Premier Association Management chuck@premiermgmtcfl.com

Sunshine Foundation Committee Jennifer Agravat Asphalt Restoration Technology Systems jennifer.agravat@asphaltnews.com

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CAICF | 4th Quarter 2019 Recap  

CAICF | 4th Quarter 2019 Recap