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Old Market • Downtown • Riverfront

Behind the Scenes: Holiday Lights Festival

Condo Life:

Top Floors of 1101 Jackson

Feature:

Holiday Shopping ON the Beaten-Brick Path

Fresh Cuisine

Reigns Supreme at Blue Sushi

www.oldmarket.com

November/December 2008

Omaha magazine • 5921 S. 118th CirCle • Omaha, ne 68137 PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID OMAHA MAGAZINE LTD


At the Old Market’s Front Door 10TH & HOWARD STREETS

Holiday décor you’ll adore!

Ornament, figurine and musical snow globe all by Jim Shore

It’s nearing Christmas, the special time we celebrate all year ‘round. Come browse our seasonal décor including wonderfully detailed collectibles by Jim Shore. • Dept. 56 Village Gold Key Dealer • Christopher Radko • Steinbach Nutcrackers • Fontanini Nativities • Beanpod Soy Candles

Handmade chocolates & fudge Featuring gourmet chocolates and fudge – all handmade with the finest ingredients in our own kitchen. Plus a tempting selection of other sweet treats including: • Vermont Truffles • International Licorice • Nostalgia Candies • Sugar-Free Varieties • Jelly Bellies • Salt Water Taffy • Molded Candies for Weddings

1005 HOWARD ST. (402) 344-8846

The souvenir and traveler’s store Small in size but large on variety! Find essentials for travelers, Nebraska-made gifts, Heartland apparel, Husker items and souvenirs. We’ve been called “the hotel gift shop, without the hotel prices.”

1007 HOWARD ST. (402) 345-9627

1003 HOWARD ST. (402) 345-8198


The Old Market’s favorite spot for lunch & dinner.

Italian & Mediterranean specialties served in“the Old Market’s most beautiful dining room,” complemented with the area’s largest selection of Italian wines.

Award-winning food & wine list – open late 7 nights a week. Call for reservations.

M’s Pub

422 S. 11th Street

342-2550

1108 Howard Street

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We’re bringin’ it New York style!

INFLATION BUSTER SPECIAL!

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PI Sam & Louie’s New York Style Pizza • • • • • •

By the slice or the whole pie Take out & dine in from 11:00am daily Fresh pasta and appetizers, too Full service bar with cold, packaged beer to-go Happy Hour daily 4-6pm, weekends 11pm-1am New flatscreen TVs ... foosball & video games, too.

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Mention or present coupon when ordering. Good at Old Market location only, not valid with any other offer. No expiration date.

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1125 Jackson St. • Old Market www.samandlouiesnyp.com

the encounter | november/december 2008 3


Second Chance

Old Market Downtown • Riverfront

Antiques & Collectibles

Bought and sold by the handful, or houseful

Furniture Architectural Items China Glassware Toys & Dolls Books Huge Selection of Vintage Clothing & Jewelry on our Lower Level

Over 30 Years in the Old Market

1116 Jackson St. 346-4930 Mon-Thurs 10am-6pm / Fri-Sat 11am-9pm / Sun 12-6pm

november/deCember 2008

P ublisher Todd Lemke

e ditor Sandra Lemke

A ssistAnt e ditor Linda Persigehl

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A rt d irector / G rAPhic d esiGn Matt Jensen

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Homemade Onion Rings and House Specials

c ontributinG W riters

An Omaha favorite for over 25 years! Kitchen: Sun-Thurs 11 am– 10:30 pm • Fri & Sat11 am– Midnight

Mike Watkins Heather Heier Lane Judy Horan Heather Akerberg Tina King

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Creating Fresh Environments To Complement Your Lifestyle. Lori Anderson Lindsey Anderson Amanda Koris

For advertising inFormation:

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Owned and managed by Omaha Magazine, LTD

Comments? Send your letter to the editor to: letters@omahapublications.com All versions of The Encounter are published bimonthly by Omaha Magazine, LTD, P.O. Box 461208, Omaha NE 68046-1208. Telephone: (402) 884-2000; fax (402) 884-2001. No whole or part of the contents herein may be reproduced without prior written permission of Omaha Magazine, excepting individually copyrighted articles and photographs. Unsolicited manuscripts are accepted; however, no responsibility will be assumed for such solicitations. 4 november/december 2008 | the encounter


contents N ow check out e NcouNter M aga ziNe oNliNe . u siNg flipbook techNology to give you a whole New Maga ziNe re adiNg e xperieNce .

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11

15

6 Feature: You Must Be On the List ...................................... 8 Feature: Holiday Gift Guide .........................................10 History: 20 Years since Jobber’s Canyon Battle ............. 11 Downtown Art: Capturing the Character of a City ....... 15 Downtown Story: Holiday Lights Behind the Scenes ....18 Feature: Market’s Holiday Gifts ................................... 20 Condo Life: Gail & Kathy Nevins .................................. 22 Old Market Map........................................................... 24 Calendar .......................................................................27 Cover Story: Blue Sushi/Sake Bombers ............................

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COver stOry

“ O ” Cooked Japanese delicacies are also on the menu at Old Market Blue Sushi.

Fresh Cuisine Reigns Supreme story by Mike Watkins

photos by minorwhitestudios.com

ld Omaha - once synonymous with steak and potatoes - melds with sleek contemporary Asian style, neon lighting and raw seafood at Blue Sushi’s new Old Market restaurant. Owners Anthony Hitchcock, Tom Allisma, Nick Hogan, Tom Buder and Tony Gentile have added to their stable of Omaha eateries by filling a previously absent ambiance niche downtown. Joining traditional Old Market foods like spaghetti and meatballs and Nebraska-raised prime rib are sushi, coconut chicken strips and edamame. Cooked Japanese delicacies are also on the menu at Old Market Blue Sushi, which now occupies the building that was formerly Jobber’s Canyon restaurant and brewery. The three-story enterprise houses a restaurant on the main floor, a Sake Bombers bar (which also serves food) on the second level, and banquet/meeting facilities on the third floor. Considering the previous tenant was a brewery/restaurant, the construction process to convert the historic building was extensive, and final touches on the third level are still being completed. However, the finished product will wow both new visitors and regular patrons of the Old Market, and create a unique draw to the area. “No other restaurants for five miles between downtown and 84th Street focus on the kind of food that we offer, which makes us very unique in this market,” said Ryan Heimes, manager of the downtown restaurant and marketing coordinator for all the Blue Sushi, Roja, Bianco

6 november/december 2008 | the encounter


and Baby Blue restaurants in Omaha. “When this building became available, we knew the location offered us a niche opportunity unavailable in the surrounding area. There was an open need for this type of restaurant in downtown.” Because of the existing Blue Sushi and Baby Blue establishments, the downtown sushi bar isn’t a ground-up venture – eliminating some of the usual and expensive start-up costs. Existing menus, restaurant practices and protocols, and brand recognition already exist, so Heimes and the owners were able to spend the majority of their money and time converting the once-working brewery into a state-of-the-art yet historically preserved sushi restaurant and sake bar in the Old Market. “Because of our existing restaurants, we already know what sells and doesn’t sell, so there really isn’t much uncertainty in menu choices that can hurt new restaurants,” Heimes said. “And since we’re not owned by a corporation, we’re able to adapt to our customer base and be flexible. If we see that a change needs to be made, we can change in the direction of the customer quickly and relatively easily. That’s our main focus – to create great relationships with our customers.” In addition to serving what Heimes calls “the freshest fish in town,” Blue Sushi in the Old Market also has its own teasmith to select and offer a variety of hot teas, and its Sake Bombers bar stocks more than 18 varieties of sake. Like its sister restaurants, the Old Market Blue Sushi has a

menu that includes a variety of cooked Japanese and Korean dishes in addition to its signature sushi rolls. “We offer a bit of a fusion or mixture of menu items that are friendly to those who haven’t tried sushi, don’t want to try sushi, or don’t enjoy sushi,” said Blue Sushi chef Roger Cox, who lives in the Old Market and is excited to add sushi to the neighborhood. “Our rolls have cooked ingredients, and we also have entrees like sea bass, shrimp, crab and other seafood dishes. We’ll also have cooked chicken and beef dishes. There really is something for everyone.” Heimes said the building’s interior décor offers a mixture of old and new that will interest Omaha residents as well as visitors. A red, full-length, airplane bomber wing lines the wall in the Sake Bombers bar, while projection screens playing Japanese films and concerts are featured on both the restaurant and bar levels. Blue neon backlighting, cement bar countertops that complement the original weathered wood floors, and exposed brick walls are found throughout all three levels. “We intend to not only attract people who come downtown to shop and browse or take in a concert or performance, but also those downtown business professionals who may live out west but want to stop by for something to eat or drink to avoid rush hour traffic before heading home,” Heimes said. “And those people who live in midtown now have the option to come downtown for sushi and sake rather than only having the choice of going west. It’s a win-win for everyone.”

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dOwntOwn Feature

?

the goal: creating a meeting place exuding sophistication without being stuffy.

8 november/december 2008 | the encounter

a Classy thank-you for arts aficionados The Orpheum Theater opens a space dedicated to donors by Heather Heier Lane | rendering courtesy of the Orpheum Theater

O

maha has a new club that is so exclusive, you can only enter if you are on the proverbial “list.” There are no bouncers who will let you in if you are wearing a trendy suit or carrying a designer bag. Despite how desperate you may be to garner a peek, you will simply have to wait until you officially make the guest list. Just what is this swank place, fashioned after ultra lounges in New York, Chicago and abroad? The Anne Thorne Weaver Lounge was created specifically for donors of the Orpheum Theater. A dedicated, private patron area for hospitality and relaxed conversation before performances and during intermission, the space features exclusive, comfortable seating areas and private bar service. Located inside the northwest corner of Omaha’s celebrated theater, this hotspot was designed to be unique, and succeeds. For years the Orpheum was searching for a space to host donors and contributors. After batting around several ideas and weighing location options, it became clear that the obvious choice was literally just steps away, in space adjacent to the Orpheum. So how do you transform what was recently a run-of-the-mill coffee shop, and way back in 1927 the home to City National Bank, into a high-end VIP room where donors would feel comfortable, relaxed and appreciated?


Doris Witte, senior interior designer with HDR One Company, says that from the very beginning everyone involved in the process wanted the lounge to be special, unlike anything else in Omaha. It needed to be classy — not funky or trendy. The meeting place should exude sophistication without being stuffy. Patrons who have traveled the world should be reminded of a major metropolitan hotel lounge, not a local chain restaurant. The dĂŠcor needed to fit the theater, the space and the clientele—and be exquisite beyond measure. Witte says that to make the Anne Thorne Weaver lounge special, the design team crafted a plan to capture a contemporary, transitional flair. The interior spaces have a linear feel with cantilevered shapes, which contrast with the traditional coved and beam ceiling, and a decorative center pendant light. Rich colors permeate the space, and to make everything flow, the Orpheum lobby marble is repeated in the lounge. While the building is on the National Historic Register, only the clerestory windows, leaded glass window tiles, and the exterior building materials and cornices have been saved. The interior is all new and extremely beautiful. Joan Squires, president of Omaha Performing Arts, says that many arts centers across the country have similar spaces, and she is thrilled at how the lounge has come together. Squires adds that many people at the dedication event held in September commented on how they felt like they were in New York City. With windows facing the First National Bank Tower, the vibe is decidedly downtown, and the goal of having a metropolitan venue was clearly met. Squires is happy to finally have a space to properly recognize and thank the Orpheum’s donors, especially Anne Thorne Weaver, whose generous gift made the project possible. Weaver, a philanthropist and long-time resident of Omaha, says she is delighted to help enhance appreciation for the arts in Omaha. “Countless memories have been made at the Orpheum throughout the last 80 years, and I am very excited to be part of the future of this treasured facility,â€? Weaver says. Curious how much you need to donate to be on the short list? Perhaps this falls in the “If you have to ask, you can’t afford itâ€? category. But if you are genuinely interested in supporting the Orpheum, call Omaha Performing Arts and someone will gladly explain the benefits of giving, at any level. Remember, no matter how big or how small, each and every donation to the arts is an investment in Omaha’s cultural landscape. If you don’t roll with the VIP crowd, just purchasing tickets to local theater is genuinely appreciated. Contact Omaha Performing Arts administration offices at 402.345.0202 for info on donating to the Orpheum and/or the Holland Performing Arts Center. Visit them online at www.omahaperformingarts.org.

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the encounter | november/december 2008 9


Encounter Magazine 2008 Gift Guide

Unique Gifting Ideas You’ll Find Downtown

Most sparkling gift under the tree!

Fine art that’s creative, original and local.

Your special one deserves a gift that’s truly breathtaking. We’ll work with you to create the perfect keepsake that will be cherished forever. Shown: Peridot and diamond pendant.

Tucked into the lower level of the Old Market Passageway, our gallery offers select works by local professional artists. All mediums and all price ranges. At right: powder-coated steel sculpture, 72” high, by Diane Mattern. Below: oil painting on linen, 18”x24”, by Debra J. Groesser.

Perspective Jewelry Design Studio 1209 Harney St. 402-934-4416 perspectivejewelry.com

Old Market Artist’s Gallery

1034 Howard Street 402-346-6569 oldmarketartists.com

Art makes a one-of-a-kind, lasting gift. Our ever-evolving collection of local art will inspire you! Choose from paintings, pottery, jewelry, sculpture, blown glass, photography and much more. Gift ideas from under $30. Shown: blown glass form, 13” high, by Frank Daharsh.

Passageway Gallery 417 S. 11th St. 402-341-1910

Books, gifts, music & more! From the inspirational to the irreverent, we stock great reads including bestsellers – plus music and gifts ideas from across the globe. “In all of my travels, I’ve never visited a bookstore with such a diverse and interesting mix.” – RECENT CUSTOMER

Soul Desires

1026 Jackson St. 402-898-7600 soul-desires.com

Tasty gift baskets of retro candies. Hollywood Candy’s retro gift baskets are full of your favorite nostalgic candies and novelties from past decades. They make perfectly delicious gifts for anyone on your list – family, friends or corporate clients. From $15-150.

Hollywood Candy 501 S. 13th St. 402-884-7688


departments

dOwntOwn histOry

Jobber’s Canyon was made up of red brick warehouses still standing from the 1870’s.

the facade is removed from the Wright & Wilhelmy, the last of the jobber’s canyon buildings to be razed. this site is where the embassy Suites hotel now stands. in the background are Conagra buildings under construction.

Battle of the Buildings

a controversial decision made 20 years ago changed the face of Omaha’s downtown riverfront. by Judy Horan | Photos by Steve Raglin

M

aybe you weren’t around Omaha 20 years ago for the fight over Jobber’s Canyon. Still, you probably heard about it. Even the New York Times wrote about Omaha’s big brawling battle. There weren’t any fistfights — that we know of. But there were plenty of hot

words. ConAgra needed space to build a new research and international headquarters campus. The company had been in Omaha since 1922 when it was called Nebraska Consolidated Mills. The City wanted to keep the company in downtown Omaha. ConAgra insisted that the 25 buildings in an area called Jobber’s Canyon would have to come down to make room for a downtown campus. Jobber’s Canyon was made up of red brick warehouses still standing from the 1870s, when Omaha was a merchandising “gateway to the west.” The buildings were on the National Register of Historic Places, which spurred opposition to their demise. Here’s the story of what really happened when the historic buildings were torn down, and why some people are still irate over their loss.

the encounter | november/december 2008 11


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Sorting it Out Architect George Haecker, an opponent of demolishing the buildings, says that ConAgra CEO Mike Harper pressured the city into destroying Jobber’s Canyon by threatening to leave the city if the buildings were not removed. Marty Shukert, then Omaha’s city planning director, says “ConAgra at no time said ‘either tear down Jobber’s Canyon or we’ll move out of Omaha.’” The confusion may have started when ConAgra released the results of a study by the University of Nebraska Bureau of Business Research that showed Omaha way down on the list of cities in terms of business climates, says Lynn Phares. She was then ConAgra’s vice president of public relations. The study showed Knoxville, Tenn., at the top of the list for favorable business climate. “That suddenly translated into ‘ConAgra threatening to move to Knoxville,’” she says. “It never happened that way, but it was a tough rumor to fight.” ConAgra’s need for expansion began with plans for a new frozen foods product development lab, which was then in St. Louis, Mo. “We were looking for the best place to build a complex that would include the new product development lab, a pilot manufacturing plant, corporate headquarters and the headquarters of several operating companies — a combination of employee groups that were in Omaha, St. Louis and Scottsdale,” Phares says. The study that ConAgra released caught the eye of Nebraska Gov. Kay Orr. She saw in it an urgent need to improve the business climate for all Nebraska companies. Nebraska was still reeling from the loss of Enron to Houston. The company (called Northern Natural Gas Co. until the name was changed in 1985) had its headquarters in Omaha for more than 50 years. “She (Orr) asked ConAgra for suggestions,” Phares says. “I think Nebraska in the mid-80s ranked near the bottom nationally in new business incorporations, jobs were decreasing and the population was declining.” lB 775 to the rescue The business incentive legislation passed by the Nebraska legislature, LB 775, was based partly on ConAgra’s suggestions. “Then we had to deal with a public perception that we were ‘blackmailing’ the state,” Phares remembers. “We were in fact working with state officials to create a positive business environment that was sorely needed at the time.” The Omaha Development Foundation, an affiliate of the Greater Omaha Chamber of Commerce, saw the ConAgra project as the anchor project needed to develop this portion of Omaha’s idle waterfront. “We were very much involved in the passing of LB 775,” says Rod Moseman of the Chamber. “A coalition called Jobs for Nebraska came together.”


departments The legislation, which was prompted by ConAgra’s needs, “ConAgra represented a major corporate vote of confidence turned out to benefit many Nebraska companies. People’s Natuin downtown Omaha,” Shukert says. “Having a multinational ral Gas, which moved from Council Bluffs back to Nebraska, was corporation in our central business district at that time was absoone of the first to be enticed by LB 775 incentives. lutely critical to maintaining downtown’s role in the community. Moseman points to an Omaha World-Herald study that shows “Many people in the city, especially the private sector, saw LB 775 has produced more job growth and more tax revenue for ConAgra as the last chance to implement the 1973 Back to the the state than the value of the credits earned by the companies Riverfront plan, fulfilling the dream of connecting downtown under this incentive program. The analysis shows Nebraska, once Omaha with the Missouri River.” near the bottom in job growth, has The $100 million investment was “ConAgra at no time said ‘either tear been competitive since the legislaprimarily from the private sector, down Jobber’s Canyon or we’ll move tion was passed. Shukert notes, along with redevelout of Omaha.’” LB 775 was replaced by the new opment bonds and city and county — Marty Shukert Nebraska Advantage program funds. “Public funding for the Conpackage on Jan. 1, 2006. The spirit of LB 775 remains, but the Agra redevelopment itself involved Tax Increment Funding (TIF) performance-based legislation was updated for a new environand environmental remediation. The bulk of public funds went ment. into acquiring and developing the Heartland of America Park.” The Chamber also assisted with land assembly, says MoseShukert says the 113 acres of redevelopment included much man. There were multiple owners within the area, so it was not more than the Jobber’s Canyon historic district. It included the an easy task. overall redevelopment area from the Missouri River to 10th Street, from Leavenworth to Farnam Streets. Putting it together “Much of the land was vacant, including the site of a former batConAgra had bought an alternate site in northwest Omaha tery plant and a former Burlington Northern railroad yard.” at Lonergan Lake with the thought to move there. But the City During a historic review for the Gene Leahy Mall (then Cenwanted to keep ConAgra downtown. tral Park Mall), the City agreed to make best efforts to save the

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Burlington building and the Greenhouse (formerly the McKesson Robbins building). Both buildings were part of the Mall’s acquisition. Shukert’s company (RDG Planning and Design) is located in the Greenhouse building.

elegance

Worth Saving? ConAgra’s Harper was quoted in the New York Times as calling the Jobber’s Canyon buildings those “big, ugly red brick buildings.” But Haecker says Omaha’s Jobber’s Canyon was the best and largest example of the nation’s jobber’s canyon districts. “Omaha’s was the most intact and had the best integrity and best quality architecture…it was like a giant Soho, and gave Omaha a unique and special identity.” “They were great buildings,” Shukert agrees. “Initially we thought ConAgra was receptive to the idea of renovating existing buildings. Finally, at the end of the day, ConAgra said that a downtown location required a cleared, campus-like environment.”

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But, he says, the buildings that were demolished may not have had a future. “I don’t think the pre-riverfront Omaha market was large enough to absorb the millions of square feet of building area in Jobber’s Canyon.”

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PrOUD to help The Omaha preservation group, Landmarks Inc., stepped forward to save Jobber’s Canyon. However, the group’s board differed on how much effort should be put into the project. Some Landmark members opted to form a separate group called People for Responsible Omaha Urban Development (PROUD). PROUD partnered with the National Trust for Historic Preservation, which provided legal counsel and litigation, to sue to try to stop the project or require a federal review, says Haecker who was on the Landmarks board at the time. “The lawsuit tried to establish there would be federal money involved in the Jobber’s Canyon demolition,” says Haecker. “The long and short of it is the argument did not prevail. They ruled against the Trust over a year later and the buildings were demolished.”


dOwntOwn art

art for the ages. the Omaha Mural Project is expected to last 30 years.

Capturing the Character of a City: The omaha mural Project by Heather Akerberg | photos by minorwhitestudios.com

W

hat do you get when a center for the arts, a philanthropic organization, and a world-renowned artist come together on a project? The result is a piece of public art that is both enormous in its physical size — measuring 22,000 square feet — as well as its historical significance. Upon completion, the mural at 13th and Webster streets will be rank among the largest in the country, and is expected to last up to 30 years. It also has already been selected for a best practices study, and other artistic accolades are looming. The Peter Kiewit Foundation initiated the collaborative project in 2006, wanting to further enrich the North Downtown area by gifting a large public mural to the City of Omaha. After the encounter | november/december 2008 15


conducting a search to find the best artists in the field, the Foundation and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts narrowed it down to approximately six qualified artists, then evaluated their styles at length. Known for her thoughtful and vibrant murals, as well as her advanced techniques, Meg Saligman, a Philadelphiabased mural artist, proved an easy choice. “They realized, hands down, that they really loved Meg’s work and were impressed by her level of excitement about the project,” said Holly McAdams, Community Arts Program Manger for the Bemis Center. Saligman conducted extensive research to learn about Omaha’s history and development. The mural, titled “Fertile Ground,” will be a depiction of the city’s story: Who we are as a community, how the city developed, and our future potential. In addition to featuring some historical images and iconic architectural ele-

ments, the mural will feature the likeness of nearly 50 real-life Omahans. The models were chosen from hundreds of photographs that were taken during five different photo shoots. “As I went through the photographs, I pulled ones that stood out—there was something aesthetically pleasing about them,” said Saligman. Unlike other paintings that express a historical timeline in a linear fashion, “Fertile Ground” expresses time through depth — the older images in the background and present day Omaha in the foreground. This positions the viewer as the future. Regardless of when one stands before the mural, be it next month or in 20 years, the viewer will always have the sense of being part of the community’s continuum. Vertically, the composition spans from the roots beneath the plains to the open sky above. “Meg was struck when she read that prairie grasses have roots

“As I went through the photographs, I pulled ones that stood out—there was something aesthetically pleasing about them.” — Meg Saligman

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departments deeper than the grass is tall—again she felt this was an expression of the area’s depth of character and community roots,” said McAdams. Saligman has called upon the community to assist in the creation of this 70-foot tall, 328-foot long painting, which has already taken more than 600 gallons of paint. Several Omahans have already pitched in, including students from a Bellevue mural class and other random, inspired citizens. “For people with no artistic experience, it’s just fun for them to have paint in their hands,” said Meg. The process Saligman uses is similar to a paint-by-numbers, which allows for less-skilled artists to help with the early stages. While the majority of the work is done directly on the wall, there are portions that are painted in the studio using a nonwoven acrylic material similar to a dryer sheet. Sections of the mural are “posterized” and projected onto these large sheets. The posterizing separates the image into sections of individual colors, which are numbered. Once the colors are painted in, the sheet is

attached to the wall using acrylic gel and then blended into the surrounding image. “Trying to clarify detail for that scale [is difficult]. The real trick, as far as detail goes, is more suggesting what’s there rather than trying to paint it,” said James Shuster, a painter on the project. The images in the mural are photo-realistic but painterly. When looking at the mural, it’s hard to believe such rich colors and intricate details are created on a cement wall. The viewer is struck by the quality of the work, like any masterpiece on canvas that hangs in Joslyn Museum. “We want it to look like a painting, not a billboard. It’s a balance,” said Saligman. “If you’re a painter, we want you to be able to enjoy the paint. If you’re a historian, we want you to enjoy the hidden references. There are different things for different people.” For more information on The Omaha Mural Project and the progress of “Fertile Ground,” visit www.omahamuralproject.org.

“For people with no artistic experience, it’s just fun for them to have paint in their hands.” — Meg Saligman

the encounter | november/december 2008 17


dOwntOwn stOry

it’s become a thanksgiving tradition for many to come out for the

lighting.

18 november/december 2008 | the encounter

holiday Lights Festival: a Closer Look at an Omaha tradition by Linda Persigehl

W

hat began in 2000 as a couple of one-day events to kick off the new millennium has grown into the Holiday Lights Festival, a seven-week-long celebration of community and family in Omaha. With an estimated 100,000 visitors from across the lower 48 states, the festival has become one of the premier seasonal events in the Midwest, garnering national attention. How does Omaha pull off such a huge event? With a lot of planning, coordinated effort and financial support. Omaha’s Thanksgiving night tree lighting ceremony kicks off the festival, and has become one of the premier lighting events in the country, said Marc Nichols, executive director of Downtown Omaha Inc. Foundation, which co-produces the event along with the Mayor’s office. This year, over a million lights from 8th Street to 19th Street and Howard Street to Abbott Drive will light up the Gene Leahy Mall and the downtown area. The newly completed Bob Kerrey Pedestrian Bridge spanning the Missouri River will also be lit this year. An estimated 30,000 people turn out for the tree lighting, sponsored by Mutual of Omaha Bank. “It’s become a Thanksgiving tradition for many to come out for the lighting,” said Nichols. “You see whole families – kids, parents, grandparents – come together…many plan their celebrations around the event.” So, just who puts up (and takes down) all those lights? Christmas Décor Co., which has


departments been the festival’s lighting contractor for take a Downtown Holiday Condo Tour, the past six years, begins installing the marvel at ice sculpture exhibits and simply lights in the hot days of summer. enjoy the lights and many fine entertain“In the early years, we’d start setting ment options in the Old Market. up in September. Now we start putting Virtually all of the free or discounted up lights the week of 4th of July,” Nichols said. The lights are left up until mid-January, then cut out of the trees between January and March 31, and the process starts all over again three months later. Why not re-use the lights, or leave up? They’ve tried. “We found only 20 to 30 percent could be re-used, and it was too labor-intensive.” And leaving them on the whole year, “We found the elements were too hard on the wiring and the lights too hard on the trees.” Copper and other parts of the old lights are recycled, he said. The family-focused activities of the seven-week festival are a huge reason for its appeal. Thanksgiving evening, downtown visitors can take in the Holiday Skating Extravaganza at the Omaha Civic Auditorium Arena, the Making Spirits Bright Holiday Concert at the Holland Performing Arts Center, a holiday production at the Rose Theater, and beginSomebody has to get up in these trees. ning last year, discounted movies at Film Streams. In mid-December, events are made possible by a long list of the Wells Fargo Family Festival offers the generous HLF sponsors, which makes for a community the opportunity to experience “who’s who” in the Omaha business commany of Omaha’s leading downtown atmunity: First Data Resources, First Nationtractions for free. Ollie the Trolley provides al Bank of Omaha, Mutual of Omaha Bank, free transpiration between many venues, HDR Engineering, OPPD, Peter Kiewit Sons’ including Durham Museum, Henry Doorly Inc., Union Pacific, among others. Zoo, Omaha Children’s Museum, The OrLast year, a charitable element was pheum, Joslyn Art Museum and others. added to the festival with the Shine a “Wells Fargo brings in their signature Light on Hunger Campaign, sponsored stagecoach for rides, and new this year, by ConAgra Foods. The campaign’s focus they’ll be bringing in horses, which will is on helping the Nebraska Food Bank add another element of excitement to the Network by collecting cash donations, day,” Nichols said. food items and personal goods to aid Every weekend and many weekdays Nebraskans in need. For two weeks in during the festival, visitors can enjoy the December, ConAgra sets up a temporary Sounds of the Season holiday concerts, skating rink on its campus, offering an-

other family-friendly activity while creating a fundraising tool. All of the proceeds from ice skating fees are donated to the Food Bank. “Helping the Food Bank, especially this time of year when they face real challenges meeting demand, goes back to our effort of being family-focused,” Nichols said. “And the generosity of people here is amazing.” The Holiday Lights Festival is capped off with a fabulous fireworks display over downtown at 7 p.m. on New Years Eve. The event is sponsored by First National Bank and produced by J&M Displays. Fireworks are choreographed to musical scores, and the event is aired on 101.9 FM. Why 7 p.m.? “Because midnight just isn’t practical for families,” Nichols said. Regardless of the weather, the event always draws a crowd in the tens of thousands. “Two years ago, we had to postpone the fireworks a day because of an ice storm,” Nichols said. “On New Years Day Night, we still drew 10,000. People just bundled up.” Plans to continue to grow the festival include expanding the lighting display from the riverfront to 20th and Leavenworth to Abbott Drive. “As the North Downtown area develops, we will expand into it more, but we’re limited by the fact there aren’t many trees there yet,” Nichols said. Adding more family-focused activities on weekdays is another goal. “We’re always looking for new opportunities to add events every year, and we’re certainly making strides to do that,” he said. “From an economic standpoint…the more events, the more of a destination it is, the more revenue for downtown businesses and hotels… “But the real payoff is in looking out into the crowds and seeing the delight in the faces of families.” the encounter | november/december 2008 19


dOwntOwn Feature

“ T ” From

unique to

offbeat to... downright quirky!

holiday Gifts on the Beaten Path by Sandy Lemke | photography by minorwhitestudios.com

he brick-lined beaten streets of the Old Market are the perfect place to search for holiday gifts. From unique to offbeat to…downright quirky!

UniQUe Retro Rocket has tie-dyed onesies for your favorite hippie baby. At $5.99, you can stock up for 2009 shower gifts at the same time. DSR Powersports Pro has all manner of motorcycle helmets in all the new styles. Helmets range from $99.99 to $679.99. Pricey, you say? What’s a melon worth?

OFFBeat Nutcrackers make a nice gift. Where other than Tannenbaum would you find a selection of MLB nutcrackers? Shown, Chicago Cubs. Also available: Atlanta Braves, Dodgers and the Boston Red Sox. For the person who has everything: action figures of The Lunch Lady, Shakespeare or Obsessive Compulsive Guy. Other characters available. ($8.99 - $9.99). At City Limits.

20 november/december 2008 | the encounter


departments

MASSAGE in the Old Market

Lisa Christensen LMT 402.850.6651 www.oldmarketmassage.com

relaxation, deep tissue, ashiatsu,trigger point spa therapies

Tara Thompson LMT 402.706.7398 www.downtownomahamassage.com

relaxation, deep tissue, myofacial release, hot stone, cupping

Joyce Linbrunner LMT 402.740.0366 www.divinemothermassage.com

relaxation, deep tissue, ayurvedic therapies, reiki QUirKY Fairmont Antiques is the quintessential quirky Old Market stop for any taste. Every interest is reflected in its wares. Jewelry? Check. Wine glasses? Check. Old Husker memorabilia? Check. Classic toys? Check. If nothing else, go to see the vintage clothing selection. The tags have comments like, LOL! and WOW! When you see the clothes, you’ll understand. Other StOreS tO CheCK Visit Ashley’s Collectables for Swarkovski, Lladro, Giuseppe Armani and every giftable you can imagine. Free shipping for every purchase over $59. Alice Kim’s Trocadero Shop will have you saying “oh that’s so cute” from the moment you enter. Kim has surprising items for friends, family, even the chic children in your life. Cross the street to Lotus for natural fiber clothing. A little OFF the beaten path, remember the Hot Shops for a truly unique piece of local craft. Check www.hotshops.com for their schedule of open houses where you can visit all the galleries at once.

OMaha Healing Arts Center 1216 Howard St. Old Market www.omahahealingarts.com

Nebraska’s raska’s Fin Finest Italian Restaurant Pasta • Chicken • Veal • Seafood Full Bar • Great Wine List

Vincenzo’s Italian Ristorante

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1913 FARNAM ST • 342-8766 12033 BLONDO ST • 493-8001 the encounter | november/december 2008 21


COndO LiFe

Loft Gallery-style Condo

although Gavin and Kathy Nevins the columns were by Tina King | photography by minorwhitestudios.com rough, here are people who long for a weekend home in the country. The Nevins longed for a weekend home in the city. For more than a decade the couple rented places downtown, making the Old stained, Market their weekend retreat from weekday life in small-town Mapleton, Iowa. They loved restaurants and the entertainment here, but they never found an apartment or condoand out of the minium that met all their needs. an old industrial warehouse. scale, they So“This,theyforbought us, was the perfect location,” says Gavin Nevins, of the warehouse-turned-condos at 1101 Jackson Street. became The Nevins bought the building – originally a Minneapolis Moline tractor warehouse the Mercer family in 2005. Actually, they just bought the top four of its five floors. Three objects of from of those floors had been vacant for more than 30 years. Now Gavin Nevins, a retired lawyer, is a residential developer. He and his wife, Kathy, chose beauty in- the north side of the second floor for their own space, looking out at treetop level and enjoying a view of the comings and goings at Upstream Brewing Company and the Saturday farmers market. side the To get that view, the couple hired contractors to change the building’s tiny windows to the that allow the space to fill with natural light. Crews sandblasted exresidence. posednew,bricklargewallspanes and concrete columns to reveal more of the 1920s architecture. Architect

22 november/december 2008 | the encounter

T

Paul Nelson from Bahr Vermeer Haecker Architects provided an updated design. “Although the columns were rough, stained, and out of scale, they became objects of beauty inside the residence,” Nelson says. “Everything is detailed around the columns, and we were careful to leave them visually separated from the new walls.” “The rough surfaces of the old building now resonate with the new and sophisticated materials,” he says.


departments

The Nevins are pleased with the results, which they’ve enjoyed for a little more than a year now. “I wanted it to be like a true New York loft,” Kathy says. The design includes entry hall walls by local metal artist Paul Konchagulian. Dark grey steel rectangles in alternating patterns climb the walls, contrasting against the lighter maple flooring that runs throughout the rest of the main living area. With the exception of the eye-catching red-painted powder room, the rest of the walls are either white or exposed brick. The neutral colors allow the Nevins’ local art collection to shine. The collection is like a tribute to the community around them. “We actually know all these people,” Gavin says of the artists. “I won’t buy anything unless I really love it,” Kathy adds. A print of a giant salmon in roses by Vera Mercer graces the hallway, and a black and white “baby dango” by Jun Kaneko livens up the office area overlooking the street. The painting by Steve Joy is significant

for several reasons. Foremost, the couple loves his work. Also, he lives in the building. Lastly, the painting’s placement at eye level on a kitchen wall highlights the lack of upper kitchen cabinets. The kitchen is designed so well, it doesn’t need cabinets above. A long, Italian-crafted center island and a bank of lower cabinets made with pullout drawers provide plenty of room to organize. All other kitchen storage is taken care of by the large but hidden built-in pantry accessed by a sliding frosted glass door. The floor-to-ceiling wooden shelves are stocked full of grocery and serving items. The pantry also houses a wine chiller that guests need never see. The Nevins’ guests are easily accommodated in the condo’s open, 2,800-squarefoot layout. Oversized, cushioned black stools flank the island, which is topped with a black absolute granite countertop that’s been heated and fire-brushed. The process gives the granite a non-glossy surface, making it fingerprint-resistant and easy maintenance. While dining on weekends, guests can enjoy Old Market people watching and

keep up on the latest wedding and high school styles. The spot across the street near Second Chance Antiques is a popular portrait-taking spot for brides-to-be and high school seniors. On cool nights, a “ribbon of fire” ventless fireplace warms the loft’s living room area. Steps away, behind a partial interior wall, the couple’s master and only bedroom looks out toward the ConAgra campus. Remote-controlled blinds release to filter out too-early morning sunlight. Once they do rise to greet the day, the couple enjoys a special master bath design that includes a sunken tub, a raised shower and teak and limestone flooring. The couple can grab dinner and a good book without even leaving the building. The ground-level floor is home to the Passport Restaurant and Jackson Street Booksellers  space that is still owned by the Mercers. For the Nevins, it isn’t exactly as if they traded small town life for the big city. “I think the Old Market area is just like a small town – everyone knows each other,” Kathy says. “I don’t think I’d want to live anywhere else in Omaha.” the encounter | november/december 2008 23


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Merchants Attractions Old MArket / dOwntOwn / riverfrOnt

Antiques

Antiques & Fine Art...(16th St). ......... 341.9942 Fairmont Antique Mall...H4 .............. 345.1778 Joe’s Collectibles...H5 ..................... 612.1543 Retro Recycle...E5 ............................ 341.1969 Second Chance...G5 ........................ 346.4930

Book stores

Jackson Street Booksellers...H5 .....341.2664 New Realities Books & Gifts...E7 ..... 342.1863 Soul Desires Books & Coffee...G7 ...898.7600

Clothing & ACCessories

Lotus ...F4 .........................................346.8080 Namaste...E7 .................................... 341.7069 Nebraska Clothing Co...E8............... 346.6114 Nouvelle Eve...E6 .............................. 345.4811 Overland Outfitters...E8 ................... 345.2900 Paper Dolls...E7 (Passageway) ........ 763.8812 Retro Recycle ...E5 ........................... 341.1969 The Souq Ltd...E7 ............................. 342.2972 Trocadéro...E4 ..................................934.8389

Downtown hotels

Courtyard by Marriott...(10th & Douglas) ....... 346.2200 DoubleTree Hotel...(16th & Dodge)...346.7600 Embassy Suites Hotel...F9 ...............346.9000 Hilton Convention Center Hotel .......998.3400 Hilton Garden Inn...(10th & Dodge) .. 341.4400 Redick Plaza Hotel...(15th & Harney) .............. 342.1500 Magnolia Hotel...(16th & Howard) ... 342.2222

home Furnishings

Crawdad’s...E5 ................................. 341.3930 Kraft DC ...(16th & Leavenworth)......342.2790 Niche ...F6 ......................................... 344.4399 Room...E7 ......................................... 342.7666 Zongkers Custom Woods ................ 344.7784

gAlleries

1301 Gallery...(13th & Nicholas) .......342.6452 Artists’ Cooperative Gallery...D7 ..... 342.9617 Bella’s Place Gallery...E4 ................. 342.4242 Bemis Ctr. for Contemporary Arts...K4 .......... 341.7130 Sirens at the Loft...F6 .......................933.3333 Everything Them...F6 ....................... 341.1156 Garden Of The Zodiac...E7 .............. 341.1877 Hot Shops...13th & Nicholas ............342.6452 Images of Nature...D5 ......................341.8460 Jackson Artworks...G6 ..................... 341.1832 Nebraska Showcase Gallery...A8 .... 595.2122 Omaha ClayWorks...H5 ....................346.0560 Passageway Gallery...E7 .................. 341.1910 White Crane Gallery...E7 .................. 345.1066

heAlth serviCes

Acupuncture Libba Harmon, LAc .......................... 214.6265 Massage Therapy Sandy Aquila LMT...E3 .....................345.5078 Lisa Christensen LMT...E3 ............... 850.6651 Barb Rost LMT (19th & Douglas)...... 345.7500 Medical Dr. John Bartholet, DC...E3 .............. 342.2216 Downtown Chiropractic (2111 Douglas) ......... 345.7500 Derek Fender, DDS...D4 ...................342.3901

Dr. Mark Goodman, MD...L1 ............280.5500 Dr. Stephen Peterson MD...L1..........280.5500 Dr. James Polerecky DDS (19th & Farnam) .... 341.7576 Dr. Ritch Miller DC (2111 Douglas) ... 345.7500 Heartland Pathology (310 S. 16th) ... 346.0195 Physical Therapy East & West Physical Therapy...E3 ..345.5078 Psychotherapy, EMDR, Hypnotherapy Jannette Davis, MS, CST .................341.2230 Cynthia Duggin, MSW, LCSW ..........345.5078 Jeff Stormberg, PhD (Psychotherapist)......... 393.0642 Tim Swisher, MHR, LMHP, LADC ....341.2230 Pharmacy Depot Drug (1416 Dodge) ................. 544.DRUG

museums & AttrACtions

Omaha Children’s Museum...(500 S. 20th) .......... 342.6164 The Durham...J9 ...............................444.5071 InPlay...(16th & Cuming) ...................991.7400 Joslyn Art Museum...(24th & Dodge) .............. 342.3300 Lauritzen Gardens...(100 Bancroft)..346.4002 Henry Doorly Zoo...(3701 So 10th St) ............. 733.8401 Qwest Center Omaha (10th & Capitol)............ 341.1500

olD mArket ProPerties

Brandeis Building .............................934.1224 Farnam 1600 Building ......................342.1616 Grubb/Ellis Pacific Realty ................345.5866 The Lofts at Soma...K5..................... 895.7662 Old Market Lofts...J7 ........................345.8000 Riverfront Place ................................397.4837 Shamrock Development/Paxton Building ...... 934.7711 Skinner Macaroni Apartments...H1 .346.2346 The Greenhouse Apts...A9 ...............342.3100 TipTop Building...(16th & Cuming)....345.8000

PuBs & tAverns

Bar 415...E3 .......................................346.7455 Barry O’s ...E8 ..................................341.8032 Billy Frogg’s Grille & Bar...E5 ...........341.4427 Dubliner Pub...D4 .............................342.5887 J.D. Tucker’s Bar...E8 .......................934.5190 Julio’s...F2 .........................................345.6921 La Buvette Wine & Grocery...F7.......344.8627 M’s Pub...E6 ......................................342.2550 Mr. Toad’s...E8 ..................................345.4488 Myth Lounge...F6..............................884.6985 Nomad Lounge...(J8) ........................884-1231 O’Connor’s Irish Pub...F3 .................934.9790 Old Market Tavern...F8 .....................341.0191 The Stadium Club Sports Bar & Grill...E8....... 359.1290 T Henery’s Pub...C6 .........................345.3651 The Underground...F7 ......................341.3547 Upstream Brewing Co...G6 .............344.0200 Urban Wine Company...J7 ...............934.0005 Waters Edge Lounge @ Embassy Suites...F9 ..... 346.9000

restAurAnts

Farrells Bar...(902 Dodge) ................884.9947 Ahmad’s...E8.....................................341.9616

the encounter | november/december 2008 25


Merchants Attractions Old MArket / dOwntOwn / riverfrOnt

Cornerstone

Mansion Inn

Billy Frogg’s Grille & Bar...E5 ...........341.4427 Delice European Bakery...E4 ...........342.2276 Falling Water Grille @ Embassy Suites...F9 ........ 346.9000 Famous Dave’s...D6 .........................614.9333 Flatiron Café...(17th & Howard) ........344.3040 House of Lee...F4 .............................991.9330 Indian Oven...E7 ...............................342.4856 Joe Banana’s ....................................346.7227 Julio’s...F3 .........................................345.6921 La Buvette Wine & Grocery...F7.......344.8627 Liberty Tavern (10th & Davenport) ...998.4321 Little King...H21 ................................344.2264 Lucky’s 10-0-One (10th & Pacific) ...991.1001 M’s Pub...E6 ......................................342.2550 Matsu Sushi...B8 ..............................346.3988 Michael’s at the Market...C6 ............346.1205 Nicola’s...G3 .....................................345.8466 O Dining...A8..................................... 502.7888 Old Chicago...D6 ..............................341.1616 Omaha Prime...E7.............................341.7040 Passport Restaurant...H6 ................344.3200 Rick’s Cafe Boatyard........................345.4545 Sam & Louie’s Pizza...H6 .................884.5757 Spaghetti Works...F6 ........................422.0770 Stokes Bar & Grill...(E5) ................... 408-9000 Subway...E4 ......................................341.8814 Sullivan’s Steakhouse (222 S. 15th St.) .......... 342.4432 The Diner...D5 ...................................341.9870 The French Café...F7 ........................341.3547 The Paxton Chop House...B1 ..........341.1222 Trini’s...E7..........................................346.8400 Twisted Fork...E7 ..............................932.9600 Upstream Brewing Co....G6 .............344.0200 V. Mertz...E7......................................345.8980 Vincenzo’s Ristorante...D4 ...............342.4010 Vivace...E6 ........................................342.2050 Zio’s Pizzeria...F4 .............................344.2222

sPeCiAlty FooDs & CoFFee

Omaha’s only historic inn & event facility. Business travelers welcome. Corporate rates available.

Fireplaces • Clawfoot tubs King and queen beds • Private baths • Satellite TV Free Wi Fi • Gourmet weekend breakfast When you need to get away without going away, call The Cornerstone Mansion.

140 N. 39th Street, Omaha

402-558-7600

www.CornerstoneMansion.com 26 november/december 2008 | the encounter

13th Street Coffee C0....G3 ..............345.2883 Aromas...I8........................................614.7009 Cubby’s Old Market Grocery...H3 ...341.2900 Delice European Bakery...E4 ...........342.2276 Hollywood Candy...F3 ......................884.7688 La Buvette Wine & Grocery...F7.......344.8627 Maggie Moo’s Ice Cream...H21 .......933.5280 MJ Java...B3 & F7 .............................342.5282 Old Market Candy Shop...F8 ...........344.8846 Patrick’s Market...(E1).......................884-1600 Soul Desires Books & Coffee...G7 ...898.7600 Ted & Wally’s Ice Cream...G5 ........... 341.5827

sPeCiAlty shoPs

Anarchy Comics & Games...E4 ........493.4955 Ashley Collectibles...E3....................934.3100 Big Brain Productions...H5 ..............342.2885 Chameleon...E7 ................................342.4444 Cibola of Omaha...F7 (509 S 11th) ...342.1200 City Limits...E3..................................345.3570 Cornerstone Gem & Bead Co....G3 . 346.4367 Drastic Plastic...F4 ........................... 346.8843 DSR Power Sports...E3 ....................991.1383 Etc. Gifts...F7 ....................................342.2846 Garden Flowers...F7 ......................... 614.5661 Garden Of The Zodiac...E7 .............. 341.1877 Goldsmith Silversmith...F7 ...............342.1737

Homer’s Records...E5 ......................346.0264 Iron Decor & More...G5 ....................346.6123 Jay Welter Cigars...(18th & Jackson)345.1965 Kessler’s...H5 (1125 Jackson) ..........715.5888 Mairzy Doatz...F6.............................. 934.4815 Namaste...E7 .................................... 341.7069 New Realities Books & Gifts...E7 ..... 342.1863 Niche...F6 .......................................... 344.4399 Old Market Habitat Floral...E6 ......... 342.0044 Old Market Sundries...F8 ................. 345.8198 OM Gifts & Imports...E3 ................... 345.5078 Overland Outfitters...F8 ................... 345.2972 Perspective Jewelry...D4.................. 934.4416 Red Square...E7................................ 342.8878 SG Roi Tobacconist...F7 .................. 341.9264 Souq Ltd...E7 .................................... 342.2972 Tannenbaum Christmas Shop...F8 .. 345.9627 The Toy Chest...E7 (Passageway).... 341.0774 Trocadéro...E4 ................................. 934-8389

serviCes

At the Loft Spa...F6...........................505.4100 Michael Boyle, Attorney...E7 ............359.1000 Centris Federal Credit Union...C3 ...334.2000 Commercial Optical...G3 .................. 344.0219 Dietz United Methodist Church ....... 346.9115 Don Fiedler Law Offices...F7 ........... 346.6263 First National Bank...(F5) ..................885-2574 Fringes Salon & Spa...G8 ................. 345.0404 Greater Omaha Chamber of Commerce...D2 346.5000 Omaha Convention & Visitors Bureau...B8 .... 444.4660 Hair Market Salon...E7 ..................... 345.3692 J P Cooke Rubber Stamps...F2 ....... 342.7175 Klein Law Offices...H3 ...................... 391.1871 Magical Journeys Carriage Service...E7 ........ 453.6745 Movers Not Shakers ......................... 614.9770 Old Market Car Wash...J2 ................ 393.2819 Old Market Encounter ......................884.2000 Old Market Mini Storage .................. 342.0022 Old Market Web Site .....www.oldmarket.com Omaha Healing Arts Center...E4 ......345.5078 Omaha Public Library...(15th & Farnam) ......... 444.4800 Omaha Yoga School...E7 .................346.7813 Pinnacle Bank...(10th & Douglas) ..... 346.9180 Security National Bank...(11th & Howard) .......... 344.7300 Sirens...F6 ......................................... 933.9333 Stinson, Morrison, Hecker LLP...C3 342.1700 Urbane Salon & Spa...B8 .................934.2909 Susie’s Baskets...D4......................... 341.4650 Sutera Law Offices...E6.................... 342.3100 Visions Framing Studio...K4 .............342.0020

theAtres & entertAinment

Blue Barn Theater...G6 ..................... 345.1576 FilmStreams...(14th & Webster) ........ 933-0259 Holland Performing Arts Center...(12th & Douglas) .............................................345.0606 Omaha Symphony...(16th & Howard).............. 342.3836 Opera Omaha...(17th & Farnam)....... 346.4398 Orpheum Theater...(16th & Farnam).345.0606 The Rose...(20th & Farnam) .............. 345.4849


Downtown and Council Bluffs OngOing eVentS:

On Sale now: hSm tickets at the rose theater. June

2009, The Rose Theater will debut Disney’s High School Musical. Tickets for this very popular show are on sale now for Rose Theater members only, and going fast! Single ticket sales for HSM to non-members will begin in November. Visit www.rosetheater.org for more information.

through 11/17: Classical Kids nominations. Classical

90.7 KVNO recognizes outstanding young musicians by designating them Classical Kids. There have been 112 Classical Kids since the program’s inception in 1999. Winners have come from throughout the KVNO listening area and have included students from Lincoln, Columbus, Elkhorn, Blair, Gretna, Omaha, and Council Bluff and Crescent, IA. Nomination forms are available at www.kvno.org and will be taken through 11/17, 2008. For more information, call Anne Hellbusch at 559-5866.

through 11/23: Chrysanthemum

Fall Show.

The indoor floral display hall is festooned in autumn colors during this Japanese-inspired show, featuring unique chrysanthemums, Japanese maples and water features, bamboo, Zen garden influences and multi-dimensional tiered displays. Cost is $7 for adults, $5 for children 6-12. Lauritzen Gardens – Omaha’s Botanical Center, 100 Bancroft Street. Visit www.lauritzengardens. org, or call 346-4002 for more information.

through 12/28: the many Faces of David Diaz at Joslyn art museum.

Caldecott Award-winning illustrator David Diaz uses bold, dynamic styles to create rich and striking illustrations for expressive children’s books. Inspired by the innovation of Viennese Secessionists such as Gustave Klimt and Egon Schiele, Diaz aims to break away from any constriction and develop his own way of telling stories through art. The exhibition includes 54 original artworks

from 15 children’s and young adult books including Smoky Night, Wilma Unlimited: How Wilma Rudolph Became the World’s Fastest Woman, Going Home, December and The Pot That Juan Built. This exhibition was organized by the National Center for Children’s Illustrated Literature (Abilene, TX). Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge St. Visit www.joslyn.orgor call 3423300 for more information.

through 1/4/09: Omaha Children’s museum DinO!saurs: a Prehistoric DinO!saurs expedition.

brings a whole new herd of creatures sure to entertain and educate young and old alike. This exhibit features 13 spectacular robotic dinosaurs, including a massive, 22-footlong Tyrannosaurus rex - plus other favorites including Triceratops and Stegosaurus. There’s even a dinosaur nest with eggs and hatchlings. Little paleontologists will love the Dinosaur Dig where they can uncover fossils, and Paleo Camp, where a number of educational activities will be available. Kids can produce images of their favorite dinosaurs at the rub station and control the movements of a robotic Duckbill Dinosaur with a hands-on model. Daily Dino Activities with the museum’s education staff will teach kids all they ever wanted to know about these fascinating reptiles. Omaha Children’s Museum, 500 S. 20th Street. Call 402-930-2352 or visit www.ocm.org for more information.

through 1/4/09: eyewitness: american Originals from the national archives. Chronicles some of the most dramatic moments in history: the storming of Bastille in Paris, the explosion of the Hindenburg, and assassination of President Kennedy. Cost is $7 adults, $6 age 62+, $5 ages 3-12, free 2 and under. Durham Museum, 801 S. 10th St., Omaha. Visit www.durhammuseum. org or call 444-5071 for more information.

November/December Calendar of Events

through 1/11/09: Fantasy Uncoiled: Prints by CoBra artists at Joslyn art museum. This print gallery

exhibition celebrates three important suites of lithographs acquired by Joslyn in 2007. CoBrA, an acronym for the members’ cities of origin  Copenhagen, Brussels, and Amsterdam — is one of the great abstract expressionistic movements of the 20th century. Though their formal relationship lasted a mere three years, artists such as Eugene Brands, Mogens Balle, and Anton Rooskens forged life-long commitments to the primal and fantastic. Initially resistant to printmaking, an introduction to lithography allowed them to produce multiples while preserving their hallmark spontaneity. The resulting prints pulled from images painted by the artists directly on lithographic stones are vividly colored and alive with childlike energy. Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge St. Visit www.joslyn.org or call 3423300 for more information.

through 1/18/09: Diego rivera exhibit at Joslyn art museum. Drawn from

the collection of the Museum of Art of the State of Veracruz in Orizaba, Mexico, the approximately 35 works in this exhibition survey the entire career of Diego Rivera, including his earliest work in Mexico and his period of study in Paris, where his paintings took on the influence of Impressionism, and later, as a colleague of Picasso, Cubism. The exhibition culminates with examples of Rivera’s monumental paintings of Mexican rural subjects, for which he is most well known. A student of the Academy of San

Carlos in Mexico City, Rivera was nurtured in the classical tradition but soon became part of the international avant-garde movement that gathered in Paris in the first two decades of the 1900s. Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge St. Visit www.joslyn. org or call 342-3300 for more information. November eveNts

11/1-12/11: Film Streams repertory Series – great Directors. Film Streams will

celebrate the work of director Stanley Kubrick, beginning with a 40th Anniversary presentation of 2001: A Space Odyssey. Ruth Sokolof Theater,

1340 Webster St. Call 933-0259 or visit www.filmstreams.org for more information.

11/2: Opera Omaha – Omaha Symphony Choral Collaborative. Opera Omaha

joins the Omaha Symphony in a collaborative venture with seven area high school choirs, members of the Opera Omaha Chorus, guest soloists of Opera Omaha, Omaha Symphony Resident Conductor Ernest Richardson, and the musicians of the Omaha Symphony for a performance at the Holland Performing Arts Center. In the weeks prior to the performances, students are

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through 1/11/09: the mastercraftsmen of Palekh miniatures at Joslyn art museum. The first American

exhibition to examine the tradition of hand-painted, lacquered, papier-mâché boxes from the Russian village of Palekh (pronounced poleck). The village, about 125 miles northeast of Moscow, was known before the Russian Revolution as a center for icon painting, but after the advent of official atheism, the craftsman moved away from religious images to a rich and acceptable genre of tourist boxes decorated with Russian folk tales, among other subjects. The exhibition examines the entire range of Palekh artistic production, in sizes ranging from a 1 x1 ½- inch box for beads to a 23 x 17-inch jewelry box decorated to honor Stalin. The display also includes icons, other boxes, and decorative objects such as Easter Eggs. Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge St. Visit www.joslyn. org or call 342-3300 for more information.

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Downtown and Council Bluffs

Venues

Ameristar Casino

Images of Nature

2200 River Road, Council Bluffs, Iowa. (712) 328-8888, Ameristar.com

1115 Harney St. (402) 341-8460, mangelsen.com

Artists’ Cooperative Gallery 405 S. 11th Street, Old Market, (402) 342-9617, www.artistco-opgallery.com. Regular hours & admission: Wed&Thur, 11am-5pm; Fri&Sat, 11am10pm, Sun, noon-5pm, free.

Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts & bemisUNDERGROUND 724 S. 12th St., (402) 341-7130, bemiscenter.org. Regular hours & admission: Tue-Sat, 11am-5pm, free.

Blue Barn Theatre 614 S. 11th St., (402) 345-1576, www.bluebarn.org

Civic Auditorium & Music Hall 18th & Capitol streets, (402) 422-1212

John Beasley Theater & Workshop 3010 Q St. (402) 444-3446. JohnBeasleyTheater.org

Joslyn Art Museum 2200 Dodge Street, (402) 342-3300, joslyn.org. Tues-Sat/10am-4pm; Sun/noon-4pm. $7 adults; $5 seniors & college students; $4 ages 5-17; free age 4 and younger; free to general public Sat/10am-noon.

Lewis & Clark Landing/Riverfront 515 N. Riverfront Dr. on the banks of the Missouri River between the new Qwest Arena and the river.

Mid-America Center One Arena Way, Council Bluffs, Iowa, (712) 323-0536.

Millennium Theatre

10th & Farnam Streets

Nebraska Showcase Gallery, Nebraska Council for the Arts, Burlington Building, 1004 Farnam St., (402) 595-2122, midamericacenter.com.

The Durham Museum

Old Market

801 S. 10th St., (402) 444-5071, durhammuseum.org. Regular hours & admission: Tues-Sat, 10am-5pm; Sun 1-5pm. $6 adults, $5 seniors, $4 ages 3-12, free 2 & under.

Area of 10th to 13th streets, and Leavenworth to Harney streets.

ConAgra Foods Campus

El Museo Latino 4701 S 25th St., (402) 731-1137. www.elmuseolatino.org. Regular hours & admission: Mon, Wed&Fri/10am-5pm; Tues/1-7pm; Thurs/1-5pm; Sat/10am-2pm. $5 adults; $3.50 students & seniors; $4 college students.

General Crook House

Omaha Children’s Museum 500 S. 20th St., (402) 342-6164, www.ocm.org. Regular hours & admission: Tues, Wed, Fri&Sat, 10am5pm; Thurs, 10am-8pm; Sun, 1-5pm. $5.50 adults & ages 2-15; $4.50, seniors 60+ & children under 2.

Opera Omaha

30th and Fort streets, (402) 455-9990.

1625 Farnam, (402) 346-4398, ext. 111. www.operaomaha.org

Harrah’s Casino

Orpheum Theater

2701 23rd Ave, Council Bluffs, Iowa. (712) 323-2500, harrahs.com

16th & Harney streets. Ticket box used only for day-of or night-of performance only. See Ticket Omaha for pre-event ticket information.

Henry Doorly Zoo 3701 S 10th St., (402) 733-8401

Hitchcock Nature Center Honey Creek, Iowa, I-29 exit #61A, (712) 545-3283

Holland Performing Arts Center 13th & Douglas Streets, ground level, TicketOmaha.org, (402) 345-0606, or (402) 341-1811 (TTY).

Horseshoe Casino 2701 23rd Ave., (712) 323-2500, horseshoe.com

Hot Shops Art Gallery 1301 Nicholas St., (402) 342-6452, hotshopsartcenter.com

28 november/december 2008 | the encounter

Qwest Center Omaha 455 N. 10th St., (402) 422-1212, qwestcenteromaha.com.

Rose Theater 2201 Farnam Street, (402) 345-4849, rosetheater.org Ticketmaster 402-422-1212 (402-475-1212) or online at ticketmaster.com

Rosenblatt Stadium 1202 Bert Murphy Ave., 738-5100.

Ticket Omaha 13th & Douglas Streets inside the Holland Performing Arts Center, (402) 345-0606, TicketOmaha.org

Sponsored by Pinnacle Bank taught the fundamentals of proper vocal technique by Opera Omaha Resident Music Director J. Gawf and discuss careers in the arts, which culminates with experiencing an unparalleled live performance of a large symphonic choral work. Admission is $10. 7:30 p.m. at the Holland Performing Arts Center, 13th & Douglas streets. Contact Tara Cowherd at 346-4398 x217 or tcowherd@ operahomaha.org for more information.

11/6-11/9: autumn Festival, an arts & Crafts affair.

Hundreds of the Nation’s finest artists and craftspeople from all over the country display and sell their handcrafted wares. Voted one of the top 100 shows in the country by Sunshine Artist Magazine! Thurs. and Fri. 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.7 p.m. and Sun. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Cost: $7 adults, $6 seniors, children under 10 are free. Quest Center Omaha, 455 N. 10th St. Visit www.hpifestivals. com or call 331-2889 for more information.

11/7: Opera Omaha guild’s Cotillion graduation. The

six Cotillion classes culminate together in an elegant and fun evening. Students put their new skills into practice and enjoy dinner and dancing. Included in class tuition (additional cost for parents is $60.00 per parent.) 6 p.m. at Qwest Center Omaha, 415 N. 10th St. Contact Tom Chandler, Director of Patron Programs at 402-346-4398 x 111 or tchandler@operahomaha.org.

11/7: Salvation army Bell ringer Campaign Kickoff.

The Salvation Army’s annual fundraiser kicks off in Omaha! This year, bring your family and friends to help ring bells! Bell ringers from schools, business groups & service clubs are also encouraged. Without your leadership in volunteering your time, our efforts would be severely curtailed! To learn details or sign up online, visit www.ringomaha.org, or call 898-6000.

11/7-11/9: the rat PaCK – live at the Sands. The

Rat Pack - Live at the Sands is the hottest and coolest party in town! You won’t find anything like it anywhere else. It’s the Rat Pack - and it’s live! Ring-a-ding-ding! Tickets start at $28. Orpheum Theatre, 409 S. 16th St. Call 345-0606 for performance times and tickets, or visit www. omahaperformingarts.org for more info.

11/7-11/23: Chanticleer presents arsenic and Old lace. Chanticleer Community

Theater will present the classic murder comedy play Arsenic and Old Lace. 830 Franklin Ave., Council Bluffs. Tickets and more information available at 712-323-9955 or www. chanticleertheater.com

11/8: met Opera live at Film Streams. Live, high-

def broadcast of Dr. Atomic, from the Metropolitan Opera in NYC. Ruth Sokolof Theater, 1340 Webster St. Call 933-0259 or visit www. filmstreams.org for more info.

11/8- 11/9: Fall home Show & green expo. Annual expo

of new home manufacturers, contractors, remodeling ideas, green products, windows, cookware, sunrooms, carpeting and furniture and more! Sat. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Sun. 11 a.m.5 p.m. Mid-America Center, exit 52 on I-29, Council Bluffs, IA. Call 712-323-0551 or visit www.jrexpos.com for more information.

11/8:

mariachi

Band

Concert at Joslyn. Latino Productions & Management presents a concert by Mariachi Luna Y Sol, voted the premier mariachi in the Midwest. The free concert is 10 a.m. -12 p.m. at Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge St. Visit www.joslyn. org or call 342-3300 for more information. 11/9: Kristallnacht Commemoration.

A Community-wide Commemoration and Multimedia presentation of 70 years since Kristallnacht, and a musical expression by Omaha professional musicians. Presented by the Institute for Holocaust Education. 5 p.m. at Witherspoon Concert Hall, Joslyn Museum, 2200 Dodge St. Visit www.joslyn.org or call 342-3300 for more information.

11/9: Omaha: Portraits of Survival. Exhibition by

Photographer David Radler will be displayed in the Joslyn Fountain Court, Joslyn Museum, 2200 Dodge St. This exhibit will then be displayed at the Jewish Community Center, 333 S. 132nd Street, through December 15, 2009. Visit www.joslyn.org or call 342-3300 for more information.

11/13: heartland Family Service Salute to Families awards. Mid-America Center,

Council Bluffs. $25 adults, $10 children. Call (402) 5527426 for more information.

11/13-11/22: iWCC Presents “noises Off”. An

Iowa Western Community College Theatre Department Production of “Noises Off” will run on the Mainstage Theatre. Iowa Western Campus, Council Bluffs, IA. For tickets and details, visit www.iwcc.edu.

11/15: the 5 Browns at the holland. Dubbed the “Fab

Five” by People Magazine, this sibling quintet has become the classical equivalent of a hot new rock band, cultivating wider and younger audiences with their fresh and energetic approach to masterpieces from greats like Rachmaninoff, Brahms and Gershwin. Tickets start at $19. 8 p.m. at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas Street.


Call 345-0606 for performance times and tickets. Visit www. omahaperformingarts. org for more info.

11/14-11/16: Council Bluffs antique Spectacular.

Melting Pot Productions will present the Council Bluffs Antique Spectacular, one of the Midlands’ premier antique shows. Admission is $6 for adults, and covers the threeday event. Friday 5 p.m.-9 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sunday 11 a.m.-4 p.m. MidAmerica Center, One Arena Way off I-80 and I-29, Council Bluffs. For more information, visitwww.antiquespectacular. com

11/16: hawkWatch eagle migration. Join us for the

annual Eagle Migration event and keep your eyes on the skies for migrating raptors. Hitchcock Nature Center has been recognized as one of the top 5 hawkwatches in the world for viewing migrating bald eagles, and November is the ideal time to view these majestic animals on their journey south. The annual event will also include live raptor demonstrations by Raptor Recovery Nebraska, activities for children, hikes in the Loess Hills and refreshments. Cost: $3.00 per person, children 5 and under admitted free. Hitchcock Nature Center, 1 p.m.-3 p.m. Please call 712-545-3283 for more information.

11/17:

Celine Dion in

This worldConcert. renowned Canadian songstress performs at 8 p.m. at the Qwest Center Omaha, 455 N. 10th St. Tickets are $47-$135, available at www.ticketmaster.com. Call 422-1212 for more information.

11/17: Opera Omaha’s Puccini 101 – Behind the music. Puccini 101 classes

are a chance to learn more about the great composer that created the ever-popular La Bohème, Turandot, Tosca and Madama Butterfly. Purchase all four classes for $49.00; include a ticket to Opera Omaha’s La Bohème for $99; or purchase the entire package including one ticket to each of the two Puccini MET HD broadcasts and your choice between the book, “Puccini without Excuses” or a Puccini highlights CD for $159.00. Class #1 explores what influenced Puccini to write his most-loved works. 6:30 p.m. at The Bluebarn Theater, 614 S. 11th St. $9 per person (cost for single class – package pricing available.) Contact Tara Cowherd, Community Programs Coordinator at 402346-4398 x217 or tcowherd@ operaomaha.org for more information.

11/21-11/27: Film Streams: the exiles. The Exiles, a film

directed by Kent MacKenzie, 1961, will be presented at the Ruth Sokolof Theater, 1340 Webster St. Call 933-0259 or visit www.filmstreams.org for more information.

11/22: hot Peas ‘n Butter at the holland. Incorporating

elements of Afro-Caribbean rhythms, jazz, R&B, folk, and rock, this group’s hit videos on Nickelodeon and Noggin are quickly making them a household name. Tickets start at $19. 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas Street. Call 345-0606 for tickets, or visit www.omahaperformingarts. org for more info.

11/22 through 1/1/09: mormon trail Center gingerbread exhibit. The

Annual Gingerbread Display will be held at the Mormon Trail Center (3215 State Street, Omaha) and the Kanesville Tabernacle (222 East Broadway, Council Bluffs) November 22,2008 - January 1,2009. This year’s theme will be “Christmas Around The World”. The displays can be viewed daily 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. For more information call 453-9372.

11/22: met Opera live at Film Streams. Live, high-def

broadcast of La Damnation De Faust, performing at the Metropolitan Opera in NYC. Ruth Sokolof Theater, 1340 Webster St. Call 933-0259 or visit www.filmstreams.org for more information.

11/22: 10th annual art auction. Bemis Center’s 10th

Annual Art Auction showcases exceptional contemporary art from some of the world’s most highly acclaimed artists, including former Bemis Center Artists-in-Residence as well as regional, national and international artists. Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, 424 S. 12th St., Omaha. Visit www.bemiscenter.org or call 341-7130 for more information.

11/27 through 1/10/09: holiday lights Festival.

Visit downtown Omaha to see the region’s largest holiday lights display. Families can enjoy a variety of activities. Free to the public. 6 p.m. at Gene Leahy Pedestrian Mall, 10th to 14th between Farnam and Douglas streets. Visit w w w.holidaylightsfestival. org or call 345-5401 for more information.

11/27: thanksgiving lighting Ceremony. Kickoff

to the Holiday Lights Festival. The festivities begin with a grand celebration. Watch as Mayor Mike Fahey and a group of local children flip the switch on over a million holiday lights! Free to the public. 6 p.m. at Gene Leahy Pedestrian Mall, 10th to 14th between Farnam and Douglas streets. Visit w w w.holidaylightsfestival. org or call 345-5401 for more information.

11/27 through 12/21: Berenstain Bears Save Christmas. In this stage

adaptation of Stan and Jan Berenstain’s phenomenal bestselling book, “The Berenstain Bears Save Christmas”, your

family will enjoy fun, upbeat, holiday-spirited songs and antics with those lovable Berenstain Bears who live in the tree house at the end of the sunny dirt road. Those who attended The Rose Theater’s production of “Berenstain Bears Save Christmas” in 2005 will discover an entirely new show featuring an interactive component that is sure to entertain and infuse the entire family with holiday spirit. 120 minutes. Recommended for ages 4-adult. Performances at either 2 p.m. or 7 p.m., depending on the day. Ticket prices: $10 for members, $16 for non-members. The Rose Theater, 2001 Farnam St. For tickets, call 345-4849. For more information, visit www.otcyp. org.

11/28 through 1/4/09: Christmas at Union Station. Omaha’s largest

indoor Christmas tree adorned with thousands of lights, annual “Holiday Miniatures” exhibit, display of miniature Christmas trees decorated in the fashion of many nations, and live entertainment each Sat. and Sun. in Dec. Cost is $7 adults, $6 seniors (62+), $5 ages 3-12, and free 2 and under. Durham Museum, 801 S. 10th St., Omaha. Visit w w w. d u r h a m m u s e u m . o r g or call 444-5071 for more information.

11/28: annual tree lighting Ceremony at the Durham. Kickoff to

Christmas at Union Station. The city’s largest indoor Christmas tree adorned with thousands of lights. Start the holiday festivities off right with holiday musical performances, children’s activities, a visit from Mr. & Mrs. Claus, the traditional tree lighting countdown and so much more. Cost is $7 adults, $6 seniors (62+), $5 ages 3-12, free 2 and under. Visit www.durhammuseum. org or call 444-5071 for more information.

11/28 through 1/4/09: holiday Poinsettia Show.

More than 7,000 poinsettia plants are grown in Lauritzen Gardens’ greenhouses for this annual holiday show. This spectacular exhibit includes a 20-foot poinsettia tree, beautifully decorated holiday trees, three antique sleighs and a model train that travels through the display. Daily from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Cost is $6 adults, $3 children ages 6-12. Lauritzen Gardens – Omaha’s Botanical Center. 100 Bancroft Street. Visit www.lauritzengardens. org or call 346-4002 for more information.

11/29: iowa Western musical/Comedy. A hilarious

musical comedy, “Church Basement Ladies,” features four unique characters as they organize the food and solve the problems of a rural Minnesota church in 1964. Funny and down to earth, you will surely enjoy these ladies as they navigate the church

year from below the house of God. 8 p.m. performance at The Arts Center, 2700 College Rd., Iowa Western Campus, Council Bluffs, IA. For tickets or more information, visit www. artscenter.iwcc.edu or call 712388-7140.

J.P. COOKE COMPANY

11/29 through 1/4/09: lightPlaY: a Celebration of holiday magic. This

dazzling holiday light show is perfect for children and filled with dancing lights, shapes and holiday music. Show runs approximately 15 minutes and is included with museum admission. Show times: TuesdaySaturday 10:30, 11:30, 1:30, 2:30 & 3:30. Additional shows on Thursday nights at 5:30 & 6:30 p.m. Sunday 1:30, 2:30 & 3:30 p.m. Omaha Children’s Museum, 500 S. 20th St., Omaha. For more information, visit www.ocm.org.

11/30: holiday harmony. A concert series featuring holiday music on Sunday afternoons. Cost $6 adults, $3 ages 6-12. Lauritzen Gardens – Omaha’s Botanical Center, 100 Bancroft Street, Omaha. Visit www.lauritzengardens. org or call 346-4002 for more information. December eveNts

12/3-12/19: holiday Under glass. This festive choral and

instrumental series is held over the lunch hour in Joslyn Art Museum’s beautiful glass atrium. The holiday-themed concerts are performed by area university, high school, and youth musicians. Performances begin at noon and are free with regular museum admission. Lunch is available for purchase. Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge St. Visit www.joslyn. org or call 342-3300 for more information.

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12/4-12/7: the imperial nutcracker at the rose.

A sensation at its premiere last season, “The Imperial Nutcracker” glitters and shines with the opulence and elegance of St. Petersburg, Russia in the 1890s. The vibrancy and grandeur of this lavish era inspired Tchaikovsky’s magnificent score and are reflected in Robin Welch’s exciting and entertaining choreography. More than just a Christmas story, “The Imperial Nutcracker” will delight your sense and awaken your holiday spirit! 125 minutes. Recommended for ages 6-adult. Performances at 2 p.m. or 7:30 p.m., depending on the day. Ticket prices: $35 for members, $40 for non-members. The Rose Theater, 2001 Farnam St. For tickets, call 345-0606. For more information, visit www. otcyp.org.

12/5: ethnic holiday Festival. Experience how

cultures from around the world celebrate the holidays by sampling ethnic holiday foods, viewing traditional crafts and observing ethnic performances. Cost $7 adults, $6 seniors (62+), $5 ages 3-12, free 2 and under. Durham

The Original Old Market Irish B ar Nightly Specials Live Irish Music Weekends Open 11a.m.

1205 H arney St. 342-5887

dublinerpubomaha.com the encounter | november/december 2008 29


»Get Moving! at the Downtown Family YMCA

Sponsored by Pinnacle Bank Museum, 801 S. 10th St., Omaha. Visit www.durhammuseum. org or call 444-5071 for more information.

12/5: the Canadian Brass at the holland. From formal

classical concerts to music served up with lively dialogue, the Canadian Brass is the world’s leading brass ensemble. Tickets start at $19. 8 p.m. at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas Street. For info, visit w w w.omahaper formingar ts. org, or call 345-0606 for tickets.

12/6-12/7: holiday happening. Enjoy a weekend

of holiday events, music and children’s activities, featuring the ever-popular poinsettia show. Santa Claus will visit, and sit with kids for photos. Cost is $6 adults, $3 ages 6-12. Lauritzen Gardens – Omaha’s Botanical Center, 100 Bancroft Street, Omaha. Visit www. lauritzengardens.org or call 346-4002 for more information.

12/7: iWCC Winter Concert.

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IWCC’s Music Department, featuring Concert Choir, Show Choir, Men’s Ensemble and Jazz Band, will perform in a free concert. 3 p.m. at Iowa Western Campus, Council Bluffs, IA. For more information, visit www. iwcc.edu.

12/7: holiday harmony. A

concert series featuring holiday music on Sunday afternoon. Cost: $6 adults, $3 children 6-12. Lauritzen Gardens – Omaha’s Botanical Center, 100 Bancroft Street, Omaha. Visit www. lauritzengardens.org or call 346-4002 for more information.

12/12-12/30: holiday Wildlights at Omaha’s zoo.

Wander through the zoo’s twinkling wonderland of lights. See moving animal images, warm up with hot cocoa and more! Closed Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. Special event admission will be charged. From 5-8 p.m. at Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo, 3701 S. 10th St., Omaha. Visit www.omahazoo. com or call 733-8401 for more information.

12/12-12/13: Salvation army Bell ringing marathon.

Ringing in the O! A 36-hour bellringing marathon will be held at locations throughout the Omaha metro. Fri., Dec. 12th 11 a.m. – Sat., Dec.13th 11 p.m. To volunteer your time, go to www. ringomaha.org or call 898-6000.

12/12-12/14: StOmP at the Orpheum. STOMP is explosive, provocative, sophisticated, sexy, and utterly unique and appeals to audiences of all ages. As USA Today says, STOMP finds beautiful noises in the strangest places. STOMP: See what all the noise is about. Tickets start at $28. Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St. For more info, visit www. omahaperformingarts.org, or call 345-0606 for tickets.

30 november/december 2008 | the encounter

12/12-12/18: Film Streams: the nightmare Before A showing Christmas.

of the dark children’s tale, directed by Tim Burton, 1993, will be presented at the Ruth Sokolof Theater, 1340 Webster St. Call 933-0259 or visit www.filmstreams. org for more information.

12/13: iowa Western hosts the Blenders. The Blenders

present Holiday Soul Tour 2008. The Blenders combine their unique style of vocal harmonies with Christmas standards and hilarious comedy in their wildly successful holiday show. A concert perfect for ages one to 93. 7:30 p.m. performance at The Arts Center, 2700 College Rd., Iowa Western Campus, Council Bluffs, IA. For tickets or more information, call 712-3887140 or visit www.artscenter. iwcc.edu.

12/14: holiday harmony. A

concert series featuring holiday music on Sunday afternoon. Cost $6 adults, $3 ages 6-12. Lauritzen Gardens – Omaha’s Botanical Center, 100 Bancroft Street. Visit www.lauritzengardens. org or call 346-4022 for more information.

12/14: Wells Fargo Family

Festival. Part of the Holiday Lights Festival. A variety of downtown arts and cultural institutions provide free admission and hands-on activities for the entire family for the day. Free trolley service connects all participating locations. Canned goods and cash donations accepted at participating locations. Held at various locations in downtown Omaha. Free to the public. 1-5 p.m. Visit www. holidaylightsfestival.org or call 345-5401 for more information. 12/18- 12/20: nCaa Division i Women’s Volleyball Championships. Cost $45-$55

per ticket. Qwest Center Omaha, 455 N. 10th St., Omaha. For more information, call 341-1500 or visit www.qwestcenter.com.

12/19-12/25: it’s a Wonderful life at Film Streams. Ruth Sokolof Theater will present the 1946 Frank Capra classic It’s A Wonderful Life. 1340 Webster St. Call 9330259 or visit www.filmstreams. org for more information.

12/20: met Opera live at Film Streams. Broadcast

live and in high-def, Thais will perform from the Metropolitan Opera in NYC. Ruth Sokolof Theater, 1340 Webster St. Call 933-0259 or visit www. filmstreams.org for more information.

12/21:

holiday harmony.

A concert series featuring holiday music on Sunday afternoon. Cost: $6 adults, $3 ages 6-12. Lauritzen Gardens – Omaha’s Botanical Center, 100 Bancroft Street. Visit www. lauritzengardens.org or call 346-4022 for more information.

12/26-12/30: Frosty the Snowman at the rose.

The holiday song “Frosty the Snowman” has taught generations of children how to build a proper snowman - a button for the nose, two lumps of coal for eyes, a scarf, hat and finally, a corncob pipe. But, as everyone knows, Frosty’s hat is magical and has the power to bring him to life! He is the perfect playmate for the town’s children - that is, until the thermometer starts to turn red. What will happen to Frosty? Don’t let the youngsters in your family miss this chance to see one of the all-time great winter season stories come to life on stage at The Rose! 60 minutes. Recommended for ages 4-adult. Performances at 2 p.m., 4:30 p.m. or 7 p.m., depending on the day. Ticket prices: free to members, $16 for non-members. The Rose Theater, 2001 Farnam St. For tickets, call 345-4849. For more information, visit www.otcyp. org.

12/31: gordon goodwin’s Big Phat Band on new Year’s eve.

GRAMMY® and Emmy®-winning film composer Gordon Goodwin leads an explosive 18-member jazz ensemble. Together their highly original sound is witty, intricate and swinging. Tickets start at $40. 8:30 p.m. at Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. Visit www. omahaperformingarts.org for more info. Call 345-0606 for tickets.

12/31: First national’s new

Year’s eve Fireworks. Part of the Holiday Lights Festival. Join thousands on New Year’s Eve with a fireworks display choreographed to music! Free to the public. 7 p.m. at Gene Leahy Pedestrian Mall, 10th to 14th between Farnam and Douglas streets, Omaha. Visit w w w. h o l i d ay l i g h t s f e s t i v a l . org or call 345-5401 for more information.


(Formerly Eyebeads & Gemstones)

Same location, Same owners, NEW NAME! Ready-to-wear pieces, or we’ll help you create your own. 515 S. 13th • Old Market 402-346-4367

Steak... Martinis... & Jazz...

OMAHA

222 S ou th 15th St

402.342.0077


Dinner well done. Or medium rare if you prefer.

At Upstream Brewing Company, we proudly serve hand-cut Omaha Steaks™ – filets, rib-eyes, New York strips. Are you getting hungry? We’re a city famous for steak so of course we serve the beef that bears our name. Our new American pub fare menu also includes delicious favorites, hearty sandwiches and burgers and a wide variety of appetizers and thin-crust pizzas. And with generous portions, scrumptious sides and a dessert menu second to none, we promise you’ll never leave hungry.

Old Market 11th & Jackson

402.344.0200

West Omaha

171st & W. Center Rd.

402.778.0100

We’re not called Upstream Brewing Company because of our iced tea. Our award-winning, hand-crafted beers are brewed fresh on-site in a variety of styles – from our bitter Firehouse ESB to our sweet Honey Raspberry Ale. Stop in today, and find one to call your favorite.

Happy hour specials, hours of operation, full food, beer and wine menus. Find all this and more at UpstreamBrewing.com


Nov/Dec 08 - The Encounter Magazine  

Condo Life: Holiday Shopping ON the Beaten-Brick Path Top Floors of 1101 Jackson Holiday Lights Festival Old Market • Downtown • Riverfront...

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