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Old Market • Downtown • Riverfront

Can I See

See Your ID?

Inside A Bouncer’s World www.oldmarket.com

November/December 2009

LUCILE SCHAAF In Memoriam 801 CHOP HOUSE AT THE PAXTON OMAHA MAGAZINE • 5921 S. 118TH CIRCLE • OMAHA, NE 68137

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID OMAHA MAGAZINE LTD


At the Old Market’s Front Door 10TH & HOWARD STREETS

Holiday décor you’ll adore!

Ornament, figurine and musical snow globe all by Jim Shore

It’s nearing Christmas, the special time we celebrate all year ‘round. Come browse our seasonal décor including wonderfully detailed collectibles by Jim Shore. • Dept. 56 Village Gold Key Dealer • Christopher Radko • Steinbach Nutcrackers • Fontanini Nativities • Beanpod Soy Candles

Handmade chocolates & fudge Featuring gourmet chocolates and fudge – all handmade with the finest ingredients in our own kitchen. Plus a tempting selection of other sweet treats including: • Vermont Truffles • International Licorice • Nostalgia Candies • Sugar-Free Varieties • Jelly Bellies • Salt Water Taffy • Molded Candies for Weddings

1005 HOWARD ST. (402) 344-8846

The souvenir and traveler’s store Small in size but large on variety! Find essentials for travelers, Nebraska-made gifts, Heartland apparel, Husker items and souvenirs. We’ve been called “the hotel gift shop, without the hotel prices.”

1007 HOWARD ST. (402) 345-9627

1003 HOWARD ST. (402) 345-8198


Downtown Omaha’s Premier Choice for Collision Repair

Open 9-12 on Saturdays!

2340 Paul Street

(NE Corner of 24th & Hamilton)

402.344.4471 www.bstreetcollision.com

New Patients Welcome Early Morning and Emergency Availability

The Old Market’s favorite spot for lunch & dinner.

Award-winning food & wine list – open late 7 nights a week. Call for reservations.

M’s Pub

422 S. 11th Street

342-2550

www.MsPubOmaha.com

Italian & Mediterranean specialties served in“the Old Market’s most beautiful dining room,” complemented with the area’s largest selection of Italian wines.

1108 Howard Street

342-2050

www.VivaceOmaha.com

the encounter | november/december 2009 3


Second Chance

Old Market Downtown • Riverfront

Antiques & Collectibles

Bought and sold by the handful, or houseful





Furniture Architectural Items China Glassware Toys & Dolls Books Huge Selection of Vintage Clothing & Jewelry on our Lower Level





Over 30 Years in the Old Market



1116 Jackson St. 346-4930 Mon-Thurs 10am-6pm / Fri-Sat 11am-9pm / Sun 12-6pm

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2009

P UBLISHER

Todd Lemke

E DITOR

Sandra Lemke

A SSISTANT E DITOR Linda Persigehl

A RT D IRECTOR / G RAPHIC D ESIGN

Farnam

Matt Jensen

P HOTOGRAPHY

Bill Sitzmann • Scott Drickey

TECHNICAL A DVISOR Tyler Lemke

EXECUTIVE OFFICE SUITES Large Conference Room 24 hour access Utilities and cleaning Complimentary coffee for you and your clients

C ONTRIBUTING W RITERS Convenient location Parking available in a security garage Parking for your clients by our back entrance Signage for office door and lobby

Terrie/Manager: 402-345-1600 • www.farnam1600.com • 1603 Farnam Street • Omaha, NE 68102

GARDNER MANAGEMENT GROUP

Tony Endelman David Williams Jonathan Welsh Chris Aponick Molly Garriott Donald Rashid Kim Carpenter

A CCOUNT E XECUTIVES

Gwen Lemke • Vicki Voet Alicia Smith Hollins • Greg Bruns

E DITORIAL A DVISORS

Rick Carey • David Scott

E DITORIAL I NTERN Adam Dallman

FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION:

402.884.2000 www.omahapublications.com

photo by Patrick Drickey, Stonehouse Publishing Co.

• 7+ years experience • Downtown Condominium Management Expert • Onsite Project Manager

• • • •

On Staff Maintenance Friendly Courteous Service 24 Hour Emergency Service Cleaning Staff Services

Currently Managing Farnam 1600 Condo Assoc., Farnam 1600 Executive Office Suites & Harney Parking Garage

Call for References For more information please contact:

Terrie Busacker, Property Manager • 402.345.1600 • www.farnam1600.com Farnam 1600 Mgmt. Office • 1603 Farnam St. • Omaha, NE 68102 4 november/december 2009 | the encounter

Owned and managed by Omaha Magazine, LTD

Comments? Send your letter to the editor to: letters@omahapublications.com All versions of The Encounter are published bimonthly by Omaha Magazine, LTD, P.O. Box 461208, Omaha NE 68046-1208. Telephone: (402) 884-2000; fax (402) 884-2001. No whole or part of the contents herein may be reproduced without prior written permission of Omaha Magazine, excepting individually copyrighted articles and photographs. Unsolicited manuscripts are accepted; however, no responsibility will be assumed for such solicitations.


contents N OW CHECK OUT E NCOUNTER M AGA ZINE ONLINE . U SING FLIPBOOK TECHNOLOGY TO GIVE YOU A WHOLE NE W MAGA ZINE RE ADING E XPERIENCE .

II r e Tow old s uS g u % A 60

n ctio u r t s s Con ExpireT e r S P ing Pric t 31

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6 Feature : Midtown Crossing’s New Luxe Cinema ................ 8 Downtown Story: Cibola ............................................ 12 Feature: Lucile Schaaf “The Christmas Lady” ................ 14 Cover Story: Inside a Bouncer’s World .......................... 16 Downtown Faces: Carolyn Rooker ..............................18 Downtown Art: Gerry Klein ...................................... 20 Condo Life: David Rice’s Lion Place Home.................... 22 Old Market Map........................................................... 24 Calendar .......................................................................27 Downtown Dining: 801 Chop House at the Paxton........

Remarkable Living begins at $255,000. RiverfrontPlace.com 402·397·4837

the encounter | november/december 2009 5


DOWNTOWN DINING

“ J ” We’re always trying to wow our tables.

Prime Service

801 Chop House at the Paxton offers up event dining story by Chris Aponick

oe Nelson figures that if someone walks through the doors of his restaurant, they probably are there for a special occasion. Whether it be an anniversary celebration, graduation party or a birthday dinner, guests at the 801 Chop House at the Paxton, 1403 Farnam St., are set to receive the restaurant’s best in service and food, says Nelson. It’s serving expertise that has been on Nelson’s mind since he was named general manager of the upscale steakhouse last March. “We’re always trying to wow our tables,” Nelson says of the service philosophy he has in-

6 november/december 2009 | the encounter


department stilled in his staff. Meanwhile, the kitchen continues to be anchored by chef de cuisine Zeb Rogers, who started as sous chef when the restaurant opened in October 2006 and has been in charge of the kitchen since August 2008. In fact, both Rogers and Nelson are Chop House veterans, having worked in the restaurant for some time prior to their promotions. Nelson says that comes from the owners’ desire to cultivate talent from within the restaurant. “We’re all kind of a big family,” he says. Rogers had stints in Iowa and Minneapolis, as well as working with Chef Nathan Newhouse of Attitude on Food Catering in Omaha. Rogers says he seized the opportunity to take the job as executive chef, as it was his first big chance to take the lead in a prime steak house. While the Paxton’s steak offerings hew closely to the standards set by the 801 Chop House’s nearly two-decades-old Des Moines flagship, Rogers says he’s taken some creative license with the fish dishes. “There’s just so much room you have for it,” Rogers says. The two approaches to cooking challenge both creativity and precision in the kitchen, he says. The restaurant boasts impressive wine and scotch lists as well, Nelson says. More than 80 varieties of scotch are offered and about 300 bottles of wine, with 20 being offered by the glass. The restaurant’s design evokes a 1920s steakhouse, with Art Deco styling and high ceilings. The restaurant has four private banquet rooms, sized to accommodate groups of 10 to 40 people. The main dining room comes with its own unique centerpiece, a golden bull designed by Iowa artist Keith Nelson. The bull is covered in 24-carat gold leaf — thin, tissue-like golden squares that the artist pasted onto the sculpture. Joe Nelson says the setting and the food have always been in place since the restaurant’s inception, but the attention to fine dining details had slipped before he came on as general manager. Now the idea is that most guests are coming for a dining experience that could last two or three hours. The restaurant, too, is adding specials to recruit new business, especially among local residents and businesspeople. Currently, the Paxton is offering a Friday and Saturday lobster special to draw people in. Crabmeat-stuffed lobster is available for $19.95 for a one-pound course, or $29.95 for two pounds. Sunday also has a prix fixe menu, offering salad, a composed plate and dessert for $29.95. “We want [locals] to be proud of the restaurant,” Nelson says of his efforts to bring in Omahan’s business to the restaurant. The 801 Chop House at the Paxton’s hours are 5-9 p.m. Monday through Friday, with the lounge bar opening at 4 p.m. weekdays. On Saturday, both bar and restaurant open at 5 p.m., and on Sunday, both open at 4 p.m. For reservations, call 341.1222.

Experience Luxury in the Heart of Downtown.

Ask about our specials!

402-345-6564 210 S. 16th Street Omaha, NE 68102

the encounter | november/december 2009 7


FEATURE

“ I ” Everyone

should ex-

pect a cin-

Midtown Crossing’s Luxe Theatre To Open Features include full bar service and ‘upper scale’ food choices by Jonathan Welsh

rendering courtesy Marcus Theatres

ema experi-

ence second to none.

8 november/december 2009 | the encounter

n November, Marcus Theatres will be opening its newest multi-level venue among the many shops, condominiums, luxury apartments and restaurants soon to be located within Midtown Crossing at Turner Park. Omahans living in or around the downtown/ midtown area will not have to travel far for an extraordinary cinema experience, where dinner, drinks and a movie are stylishly packaged into one. Marcus Theatres is a family-run corporation founded by Ben Marcus in 1935. Currently, Ben’s son, Stephen H. Marcus, is chairman of the company, and Stephen’s son, Gregory


feature

S. Marcus, is president and CEO. The company has locations throughout the Midwest – Wisconsin, Illinois, Iowa, Ohio, North Dakota and Nebraska – offering moviegoers the latest amenities in sound and picture quality as well as innovative “dine-in” concepts. Their latest choice of locations, Midtown Crossing at Turner Park, promises to keep up the tradition. Completion of the Midtown Crossing development has been eagerly anticipated, and the new Marcus Theatre just might be its crown jewel with Times Square-esque flashing lights set to bring the building’s entrance to life. “Everyone should expect a cinema experience second to none,” said Carlo Petrick, communications manager for Marcus Theatres. Inside, the four-story midtown theatre houses five auditoriums, two separate lounges, a baby grand piano, and a fully equipped kitchen complete with a head chef. The Glo Lounge is situated on the second floor and is designed to not only provide theatre-goers with something to do before or after the film, but also to be an attraction in itself. It has a Vegas look with backlighting that lives up to the name Glo. Cocktails made the old-fashioned way are offered along with a full drink menu and “world cuisine” appetizers. There will be a baby grand piano on the same floor for your

OPENING THIS NOVEMBER THE ULTIMATE DINING & MOVIE EXPERIENCE state-of-the-art digital auditoriums featuring:

in-theatre dining • friendly wait staff • full menu SLEEK URBAN COCKTAIL LOUNGE HANDMADE COCKTAILS WORLD CUISINE SMALLPLATE DINING

theatre admission not required

WWW.MARCUSTHEATRES.COM•SHOWTIMES:402-345-6900•GLO:402-342-4505

MARCUS MIDTOWN CINEMA • 3201 FARNAM STREET • OMAHA, NE

m i d t o w n c i n e m a

listening entertainment and flat-screen televisions for the big game. “We like to think of ourselves not as an upscale theatre but as ‘upper scale’,” said Petrick. The third floor hosts all 5 auditoriums, each stocked with “top of the line sound systems, stadium seating and digital projectors,” said Petrick. Each auditorium also has a “cinedine” section where patrons can sit in customized memory foam chairs attached to tables and order a meal from the wait staff… all while enjoying the film. The cinedine section is reservation-only, but there’s also traditional theatre seating available. “One of the greatest features of our theatre is the time it saves families,” said General Manager Ken Kealy. “Instead of parents having to pack and unpack the kids endlessly in one evening out, they only have to do it once: dinner and a movie in one stop,” Kealy added. And the dinner menu offers a wide variety of foods: handmade pizzas, specialty burgers, wraps, salads, desserts and more. Traditional theatre fair such as popcorn can be ordered from the wait staff as well. On the fourth level resides the VIP lounge for ages 21 and up. They call it the “vue” Lounge, as it overlooks the main floor and Glo. Turner Park can be seen from a bird’s eye view from the 4th

the encounter | september/october 2009 9


level, and it’s designed in such a way that the baby grand piano music from the main level can be heard clearly. Plush, oversized chairs and couches decorate the vue, which offers its own unique selection of appetizers and a full bar. The lounge is also connected to the theatre’s largest auditorium, so patrons can walk right to their seats from the lounge. And their liquor license applies to the entire building, so once a drink is purchased, it can be taken anywhere within the multi-level theatre. The theatre is also prepared to host corporate events or private parties with a conference room or auditoriums available. Mutual of Omaha is scheduled to rent out the entire building for a corporate function. With all of the amenities offered, one might expect to pay an arm and a leg for admission, but the price of a traditional seat is

$9, $10 for the reserved cinedine section, and $15 for the fourth floor VIP section, which includes a $5 voucher that can be used to purchase food or drinks. Not bad when you think about what the average movie ticket price is these days. And instead of shelling out $10 for an overpriced drink and a really overpriced bag of popcorn, you might as well put that $10 towards a full meal, right? There is a new theatre in town that is going to offer moviegoers the choice to try something different and exciting, as well as a stylish place to just hang out and have drinks. At the least, once the development is finished, we can look forward to not having to get a carwash every time we drive past the midtown construction.

“Instead of parents having to pack and unpack the kids endlessly in one evening out, they only have to do it once: dinner and a movie in one stop.”

www.awell-dressedwindow.com

10 november/december 2009 | the encounter


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“OLD MARKET”

1311 HOWARD OMAHA, NE 68102 (402) 342-7175 FAX: 402-342-9426

the encounter | november/december 2009 11


DOWNTOWN STORY

“ T ” Omaha

has be-

come an

art-savvy town.

12 november/december 2009 | the encounter

Coronado’s Quest Cibola Adds a Second Omaha Location story by David Williams photos by minorwhitestudios.com

he name may be mythical, but there is nothing imagined about the growing success of Cibola of Omaha, the Old Market purveyor of jewelry and art that dwells at the nexus of Native American-meets-contemporary. Owner Bob Welsh, an Omaha native who operates Cibola of Scottsdale and another store in the Phoenix metroplex, opened his Old Market venture just in time for the Thanksgiving rush in 2005. And like a harried cook directing the precision-timed choreography of a big stuff-roast-baste dance number, Welsh is at it again in racing the clock to ready his


department second Omaha location in time for another Thanksgiving feast, this one at Village Pointe in the space next to Paradise Bakery. The mystery-shrouded Cibola was one of the Seven Cities of Gold that sent Coronado and his conquistadors wandering in vain throughout the Southwest. Had the Old Market existed in the middle of the 16th Century, Coronado could have saved himself a lot of effort. What were untold treasures to the Spanish explorer - gold, silver, precious gems, exquisite pottery, lyrical Kachina dolls, intricately carved fetishes – all are within easy reach at Welsh’s Cibola. And wearing armor on your quest is now strictly optional. “Omaha has become an art-savvy town,” explained the man who eyed with envy the bustling Old Market over two decades of annual pilgrimages here for the College World Series. “And our customers really get it; this Southwestern Contemporary movement that is certainly evocative of Native American and yet so thoroughly modern in its expression and execution,” he continued. “And then there’s Jim.” That would be certified gemologist Jim Robinson, the much-traveled jeweler who is more artist-in-residence than he is a workman. Creating his masterworks only a few paces from the glass showcases that become oh-so fleeting homes for his Navaho/Hopi/Zuni – inspired art is one thing, but it is another altogether to have a craftsman on hand who can make on-site, often while-you-wait adjustments and repairs. “Landers. Bisbee. Number 8,” he intones as we rifle through an astonishing array of turquoise and other marvels in his tool-splattered workshop. Our little game takes on the aura of “stump the jeweler” as, stone by stone, he needs only a split second each to rattle off the names of the Arizona mines where his precious friends were born – mines that have now been closed for almost 40 years. And Robinson ought to know. He spent almost 15 years living and working on the Navaho Reservation nestled in the Arizona desert. Echoes of life on “The Res” reverberate in work that is as bold and vibrant as the artist is unassuming. The one-word appellation of “different” is this quiet man’s succinct way of describing his creations. “I had returned from Vietnam in 1969 with few prospects but with a love for art,” said the man who had studied architecture in college. “And one thing just kind of led to another,” he shrugged of a serendipitous adventure that, like Coronado’s, began with a trek across the arid sands of the southwest. But his quest, not nearly so mythical, has now brought him to Omaha. Robinson’s wanderlust has been at least temporarily tamed, but not so for his dazzling jewelry pieces. They’re just itching to hit the road again, this time setting out for the far horizons of Village Pointe.

Sushi, Sashimi & Seafood Dishes Beef Tenderloin, Chicken & Tempura

BLUE

SUSHI SAKE GRILL

Old Market Location Just North of Howard

402.408.5566

Sake bombers Lounge second floor / martinis Sake Bombers Lounge Late Night Entrance Please use the southeast door to the 2nd floor lounge

the encounter | november/december 2009 13


FEATURE “She wasn’t afraid to be unique in her own way.” — Jeff Jorgensen

“ L ” It reminded her of the tea party from Alice in Wonderland.

14 november/december 2009 | the encounter

Lucile Ann (Duda) Schaaf In Memoriam by Molly Garriott | Photos by minorwhitestudios.com

ucile Schaaf was a colorful character. Literally. The Old Market fixture dressed head to toe in orange. When asked what her favorite color was, she’d respond, “Orange. Is there any other color?” Her affinity to the color extended beyond her wardrobe. When Lucile began working for Val Chickinelli at his antique store, he unwittingly gave her free license with the shop’s décor. In his absence she painted the walls and display shelving bright orange, Chickinelli recalls with a laugh. Such was her love of the sunny hue that Old Market residents and merchants began dubbing her “The Orange Lady.” Her preference for orange was second only to her love of Christmas, a passion that


feature would also earn her the title of “The Christmas Lady.” Before Lucile moved to the Old Market in 1980, she lived in Omaha’s Gold Coast neighborhood where her house was almost perennially decorated for Christmas. Every room in the house, even the bathrooms, hosted one or even two Christmas trees. She covered unused bathtubs with red boarding and erected small, flocked trees. Tubs that were in use did not escape adornment; Lucile simply “limited” her decorations to the tubs’ edges. Decorations sat on every surface. Fireplace mantels, sideboards and tabletops heralded the season with miniature trees and mistletoe, candles and cones, baubles and glass balls. She even transformed her home’s main staircase into a Christmas village that would make Charles Dickens jealous. Each stair’s riser she covered with decorative paper, creating a snowy wonderland backdrop for her village. On the stairs were cottages, churches and evergreen trees. Lucile’s family was relegated to the former servants’ staircase at the back of the house so the village could be at peace, unmolested by human feet. This unconventional use of space was a trademark of Lucile’s, says Joe Montello, co-owner with Jeff Jorgensen of Tannenbaum in the Old Market. Montello worked for Lucile at her shop, The Place. He said she “wasn’t afraid to be unique in her own way.” To wit, she wore a clock around her waist frozen at 10 minutes to 4

– tea time. “It reminded her of the tea party from Alice in Wonderland,” says Montello. Lucile built an impressive collection of Christmas decorations during her lifetime. The after-Christmas sales would find her rummaging around for discounted decorations to add to her extensive collection. She had a special affinity for items cast aside by other shoppers. Think Land of Misfit Toys from Rudolf the RedNosed Reindeer. Yet her creative eye would find just the right spot for the unwanted garland or overlooked obelisk. Montello says her motto was “Work with what you have.” She’d find unusual, often discarded pieces, and make them work beautifully in her home or store. Her favorite comment when shopping was, “If you love something you have to buy them all!” Perhaps this philosophy is why she and her family had to begin decorating her home for the holidays in autumn. Given that her home was decked out for Christmas nearly 5 months out of the year, it was duly dubbed The Christmas House. Letters, addressed with nothing more than “The Christmas House, Omaha NE,” made it to her mailbox. When she stopped decorating the many trees in her own home, she satisfied her Christmas fix by turning her attention to The Durham Museum’s Christmas tree and the tree at First Presbyterian Church where she worshipped. For nearly 30 years she donated her time, decorations from her own collection, and her artistic eye to the museum and church. She was more than a woman with an artistic eye. She was also an astute businesswoman. Well before the Old Market’s heyday, Lucile acquired the corner at 10th and Howard streets and developed it into retail and, eventually, living spaces. In what is now the eastern portion of Overland Trading Company, she owned and operated The Place. A gift shop offering an eclectic array of items, The Place eventually shifted focus to become a Christmas shop and fittingly moved to where Tannebaum now stands today. The T Room sandwich shop stood where the Candy Shop is located today, and an ice cream parlor existed where Sundries now operates. Grandchildren visiting their grandmother at her store sometimes found themselves put to work where needed. Well ahead of today’s Old Market housing boom, Lucile sought to convert three separate warehouses facing 10th Street into residential space. She razed adjoining walls between the spaces and gutted the interior with the intention of living there herself and revitalizing the block in the process. Whether it is the brick path she laid herself in front of her Howard Street businesses, her love of Christmas she so unselfishly shared with others, or her colorful presence in the Old Market, Lucile Schaaf has left an indelible mark on her family, friends, and community. In the words of Val Chickinelli, “She was the greatest lady who ever walked on two feet.”

the encounter | november/december 2009 15


COVER STORY

“ W ” I meet lots of people,

Identification, Please First-Person Account of a Bouncer’s World by Tony Endelman | photos by minorwhitestudios.com

and that’s definitely

the best part about it.

16 november/december 2009 | the encounter

hen my manager from Blue Sushi/Sake Bombers Lounge called and asked if, in addition to bartending, I’d also like to work as a bouncer, I promptly asked him if he was joking. I didn’t exactly think I was qualified for the position. I may be a bit taller than the average bar patron, but I have a noticeable lack of muscle and tend to shy away from confrontation. Not to mention that, just last week, my three-year-old niece successfully demonstrated that she could beat me up in a fight. But, after my manager explained that because I enjoy interacting with customers, I’d be perfect for the job, I gladly accepted the offer. When people walk into Blue, they’re expecting great food, great drinks, and a great time.


cover story As a bouncer, I certainly don’t concoct the meals or shake the martinis. But, I am the first person that our customers see. If I greet them cordially and make them laugh as soon as they come though the door, then I feel that I’ve played at least a small role in making their experiences enjoyable. Though, now that I’ve been bouncing for nearly a year, I’ve discovered how much more the job truly entails. Granting you access to your favorite bar is hardly a bouncer’s primary responsibility. While every bar is undeniably different, each must adhere to the same guidelines implemented by the city. It’s the bouncer’s job to make sure that both the bar and its patrons are in compliance with the law. At Blue, minors aren’t allowed up to Sake Bombers Lounge past 9:00 p.m. And,

anybody over 21 that plans to drink needs a smiley-face stamp from me. Of course, every bar has its own method for keeping order, and each bouncer deals with a different kind of clientele. John Harvey, a jovial twenty-something that needed a part-time

portant job to do. I need to make sure that fights aren’t breaking out or people aren’t driving home when they shouldn’t be.” Just down the street, Shane Farrell sits contently outside the door to Mr. Toads, observing a more subdued crowd. A veteran of the trade, Farrell has worked the door to several Omaha bars and fits the classic bouncer profile, with conspicuously rotund biceps and an intimidating glare. “I’ve been doing this for a very long time,” says an unexpectedly gentle Farrell. “It’s like a second career for me, and I love it. Most days you get really terrific people. But, once in a while, somebody will get a little too drunk. The thing is, we’re never out to hurt anyone. We want everybody to have a good time, and we want to have a good time too.”

Granting you access to your favorite bar is hardly a bouncer’s primary responsibility. job, has found his niche as a bouncer at Billy Frogg’s, which attracts a younger, wilder crowd. “It’s a blast,” says Harvey. “I meet a lot of people, and that’s definitely the best part about it. We get a lot of bachelorette parties and birthday parties, which always makes for a good time. But, I do have an im-

Contemporary and traditional Southwestern jewelry and home decor. Native American pottery, kachina and semi-precious stones set beautifully in gold and silver.

Old Market 509 South 11th Omaha, Nebraska (402) 342-1200

Fifth Avenue 7132 East 5th Avenue Scottsdale, Arizona (480) 663-8444

Serving Lunch and Dinner 11.30 am - 10 pm Monday - Thursday 11.30 am - 10.30 pm Friday & Saturday Closed on Sunday

the encounter | november/december 2009 17


DOWNTOWN FACES

In March of 2009, Carolyn Rooker was hired as the CEO of the Omaha Public Library Foundation.

The Library Foundation helps enhance and transform the library into a premier community resource through private contributions.

18 november/december 2009 | the encounter

Wooing Omaha One Star at a Time

by Donald Rashid | photos by minorwhitestudios.com

I

f Dr. Seuss could arrange a meeting at the Omaha Public Library with Sookie Stackhouse, the fictional protagonist in The Southern Vampire series, they would discover that Carolyn Rooker is a huge fan of both of them. The avid reader’s taste in literature is quite varied, as are her other creative pastimes. In March of 2009, Carolyn was hired by a search committee as the CEO of the Omaha Public Library Foundation. Carolyn’s life adventures include fund-raising and community relations at the Visiting Nurse Association for 10 years, where she played an instrumental role in the highly successful Art & Soup event, along with developing a comprehensive donor system. Her creative and musical pursuits include sultry vocal stylings on a locally produced CD “The Conspirators,” along with playing the guitar. Photography and creative writing also capture her interest. Her family — her greatest source of pride, which keeps her world filled with love, she says — includes husband Craig and their four children ranging in age from a first grader to a college freshman. For the last 18 years, she has called Omaha home and counts to her credit a total of 22 years in the Cornhusker state. Carolyn has also lived in a small town as a Texas native, in Alaska and Colorado. By day, this energetic CEO’s passion is to help develop, sustain, enhance and financially support a library system where people gather, learn, connect and grow regardless of who they are, their status, wealth or situation. “This potential can only be realized by moving forward past the struggles that have occurred historically, to recognizing we are in a ‘new day’ and a ‘new era’ of collaborative potential.”


department Books and libraries have played a formative role in Carolyn’s life since childhood. Her parents frequently took the family to a library at a local university. As a college student, while processing incoming books in the basement of this same library, she could not have imagined her world of work would come full circle in Omaha. Carolyn’s authentic values shine through in a word picture she paints, “The sky is much more beautiful and brighter when all the stars are shining brightly. A single shining star is not as beautiful as a sky full of them. We all need each other and must shine as we were intended.” When asked by the general community why they should support the Omaha library system, her five-second elevator speech is “The city keeps the lights on, the staff in place and the buildings renovated.” She adds, “The Library Foundation helps enhance and transform the library into a premier community resource through private contributions. In a world where knowledge is power, libraries make everyone more powerful, bringing people and ideas together. I think the library is the living room of the community.” In 2008, over 80,000 children benefited from early literacy library programming and this summer alone, the Library could have filled the Qwest Center arena with their number of participants. “People that love libraries know that libraries are America’s great information equalizers — the only place people of all ages and backgrounds can find and freely use a diversity of resources, along with the expert guidance of librarians.” On your next visit to the downtown library, you may see Carolyn looking for a novel in a genre newer to her such as a series of vampire stories, or a historical fiction book written by her favorite author, Diana Gabaldon. You might even notice a storybook from Dr. Seuss in her hands.

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(402) 595-8805 the encounter | november/december 2009 19


DOWNTOWN ART

“ H ”

Heart of Glass:

I was drawn instead to the Artist Gerry Klein multicolored lights by Kim Carpenter | photos by minorwhitestudios.com that would shine through the bevot Shops’ Studio 105 may have only 700 square feet, but it is filled with art that eled glass winis deceptively delicate as well as stunningly colorful. That’s because artist Gerry dows and create Kein creates glass works that feature deep, rich hues as well as complex patterns ranging from geometric crosshatches to lightly lacy swirls. designs of their Originally from New Orleans, Klein was always drawn to visuals that most people see but don’t necessarily notice. For example, when she accompanied her family down the city’s own. famed St. Charles Avenue to view the annual Christmas decorations, the young girl wasn’t interested in the moving reindeer and twinkling lights. “I was drawn instead to the multicolored lights that would shine through the beveled glass windows and create designs of their own,” reflects Klein. “It fascinated me.”

20 november/december 2009 | the encounter


department Decades later, the artist - who has two children and two grandchildren - continues to draw on her childhood ability to see the extraordinary in the quotidian. “Everyday things you see, like when you go for a walk and see a rusty, old iron gate, can be an inspiration,” offers Klein. “Patterns are everywhere. It’s just a matter of seeing them.” Klein translates such patterns into glass, a medium that involves turning something solid into a molten material and then blending, structuring, and molding it into something anew. It’s a challenging process that requires both technical prowess as well as a keen eye for design. To create her work, Klein uses a wide range of techniques, some requiring temperatures as 1700 degrees. For example, one includes using quarter-inch glass strips, which she glues together and wraps with fiber paper to hold them together. Another involves bending fine glass strings over a candle flame, while yet a third combines crushed glass and pebbles to achieve beautifully textured effects. Klein also molds, fuses and even sandblasts some pieces. And for as many techniques and materials exist, there are perhaps even more satisfying results. “Gerry has an incredible knowledge of her materials and processes,” says painter and friend Jean Mason. “Her fused-glass pieces fascinate me the most - they radiate pure color and light.” And whether it’s an intricate piece of jewelry, a stained glass window, or a curving, elongated tray, Mason is struck by Klein’s creations. “Each one is a beautiful composition in a

very tiny format,” she observes. “[Gerry] has a way of creating contrast to set off the bright bits of glass.” Klein elaborates, “Glass is a study in contrasts…it can be opaque or transparent; it can have a smooth surface, or it can be textured, rough, and uneven.” She finds these possibilities endlessly attractive. “Properties of glass allow unlimited combinations and a multitude of options, so I never get bored with it.” The public, though, doesn’t always view glasswork as art in its own right, meaning that artists like Klein don’t always receive the attention or accolades they deserve. Says Mason, “Gerry is one of the hardest-working artists I know.” But, adds Klein’s colleague, “She is in the background of almost every significant art event in the city…she’s highly creative.” This creativity has been rewarded in a variety of ways. In 1990, the White House Communication Agency commissioned Klein to reproduce a crest for Air Force Wives. Her work has been featured in international publications such as Best Designs Showcase. And just this past October, her work was included in the Expressions in Fiber Art exhibition at Hot Shops. But for Gerry Klein, the greatest reward comes not so much from working with glass as making people happy. Indeed, recent visitors to Hot Shops commented that she has a “happy studio with good vibes.” She reflects, “I simply want them to smile and have them enjoy what they are looking at. And in this respect, the glass artist certainly succeeds. To view the artist’s work, visit: www. GerryKlein.com

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the encounter | november/december 2009 21


CONDO LIFE

I don’t David Rice go look- Good Things Come To Those Who Wait ing for them. They kind of happen.

by Molly Garriott | photography by minorwhitestudios.com

22 november/december 2009 | the encounter

W

hen David Rice relocated from his house near 114th and Pacific streets to his Old Market condo, he was continuing a downsizing trend he and his partner of 47 years, Ephraim Marks, began years earlier when they originally moved from their Fairacres home. But downsizing didn’t necessarily translate to tight quarters; there is nothing small about Rice’s spacious condo. That’s because Rice purchased two adjoining Lion Place condos and razed a mutual wall, unifying the two separate spaces into a single, airy home overlooking the Old Market to the south and ConAgra’s campus to the east. The death of Marks precipitated Rice’s Old Market move, he acknowledges. “I wanted to be around people,” he says. The bustle of the Old Market, with its parades and pedestrian traffic, was the perfect diversion for Rice. Rice gutted the now enlarged condo from ceiling to floor. The space’s tall ceilings meant he could raise the floors, enabling him to reroute plumbing where he wanted and hide electrical conduits for a more finished, polished look. He pushed back a south exterior wall to make a screened-in three-season porch. But Mother Nature demonstrated her dominance: her winds tossed his furniture about like dried leaves. So, he traded the screens for seamless windows “that give you the feeling of openness,” the atmosphere he ardently sought for his green space.


departments

Rice mixes contemporary pieces and antiques with a deft hand. This comes as no surprise; before his retirement, he was one of Omaha’s most well-known and sought-after interior designers. A quick glance around his porch reveals wicker furniture from Target and Pier One side by side with a reproduction of an English antique Brighton chair, African ceremonial masks, antique Persian tiles, four cubic bronzes that adorned the outside of his former Fairacres home, and a wrought iron lantern light fixture from England. In the living and dining rooms, he has continued this “planned, mixed mash” style, as he dubs it. An oversized East Lake book cabinet and a Victorian reproduction of an intricately carved, medieval Hamlet chair keep company with more streamlined, contemporary furniture in what Rice describes as “an architectural style.” The dining room boasts a fireplace with a low mantel of German limestone opposite a 19th century Japanese red tonsu. Situated in the middle is a custom-made mahogany table from North Carolina encircled by 1910 chrome-framed chairs covered in a distinctive leopard print. Rice tends toward a warm, neutral color palate, accentuated

with eye-catching pops of vibrant color. In both the dining and living rooms, a tribal-influenced Heriz rug in rich reds and orange shades unify the colors and patterns of the rooms. Walls are either a warm brown or exposed brick that was glazed to soften the brick’s natural bright orange tone. The beams that originally divided the two separate units were left raw. Kitchen cabinets are black; countertops, putty. Oak flooring running the length of the central hall connects the various rooms. Many of the treasures tucked away in Rice’s condo were found while the designer traveled in Europe, Cape Cod and Key West. “I don’t go looking for them. They kind of happen,” Rice concedes. Much of the art adorning his walls comes from local artists, like the large Kenneth Williams painting positioned above his sofa, and multiple Kent Bellows commissioned pieces hanging in his study and hallway walls. The annual Bemis Art Auction is another of Rice’s key art sources. Rice said it took six months to renovate the two condos into one. The outcome is at once both stately and homey, filled with personal effects, antiques and art. It’s true: good things come to those who wait. the encounter | november/december 2009 23


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Merchants Attractions OLD MARKET / DOWNTOWN / RIVERFRONT

ANTIQUES

Antiques & Fine Art...(16th St). ......... 341.9 942 Fairmont Antique Mall...H4 .............. 345.1778 Joe’s Collectibles...H5 ..................... 612.1543 Retro Recycle...E5 ............................ 341.19 69 Second Chance...G5 ........................ 346.4930

BOOK STORES

Jackson Street Booksellers...H5 .....341.2664 New Realities Books & Gifts...E7 ..... 342.1863 Soul Desires Books & Coffee...G7 ...898.7600

CLOTHING & ACCESSORIES

Lotus ...F4 ......................................... 346.8080 Namaste...E7 .................................... 341.7069 Nebraska Clothing Co...E8............... 346.6114 Nouvelle Eve...E6 .............................. 345.4811 Overland Outfitters...E8 ................... 345.2900 Retro Recycle ...E5 ........................... 341.19 69 The Souq Ltd...E7 ............................. 342.2972 Trocadéro...E4 ..................................934.8389

DOWNTOWN HOTELS

Courtyard by Marriott...(10th & Douglas) ....... 346.2200 DoubleTree Hotel...(16th & Dodge)...346.7600 Embassy Suites Hotel...F9 ...............346.9000 Hilton Convention Center Hotel .......998.3400 Hilton Garden Inn...(10th & Dodge) .. 341.4400 Redick Plaza Hotel...(15th & Harney) .............. 342.1500 Magnolia Hotel...(16th & Howard) ... 342.2222

HOME FURNISHINGS

Crawdad’s...E5 ................................. 341.3930 Habitat .............................................. 342.0044 Julia Russell ...(11th & Douglas) ....... 891.0691 Kraft DC ...(16th & Leavenworth)......342.2790 Room...E7 ......................................... 342.7666 Zongkers Custom Woods ................ 344.7784

GALLERIES

1301 Gallery...(13th & Nicholas) .......342.6452 Artists’ Cooperative Gallery...D7 ..... 342.9 617 Bemis Ctr. for Contemporary Arts...K4 .......... 341.7130 Fred Simon Gallery...A8 ................... 595.2122 Garden Of The Zodiac...E7 .............. 341.1877 Hot Shops...13th & Nicholas ............342.6452 Images of Nature...D5 ......................341.8460 Jackson Artworks...G6 ..................... 341.1832 Julia Russell ...(11th & Douglas) ....... 891.0691 Omaha ClayWorks...H5 ....................346.0560 Passageway Gallery...E7 .................. 341.1910 Sirens at the Loft...F6 .......................933.3333 White Crane Gallery...E7 .................. 345.1066

HEALTH SERVICES

Acupuncture Libba Harmon, LAc .......................... 214.6265 Massage Therapy Sandy Aquila LMT...E3 .....................345.5078 Lisa Christensen LMT...E3 ............... 850.6651 Barb Rost LMT (19th & Douglas)...... 345.7500 Medical Dr. John Bartholet, DC...E3 .............. 342.2216 Downtown Chiropractic (2111 Douglas) ......... 345.7500 Derek Fender, DDS...D4 ...................342.3901

Dr. Mark Goodman, MD...L1 ............280.5500 Dr. Stephen Peterson MD...L1..........280.5500 Dr. James Polerecky DDS (19th & Farnam) .... 341.7576 Dr. Ritch Miller DC (2111 Douglas) ... 345.7500 Heartland Pathology (310 S. 16th) ... 346.0195 Omaha Dental Spa (11th & Howard) 505.4424 Physical Therapy East & West Physical Therapy...E3 ..345.5078 Psychotherapy, EMDR, Hypnotherapy Jannette Davis, MS, CST .................341.2230 Cynthia Duggin, MSW, LCSW ..........345.5078 Bobby Escolas, CMHT (Hypnotherapist) ...... 990.2979 Jeff Stormberg, PhD (Psychotherapist)......... 393.0642 Tim Swisher, MHR, LMHP, LADC ....341.2230 Pharmacy Depot Drug (1416 Dodge) .................544.DRUG

MUSEUMS & ATTRACTIONS

Omaha Children’s Museum...(500 S. 20th) .......... 342.6164 The Durham...J9 ...............................444.5071 Joslyn Art Museum...(24th & Dodge) .............. 342.3300 Lauritzen Gardens...(100 Bancroft)..346.4002 Henry Doorly Zoo...(3701 So 10th St) ............. 733.8401 Qwest Center Omaha (10th & Capitol)............ 341.1500

OLD MARKET PROPERTIES

902 Dodge Condos ......................... 884.6200 Brandeis Building .............................9 34.1224 Farnam 1600 Building ......................342.1616 Grubb/Ellis Pacific Realty ................345.5866 Harney Street Appartments .............9 34.7510 Old Market Lofts...J7 ........................345.8000 Riverfront Place ................................397.4837 Shamrock Development/Paxton Building ...... 934.7711 Skinner Macaroni Apartments...H1 .346.2346 The Cornerstone.............................. 346.0510 The Greenhouse Apts...A9 ...............341.3200 TipTop Building...(16th & Cuming)....345.8000

PUBS & TAVERNS

Bar 415...E3 .......................................346.7455 Barry O’s ...E8 ..................................341.8032 Billy Frogg’s Grille & Bar...E5 ...........341.4427 Bullpen...G6 ...................................... 502.5150 Dubliner Pub...D4 .............................342.5887 J.D. Tucker’s Bar...E8 .......................9 34.519 0 Julio’s...F2 .........................................345.6921 Irie...D7 ..............................................504.4901 La Buvette Wine & Grocery...F7.......344.8627 M’s Pub...E6 ......................................342.2550 Mr. Toad’s...E8 ..................................345.4488 Myth Lounge...F6..............................884.6985 Nomad Lounge...(J8) ........................884-1231 O’Connor’s Irish Pub...F3 .................934.9790 Old Market Tavern...F8 .....................341.0191 The Stadium Club Sports Bar & Grill...E8....... 359 .129 0 T Henery’s Pub...C6 .........................345.3651 The Underground...F7 ......................341.3547 Upstream Brewing Co...G6 .............344.0200 Urban Wine Company...J7 ...............934.0005 Waters Edge Lounge @ Embassy Suites...F9 ..... 346.9000

the encounter | november/december 2009 25


Merchants Attractions OLD MARKET / DOWNTOWN / RIVERFRONT

RESTAURANTS

801 Chophouse at the Paxton...B1..341.1222 Farrells Bar...(902 Dodge) ................884.9947 Ahmad’s...E8.....................................341.9 616 Billy Frogg’s Grille & Bar...E5 ...........341.4427 Delice European Bakery...E4 ...........342.2276 Falling Water Grille @ Embassy Suites...F9 ........ 346.9000 Famous Dave’s...D6 .........................614.9333 Flatiron Café...(17th & Howard) ........344.3040 House of Lee...F4 .............................991.9330 Indian Oven...E7 ...............................342.4856 Joe Banana’s ....................................346.7227 Julio’s...F3 .........................................345.6921 La Buvette Wine & Grocery...F7.......344.8627 Liberty Tavern (10th & Davenport) ...998.4321 Little King...H21 ................................344.2264 Lucky’s 10-0-One (10th & Pacific) ...9 91.1001 M’s Pub...E6 ......................................342.2550 Matsu Sushi...B8 ..............................346.3988 Michael’s at the Market...C6 ............346.1205 Nicola’s...G3 .....................................345.8466 O Dining...A8..................................... 502.7888 Old Chicago...D6 ..............................341.1616 Omaha Prime...E7.............................341.7040 Passport Restaurant...H6 ................344.3200 Rick’s Cafe Boatyard........................345.4545 Sam & Louie’s Pizza...H6 .................884.5757 Spaghetti Works...F6 ........................422.0770 Stokes Bar & Grill...(E5) ................... 408-9000 Subway...E4 ......................................341.8814 Sullivan’s Steakhouse (222 S. 15th St.) .......... 342.4432 The Diner...D5 ...................................341.9 870 The French Café...F7 ........................341.3547 Trini’s...E7..........................................346.8400 Twisted Fork...E7 ..............................932.9600 Upstream Brewing Co....G6 .............344.0200 V. Mertz...E7......................................345.8980 Vincenzo’s Ristorante...D4 ...............342.4010 Vivace...E6 ........................................342.2050 Zio’s Pizzeria...F4 .............................344.2222

elegance

cuisine

intimacy

SPECIALTY FOODS & COFFEE

13th Street Coffee C0....G3 ..............345.2883 Aromas...I8........................................614.7009 Bickford Bakery...I8 .......................... 9 34.7450 Cubby’s Old Market Grocery...H3 ...341.2900 Delice European Bakery...E4 ...........342.2276 Hollywood Candy...F3 ......................884.7688 La Buvette Wine & Grocery...F7.......344.8627 Maggie Moo’s Ice Cream...H21 .......933.5280 MJ Java...B3 & F7 .............................342.5282 Old Market Candy Shop...F8 ...........344.8846 Old Market Eea House...G3 .............934.8538 Patrick’s Market...(E1).......................884-1600 Soul Desires Books & Coffee...G7 ...898.7600 Ted & Wally’s Ice Cream...G5 ........... 341.5827

SPECIALTY SHOPS

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26 november/december 2009 | the encounter

Ashley Collectibles...E3....................934.3100 Big Brain Productions...H5 ..............342.2885 Chameleon...E7 ................................342.4444 Cibola of Omaha...F7 (509 S 11th) ...342.1200 City Limits...E3..................................345.3570 Cornerstone Gem & Bead Co....G3 . 346.4367 Drastic Plastic...F4 ........................... 346.8843 DSR Power Sports...E3 ....................9 91.1383 Etc. Gifts...F7 ....................................342.2846

Garden Flowers...F7 ......................... 614.5661 Garden Of The Zodiac...E7 .............. 341.1877 Goldsmith Silversmith...F7 ...............342.1737 Homer’s Records...E5 ......................346.0264 Iron Decor & More...G5 ....................346.6123 Jay Welter Cigars...(18th & Jackson)345.19 65 Kessler’s...H5 (1125 Jackson) ..........715.5888 Mairzy Doatz...F6.............................. 934.4815 Namaste...E7 .................................... 341.7069 New Realities Books & Gifts...E7 ..... 342.1863 Old Market Habitat Floral...E6 ......... 342.0044 Old Market Sundries...F8 ................. 345.8198 OM Gifts & Imports...E3 ................... 345.5078 Overland Outfitters...F8 ................... 345.2972 Perspective Jewelry...D4.................. 934.4416 Red Square...E7................................ 342.8878 SG Roi Tobacconist...F7 .................. 341.9264 Souq Ltd...E7 .................................... 342.2972 Tannenbaum Christmas Shop...F8 .. 345.9627 Trocadéro...E4 ................................. 934-8389

SERVICES

At the Loft Spa...F6...........................505.4100 Michael Boyle, Attorney...E7 ............359.1000 Centris Federal Credit Union...C3 ...334.2000 Commercial Optical...G3 .................. 344.0219 Dietz United Methodist Church ....... 346.9115 Don Fiedler Law Offices...F7 ........... 346.6263 First National Bank...(F5) ..................885-2574 Fringes Salon & Spa...G8 ................. 345.0404 Greater Omaha Chamber of Commerce...D2 346.5000 Omaha Convention & Visitors Bureau...B8 .... 444.4660 Hair Market Salon...E7 ..................... 345.3692 J P Cooke Rubber Stamps...F2 ....... 342.7175 Klein Law Offices...H3 ...................... 391.1871 Magical Journeys Carriage Service...E7 ........ 453.6745 Movers Not Shakers ......................... 614.9770 Old Market Car Wash...J2 ................ 393.2819 Old Market Encounter ......................884.2000 Old Market Mini Storage .................. 342.0022 Old Market Web Site .....www.oldmarket.com Omaha Healing Arts Center...E4 ......345.5078 Omaha Public Library...(15th & Farnam) ......... 444.4800 Omaha Yoga School...E7 .................346.7813 Pinnacle Bank...(10th & Douglas) ..... 346.9180 Security National Bank...(11th & Howard) .......... 344.7300 Sirens...F6 ......................................... 933.9333 Stinson, Morrison, Hecker LLP...C3 342.1700 Urbane Salon & Spa...B8 .................934.2909 Susie’s Baskets...D4......................... 341.4650 Sutera Law Offices...E6.................... 342.3100 Visions Framing Studio...K4 .............342.0020

THEATRES & ENTERTAINMENT

Blue Barn Theater...G6 ..................... 345.1576 FilmStreams...(14th & Webster) ........ 933-0259 Holland Performing Arts Center...(12th & Douglas) .............................................345.0606 Omaha Symphony...(16th & Howard).............. 342.3836 Opera Omaha...(17th & Farnam)....... 346.4398 Orpheum Theater...(16th & Farnam).345.0606 The Rose...(20th & Farnam) .............. 345.4849


Pinnacle Bank would like to welcome you downtown. owntown. Visit us in the historical Riley Building at 1016 Douglas On The Mall, 402.346.9180 or online at pinnbank.com

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Downtown and Council Bluffs 09_POG14_DOWNTOWN.indd 1

ONGOING EVENT American Letterpress: The Art of the Hatch Show Print. The Durham Museum. American Letterpress: The Art of Hatch Show Print illustrates the fascinating fusion of art with popular culture and music history. Featuring the work of one of the nation’s oldest and continuously printing shops – Nashville, Tennessee’s Hatch Show Print – the exhibition highlights the uniquely American poster. 801 S. 10 St. www.durhammuseum.org 444-5071. NOVEMBER EVENTS 11/1: Trans-Siberian Orchestra. Mid-America Center. The show features TSO’s trademark “symphonic rock,” which fuses elements of hard rock, Broadway, R&B, and classical music into a unique and distinctive blend of original compositions, symphony excerpts and holiday standards. One Arena Way. www.midamericacenter.com 712-3230536. 11/4 - 11/30: Featured Artists: Adams / Dewaele / Markoff / Ocken. Artists’ Cooperative Gallery Ltd. New works of Duane Adams, Robert Dewaele, Richard Markoff & Virginia Ocken. Opening party Saturday November 7th, 7-10pm. Food and Drinks & Live Music. Always FREE and open tothe public. Wed & Thurs/11am-5pm; Fri & Sat/11am-10pm; Sun/12-5pm Free. 405 S. 11 St. http://www.artistscoopgallery.com (402) 3429617.

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Member FDIC

November/December Calendar of Events 3/31/09 10:27:28 AM

11/5: Auction Give-Away & Art Talk. Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts. Join us for First Thursday Art Talk and a special preauction give-away in preparation of the 11th Annual Art Auction on November 14th. Thurs/7pm 724 S. 12 St. www.bemiscenter.org 341-7130. 11/5: First Thursday Art Talk for November. Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts. Join us as artists-inresidence Shaun Richards & Mayumi Amada present during the Bemis Center’s First Thursday Art Talk on November 5th, at 7:00 p.m. 7 p.m. Free. 724 S. 12 St. www.bemiscenter.org 341-7130. 11/6: First Friday Gallery Walk in the Old Market. Old Market. On the first Friday of each month, come visit these Old Market galleries for an evening of art entertainment. Omaha Clay Works - tour down the alley on 12th Street between Jackson & Jones Sts; Old Market Artists - Lower Level of the Old Market Passageway on the NE corner of 11th & Howard Sts; White Crane Gallery - Lower Level of the Old Market Passageway on the NE corner of 11th & Howard Sts; Passageway Gallery - Upper Level of the Old Market Passageway on the NE corner of 11th & Howard Sts. Fri/6-9p.m. Free. w w w.omahaclay work s. com For more information: 346-0560.

Herb Alpert and Lani Hall, Holland Performing Arts Center 11/12. 11/7: 9th Annual Omaha Blues & Jazz Gospel Concert. Joslyn Art Museum. Featuring Marion Meadows, Karen Briggs and Althea Rene. 7 p.m. $20/ adults; $15/students (with student ID). 2200 Dodge St. www.joslyn.org. 342-3300. For more information: 7078915. 11/7: Irving Berlin’s White Christmas. Orpheum Theater. Join us as Irving Berlin’s White Christmas kicks off its national tour in Omaha. This holiday

tradition features a brand new Irving Berlin musical opening and hits such as “Sisters,” “Blue Skies,” and “White Christmas.” www. omahaperformingarts.org 345-0606. 11/7: Omaha Symphony Special Concert: Itzhak Perlman. Itzhak Perlman is one of the few classical artists to achieve genuine celebrity status. This living legend is just as comfortable playing on The Tonight Show as he is at Carnegie Hall. Recently, the

entire world saw his talent and personality shine at President Obama’s Inauguration ceremony. 8 p.m. $40-$100. 11/5 - 11/8: Autumn Festival, An Arts & Crafts Affair. Qwest Center Omaha. Hundreds of the nation’s finest artists and craftspeople from all over the country display and sell their handcrafted wares. Voted one of the top 100 shows in the country by Sunshine Artist Magazine! Hourly gift certificate

winners, stage entertainment, plenty of food and drink, and great family fun! Thurs&Fri/11am-9pm; Sat/9am-7pm; Sun/10am5pm $7 Adults, $6 Seniors, Children under 10 are free. http://www.hpifestivals. com 402-331-2889. 11/12: Herb Alpert and Lani Hall. Holland Performing Arts Center. Want another “Taste of Honey”? With eight Grammy® Awards and 30 gold and platinum records between them, you’ll fall in love

the encounter | november/december 2009 27


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It’s A Wonderful Life. Film Streams Ruth Sokolof Theater. with Herb and Lani. Enjoy legendary chemistry and a masterful line-up from two stars who propelled Latino music into the pop limelight. 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $19. 13th & Douglas Sts. www.omahaperformingarts.org 345-0606. 11/13: Lionel Loueke Trio. Holland Performing Arts Center. Deftly executed modern jazz woven with clear vision, wicked improv, mouth clicks, and propulsive West African beats. 8 p.m. Tickets start at $25. 13th & Douglas Sts. www. omahaperformingarts.org 345-0606.

Join the YMCA - No Contracts Pool • Indoor Track • Small Group Exercise • Pilates Yoga • Personal Trainers • All-Day Child Care Separate Men’s and Women’s Workout Areas* Steam Room/Sauna* • Off-Site Corporate Services *With Fitness Center membership.

430 S 20TH ST• OMAHA • 402-341-1600 • METROYMCA.ORG 28 november/december 2009 | the encounter

11/13: VFC 29: The Rising. Mid-America Center. Get ready to throwdown when the Victory Fighting Championship (VFC) returns to the Mid-America Center. Tickets can be purchased at the MAC Box Office, all Ticketmaster locations, online at midamericacenter.com or ticketmaster. com or charge by phone: 800.745.3000. $23-$103.

One Arena Way. www. m i d a m e r i c a c e n t e r. c o m 712-323-0536. 11/13: Omaha Symphony Masterworks: Mendelssohn’s Masterpiece. Omaha Symphony. Enjoy a vituosic crowd-pleaser that will have you clinging to each note. You’ll be mesmerized by Mendelssohn’s romantic rollercoaster that expresses the violin’s full emotive spectrum. Don’t be surprised if the sweet, haunting melodies linger in your head for days. With music like this in its arsenal, it’s no wonder the violin is so immensely popular. 8 p.m. $15- $75. www.omahaperformingarts.org 3450606. 11/14: 11th Annual Art Auction Exhibition. Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts. Visitors can experience spectacular works of art during the Bemis Center’s Auction Exhibition opening reception on Friday, October 2nd through to the evening of the 11th

Annual Art Auction on Sat Nov 14th, 5:30-10pm. 724 S. 12 St. www.bemiscenter. org 341-7130. 11/14: 11th Annual Art Auction. Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts. The Annual Art Auction is the Bemis Center’s largest and most important fund raiser of the year. All proceeds support the Bemis Center’s internationally acclaimed artist-in-residence program. Sat/5:30-10pm $25 - $60. 724 S. 12 St. www. bemiscenter.org 341-7130. 11/14: 311 with Kottonmouth Kings. Mid-America Center. 311’s fusion of reggae and rap-metal was created in Omaha in 1990. Tickets can be purchased at the MAC Box Office, all Ticketmaster locations, online at ticketmaster. com or midamericacenter. com or charge by phone at 800.745.3000. 8 p.m. $35 One Arena Way. www. m i d a m e r i c a c e n t e r. c o m 712-323-0536.


11/15: The Art and History of Ak-Sar-Ben. The Durham Museum. This exhibit highlights the rich artistic heritage behind AkSar-Ben and reveals how Ak-Sar-Ben has evolved throughout its more than 100-year history. The exhibition includes coronation dresses, original designer sketches, brochures, dance cards, photographs and restored video. 801 S. 10 St. www.durhammuseum.org 444-5071. 11/19: Kaneko Great Minds Series. KANEKO. (Un)covering Human Crisis: Crucial Dispatches from the Innovative Journalist with Nicholas Kristof and Sonia Nazario. 7 p.m. $70/series of 3 events; $60/ member price of series; $25/general admission;18/ seniors; $10/students. 1111 Jones St. www.thekaneko. org 341-3800For more information:341-3800. 11/20: KANEKO Great Minds Series. KANEKO. On Writing as Witness; A Reporter’s Perspective with Sonia Nazario. 12 noon $70/series of 3 events; $60/member price of series; $25/general admission;18/seniors; $10/ students. 1111 Jones St. www.thekaneko.org 3413800. 11/20: Omaha Symphony Pops Series: Patriotic Celebration. Omaha Symphony. Celebrate America at this patriotic program directed by Erich Kunzel, conductor of the Cincinnati Pops Orchestra. The “Prince of Pops” is renowned for his all-American tributes that mix reverence with enthusiasm. You’ll be bursting with pride and smiling all night long as we salute our country and show off the first-class Omaha Symphony. 8 p.m. $15-$80. www. omahaperformingarts.org 345-0606. 11/20 - 11/22: Cirque Dreams Illumination. Orpheum Theater. American circus arts and Broadway theatrics combine to create what the LA Times describes as “jaw dropping and family-friendly entertainment.” World-class acrobats, athletes, musicians and one-of-a-kind artists

join in this journey of suspense and theatrical innovation. Fri/8pm; Sat/2pm & 8pm Tickets start at $25. w w w.omahaper formingarts.org 345-0606. 11/22: Fall Chrysanthemum Show. Lauritzen Gardens, Omaha’s Botanical Center. The indoor floral display hall is festooned in autumn colors during this Japanese-inspired show, featuring unique chrysanthemums, koinobori, Japanese maples, water features and more. 100 Bancroft St. www.lauritzengardens.com 11/27 - 12/25: Annie The Musical. The Rose Theater. It’s a hard knock life for Annie-a spunky Depression-era orphan determined to find her parents who abandoned her on the doorstep of a New York City orphanage. For ages 4-adult. Fri/7pm; Sat-Sun/2pm $16; Members Save $6/ticket. 2001 Farnam. www.rosetheater. org 345-4849. 11/27 - 2/4: Holiday Poinsettia Show. Lauritzen Gardens, Omaha’s Botanical Center. More than 5,600 poinsettia plants are grown in our greenhouses starting as early as July for this annual show. This exhibit includes a 20-foot-tall poinsettia tree, decorated holiday trees, antique sleighs and three model trains that travel through the display. Daily 9-5 p.m. $6 adults; $3 ages 6-12, free members and age 5 & under. 100 Bancroft St. w w w.laurit zengardens. com 11/28: WorldFest 2009. Lied Activity Center. Christmas, Culture & Customs From Around The World; We have live enter tainment,Vendors providing food/activities/ educational opportunities, and Hay Rack Rides. New for 2009 is the addition of the Medieval and Renaissance Society. Visit the special Medieval/ Renaissance Village and learn about rope making, leather work, weaving, woodworking, metal work, jewelry making and more! Santa Claus will visit the children in our special holiday village. Each child

receives a complimentary photo with Santa. Free. w w w.bellevueworldfest. com 11/29: Arte Popular: Mexican Folk Art from the Collection of Pat and Judd Wagner. Joslyn Art Museum. A celebration of the rich folk art traditions of Mexico, guest curated by Jose Francisco Garcia & his wife, Linda. 2200 Dodge St. www.joslyn.org 342-3300. DECEMBER EVENTS 12/1: The Ten Tenors. Holland Performing Arts Center. With 10 electric voices and 77 million fans on four continents, these Australian chart toppers balance mischief and a classic aesthetic for a playful operatic sound! 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $19. 13th & Douglas Sts. www.omahaperformingarts.org 345-0606. 12/2 - 1/31: Affordable Treasures, All-Member Holiday Show. Artists’ Cooperative Gallery Ltd. Visit the Artists’ Co-operative Gallery to find one-ofa-kind gift items for the holiday season. Opening reception Saturday 12/5 from 6-10pm and Sunday 12/6 from 2-5pm with live jazz and refreshments to get you in the spirit. W e d & T h u r / 11a m - 5 p m ; Fri&Sat/11am-10pm; Sun/ noon-5pm Free. 405 S. 11 St. www.artistsco-opgallery. com (402) 342-9617.

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12/3: The Imperial Nutcracker. The Rose Theater. Tues-Sat/10am-4pm; Sun/12pm-4pm $7 adults; $5 seniors/college students; $4 ages 5-17; free/ages 4 & under and Members. 2001 Farnam. www.rosetheater. org 345-4849. 12/4: Jane Monheit. Holland Performing Arts Center. Escape this holiday season with the marvelous Jane Monheit, whose acclaimed dewy vocals bring Ella Fitzgerald to mind. Soak up your favorite seasonal standards from one of the jazz world’s foremost vocalists. 8 p.m. Tickets start at $19. 13th & Douglas Sts. www.omahaperformingarts.org 345-0606.

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the encounter | november/december 2009 29


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11/27 - 12/19: Silent Night of the Lambs. Blue Barn Theatre. A twisted take on two classic tales. Mixes one part holiday TV special (Rudolf the Red Nosed Reindeer) to create a twisted recipe of mayhem and mistletoe. $80 adults; $64 ages 65+ & students. 614 S. 11 St. www.bluebarn.org 345-1576.

Paul Renner “The Omaha Diner”, 2009, Oil, varnish on photo and canvas, 82 x 118 in. at Bemis Art Auction 11/14.

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12/4: The Fred Simon Gallery: Richard Austin and Kimberly Thomas. The Fred Simon Gallery. Displaying the artwork of contemporary Nebraska artists. The Fred Simon gallery is located in the Nebraska Arts Council offices. 12/5: Omaha Symphony Chamber Series: Schubert’s Second. Omaha Symphony. Brighten up your winter with this sunny program! Britten and Torke’s playful pieces showcase a lighthearted slice of 20th Century repertoire. After intermission, the audience slips into Schubert’s lovely Symphony No. 2. Here, a young Schubert explores his developing voice, producing a work of great brilliance and cheer. 7 p.m. $30 w w w.omahaper formingarts.org 345-0606. 12/7: Holiday Harmony. Lauritzen Gardens, Omaha’s Botanical Center. Stroll the holiday poinsettia show with added ambience from performers filling the visitor and education center with holiday music. Enjoy a warm meal or snack in front of the crackling fireplace while listening to the entertainment. 2 p.m. $6 adults; $3 children ages 6-12, free members & age 5 & under. 100 Bancroft St. www.lauritzengardens.com 12/8: Wynonna - A Classic Christmas. Mid-America Center. Wynonna is taking her critically acclaimed holiday album, A Classic Christmas, on the road for the third year in a row. Spreading festive cheer across the country, Wynonna will combine her smooth vocals and

tremendous live presence in an unforgettable performance that will warm the heart and inspire the spirit. Tickets can be purchased at the MAC Box Office, all Ticketmaster locations, online at ticketmaster. com or midamericacenter. com or charge by phone at 800.745.3000. 7:30 p.m. $58 - $100. One Arena Way. www.midamericacenter. com 712-323-0536. 12/10: USAF Heartland of America Band Holiday Concert. Holland Performing Arts Center. As a gift to our community, the Omaha World-Herald and the USAF Heartland of America Band proudly present the 23rd Annual Holiday Concert Series. This year’s theme is Here Come the Holidays. There will be five performances at the Holland Performing Arts Center, Dec 1013. For tickets, watch for the coupon in the WorldHerald on Sunday, November 1. Thurs&Fri/7:30; Sat/2pm&7:30pm; Sun/2pm 13th & Douglas Sts. www.omahaperformingarts.org 345-0606. 12/11: Gary Mauer and Elizabeth Southard. Holland Performing Arts Center. These star-crossed Phantom of the Opera lovers are also husband-andwife off the stage. A romantic evening of Broadway standards by the best in the biz. 8 p.m. Tickets start at $25. 13th & Douglas Sts. www.omahaperformingarts.org 345-0606. 12/11: Modern and Contemporary Art Acquisitions On View in Exhibition. Joslyn Art Museum. Works by 21 of the most thoughtful and experi-

mental artists of our time comprise this exhibition of new acquisitions for the Museum’s modern and contemporary collection. The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States features works that come to Joslyn as part of a national gift program that testifies to the remarkable vision of two people committed to acquiring and sharing the art of our time. 2200 Dodge St. www.joslyn.org 342-3300. 12/11: Modern and Contemporary Art Acquisitions On View in Exhibition. Joslyn Art Museum. Works by 21 of the most thoughtful and experimental artists of our time comprise this exhibition of new acquisitions for the Museum’s modern and contemporary collection. The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States features works that come to Joslyn as part of a national gift program that testifies to the remarkable vision of two people committed to acquiring and sharing the art of our time. 2200 Dodge St. www.joslyn.org 342-3300. 12/12: Jesse Cook. Holland Performing Arts Center. Cook plays a hot mix of jazz and Cuban rumba with smoldering charisma. Called a flamenco guitar “genius,” his soulful fretwork is intoxicating. 8 p.m. Tickets start at $25. 13th & Douglas Sts. www. omahaperformingarts.org 345-0606.

12/19: Science Saturday Show Strategic Air & Space Museum. Join us and Egad! Science once a month for a science experience that is sure to inspire. Science Saturday brings to life the Museum’s mission to inspire learning. December 19 ~ Leonardo da Vinci’s “Dream Machines”. Strategic Air & Space Museum is committed to educating the community in the areas of (STEM) Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. Sat/11am & 1:30pm Adults: $8.50; Children (ages 5-12): $4.00; Seniors: $7.00; Military: $6.00. 28210 W Park Hwy, Ashland. www.sasmuseum. com 944-3100. 12/18 - 12/20: Omaha Symphony Pops Series: Christmas With The Symphony. Omaha Symphony. Celebrate the season with this beloved Omaha tradition. Broadway entertainers team up with local talent to create a spectacular production, featuring classic holiday hits, amazing vocalists, and the popular dancing Santas! Create a Christmas memory that the whole family will treasure. Fri/8pm; Sat/2&8pm; Sun/2&7pm $15-$80. w w w.omahaper formingarts.org 345-0606. 12/26 - 12/30: Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer. The Rose Theater. Santa, Hermey the Elf and the Abominable Snowman will lead families through thrilling adventures at the North Pole as “the most famous reindoor of all” saves Christmas for all the children of the world. For ages 4-12. SatSun/2pm & 4:30pm; MonWed/2pm,4:30pm & 7pm $16; Free with Membership. 2001 Farnam. www. rosetheater.org 345-4849.


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Nov/Dec 09 - The Encounter Magazine