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@military_cots

John McHale

Technology Update

Dragonflies and missile defense

Mil Tech Trends

Key radar test considerations

Industry Spotlight

Military supply chain and security MIL-EMBEDDED.COM

2019 RESOURCE GUIDE

Shipboard electronics evolve to match the pace of threat

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Open architectures, standards for space

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September 2018 | Volume 15 | Number 6

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P 34 Test and evaluation of advanced radar systems By Tony Girard, Mercury Systems

Obsolete and counterfeit electronics remain challenges for the military P 42


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Volume 15 Number 6

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September 2019

COLUMNS

SPECIAL REPORT

Editor’s Perspective 8 Open architectures and standards for space

Shipboard Electronics 18 Shipboard electronics evolve to match the pace of threat

By John McHale

By Emma Helfrich, Associate Editor

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Technology Update 10 Do dragonflies hold the secret to better missile defense?

RF converters – a technology enabling wideband radios By Daniel E. Fague and Steven Rose, Analog Devices

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By Sally Cole

MIL TECH TRENDS

Mil Tech Insider 12 Managing next-generation open standard vehicle electronics architectures

Test and Measurement Trends 30 Multicore processors in the mission-critical context By Dr. Guillem Bernat, Rapita Systems

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By David Jedynak, Curtiss-Wright Defense Solutions; Charlie Kawasaki, Pacific Star Communications; and David Gregory, Pacific Star Communications

Test and evaluation of advanced radar systems By Tony Girard, Mercury Systems

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Key considerations in radar test By Alex Western, National Instruments

DEPARTMENTS

INDUSTRY SPOTLIGHT

Managing Supply Chain; Obsolescence; Counterfeits Parts 42 Obsolete and counterfeit electronics remain challenges for the military By Sally Cole, Senior Editor

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As the military supply chain expands, so does the information security risk

14

Defense Tech Wire

98

Connecting with Mil Embedded

By Emma Helfrich

By Mil-Embedded.com Editorial Staff

PG 50 RESOURCE GUIDE

By Kevin Deal, IFS North America

WEB RESOURCES Subscribe to the magazine or E-letter Live industry news | Submit new products http://submit.opensystemsmedia.com White papers: Read: http://mil-embedded.com/white-papers/ Submit: http://submit.opensystemsmedia.com

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ON THE COVER: Top image: As the threat environment for the U.S. Navy – and modern warfare as a whole – continues to evolve, electronics aboard ships must keep up in order to address electronic warfare (EW) concerns. Photo of the U.S. Navy’s Littoral Combat Ship (LCS): Lockheed Martin. Bottom image: Nondestructive testing solutions are emerging to help detect counterfeit electronics that may be destined for use in legacy military electronics systems.

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GROUP EDITORIAL DIRECTOR John McHale john.mchale@opensysmedia.com ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR Lisa Daigle lisa.daigle@opensysmedia.com SENIOR EDITOR Sally Cole sally.cole@opensysmedia.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR Emma Helfrich emma.helfrich@opensysmedia.com DIRECTOR OF E-CAST LEAD GENERATION AND AUDIENCE ENGAGEMENT Joy Gilmore joy.gilmore@opensysmedia.com ONLINE EVENTS SPECIALIST Sam Vukobratovich sam.vukobratovich@opensysmedia.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR Stephanie Sweet stephanie.sweet@opensysmedia.com SENIOR WEB DEVELOPER Aaron Ganschow aaron.ganschow@opensysmedia.com WEB DEVELOPER Paul Nelson paul.nelson@opensysmedia.com CONTRIBUTING DESIGNER Joann Toth joann.toth@opensysmedia.com EMAIL MARKETING SPECIALIST Drew Kaufman drew.kaufman@opensysmedia.com VITA EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Jerry Gipper jerry.gipper@opensysmedia.com

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EDITOR’S PERSPECTIVE

Open architectures and standards for space By John McHale, Editorial Director Open architecture initiatives and open standards are regularly discussed in this space, but I don’t often get to discuss them with an open architecture guru such as Patrick Collier, one of the minds behind the Sensor Open Systems Architecture (SOSA) initiative and the OpenVPX standard, like I did in a recent podcast on “Open Architectures in Space.” Collier, who previously worked for the government pushing open architectures, is now an open systems architect with Harris Corp., where he continues to help the industry from the inside, working to move users to an area where they start heavily leveraging open architectures. During the podcast – part of a series called the New Space Race – we chatted about SpaceVPX, SpaceVNX, Collier’s work on SOSA, and the possibility of applying SOSA to space applications. I share part of that discussion below. (To listen to the podcast, visit windriver.com/new-space-race.) Collier told me the most common roadblock he found in getting open architecture initiatives off the ground has not been a technical one, but is more of a mindset challenge. “If you look at it, these are not technically hard problems,” Collier said. “They’re not things that require a lot of research and development. They are engineering efforts. It’s really about getting all the people involved to change their mindset, to get them essentially out of their comfort zone, to start to think differently. They’re used to doing things a certain way. What we wanted to do is to have them stop and re-orient themselves, and start to think about how you do, or build, or design these systems differently. It’s essentially getting the people and the organizations to change.” Collier, along with the VITA Standards Organization, developed the SpaceVPX standard (VITA 78) and is now working on developing a space version of the VNX (VITA 74) standard. “VNX was an interesting kind of animal [as it] is tied more to commercial applications, even though the defense industry and the DoD are interested in using CubeSats and SmallSats,” he said. The roadblock remains the same, as Collier told me he is “just trying to get a good group of people together that understand and are passionate about developing a small-form-factor standard for space. “I found that finding the right group that wants to virtually sit down and start working toward the standard to be the hardest part, but we’ve finally done that,” he continued. “We have a group right now that’s motivated to see it through. There is

8 September 2019

“It’s really about getting all the people involved to change their mindset, to get them essentially out of their comfort zone, to start to think differently.” – Patrick Collier, SOSA cofounder

energy to want to do this and the price points are going down. That’s why I believe that this standard will be of benefit.” Open architecture initiatives for defense and space applications We also chatted about how SOSA and the U.S. Navy’s Hardware Open Systems Technologies (HOST) initiatives for the defense industry are progressing. “Both efforts are going quite well,” Collier said. “There’s a lot of alignment between them right now. [With SOSA] all the services are involved as well as their contractors. We’re seeing a lot of alignment between those two standards efforts and even between SOSA and VITA 65. So, there’s this convergence that’s going on, which has been the one thing that I and others at NAVAIR focused on. “You’re seeing all the services and other organizations getting together,” he added. “They understand that this is the way that we need to go. We need to make sure that we do it the right way and that means getting industry involved and getting them to willingly want to do it on their own, so it’s organic.” I also asked Collier if we would see any efforts to extend SOSA to the space industry. He said he “proposed it to the consortium, and they agreed, since it was a low-level exercise at this point.” Collier noted that papers have been presented on modeling CubeSats with the SOSA architecture. “We’re pushing this slowly, but surely,” he said. “We hope to see this section of SOSA grow and start to market and serve the space industry. And from what we’ve heard, there’s an interest in doing so. Who knows – it may be that like with everything else we’ve done in SOSA: That if we can leverage an existing standard and use that, they will do it. Maybe SOSA will start to leverage VITA 78, maybe it’ll start to leverage some of the other standards, and then we’ll have this SOSA version of what we consider to be a space architecture.” To learn more about SOSA, visit www.opengroup.org/sosa. To learn more about SpaceVPX and other VITA standards, visit www.vita.com.

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TECHNOLOGY UPDATE

Do dragonflies hold the secret to better missile defense? By Sally Cole, Senior Editor A researcher at Sandia National Laboratories is exploring how dragonfly brains might be wired to be extremely efficient at calculating complex trajectories. Dragonflies were among the first winged insects to emerge 300 million years ago, predating dinosaurs, and are wellknown as excellent fliers and hunters. They’re so adept, as one recent Harvard University study found, that dragonflies caught between 90% to 95% of prey when it was released into an enclosure with the insects. If you’ve ever looked closely at a dragonfly, its eyes make up most of its head, which gives them amazing vision from nearly every angle. Even when its prey is weaving evasively, a dragonfly will track it with seemingly instant reflexes; just when the prey thinks it has gotten away, the dragonfly closes in for the kill swiftly from below. How do they do it? By calculating the distance of their prey, where it’s heading, and the speed at which it’s flying. The dragonfly needs only milliseconds to calculate its optimum angle of approach. Dragonflies’ combo of quick brains and skilled flying are highly desirable for missile defense systems. To this end, Frances Chance, a computational neuroscientist at Sandia National Laboratories, is trying to figure out whether dragonflies’ tiny brains might be wired for calculating complex trajectories akin to those needed for missile defense. (Figure 1.) In Sandia computer simulations, faux dragonflies within a simplified virtual environment successfully caught their prey using computer algorithms – designed by Chance – to mimic the way a dragonfly processes visual information while hunting. These positive test results indicate that this programming is fundamentally a sound model, according to Chance. Her ultimate goal is to determine whether dragonfly-inspired computing can improve missile defense systems, which have the similar task of intercepting an object in flight, by making its onboard computers smaller, but without sacrificing speed or accuracy. Chance specializes in replicating biological neural networks, basically brains, which require less energy and are better than computers at learning and adapting. Her studies center on neurons, which are cells that send information through the nervous system. “I try to predict how neurons are wired in the brain and understand what kinds of computations those neurons are doing, based on what we know about the behavior of the animal or what we know about the neural response,” she says.

10 September 2019

Figure 1 | SNL scientist Frances Chance is revealing insights into how dragonflies intercept their prey, which might prove useful for missile defense. Photo: Sandia National Laboratories.

A dragonfly’s reaction time to a maneuvering mosquito, for example, is merely 50 milliseconds. (To compare, a human blink lasts about 300 milliseconds.) Fifty milliseconds is only enough time to cross about three neurons, according to Chance. In other words, to keep up with a dragonfly, an artificial neural network needs to be done processing information after only three steps. But because brains fire many signals at once, each step may involve many calculations running simultaneously. Missile defense systems today rely on established intercept technologies that are, relatively speaking, computationally intense. Chance is rethinking these strategies via highly efficient dragonflies as a model to see if she can potentially shrink the size, weight, and power (SWaP) needs of onboard computers. Lowering SWaP would enable the development of smaller, lighter, and more maneuverable interceptors and may also reveal new ways to intercept maneuvering targets such as hypersonic weapons, which follow less predictable trajectories than ballistic missiles. Further, it could reveal new ways to home in on a target with less sophisticated sensors than the ones currently used. Hypersonic weapons pose an existential threat because their blistering speed, altitude, and maneuverability may be capable of defeating most missile defense systems. Russia, China, and the U.S. are all currently working to develop hypersonic weapons or already have this capability, so it will become increasingly important to be able to defend against them. That said, dragonflies and missiles move at vastly different speeds, so it’s unknown how well this research will ultimately translate to missile defense. But developing a computational model of a dragonfly brain should also provide long-term benefits for machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI). AI – currently used in such disparate areas as the military, selfdriving transportation, and prescription drug development – can benefit all kinds of applications that need highly efficient methods for constructing fast solutions to complex problems. Work is currently ongoing at Sandia to refine Chance’s algorithms to determine where they’re most applicable.

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MIL TECH INSIDER

Managing next-generation open standard vehicle electronics architectures By David Jedynak, Curtiss-Wright Defense Solutions; Charlie Kawasaki, Pacific Star Communications; and David Gregory, Pacific Star Communications The new IP-based networking architectures being integrated into military ground vehicles are able to unify the communications and shared hosting of services that used to require discrete hardware devices. These network architectures are frequently derived from enterprise-class functions leveraging the robust networking capabilities, cybersecurity maturity, and development pace, plus the innovation, research, and development developed for the commercial sector. These trends promise significant technology cost savings and an increased pace of modernization, but they also introduce complexity with respect to usability and manageability. Newer on-vehicle integrated networks will be composed of heterogeneous networks (including functions such as routing, switching, timing/A-PNT, encryption, cybersecurity, voice/video/data integration, remote control, sensor integration, logging, and more) in the form of software and equipment from multiple commercial vendors. Many networks have enormous feature sets in order to meet emerging interoperability and cybersecurity requirements for Department of Defense (DoD) systems and will require a level of training and expertise for operation and maintenance that far exceeds available specialists. In recent years, major efforts have been undertaken to develop comprehensive “standards-based communication,” such as Vehicular Integration for C4ISR/ EW Interoperability (VICTORY). These efforts address interoperability issues, databus functionality, and standardized messaging services for interconnected system components. But the resulting standards don’t typically address the network operation, configuration, and management challenges of hybrid (multimedia, multiclassification, multiplatform) DoD-ready networks themselves. Going forward, the complexity, downtime, and configuration errors in

12 September 2019

current and next-generation tactical and expeditionary command-and-control (C2) networks must be reduced. An intuitive cross-platform solution would enable collaborative management between lightly trained operators plus on-platform network situational awareness in disconnected, intermittent, or limited WAN conditions. The solution should also be able to simultaneously provide full control from higher echelons that can be staffed with a limited number of experts that provide technical assistance across large numbers of remote platforms. In short, system designers need a robust communications management software solution for ground vehicle networks. The ideal solution will consolidate the management plane of networks into a “single pane of glass,” regardless of the type of technology or vendor, and support distributed, hierarchical, and efficient management of network attached nodes on multiple platforms and at multiple tiers. The many benefits of this approach include significant improvements for tactical settings and reduced command-post setup time. It also enables new classes of communication applications while limiting management complexity and training burdens for ground vehicle and tactical networking programs. During the NDIA [National Defense Industrial Association] Ground Vehicle Systems Engineering and Technology Symposium, held during August 2019, Pacific Star Communications (PacStar) held the first live demonstration of a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS)-based management solution for open standard vehicle electronic components through the VICTORY framework. The demo – which showed network management planes consolidated into a “single pane of glass” dashboard – featured PacStar’s IQ-Core Network Communication Management (NCM) software with Remote

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Operations and Management (ROAM) capability running on a Curtiss-Wright DuraCOR mission computer, that itself managed a DBH-670 Digital Beachhead Ethernet switch and vehicle management computer. The user interface of the IQ-Core Software, adoptable to the VICTORY framework on ground vehicles, includes a dashboard with auto-generated network diagrams showing the logical structure of hierarchical nodes. It automates deployment of network planning and configuration files across the network, ensuring consistent configuration of all network devices. The software enables centralized management of distributed network nodes at multiple tiers in a hierarchical manner. It also enables secure wireless networking to integrate vehicle networks and C2 networks, with support for classified wireless communication and PKI secure key management using open architecture off-the-shelf NSA/Central Security Service (NSA/CSS)-approved Commercial Solutions for Classified (CSfC) encryption components. The “single pane of glass” dashboard approach addresses today’s critical need to simplify and improve configuration control, management, and situational understanding of ground vehicles by overlaying management tools on interoperable network-based standards. David Jedynak is Program Director, A-PNT Program Office, for Curtiss-Wright Defense Solutions; Charlie Kawasaki is Chief Technical Officer of PacStar; David Gregory is Director, Strategic Initiatives for PacStar. Curtiss-Wright Defense Solutions www.curtisswrightds.com Pacific Star Communications (PacStar) www.pacstar.com www.mil-embedded.com


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DEFENSE TECH WIRE NEWS | TRENDS | DOD SPENDS | CONTRACTS | TECHNOLOGY UPDATES By Emma Helfrich, Associate Editor NEWS

Ground-based cruise missile tested by U.S. military A ground-launched intermediate-range cruise missile has been tested off the coast of California, the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) announced. The test would not have been permitted under the Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, which was signed by the U.S. and the Soviet Union in 1987 but was allowed to expire in early August of 2019. DoD officials said the missile is designed to carry a conventional, and not a nuclear, warhead. Imagery from the test, reports the DoD, depicts the missile launching from a Mark 41 Vertical Launch System, the same launcher used in the Aegis Ashore missile defense system. Russia has called the presence of Mark 41 launchers in Europe a violation of the treaty, presuming that the Aegis Ashore systems currently installed in Poland and Romania could be converted to offensive systems.

ROBOpilot unmanned air platform first flights conducted by AFRL The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and DZYNE Technologies completed a two-hour initial flight of a Robotic Pilot Unmanned Conversion Program – called ROBOpilot – at Dugway Proving Ground in Utah. ROBOpilot interacts with an aircraft the same way as a human pilot would: The system, say officials, handles the yoke, pushes on the rudders and brakes, controls the throttle, flips the appropriate switches, and reads the dashboard gauges the same way a pilot does. The system uses sensors to handle situational awareness and information gathering; a computer analyzes these details to make decisions on how to best control the flight. According to researchers, ROBOpilot is easy to install: Users remove the pilot’s seat and install a frame in its place, which contains all the equipment necessary to control the aircraft including actuators, electronics, cameras, power systems, and a robotic arm.

Under-1-meter resolution radar imagery achieved by ICEYE ICEYE, a small satellite synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) technology company, reports that it has achieved better than 1-meter resolution imagery from under-220-pound SAR satellites. The company’s latest launch was in July 2019 with two new units.

Figure 1 | The DoD conducted a flight test of a conventionally configured ground-launched cruise missile at San Nicolas Island, California. Photo: Scott Howe/U.S. DoD.

Company information states that with Spotlight imaging, the satellite focuses its energy on a smaller area for a longer time, resulting in more data received from the same location. This data can then be processed into more detailed imagery. Veryhigh-resolution radar satellite images are used to both distinguish small objects and also to accurately classify larger objects such as vessels. ICEYE’s SAR satellites are intended for use in such sectors as maritime security, emergency response, and civil government.

Cyberthreat assessment tool contract signed between USAF, Radiance Technologies Cyberengineering firm Radiance Technologies has won a potential five-year, $99.9 million contract to design, build, develop, and integrate a set of tools and models for the U.S. Air Force to use in the assessment of cyber vulnerabilities on Internet of Things-based devices and other distributed systems. The Air Force Research Laboratory, the contracting organization, states that the resulting tools will also be usable for multiple application spaces and other DoD missions. Work under the terms of the contract will be performed in Huntsville, Alabama, and is expected to wrap up in August 2024.

14 September 2019

Figure 2 | ICEYE radar satellite imagery that has been acquired and processed at 0.5-meter ground sample distance, featuring a port container terminal near Port Harcourt, Nigeria. Photo: ICEYE.

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NEWS

Night-vision system for aviators’ helmets gets $22 million nod

DIA chooses 16 firms for massive $17.1 billion military intelligence support contract

Collins Elbit Vision Systems, a joint venture between Collins Aerospace Systems and Elbit Systems of America, has obtained a $22 million firm-fixed price contract for the production and delivery of Night Vision Cueing and Display (NVCD) systems for the U.S. Navy and for the governments of Australia and Switzerland. The NVCD works in tandem with the Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing Systems (JHMCS) – used by aviators flying the F/A-18 and E/A-18G combat jets – to offer users innovative head-tracking technology, a helmet-mounted display that shows mission-critical symbology, and the ability to record video of what the aviator sees while using the system.

The Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) has awarded spots to 16 companies on a potential 10-year, $17.1 billion contract to provide military intelligence support for national-security policymakers, defense planners, and warfighters in the field.

Dan Karl, co-general manager of CEVS, said of the system: “Providing the NVCD means warfighters are connected even in less-than-ideal situations, such as during nighttime, keeping them safe and aware of their surroundings.” The contracts call for work on the systems for the Navy and for Australia and Switzerland to be completed by February 2021.

Awarded under the terms of the contract are BAE Systems, Bluehawk, Booz Allen Hamilton, CACI International, Calhoun International, Celestar, Edge Analytic Solutions, Huntington Ingalls Industries, General Dynamics Information Technology, Invictus International Consulting, Leidos, Mission Essential Personnel, Perspecta, Preting, SOS International, and the Buffalo Group. Work under the ID/IQ contract – dubbed the Solutions for Intelligence Analysis 3 award – will occur at multiple sites in the continental U.S. and abroad through August 2029.

Radar-guided missile defense system for ships will get update from Raytheon Raytheon Missile Systems has won a potential four-year, $367.2 million contract from the U.S. Navy to update a radarguided missile defense system and related hardware for several domestic and foreign military customers.

Figure 3 | As seen through a night-vision device, paratroopers form a security formation and prepare to move to their next objective during a night operation mission on Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Photo: U.S. DoD.

Under the terms of the contract, Raytheon will work on upgrades and conversions, system overhauls, and associated hardware for the MK 15 Close-In Weapon System (CIWS), a fast-reaction terminal defense used on Navy surface combatant ships against high-speed maneuvering antiship missile threats that have penetrated all other defenses. Fiscal 2019 U.S. Navy and Army funds, as well as foreign military sales funds from the U.K. and Saudi Arabia, will be obligated to cover the firm-fixedprice contract’s base amount. The DoD expects contract work to be complete by October 2023.

Littoral combat ship sensors contract awarded to FLIR FLIR Surveillance received received a $12.6 million contract for supplies, repairs, and upgrades to its Saffire III Electro-Optics Sensor Systems sensor systems installed aboard U.S. Navy littoral combat ships. The systems enable, say company offcials, image stabilization, long-range and thermal imaging, and color and low-light cameras. The systems are aimed at use in search-and-rescue operations, reconnaissance, border and coastal patrol, and target identification, according to the manufacturer. The ball-shaped 22-pound systems, which attach to horizontal planes of a vessel or aircraft, have also been affixed to helicopters and fixedwing aircraft, as well as on the shallow-water littoral combat ships. The unit includes an optional sensor system for chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear detection. www.mil-embedded.com

Figure 4 | The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64) fires a Phalanx close-in weapons system during a live-fire exercise in the Black Sea. Photo: U.S. Navy.

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Special Report SHIPBOARD ELECTRONICS

Shipboard electronics evolve to match the pace of threat By Emma Helfrich The Littoral Combat Ship -- which replaced three classes of ship in the U.S. Navy (the FFG7, the PC, and the mine-countermeasure ships) – was intended to use the concepts of modularity and open architecture to modernize its weapons systems and simplify upgrades. Lockheed Martin photo.

The threat environment for the U.S. Navy is ever-evolving, as is modern warfare as a whole, with the result that shipboard electronics must keep up in order to address electronic warfare (EW) concerns. Leveraging open architecture and agnostic design in a ship’s defense system is therefore the paramount goal of the Navy’s Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program (SEWIP). Major players in the shipboard electronics design market are bringing major advancements to the naval EW arena. According to the U.S. Navy, its Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program (SEWIP) was introduced in 2002 as

18 September 2019

a way to modernize naval technology and mitigate obsolescence with incremental upgrades to the program – all with Raytheon’s AN/SLQ-32 system in mind. Introduced in the late 1970s, the AN/SLQ-32 (Slick-32) electronic warfare (EW) system was designed to protect fleets using such technologies as early detection, signal analysis, threat warning, and protection from antiship missiles. SEWIP maintained, and continues to maintain, the operationality of Slick-32 as it relates to a modern-day threat environment by establishing block upgrades as the technology associated with EW evolves. Today, there are three block upgrades in place with a fourth currently in production, naval documents assert. The continuous upgrades, completed through contract by Lockheed Martin, ensure that the Navy is equipped with only the latest versions of shipboard EW capabilities and that Slick-32 is able to carry out those capabilities as threats develop. Leveraging open architectures and modularity in the ship’s defense systems have proven to be key design considerations in SEWIP’s upgrade efforts. While the modernization of military technology tends to move at a slower and more expensive pace than that of commercial advancements, the Navy understands that rivaling electronic risks in a quick, cost-effective manner is necessary. Industry officials say they believe that commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) electronics, open architecture, modularity, and agnostic design will combine to achieve a near-automated shipboard defense system.

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The current state of SEWIP Blocks 1 and 2 of the SEWIP upgrades laid out the groundwork for more reliable, modernized ship combat systems. They provided fleets with a full suite of EW capabilities including countertargeting, countersurveillance capabilities, and antiship missile defense. Obsolescence mitigation was a significant focus as well and led to the introduction of electronic surveillance enhancements (ESE) and improved control and display (ICAD). The electronic support (ES) capability that came along with Block 2 showcased an open combat interface, which revolutionized shipboard electronic defense systems and has provided operators with enhanced programmability opportunities. “You don’t have to cut the ship open and rip equipment out and do those kinds of things to create the next capability upgrade,” says Joe DePietro, vice president of small combatants and ship systems at Lockheed Martin in Bethesda, Maryland. “Because you have that space, you have those standard interfaces that are able to quickly move other systems into the ship design.” The latest upgrade to SEWIP was its Block 3 update, which consisted of electronic attack capability improvements to Slick-32 in order to ensure its operationality is modernized in tandem with the pace of threat. SEWIP as a whole employs an open architecture design, which according to original SEWIP implementer General Dynamics, enables rapid integration of emerging technologies to aid in antiship missile defense and EW situational awareness. Its block updates and open business model enable implementation of a low-risk modernization process when it comes to updating the 1970s-vintage Slick-32 system. The importance of open architecture Today’s reality: Countries like Russia and China continue to develop of antiship missiles equipped with targeting radar that uses frequencies Slick-32 may simply be too out-of-date to detect. SEWIP provides checks and balances on shipboard defense systems to ensure that U.S. Navy fleets have the most www.mil-embedded.com

Figure 1 | Pictured is LCS 17, the future USS Indianapolis, during its acceptance trials in Lake Michigan during June, 2019. Lockheed Martin photo.

contemporary electronic defense possible. Industry players are now designing ships with that requirement in mind. Lockheed Martin’s Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) – which replaced three classes of ship in the Navy (the FFG7, the PC, and the mine countermeasure ships) – was intended to use modularity and open architecture to modernize and simplify upgrades. (Figure 1). “About 40 percent of the Freedom variant on our ship is empty and reconfigurable,” DePietro says. “But when I say it’s empty, it actually has the standard interfaces to include how things connect to the network, how things get data, etc., because there would be different systems that ran different computer programs and had different footprints that can be plugged in and have sort of a plug-and-play capability across the ship.” This “plug-and-play” concept provides operators with the capacity to swap out mission packages and move from capability to capability without having to change the ship’s programming. According to DePietro, the physical connection to the network – the actual physical implementation of the product onto the ship – is why the LCS replaced the other classes. With the LCS specifically, a requirement for the ship’s design is to be able to swap out a mission package capability and be ready to go with a new one within 96 hours. Having the capability to, for example, pull out an antisubmarine warfare mission package today, and then put on a surface warfare mission package with guns and missile launchers to then have it ready for operation in less than a week is simply unachievable without an open architecture environment. “Modularity goes from not only having different spaces, whether they be weapon spaces or internal ship spaces that have a standard interface, but also having that network connection.” DePietro says. “So, there’s a gateway to allow the mission packages to plug in and be able to get data from the ship, like navigation data and mining data and combat systems data.” Open architecture is also present in the latest generation of Raytheon’s Ship SelfDefense System (SSDS) Integrated Combat System (ICS). It includes a component called Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC), which provides a single integrated air picture by fusing data from multiple sensors to improve track accuracy, according to Raytheon officials. “CEC embraces a wide variety of open standards and architectural tenets in order to keep the implementation current, flexible, and extensible.” says Alicia Calef, senior director of total ship integration systems at Raytheon in Waltham, Massachusetts. “All while leveraging the latest advances in technology to deliver advanced capability to the warfighter.”

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Essentially, on-the-fly upgrades are a necessity in today’s ships (see Figure 2) that can be executed successfully only through modularity and open architecture. Those capabilities are quickly becoming requirements in today’s threat environment. COTS continues to play a significant role COTS products are becoming a more prevalent piece in the design of a ship’s electronic defense system, because these parts contribute to the overall ease of implementation and affordability when undergoing a refresh process.

Figure 2 | The Raytheon Ship Self-Defense System (SSDS) Integrated Combat System (ICS) is getting tested on U.S. Navy Ford-class carriers, similar to the carrier pictured here. U.S. Navy photo.

“The Navy did provide systems like that to us, like the CRAM, our self-defense rolling air frame missile capability. They offer that to us, and we integrate the capability for them.” DePietro says. “But the backbone of all of those systems was provided by industry in an open architecture way to be able to receive a lot of

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“It’s the integration of COTS electronics,” DePietro says. “Being able to develop virtual machines, as opposed to having dedicated hardware and software for everything, created the capability for us with the ship design and the shippackage interface to support multiple computer programs, different systemintegration capabilities – it’s almost like putting a USB device into your computer and having it find it.” This isn’t to say that Lockheed Martin doesn’t also continue to use an industry-provided social computing environment, he asserts, but that does not limit the Navy in providing custom systems for the company to integrate into the LCS.

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“CEC embraces the latest COTS technology, packaged for operations in a rugged environment, to provide state-ofthe-art resources for implementing the CEC mission while simultaneously embracing the ability to adapt and evolve to the ever-changing technological landscape,” Calef says.

of course, there is form, fit, and function replacement. Those are very proactive approaches to dealing with what’s going on as we field those COTS systems.” The future of shipboard electronics The tides are bringing in many exciting advancements for the shipboard electronic industry. As with most military technology, artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) are expected to eventually play a role in combat ships’ defense systems. Both have already been introduced in routine maintenance procedures: “We’ve installed systems on the ship that will allow sailors to say, ‘OK, based on all of these parameters, the machine knows that it’s going to be time to do this maintenance check and recommends this configuration,’” DePietro says. “And that can become available for its maintenance as a part of the cycle.” AI and ML will most likely exist more prevalently in fleets’ decision-making processes. Having a capability in a ship’s electronic defense system that is always thinking one step ahead of the warfighter levels the EW playing field.

Obsolescence and life cycle management Implementing COTS electronics makes modernizing a combat ship’s self-defense systems quicker, more affordable, and ensures the technology’s relevance in relation to the pace of threat. However, reliability remains a concern when comparing the long-term operability of COTS electronics versus custom ones.

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To address this matter, certain requirements within Blocks 1 and 2 of SEWIP were implemented that COTS electronics must meet. The manufacturers that play a role in the design of ships’ EW systems have adopted certain standards to mitigate these concerns as well.

The overarching goal of using COTS electronics and mitigating obsolescence in shipboard defense systems: To take hardware and software out of the life cycle management discussion. The endgame: Having the flexibility to move to the next processor or the next single-board computer without having to change the ship’s software. “The goal is to be able to extend the life cycle of a product based on vendor cooperation and supporting the assets that are out there.” DePietro says. “And www.mil-embedded.com

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“CEC employs an extensive ‘Whole Life’ management concept that constantly monitors and adapts for change and evolution in the technological landscape.” Calef says. “Technology is refreshed as advanced capabilities demands and technological obsolescence requires in order to keep the capability modern, relevant, and producible.”

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“The evolution of CEC is embracing artificial intelligence and machine learning in order to deliver advanced capability and decision aids for understanding and acting upon the ever-increasing complexities and speed of change in the battlespace to the direct benefit of the warfighter,” Calef says. Laser weapons and combat management systems are also on the horizon for shipboard electronics, it appears: Lockheed Martin asserts that the Arleigh Burke class of ship will eventually be equipped with a laser weapon system. It’s also on the horizon that fleets will soon be able to implement capabilities like Raytheon’s CEC to interface

and ensure use of the best weapon or system for the mission underway. “A combat management system and the interfaces associated with it – that is where the biggest capability is,” DePietro says. “The ships, the aircraft, the unmanned vehicles all work together. That is a big part of what we’re doing.” MES

A black box for high-speed boats By John McHale, Editorial Director High-speed boats for military, law enforcement, and search and rescue (SAR) applications can take an unwanted pounding, as can their operators and critical electronic payloads. While suspension seating and shock-mitigation technology have improved conditions for the operators, enabling the operators to run the boats at increased speeds and for longer hours, the boats still continue to get beat up, as they were not designed to operate that fast, in rough seas, for extended periods of time. “The boats are being destroyed because they’re being driven too hard,” says Sean Gerrett, Sales Manager, Military/Professional Products for Shockwave Seats (Victoria, British Columbia, Canada). “Another reason for increased speeds has been the increased engine horsepower. Just a few years ago, the outboard engine was 250 horsepower; now it is 425 horsepower and there are four installed across the back of the boat instead of one or two. That is a lot more horsepower and way more speed – and shock goes up exponentially with speed.” All that increased speed and slamming will create problems in different parts of the boat: “We also see problems surfacing with the hull, propulsion, and electronics,” Gerrett continues. “Scanners on the radar arch are failing, as are thermal-imaging cameras, antennas, and so forth.” A black box for high-speed boats To solve the problem of damage to boats at high speeds, Shockwave Seats invested in a U.S.-based company called KENAI that leverages the concept of data collection and monitoring to provide real-time feedback on the health of the boat during high-speed operations through its Vessel Impact and Motion Monitoring System (VIMMS). Having all this information at their fingertips enables vessel operators and program managers to slow down their speeds if necessary and even track the health and well-being of the boat’s crew and electronics. “Elements of the system originated from across multiple applications and industries,” Gerrett says. “The telemetry comes from work we’ve been doing for race cars. The military has been monitoring personnel well-being for years; for example, in fighter planes, the Air Force monitors and tracks every turn and every acceleration throughout the aircraft’s life cycle.” KENAI uses its DYENA Vessel Monitoring Unit (VMU), to record detailed information on acceleration forces throughout the vessel as well as on such data as optional position and performance factors, like the black box in aircraft. (Sidebar Figure 1.)

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Sidebar Figure 1 | Pictured is where the KENAI Vessel Impact and Motion Monitoring System (VIMMS) sensors and interfaces typically reside in a high-speed boat. Image courtesy of Shockwave Seats.

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“This black-box approach has been a long time coming to this industry,” Gerrett says. “This was a dream of ours since our first seat. We visualized a system that provided boat operators with a warning when unsafe conditions existed, such as an over limit G [force] alarm, or OLGA.” The DYENA VMU samples vessel-shock loads at 1,000 Hz alongside optional GPS data, which is then filtered at 25 Hz to provide real-time situational awareness and vessel/ crew health. Records are simultaneously logged to generate reports on vessel use, impact forces, and crew exposure to shock and vibration. With this new technology, data can be collected and tailored easily – including information on telemetry, location, and video – to the specific requirements of the customer. This monitoring enables the boat operators and their superiors to know how the boat and its contents, both humans and electronics, are being impacted by wave actions and acceleration. The black box also tracks the crew from the moment they sit down: “The crew will have an RFID chip in their primary flotation device (PFD) and an antenna on the seat back so when they get into a seat it knows who they are and will track their acceleration experience, calculating whole body vibration (WBV) to the limit,” Gerrett explains. “With the WBV metric, cumulative damage can be determined and limits placed on the crew so as not to expose them over a certain period to excessive shock.” Security has also been built into the system, which is initially targeted at Department of Defense (DoD), law enforcement, and SAR vessels. “The data gets transmitted over a secure transfer uplink to the cloud, depending on the user’s security preferences,” Gerrett says. “For example, the military will have more complex levels of security than many other users of this technology.” www.mil-embedded.com


Special Report SHIPBOARD ELECTRONICS

RF converters – a technology enabling wideband radios By Daniel E. Fague and Steven Rose

One design constraint that faces every military radio designer is the trade-off of designing for signal bandwidth with the highest possible quality versus the power consumption of the radio. The way in which the radio designer meets this constraint determines the size and weight of the radio and fundamentally influences the placement of the radio, which includes buildings, towers, poles, underground vehicles, packs, pockets, ears, or glasses. Each radio location has an amount of power available that is commensurate with its location. A building or a tower, for example, will likely have more power available to it than a smartphone in a pocket or a Bluetooth headset in an ear. As semiconductor companies have integrated more functionality and higher performance into the same- or smallersize component, the equipment that uses these components has delivered on the promise of a radio that is smaller,

24 September 2019

more functional, lighter, or all three in some cases. These upgrades enable placement of the equipment in locations that were previously prohibited due to some other constraint, such as the amount of real estate needed for a building that is reduced when the unit can go on a tower, the size of a tower radio unit that can be reduced to a pole unit if the weight of the unit is low enough, or a unit that was required to be carried in a vehicle due to its weight that can now be carried in a pack. Today’s environment is filled with legacy installations that require buildings, towers, poles, and vehicles. Driven by the need to connect the people in the world to each other, engineers meet that challenge by designing equipment with the available components at that time, delivered to us via the communications-rich environment we have today. People can talk, text, IM, photograph, download, upload, and browse nearly anywhere on one of several different networks, including mobile networks wireless LANs, ad hoc short-range wireless networks, and others. These all connect to the broadband wired network on which the data is carried by RF cables, and eventually by optical fiber. (Figure 1.) Enhanced video experience As several studies have shown,1, 2 the demand for data is projected to continue to increase well into the next decade. This mounting number is driven by a seemingly insatiable demand for richer data content that needs wider bandwidths. For example, cable television and fiber-to-the-home carriers continue to compete on broadband services to the home by offering higher-speed connections and more high-definition TV channels. The move to ultrahigh definition (UHD or 4K definition) TV calls for more than twice the capacity of HD TV and requires wider channel bandwidths than are being used today. In addition, immersive video, which includes virtual reality (VR) – as well as gaming and 3D effects like 180-degree or panoramic viewing with multidimension freedom, all with 4K UHD TV – will demand as much as 1 gigabit of bandwidth per user.2 This ask goes well beyond the already demanding needs of simple 4K UHD TV broadcast and streaming. Moreover, online gaming requires symmetrical data bandwidths in the

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Figure 1 | RF converters enable wideband radios that can service demanding data asks like streaming video and gaming.

network since latency times are crucial, a need that is driving development of much wider-bandwidth upstream transmission capability. This need for wider upstream capability is, in turn, driving equipment makers to upgrade their designs to enable symmetrical, wide-bandwidth transmissions. The enhanced capabilities of today’s RF converters are crucial to enabling advances in the delivery of such rich video content. They must be able to create high dynamic range signals with excellent spurious-free performance in order to enable the use of higher order modulation schemes such as 256-QAM [Quadrature Amplitude Modulation], 1024-QAM, and 4K-QAM. These higher-order modulation methods are needed to increase the spectral efficiency of each channel, since the installed coaxial cable plant and distribution amplifiers have a finite bandwidth of 1.2 GHz to 1.7 GHz. www.mil-embedded.com

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Higher performance in the head-end transmission equipment extends the usable life of the installed equipment base, easing capital budget constraints and allowing multiple service operators (MSOs) a longer window of time in which to upgrade their equipment and transmission systems. Multiband, multimode test Today’s smartphones resemble traditional mobile phones even less as more features are packed into them. Many of these features have radios associated with them; therefore, the mobile device of today has upward of five or seven or more radios in it. Because all of these radios must be tested when the smartphone is produced, makers of multimode communications testers face new challenges. There is a need for speed to keep test costs down, despite the number of tests increasing with the number of radios. Building different radio hardware for each radio in the mobile device becomes impractical with

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regards to size and cost of the tester. With more bands opening or being proposed for mobile services,3 the challenge of testing mounting numbers of radios in the mobile device increases. This challenge can be addressed well by RF converters: In both the transmitter and receiver, RF converters can provide flexibility that cannot be achieved with conventional radios. Wideband RF converters enable testers to capture and directly synthesize signals in every band at the same time, enabling simultaneous test of multiple radios in the mobile device. With channelizers built into the RF digital-to-analog converter (DAC) and analog-to-digital converter (ADC), those multiple radio signals are efficiently processed in the converters. For example, in Figure 2, three channelizers per RF DAC are shown, enabling three different signals and bands to be directly synthesized, combined, and then upconverted digitally with the numerically controlled oscillator (NCO) before being converted to an RF signal by the RF DAC. Other market segments – such as testing equipment for defense and aerospace – are seeing increasing need for wideband test solutions for pulsed radar and military communications. Due to the number and types of radar, electronic intelligence, electronic warfare (EW) equipment, and communications equipment needing to be tested, the test-equipment manufacturer must create a flexible instrument with a rich set of features.4 For example, arbitrary waveform generators must be able to create various signals, including linear frequency modulation, pulsed signals, phase coherent signals, and modulated signals across a wide range of output frequencies and bandwidths. Measurement equipment must be equally capable in order to receive such signals when testing the exciter or transmitter. RF converters handle this application by enabling direct RF synthesis and measurement at RF frequencies. In some cases, this approach can eliminate the need for an up- or down-conversion, and in other cases can reduce the number needed to a single conversion. It can also www.mil-embedded.com


simplify the hardware and thus reduce its size, weight, and power (SWaP) requirements. The addition of digital features such as channelizers, interpolators, NCOs, and combiners makes for efficient signal processing on dedicated, low-power CMOS [complementary metal-oxide semiconductor] technology. Software-defined radios RF converters can be a critical enabler in software-defined radios. With the ability to directly synthesize and capture radio frequencies in the multi-GHz range, RF converters simplify the radio architecture by eliminating entire up- or downconversion stages, instead implementing them digitally. The removal of the analog conversion stage and the associated mixers, LO [local oscillator] synthesizers, and filters reduces the SWaP of a radio, enabling the radio to be situated in more places and operate from smaller power supplies. Such technology makes it possible for the radios to be small and light enough to be hand-carried, driven in small ground vehicles, or mounted in various airborne assets such as planes, helicopters, and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs).5 In addition to enabling better communication across platforms, radio hardware built with RF converters has the potential to be multifunction, as well as multimode and multiband. Because RF converters are now able to reach to the lower radar bands, and in the near future will reach the higher bands, the concept of a single unit that can be used as both a radar and a tactical communications link can become a reality. Such a unit offers clear leverage in terms of field repairs, upgrades, and procurement procedures and costs. The ability to directly synthesize and capture radar frequencies makes RF converters ideal for phased-array radar systems. Because direct RF converter synthesis and capture eliminates so much conventional radio hardware, an individual signal chain is much smaller and lighter. Thus, packing many of these radios into a smaller space is possible. Arrays suitable for ship-mounted or ground-based phased arrays, as well as www.mil-embedded.com

smaller arrays and units for signal intelligence operations, can be built with reduced SWaP. (Figure 3.) The technology behind RF converters One of the key technology advancements that makes RF converters possible is the continuous march toward finer-line CMOS processes. As the gate length and feature size of the basic CMOS transistor becomes smaller, digital gates get faster, smaller, and lower-power.6 This setup enables significant digital signal processing (DSP) to be included on-chip with the RF converter with reasonable power and area. The inclusion

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Figure 2 | Example of an RF DAC with channelizers.

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Figure 3 | Software-defined radio (SDR) powered by RF converters enables connected communications across platforms.

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of digital channelizers, modulators, and filters that are software-programmable are critical to constructing an efficient and flexible radio. This more efficient DSP also opens the door to use digital processing to help correct analog deficiencies in the converter. On the analog side, each new node provides faster transistors that have better matching per unit area. These improvements are critical for faster high-precision converters.

DAC current. The traditional dual-switch structure (Figure 4) has several drawbacks when operated at very high speeds.9, 10 Since the data driven into the dual switch can stay the same anywhere from one to many clock cycles, the tail node will have a datadependent amount of time to settle. If the clock rate is slow enough for this node to settle within one clock period, this is not a problem. However, at very high rates this node will not settle fully in one clock period and thus the data-dependent settling time will cause distortion in DAC output. If a quad switch (Figure 5) is used, the data signals are all returned to zero. This leads to the tail node voltage being independent of data input, which alleviates the problem mentioned above. The quad switch also enables the DAC data to be updated on both edges of the clock. This feature can be used to effectively double the DAC sample rate without doubling the clock frequency.11

Process-technology advancement alone is not sufficient, however: Several key architectural advancements also make these converters possible. The architecture of choice for RF DACs is the current steering DAC architecture. The performance of this type of DAC is dependent on the matching of the current sources that comprise the DAC. Uncalibrated current source matching is proportional to the square root of the area of the current source.7 The matching per unit area will improve with each technology node. However, even in the most advanced nodes, a current source with low enough random mismatch for a high-resolution converter would be very large. Having such a large current source would make the converter large and – more critically – the parasitic capacitance of this large current source degrades the highfrequency performance of the DAC.

Using a well-designed current source calibration algorithm and a quad switch current steering cell – in combination with today’s fine line CMOS processes – enables design of a DAC that can sample at very high rates with excellent dynamic range, which allows for synthesis of high-quality signals across a wide range of frequency. When this wideband DAC is combined with supporting DSP, it becomes a very flexible highperformance radio transmitter that can be configured to provide signals for all of the different applications mentioned previously in this article.12

A much more attractive solution is to calibrate smaller current sources to achieve the desired level of matching, which can significantly reduce the added parasites from the current source and thus enable the desired linearity performance without compromising the high-frequency performance. If done correctly, this calibration can be made very stable across temperature, which means the calibration need only be done once. Stable one-time calibration avoids periodic background calibration, which saves operating power and alleviates concerns about spurious products being created due to the calibration running in the background.8 Another architectural choice that helps meet the desired converter performance metrics at very high speeds is the choice of switch architecture used to steer the

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Figure 4 | The traditional dual-switch architecture used to steer the DAC current.

Figure 5 | A quad-switch structure can alleviate many of the problems encountered by dual switch structures when operated at very high speeds.

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A50_MilEmbSys_2_12x10.qxp_A45.qxd 7/16/19

Future radios While the RF converters of today are already enabling radical changes in radio architecture design, they are poised to enable even greater changes in the future. As process technology continues to advance and RF converter design is further optimized, the RF converter’s impact on power consumption and size of a radio will continue to shrink. These opportune technology advances come just in time to enable the next generation of radios, such as emerging 5G wireless base station applications, as well as large-scale phased-array radars and beamforming applications. Deep-submicron lithography will enable even larger amounts of digital circuitry to be placed on the RF converter die, integrating critical compute-heavy functions like digital predistortion (DPD)13 and crest factor reduction (CFR) algorithms that help to improve power amplifier efficiency and reduce overall system power dramatically. Such integrations will relieve the pressure on power-hungry FPGA [field-programmable gate array] logic and instead move those functions to power-stingy dedicated logic. Other possibilities include integrating the RF converter and its digital engines with RF, microwave, or millimeter-wave analog components, further reducing size and further simplifying the radio design, and delivering a bits-to-antenna, system-level approach to radio design. MES References 1. “5G Radio Access.” Ericsson, April 2016. 2. “Consumer Survey Report on Typical Future Mobile Applications.” Huawei Wireless X Labs. 3. “Notice of Inquiry FCC 17-104.” Federal Communications Commission, August 2017. 4. John Hansen. “Radar, Electronic Warfare, and Electronic Intelligence Testing.” Agilent Technologies, August 2012. 5. Henry S. Kenyon. “New Radios, Waveforms Move Military Communications into the Sky.” Signal, October 2013. 6. William Holt. “Moore’s Law: A Path Going Forward.” 2016 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference, IEEE, 2016. 7. A.C.J. Duimaijer, Anton Welbers, and Marcel Pelgrom. “Matching Properties of MOS Transistors.” IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, IEEE, Vol. 24, No. 5, October 1989. 8. Haiyan Zhu, Wenhua Yang, Gil Engel, and Yong-Bin Kim. “A Two-Parameter Calibration Technique Tracking Temperature variations for Current Source Mismatch.” IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems – II: Express Briefs, IEEE, Vol. 64, No. 4, April 2017. 9. “Constant Switching for Signal Processing.” U.S. Patent US6842132 B2, January 2005. 10. Sungkyung Park, Gyudong Kim, Sin-Chong Park, and Wonchan Kim. “A Digital-to-Analog Converter Based on Differential-Quad Switching.” IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, IEEE, Vol. 37, No. 10, October 2002. 11. Gil Engel, Shawn Kuo, and Steve Rose. “A 14-Bit 3 GHz/6 GHz Current-Steering RF DAC in 0.18 µm CMOS with 66 dB ACLR at 2.9 GHz.” 2012 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference, IEEE, 2012. 12. Daniel Fague. “New RF DAC Broadens Software-Defined Radio Horizon.” Analog Dialogue, Vol. 50, No. 7, July 2016. 13. Patrick Pratt and Frank Kearney. “Ultrawideband Digital Predistortion (DPD): The Rewards (Power and Performance) and Challenges of Implementation in Cable Distribution Systems.” Analog Dialogue, Vol. 51, No. 07, July 2017.

Daniel E. Fague is the director of systems application engineering in the High Speed Products Group at Analog Devices. He received his B.S.E.E from Gonzaga University in 1989 and his M.S.E.E. from the University of California at Davis in 1991. He joined Analog Devices’ Wireless Handset Group in 1995; since joining the High Speed Products Group in 2011, Dan has focused on RF converter development. He holds seven patents and has published more than 30 articles and papers. He can be reached at daniel.fague@analog.com. Steven C. Rose is a staff design engineer in the High Speed Products Group at Analog Devices. He received his B.S.E.E. from the University of Michigan in 1999 and his M.S.E.E. from the University of California at Berkeley in 2002. He joined Analog Devices’ High Speed Conversion Products Group in 2002; since 2009, Steve has focused on the design of RF DACs. His email is steven.rose@analog.com. Analog Devices • www.analog.com www.mil-embedded.com

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Multicore processors in the mission-critical context By Dr. Guillem Bernat

Multicore processors are increasingly being adopted in the critical systems domain, especially within the mission-critical military context. They offer a solution to the issue of long-term availability of single-core processors and the increasing processing power needed to facilitate increased innovation in military systems. As multicore processors offer neither a deterministic environment nor predictable software execution times, a new verification approach – one that solves the challenges of multicore timing analysis – is needed for their safe use. Continued progress on SWaP (size, weight, and power) concerns of processors has resulted in multicore-powered cellphones containing more power than the Apollo 11 lunar lander. The benefits offered by using multicore processors have led to the widespread adoption of this technology across mainstream technology industries, with single-core processors now representing only a tiny share of the market. Due to this shift, chip manufacturers are moving away from producing these legacy processors, and their long-term availability is in serious doubt. As the supply of single-core processors continues to diminish and modern embedded systems continue to mount in popularity, the adoption of multicore processors is inevitable. The safe use of these processors in mission-critical military domains is challenging, however, as they offer neither a deterministic environment nor predictable software execution times. The gold standard of military avionics certification DO-178C is the primary document by which prominent certification authorities such as the FAA [Federal Aviation Administration] and EASA [the European Union Aviation Safety Agency] approve all commercial software aerospace systems. Over the years, it has also become the de facto gold standard for the use of software in military avionics systems. The FAA has supplemented DO-178C guidance with Position Paper CAST-32A – titled “Multi-core Processors,” to address the increasing use of multicore processors in aviation.

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The U.S. Army’s designated primary Airworthiness Authority, the AMRDEC Aviation Engineering Directorate (AED), published a [draft] guidance document called “Multi-Core Processor (MCP) Airworthiness Requirements,” in which DO-178C and CAST-32A objectives are identified as guidelines that can be used in satisfying the MCP [multicore processor] airworthiness requirements. Timing analysis is one of the core objectives identified in CAST-32A guidance and is addressed specifically by the objective dubbed MCP_Software_1, which requires evidence demonstrating that all hosted software components function correctly and have sufficient time to complete their execution when operating in their multicore environment. This is a very challenging objective to satisfy and has proven to be a serious obstacle for military and www.mil-embedded.com


DO-178C HAS BECOME THE DE FACTO GOLD STANDARD FOR MILITARY AVIONICS SOFTWARE CERTIFICATION.

aerospace companies aiming to certify multicore projects. Analyzing multicore timing behavior Verification solutions designed to verify the timing behavior of single-core systems are not applicable to multicore timing analysis for a number of reasons, mostly because these solutions fail to account for the effects of interference caused by resource contention. To verify the timing behavior of multicore systems, new methods are needed that specifically address the challenges of multicore timing analysis. Accounting for resource contention and interference The timing behavior of a task in a multicore system task is affected not only by

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the software running on it and its inputs, but also by contention over resources such as buses, caches, and GPUs that are shared with tasks running on other cores. To design experiments to analyze the timing behavior of a multicore system, sources of interference must be identified and accounted for.

Core 0

Core N

Figure 1 shows a simplified example of a multicore architecture where a bus is shared between multiple cores. Traffic caused by accesses to this bus by Core N are likely to have an impact on the timing behavior of an application running on Core 0 that needs to access this bus.

L1

L1

Assumptions must be tested To analyze the timing behavior of a multicore system, there are necessarily some assumptions about the behavior of the system under study, including the effects of interference channels present. Due to the complexity of multicore systems,

Shared Bus

Shared L2

›

Figure 1 | Example of interference channel in a multicore system.

seemingly logical assumptions made about the system may later be proved incorrect, potentially requiring an iterative process of making assumptions, testing them, and using analysis results to refine assumptions for the next round of testing. This is best explained with a practical example: Under study is the sensitivity of a memory-intensive application running on a Xilinx Zynq Ultrascale+ ZCU102 target board to different levels of interference. The Application Processing Unit on which the application was running has four cores. The reasonable assumption has been made that the L2 cache is a major interference channel for this application due to prior knowledge of the system. To validate this assumption, a test was performed where the application was running while sustained accesses were made on the L2 cache from tasks running on between 0 and 3 contender cores. (Figure 2.) If the assumptions were valid, then the number of both L2 cache misses and CPU cycles taken for the application to execute would increase with each additional contender core. The figure shows that this assumption held until the introduction of a third contender core. This increased the number of CPU cycles, but the number of L2 cache misses remained around the same as when only two contender cores are active.

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The complexity of interference effects in multicore systems means that designers should expect to need iterative cycles of forming assumptions, testing them, and using the analysis results to form new assumptions. While there is no way to automate this process, an engineer can develop expertise both in terms of how to form reasonable assumptions about multicore processors and how to reassess those assumptions during investigatory work by working on multiple projects and building their experience. Effective reassessment and testing will lead to a well-rounded understanding of how the multicore processor behaves and what things will affect its timing behavior.

›

Figure 2 | CPU cycles and L2 cache misses.

Testing on the real hardware Multicore CPUs are complex and often their internals are hidden, making purely analytical models of limited use in understanding their timing behavior. While purely analytical (static-analysis) models can provide usable timing estimates for single-core systems, this is not the case for multicore systems. Even were these methods to be used, they would produce highly pessimistic results based on the pathological worst-case behavior of the multicore configuration, and these results would be of no practical use. To produce usable timing metrics from multicore systems, timing behavior on the system itself must be measured. Engineers at Rapita Systems use a collection of microbenchmarks, developed by the Barcelona Supercomputing Center, to stress specific shared resources and observe the timing behavior of an application when this contention is in place. By applying a configurable degree of contention on specific shared resources using this technology, experiments can be formulated that help analyze timing metrics based on feasible timing environments. These experiments can produce key evidence needed to satisfy CAST-32A timing objectives, such as worst-case execution times (WCET). (Figure 3.) Multicore timing analysis cannot be entirely automated The complexity of multicore processors means that building a fully automated www.mil-embedded.com

›

Figure 3 | By applying a configurable degree of contention on specific shared resources, experiments can be formulated that help analyze timing metrics based on feasible timing environments.

timing analysis solution is unrealistic. While tool support can automate most of the data-gathering and analysis processes, engineering wisdom and expertise is needed to understand the system and direct tool usage to produce necessary evidence. The more experience engineers have in understanding multicore systems, investigating interference channels, and using supporting tools, the more efficient the analysis process will be. Mission-critical going forward Mission-critical embedded systems used in the military sector are increasingly utilizing multicore processors. It is imperative that certification considerations for these systems are not an afterthought, but are considered early in the development process. Thankfully, DO-178C provides a set of robust objectives for ensuring the safe and reliable use of these processors. Timing analysis for multicore systems is challenging, but tried and tested solutions are available to perform it in a commercial context. MES Dr. Guillem Bernat is an expert on execution time analysis for real-time systems with over 70 published papers in international conferences and journals. Since 2004, he has been CEO of Rapita Systems, which provides verification solutions to the global embedded embedded aerospace and automotive industries. Rapita Systems • www.rapitasystems.com

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Test and evaluation of advanced radar systems By Tony Girard Free-space radar test equipment is the system of choice when “opening” the radar for signal access is not an option. Photo courtesy Mercury Systems.

Advances in both electronic warfare (EW) and radar systems present numerous challenges in the test and evaluation of these modern systems. Radar capabilities such as synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging, multiple degrees of agility, and a wide spectral range – coupled with the introduction of cognitive/adaptive EW jamming techniques – have dramatically increased the complexity and cost of developing effective test environments. Typical Digital Radio Frequency Memory (DRFM)-based target generation can fall short, as many radar systems can quickly recognize DRFM-generated target returns as decoys. Test and evaluation engineers and test equipment providers are attempting to address these challenges by building in general-purpose graphics processing units (GPGPU); live, virtual, and constructive (LVC) simulations; and the next generation of DRFM technologies to provide the necessary capabilities, features, and quality of target and image returns to properly exercise the latest radar systems. Current challenges in testing advanced radar systems Whether ground-based, shipboard, or mounted on an aircraft or missile, radar systems are essential components of both the offense and defense of the platforms they are used on. Often considered the “eyes” of the platform, radar systems are used for everything from intelligence gathering, navigation, and traffic control to weather reporting, platform protection, and targeting. Given the criticality of radar performance to the safety and effectivity of the platform, there are two major fronts of advancement. The first is to continue to increase the capability, capacity, and intelligence of the radar system itself, while the second is to find ways to defeat, deceive, or blind the system, generally referred to as electronic warfare (EW). In order to properly ensure these critical systems are operating as designed in a wide variety of scenarios and possibly under electronic attack, extensive testing and evaluation is essential. Radar system

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designers and end users have relied on a combination of test equipment and field testing to provide this assurance, but as the systems themselves grow more complex, the requirements on the test equipment grow more daunting. For example, advances in EW systems have brought increased complexity to the prospect of dominating the electromagnetic spectrum. Expanded frequency ranges, instantaneous bandwidth (IBW), and complex signal coding and other advanced EW systems capabilities result in system performance that is difficult to test and evaluate. Radar test equipment (RTE) – employed at various stages of the development, test, evaluation, and production cycle – provides a wide variety of simulated radio frequency (RF) returns that exercise radar sensors. These include fire control, surveillance, guidance, imaging, proximity, fuses, and altimeters. There are two primary types of RTE: First is a target generator, a basic system used to generate a single or limited number of targets returns to a radar-under-test. The other is an environment simulator, which is substantially more advanced and generates a number of targets as well as other RF www.mil-embedded.com


effects like clutter, terrain, weather, and other environmental factors. Environment simulators often include capabilities to simulate electronic countermeasure returns including noncoherent denial and coherent deceptive techniques. RTE systems are the optimal tool for low-cost radar testing, as they avoid the expense and unpredictability associated with full field trials. RTE is used in a secure, controlled environment, where situational complexity is dialed in as required. With their ability to control the full spectrum of test metrics, RTE delivers excellent results when testing radar development and upgrades and during in-line production, platform integration, repair, and operator training. The most usable RTE uses Modular Open Systems Architecture (MOSA) hardware as well as flexible and scalable software-defined functionality. This approach to designing RTE hardware and software makes it easily upgradeable as new capabilities are released and as requirements for testing advanced radar capabilities evolve. Figure 1 shows an example of a graphical user interface control display with comprehensive user-defined functionality. www.mil-embedded.com

Figure 1 | An example of a radar environment simulator graphical user interface. Courtesy Mercury Systems.

RTE architectures RTE employs two basic architectures; synthesizer- and Digital Radio Frequency Memory (DRFM)-based. Synthesizer-based systems do not use the signal generated by the radar as the source return; rather, these systems use frequency synthesizers to create the return independently. A synthesizer-based system requires RTE designers with detailed knowledge of the waveforms used by the radar-under-test in order to generate signal returns that properly match the waveforms generated by the radar. Additionally, in general a synthesizer-based system must be synchronized to the radarunder-test to ensure that the phase relationship of the returns is fixed with respect to the radar to achieve the correct coherent pulse and Doppler processing. Typically, synthesizer-based RTE provides better signal performance in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, spurious-free dynamic range, noise floor, etc. Synthesizer-based systems are well suited for radar systems that do not use complex radar waveforms or signal return processing, or for individual radar systems for which the waveforms are well-known and access to internal radar signals and data is not an issue. In contrast, DRFM-based systems use the waveform generated by the radar-undertest as the source for the signal return. These systems typically digitize RF waveforms generated by the radar-under-test, store the waveforms, apply the appropriate signal modulation, and then play the RF waveforms back to the radar to generate the return. Since the return signal is DRFM-based, the RTE system designer or user needs no detailed knowledge of the radar-under-test to generate useful returns. DRFMbased systems have the benefit of being able to respond on a pulse-by-pulse basis to radar waveform agility in terms of frequency, pulse width, and separation. In addition, they dynamically respond to changes in radar signal modulation. While a priori radar waveform information is not necessary for DRFM-based systems, the frequency range and IBW of the RTE is set by the system design. It’s important to note the signal performance of DRFM-based RTE is limited by the resolution and sample rate of the analog-to-digital converters (ADC) and digital-to-analog converters (DAC) used in the system. Although it is possible to increase IBW by increasing ADC/DAC sample rates, doing so reduces ADC/DAC resolution, which in turn reduces signal performance. IBW versus signal performance is a trade-off decision that must be made by the RTE system designer. Designers must also consider another significant aspect of DRFM-based RTE: Over the last 30-plus years, DRFM technology has been increasingly used in ECM jammer systems to deny and/or deceive radar systems. As a result, modern radar systems have developed methods to quickly detect “synthetic” DRFM-generated signals and identify them as jamming signals rather than tracking them as valid targets. DRFM-based RTE designers must continue to adopt new capabilities to counter this trend in order for this approach to remain a viable option for testing advanced radar equipment.

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This requires the development of innovative hardware with higher fidelity and greater agility than historically deployed. Test configurations affect results Decisions on how best to test and evaluate a new radar system requires consideration of both the type of system under test as well as the testing configuration. RTE systems have two basic configurations, free-space and direct-inject, with options for a hybrid approach. Free-space RTE is completely external to the radar-under-test and receives the radar signal from a “free-space” antenna, then radiates the return to the radar through the same or a similar antenna. One way of testing is by placing the system under test suspended in an anechoic chamber and the RTE colocated, but not directly connected to, the radar. (See lead photo.) If the radar has a directional beam that is not received by the free-space antenna, no return can be generated. RTE with an IBW

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narrower than the frequency agility of the radar must have the ability to measure the radar frequency quickly and tune the system’s IBW accordingly. A free-space system has the advantage of needing no knowledge of or physical connection to the radar-under-test. The disadvantage is that free-space systems only generate returns on the radial in which the antenna is positioned. That said, a freespace system remains a good choice when “opening” the radar for signal access is undesirable or impossible, and when providing RF returns from the RTE antenna radial is acceptable. When access to the radar signal is not an issue, it is possible to inject the radar transmit signal directly into the RTE system rather than through an antenna. Because the direct-inject system receives the signal from a point before the antenna, the RTE receives every radar pulse, regardless of the antenna’s pointing angle. However, direct-inject systems require azimuth and elevation information from the radar in order to selectively generate radar returns for a target only when that target is within the beam width of the radar’s pointing angle. Additionally, for the RTE to generate the desired RF scene, it requires other information from the radar-under-test, such as antenna patterns. While direct-inject RTE is more complex and has the disadvantage of requiring connection to radar RF signals and data buses, it provides the distinct advantage of generating returns with six degrees of freedom to a system under test. Essentially, this covers the entire radar target space. A direct-inject system is a good choice when full-scene generation is desired, access to internal radar signal is possible, and detailed characterization of the radar’s antenna is not a concern. Radar modalities add complexity The features and functions of RTE used with air-to-air and surface-to-air radars are similar, yet they have subtle differences in terms of background clutter modeling and multipath returns. The more significant variance is in RTE for airto-ground radar, which brings the additional challenge of emulating complex www.mil-embedded.com


signal modulations required for SAR; such signal returns require RTE to combine modulation for many individual point returns, or pixels, in order to provide high-fidelity distributed images in the RF return. Historically, simulated SAR returns were generated with a timedomain approach that employs what’s called a delay tap for each downrange pixel. Each pixel is modulated with unique coefficients for crossrange effects based on the desired image, and then summed (Figure 2) to produce a complete SAR RF signal return. While hardware-intensive, this approach requires no prior knowledge of the RF waveform. In addition, low system-insertion delays provide images relatively close to the radar. RTE systems that produce SAR returns by processing the RF signal based on a convolution in the frequency domain (Figure 3) have advantages over timedomain processing. Frequency-domain systems provide higher-resolution images both downrange and crossrange with significantly less signal processing hardware compared to time-domain processing systems. Using efficient multi-GPU servers with optimized software for signal modulation coefficient calculations, high-resolution SAR images can be calculated in nearreal time. More complexity means more data Many radar test and evaluation applications need to store captured radar waveforms and signals transmitted to the radar, with the data enabling the radar engineer to evaluate the performance of the radar transmissions and the radar’s algorithm response to target and/or jamming returns. Any time defenserelated radar signal and processing data is stored, information assurance should be seriously considered with respect to protecting sensitive radar parameters. As radar bandwidths increase, storing the real-time data with the necessary levels of protection becomes an increasingly complex challenge. Many of today’s RTE systems use mass data storage/ retrieval capability, but few offer validated information-assurance features. www.mil-embedded.com

Figure 2 | Time-domain SAR scene generation logic.

Figure 3 | Frequency-domain SAR scene generation approach.

Future challenges Complex, coordinated, and multidomain EW scenarios continue to drive the need to support wider analog bandwidths and ever-higher-fidelity signal capture and generation. This in turn requires ADC/DAC technology with cutting-edge sample rate and resolution capabilities. For example, devices that combine multiple ADC/DAC devices packaged with FPGA resources, such as the new wave of RF system-on-chip (RFSoC) products, allow RF channelized architectures to be utilized within reasonable size and cost constraints. RF channelization reduces the need for costly fast-tuning RF conversion stages to cover wide frequency ranges. As this technology develops, direct digital conversion of radar RF signals becomes possible, reducing or possibly eliminating the need for RF to IF conversion. This move in turn reduces cost and improves performance. Additionally, the move toward multicore GPU servers for complex radar signals will accelerate as machine learning and artificial intelligence are employed in radar and jammer systems to enable cognitive/adaptive capabilities. As advances in technology improve radar system performance, agility, and builtin electronic protection capabilities, RTE functionality must keep pace. Designing MOSA-based RTE architectures with the latest secure digital processing hardware and software configurable features are keys to supporting the future needs of the radar and EW test and evaluation community. MES Tony Girard is Chief Technologist for Mercury Defense Systems, based in Cypress, California. Mr. Girard has 25-plus years architecting complex EW training, test, and evaluation solutions for a variety of RF applications including radar, EA, and SIGINT systems for airborne, surface, and laboratory applications. He has a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from California State Polytechnic University. Mercury Systems • www.mrcy.com

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Key considerations in radar test By Alex Western

Makers of traditional radar and electronic warfare (EW) test and measurement equipment are adapting to meet new requirements, introducing modular instruments and additional modeling and simulation during different test phases. Modeling and simulation will also reduce the need for expensive full-system testing and aid in identifying and solving problems earlier in the testing process to reduce schedule risk. The operating environment and requirements for military radars – and particularly electronic warfare (EW) – are changing rapidly due to such efforts as radar architecture proliferation, including active electronically scanned array (AESA), bistatic, and passive radar. Each of these brings a seemingly infinite number of software-defined techniques within cognitive radar and low probability of intercept (LPI) radar, which increases the range of testing required by test systems. Another trend is platform miniaturization, which is driving the consolidation of radio frequency (RF) systems. Future radars, EW receivers, and communications will likely share the same sensor platform and be tested as a unit. Autonomy similar to that seen in the commercial-vehicle market will also drastically increase the amount of testing required across multi-sensor and multiplatform systems as applications demand higher levels of safety and reliability. Radar modeling and target simulation is the only type of test that can be applied throughout the design process. The increased complexity of radar systems makes flexible radar modeling and simulation during development critical to decreasing the cost of expensive full-system testing, finding and resolving design problems earlier in the process, and reducing schedule risk. New test considerations Addressing test challenges early in the test design process means understanding the initial component- and system-level test considerations for such innovations in the radar and EW industry as hypersonic weapons, multistatic sensors and drones, networked

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electronic order of battle, and cognitive radar or predictive EW. For systems that combine data from a group of sensors and make softwaredriven adjustments based on that data, two main component tests are critical: waveform variance test for antennas and a signal-integrity test for system inputs and outputs (I/O). Because antennas are multipurpose, the test must account for waveform variance and verify that isolation and directivity are both high. Due to the mix of sensors and the data these sensors are generating, the system I/O is complex; signal-integrity testing must ensure and maintain high data throughput and the ability to use customizable system I/O. For systemlevel test, the heavy software suite and integration require further testing with a series of multifunction simulations to ensure the software is able to manage potential error or unexpected inputs. For their part, hypersonic weapons systems and reacting platforms need dependable low-latency systems to adapt quickly enough to the environment. As a result, radar and EW systems have higher range requirements, which means that their antenna systems at www.mil-embedded.com


and accuracy of these radar systems means balancing channels with high-density and detailed EW simulation.

THE INCREASED COMPLEXITY OF RADAR SYSTEMS MAKES FLEXIBLE RADAR MODELING AND SIMULATION DURING DEVELOPMENT CRITICAL TO DECREASING THE COST OF EXPENSIVE FULL-SYSTEM TESTING, FINDING AND RESOLVING DESIGN PROBLEMS EARLIER IN THE PROCESS, AND REDUCING SCHEDULE RISK.

The connected world and big data trends have also inspired a networked electronic order of battle, which is a series of new types of sensors and devices working together

the component level must feature more elements per antenna for the radar to conduct more precise beam steering with phase and amplitude control. The system level requires low-latency testing, specifically quick update rates for simulations, to ensure that the system can keep up with the hypersonic speeds and decision-making of the weapons or antiweapon system. The requirement to know more information earlier about smaller radar targets or a target environment has led to greater demand for systems that combine multistatic or geographically diverse) sensors plus unmanned aerial systems (UASs), which must work in tandem. Having connected systems at the component level drives the need for wider-band linear components that may need to test for nontraditional impairments. For elements on phased-array antennas, high gain and directivity guarantee that each element has higher performance over a smaller area, while the entire system of elements ensures the correct coverage for the overall phased-array antenna. High directivity and tighter beams enables the radar to find smaller and more distant targets. Testing for robustness www.mil-embedded.com

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Mil Tech Trends to identify, locate, and classify other groups’ movements, capabilities, and hierarchy. With the wide array of sensors used, testing at the component and the system level requires more complex I/O analysis. Such systems also need intricate simulators that can provide higher fidelity and handle more complex threat scenarios. As these enhanced systems generate more data at a higher rate, cognitive radar or predictive EW systems are needed that make decisions and organize data faster than humans. For these systems, component and subsystem test program sets involve a wider range of frequencies and bandwidths than other systems. Also, traditional parametric testing is likely not enough to fully understand system performance, which means that modeling and simulation testing must be done early in the test process. At a system level, open-loop simulators are no longer a viable option; test assets need to more accurately emulate targets and environments instead of relying on traditional threat databases that do not assess all the capabilities of a cognitive radar system. Traditional test instrumentation considerations Four traditional test approaches are used for radar system integration and test: delay lines, commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) FPGA-enabled instrumentation or RF systems on chip (RFSoCs), COTS radar target generators, and turnkey test and measurement solutions. Each of these test methods presents its own strengths and weaknesses. Delay lines are robust and cost-effective solutions that are easier to buy and develop and that meet very low-latency requirements. However, they are very limited in capability and only work for simple system functionality testing. They don’t offer electronic counter-countermeasure (ECCM) techniques and simulations of real-world environments or scenarios seen by modern radars, like clutter and interference. COTS FPGA-enabled instrumentation or RFSoCs feature low capital cost, low-latency capabilities, and customizable design. These do, however, require substantial initial nonrecurring engineering (NRE) costs, can be difficult to maintain, and involve a lot of pre-test firmware and software work. COTS radar target generator systems have a lower NRE cost investment because of their higher-level software starting point and ability to be tailored earlier in the process to specific application needs. There are some drawbacks, however: These COTS radar target generators typically cost more, require support to upgrade and maintain, and lack flexibility because a larger part of their functionality is already defined. Closed or turnkey test and measurement solutions are delivered as full solutions, which results in great dynamic range, well-calibrated and well-known support based on a core COTS model, and the ability to be leveraged across multiple programs quickly. However, turnkey test and measurement solutions are limited to vendordefined functionality and are difficult to configure for unique system needs. They also produce higher latency because they are not optimized for a specific test, are typically not phase-coherent, and are often prescripted or open-loop systems. Test instrumentation trends The industry trends affecting new radar and EW technology are also driving new instrumentation trends like industry convergence, software-defined platforms, test system maintainability, and test system architectures. As the technologies and testing for industries like automotive, 5G, and defense converge, test instrumentation must expand frequency coverage and offer larger operating bandwidths with higher channel counts. Test and measurement vendors are investing more in software platforms to run their instruments as customers quickly choose the flexibility, test speed, and reliability of software over previous manual test systems.

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TEST AND MEASUREMENT TRENDS

Economies of scale are driving down test instrumentation solution cost while creating more capable test instrumentation. The industry agrees that boxed instruments for test need to last 8 to 12 years, with firmware updates required at 18- to 24-month intervals, and hardware upgrades every 18 to 36 months. Makers of these boxed instruments are emulating personal mobile devices by building in touchscreens, and are creating “super boxes,” or collections of boxed instruments, for larger test coverage from single systems. Modular instruments are seeing the most growth in the industry with an increase in radio front ends, multiprocessor architectures, and reporting and storage needs. Modular hardware and software platforms enable users to adapt test systems for a wide variety of needs, from faster design and reduced schedule risk to compliance with future system requirements and added flexibility with FPGA and RF hardware in the same device. Multipurpose modular measurement instruments also offer improved measurement IP, better components, advances in signal processing, and better software accessibility and architectures. In addition, modular test instrumentation has led to more compact test systems, so that more than one function can fit into a smaller, PXI-based modular instrument or system. MES Alex Western is Solutions Marketer – Aerospace, Defense and Government, for National Instruments. She is responsible for applications involving research, design, prototyping, and deployment in the defense and aerospace industries. Alex began her NI career as an applications engineer before taking a role as a partner development manager within the aerospace, defense and government group. Alex received both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Michigan where she studied both mechanical and space systems engineering. National Instruments • www.ni.com www.mil-embedded.com


Industry Spotlight MANAGING SUPPLY CHAIN; OBSOLESCENCE; COUNTERFEIT PARTS

Obsolete and counterfeit electronics remain challenges for the military By Sally Cole, Senior Editor Legacy military electronics systems are a frequent target of counterfeiters, a common problem driven by obsolescence. Nondestructive testing solutions are emerging, however, that can help detect counterfeits.

Counterfeiting of electronics and components for military systems is widespread, posing an enormous challenge for designers and users. Many military systems are 40 years old or older, so replacement parts can be difficult to find.

“Because of the mismatch with the design cycle and the production cycle of modern electronics, we have an obsolescence problem,” Kent says. “It’s part of the problem and why we get used components from gray markets and the like. The dedicated production of cloned devices is another set of problems because somebody tries to build what are essentially replacements for legacy devices, but they aren’t necessarily authorized by the original manufacturer.”

Because so many systems with legacy components need to go outside of traditional channels for purchasing devices, buyers tend to encounter counterfeit components of various types within their supply chains, particularly specified parts that are older than a decade, which is nearly every military system in existence.

Scope of the problem How big a problem are obsolescence and counterfeits of semiconductors, integrated circuits (ICs), and electronics for the U.S. military? “Quantifying how big a problem semiconductor obsolescence is for the U.S. military requires some guesswork, as does gauging the size of the counterfeit problem,” says Dan Deisz, director of design technology for Rochester Electronics (Newburyport, Massachusetts). “The risk goes well beyond the military and is industrywide; it affects all users. No one wants to discuss either obsolescence or counterfeit devices until a product in the field requires a critical component.”

“We’re going to be flying the B-52 for a century,” points out Thomas Kent, manager of Microelectronics Trust & Assurance at Battelle (Columbus, Ohio), a nonprofit applied science and technology development company.

Obsolescence is and always has been a certainty driven by the law of supply and demand, where supply-chain disruption creates an opportunity for the introduction of counterfeit product, according to Deisz. “Counterfeit awareness at the first-level military primes is significantly better than it was five to 10 years ago, but lower-level subcontractors still purchase unauthorized product based on price or lead time where they feel it is necessary to meet schedules or margins,” he explains.

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screening or pay for extremely detailed testing. Consequently, used parts can be genuine but are less reliable.”

THE LEVEL OF FRAUD CAN RANGE FROM SIMPLY SCRAPING A LABEL OFF AND PUTTING A NEWLY PRINTED ONE ON ALL THE WAY TO PASSING IT OFF AS ADVANCED NEW SILICON.

Another challenge comes from device clones, particularly if the original manufacturer isn’t involved to validate the product and only room-temperature testing is performed. “These device clones from unauthorized sources could easily have malicious circuitry onboard,” Deisz notes. “They may be capable of passing simple room-temperature testing per datasheet specifications, but they may not be capable of passing complete testing over temperature per the OCM’s test program. When a device clone is believed to be discovered, the OCM should be involved for proper validation.” Counterfeit detection Counterfeit microelectronics come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes and different levels of sophistication. The level of fraud can range from simply scraping a label off and putting a newly printed one on all the way to passing it off as advanced new silicon. Microelectronics can also be reverse-engineered and built again. “There are many challenges for detecting counterfeits within a supply chain,” Kent says. “Counterfeiters often are able to functionally mimic a device’s original design intent. If you look at the data sheet for a counterfeit device, does it do what you tell it to do? Chances are you’re going to get the same result. It’s usually detected via more nuanced signals like performance over temperature, things like resisting certain elemental content tests, but even some of those are pretty easy to replicate.”

When the term “counterfeit” is used, that word should also mean previously used genuine parts that are being sold as new within that product population, Deisz says. “These are the counterfeit products that create the biggest challenge.” Used genuine products have “all of the correct date code information and die/package from the original manufacturer,” Deisz says. “Problems arise because test houses don’t have the original test programs used by the original component manufacturers (OCMs), who are the intellectual property rights holders of the product, for these products. Test houses can only provide their best effort based on what they have been contracted to test. The contract manufacturers who use the test houses also don’t have the OCM’s real test programs and they will rarely order lot-by-lot reliability www.mil-embedded.com

Battelle has developed unique nondestructive electrical tests for devices to detect counterfeits ICs, essentially looking at the second-order effects, or side-channel behavior, of devices. “This really probes the fundamental physics or architecture to really tease out how we measure the unique signatures of the manufacturing process by which these devices were built,” Kent says. “And the neat thing about that signature is that it can evolve over time, so if parts are reused, you’ll tend to see different signatures from those parts than if they were brand-new.” Battelle’s nondestructive technology – called “Barricade” – measures very minute power consumption of devices. “The difficulty of detecting counterfeits depends on what kind of device it is and the question you want to answer,” Kent explains. “Is it anomalous or is it a known specific counterfeit device from a specific manufacturer? Attribution is a very challenging problem. So we’re working to establish some partnerships with government and industry to really understand how to make these techniques successful and scalable, as well as how to make them a great solution for nondestructive tests for 100% screening.” Most parts go through some sort of testing – often by a third party – to, at a minimum, see if they match a data sheet. “They typically aren’t tested for other types of behavior,” Kent says. “But it’s something that we think needs to be included in future processes to screen parts for authenticity.” A significant number of counterfeits come from Southeast Asia, Kent says, because this type of activity tends to be widespread anywhere a lot of e-waste recycling happens: “You can make a buck doing it, but it requires some capital investment up front for more sophisticated counterfeiting.”

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MANAGING SUPPLY CHAIN; OBSOLESCENCE; COUNTERFEIT PARTS

The concern is that as counterfeiters become more sophisticated and start creating new parts with designs that they’ve either stolen or reverse-engineered, there’s a possibility of them not just directly counterfeiting the device but also manipulating the device’s behavior to make it meet their end goals. “Legacy systems are a rich target, primarily because of their reliance on gray-market sources for devices,” Kent says. “Then there’s buy low and sell high, and cost economics, so you go for higher-value things to counterfeit – certain types of chips would have higher market value. Processors and FPGAs and things of that nature are where you want to be especially careful.” Avoiding counterfeits for legacy systems Avoiding counterfeits and destructive testing is why the military often chooses to buy from companies like Rochester Electronics or Lansdale Semiconductor. “We were authorized by the original manufacturers to produce their parts when they discontinued them, so by default we’re supplying noncounterfeit parts,” says Dale Lillard, president of Lansdale Semiconductor (Tempe, Arizona). If you think about how easy it is to duplicate a Rolex watch, at least so it looks right, faking paperwork and integrated circuit marking is easy, according to Lillard. “Destructive testing is one way to detect it,” he says. “You look at whether the part has been erased, and x-ray the die size to see if the die is the correct size or if there’s even a die in the package. All kinds of processes have been authorized by the government to ensure that parts aren’t counterfeit. But a lot of military parts can be counterfeited. A commercial ceramic part can be made to look like it’s a military processed part, and it’s very difficult to tell the difference.” Rochester Electronics also provides 100% authorized product, “never buys from open markets, and adheres to a standard (AS6496) that we helped write,” Deisz says. “We’re actively involved in the Semiconductor Industry Association’s Anti-Counterfeit Task Force and provide a significant amount of counterfeit training for U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents.” (Figure 1.) Supplying obsolete parts isn’t easy. “The challenges are greater with commercial products because the sales aren’t concentrated,” Lillard points out. “It’s very difficult for companies like us to pick up a commercial product line that we know the military needs. Because they buy so many different products, it’s expensive to try to support. And, for the most part, it’s getting more difficult to try to pick up product lines to support the

Figure 1 | Tracking and authorization of product are paramount in ensuring no counterfeit parts are supplied for mission-critical electronics applications. Photo courtesy Rochester Electronics.

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marketplace because volumes are just too low to maintain production.” Emerging trends and threats During the past decade, researchers have worked to translate what’s known about destructive testing for counterfeits into nondestructive high-throughput electrical testing that can be done automatically in a test facility. The field is now starting to mature around a few different electrical test approaches, with second-order effects among them. “There are many groups engaged in various aspects of gaining a better understanding of the fundamental physics, how we can build the best instrument and validate it, and Battelle is involved in this work,” Kent says. Another trend, Deisz points out, is the continual evolution of counterfeit-device detection methods being classified broadly into two categories: “track and trace” or “known good library” of parts. “From what we’ve seen, counterfeitdetection methods fall into one of these two categories and both have significant shortcomings,” he says. “The first step in avoiding counterfeits is to buy from authorized sources when available.” One emerging threat Deisz sees is unmarked devices being shipped into the U.S. “Unmarked devices are a threat because U.S. Customs can’t stop products without a mark,” he says. “This essentially allows used products to be marked and then sold as new within the U.S.” Moreover, while the use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) technology “allows us to take advantage of innovations, it’s not necessarily optimized for Department of Defense (DoD) applications,” Kent says. “But the challenge of going back to a 1980s model of making everything bespoke is simply that the DoD needs to be able to leverage commercial innovations, specifically in microelectronics, because the industry out-invests the government significantly in terms of R&D and fabrication capability in making advanced systems. In the area of microelectronics, we’re really along for the ride.” MES www.mil-embedded.com


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TECHNICAL COVERAGE OF ALL PARTS OF THE DESIGN PROCESS Military Embedded Systems focuses on “whole life COTS” and the total military program life cycle, providing technical coverage that applies to every stage of a program, from front-end design to deployment. The website, Resource Guide, Internet editions, e-newsletters, and print editions provide insight on embedded tools and strategies such as hardware, software, systems, technology insertion, endof-life mitigation, component storage, and many other military-specific technical subjects. Coverage areas include the latest, most innovative products and technology shifts that drive today’s military embedded applications, such as SDR, avionics, AI, radar, cybersecurity, C4ISR, standards, and more. Each issue provides readers with the information they need to stay up to date on the embedded technology used by the military and aerospace industries and the newest, most exciting technologies in the pipeline. mil-embedded.com


Industry Spotlight MANAGING SUPPLY CHAIN; OBSOLESCENCE; COUNTERFEIT PARTS

As the military supply chain expands, so does the information security risk By Kevin Deal

The military supply chain continues to expand, with the result that more confidential unclassified information (CUI) spreads further than just military servers. With business information now also commonly stored in the cloud, keeping this data secure quickly becomes a complex task. Information assurance flows downstream in this ecosystem by necessity, with the result that it now touches all defense contractors. Those who can demonstrate secure and compliant data processes stand to gain real business advantages in this increasingly cyber-aware ecosystem. In a changing and more complex supplier ecosystem, any organization involved in the U.S. military supply chain must have strategies in place to meet multiple requirements from the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), specific branches of the military, and even the U.S. State Department. In particular, there are three key areas that defense contractors should focus on. Those companies that adapt their processes to deal with these three areas can stand to gain huge opportunities. 1. Security and compliance complexity These various regulations and administrative rules are designed to meet a single goal: Compliance protocols for the Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA). As one component of the Electronic Government Act of 2002, FISMA is designed to protect government information from threats including malicious or accidental disclosure or natural disasters. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) provides the NIST Risk Management Framework as a guide for supplier compliance. This voluntary framework consists of standards, guidelines, and best practices to manage cybersecurity-related

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risk. Each federal agency must conduct annual reviews of systems handling confidential unclassified information. The U.S. DoD requires that suppliers comply with the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) minimum security standards. NIST issues regular guidance on compliance and helps contractors make sense of the requirements by organizing them into 14 families ranging from access control to maintenance, media protection, and systems and information integrity. NIST also outlines several self-assessment steps a company should take to prepare for compliance in each of the 14 families. While NIST assumes that defense contractors have existing IT www.mil-embedded.com


A FEW SHORT YEARS AGO, CLOUD-BASED SOFTWARE WAS VIEWED WITH SKEPTICISM IN THE DEFENSE SECTOR ... NOW, CLOUD INFRASTRUCTURE HAS PRODUCED WORKAROUNDS FOR THIS CHALLENGE, MOST NOTABLY FROM MICROSOFT, WHICH HAS MADE ITS AZURE CLOUD PLATFORM ISO-COMPLIANT.

organizations protecting CUI and other sensitive data. A few short years ago, cloudbased software was viewed with skepticism in the defense sector. This was not only due to overarching security concerns, but specifically to International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) requirements that data should only be available to U.S. persons. Now, cloud infrastructure has produced workarounds for this challenge, most notably from Microsoft, which has made its Azure cloud platform ISO-compliant. The Bureau of Industry & Security has also issued a rule that exempts cloud data from some requirements of ITAR provisions if the cloud platform delivers “end-to-end” encryption of the data. Put simply, it requires that data be encrypted before it crosses any foreign border and remain encrypted unless it is accessed by an authorized U.S. person. 3. Export control considerations ITAR takes a broad interpretation of the term “exports” to include data released or stored on servers outside the U.S. or released to non-U.S. persons. The Defense Acquisition University (DAU) suggests that military organizations must not only protect U.S. DoD CUI and information subject to export control by the State Department, but

infrastructures in place that do not necessarily need to be replaced, a variety of tactics can be used to achieve compliance. There is no shortage of mandates for the treatment of CUI in nonfederal systems, and the fact that defense contractors have some degree of discretion in terms of how they comply may be more confusing than liberating. 2. Cloud confusion Application security control (ASC) is a substantial challenge even when enterprise applications and underlying data is housed on servers in an organization’s own premises. These server rooms must be secured physically against intrusion and data must be encrypted. Applications also need to include preventive and detective controls to ensure that data cannot be improperly accessed or modified, and that any security breach is recorded and will show up in an audit trail. The trend of commercially available cloudbased software places new burdens on www.mil-embedded.com

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must also protect CUI originating from other countries, following the laws of each country. In an environment where U.S. military organizations collaborate globally on major projects such as the Joint Strike Fighter and where American manufacturers and defense contractors may supply militaries around the world, this situation adds yet more complexity to the data-security challenge. This brings CUI protection to the attention of the State Department and the DoD. The DAU recommends that conforming to ITAR alone may be insufficient when it comes to protecting CUI for export control purposes, even for military organizations. These entities must, according to DAU, walk a tightrope between two bodies of regulation. It states that “there are several DoD policies that govern overall EC-CUI transfer by DoD personnel to foreign entities, they are overlapping and in some areas unclear of the procedures that DoD personnel should employ for transfer and safeguarding of EC-CUI to foreign entities in the pre-contract award phase of the DoD contracting process.” Enterprise software underpins security Dealing with complex data-security problems that have broad business implications is best handled with a centralized approach. The enterprise software system of record in a military or defense contractor organization may be the ideal tool since it can be used to exclusively handle CUI as it flows through the organization and even to suppliers and subcontractors. Centralizing CUI in an application proven specifically in the defense industry can be beneficial. Security and privacy of data can be centrally administered based on role or individual permissions. This can help executives ensure and document to auditors that only employees authorized and trained in the handling of CUI have access to it.

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An enterprise application can also enable an organization to take a standardsbased approach to compliance. For the defense sector, ISO 27034-1 is a globally recognized approach for managing application security. Adopting the standard can signal to regulators and trading partners that an organization more likely has a sound approach to ASC. There are technical elements within enterprise software that are verifiable so a government or private entity can prove these measures have been adequately implemented. Included in this process are not only the people-focused elements, which would require tracking of certification and training, but also the application control security data structure, including XML schemas and Application Lifecycle Reference Model. (Figure 1.) Enforce compliant practices An enterprise application can be configured to deny network communications traffic by default, in favor of allowing network communications traffic by exception. But internal changes to the software configuration, functionality or data models should be handled according to ITIL [Information Technology Infrastructure Library] processes. These ITIL processes will affect all changes to the instance of the software, but the change-management benefits will be particularly desirable when it comes to ensuring that application security policies are followed and protections remain intact as an instance of software evolves. Organizations subject to these regulations will want to carefully audit their current enterprise technology and processes and keep CUI security top of mind during new technology-acquisition processes. It also may make sense to ensure that enterprise software vendors whose products handle CUI handle security issues using an industry standard framework, most notably the Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS). The CVSS obviously helps an organization gauge the severity of a given threat by assigning each a numerical score based on common criteria. It also assigns scores based on the extent to which the problem can be easily mitigated and how widespread it is in an organization. www.mil-embedded.com


from competition and secure ongoing business in an increasingly cyber-aware market sector. MES

Figure 1 | This Application Lifecycle Reference Model traces the layers and stages of security compliance.

Opportunity ahead for defense contractors Rather than view new security requirements as a difficult hurdle, defense contractors should view them as an opportunity. There is now very clear guidance on how to handle CUI data, either on premise or in the cloud, but this requires diligence, hard work, and the support of the right enterprise software. With those three factors, contractors can meet regulatory requirements of the different agencies involved in the military ecosystem. It is this enhanced information security that will help differentiate them

Kevin Deal is vice president for Aerospace and Defense, IFS North America. Kevin is responsible for all aspects of IFS in Aerospace and Defense within North America and has been in the A&D IT business for over 25 years. Prior to joining IFS, Kevin held a number of roles as director of Mid-Americas and Federal at BroadVision, as well as director of national sales at Cincom. Kevin was also a logistics war modeler and former director of the DoD’s Supportability Investment Decision Analysis Center (SIDAC). Readers may reach the author at kevin.deal@ifsworld.com. IFS North America www.ifsworld.com

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RESOURCE GUIDE PROFILE INDEX ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE/ MACHINE LEARNING One Stop Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

EMBEDDED HARDWARE (Continued) Interface Concept . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 MPL AG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 North Atlantic Industries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78

AVIONICS

Omnetics Connector Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79

Afuzion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 AIM-USA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 VPT Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

COMMUNICATIONS ALPHI Technology Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Dolphin ICS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 MilesTek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56, 57 RTD Embedded Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

CYBERSECURITY Aitech Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

Opal Kelly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Pentek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Phoenix International . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Red Rapids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 RTD Embedded Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Vector Electronics & Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 WDL Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 WinSystems Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Extreme Engineering Solutions (X-ES) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Z Micro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89

EMBEDDED SOFTWARE Lauterbach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90, 91

ELECTRONIC WARFARE TE Connectivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

REAL-TIME OPERATING SYSTEMS AND TOOLS

EMBEDDED HARDWARE

WDL Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86

ACCES I/O Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60, 61

Wind River Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92

Acromag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 ADL Embedded Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 ADLINK Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63, 64 Advantech Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Annapolis Micro Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65, 66 BiTMicro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Crystal Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Dawn VME Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

RF & MICROWAVE Pixus Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95

SIGNAL PROCESSING Annapolis Micro Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93, 94

TEST Ellisys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95, 96

Dolphin ICS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 General Micro Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-75 GET Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Holt Integrated Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

50 September 2019

VIDEO MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS/ VIDEO SYSTEMS/VIDEO DISPLAYS Curtiss-Wright . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97

MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

www.mil-embedded.com


Gen4 NVMe Flash Storage Array (FSA4000) The FSA4000 end-to-end PCIe Gen4 NVMe all-flash-array is comprised of an OSS Flash Storage Array (FSA) and the 2U Expansion Optimized Server (EOS) or all-inone rugged solution with optional JBOF, data recorder or SAN storage software. The FSA4000 stores at speeds up to 56GB/s using a Gen4 path from the latest AMD Gen4 CPUs to Gen4 NVMe slots and Gen4 or Gen3 NVMe drives to maximize storage throughput in a flexible platform. The 4U Flash Storage Array is a 4U Rackmount Enclosure with up to 16 total Gen 3 or Gen 4 NVMe FHFL AICs. It features two 2000-watt 1+1 redundant power supplies and superior cooling with four variable speed fans. There are up to two PCIe x16 Gen 4 cable connections to the host server. The 2U Gen4 EOS server revolutionizes the capabilities of homogeneous systems containing closely coupled processors, NVMe storage and accelerator co-processing elements such as GPGPUs and FPGAs. The 2U Gen4 EOS contains the newest AMD Epyc 7002 series processors and provides the widest compatibility with dense accelerator expansion systems. It features up to seven PCIe 4.0 ½ height slots and supports 24 2.5" SATA, SAS or NVMe drives. The server features motherboards optimized to support up 7 PCIe 4.0 NVMe flash cards, advanced network interfaces and supports up to 3TB of memory mapped IO for memory intensive GPUs and accelerators.

FEATURES ĄĄ

4U Rackmount Enclosure

ĄĄ

Up to 16 total Gen 3 or Gen 4 NVMe FHFL AICs

ĄĄ

Two 2000-watt 1+1 redundant power supplies

ĄĄ

Superior Cooling with four variable speed fans

ĄĄ

ĄĄ

Up to two PCIe x16 Gen4 cable connections to host server Features AMD Epyc 7002 processor motherboards

ĄĄ

Eight PCIe 3.0 Expansion Slots

ĄĄ

Guaranteed to work with expansion

ĄĄ

Up to 24 2.5" drives

www.onestopsystems.com/gen4-nvme-flash-storage-array-fsa4000

One Stop Systems

www.onestopsystems.com www.mil-embedded.com

sales@onestopsystems.com

 877-438-2724 or 760-466-1646 _OneStopSystems

 www.linkedin.com/company/one-stop-systems

MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide



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Avionics

Safety-Critical Consulting Services Because Safety IS Critical TM

www.afuzion.com Safety Critical Services in Avionics Systems and Training Workshops Title>> Developing military avionics? 90% of your peers infuse AFuzion‘s expertise for avionics development and certification. For a free copy of AFuzion’s new “Military Avionics Certification” whitepaper, click here: https://afuzion.com/avionics-safety-critical-training-whitepapers/ Training: DO-178C, DO-254, ARP-4754A, ARP4761, DO-326A. More Training Info: https://afuzion.com/training/ Military Gap Analysis: DO-178C, DO-254, ARP-4754A. Gap Analysis Info: https://afuzion.com/gap-analysis/ Military DO-178C/DO-254 Plans, Checklists & Templates: Free Checklist Download: https://afuzion.com/plans-checklists/

• World’s largest military avionics certification company • 23,000 Engineers training worldwide; more than all competitors combined • 150+ Gap analysis in DO-178C, DO-254, and ARP4754A • AFuzion directly supports militaries in 25 countries on four continents • Engineers able to assist your miliary avionics development, onsite or remote • Checklists and templates used by 7,000 avionics engineers worldwide www.afuzion.com

AFuzion Inc

www.afuzion.com 52 September 2019

info@afuzion.com

 www.linkedin.com/in/vancehilderman/

MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

 858-922-6331

 @afuzion_vance www.mil-embedded.com


AME1553 - Mini-PCIe MIL-STD-1553 Interface Card The new rugged embedded MIL-STD-1553 mini-PCIe card is a member of AIM’s line of rugged embedded cards that additionally includes PMC cards, XMC cards, and rugged Ethernet to MIL-STD-1553 converters. These cards are uniquely designed for harsh environmental conditions that require a very small footprint. The extended temperature range and low power dissipation of the AME1553-1-E make it ideal for rugged flight applications with limited space due to its minimal Size, Weight and Power minus the Costs (SWaP-C). The card is a complete solution for MIL-STD-1553 applications in harsh environments where shock and vibration can create reliability challenges. An easy-to-use Application Programming Interface (API) is provided along with low level 32/64-bit operating system specific drivers for Windows, Linux and VxWorks to ease systems integration. Other Operating Systems are available upon request.

FEATURES ĄĄ

Easily add MIL-STD-1553 to any system

ĄĄ

BC/Multi-RT/MT Modes

ĄĄ

Shock and Vibration Qualified

ĄĄ

SAE AS4111 / 4112 Qualified (RT Validation)

ĄĄ

Ideal for Rugged Embedded and Portable Lab Applications www.aim-online.com/products/ame1553-1-e/

AIM-USA, LLC

www.aim-online.com

salesusa@aim-online.com

 267-982-2600

Avionics

VXR Series Hi-Rel COTS DC-DC Converters VPT’s high-reliability VXR Series of DC-DC converters are optimized for a broad range of applications from military ground vehicles to commercial and military aircraft and is intended for harsh environments including severe vibration, shock and temperature cycling. The VXR Series patent-pending epoxy encapsulated V-SHIELD® packaging is highly resistant to chemical, solvent and salt environments and is fully compatible with high volume manufacturing processes including wave solder, cleaning solvents, high pressure sprays, and aqueous wash processes. A unique integral six-sided metalized shield improves system EMI compatibility. Dual sided conduction cooling coupled with reduced power dissipation simplifies system thermal design. VPT’s product designs are based on decades of proven heritage and deliver high-reliability at a reasonable cost.

VPT, Inc.

www.vptpower.com www.mil-embedded.com

FEATURES 7 to 250 Watts ĄĄ Wide input voltage range: 9 V to 60 V ĄĄ Single outputs of 3.3V, 5V, 12V, and 15V ĄĄ Rugged epoxy encapsulated V-SHIELD® package ĄĄ Fully compatible with aqueous cleaning processes ĄĄ -55 °C to +105 °C operation ĄĄ Integral EMI shield ĄĄ Dual-sided thermal conduction ĄĄ

Proven Power Conversion Solutions for Mission Critical Applications

vptsales@vptpower.com

 https://www.linkedin.com/company/vpt-inc-

 425-353-3010

 @vptnews

MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

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Military Embedded Systems Resource Guide

Communications

PCIe-Mini-COM-8 Octal PCI Express Mini UART The PCIe-Mini-COM-8 is an 8-channel PCI Express (PCIe) UART (Universal Asynchronous Receiver and Transmitter) optimized for higher performance. The PCIe-Mini-COM-8 serves as a single lane PCIe bridge to 8 independent enhanced 16550 compatible UARTs. All 8 channels can be programmed in pairs with the required frontend interface:

FEATURES ĄĄ

Eight independent 16C550-class UARTs

ĄĄ

256-bytes Tx and Rx FIFOs

ĄĄ

Up to 31.25Mbps serial data rate per channel

ĄĄ

Selectable serial mode in pairs: RS-232, RS-485, and RS-422

• Programmable data rates go up to 31.25Mb/s per channel • for all channels

ĄĄ

Full or half duplex configurations

ĄĄ

On board termination 120Ω software selectable

Operating temperature is -40ºC to +85ºC.

ĄĄ

Robust ±15KV ESD protection (IEC 61000-4-2 air gap)

• Software selectable RS-232, RS-485 and RS-422 • Software selectable 120Ω termination for RS-422 and • RS-485 interfaces

www.alphitech.com

ALPHI Technology Corporation www.Alphitech.com

Sales@Alphitech.com

 480-838-2428

Communications

PCIe-Mini-DIO16/32 PCIe Mini FPGA The PCIe-Mini-DIO16/32 incorporates a user reconfigurable Altera Cyclone IV FPGA with RS-422/485 and LVTTL I/O drivers in a small form factor PCI Express Mini package. It combines the speed and user programmability of an FPGA with versatile communications capability. The PCIe-Mini-DIO16/32 provides 32 I/O channels, software selectable in groups of two, with the following options: • Up to 16 channel pairs RS-422/485, bidirectional, half or full duplex, up to 20Mb/s data rate per channel • Software selectable 120Ω termination for RS-422 and RS-485 interfaces • High input impedance supports 256 nodes per bus • Up to 32 channels LVTTL • Change-of-state/level interrupts, software programmable for change of state or level detection Operating temperature: -40ºC to 85ºC. Standard size Mini PCIe Module (30mm x 50.95mm), with no separate transition module required.

ALPHI Technology Corporation www.Alphitech.com 54 September 2019

FEATURES ĄĄ

User configurable Altera Cyclone IV FPGA

ĄĄ

32 I/O lines, configurable in pairs

ĄĄ

RS-422/485 and LVTTL I/O

ĄĄ

On board termination 120Ω, software selectable

ĄĄ

Full or half duplex configurations

20Mb/s data rate per RS-422/485 channel ĄĄ Robust ±25kV HBM ESD protection ĄĄ

www.alphitech.com

Sales@Alphitech.com

MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

 480-838-2428

www.mil-embedded.com


Application NVMe Lib

MPI

Socket Switch

User Space SuperSockets

eXpressWare PCIe Software Suite eXpressWare™ software enables Military applications to easily migrate to PCIe Networks using standard PCI Express. It supports a low level direct remote memory access API – SISCI API, a sockets API – SuperSockets™, and SmartIO technology. The SISCI API enables customers to time efficiently exploit the PCIe model. It offers a C programming API for shared/remote memory access, including reflective memory/multi-cast, peer-to-peer memory transfers, RDMA capabilities, and direct support for FPGAs, GPUs, or any combination of communication with FPGAs, CPUs, GPUs or system memory over PCIe. SuperSockets™ enables applications to benefit from a low-latency high throughput PCIe network without any modifications. It delivers maximum application performance without application changes. SuperSockets™ is a unique implementation of the Berkeley Sockets API that capitalizes on the PCIe transport to transparently achieve performance gains for existing socket-based network applications. PCIe SmartIO is a collection of software for PCI Express enabling customers to utilize standard PCIe devices in a new and flexible way. It includes capabilities to share devices and includes features for device lending, hot adding transparent devices and sharing PCIe endpoints. eXpressWare™ is a complete software suite that supports Linux, Windows and VxWorks. Dolphin supports both standard and custom designs.

SISCI - Shared Memory API

Dolphin ICS

Device Driver

SISCI SmartIO

Device Lending

TCP/IP Stack

Windows User SuperSockets

IP-Driver

IRM - Interconnect Resource Manager

IP- Driver

Ethernet Hardware

PCIe Hardware Failover Support

FEATURES Ą PCIe Gen 1, 2, 3, 4 and beyond support Ą Address based Multi-cast/reflective memory Ą Point-to-point and switched network support Ą Low latency direct memory and peer-to-peer transfers Ą Operating systems – Windows, Linux, VxWorks,

and RTX

Ą FPGA and GPU direct memory transfers Ą Microsemi, Broadcom, IDT and Intel NTB support

info@dolphinics.com

 603-747-4100

 www.linkedin.com/company/dolphin-interconnect-solutions

www.dolphinics.com

Communications

Managed Scalable GigE Switch The LAN35MH08HR is an 8-port 10/100/1000 Managed Ethernet switch. This switch module has a total of 10 ports: eight ports are provided to I/O connectors, one port is available to the host CPU through a x1 PCI Express GigE controller, and one port is used as a stacking switch expansion port allowing full compatibility with RTD’s managed and unmanaged StackNET® Ethernet switch family. Additionally, this allows the CPU to use the switch without the need for external cables. The LAN35MH08HR can also be used as an expandable, standalone 8-port Ethernet switch. The onboard CEServices Carrier Ethernet switching software provides a rich Layer 2 switching solution with Layer 3-aware packet processing. All of the industry-standard Managed Ethernet Switch features found in an enterprise rackmount switch are provided, such as VLANs, Spanning Tree, QoS, and SNMP. Additionally, the CEServices software provides features for carrier and timing-critical networks such as OAM, Synchronous Ethernet, and IEEE 1588. The switch may be configured via a web GUI interface, or a command-line console via USB, Telnet, or SSH.

RTD Embedded Technologies, Inc. www.rtdstacknet.com www.mil-embedded.com

FEATURES Ą -40 to +85°C operation, passively cooled Ą PCIe/104 stackable bus structure Ą Eight 1000/100/10 Mbps Ethernet ports plus one host port and one

stacking switch expansion port

Ą Onboard tri-color LED for each Ethernet Port Ą RJ-45 jacks or 10-pin right-angle headers Ą Fully-managed Layer 2 Ethernet Switch with Layer 3-aware packet

processing • Support for all major Enterprise switching features such as VLANs, Spanning Tree, QoS, and SNMP • Manageable via web GUI interface, SSH, Telnet, and Serial Console • Industry-standard CLI interface Ą Onboard PCI Express Ethernet Controller for interface to host cpuModule Ą USB Device Port for Serial Console command-line interface Ą Available in stackable, rugged enclosures

sales@rtd.com

 814-234-8087

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Military Embedded Systems Resource Guide

Communications

RoHS/Reach Compliant, MIL-STD-1553 Lab Rated Cables RoHS/Reach Compliant, MIL-STD-1553 Lab Rated Cables Demanding military and R&D applications require cables that can tolerate an extreme temperature range while being able to offer the highest levels of performance. To address such applications, MilesTek has just launched a new series of Lab rated MIL-STD-1553 cable assemblies that are RoHS and REACH compliant. MilesTek’s new lead-free lab-rated cables feature an operating temperature range of -20°C to +75°C, 30-02003 PVC-jacketed, 78 Ohm, twinax cable and are available in off-the-shelf lengths ranging from 0.3 meters to 6 meters (model dependent). Connector options in this series include 2-slot and 3-slot TRB & TRS plugs and jacks, bulkhead-style jacks, insulated and non-insulated connectors as well as versions with blunt cut ends. Additionally, select models feature rugged bend reliefs to stand up to demanding applications. MilesTek's new RoHS/REACH compliant, lab-rated cables are in-stock and available for immediate shipment. Contact us today with all your application needs.

FEATURES ĄĄ ĄĄ

ĄĄ ĄĄ

ĄĄ ĄĄ

ĄĄ

-20°C to +75°C temperature range 2-slot and 3-slot TRB & TRS plugs and jacks, bulkhead jacks, insulated and non-insulated connectors Blunt cut-end assemblies Off-the-shelf lengths from .03 meters to 6 meters (model dependent) RoHS and REACH compliant Custom labeling, lengths and connector combinations available In Stock and Ready for Same-Day Shipping

Applications ĄĄ

Lab environments

ĄĄ

MIL-STD-1553 R&D

ĄĄ

MIL-STD-1553 test and measurement

– About MilesTek – MilesTek has offered complete connectivity solutions since 1981. Our customers have come to expect more than just products – they expect answers that will help them solve their installation or project questions. We offer quality products, in-stock for same-day shipping and quick turnaround on your custom requirements. MilesTek manufactures specialized products for the Military Avionics, Broadcast and DS3 /Telecom industries, Military and Industrial Networking connectivity solutions.

Part Number: MSA00472-03M RoHS Lead Free Lab Rated 0.0150" O.D. Twinax Cable Assembly Plug to Cable Jack .3 Meter

www.milestek.com/p-22409-lead-free-lab-0150-od-1553-twnx-p-cj-3m.aspx

MilesTek

www.milestek.com 56 September 2019

sales@milestek.com

MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

 949-267-9734 or Toll Free 866-524-1553

www.mil-embedded.com


RoHS Lead Free High Temp 1553 Twinax Cable Assembly RoHS and REACH Compliant M17/176-00002, High-temp, MIL-STD-1553B Cables Today many MIL-STD-1553B connectivity applications are requiring that products be compliant with RoHS and REACH directives. Until now, it was necessary to order these products as customs which meant long lead times and high minimum order quantities. To address the need for RoHS and REACH compliant MIL-STD-1553B cables, MilesTek has introduced and now stocks a wide selection of MIL-STD-1553B cable assemblies that feature high-temperature M17/176-00002 cables that are fully RoHS and REACH compliant. These 78 Ohm cables are rated for 200°C, the cable dielectric and fillers are made of PTFE (Teflon) and the outer jackets are PFA (perfluoroalkoxy) to address extreme temperatures. Connector options within this series include male and female, TRB, TRS, TTM and TRT. In addition to a wide selection of off-the-shelf lengths, custom lengths and connector combinations are also available upon request. MilesTek's new RoHS and REACH compliant M17/176-00002 cable assemblies are in-stock and available for immediate shipment. Contact us today with all your application needs.

FEATURES ĄĄ

RoHS and REACH compliant

ĄĄ

78 Ohm impedance

ĄĄ

M17/176-00002 cable rated for -55°C to +200°C

ĄĄ

ĄĄ

ĄĄ

ĄĄ

PTFE (Teflon) dielectric and fillers and PFA (Perfluoroalkoxy) Jackets designed to withstand temperature extremes TRB, TRS, TTM and TRT connector options provide a wide selection for a variety of applications Custom labeling, length and connector combinations offered In Stock and Ready for Same-Day Shipping

Applications ĄĄ

Military/Aerospace, R&D, military vehicle use

ĄĄ

Harsh Environment

– About MilesTek – MilesTek has offered complete connectivity solutions since 1981. Our customers have come to expect more than just products – they expect answers that will help them solve their installation or project questions. We offer quality products, in-stock for same-day shipping and quick turnaround on your custom requirements. MilesTek manufactures specialized products for the Military Avionics, Broadcast and DS3 /Telecom industries, Military and

Part Number: MSA00464-1M

Industrial Networking connectivity solutions.

RoHS Lead Free High Temp 1553 Twinax Cable Assembly 2-Slot Plug To 3-Lug Cable Jack 1 Meter

www.milestek.com/p-22116-lead-free-high-temp-1553-twinax-cable-assembly-2-slot-plug-to-3-lug-cj-1-meter.aspx?keyword=msa00464-1m

MilesTek

www.milestek.com www.mil-embedded.com

sales@milestek.com

 949-267-9734 or Toll Free 866-524-1553

MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

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Military Embedded Systems Resource Guide

Cybersecurity

???? Cybersecurity in Intel Xeon SBCs Help Protect Data Both On-site and Remotely The need for reliable, secure, protected data is top of mind in any missioncritical application, from safeguarding assets to ensuring proper system operation. Recognizing the increasing number of potential tamper attacks and theft of data in embedded systems, Aitech Group developed the AiSecure™ cybersecurity architecture. This proprietary set of tools, currently available on the Intel Xeon-based C875 and C877 SBCs, help protect against data breaches from remote threats as well as those found at the system site itself. Comprised of a set of trusted hardware and firmware, AiSecure provides the tools to maintain a highly secured system and supports a wide range of user-defined security policies, including system element integrity, access permissions and authentication of system resources and external interfaces. These security mechanisms protect embedded systems against threats such as theft of control, theft of intellectual property, theft of secrets and cloning. The AiSecure architecture works in tandem with Intel’s inherent security features, which include the Trusted Platform architecture, Secure Boot and BIOS Guard based on Intel’s TXT, TPM 2.0 and BIOS security SSD.

C877-Rugged 3U VPX using Intel Xeon D

FEATURES

The new C877 provides one of the most powerful combinations of data processing and cybersecurity for rugged, high reliability, mission-critical environments that need high levels of data security and peak processing performance. It combines the latest generation 16-core Intel Xeon D processor and up to 1 terabyte of onboard security-protected SATA SSD with an optional, large onboard Xilinx Zynq UltraScale+ FPGA. The Zynq FPGA contains user-programmable code to independently monitor onboard I/O ensuring data to/from the C877 is legitimate and authorized depending on the application. It also employs a high-bandwidth bus architecture and offers versatile onboard I/O interfaces, with an XMC site for additional I/O options.

AiSecure™ CYBERSECURITY ARCHITECTURE ĄĄ

ĄĄ

Protects against theft of control, IP, secrets and cloning

ĄĄ

Works in tandem with Intel’s inherent security features

ĄĄ

Supports a wide range of user-defined policies

SBC TECHNOLOGY HIGHLIGHTS ĄĄ

C875-Rugged 3U VPX using Intel Xeon E Complementing its data protection advantages, the C875 offers powerful performance attributes with three independent Intel UHD graphics ports, an onboard Microsemi SmartFusion FPGA (with ARM core) and exceptional storage capacities as well as a host of standard I/O. It uses the Intel Xeon E with a 6-core (12-thread) architecture and 12 MB of Smartcache to deliver an impressive 2.7 GHz of performance that increases up to 4.4 GHz when Turbo Mode is enabled. Complete with an 8-lane PCIe Gen 3 VPX data plane, the SBC offers several VITA 65 OpenVPX slot profiles to meet different configurations.

Firmware and hardware-based measures for increased data security

ĄĄ

ĄĄ ĄĄ

Rugged 3U VPX SBCs for harsh applications High performance, high reliability processing • C875: 6-core (12-thread) Intel Xeon E • C877: 16-core Xeon D Large memory resources such as 1 TB Onboard SSD Versatile I/O including USB 3.0 & 2.0; Serial; SATA III; Discrete; GbE

ĄĄ

Expandable through standard XMC slot w/PCIe x8 Gen3

ĄĄ

8 Lane PCIe Gen3 VPX Data Plane

Aitech Group

58 September 2019

MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

www.rugged.com

sales@rugged.com

 www.linkedin.com/company/Aitech

 888-Aitech-8

 @AitechDefense www.mil-embedded.com


BACKPLANE CONNECTORS FOR THE MODERN BATTLEFIELD Lighter, faster, and tougher: TE Connectivity’s (TE) MULTIGIG RT 3 and RT 2-S connectors deliver unmatched reliability in embedded computing and OpenVPX systems. The lightest design ever achieved in any comparable backplane connectors, the MULTIGIG RT 3 and RT 2-S connectors owe their strength and performance to durable, weight-saving thermoplastic and copper alloy construction. These backplane connectors have been rigorously tested and proven in military, avionics, ground defense, missile defense, and space applications. As our warfighters become increasingly dependant on technological innovation, we’re excited to expand our offering of VPX-compliant solutions that support 10G Ethernet, RapidIO, InfiniBand, HyperTransport, and other high-speed protocols.

FAST • Enhanced PCB wafer and contact design supports increased bandwidth up to 25+ Gb/s FLEXIBLE • Meets interface requirements for VITA 46 connectors allowing backward compatibility with legacy VPX products • Customizable to meet unique application requirements MODULAR • Modular design enables numerous configurations by interchanging higher-speed MULTIGIG RT 3 connectors with the legacy MULTIGIG RT 2 and MULTIGIG RT 2-R connectors RUGGED • Contact design utilizes quad redundant contacts for optimum performance in shock and vibration

www.te.com/embeddedcomputing

TE Connectivity www.te.com

www.mil-embedded.com

 800-522-6752 @TEConnectivity www.linkedin.com/company/te-connectivity/





MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

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Embedded Hardware

USB3-104-HUB – Rugged, Industrial Grade, 4-Port USB 3.1 Hub Designed for the harshest environments, this small industrial/military grade 4-port USB 3.1 hub features extended temperature operation (-40°C to +85°C), locking USB and power connections, and an industrial steel enclosure for shock and vibration mitigation. The OEM version (board only) is PC/104-sized and can easily be installed in new or existing PC/104-based systems as well. The USB3-104-HUB makes it easy to add USB-based I/O to your embedded system or to connect peripherals such as external hard drives, keyboards, GPS, wireless, and more. Real-world markets include Industrial Automation, Security, Embedded OEM, Laboratory, Kiosk, Military/Mission Critical, Government, and Transportation/Automotive. This versatile four-port hub can be bus powered or self (externally) powered. You may choose from two power inputs (power jack and terminal block) to provide a full 900mA source at 5V on each of the downstream ports. Additionally, a wide-input power option exists to accept from 7VDC to 28VDC. All type A and type B USB connections feature a locking, high-retention design.

ACCES I/O Products, Inc. www.accesio.com

FEATURES ĄĄ Rugged, industrialized, four-port USB 3.1 hub ĄĄ USB 3.1 Gen 1 with data transfers up to 5Gbps (USB 2.0 and 1.1 compatible) ĄĄ Extended temperature (-40°C to +85°C) for industrial/military grade applications ĄĄ Locking upstream, downstream, and power connectors prevent accidental disconnects ĄĄ SuperSpeed (5Gbps), Hi-speed (480Mbps), Full-speed (12Mbps), and Low-speed (1.5Mbps) transfers supported ĄĄ Supports bus-powered and self-powered modes, accessible via DC power input jack or screw terminals ĄĄ LED for power, and per-port RGB LEDs to indicate overcurrent fault, High-Speed, and SuperSpeed ĄĄ Wide input external power option accepts from 7-28VDC ĄĄ OEM version (board only) features PC/104 module size and mounting compatibility

contactus@accesio.com

 www.linkedin.com/company/acces-i-o-products-inc

 858-550-9559

 @accesio

Embedded Hardware

mPCIe-ICM Family PCI Express Mini Cards The mPCIe-ICM Series isolated serial communication cards measure just 30 x 51 mm and feature a selection of 4 or 2 ports of isolated RS232/422/485 serial communications. 1.5kV isolation is provided port-to-computer and 500V isolation port-to-port on ALL signals at the I/O connectors. The mPCIe-ICM cards have been designed for use in harsh and rugged environments such as military and defense along with applications such as health and medical, point of sale systems, kiosk design, retail, hospitality, automation, and gaming. The RS232 ports provided by the card are 100% compatible with every other industry-standard serial COM device, supporting TX, RX, RTS, and CTS. The card provides ±15kV ESD protection on all signal pins to protect against costly damage to sensitive electronic devices due to electrostatic discharge. In addition, they provide Tru-Iso™ port-to-port and port-to-PC isolation. The serial ports on the device are accessed using a low-profile, latching, 5-pin Hirose connector. Optional breakout cables are available, and bring each port connection to a panel-mountable DB9-M with an industry compatible RS232 pin-out. The mPCIe-ICM cards were designed using type 16C950 UARTS and use 128-byte transmit/receive FIFO buffers to decrease CPU loading and protect against lost data in multitasking systems. New systems can continue to interface with legacy serial peripherals, yet benefit from the use of the high performance PCI Express bus. The cards are fully software compatible with current PCI 16550 type UART applications and allow for users to maintain backward compatibility.

ACCES I/O Products, Inc. www.accesio.com

60 September 2019

FEATURES ĄĄ PCI Express Mini Card (mPCIe) type F1, with latching I/O connectors ĄĄ 4 or 2-port mPCIe RS232/422/485 serial communication cards ĄĄ Tru-Iso™ 1500V isolation port-to-computer and 500V isolation

port-to-port on ALL signals

ĄĄ High performance 16C950 class UARTs with 128-byte FIFO for each ĄĄ ĄĄ ĄĄ ĄĄ ĄĄ ĄĄ

TX and RX Industrial operating temperature (-40°C to +85°C) and RoHS standard Supports data communication rates as high as 3Mbps – 12MHz with custom crystal Custom baud rates easily configured ±15kV ESD protection on all signal pins 9-bit data mode fully supported Supports CTS and RTS handshaking

contactus@accesio.com

 www.linkedin.com/company/acces-i-o-products-inc

MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

 858-550-9559

 @accesio

www.mil-embedded.com


mPCIe-COM Family PCI Express Mini Cards ACCES I/O Products is pleased to announce the release of a new family of mini PCI Express (mPCIe) multi-port serial communication cards. These small, low-priced, PCI Express Mini cards feature a selection of 4 or 2-ports of software selectable RS-232/422/485 asynchronous serial protocols on a port-by-port basis. These cards have been designed for use in harsh and rugged environments such as military and defense along with applications such as health and medical, point of sale systems, kiosk design, retail, hospitality, automation, gaming and more. The small size (just 50.95mm x30mm) allows for maximum performance in applications where space is a valuable resource. Each RS-232 port is simultaneously capable of supporting data communication rates up to 921.6 kbps. RS-422/485 modes support data communication speeds up to 3 Mbps. The cards provide ±15kV ESD protection on all signal pins to protect against costly damage due to electrostatic discharge. Existing serial peripherals can connect directly to industry standard DB9M connectors on the optional breakout cable accessory kits. The mPCIe-COM cards were designed using type 16C950 UARTs and use 128-byte transmit/receive FIFO buffers to decrease CPU loading and protect against lost data in multitasking systems. New systems can continue to interface with legacy serial peripherals, yet benefit from the use of the high performance PCI Express bus. The cards are fully software compatible with current PCI and PCI Express 16550 type UART applications and allow users to maintain backward compatibility.

ACCES I/O Products, Inc. www.accesio.com

FEATURES ĄĄ PCI Express Mini Card form-factor (mPCIe) type F1, with latching I/O

connectors

ĄĄ 4 or 2-port serial communication cards with optional DB9M connectivity ĄĄ Software selectable RS-232, RS-422, and RS-485 protocols, per port

stored in EEPROM

ĄĄ High performance 16C950 class UARTs with 128-byte FIFO for each

TX and RX

ĄĄ Port-by-port field selectable termination for RS-422/485 applications ĄĄ Industrial operating temperature (-40°C to +85°C) and RoHS standard ĄĄ Supports data communication rates up to 3Mbps simultaneously,

(RS-232 up to 921.6 kbps)

ĄĄ Custom baud rates easily configured ĄĄ ±15kV ESD protection on all signal pins ĄĄ CTS, RTS, 9-bit data mode, and RS-485 full-duplex (4 wire) fully

supported

ĄĄ RS-232 only and RS-422/485 versions available

contactus@accesio.com

 www.linkedin.com/company/acces-i-o-products-inc

 858-550-9559

 @accesio

Embedded Hardware

ETH-DIO-48 Ethernet 48-Channel Industrial Strength Digital I/O Designed for compact control and monitoring applications, this product features 48 or 24 industrial strength TTL digital I/O lines. This Ethernet device is an ideal solution for adding portable, easyto-install, digital I/O to any Ethernet network, even wirelessly. The ETH-DIO-48 is excellent for use in applications sensing inputs such as switch closures, TTL, LVTTL, CMOS logic, and is ideal for controlling external relays, driving indicator lights, and more. Applications include home, portable, tablet, laboratory, industrial automation, and embedded OEM. Available accessories include a broad range of ribbon cables, screw terminal boards, optically isolated adapters, electromechanical relay boards, and industry standard solid state module racks. Special order items such as conformal coating, custom software, right angle headers, and more are also available.

ACCES I/O Products, Inc.

www.accesio.com/eth-dio-48

www.mil-embedded.com

FEATURES ĄĄ Ethernet 10/100 RJ45 connector for interfacing to CPU or network ĄĄ 48 or 24 channel high-current TTL digital I/O lines ĄĄ Compatible with industry standard I/O racks such as Grayhill, Opto 22,

Western Reserve Controls, etc.

ĄĄ Eight-bit ports software selectable for inputs or outputs ĄĄ All 48 digital I/O lines buffered with 32 mA source/64mA sink current

capabilities

ĄĄ Jumper selectable I/O pulled up to 5V (via 10KΩ) for contact monitoring, ĄĄ ĄĄ ĄĄ ĄĄ

pulled down to ground or floating Resettable 0.5A fused +5VDC output per I/O connector OEM version (board only), features PC/104 size and mounting compatibility Small, (4"x4"x1.7") rugged, steel industrial enclosure LVTTL (3.3V) and -40°C to +85°C industrial operating temperature available as factory options

contactus@accesio.com

 www.linkedin.com/company/acces-i-o-products-inc MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

 858-550-9559

 @accesio

September 2019 61

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Military Embedded Systems Resource Guide

Embedded Hardware

VPX6600 AcroExpress 3U VPX Processor Board The AcroExpress® VPX6600 is a high-performance 3U OpenVPX® embedded single board computer based on the 6th Generation Skylake Intel® Xeon® processor and PCH. Designed for COTS applications this Intel SBC utilizes the Intel C230 series PCH chipset for extensive I/O support. Heat is managed with a fully integrated heatsink for advanced cooling management. This board can support either one or two DDR4 ECC SODIMMs, for a total of up to 32 GB. The SODIMMs are firmly attached to the module with screws and surrounded by heat sink material to provide a mechanically and thermally robust mechanism. Extended temperature models are available for operating in a -40°C to +85°C range. The VPX6600 contains an M.2 expansion card slot to provide on-board storage capabilities. The M.2 slot supports the use of SATA III and PCIe Gen. 3 storage drives. A two-digit LED display is available for Power ON Self-Test (POST) codes, should a problem arise during the boot operation. This display is available for application software user codes after POST to aid in software debugging. The optional VPX6600-RTM Rear-Transition Module is available to provide easy access to all of the P2 connector’s I/O signals.

Acromag, Inc.

www.acromag.com

FEATURES ĄĄ 6th Generation Intel Xeon: Quad Core Xeon E3-1505M V5 (47W) ĄĄ Up to -40 to 85°C extended operating range ĄĄ Programmable CPU power for heat sensitive applications ĄĄ Intel C230 series CM236 PCH chipset ĄĄ Up to 32GB of high-speed DDR4 memory with SODIMM

lock-down mechanism

ĄĄ Front panel I/O includes: dual USB 3.0 ports and mini-display port ĄĄ Backplane I/O has many options www.acromag.com

solutions@acromag.com

 www.linkedin.com/company/acromag

 877-295-7088 @Acromag



Embedded Hardware

XMC610 – 1GbE NIC Card with Quad RJ45, SFP, or Rear Ports Acromag’s new XMC610 Series modules provide four independent gigabit Ethernet interface ports when used on VME, VPX, PCIe or other embedded computing carrier boards. The industry-leading Intel® I350 Ethernet Controller interfaces with the PCIe bus via four high-speed serial lanes on the XMC P15 connector. Three models are available: The XMC611 model offers four RJ45 connectors on the front panel for copper cabling while the XMC612 substitutes four SFP connectors to additionally support fiber optic media. The rear I/O model XMC613 routes four 1000BASE-T connections to the P16 connector and is compatible with conduction-cooling frames. Designed for COTS applications, these XMC modules are ideal for use in defense, aerospace, industrial, and scientific research computing systems. Employing Intel’s advanced I350 4-port gigabit Ethernet controller, these networking modules introduce new levels of performance including improved power management technologies, such as energy-efficient Ethernet and direct memory access coalescing. Other enhancements add flexibility for virtual functions and increased off-load capabilities. Autonegotiation supports 10/100/1000 Mbps data rates. A 3.3V low power design and extended temperature operation from -40 to 85°C further simplify system integration.

Acromag, Inc.

www.acromag.com 62 September 2019

FEATURES Four independent 1-gigabit Ethernet interface ĄĄ Industry-leading Intel I350 Ethernet controller ĄĄ Front or rear I/O access (RJ45, SFP, or P16) ĄĄ XMC PCIe x4 Gen 2 interface ĄĄ Up to 5Gbps bus speed per lane ĄĄ Supports fiber optic or copper media ĄĄ 10/100/1000 Mbps data rates ĄĄ

solutions@acromag.com

 www.linkedin.com/company/acromag MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

www.acromag.com

 877-295-7088 @Acromag



www.mil-embedded.com


ADLMES9200 Series Rugged Chassis Systems The ADLMES9200 is a successor to ADL’s popular ADLMES8200 rugged chassis system. Design improvements include lower weight, lower cost, quick and reliable IP67 integration as well as rugged features including MIL-STD 810G shock and vibration and MIL-STD 461F/704F/1275D compliance capability. Our ADLMES9200 rugged chassis systems are ideal for SWaPconstrained military/defense applications for mobile, tactical, airborne and ground vehicles. Designed to survive MIL-STD 810 rugged environments, the ADLMES9200 can suit the needs of a broad range of rugged uses from the ground up.

APPLICATIONS: Military/Defense Ground Vehicles, Mission/Payload Computers, SWAP-constrained Embedded Systems for Mobile, Tactical, Airborne and Vehicle applications, Rugged industrial Oil and Gas, Mining and Construction and Commercial Unmanned Vehicles.

FEATURES Two Size Profiles Available IP7-rated EMC-Compliance Gasket Kit ĄĄ Passive Fanless and High-Power Conductive-Cooled Designs ĄĄ Space for 3x or 5x PC/104 Cards ĄĄ Uni-body design ĄĄ SWaP-Optimized for Size, Weight, or Power Constrained Applications ĄĄ Customizable Front I/O Plate For Feature and Function ĄĄ ĄĄ

www.adl-usa.com

sales@adl-usa.com  855-727-4200  @ADLEmbedded  www.linkedin.com/company/adl-embedded-solutions

ADL Embedded Solutions, Inc.

www.adl-usa.com

Embedded Hardware

SETO-1000 – Extreme Outdoor Server with Intel Xeon Processor ADLINK’s new Extreme Outdoor Server is the first high-performance mobile edge computing (MEC) platform specifically designed for extreme environments and outdoor telecom/networking applications. The Extreme Outdoor Server provides data center server-grade performance powered by Intel® Xeon® E5 Processors with excellent 4K video data processing capability in a 1U platform. Attributes such as shock and vibration resistance, -40°C to +55°C operating temperature range, and IP65 water and dust ingress rating make the Extreme Outdoor Server an ideal solution for outdoor and extreme environments. The Extreme Outdoor Server reduces maintenance costs by eliminating fans and filters and offering worry-free, weather-resistant, high-speed connections for copper or fiber options. Use Cases Download (Web Link):

• Aeronautical Communications for Airborne Early Warning & Control (AEW&C) • Vehicular Communications for Armored Vehicles • 4G/LTE Surveillance Services in Remote and Harsh Environments

FEATURES ĄĄ Single/Dual Intel® Xeon® Processor E5-2400 v2 series ĄĄ Six memory sockets support VLP RDIMM DDR3-1333/1600

REG/ECC up to 96 GB

ĄĄ Intel® C604 Chipset ĄĄ Dual 10G SFP+ ports ĄĄ Dual 10/100/1000 BASE-T ports ĄĄ IP65 water and dust proof ĄĄ Conduction cooled, aluminum chassis

www.adlinktech.com/Products/Extreme_Outdoor_Server/ExtremeOutdoorServer/SETO-1000

ADLINK Technology Inc www.adlinktech.com www.mil-embedded.com

info@adlinktech.com

 www.linkedin.com/company/adlink-technology MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

 1-800-966-5200

 @ADLINK_Tech

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Military Embedded Systems Resource Guide

Embedded Hardware

CMx-SLx – PCI/104-Express Type 1 Single Board Computer The CMx-SLx is a PCI/104-Express Type 1 Single Board Computer (SBC) featuring the 64-bit 6th Gen. Intel Xeon/Core processor. The CMx-SLx is specifically designed for customers who need high-level processing and graphics performance in a long product life solution. The CMx-SLx is specifically designed for customers with high-performance processing graphics requirements who want to outsource the custom core logic of their systems for reduced development time. The CMx-SLx features one mini DisplayPort (DDI1), one micro HDMI port (DDI2), and one single channel 18/24-bit LVDS port (eDP), two Gigabit Ethernet ports, four USB 2.0 ports, two COM ports, eight GPIOs (from BMC), two SATA 6Gb/s ports, and one onboard SATA SSD supporting SLC (up to 32GB) and MLC (up to 64GB). The module is equipped with an SPI AMI EFI BIOS with CMOS backup, supporting embedded features such as fail safe BIOS, remote console, CMOS backup, hardware monitor, and watchdog timer. The CMx-SLx is capable of working in the temperature ranges of 0C~60C (standard) and -40C~85C (extended).

FEATURES ĄĄ 6th gen. Intel Core Processor (formerly codenamed Skylake) ĄĄ Up to 16GB DDR4-ECC soldered memory ĄĄ 3x DDI channels, 1x micro HDMI, 1x mini DP and 1x 18/24 bit

single channel LVDS

ĄĄ 4x PCIe x1 and 1x PCIe x 16 (PEG) configurable as 1x PCIe x16

or 2x PCIe x8 or 1x PCIe x8 + 2x PCIe x4

ĄĄ 2x GbE LAN, 2x SATA 6Gb/s, 1x USB 3.1, 6x USB 2.0, 2x COM,

8x GPIO

ĄĄ Extreme Rugged operating temperature -40°C to +85°C variant

www.adlinktech.com/Products/PC104SBCs/PCI104-Express/CMx-SLx

ADLINK Technology Inc www.adlinktech.com

info@adlinktech.com

 www.linkedin.com/company/adlink-technology

 1-800-966-5200

 @ADLINK_Tech

Embedded Hardware

VPX6010/6020 – 6U VPX Intel® Xeon® / Core™ Single Board Comp VPX6010 – Integration of the Intel® Xeon® D-1500 Processor series (formerly “Broadwell-DE”) and an optional 4x Serial RapidIO module for higher bandwidth across computing and intra-system communications. Featured are up to 32GB of dual-channel DDR4 ECC, dual 10G Ethernet, air cooling, conformal coating, and rugged front I/O implementation for operation in harsh environments. VPX6020 – Integration of the quad-core 7th Gen Intel® Core™ i7-7820EQ Processor (formerly “Kaby Lake”). Featured are up to 16GB of DDR4, 64GB of MLC SSD, 2x mSATA slots, 4x SRIOx4, DVI output, and PCIe Gen3 x16 (with NTB) connectivity. ADLINK 6U VPX SBCs are available in air and conduction cooled versions and are designed to withstand the extreme shock and vibration encountered in rugged field applications. Combined with wide operating temperature ranges required for arctic cold and desert heat, ADLINK 6U VPX SBCs are rugged and ready for mission-critical applications

requiring high processing and data throughput capabilities in the field. ADLINK 6U VPX SBCs have formed the heart of several key types of application including: Radar Processing – GPGPU-based synthetic-aperture radar (SAR), phased-array radar, and hybrid radar/EW systems. Applications include air-defense, antimissile, marine radar, aircraft anti-collision, ocean surveillance, outer space rendezvous, flight control, and guided missile systems. Sonar – Digital signal processing and analysis from towed and fixed acoustic arrays, sonobuoys, and torpedo guidance. Applications include the MK-48 torpedo, Poseidon P-8, and autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs).

www.adlinktech.com/Products/VPX/VPX6UProcessorBlades/VPX6010

ADLINK Technology Inc www.adlinktech.com 64 September 2019

info@adlinktech.com

 www.linkedin.com/company/adlink-technology

MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

 1-800-966-5200

 @ADLINK_Tech

www.mil-embedded.com


SOM-5992 SOM-5992 is the world’s first COM Express powered by a server-grade processor with up to 16-core scalability and up to 64GB DDR4 memory (up to 128GB coming soon) ; it delivers amazing computing performance. Integrated with two 10GBASE-KR, it provides high bandwidth interfaces for data transmission and reception. The outstanding computing capability and low thermal design power deliver excellent power efficiency and make it very suitable for microservers, networking, and cloud storage. With maximum of 64GB memory, which puts it closer to server application scenarios, and makes it possible to take advantage of the extreme performance of the Intel® Xeon® 16-core processor in a 125mm x 95mm COM Express Basic module. This is the first COM Express designed for servers, and fully satisfies users who pursue maximum performance in order to process multiple complicated tasks in the system, and can cover thousands of data exchange demands from worldwide clients. Since it is a standard form factor and ready to use, users can adopt it into their systems as usual, without taking additional time for customization, and there is no sacrifice of limited system space. The enhanced reliability, availability, and scalability allow for quick integration, easy platform upgrade, and hardware virtualization benefits.

Advantech Corp.

www.advantechusa.com/military/

FEATURES ĄĄ Intel® Xeon® Processor D-1500 Product Family ĄĄ PICMG COM.0 R3.0 type 7 COM Express Basic Module ĄĄ Up to 16 cores with TDP of 45W ĄĄ Support optional 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac & 4.0 BLE ĄĄ Dual DDR4 2400, 1.2V Low Power Memory, up to 64GB

(up to 128GB coming soon)

ĄĄ Configurable Gen3 PCIe x16, x8 and8x1 expansion ĄĄ Two 10GBASE-KR interfaces, and 1000BASE-T

mae@advantech.com  1-949-420-2500  @Advantech_USA  www.linkedin.com/showcase/advantech-embedded-boards 

Embedded Hardware

WILDSTAR 6SN0 6U VPX Storage boasts up to 64 TB depth and 10 GB/sec bandwidth

VPX Storage Combines Depth & Bandwidth When storage capability is needed, Annapolis offers the highest density OpenVPX data recording solution on the market. Its combination of capacity and speed is unmatched. Available in 6U and 3U form factors, the WILDSTAR Data Storage Solution is hot swappable (10,000 insertion cycles), is 100GbE capable, and is developed in alignment with SOSA™. One Xilinx® Zynq® UltraScale+™ MPSoC ZU11 Motherboard Controller allows standalone operation, and supports multiple levels of hardware and software security. Annapolis high-performance storage boards are optimized for SIGINT, ELINT, EW, and other high-bandwidth storage applications.

Annapolis Micro Systems, Inc.

MADE IN

Ą 3U Boards feature 32 TB storage depth and 5 GB/s BW Ą 6U Boards feature 64 TB storage depth and 10 GB/s BW Ą Scalable depth and bandwidth using multiple cards Ą Backplane I/O using PCIe or 1/10/25/50/100Gb Ethernet Ą 6U/3U OpenVPX (VITA 65) compliant, 1" VITA 48.1 spacing Ą Hot swappable (exclusive to WILD EcoSystem) Ą Optional VITA 66 support Ą RTM available for additional I/O Ą Available for Air, Conduction, Air-Flow-Through, and Liquid-

U. S. A.

Cooled environments

Ą Full BSP for fast and easy Application Development

wfinfo@annapmicro.com  410-841-2514 

www.annapmicro.com/product-category/storage-boards/ www.mil-embedded.com

FEATURES

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Embedded Hardware

WILD FMC+ GM60 ADC & DAC with RFSoC The WILD FMC+ GM60 ADC & DAC is the industry’s first COTS Mezzanine to feature the Xilinx® Zynq® UltraScale+™ RF System-on-Chip (RFSoC) technology (ZU25DR, ZU27DR, or ZU28DR). This breakthrough RFSoC combines FPGA processing and A/D and D/A Converters in a single chip, giving the GM60 card remarkable density and performance.

GM60 shown mounted to 3U Baseboard with blindmate RF out the backplane (VITA 67.3)

FEATURES

For maximum performance, pair one GM60 with an Annapolis WILDSTAR 3U OpenVPX or PCIe Baseboard, or pair two GM60 with a 6U OpenVPX Baseboard. Annapolis WILDSTAR Baseboards utilize up to four high-performance FPGAs, in addition to the GM60’s RFSoC.

Ą ADC

Also designed for standalone use, the GM60 is ideal for applications limited by Size, Weight, Power, and Cost (SWaPC). This small package option is readily-deployed in UAVs, backpacks, handheld devices, and custom-integrated applications.

• • • •

• • • •

Channels: 4 Max Sample Rate: 4.0 GSps Resolution: 12 bit Other configurations available

Ą DAC

Channels: 4 Max Sample Rate: 6.4 GSps Resolution: 14 bit Other configurations available

Ą I/O Connectors

• Optional 50Ω SSMC or VITA 67 • Deliver superior analog performance

Ą Mechanical and Environmental

• Air- or conduction-cooled

Ą Comprehensive and Flexible BSP

• • • •

Utilize VHDL or CoreFire Next Application Design Suite Software and firmware full examples Manipulate existing IP and add your own Latest Vivado (2019.1) support

Ą Clock Synchronization

The GM60 is compatible with next generation Xilinx RFSoCs

• Software-selectable external clock input or onboard PLL clock • ADCs and DACs across multiple cards easily synchronized

MADE IN

U. S. A.

www.annapmicro.com/products/wild-fmc-gm60-adc-dac/

Annapolis Micro Systems, Inc. www.annapmicro.com 66 September 2019

MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

 wfinfo@annapmicro.com  410-841-2514

www.mil-embedded.com


BiTMICRO® ACUMEN™ Scalable Secure Network Storage Nodes ACUMEN Node supports data-intensive applications where high capacity, performance, low power, and security are essential. ACUMEN Node provides both file and block storage to address a variety of workloads. Its Ultra-low SWaP design is ideal for avionics, autonomous, and mobile C4ISR systems. ACUMEN’s Power over Ethernet feature delivers a highly efficient network connection for both power and data; replacing cumbersome legacy cables. With PoE, ACUMEN is more portable and easy to deploy. ACUMEN’s security features include NIST ratified, FIPS 197- approved AES-256 encryption for stored data and data transmitted between locations. ACUMEN Node is rugged; it can be fixed in place or used in harsh environments where frequent removal is required. The ACUMEN platform is extremely flexible and supports various interfaces and protocols. ACUMEN incorporates cutting-edge technology, including NVMe over Fabrics. With NVMe/oF, multiple networked ACUMEN Node systems can be concatenated to provide greater capacity and performance for demanding high-speed low-latency applications, or mirrored to provide continuous access to data in the event of an infrastructure outage. ACUMEN Node is extremely compact, efficient, rugged, and secure. Agility and reliability are at the core of ACUMEN. It’s a unique platform designed to meet the needs of ever-evolving applications and environments.

BiTMICRO

www.bitmicro.com/

FEATURES ĄĄ ĄĄ

File and Block Storage – Up to 16TB in a single system Power over Ethernet – NVMe over Fabrics – Dual Ethernet 10GbE Ports

ĄĄ

NIST ratified, FIPS 197 approved AES-256 encryption

ĄĄ

As low as 30W power – Fanless – Rugged Design

ĄĄ

COTS or Customizable to meet any requirement

sales@bitmicro.com

 www.linkedin.com/company/bitmicro/

 888-723-5274

 @bitmicro

Embedded Hardware

Crystal Group FORCE™ Rugged Servers Crystal Group FORCE™ rugged 1U server is designed to process sensor fusion inputs with an integrated 16 port layer 2+ switch, NVMe storage, FPGA graphics accelerator, and two scalable Xeon CPUs. The system supports deep learning applications (CNN) with maximum efficiency and speed using Intel® OpenVINO™. Excellent for geospatial, data compression, video analytics, and facial recognition applications. MIL-SPEC environmental performance with customizable options. All Crystal Group products are manufactured in NIST compliant US-based facilities with end-to-end US supply chain assurance.

FEATURES ĄĄ

1U, 2U, 3U rugged, lightweight chassis

ĄĄ

Up to 1TB DDR4 EEC memory

ĄĄ

Intel® Xeon® Scalable Processors

ĄĄ

Up to 12 SSDs/rack unit

ĄĄ

EMI compliance

ĄĄ

Humidity protection

ĄĄ

MIL-STD-810 Shock and Vibe

www.crystalrugged.com/products/FORCErugged-servers/

Crystal Group Inc.

www.crystalrugged.com www.mil-embedded.com

info@crystalrugged.com

 800-378-1636

 www.linkedin.com/company/crystal-group

 @CrystalGroup

MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

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Fabric Mapping Modules Dawn OpenVPX backplane Fabric Mapping Modules simplify topology customization. Dawn VME Products FABRIC MAPPING MODULES automate optimization of OpenVPX backplane topologies. Newly patented FMM micro-overlays quickly customize off-the-shelf OpenVPX backplanes to mission requirements. Fabric Mapping Modules allow designers to work with flexible configurations of high speed links. Off-the-shelf backplanes can be quickly customized to mission requirements without the time and expense required for new backplane designs, a critical advantage when schedules are compressed by late system changes. Dawn engineers have successfully used Fabric Mapping Modules to solve many OpenVPX application problems in the design phase. Fabric Mapping Modules provide a natural migratory development environment for moving from the lab to the field with high speed OpenVPX backplanes.

FEATURES ĄĄ Off-the-shelf backplanes can be quickly customized to mission

requirements

ĄĄ Optimize the communication topology between slots within a system’s

backplane

ĄĄ Customize inter-slot communications to meet unique system

requirements

ĄĄ Improve signal integrity between system cards beyond requirements of

PCI Express, Serial Rapid I/O and 10Gbit (XAUI) Ethernet standards

ĄĄ Directly connect PCI Express or SerialRapid I/O to multiple cards or

cards and switches

ĄĄ Link SATA from a CPU card to a Solid State Drive (SSD) carrier ĄĄ Enable XMC cards to talk to other XMC cards or other I/O like

PCI Express links

ĄĄ Facilitate rear backplane I/O connections and low profile connector

interface systems when normal transition modules do not fit the system application envelope

www.dawnvme.com

 sales@dawnvme.com  800-258-DAWN (3296)

Dawn VME Products www.dawnvme.com

510-657-4444

Embedded Hardware

Gen3 3U OpenVPX Backplanes Shown is Dawn’s VPX-5987 3U OpenVPX backplane designed to deliver robust signal integrity at Gen3 bandwidths. When your systems are built around interconnects operating with Gen3 signaling rates, you need a backplane you can rely on to support the most advanced module configurations. Dawn’s 598x Series VPX backplanes are designed to be compliant with the following released standards and December 2015 state of draft specifications: VITA 46.0, VITA 46.1, VITA 46.3, VITA 46.4, VITA 46.6, VITA 46.7, VITA 46.9, VITA 46.10, VITA 46.11, VITA 48.0 (REDI), VITA 48.1(REDI Air Cooling), Vita 48.2(REDI Conduction Cooling), VITA65.0 (OpenVPX) ready. VITA 68 backplane models are available on request for system simulation. Dawn’s Gen3 3U OpenVPX backplanes are designed for true signal integrity at up to 10.3 Gbaud performance (per VITA 68 backplane simulation models). Supporting PCIe Gen 3 and 10 GbE (XAUI) and the most advanced Gen3 bandwidth module configurations, Dawn Gen3 backplanes offer multiple connector choices, including a high vibration option.

Dawn VME Products www.dawnvme.com 68 September 2019

FEATURES ĄĄ

3U OpenVPX compliant, 1" pitch

ĄĄ

Supporting PCIe Gen3 and 10 GbE (XAUI)

ĄĄ

Designed for signal integrity at up to 10.3 Gbaud performance

ĄĄ

Multiple connector choices, including a high vibration option

ĄĄ

Terminal block and bus bars to facilitate any desired power supply www.dawnvme.com

sales@dawnvme.com  800-258-DAWN (3296) 

MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

510-657-4444

www.mil-embedded.com


PXH82X Gen 3 XMC Module PXH82X XMC Adapters come in various formats supporting transparent and non-transparent operations. PXH82X brings up to 128 GT/S connectivity and advanced connection features to embedded computers and carrier cards that support XMC mezzanine cards. The cards provide external connectivity with a quad SFF-8644 connector that supports standard MiniSAS-HD or PCIe 3.0 cables. The PXH822 and PXH826 are Dolphin’s transparent host/target adapters. These quad SFF-8644 cable adapters support the new PCI SIG External Cabling Specification 3.0 enabling connections to compliant Dolphin products and third-party PCI Express cabled systems. The adapters can act as either hosts or targets when connecting to expansion chassis. The PXH820 and PXH824 are Dolphin’s non-transparent host adapters. They come with Dolphin’s comprehensive PCIe NTB eXpressWare™ software suite that reduces time to market. eXpressWare™ software includes several components to support connecting systems, SOCs, FPGAs, and GPUs. It comes with a shared memory API (SISCI), sockets API, SuperSockets™, and a TCP/IP driver. These components create a robust and powerful programming environment for easy use of shared memory in multi host/root systems and removes the traditional network bottlenecks by taking advantage of high performance of the PCIe interconnect. eXpressWare™ delivers extremely low latency starting at 540 nanoseconds.

Dolphin ICS

FEATURES ĄĄ VITA 42.0 XMC 1.0/VITA 61.0 XMC 2.0 SUPPORT ĄĄ UP TO 128 GBIT/S PERFORMANCE ĄĄ X4, X8 OR X16 PCI EXPRESS HOST PORT ĄĄ QUAD SFF-8644 CONNECTOR FOR X4, X8 OR X16

PCIe CABLING

ĄĄ UP TO 9M COPPER AND 100M FIBER CABLES ĄĄ TRANSPARENT AND NON-TRANSPARENT BRIDGING ĄĄ PIO AND DMA RDMA SUPPORT

info@dolphinics.com

 603-747-4100

 www.linkedin.com/company/dolphin-interconnect-solutions

www.dolphinics.com

Embedded Hardware

A One-Stop Source for MIL-STD-1553 Components Holt has been supplying MIL-STD-1553 ICs to the military and aerospace industries since 2001 and is a one-stop source for all MIL-STD-1553 components. In addition to Holt’s proprietary products, Holt offers drop-in replacements for existing competitor industry standard solutions, providing customers with a cost effective alternative, reducing lead times and mitigating future product obsolescence issues. Holt is the recipient of numerous supplier awards and coupled with its unparalleled technical support and customer service, Holt stands out as the number one choice for MIL-STD-1553 components. Holt’s products cover the entire gamut of MIL-STD-1553 functionality, including protocol ICs, IP cores, transceivers and transformers. Holt specializes in mixed signal IC design, integrating both digital protocol and analog transceiver functions on a single IC. Select products also integrate MIL-STD-1553 transformers, transceivers and protocol in a single package, providing customers with the highest level of integration necessary to minimize size, weight, power and cost (SWaP-C).

Holt Integrated Circuits www.holtic.com

www.mil-embedded.com



FEATURES ĄĄ IP Core Family: HI-6300 ĄĄ Protocol ICs with integrated transceivers: HI-6130 and MAMBATM ĄĄ Error-correcting code (ECC) RAM or RAM parity with BIST ĄĄ Unparalleled free technical support including plug-and-play

reference designs and software

ĄĄ Drop-in replacements for existing competitor industry-standard

solutions

ĄĄ DO-254 Design Assurance Level A Compliant options www.holtic.com/AD2019AugC-MilEmbeddedBG-Mil1553.html

sales@holtic.com  +1 (949) 859-8800 www.linkedin.com/company/holt-integrated-circuits

 www.twitter.com/holtic (@holtic)

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“TIGER” S402-SW The S402-SW “Tiger” is a third-generation, fan-less (conductioncooled) fully rugged, low cost Intel® Xeon® E5 server. It is designed to provide the highest level of server-class performance possible in a fully ruggedized, conduction-cooled system, operating up to -40° C to +85° C. Tiger simplifies local data processing tasks that require an ultra-fast, Xeon®-class server with vast amounts of high-speed, ECC-protected RAM and storage in one ultrarugged chassis. S402-SW is ideal for the application that requires the horsepower of a high-performance server deployed onto a rugged platform with no fans required. When equipped with the Layer 2/3 intelligent ethernet switch, Tiger becomes a rugged compact server, router, switch, NAS subsystem weighing only about 10 pounds. The switch is intentionally segregated from the processor subsystem for cybersecurity purposes; it can be optionally internally connected to provide one 10GbE from the CPU and one 10GbE from the switch.

The Tiger is an 8 to 18-core Xeon® E5 server intended for commercial, industrial, military, defense, and aerospace applications with the greatest SWaP-Efficiency (SWaP-E) on the market due to its compact size and robust computing and I/O performance. Tiger is an ideal forwardly deployed vehicle-mounted battlefield/ airborne/shipboard server/router/switch/NAS that offers the greatest reliability in the smallest packaging. Tiger can also be used in industrial and commercial platforms since it has serverclass performance, significant networking options, exceptional I/O capabilities and removable storage. The S402-SW is fully compliant to MIL-STD-810G, MIL-STD1275D, MIL-S-901D, DO-160D, MIL-STD-461F and has ingress protection up to IP67. This system may also be ordered from the factory with operating systems such as Windows® or Linux® pre-installed.

FEATURES ĄĄ

Intel® Xeon® E5 v4 CPU with up to 18 cores

ĄĄ

Hyper-Threading on each core for total of 36 logical cores

ĄĄ

Supports up to 128 GB of DDR4 memory with ECC

ĄĄ

ĄĄ

Optional fixed M.2 or NVMe SSD for OS boot (Optional for I/O) Up to four 10 GbE plus twelve 1 GbE Ethernet ports (two from CPU, two from switch)

ĄĄ

Personal Profile Module™ (PPM) uses SD card authentication

ĄĄ

Optional AMD® Radeon® GPU E8860, up to 768 GFLOPS

ĄĄ

Optional NVIDIA® Quadro® GPU M2200M, up to 1.32 TFLOPS

ĄĄ

Size: 11.75" x 7.75" x 2.0" Weight: 10 lbs.

ĄĄ

MIL-STD-810G, MIL-STD-1275D, MIL-S-901D, MIL-STD-461F, DO-160D, IP67 compliant

ĄĄ

Temperature: Operates up to extended temp -40° C to +85° C (Optional) http://www.gms4sbc.com/s402sw

General Micro Systems, Inc. www.gms4sbc.com 70 September 2019

jmalaney@gms4sbc.com

 800-307-4863

 www.linkedin.com/company/general-micro-systems

MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

 @gms4sbc www.mil-embedded.com


“PEACOCK III” S1202-XVE The S1202-XVE “Peacock III” is a third-generation, ultra-rugged, small, lightweight workstation computer system with up to two GPU sites for MXM 3.0 graphics expansion or GPGPU algorithm processing. It is designed to provide a rugged system optimized for the lowest cost and weight in a fully sealed case, while providing the highest level of workstation performance possible in a fully ruggedized, conduction-cooled, sealed system, operating up to -40°C to +85°C (0°C to +55°C standard). This system is designed for applications that require a small enclosure with the highest possible performance per dollar and per watt while utilizing rugged interconnects to provide a fully sealed system. This system can also be equipped with an optional radiator system that can cool the system with front to back air cooling. Peacock III supports the Kaby Lake Intel® Core™ i7 (E3-1505Mv6) processor with Hyper-Threading for a total of 8 logical cores, each operating at 3.0 GHz with the ability to Turbo Boost up to 4.0 GHz. The CPU is coupled with up to 64 GB of RAM organized in two banks that support error correcting code (ECC). The S1202-XVE standard configuration supports three 1 GigE and two 10 GigE channels with a TCP/IP offloading engine (TOE),

four USB 2.0 ports with power, four USB 3.0 ports, eight buffered digital I/O lines, one DVI/HDMI and one RGB video port, and full HD audio with a 5 W audio amplifier and mic-in. Additional I/O functions include one expansion I/O site (SAM™) for I/O such as GPS, Video capture, CANbus, MIL-STD-1553, ARINC-429, and more on a PCIe-mini card. Peacock III also includes the most secure storage subsystem possible. The system supports M.2 as a boot device, removable 2.5" SATA or NVMe SSD, Trusted Platform Module (TPM) 2.0, Secure Erase/Write Protect/Encryption SSDs and discrete triggers for Secure Erase and Write Protect and encryption up to FIPS-140-2. There are hard-wired status/Secure Erase signals used for total system cyber security. The graphics subsystem is provided by native Intel Graphics Processing (IGP) plus a separate optional primary GPU. There is one HDMI/DVI output plus one HD analog (VGA) output via IGP, plus dual 4K/UHD outputs via the primary (optional) MXM. A second MXM 3.0 site provides additional graphics outputs or GPGU co-processing with up to 8.7 TFLOPS algorithm capability.

FEATURES ĄĄ

3.0 GHz Intel® Quad Core™ Kaby Lake E3 Processor (E3-1505Mv6)

ĄĄ

Supports max Turbo Boost frequency of up to 4.0 GHz using Intel’s Turbo Boost Technology

ĄĄ

Up to 64 GB of DDR4 memory with ECC

ĄĄ

Up to 1 TB of fixed M.2 SSD (optional)

ĄĄ ĄĄ ĄĄ ĄĄ ĄĄ ĄĄ

Up to 4 TB of removable 2.5" SSD with SATA III or NVMe interface (optional) Removable Drive secured behind EMI/IP-rated door SSD drives support optional Encrypt/Secure Erase/Write Protect Size: 10.0" x 5.38" x 2.6" Weight: 7 lbs. MIL-STD: MIL-STD 810G, MIL-STD-1275D, MIL-S-901D, DO-160D, MIL-STD 461E and IP66 compliant Temperature: Operates up to extended temp -40°C to +85°C (Optional) http://www.gms4sbc.com/s1202xve

General Micro Systems, Inc. www.gms4sbc.com www.mil-embedded.com

jmalaney@gms4sbc.com

 800-307-4863

 www.linkedin.com/company/general-micro-systems

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“THUNDER” S422 The S422-LC/SW/RT/AI is fan-less fully rugged, low cost Intel® Xeon® E5 server family available in four variants. It is designed to provide the highest level of server-class performance possible in a fully ruggedized, conduction-cooled system, operating up to -40 °C to +85 °C. “Thunder” simplifies local data processing tasks that require an ultra-fast, Xeon®-class server with vast amounts of high-speed, ECC-protected RAM and storage in one ultra-rugged chassis. Thunder is ideal for the application that requires the horsepower of a high-performance server, enterprise-class multi-port LAN or a NAS subsystem appliance, while deployed into a rugged platform with no fans required. When equipped with the router or intelligent Layer 2/3/4 Ethernet switch, Thunder becomes a rugged compact server, with a dedicated switch or router capabilities to offer maximum network flexibility. Networking capability starts with three 1 GbE and two 40 GbE fiber ports on the Low Cost (LC) variant and expands to an additional 40 GbE port and twenty 10 GbE ports (in variants SW, RT and AI). The 10 GbE ports can be configured with a Broadcom® Layer 2/3/4

enterprise class switch (SW) or as segregated and secure port connections each with their own subnet mask to avoid data crossover (RT). In the RT every Ethernet port is directly coupled to the CPU(s), an architecture that is ideal for secure communications or dedicated hypervisor/virtual environments. Network routing technology includes software-defined networking (SDN) on various operating systems and virtual machine (VM) hypervisor environments. Each of the 10 GbE ports support powerover-Ethernet (POE+) to directly power remote nodes while simplifying wiring requirements, up to 100 W maximum total power sourced. Integrated support is available for a lower power commercial General-Purpose Graphics Processing Unit (GPGPU), full size and height, for applications where large data processing tasks are required. The integrated GPGPU can “link” with other external GPGPUs, such as the GMS’s companion X422 Co-Processor, via the PCIe 3.0 FlexIO™ bus expansion feature. This bus expansion provides flexibility to upscale computing resources to match application computing requirements.

FEATURES ĄĄ

Intel® Xeon® E5 v4 CPU with up to 22 cores (E5-2699RV4)

ĄĄ

Hyper-Threading on each core for total system with 44 logical cores

ĄĄ

Supports up to 512 GB of DDR4 memory with ECC

ĄĄ ĄĄ ĄĄ ĄĄ

Optional 20 port x 10 GbE ports configured as enterprise switch or segregated subnets Optional x8 PCIe add-in card slot for GPGPU, co-processor, I/O (FHFL size) Optional PCIe-over-cable bus extension for chassis expansion to external PCIe co-processors GMS FlexIO™ x16 PCIe Gen 3.0 8 Gbits/s fabric expansion architecture for inter-chassis co-processor sub-rack (connects to X422 co-processor chassis)

ĄĄ

Dual 40 GbE ports directly coupled to CPU/FlexIO™ PCIe fabric for non-blocking data movement

ĄĄ

Size: 7.75" x 11.60"

ĄĄ

MIL-STD-810G, MIL-STD-1275D, MIL-S-901D, MIL-STD-461F, DO-160D, IP67 compliant

ĄĄ

Temperature: Operates up to extended temp -40°C to +85°C (Optional) http://www.gms4sbc.com/s422

General Micro Systems, Inc. www.gms4sbc.com 72 September 2019

jmalaney@gms4sbc.com

 800-307-4863

 www.linkedin.com/company/general-micro-systems

MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

 @gms4sbc www.mil-embedded.com


“LIGHTNING” X422 The X422 is a GPGPU Co-Processor System that supports GMS’ companion S422 SW Server. Up to two full size GPGPU cards can be installed, either as two independent processing units or they can be intelligently linked together to form one virtual processing unit. In addition to the GPGPU capabilities, “Lightning” offers bus expansion capabilities to virtually any full size, full height PCIe 3.0 card, but is optimized to harness multiple GPGPU systems. The X422 affords the use of commercially available, full size, GPGPU products in a completely sealed and protected, extended temperature fully ruggedized enclosure that utilizes GMS’ patented RuggedCool™ technology. Owing to the underlying GPGPU architecture with multiple cores and threads, the X422 can accelerate large data processing tasks such as image recognition, digital signal processing, data mining, block chain computation, artificial intelligence, machine vision, image processing, vector processing, and other compute-intensive tasks. PCIe 3.0 bus expansion allows upward-scaling by cascading (daisy chaining) additional GPGPUs as as necessary via additional X422 chassis. The X422 utilizes GMS’s FlexIO™ flow-through architecture which is based upon wide PCIe 3.0 lanes (x16) operating at 8 Gbps. When connected via x16 PCIe 3.0 to the companion S422 dual Xeon® conductioncooled rugged server, the GPGPUs (or any PCIe cards) appear to be within the same “bus” of the main server. This closely-coupled architecture allows for rapid data passing, RDMA and “atomic” operations, or provides

a fully autonomous GPGPU co-processor where only data is shared asymmetrically from the main CPUs. The onboard intelligent PCIe 3.0 switch provides packet processing and local “routing”, allowing the user to customize a homogeneous or heterogeneous architecture between the local GPGPU resources. For example, the X422 can be partitioned for GPGPU A to operate separately and independently from GPGPU B – or they can pass data between each other via the dual x16 PCIe 3.0 fabric. Separate, GPGPU-specific, and customizable I/O “pipes” are available to the front panel for each PCIe slot. This allows sensor-to-GPGPU processing, down- or up-stream processing, or an additional data path that bypasses the companion S422 dual-Xeon® server. The X422 is a high performance GPGPU co-processor and bus expansion system designed for use with the S422 SW Server. The X422 is an ideal forwardly-deployed, vehicle-mounted, high performance GPGPU co-processing system. Applications include computing clusters and parallel computing, digital signal processing, digital image processing, video processing, neural networks, data mining, cryptography, and intrusion detection. The X422 system is fully compliant to MIL-STD-810G, MIL-STD-1275D, MIL-S-901D, DO-160D, MIL-STD-461E and has ingress protection up to IP64.

FEATURES ĄĄ PCIe-over-cable local bus extension for inter-/intra chassis

expansion for two full-size PCIe co-processors

ĄĄ Supports up to two full size commercially-available

General-Purpose Computing on Graphics Processing Units (GPGPUs) ĄĄ FlexIO™ backplane provides internal/external PCIe Gen 3 at 8 Gbps ĄĄ GPGPU modules support a total of 32 PCIe Gen 3 lanes, 16 lanes of input and 16 lanes of output ĄĄ X422 system daisy chains to multiple Lightning GPGPU co-processor units ĄĄ Software support for NVIDIA™ CUDA proprietary framework and OpenCL open framework ĄĄ PCIe-over-cable bus extension for co-processor cards ĄĄ Up to two full size GPGPUs (dual x16 PCIe 3.0 slots) ĄĄ Size: 12.45" x 11.6" x 2.54" (including fins) ĄĄ MIL-STD-810G, MIL-STD-1275D, MIL-S-901D, MIL-STD-461F, DO-160D, IP64 ĄĄ Temperature: Operates up to extended temp -20° C to +55° C (Optional) http://www.gms4sbc.com/x422

General Micro Systems, Inc. www.gms4sbc.com www.mil-embedded.com

jmalaney@gms4sbc.com

 800-307-4863

 www.linkedin.com/company/general-micro-systems

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“TITAN” The rugged “TITAN” 1U and 2U servers are unique expandable standard rackmount servers using Intel’s second-generation Scalable Xeon® processors. Designed for high-reliability aerospace, defense, military and industrial applications, “TITAN” is set apart by extreme density and expandability with air- and conduction-cooling options. It includes more networking I/O, memory, PCIe card add-in options, and removable storage than found anywhere in a in a 1U or 2U rackmount server. Additionally, “TITAN” is exceptionally rugged and designed for technology refresh and pre-planned product improvement (P3I) in long-life applications. Available in air-cooled and sealed conduction-cooled versions, “TITAN” is like no other server on the market. Air-cooled versions feature either internal fans or external rack-supplied plenum cooling, and either COTS or mil-circular (38999) connectors.

In shock- and vibration-resistant conduction-cooled versions, “TITAN” is equipped with military-style circular 38999 connectors for assured reliability. “TITAN” uses patented internal cold plates and thermal mitigation in a sealed chassis to protect against ingress and EMI. “TITAN” is also expandable from a 1U high, 2S dual-socket version to a 2U high, 4S (four socket) four-way symmetric multiprocessing (SMP) 2U version with exceptionally high-performance inter-processor UPI connections. Alternatively, the system can remain a dual socket server (2S) but grow from 1U to 2U, adding additional storage (up to 18 SSDs total), additional PCIe slots (up to 10 total), and a segregated 20-port managed Ethernet switch. In either 1U or 2U variants, “TITAN” is an exceptionally rugged, densely packed, well-equipped rackmount server with Intel’s very latest server technology.

FEATURES ĄĄ

ĄĄ

Dual or Quad Intel® Scalable Xeon® processors with up to 28 cores (2.50 GHz) and Turbo Boost (3.80 GHz); 38.5 MB of Smart L3 Cache (server-class processors: Platinum and Gold) Air- and conduction-cooled (sealed) versions with commercial (COTS) connectors or mil-circular 38999 connectors for ultimate reliability

ĄĄ

3x UPI (10.4 GT/s) interconnects for HPEC, SMP, NUMA architecture

ĄĄ

Up to 1 TB DDR4 ECC memory (8 DIMMs) per CPU

ĄĄ

Up to 10 PCIe Gen 3 add-in cards (4x in 1U and 10x in 2U; factory-installed)

ĄĄ

Optional 20-port segregated Ethernet switch in TITAN-2U

ĄĄ

Optional 20 port 10GbE switch in TITAN-2U

ĄĄ

AI version > 400 TFLOPs supports up to 4x Nvidia V100 GPGPUs in 2U

ĄĄ

Encryption and security via Intel® AES-NI encryption and Trusted Platform Module 2.0 (TPM)

ĄĄ ĄĄ

Dual-redundant MIL-STD-1275 500 W power supplies (single/three phase; 60-400 Hz 110/220 VAC; 28 VDC), 2x PSU’s in 1U; 4x PSU’s in 2U Optional MIL-STD-704F power supplies with 50 ms hold-up http://www.gms4sbc.com/titan

General Micro Systems, Inc. www.gms4sbc.com 74 September 2019

jmalaney@gms4sbc.com

 800-307-4863

 www.linkedin.com/company/general-micro-systems

MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

 @gms4sbc www.mil-embedded.com


“SMARTVIEW” SD12/SD17/SD24 The SmartView™ series rugged all-in-one 12", 17" and 24" Smart Panel PCs that integrate the most rugged, crisp displays with Intel’s latest seventh-generation Kaby Lake E3 Xeon® processor resulting in the thinnest, most powerful and robust smart display system on the market today. SmartView™ is designed to provide the highest level of workstation performance possible in a fully ruggedized, conductioncooled, fully sealed system with an ultra-bright display and Night Vision Imaging System (NVIS). This system architecture simplifies applications where a full-featured computer with a rugged display is needed to deliver the best possible stand-alone-system, per dollar and per watt, while utilizing rugged interconnects to provide a fully sealed smart display system that is less than 2.1-inches thick. SmartView™ is equipped with the latest Intel® Kaby Lake-H workstation processor with Hyper-Threading (also called Intel® Xeon® E3-15xxM v6) for a total of up to four physical cores (eight logical cores) operating up to 3.0GHz and using Intel’s Turbo Boost 2.0 up to 4.0GHz. To harvest this incredible CPU performance, the CPU is coupled with up to 64 GB of DDR4 RAM organized in two banks with ECC support (2-bit error detection and 1-bit error correction). These Kaby Lake Xeon® E3 cores coupled with SmartView’s I/O can be used to create multiple

virtual machines (VMs) allowing a single SmartView™ system to replace up to 8 separate single-processor systems. The I/O subsystem is designed to support a wide array of standard and custom I/O functions. Standard configuration supports two 1 Gigabit Ethernet ports or an optional two 10Gigabit Ethernet (copper) ports with TCP/IP Offloading Engine (TOE), one USB 3.0 and one USB 2.0 port (two are optional, but lose Audio), two COM ports with RS232/422/485 options, eight buffered digital I/O lines (optional), audio in/out for headset use and DVI output from the CPU or DVI input from an external source, which can be displayed on the SmartView™ screen (bezel key selectable). Utilizing the two SAM™ sites, additional I/O functions are optionally provided, such as quad video capture, CANbus, MIL-STD-1553, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, FireWire, GPS and many other I/O. SmartView™ also offers the most secure storage subsystem possible. It supports up to 32MB BIOS Flash with hardware-write protect and secure erase. The onboard fixed mSATA boot device and removable nDrive™ SSD provides optional hardware write-protect, ATA Secure Erase and encryption functions. SmartView™ displays can optionally support FIPS-140-2 and FIPS-197 encryption standards for ultra-secure data storage.

FEATURES ĄĄ

ĄĄ ĄĄ

3.0GHz Intel® Xeon® E3 (Kaby Lake, 7th Generation Core™) processor with 4 cores and Turbo Boost 2.0 up to 4.0GHz; 8MB of Smart Cache (E3-15xxM V6) Up to 64GB of DDR4 memory with ECC Intel® HD Graphics P630 with GT2, 8-bit VP9 8-bit CODEC, 10-bit HEVC (H.265) CODEC

ĄĄ

12"/17"/24" 16:9 aspect ratio (1920x1080 native) HD 1080p

ĄĄ

Full daylight viewable screen greater than 800 nits (typ.)

ĄĄ

Optional Night Vision Imaging System (NVIS) compatible to MIL-STD-3009

ĄĄ

Optional ultra-rugged “boot-kick” glass for a virtually unbreakable screen

ĄĄ

Resistive touchscreen with glove and/or stylus operation with EMI shielding

ĄĄ

Bezel keys for Power, Blackout, Zeroize, Brightness, NVIS, Video Source, and “Shift”

ĄĄ

Operates over -20°C to +80°C (no heater) or over -40°C to +80°C (with optional heater)

ĄĄ

MIL-STD-810G, MIL-STD-1275D, MIL-S-901D, DO-160D, MIL-STD-461F, up to IP66 compliant http://www.gms4sbc.com/smartview

General Micro Systems, Inc. www.gms4sbc.com www.mil-embedded.com

jmalaney@gms4sbc.com

 800-307-4863

 www.linkedin.com/company/general-micro-systems

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FEATURES ĄĄ Mix and Match 100’s of I/O per ring

ĄĄ

ĄĄ ĄĄ ĄĄ

• A/D, D/A , DI, DO, DIO • Serial Communication • RTD/Thermistor/Thermocouple • Relay • Video • Field Programmable Analog Array (FPAA) • Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) • Multi-Port Switch • Multi-Port Routers MIX AND MATCH Protocols • NTDS • ATDS • MIL-STD 1553 • ARINC • Serial Communication • NMEA • OD-19 • ETHERNET Design to meet MIL STD 810 Operating Systems: Windows (WHQL), Linux, VxWorks Power supply compliant to MIL-STD 704, MIL-STD 1275, and MIL-STD 461

GET Engineering

Compact Embedded System (CES) GET Engineering’s Rugged Compact Embedded System (CES) is a Small Form Factor (SFF) reliable fanless family of rugged computer products. With stackable solid aluminum rings and MIL 38999 connectors, the CES is used in military and industrial platforms and can easily accommodate Multi-Protocol Conversions, 100’s of High Density I/O’s per ring, Mission Computer, Ethernet Switches and Routers (including CISCO) applications. Our unique design allows for mixing and matching protocols and functionalities in complex systems for maximum flexibility, minimal size, fast time to market and easy software development at low cost. 

https://gethdio.com/ces

sales@getntds.com

 619- 443-8295 • 877-494-1820

 www.linkedin.com/company/get-engineering/

Embedded Hardware

High Density I/O (HDIO) GET Engineering offers a unique solution to the Input/Output problem by offering a high density modular approach which allows for mix and match of I/O for maximum flexibility and capability in a small space. The HDIO module is smaller with double the I/O density of a MiniPCIe module. GET Engineering’s HDIO can provide up to 3 high density I/O modules on a conduction cooled XMC carrier card fully complying with VITA 42.0 and 48.2 specifications. We also support PCI/104 Express, VME, PCIe and VPX form factors for both commercial and rugged applications. Designed for reliability in a rugged environments, the HDIO uses screws to firmly attach it to a thermal bar on the HDIO carrier card. Thermal bars path and thermal pads contact to the chips path create two different thermal paths to conduct the heat from the HDIO modules to the HDIO carrier card. GET Engineering provides programming libraries for Linux, VxWorks, and Windows to simplify system development and integration. Additionally, virtual drivers are available to allow development of fully portable applications in environments without the final hardware configuration (e.g., cloud or test environments). Applications developed using virtual drivers can be moved seamlessly into final hardware configurations without modification or recompiling. Finally, the GET Integrator’s Toolkit (iT) provides a GUI platform to assist system integrators with rapid prototyping and analysis, system integration testing, virtual system configuration, and remote module configuration and operation. GET iT is available for Linux and Windows operating systems.

GET Engineering

https://gethdio.com/hdio 76 September 2019

sales@getntds.com

FEATURES ĄĄ Mix and Match per HDIO Module

• 32 Channel 18 bit SAR A/D • 32 Channel 16 Bit D/A • 32 High Voltage Digital Input or Output • 8 Channel Serial Communication • 20 Channel RTD/Thermistor/Thermocouple • 32 Channel Field Programmable Analog Array (FPAA • Xilinx Artix Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) ĄĄ Design to meet MIL STD 810 ĄĄ Operating Systems: Windows (WHQL), Linux, VxWorks

 619- 443-8295 • 877-494-1820

 www.linkedin.com/company/get-engineering/

MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

www.mil-embedded.com


ComEth4590a – VPX 10/40 GbE Layer 3 switch The ComEth4590a is the first and only 3U VPX 10/40 Gigabit Ethernet Layer 3 switch currently on the embedded market which has two separate and independent on-board Ethernet switch matrices – one for the Data Plane and one for the Control Plane. These two separate switch matrices or packet processors are managed by two independent dual core processors. Each matrix supports separate instances of Interface Concept Switchware network management which allows independent network configuration for features such as network optimization, monitoring and security. In addition to offering the outstanding switching capabilities you’ve come to expect from Interface Concept, this high-performance Layer3 switch can be remotely configured by the Switchware web interface, SNMP or CLI interfaces. It features a total of 41 SerDes or Lanes routed to the rear VPX connectors as 1000Base-KX, 10GBase-KR or even 40GBase-KR4 ports and to the front panel as 10GBase-SR or 1000Base-SX fiber optical ports. Moreover, the Cometh4590a is fully compatible with the Intelligent Platform Management Interface (IPMI) required by the most recent high performance VPX systems, and it supports Precision Time Protocol (PTP) IEEE 15888-2008 (v2) for networks requiring sub-microsecond synchronization capabilities throughout the IP network.

INTERFACE CONCEPT

www.interfaceconcept.com



FEATURES ĄĄ 3U VPX 10/40 Gigabit Ethernet Layer 3 switch ĄĄ 2*on-board Ethernet switch matrices ĄĄ 2*dual-core processors ĄĄ Switchware network management ĄĄ 41*SerDes or Lanes ĄĄ 1000Base-KX, 10GBase-KR or even 40GBase-KR4 ports

(rear)

ĄĄ 10GBase-SR or 1000Base-SX fiber optical ports (front) www.interfaceconcept.com

info@interfaceconcept.com  +33(0) 2 98 57 30 30 www.linkedin.com/company/interface-concept/

Embedded Hardware

IC-FEP-VPX6e 6U OpenVPX UltraScale™ FPGA board with FMC+ sites The IC-FEP-VPX6e is a 6U OpenVPX front end processing board, based on two Xilinx Virtex UltraScale FPGAs and one NXP QorIQ® TLS1046A quad 64-bit processor, for DSP intensive processing applications. The IC-FEP-VPX6e design is based on the Xilinx FPGA package B1204, providing the board with a high scalability level (Kintex® UltraScale™ KU115 standard configuration, or Virtex® UltraScale™/UltraScale+™ configurations). Each FPGA is coupled with two DDR4 SDRAM memory banks (supporting up to 2400 MT/s transfers), two optional DDRII SRAM memory banks and SPI Mirror flash memories for local bitstreams storage and for user parameters. The high-end IC-FEP-VPX6e is controlled by a QorIQ® LS1046A processor integrating quad 64-bit Arm® Cortex A72 cores with high-performance Data Path Acceleration Architecture (DPAA) and network peripheral interfaces. The on-board PCI Express advanced switch allows versatile coupling between the processor, the FPGAs and the fabric links of P1 VPX connector. The IC-FEP-VPX6e can be easily integrated into heterogeneous multi-domains PCIe architectures thanks to the Interface Concept MultiWare software package and its simplified API. Both FMC+ sites are compliant with VITA 57.4 standard. Boards are available in air-cooled and conduction-cooled grades.

INTERFACE CONCEPT

www.interfaceconcept.com www.mil-embedded.com



FEATURES ĄĄ 1*QorIQ® LS1046A – quad 64-bit Arm Cortex®-A72

cores @1,8 MHz

ĄĄ 4 GB DDR4 ECC ĄĄ 256 MBytes of NOR Flash ĄĄ On-board SSD (32GB) ĄĄ 2* Kintex® UltraScale™ KU115, Virtex® UltraScale™/

UltraScale+™

ĄĄ 1* Gen2/3 PCIe switch ĄĄ 1*Giga Ethernet L2 switch www.interfaceconcept.com

info@interfaceconcept.com  +33(0) 2 98 57 30 30 www.linkedin.com/company/interface-concept/

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Embedded Hardware

Vehicle Health Monitoring System – IVHM Series The IVHM-35CP0C is a preconfigured rugged system ideally suited to support a multitude of functions that require “SBC-less” remote Gig-E or localized processing options for command and control of high-density, multichannel, programmable ARINC 429/575; DualRedundant, Quad Channel MIL-STD-1553B; CANBus (CAN 2.0 A&B or J1939); A/D Conversion; RTD Measurement; RS-232/422/485 Serial Communications; Discrete I/O; TTL/CMOS I/O and Dual-Port Gig-E Ethernet. NAI’s remote integrated vehicle health monitoring systems employ a range of device interfaces that support a myriad of sensor inputs and perform intelligent sensor monitoring of military vehicles on critical missions. IVHM systems enable the collection and transmission of information regarding a vehicle’s condition, performance and location. This provides early warning maintenance signals, enhances vehicle safety, reduces man-power and maintenance costs, and improves vehicle readiness. NAI’s IVHM systems combine a range of diagnostic tools within a single platform and provide around-the-clock, intelligent diagnostics on critical mission, air, land and sea.

FEATURES Ą

A single source mitigating 3rd party integration risks

Ą

No NRE

Ą

Increased design versatility

Ą

Reduced power consumption

Ą

Scalable with three systems to choose from

Ą

Higher package density

Ą

Streamlined development resources

Ą

Overall lower program cost

Ą

Accelerated time-to-mission

Ą

MIL-STD-461F and MIL-STD-810G

Ą

Continuous Background Built-in-Test (BIT)

Ą

COTS/NDI

Ą

COSA® architecture

Ą

SWaP-optimized

Applications include: • Fault detection and diagnostics • Proactive maintenance and failure prevention • Data management

Made in the USA Certified Small Business

The Possibilities with NAI’s COSA Architecture NAI’s highly Configurable Open Systems Architecture™ (COSA®) enables you to leverage our portfolio of pre-integrated modules, boards, systems and power supplies to quickly and easily meet complex mission processing requirements – today and down the road. This modular approach allows you to quickly combine our hardware with your IP to meet your most demanding system requirements – in less time while reducing costs and risks associated with custom designs. SWaP optimized, semi-custom solutions can be developed quickly, without NRE, while retaining all the benefits of COTS products.

NIU1A Single Module 70 Configurations

NIU2A Dual Module 2,415 Configurations

North Atlantic Industries www.naii.com

78 September 2019

SIU31 3 Modules 62,196 Configurations

SIU33 9 Modules >97B Configurations

mciesinski@naii.com

SIU6 12 Modules >18.3T Configurations

 631-567-1100

 www.linkedin.com/company/north-atlantic-industries

MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

SIU35 15 Modules >1.4Q Configurations

 NorthAtlanticI1 www.mil-embedded.com


Rugged Embedded Computers up to 9th Gen. i7 and Xeon Server The PIP Family, CEC, and MXCS Server are powerful, highly integrated, robust and fanless embedded computer solutions. Selection of the components are purely made on the subject for long-term availability and low power consumption. The systems can be expanded in a very modular way and represent a unique solution for today’s demanding and flexible defense requirements. The products are designed to operate under extreme and normal conditions without the need of fans. MPL solutions are engineered and manufactured in Switzerland to meet MIL STD-810F as well as other MIL standards. The systems include features like wide DC input power, reverse polarity protection and more. Additional GPGPU, GPS, WLAN, CAN, Sound, and UPS modules are available.

FEATURES Ą Ą Ą Ą Ą Ą Ą

Soldered CPU and ECCRAM Ethernet (up to 10Gbit), USB (3.1/2.0), Serial ports… PCIe, PMC, XMC, mPCIe, PCIe/104, MXM expansion Extreme low power consumption Compliance: e.g. DO-160G, MIL-STD-461, -704E, -1275E Availability 10+ years (repair 20+ years) Optional -40°C to 85°C environment temperature

T h i n k L o n g - Te r m – T h i n k M P L

www.mpl.ch

MPL AG Switzerland www.mpl.ch

info@mpl.ch

 www.linkedin.com/company/mpl.ch

 +41 56 483 34 34

 @MPL_AG

Embedded Hardware

Miniature Rugged Nano-D Connectors As the leading manufacturer of Nano-D connectors, Omnetics is ready to meet your light weight, small size, and high durability requirements for high reliability applications. They meet and exceed MIL-DTL-32139 and are available in a multitude of form factors, including single row, dual row, panel mount, and latching options. These connectors feature Omnetics’ highly reliable gold-plated Flex Pin contact system and are available in standard sizes ranging from 5 to 51 positions, as well as custom configurations. Set on a .025" (.64mm) pitch, these rugged lightweight connectors are available with threaded mounting holes and retention screws, and they are suitable for the most demanding applications. Proudly engineered and built in USA.

Omnetics Connector Corporation www.omnetics.com www.mil-embedded.com

FEATURES Small size Light weight ĄĄ Extreme durability ĄĄ Meets and exceeds MIL-DTL-32129 ĄĄ -55ºC to 125ºC (200ºC with HTE) ĄĄ 1 AMP per contact ĄĄ ĄĄ

http://bit.ly/nano-D 

sales@omnetics.com

 763-572-0656 • 608-799-9445 @Omnetics

 www.linkedin.com/company/215670



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Embedded Hardware

XEM8350 The XEM8350 Kintex UltraScale based FPGA module offers a turnkey dual Super-Speed USB 3.0 host interface using Opal Kelly’s FrontPanel SDK. System integrators can build fully-operational prototype and production designs quickly by integrating this device into their product. Manufacturers of high-speed devices such as JESD-204B data acquisition devices can launch fully-functional evaluation systems without the costly design and maintenance of an evaluation platform. As an industry first, the XEM8350 features two fully-independent SuperSpeed USB 3.0 ports for high-bandwidth applications requiring duplex operation or over 650 MB/s bandwidth. The FrontPanel SDK includes a multi-platform API (Windows, macOS, and Linux) and very low logic utilization on the FPGA.

FEATURES ĄĄ Dual SuperSpeed USB 3.0 ports for high-bandwidth data transfer ĄĄ Xilinx Kintex UltraScale XCKU060 or XCKU115

Memory-hungry applications enjoy access to 4 GiB of on-board DDR4 memory with a 64-bit wide data bus and ECC.

ĄĄ 4 GB DDR4 SDRAM with (64-bit with ECC)

Typical applications include ultra high-performance data acquisition such as: • Remote Sensing • LIDAR and RADAR • Photonics • Video / Image Capture • Advanced Metrology • Software-Defined Radio (SDR) • Data Ingestion Acceleration • 5G Systems

ĄĄ 28 multi-gigabit transceivers

Opal Kelly Incorporated www.opalkelly.com

ĄĄ Over 330 I/O pins on three Samtec QTH connectors ĄĄ Small form-factor: 145mm x 85mm ĄĄ On-board programmable oscillator

https://opalkelly.com/products/xem8350/ 

sales@opalkelly.com

 opal-kelly-incorporated

 217-391-3724

 @opalkelly

Embedded Hardware

XEM7360 The XEM7360 Kintex-7 based FPGA module offers a turnkey SuperSpeed USB 3.0 host interface using Opal Kelly's FrontPanel SDK. System integrators can build fully-operational prototype and production designs quickly by integrating this device into their product. Manufacturers of high-speed devices such as JESD-204B data acquisition devices can launch fully-functional evaluation systems without the costly design and maintenance of an evaluation platform. With ample logic resources, the Kintex-7 is well-suited for signal processing, image processing, and other logic-heavy acceleration tasks. Memory-hungry applications enjoy access to 2 GiB of on-board DDR3 memory with a 32-bit wide data bus. Celebrating over 10 years of USB FPGA connectivity, Opal Kelly’s FrontPanel SDK fully supports the XEM7360 for real-world transfer rates in excess of 340 MiB/s. FrontPanel includes a multi-platform (Windows, Mac, Linux) API, binary firmware for the on-board Cypress FX3 USB controller, and atomic HDL modules to integrate into your design. FrontPanel is the industry's most full-featured, high-performance, turnkey solution for professional-grade USB connectivity.

Opal Kelly Incorporated www.opalkelly.com 80 September 2019

FEATURES Xilinx Kintex-7 XC7K160T or XC7K410T ĄĄ 2 GiB DDR3, 2x 16 MiB serial flash ĄĄ Two Samtec QSH-090 expansion connectors ĄĄ Up to 193 user I/O + 8 Gigabit Transceivers ĄĄ Low-jitter 200 MHz and 100 MHz clock oscillators ĄĄ Integrated voltage, current, and temperature monitoring ĄĄ Small form-factor: 100mm x 70mm x 19.65mm ĄĄ

https://opalkelly.com/products/xem7360/ 

sales@opalkelly.com

 opal-kelly-incorporated

MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

 217-391-3724

 @opalkelly

www.mil-embedded.com


Model 6001 8-Channel A/D & D/A Zynq UltraScale+ RFSoC Module The Quartz Model 6001 is a high-performance Quartz eXpress Module (QuartzXM) based on the Xilinx Zynq UltraScale+ RFSoC FPGA. The RFSoC FPGA integrates eight RF-class A/D and D/A converters into the Zynq’s multiprocessor architecture, creating a multichannel data conversion and processing solution on a single chip. The Model 6001 has been designed to bring RFSoC performance to a wide range of different applications by offering the FPGA in a small system on module solution measuring only 2.5 by 4 inches. In addition to the RFSoC FPGA, the 6001 includes all of the support circuitry needed to maximize the performance of the RFSoC. The 6001 is available on standard form factor carriers. The Pentek Model 5950 delivers the 6001 as a 3U OpenVPX Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) board available in air cooled and fulled rugged and conduction cooled versions. In many applications, the 3U VPX standard form factor carrier can provide a final, deployable turn-key solution. In situations where only a custom form factor will satisfy the application requirements, Pentek supports the 6001 with a design kit for users to engineer and build their own custom carrier. As a complete and tested module, the QuartzXM encapsulates bestin-class electrical and mechanical design, eliminating some of the most challenging aspects of embedded circuit design and allowing the user to focus on the application specific carrier design.

Extendable IP Design For applications that require specialized functions, users can install their own custom IP for data processing. The Pentek Navigator FPGA Design Kits (FDK) include the board’s entire FPGA design as a block diagram that can be edited in Xilinx’s Vivado IP Integrator. In addition to the IP Integrator block diagrams, all source code and complete IP core documentation is included. Developers can integrate their own IP along with the Pentek factory-installed functions or use the Navigator kit to completely replace the Pentek IP with their own. The Navigator Board Support Package (BSP), the companion product to the Navigator FDK, provides a complete C-callable library for control of the 6001’s hardware and IP. The Navigator FDK and BSP libraries mirror each other where each IP function is controlled by a matching software function, simplifying the job of keeping IP and software development synchronized. The Navigator BSP includes support for Xilinx’s PetaLinux running on the ARM Cortex-A53 processors. When running under PetaLinux, the Navigator BSP libraries enable complete control of the 6001 either from applications running locally on the ARMs, or using the Navigator API, control and command from remote system computers.

FEATURES Ą

Unique QuartzXM eXpress Module enables deployment in custom form factors

Ą

Measures only 2.5 by 4 inches.

Ą

Supports Xilinx Zynq UltraScale+ RFSoC FPGAs

Ą

16 GB of DDR4 SDRAM

Ą

LVDS connections to the Zynq UltraScale+ FPGA for custom I/O

Ą

GTY connections for gigabit serial communication

Ą

Ruggedized and conduction-cooled versions available

Ą

Includes a complete suite of IP functions and example applications www.pentek.com/go/6001rg

Pentek

www.pentek.com www.mil-embedded.com

sales@pentek.com

 www.linkedin.com/company/pentek

 201-818-5900

 @pentekinc

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Phoenix International is an AS9100D/ISO 9001-2015 certified, NIST SP 800-171 compliant Small Business

PHALANX II NAS File Server The Phalanx II is a rugged Small Form Factor (SFF) Network Attached Storage (NAS) File Server, specifically tailored for the avionics, military and rugged industrial market. The system offers the best utilization of Size, Weight and Power (SWaP) and adherence to Commercial Off the Shelf (COTS) standards in the industry. Utilizing two military grade solid state disk storage devices (fixed or removable), the Phalanx II will support a variety of network-based file systems that allow for multiple hosts to store and share information. Network connections are provided through four load balanced Gigabit Ethernet ports, and can support optional dual optical 10 Gigabit Ethernet ports for low EMI susceptibility. Management is via a convenient web based GUI or CLI. System and storage health and performance monitoring capabilities include SMART, SNMP (read-only), and Email notification. The optional dual removable storage bay is available for ready access to the storage media, allowing for fast data availability for ground station analysis, and quick mission turnaround and declassification.

Phoenix International www.phenxint.com

FEATURES ĄĄ CPU: Intel Core i7-6822EQ ĄĄ FIPS 140-2 Validated AES 256 Encryption ĄĄ Two SSDs (fixed or removable) up to 8TB ea, 16TB total ĄĄ Network Services: NFS (V3/V4), SBM/CIFS, FTP, TFTP, RSYNC, SSH ĄĄ Temp: -40°C to +71°C (Op.), -40°C to +85°C (Non-Op.) ĄĄ MIL-STD-810F, MIL-STD-461F,

MIL-STD-704F/1275D ĄĄ Weight: < 6lb with fixed SSDs

MADE IN THE USA

www.phenxint.com/portfolio/phalanx-ii/ 

info@phenxint.com

 714-283-4800

 www.linkedin.com/company/phoenix-int-systems Embedded Hardware

VP1-250-eSSDC The VP1-250-eSSDC is a Conduction Cooled (VITA 48) Open VPX NVMe Solid State Disk storage module that delivers extremely high performance via a single fat pipe (PCIe 4x). Designed from the ground up to remove legacy layers of hard drive interfaces such as SATA and SAS, it takes full advantage of the speed and parallelism of solid state nonvolatile memory. Streamlined efficient queuing protocol combined with an optimized command set register interface enables low latency and high performance. NVMe is an industry standard registered interface designed to accelerate the performance of nonvolatile PCI Express (PCIe) SSDs. The NVMe protocol was established in collaboration by server industry leaders to standardize a scalable PCIe interface, making it easier for designers to unlock the full potential of PCIe. NVME provides opportunities for increased data throughput and reduced latency all while reducing the number of drives needed – both now and in the future. Adoption of this industry standard is driven by a strong consortium of storage technology providers and a robust ecosystem of drivers across multiple operating systems. Phoenix International is an AS9100D/ISO 9001-2015 certified, NIST SP 800-171 compliant Small Business

Phoenix International www.phenxint.com 82 September 2019

FEATURES ĄĄ Storage Capacity to 8TB ĄĄ Sequential 128KB read: 1.2GB/sec, write: 1.2KB/sec ĄĄ Operational Altitude to 80,000 Feet ĄĄ Operational Temperature from -40 degrees to +85 degrees C ĄĄ Streamlined protocol with efficient queuing mechanism to scale

with multi-core CPUs

ĄĄ Optional AES 256/FIPS140-2 Encryption ĄĄ Also Available in Air Cooled Configurations

MADE IN THE USA

www.phenxint.com/portfolio/rugged-open-vpx-nvme-ssd-module/ 

info@phenxint.com

 714-283-4800

 www.linkedin.com/company/phoenix-int-systems

MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

www.mil-embedded.com


Red Rapids Red Rapids Product Families Red Rapids offers a catalog of signal processing hardware products that target communication, telemetry, radar, electro-optic, and high-speed data acquisition systems. The products are available in multiple form factors for seamless integration into an embedded chassis or traditional server/desktop computing environment. Red Rapids hardware is built around widely adopted open architecture standards. Direct connection to a host is achieved through a PCI Express bus interface while network connections are supported by 10 Gigabit Ethernet.

Analog Up/Down Converter Products The SigFront product family offers high fidelity analog up/down converters with multiple IF bandwidth options. The up and down converter functions are supplied as individual products that cover two separate RF bands; 1 MHz to 3.9 GHz and 100 kHz to 6 GHz. The 3.9 GHz RF converter is a triple-stage superheterodyne structure with a 70 MHz IF center frequency. The up/down converter can be configured with a 10 MHz, 18 MHz, or 40 MHz IF bandwidth. The 6 GHz RF converter is a triple-stage heterodyne structure with a programmable IF center frequency from 1 to 500 MHz. The up/down converter can be configured with an 80 MHz or 160 MHz IF bandwidth.

Digital Up/Down Converter Products The SigStream product family digitizes and reproduces analog signals under software command from a host computer. The hardware offers a rich set of software programmable features that include selectable operating modes (continuous, snapshot, periodic), external or timed event triggers, programmable up/down converters, timestamped data samples, data sizing, and data packing. Data can be organized as a continuous stream of samples or in data packets defined by the VITA 49 specification. SigStream product options include a single channel 12-bit (1.5 Gsps) receiver, dual channel 16-bit (310 Msps) transceiver, quad channel 16-bit (250 Msps) receiver, and eight channel 16-bit (125 Msps) receiver. ADC/DAC with FPGA Products The SigFPGA product family provides the ideal platform to rapidly field application specific signal processing functions minus the expense of custom hardware development. The products share a common Xilinx FPGA processing architecture with multiple size and speed grade options. Two banks of QDR SRAM attached to the FPGA provide 32 Mbytes of local storage. SigFPGA product options include a dual channel 12-bit (1.6 Gsps) receiver, dual channel 16-bit (310 Msps) transceiver, quad channel 16-bit (250 Msps) receiver, and eight channel 16-bit (125 Msps) receiver.

www.redrapids.com

Red Rapids

www.redrapids.com www.mil-embedded.com

ď&#x192;

sales@redrapids.com

ď&#x201A;&#x2DC; 972-671-9570

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Embedded Hardware

Four Channel 1-25 MSPS Digitizer RTD’s DM34216HR dataModule is a rugged high speed data acquisition (DAQ) module in the PCIe/104 format which boasts four 16-bit 25 MHz A/D converters. This module provides 4 single-ended analog input channels with software-selectable input ranges and input impedances. Each input channel has a dedicated ADC, permitting simultaneous sampling of the inputs. Additionally, each channel also has a dedicated DMA channel, which ensures the ability for the host controller or a DSP to continuously collect data from all four channels across the PCIe x4 interfaces. (Note that a separate version, the DM34116, is available with 2 inputs and 2 outputs.) The DM34216HR also features 32-bit advanced DIO with peripheral output capabilities including a quad PWM and external clocking. The SyncBus permits multiple DAQ cards to be synchronized within the system. When used with RTD’s SPM34CP high-performance DSP, data can be transferred directly to the DSP’s memory using a CPU’s PCIe connection.

RTD Embedded Technologies, Inc. www.rtd.com

FEATURES Ą Ą Ą Ą Ą Ą

-40 to +85°C operation, passively cooled PCIe/104 stackable bus structure 4 high-speed, single-ended analog inputs with simultaneous sampling Input sampling rate from 1–25 MSPS 16-bit resolution Complete board support library and example software for Linux

sales@rtd.com

 814-234-8087

Embedded Hardware

RTD Off-the-Shelf Mission Computer RTD’s standard HiDANplus® embedded computer system provides a robust Commercial-Off-the-Shelf (COTS) solution enabling rapid uptime for mission-critical applications. The system includes a rugged single board computer, power supply, and room for an additional peripheral module. Without increasing the enclosure size, functional upgrades can include high-performance data acquisition, versatile networking options, or enhanced capabilities from a variety of special-purpose add-in modules. Additional configuration options include a removable SATA drawer. The milled aluminum enclosure with advanced heat sinking delivers passively-cooled performance from -40 to +85°C. Integrated tongue-and-groove architecture with EMI gaskets create a watertight solution with excellent environmental isolation. Keyed cylindrical connectors offer easy cable connections while maintaining the integrity of the environmental seal.

RTD Embedded Technologies, Inc. www.rtdstacknet.com/iot 84 September 2019

FEATURES Ą -40 to +85°C standard operating temperature Ą Designed for high ingress protection in harsh environments Ą Milled aluminum enclosure with integrated heat sinks and Ą Ą Ą Ą

heat fins Rugged Intel and AMD-based Single Board Computers High-performance, synchronized power supply Optional 2.5" removable drive Designed to include an additional PCIe/104, PCI/104-Express or PCI-104 peripheral module without increasing overall enclosure size sales@rtd.com

MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

 814-234-8087

www.mil-embedded.com


A FINE TECHNOLOGY GROUP

cPCI, PXI, VME, Custom Packaging Solutions VME and VME64x, CompactPCI, or PXI chassis are available in many configurations from 1U to 12U, 2 to 21 slots, with many power options up to 1,200 watts. Dual hot-swap is available in AC or DC versions. We have in-house design, manufacturing capabilities, and in-process controls. All Vector chassis and backplanes are manufactured in the USA and are available with custom modifications and the shortest lead times in the industry. Series 2370 chassis offer the lowest profile per slot. Cards are inserted horizontally from the front, and 80mm rear I/O backplane slot configuration is also available. Chassis are available from 1U, 2 slots up to 7U, 12 slots for VME, CompactPCI, or PXI. All chassis are IEEE 1101.10/11 compliant with hot-swap, plug-in AC or DC power options.

FEATURES ĄĄ

Made in the USA

ĄĄ

Most rack accessories ship from stock

Our Series 400 enclosures feature side-filtered air intake and rear exhaust for up to 21 vertical cards. Options include hot-swap, plug-in AC or DC power, and system voltage/ temperature monitor. Embedded power supplies are available up to 1,200 watts.

ĄĄ

Series 790 is MIL-STD-461D/E compliant and certified, economical, and lighter weight than most enclosures available today. It is available in 3U, 4U, and 5U models up to 7 horizontal slots. All Vector chassis are available for custom modification in the shortest time frame. Many factory paint colors are available and can be specified with Federal Standard or RAL numbers.

Modified ‘standards’ and customization are our specialty

ĄĄ

Card sizes from 3U x 160mm to 9U x 400mm

ĄĄ

System monitoring option (CMM)

ĄĄ

AC or DC power input

ĄĄ

Power options up to 1,200 watts

VISIT OUR NEW WEBSITE! WWW.VECTORELECT.COM

For more detailed product information, please visit www.vectorelect.com

QUALITY SYSTEMS PACKAGING AND PROTOTYPE PRODUCTS

or call 1-800-423-5659 and discuss your application with a Vector representative. Vector Electronics & Technology, Inc. www.vectorelect.com www.mil-embedded.com

Made in the USA Since 1947

 inquire@vectorelect.com  800-423-5659

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Military Embedded Systems Resource Guide

Embedded Hardware GraphiteVPX/CPU-TX2/TX2i/TX1 GraphiteVPX/CPU-TX2/TX2i/TX1 is a VITA 65 compliant 3U VPX single board computer that brings the NVIDIA® Jetson™ TX2, TX2i, and TX1 embedded computing platforms to the VPX form factor. This complete host solution delivers over a TeraFLOP of performance, with multiple USB 3.0 ports, multiple GbE channels, and 6 x CSI camera interfaces to round out this 3U VPX solution. The onboard PCIe Gen 3.0 switch allows for two x4 interfaces providing two additional downstream ports on the backplane. The GraphiteVPX/CPUTX2/ TX2i/TX1 has a Quad-Core 64bit ARM Cortex-A57 processor.

FEATURES 1 TFLOP, 256 CUDA cores with NVIDIA® Pascal™ or Maxwell™ GPU Architecture ĄĄ Conduction cooled ĄĄ The onboard PCIe Gen 3.0 switch supports two x4 port dataplane connections ĄĄ Extended Temperature Range -40°C to +85°C (TX2i) ĄĄ Can be used with RTG004 Graphite VPX CPU TX2/TX1 RTM to aid in development ĄĄ

https://www.wdlsystems.com/landing-ee-mil-cti-vpx

WDL Systems

www.wdlsystems.com

sales@wdlsystems.com

 800.548.2319

 /company/wdl-systems

 @wdlsystems Real-Time Operating Systems and Tools

HPERC VITA-75 COTS Computers HPERC VITA-75 COTS computers from ADLINK Technolare sealed Extreme Rugged™ COTS computing platform in a tiny VITA-75 footprint, ideal for ground, air, and sea deployments. Based on Intel® Core™ i7 or Xeon® processors and optional GPGPU parallel processing engine, HPERC systems feature an easily configured application-ready platform for fast integration of custom rugged embedded applications. A wide array of fast IO provided on uniquely-keyed MIL-DTL-38999 connectors. Dual removable secure erase RAID-0 SSDs provide 12Gb/s throughput and security for deployment in hostile environments.

FEATURES ĄĄ VITA 75 mount with passive convection cooling (MH) or cold

plate mounting (MC)

ĄĄ Intel® Xeon® Processor E3-1505M v6, quad-core; 16GB

DDR4-2400 with ECC soldered down

ĄĄ Compliant with MIL-STD-810G/461F/704F/1275E ĄĄ Quad Gigabit Ethernet and 6x USB ports

ĄĄ Available GPGPU on PCI Express x16 Gen3

ĄĄ Wide temperature range: storage -40°C to +85°C, operating

-40°C to +75°C

https://www.wdlsystems.com/wdlsystems-news-2019-mes-adlink-hperc

WDL Systems

www.wdlsystems.com 86 September 2019

sales@wdlsystems.com

 /company/wdl-systems

MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

 800.548.2319

 @wdlsystems www.mil-embedded.com


EBC-C413 EBX-compatible Single Board Computer WINSYSTEMS’ EBC-C413 is an EBX-compatible single-board computer, which uses Intel®’s Bay Trail E3845 or E3825 processor. Its rugged design, high reliability, and extended operating temperature range make it a great fit for high-performance industrial, military or commercial off-the-shelf (Mil/COTS), medical, and communications applications.

FEATURES Intel® Bay Trail E3845/E3825 Processor ĄĄ EBX Single Board Computer (SBC) ĄĄ PC/104 and PC/104-Plus Expansion Buses ĄĄ -40°C to +85°C Operational Temperature ĄĄ Two 10/100/1000 Mbps Ethernet Ports ĄĄ 2 MiniPCIe Sockets, 1 MSATA ĄĄ Onboard CFast Socket ĄĄ

WINSYSTEMS, Inc.

www.winsystems.com

EMBED SUCCESS IN ALL YOUR PRODUCTS www.winsystems.com/product/ebx-c413/ 

pcoffaro@winsystems.com

 www.linkedin.com/company/winsystems-inc-

 817-274-7553 @WinSystemsInc



Embedded Hardware

PX1-C415 PC104 form factor Single Board Computer WINSYSTEMS’ PX1-C415 is a PC/104 form factor SBC with PCIe/104™ OneBank™ expansion and the latest generation Intel® Atom™ E3900 processor. It offers dual Ethernet and robust I/O. Its rugged design, high reliability, and extended operating temperature range make it a great fit for SBC is ideal for industrial IoT apps and embedded systems in industrial control, transportation, Mil/COTS, and energy markets.

FEATURES Intel® Atom™ E3900 Processor ĄĄ PC/104 Small Form Factor Single Board Computer (SBC) ĄĄ Up to 8 GB DDR3-LV System RAM ĄĄ -40°C to +85°C Operating Temperature Range ĄĄ Shock and Vibration Tested ĄĄ Multiple Displays Supported ĄĄ Expansion Options: PCIe/104™ OneBank™, M.2 Socket ĄĄ

WINSYSTEMS, Inc.

www.winsystems.com www.mil-embedded.com

pcoffaro@winsystems.com

EMBED SUCCESS IN ALL YOUR PRODUCTS www.winsystems.com/product/px1-c415/

 www.linkedin.com/company/winsystems-inc-

 817-274-7553 @WinSystemsInc



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XPedite7683 XPedite7683 is a secure, high-performance, 3U OpenVPX™, single board computer based on the Intel® Xeon® D-1500 family of processors. Providing up to 16 Xeon®-class cores, up to 32 GB of DDR4-2133 ECC SDRAM, and XMC support, the XPedite7683 is an optimal choice for computationally heavy applications requiring maximum data and information protection. XPedite7683 integrates SecureCOTS™ technology with a Microsemi SmartFusion®2 security SoC for hosting custom functions to protect data from being modified or observed, and provides an ideal solution when stringent security capabilities are required. The Microsemi SmartFusion®2 can control, intercept, and monitor the Xeon® D subsystem, implement penalties, and interface to the system through GPIO directly connected to the VPX backplane. Circuit board enhancements and optimized Two-Level Maintenance (2LM) metalwork provide additional protection to the physical hardware. XPedite7683 maximizes network performance with two 10 Gigabit Ethernet interfaces and two Gigabit Ethernet interfaces. It accommodates up to 32 GB of DDR42133 ECC SDRAM in two channels and up to 256 GB of onboard SATA NAND flash in addition to numerous I/O ports, including USB, SATA, and RS-232/422/485 through the backplane connectors. The XPedite7683 provides additional expansion capabilities with an integrated XMC site, which includes a x8 PCIe connection to the Intel® Xeon® D processor and X12d I/O mapped directly to the VPX backplane connectors.

Extreme Engineering Solutions (X-ES) www.xes-inc.com

FEATURES ĄĄ Supports Intel® Xeon® D-1500 family processors (formerly

Broadwell-DE)

ĄĄ Up to 16 Xeon®-class cores in a single, power-efficient SoC

ĄĄ ĄĄ ĄĄ ĄĄ ĄĄ

sales@xes-inc.com

package. 4-, 8-, or 12-core SKUs available with native extended temperature support. Up to 32 GB of DDR4-2133 ECC SDRAM in two channels Ruggedized Enhanced Design Implementation (REDI) per VITA 48 Designed with SecureCOTS™ technology to support enhanced security and trusted computing Microsemi SmartFusion®2 SoC with 1 GB DDR3-667 ECC SDRAM and 32 MB SPI flash Two 10 Gigabit Ethernet ports and two Gigabit Ethernet ports, four SATA ports, and two USB 2.0 ports www.xes-inc.com/products/sbcs/xpedite7683/

 608-833-1155

 www.linkedin.com/company/extreme-engineering-solutions

 @XES_INC

OpenSystems Media works with industry leaders to develop and publish content that educates our readers. Ground Vehicle Modernization with VICTORY and GVA By Curtiss-Wright Defense Solutions Modern efforts like the U.S. Army’s VICTORY (Vehicle Integration for C4ISR/EW Interoperability) initiative and the U.K Ministry of Defence Generic Vehicle Architecture (GVA) are paving the way for a modern battlefield where system upgrades and modifications for technologies used in military vehicles – including GPS and human-machine interface – are quicker and less expensive. Read this white paper to learn about these emerging frameworks, review their key similarities and differences, and discuss the benefits of using such frameworks in land vehicle upgrades and new builds.

Read this paper at https://bit.ly/2KHHhYv 88 September 2019

MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

Read more white papers: http://mil-embedded.com/white-papers/ www.mil-embedded.com


ZM3 MISSION COMPUTER

FULL COMPUTING CAPABILITY IN A SMALL, RUGGED PACKAGE. Focus on SWaP The ZM3 rugged computer is designed specifically to minimize size, weight and power for airborne ISR applications. Built to provide advanced compute processing in the smallest form-factor possible, the ZM3 offers full server capability in a small, rugged packaging. The system supports double-wide COTS high-end graphics cards and an additional PCI Express card for custom user expansion. Utilizing an advanced Type 7 COM Express module, the ZM3 utilizes a 16 Core Intel® Xeon® Processor with up to 48G RAM.

Designed to Survive Airborne Environments The ZM3 is carefully engineered to handle the extreme conditions of airborne environments. Designed and tested to DO-160D requirements for vibration, shock, temperature, humidity, dust and EMI/EMC, the ZM3 provides powerful compute capabilities with robust environmental design to ensure your missions will be a success.

FEATURES ĄĄ

16 Core, 1.3GHz Base, 2.1GHz Max. Intel® Xeon® Processor

ĄĄ

Up to 48G RAM

ĄĄ

Removable NVMe storage drives (up to 4TB)

ĄĄ

x16 GPU Support; Up to NVIDIA P6000 class GPU; 3840 GPU Cores (or two PCIe slots x8 Gen3 slots)

ĄĄ

Additional x8 PCIe slot for user expansion

ĄĄ

18-36V DC Power Input

ĄĄ

Status indicators for disk activity and fault detection

ĄĄ

Ultra-compact, lightweight aluminum construction

ĄĄ

4.6"w x 5.6"h x 14"d • Under 10lbs

ZMicro is a leading manufacturer of rugged deployable

NVMe Based Removable Storage Drives

computing and visual solutions. Since 1986 we have

Further reducing weight, the ZM3 can house up to two TranzPak 1 rugged storage drives (up to 4TB), which utilize the latest NVMe technology to provide storage read/write speeds up to 3x faster than SATA and only weigh 3 oz. each.

been delivering reliable, high-performance MIL-Spec solutions that are custom tailored to perform at their highest capacity in harsh environments. Our ruggedized products include: displays, computers, servers, handhelds, data storage, video enhancement, video management resources, and much more.

https://zmicro.com/zm3

ZMicro, Inc.

www.zmicro.com www.mil-embedded.com

sales@zmicro.com

 www.linkedin.com/company/z-microsystems

 858-831-7000

 @zmicrosystems

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Lauterbach Debugger for Intel x86/x64 Skylake/Kabylake Lauterbach TRACE32 Debugger for Intel x86/x64: In January of this year, Lauterbach introduced the new CombiProbe Whisker MIPI60-Cv2. The TRACE32 CombiProbe and TRACE32 QuadProbe now offer the same debug features for the Converged Intel® MIPI60 connector: • Standard JTAG, Intel® debug hooks with Pmode, and I2C bus • Merged debug ports (two JTAG chains) • Intel® Survivability features (threshold, slew rate, ...) However, these debug tools have different areas of application. The TRACE32 QuadProbe, which is expressly designed for server processors, is a dedicated debug tool that enables SMP debugging of hundreds of threads on targets with up to four debug connectors. The TRACE32 CombiProbe with the MIPI60-Cv2 Whisker, designed for client as well as mobile device processors, can capture and evaluate system trace data in addition to its enhanced debugging features. Trace capabilities include support of one 4-bit and one 8-bit trace port with nominal bandwidth. The TRACE32 CombiProbe with the DCI OOB Whisker is specially designed for debugging and tracing of form factor devices without debug connectors. If the chip contains a DCI Manager, the target and the debugger can exchange debug and trace messages directly via the USB3 interface. The DCI protocol used to exchange messages supports standard JTAG and Intel® debug hooks as well as trace messages for recording system trace information.

Lauterbach, Inc.

ĄĄ

ĄĄ ĄĄ

ĄĄ

ĄĄ

CombiProbe MIPI60-Cv2 provides debug and system trace capability Support for standard JTAG, debug HOOKs and I2C bus Support for merged debug ports (two JTAG chains per debug connector) Support for survivability features (threshold, slew rate, etc.) Support for system trace port with up to 8 trace data channels

ĄĄ

128 MByte of trace memory

ĄĄ

SMP debugging (including hyperthreading)

ĄĄ

AMP debugging with other architectures

ĄĄ

BIOS/UEFI debugging with tailor-made GUI for all UEFI phases

ĄĄ

Linux- and Windows-aware debugging

ĄĄ

Hypervisor debugging

info_us@lauterbach.com  508-303-6812 www.lauterbach.com/pro/pro_core_alt1.php?chip=COREI7-7THGEN

www.lauterbach.com 90 September 2019

FEATURES

MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

www.mil-embedded.com


TRACE32 Integration for Wind River Workbench The Lauterbach TRACE32 Debugger now also operates as a TCF agent. This makes it possible to use the Wind River Workbench or the Eclipse debugger as an IDE and a TRACE32 debugger as a debugging back-end tool. The Target Communication Framework (TCF) was developed by the Eclipse Foundation as a protocol framework with the goal of defining a uniform debugging communication protocol between an IDE and a target system. TCF defines a series of standard services. At the same time, the framework is open for the definition of proprietary services. After the TRACE32 software is started as a TCF agent, it provides its services to the Wind River Workbench or the Eclipse debugger via TCP/IP. Using its TCF services, the TRACE32 debugger can now provide an open communication interface for debugging with Eclipse or the WindRiver Workbench for all processor architectures and compilers supported by TRACE32.

Lauterbach, Inc.

www.lauterbach.com

FEATURES ĄĄ TRACE32 operates as TCF agent ĄĄ Support for various launch mechanisms ĄĄ Support for all debug relevant TCF services ĄĄ Synchronized debugging between TRACE32 and TCF C/C++ Debugger

in Wind River Workbenchd

ĄĄ Support for multiple projects (multicore) ĄĄ Applicable for all processor architectures supported by TRACE32 ĄĄ Based on Target Communication Framework (TCF)

info_us@lauterbach.com www.lauterbach.com/intwindriver.html

 508-303-6812

Embedded Software

Hypervisor Debugging with Lauterbach TRACE32 Debugger Lauterbach provides support for seamless debugging of hypervisor-based systems. The introduction of the unique Lauterbach Machine ID allows the debugger to identify any virtual machine in the system. This gives the debugger full visibility of the context of all active and inactive virtual machines and provides a supporting framework to load OS specific awarenesses for each virtual machine. The most important objective of the TRACE32 hypervisor-awareness is a seamless debugging of the overall system. This means that when the system has stopped at a breakpoint, one can check and change the current state of every single process, all VMs, plus the current state of the hypervisor and of the real hardware platform. The TRACE32 hypervisor-awareness provides the debugger with all of the hypervisor’s information running on the hardware platform. After the OS-awareness is loaded for each guest/VM the debugger can display an overview of the overall system. TRACE32 assigns each VM a number, the machine ID (mid column). The machine ID is a unique identifier that is used by TRACE32 and appears as an address extension; a concept already familiar to TRACE32 users. The Global Task List represents the heart of the TRACE32 hypervisor-aware debugging. It lists all tasks/processes/threads of the guest OSes and the hypervisor. TRACE32 can visualize the context of any task in its GUI. Just double-click to on the task name. The TRACE32 CORE List window displays in detail what is currently running on the individual cores of an SMP system. The TRACE32 GUI visualizes the context of the current core/task by a double-click on the task name in the TRACE32 Global Task List. TRACE32 allows the visualisation of any task, even if its VM is currently not active. Since Lauterbach has systematically extended the well known concepts for OS-aware debugging to hypervisor debugging, it will be easy for TRACE32 users to get started with just a little practice.

Lauterbach, Inc.

www.lauterbach.com

www.mil-embedded.com

FEATURES ĄĄ Seamless debugging of the total system in stop-mode ĄĄ Hypervisor-awareness as a loadable debug extension is provided

by Lauterbach

ĄĄ Machine ID allows the user to uniquely identify any virtual

machine in the system

ĄĄ Machine ID provides full visibility of context of active and inactive

virtual machines ĄĄ OS-awareness can be loaded for each virtual machine

info_us@lauterbach.com www.lauterbach.com/hypervisor.html

 508-303-6812

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Real-Time Operating Systems and Tools

Wind River® Helix™ Virtualization Platform Wind River® Helix™ Virtualization Platform is an adaptive software environment that consolidates multi-OS and mixed-criticality applications onto a single compute software platform, simplifying, securing, and future-proofing designs in the aerospace and defense markets. Applications can be legacy or new capability, based on industry standards such as ARINC 653, POSIX®, or FACE™ or based on operating systems such as Linux, VxWorks®, and others. Designed for modularity and application portability, Helix Platform facilitates rapid capability integration and product upgrades, enabling a path to application consolidation for systems requiring mixed-criticality applications – from highly dynamic environments without certification requirements to highly regulated static applications, as well as systems requiring a mix of safetycertified applications with non-certified ones. The commercial offthe-shelf (COTS) platform helps aerospace and defense suppliers develop innovative, software-defined devices that enable future generations of advanced capability, in a cost-effective and low-risk manner.

Features and Benefits: • Proven market excellence: Developed from the Wind River market-leading RTOS product line VxWorks, Helix Platform leverages a successful track record of nearly 40 years of software innovation deployed in over 2 billion devices and more than 90 civilian and military aircraft. • Modular architecture: The platform allows for maximized portability and easy application integration. • Adaptability: Development and deployment of static or dynamically configured systems running applications such as machine learning and analytics. • Industry standards conformance: Simultaneous support for application development follows standard APIs such as ARINC 653 APEX API, FACE, POSIX, and VxWorks. • Support for unmodified guest OSes: OS-agnostic virtualization and separation technology eases portability of legacy applications, bringing them to modern operating systems next to new applications. • Mixed-criticality support: Hardware virtualization assist allows safe and non-safe applications to run in parallel on separate cores, increasing safety, security, and robustness. • Cybersecurity protection: Robust partitioning restricts access control and resource allocation, improving the overall integrity of the system. • High performance and low jitter: The Type 1 hypervisor virtualization layer provides full control over hardware configuration. • Rapid development environment: Standard workflows are used to configure, build, develop, and debug. • Broad range of architectures and CPUs: Helix Platform provides multi-core hardware support and availability on the latest Arm® and Intel® architectures, and CPUs from Intel, NXP, and Xilinx that enable both 32- and 64-bit guest OSes.

Wind River Systems Inc.

www.windriver.com/helix-platform 92 September 2019

inquiries@windriver.com

 www.linkedin.com/company/wind-river/

MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

 800-545-WIND (9463) @windriver



www.mil-embedded.com


WILDSTAR 6XB2 6U Board features 25Gb/s RT3 connectors

WILDSTAR™ FPGA Boards with 100GbE Capability The 6XB2 (6U) and 3XBM (3U) WILDSTAR Boards are the first OpenVPX COTS FPGA Baseboards with capability for 100GbE over copper on the VPX backplane. Both boards are VITA 65compliant and align with the SOSA™ technical standard. High Performance These high-performance boards combine the latest Xilinx Kintex UltraScale or Virtex UltraScale+ FPGAs with a powerful Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC. They are 2.5X faster than existing technology, and enable PCIe Gen-4, 100 Gbps Ethernet, and InfiniBand high-speed bandwidths. Superior speed and bandwidth is made possible by 25Gbps+ FPGA transceivers and high-density MULTIGIG RT3 interconnects. Rugged Annapolis rugged FPGA boards are designed from the ground up to perform at the highest levels in the harshest environments. They are designed and tested for reliability, utilizing high-performance air, conduction, or air-flow-through cooling for thermal control. Proven Wild100 EcoSystem WILDSTAR boards are part of the Wild100 EcoSystem. The 100Gb EcoSystem is an integrated and agile VITA 65-compliant system architecture for high-end data digitization, signal processing, and storage. Designed & Manufactured in USA All Annapolis products are engineered and manufactured under one roof in the United States. This co-location of engineering and manufacturing allows for more aggressive design, and better quality control and production flexibility. MADE IN

www.annapmicro.com

Annapolis Micro Systems, Inc.

U. S. A.

WILDSTAR 3XBM 3U Board, shown with optional VITA 67.3 blindmate RF

FEATURES Ą General Features

• • • • • • •

Up to two Xilinx® Kintex® UltraScale™ or Virtex® UltraScale+™ FPGAs – Gen3/Gen4 PCIe, 150G Interlaken and 100Gb Ethernet Hard Cores – FPGAs programmable from attached flash, JTAG or Annapolis-provided software API Xilinx Zynq® UltraScale+ MPSoC Motherboard Controller A Full Board Support Package using Open Project Builder™ for fast and easy Application Development • – BSP options include 40/100GbE IP and both VxWorks 7 • and Linux support • Multiple levels of hardware and software security

Ą OpenVPX Backplane I/O

• 12 (3U) or 38 (6U) HSS I/O lanes to VPX backplane for 72 (3U) or 182 (6U) GB/s of full duplex bandwidth • 16 (3U) or 32 (6U) LVDS lines to VPX backplane • RT3 connectors deliver 25Gb/s, for a total of 100Gb per Fat Pipe • Backplane Protocol Agnostic connections support 10/40/100Gb Ethernet, IB capable, AnnapMicro, Aurora protocol and userdesigned protocols • Radial Backplane Clock Support for OpenVPX backplane signals AUXCLK and REFCLK, to enable ADC/DAC synchronization

Ą Front Panel I/O

• • • • •

Ą Mechanical and Environmental

• Air, conduction, or air-flow-through cooled: -55°C to +85°C Operating • Available in extended temperature grades • Optional blind mate optical and/or RF (VITA 66/67) • Hot swappable • RTM available for additional I/O • Developed in alignment with the SOSA™ Technical Standard

www.annapmicro.com/product-category/fpga-boards-2/ www.mil-embedded.com

WILD FMC+ (WFMC+™) next generation I/O site(s) – Accepts standard FMC and FMC+ cards (complies to FMC+ specification) – Supports stacking (2 I/O cards per site) – Up to 32 HSS and 100 LVDS pairs connections to FPGA

 wfinfo@annapmicro.com  410-841-2514

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WILDSTAR™ UWB for 6U OpenVPX – WB6XBU

FEATURES

This breakthrough Ultra-Wide-Bandwidth (UWB) FPGA Board features a super-high-performance digitizer and processor in a single rugged 6U OpenVPX board. It is designed to handle full ADC input bandwidths in the most challenging data acquisition, processing, and storage applications. All Annapolis FPGA boards are engineered for superior performance and maximum bandwidth. Both Altera and Xilinx FPGAs are leveraged to offer the best FPGA technology available and to fit customer preference, design requirements and production schedule.

Annapolis is famous for the high quality of our products and for our unparalleled dedication to ensuring that the customer’s applications succeed. We offer training and exceptional special application development support,

Ą General Features

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Processing – Two Xilinx UltraScale+ Virtex (XCVU9P or XCVU13P) – On-Board Zynq+: Quad-core 64-bit ARM Cortex-A53 & Dualcore 32-bit Cortex-R5 – Gen4 PCIe, 150G Interlaken and 100Gb Ethernet Hard Cores ADC Performance – 2 Channels @ 32GSps – 4 Channels @ 16GSps – Resolution: 10 Bits – Analog Input Bandwidth: 9GHz per channel Backplane I/O – Up to 38 HSS to VPX Backplane for up to 182 GB/s – 32 LVDS lines to VPX Backplane – RT3 connectors deliver 25Gb/s, for a total of 100Gb per Fat Pipe A Full Board Support Package using Open Project Builder™ for fast and easy Application Development

Ą Mechanical and Environmental

• • • • •

Air or conduction cooled: -40°C to +70°C Operating Available in extended temperature grades Optional blind mate optical and/or RF (VITA 66/67) RTM available for additional I/O Developed in alignment with the SOSA™ Technical Standard

Ą What Can the WILDSTAR UWB Board Do for You?

If you need to acquire, process, and store a large volume of raw data in real time, this Ultra-Wide-Bandwidth FPGA Board is for you. Contact us today to request a block diagram and additional specifications. MADE IN

as well as more conventional support.

U. S. A.

www.annapmicro.com/product-category/fpga-boards-2/

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MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

 wfinfo@annapmicro.com  410-841-2514

www.mil-embedded.com


VITA 66 Optical / VITA 67 RF over OpenVPX – Chassis Pixus is a leader in OpenVPX backplane/chassis solutions with several configurations in stock. Whether your project is CMOSS/SOSA/HOST utilizing VITA 66 Optical and VITA 67 RF contacts or another OpenVPX requirement, Pixus has a solution for you. From Test/ Development chassis to rugged rackmount and ATR designs to meet MIL 810/901D/461 specifications, our modular approach ensures a proven, reliable design in a faster turnaround. Enclosures

Cases

Subracks

FEATURES Rugged and commercial designs in various sizes & configurations ĄĄ Backplane design expertise to 100GbE speeds, RT3 connector ĄĄ Powerful RiCool cooling approach for benign environments ĄĄ Competitive pricing with shorter leadtimes ĄĄ Wide range of standard OpenVPX backplanes/profiles ĄĄ OpenVPX Chassis Managers & specialty OpenVPX products ĄĄ VITA 62 Power Interface boards & more! ĄĄ

Backplanes

Chassis

Integrated Systems

Components

sales@pixustechnologies.com @pixustech  519-885-5775 or West Coast Sales 916-297-0020

Pixus Technologies

www.pixustechnologies.com



Test

Ellisys Bluetooth® Tracker™ Ultra-Portable BLE and Wi-Fi Protocol Analyzer The pocket-sized (7.5 x 7.5 x 1.7 cm), bus-powered Bluetooth Tracker supports concurrent capture and analysis of Bluetooth Low Energy and Wi-Fi communications, as well as a wide variety of wired interfaces, including logic signals, host controller interface (HCI) protocols (UART and SPI), Audio I2S, and WCI-2, all visualized over the widely adopted Ellisys software suite. With its innovative reconfigurable radio, the Ellisys sniffer can be updated by software to support changes in the specification, without any change to the hardware, and even without any interaction from the user. The Tracker comes with free lifetime software updates, so all customers can benefit from these great additions free-of-charge! The Ellisys Bluetooth Tracker sniffer supports one-click concurrent capture of Bluetooth Low Energy, Wi-Fi 1x1 802.11 a/b/g/n, 2.4 GHz Spectrum, UART HCI and SPI HCI (2 ports), logic signals, and Wireless Coexistence Interface 2 (WCI-2).

Ellisys

www.ellisys.com www.mil-embedded.com

FEATURES ĄĄ All-in-One: Concurrent capture of Bluetooth Low Energy, Wi-Fi 1x1, raw

spectrum, HCI and logic, all synchronized to sub-microsecond precision

ĄĄ Wideband Capture: Rock-solid capture of all Bluetooth Low Energy

channels

ĄĄ Reprogrammable Digital Radio: Support for new specifications with a

simple software update, without hardware changes

ĄĄ Wi-Fi: Debug your Wi-Fi a/b/g/n and BLE connections simultaneously,

as well as coexistence

ĄĄ Raw 2.4 GHz Spectrum Capture: Characterize the wireless environment

and visualize interferences

ĄĄ Professional Software: Use the acclaimed, widely adopted and highly

flexible Ellisys multi-protocol analysis software

ĄĄ Logic Analysis: Visualize digital signals such as GPIOs, interrupts, debug

ports, etc. Concurrently and perfectly synchronized with your BLE and Wi-Fi traffic.

sales.usa@ellisys.com

 www.linkedin.com/company/Ellisys

www.ellisys.com

 866-724-9185

 @Ellisys1

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Ellisys Bluetooth® Vanguard™ Advanced Wireless Protocol Analysis System The most advanced, most comprehensive Bluetooth protocol analyzer ever made. Building on a legacy of innovation, the Bluetooth Vanguard All-In-One Wireless Protocol Analysis System delivers new advances designed to ease the increasingly complex tasks of Bluetooth developers. With its revolutionary wideband Digital Radio and integrated Allin-One hardware approach, Ellisys has changed the way Bluetooth protocol capture and analysis is done, by radically overcoming the drawbacks of legacy approaches. The Ellisys whole-band capture approach robustly records any packet, at any time, from any neighboring piconet, with zero-configuration and without being intrusive. Vanguard provides synchronized capture and analysis of BR/EDR, Bluetooth Low Energy, Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac (3x3), WPAN 802.15.4 (all 16 2.4 GHz channels), raw 2.4 GHz RF spectrum analysis, HCI (USB, UART, SPI), generic SPI/UART/I2C/SWD communications, WCI-2, logic signals, and Audio I2S.

Ellisys

FEATURES ĄĄ All-in-One: Fully hardware-integrated, time-synchronized, and truly

ĄĄ ĄĄ ĄĄ

ĄĄ ĄĄ

one-click concurrent capture of BR/EDR, Bluetooth Low Energy, Wi-Fi, WPAN (IEEE 802.15.4), raw RF spectrum, HCI, logic/GPIO, generic I2C, UART, SWD, and SPI, Audio I2S, and WCI-2 Bluetooth Wideband Capture: Easy and rock-solid capture of any traffic on all channels Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac (3x3) Capture: Extremely accurate and perfectly synchronized Wi-Fi capture accelerated by Ellisys hardware WPAN 802.15.4 Wideband Capture: Concurrent capture of all 16 WPAN 2.4 GHz channels for an unmatched coexistence analysis capability Connection / Power Flexibility: Connect, control, and power the system locally or remotely via networkable GbE or USB 3.1 over Type-C™ Mesh Support: Includes full support for Bluetooth Mesh www.ellisys.com

sales.usa@ellisys.com

 www.linkedin.com/company/Ellisys

www.ellisys.com

 866-724-9185

 @Ellisys1

Test

Ellisys Bluetooth® Explorer™ All-in-One Dual-Mode Bluetooth Protocol Analysis System

Industry’s First All-In-One Wideband BR/EDR and Low Energy sniffer with concurrent capture of Wi-Fi 2x2 802.11 a/b/g/n, 2.4 GHz spectrum, HCI (USB, UART, SPI), WCI-2, logic signals, generic I2C/UART/SPI/SWD, and Audio I2S. With its revolutionary whole-band Digital Radio, the Bluetooth Explorer lifts protocol capture and analysis to new heights, radically overcoming the drawbacks of legacy approaches to Bluetooth sniffing. The Ellisys all-in-one whole-band sniffer robustly records any packet, at any time, from any neighboring piconet, with zeroconfiguration and without being intrusive. The Bluetooth Vanguard Explorer can uniquely be updated by software to support changes in the specification, without any change to the hardware, and even without any interaction from the user.

Ellisys

www.ellisys.com 96 September 2019

FEATURES ĄĄ All-in-One: Concurrent capture of BR/EDR, Low Energy, Wi-Fi,

ĄĄ ĄĄ ĄĄ ĄĄ ĄĄ ĄĄ

spectrum, HCI, logic, UART, SPI, I2C, SWD, Audio I2S, and WCI-2, all synchronized to nanoseconds precision Bluetooth Wideband Capture: Easy and rock-solid capture of any traffic, including discovery/connection traffic and SSP pairing Reprogrammable Digital Radio: Support for new specifications without hardware changes Multi-Piconet Support: See multiple piconets and scatternets, without limitations All Protocols and Profiles: Best-of-breed protocol decoding Integrated Audio Analysis: Listen to captured audio over-the-air, including HCI audio and I2S, within the software Spectrum Display: Characterize the wireless environment and visualize coexistence issues

sales.usa@ellisys.com

 www.linkedin.com/company/Ellisys MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

www.ellisys.com

 866-724-9185

 @Ellisys1

www.mil-embedded.com


Rugged Video Display Unit (RVDU) As modern land vehicles increasingly depend on the proliferation of cameras mounted on the platform to provide 360 degree situational awareness, the need for low cost, size, weight, and power optimized (SWaP), rugged displays is on the rise. Similar to the latest cars on the market, ground vehicles benefit from having an operator display that shows them what’s behind them while reversing. However, commercially available re-view reversing displays are unable to maintain reliability in the harsh environmental conditions of the battlefield. The Rugged Video Display Unit (RVDU) is a SWaP optimized and rugged display designed for non-mission critical applications such as vehicle reversing and equipment monitoring. The 7 inch, 800 x 480 pixel, widescreen display is ideal for adding general purpose video imagery capability such as 360 degree situational awareness, rearview reversing camera, equipment monitoring, and flexible display functionality, in a small, affordable display that maintains reliability in harsh environments. The RVDU has two CVBS (composite video) inputs and two digital inputs. Ambient light sensors on the RVDU automatically change the screen brightness to the optimal setting for visibility in any light conditions, while the LED backlight provides a clear, crisp picture. A CAN bus control interface is provided for seamless software

upgrades and for interfacing with Curtiss-Wright video management solutions such as those in the Rugged Video Gateway (RVG) product line. Environmentally qualified to military standards, the RVDU is a fully sealed unit and is IP65 rated which eliminates the risk of sand or water ingress over the life of the display. As well, the RVDU has buttons on the front that enable the operator to control screen brightness, select the video input, and illuminate the keys for night mode, providing a low cost solution for ground vehicle video applications with one or two cameras. Curtiss-Wright recognizes that every program, platform, and application has unique requirements and constraints for video displays, video management systems, and computer processing. As a result, we take a building block approach, providing a wide range of standalone mission displays, video processing components, and modular mission computers that can be combined in the optimal configuration for the platform, tasks, available space, and budget. Together, these video solutions and systems demonstrate our commitment to helping teams in the field leverage advanced, highly reliable video technologies in a cost effective way and they provide another example of why Curtiss-Wright has been a trusted, proven leader in defense and aerospace for decades.

FEATURES 7 inch widescreen ĄĄ 800 x 480 pixels ĄĄ 2 x CVBS inputs ĄĄ 2 x digital inputs ĄĄ Optional PCAP touchscreen ĄĄ Low cost design ĄĄ Low latency ĄĄ Low SWaP ĄĄ Military standards qualified ĄĄ

APPLICATIONS Ground vehicle platforms ĄĄ Reversing camera display ĄĄ Equipment monitor ĄĄ

www.curtisswrightds.com/products/electronic-systems/video-systems/mission-displays/rvdu.html

Curtiss-Wright Defense Solutions www.curtisswrightds.com www.mil-embedded.com

ds@curtisswright.com  +1.703.779.7800  twitter.com/CurtissWrightDS  www.linkedin.com/company/curtiss-wright-defense-solutions 

MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

September 2019 97

Military Embedded Systems Resource Guide

Video Management Systems/Video Systems/Video Displays


CONNECTING WITH MIL EMBEDDED By Mil-Embedded.com Editorial Staff

www.mil-embedded.com

GIVING BACK | MARKET PULSE | WHITE PAPER | BLOG | VIDEO | SOCIAL MEDIA | WEBCAST GIVING BACK

Spirit of America Each issue, the editorial staff of Military Embedded Systems will highlight a different charitable organization that benefits the military, veterans, and their families. We are honored to cover the technology that protects those who protect us every day. To back that up, our parent company – OpenSystems Media – will make a donation to every group we showcase on this page. This time we are highlighting Spirit of America (SoA), a 501(c)(3) organization which has as its stated mission “to support the safety and success of Americans serving abroad and the local people and partners they seek to help.” Spirit of America was founded in 2003 by U.S. business owner Jim Hake, who responded to requests for assistance in deployed areas in response to needs identified by American military and civilian personnel. SoA, according to information provided by the organization, calls itself the only privately funded (that is, not a government contractor) 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that directly supports the safety and mission success of deployed U.S. service members. Its all-veteran field team works alongside U.S. teams to support the success of their missions, adding the agility, innovation, and resources of the U.S. private sector to the capabilities of the U.S. government and military in support of its missions abroad. The group reports that as of 2019, it has implemented more than 1,000 projects in 70-plus countries. Examples of current SoA projects include supporting the U.S. military’s efforts to perform community outreach in Niger in order to help stabilize the region, partnering with the U.S. Navy to deliver aid and medical relief in Venezuela and Colombia, and assisting U.S. National Guard troops in their ongoing effort to reach out to key communities in Kosovo. For more information on SoA, please visit www.spiritofamerica.org.

WEBCAST

WHITE PAPER

The Evolution of Higher Speed and Density in Rugged Electronic Packaging Sponsored by TE Connectivity – featuring Mark C. Benton, RFO Engineering Manager/Active Products Business Development Manager; Michael Walmsley, Global Product Management – Connectors, Aerospace, Defense & Marine; and Matthew R. McAlonis, Engineering Fellow – Certified LDFSS Black Belt, Aerospace, Defense & Marine (AD&M). As avionics suppliers’ R&D budgets are reduced, the keys to greater affordability are greater flexibility and code reuse through common building blocks across the enterprise. In these situations, software components must be modular, upgradeable, and customizable. In this webcast, get some guidance on how to achieve affordability targets and program profitability, learn how to optimize corporate investment by creating and developing standardized software products that can be reused on multiple platforms and customer environments, and discuss long-term profitability by consolidating different platforms and understanding certification requirements. In addition, participants will learn how to enhance innovation by using technologies with high Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs).

Using Software Full Disk Encryption and Disk Partitioning to Protect and Isolate Network Attached Storage Functions By Paul Davis and Elisabeth O’Brien, Curtiss-Wright Unmanned vehicles – while ideal for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) missions due to the amount of data a vehicle can gather without risk to human life – also must ensure both data security and storage versatility. The risk of data loss or corruption grows as the number of systems using different protocols connecting to the device rises. Additionally, as the use of unmanned vehicles for deployed applications increases, so does the risk of highly sensitive data being lost or captured. In this white paper, consider a solution that, through disk partitioning and commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) data-atrest (DAR) encryption, can mitigate the risk of data loss, corruption, and accessibility if intercepted.

View archived webcast: ecast.opensystemsmedia.com/806

Read the white paper: https://bit.ly/2HgwNxk

View more webcasts: http://opensystemsmedia.com/events/e-cast/schedule

Read more white papers: http://mil-embedded.com/white-papers/

98 September 2019

MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Resource Guide

www.mil-embedded.com


WE NEVER FORGET THOSE WHO SERVE Inside the helmet, someone is relying on us We develop advanced technologies and, working with our partners, help give our warfighters the competitive advantage that will keep them safe. We know that fathers, mothers, husbands, wives, sons and daughters depend on us. Yes: for us, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personal... abaco.com/we-serve

abaco.com

@AbacoSys

WE INNOVATE. WE DELIVER. YOU SUCCEED.


Breakthrough Performance…

Weight No More!

Wideband RF Signal Recorders

Rugged ½ ATR Built for SWaP

Designed for harsh environments and weighing only 18 pounds, the new Talon RTX SFF series captures real-time RF bandwidths of a gigahertz or more. Complete with a removable QuickPac™ drive pack holding terabytes of data, these units offer flexible I/O options and sustained real-time recording rates up to 4 GB/sec! The RTX SFF series is the latest in our COTS Talon recording systems that deliver the industry’s highest levels of performance in the harshest, space-constrained environments. You’ll get high dynamic range, exceptional recording speeds and ample storage capacity for extended missions—all in this compact solution. • Sealed, rugged, ½ ATR chassis for MIL-STD 810 and 461 • Multi-channel recording, A/Ds from 200 MS/s to 6.4 GS/s

Model RTX 2589 with removable QuickPac drive

• Easily removable 61 TB SSD QuickPac drive pack • Ideal for UAVs, military vehicles, aircraft pods and more • Operating temperature from -40°C to +60°C • sFPDP and Ethernet models available

Download the FREE Development Tactics & Techniques for SFF Recorders White Paper www.pentek.com/go/messff

All this plus FREE lifetime applications support! Pentek, Inc., One Park Way, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Phone: 201-818-5900 • Fax: 201-818-5904 • email: info@pentek.com • www.pentek.com Worldwide Distribution & Support, Copyright © 2019 Pentek, Inc. Pentek, Talon and QuickPac are trademarks of Pentek, Inc. Other trademarks are properties of their respective owners.

Profile for OpenSystems Media

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