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Old Market • Downtown • Riverfront

www.oldmarket.com

May/June 2010

Last Blast at the ‘Blatt

Our fond farewell to the final College World Series at Rosenblatt Stadium

DOWNTOWN THE SUMMIT FACES JULIE REILLY OMAHA MAGAZINE • 5921 S. 118TH CIRCLE • OMAHA, NE 68137


Coming July 1-25

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Small in size, large in variety! Find souvenirs, downtown’s largest selection of Heartland t-shirts & hats, Nebraska-made gifts, Husker items and essentials for the traveler. We’ve been called “the hotel gift shop, without the hotel prices.” Handcrafted Cornhusk dolls and wheat weavings

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Fine Dining Award Winning Wine List

Check out current and past results of Best of Omaha速. See who the readers of Omaha Magazine chose as their local favorites for Dining, Entertainment, Shopping and much more.

the encounter | may/june 2010 3


Second Chance

Old Market Downtown • Riverfront

Antiques & Collectibles

Bought and sold by the handful, or houseful





Furniture Architectural Items China Glassware Toys & Dolls Books Huge Selection of Vintage Clothing & Jewelry on our Lower Level





Over 30 Years in the Old Market



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TECHNICAL A DVISOR Tyler Lemke

C ONTRIBUTING W RITERS

photo by Patrick Drickey, Stonehouse Publishing Co.

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Tori Lemke, Sr. Account Representative tori.lemke@otis.com (402) 733-4525, ext. 14

Owned and managed by Omaha Magazine, LTD

Comments? Send your letter to the editor to: letters@omahapublications.com All versions of The Encounter are published bimonthly by Omaha Magazine, LTD, P.O. Box 461208, Omaha NE 68046-1208. Telephone: (402) 884-2000; fax (402) 8842001. No whole or part of the contents herein may be reproduced without prior written permission of Omaha Magazine, excepting individually copyrighted articles and photographs. Unsolicited manuscripts are accepted; however, no responsibility will be assumed for such solicitations.


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6 Downtown Story : Meet You at The Summit .................... 8 Feature: Sacred Heart Makeover ..................................10 Feature: Goodbye, Rosenblatt ..................................... 13 Downtown Face: Julie Reilly ....................................... 28 Condo Life: “It’s All Here” at the Paxton ..................... 30 Old Market Map........................................................... 32 Calendar ...................................................................... 35 Downtown Face: Sandy Aquila ......................................

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the encounter | may/june 2010 5


DOWNTOWN FACE

“ U ”

I love The Many Faces of beauty in all forms. Sandy Aquila

by Donald J. Rashid | photos by minorwhitestudios.com

pon reading the laundry list of life accomplishments by Sandy Aquila in her 40-something years, one just might feel a bit jealous: world traveler, photographer, jewelry artist, massage therapist, and 30-year practitioner of the healing arts. Add to this ambitious list serving as a business owner/director and legislative activist, and you’re even more impressed. As a native of this area, she relishes her family ties here, which include her son, Cory. Among her great loves are the friendly people of Omaha, and the four seasons in Nebraska. One of Sandy’s early creative adventures was selling jewelry in her booth at the first-

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cover story ever Omaha Summer Arts Festival. As an artist and craniosacral massage therapist, her DNA seems peppered with creative drive and a love of beauty, and jewelry making helps her express that. Twenty years ago her brother, a bestselling sci-fi author, gave her a camera. It’s become a near-permanent fixture in her hands ever since. She especially enjoys taking candid photographs of people and expansive landscapes. “I love getting that one magic image. I love beauty in all forms.” Sandy believes that bodywork and healing sessions can assist and gently encourage people in taking a journey back into self. Her experience with the healing arts led her to the idea that after we are born, we forget our connection to the source and spend our lifetimes re-remembering our origin. She explains that her clients seek the healing arts as means of taking responsibility of their health and learning new ways to be whole in body, mind and spirit. Part of this process is paying attention to clues pointing to our passions. Cherished travel memories include her trips to Jerusalem, China and India. Sandy has taken five classes with the Dalai Lama, and describes a profound respect for the sacred rituals of many spiritual paths. As a lover of form and design, Sandy played an integral role in the more than two-year design process of the OM Center. Founded in 2001, along with her 84-year-old mother and business part-

ner, Natalie Goodkind, the Center is located in the former site of her uncle’s antique store, aptly named Honest Johns. In her words, “The OM Center is a dynamic space for education, holistic healing, performing arts and community. We have all ages come through our doors.” As an advocate for the healing arts, she played a role in Nebraska passing legislation regulating the practice of massage therapy and acupuncture. An active and life-long learner, she whimsically notes that she could wallpaper her house with the checks she has written to attend classes in the healing and visual arts. Nutrition and herbal remedies have also been lifelong passions. Her musical tastes include Indian music with modern Western nuances, old music, rock and roll, New Age, and meditation music. She enjoys working with local filmmakers on behind-thescenes photography, journaling the making of the film. She has also collaborated with Michael Braunstein, founder and executive director of Heartland Healing, on the Omaha Health Expo. Braunstein describes her as “A powerful healer and brilliant creative artist. She brings artistry to healing and brings healing to art. She is driven by a force – absolutely! When she puts her mind (to a project), it happens.” While Sedona, Arizona, radiates a source of energy she loves, prompting visits, fortunately for us, her home and heart remain in Omaha.

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402.341.5555 Hours: 6:30a-5p Monday-Friday the encounter | may/june 2010 7


DOWNTOWN STORY

“ W ”

High-end Convenience

If you want something unique,

we have it.

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Served Up at The Summit story by Annamarie Adams Mann | photos by minorwhitestudios.com

hen you look toward the Omaha skyline, you cannot help but notice the towering, glass building known as the First National Bank Tower (FNBT). Less noticeable is the welcoming store clear down on the main floor of the tower, ironically named The Summit. Walking past the store, a passer-by might assume that The Summit is just an ordinary convenience store. But once you walk through the doors, hear the ‘60s Rock n’ Roll music, and talk to their customer-focused staff, you quickly realize that The Summit far exceeds the typical. It’s immaculate, it’s upscale, and it’s unique. The Summit opened its doors in 2002 when FNBT was beginning to bring on staff. Originally intended to help improve the quality of life for First National Bank’s employees, The Summit has grown to be much more than an employee perk. With a tenured staff and seasoned leadership, this store focuses on putting the customer first. As George Poullos (owner) stated, “We provide the best, because our customers deserve it.” Their attitude, products, and atmosphere make The Summit unique. From the onset, they


department

have focused on pleasing their customers and quickly, providing new products upon request. As Mr. Poullos exclaimed, “If you want something unique, we have it! If you want something new, we have it! If you need something now, we have it!” An examination of their wide selection of inventory proves this mantra; while The Summit offers convenience store products such as fountain drinks, candy, snacks and coffee, it also offers much more. From Nebraska paraphernalia to Hallmark cards, from bouquets of flowers to unique gifts, The Summit’s list of goods is extensive. In fact, it even operates as a dry cleaning outlet with a 24-hour turnaround time (if dropped off by 9 a.m.). And if you are hungry for a quick, freshly prepared lunch, The Summit offers something for that, too. Each weekday, on a rotating schedule, an Omaha restaurant serves meals. Pop in on a Monday and you may get Panera Bread; stop by on a Tuesday and La Mesa may be featured. The variety and quality draw in over 1,000 customers a day from FNBT and surrounding businesses, and, of course, they’re always open to seeing new faces. George Poullos attributes The Summit’s success in part to a phenomenal staff [Sheri Timm, Jacque Anderla, and Chris Abele] which connects to the customers and elevates expectations. He’s also grateful to Heidi Jackson, who was instrumental in opening the store and who initially set the tone for service and personality. So next time you pass by that towering building of glass and consider the “work” being accomplished inside, remember to walk through the doors of The Summit. You will likely see a friendly face, an inviting atmosphere, and a wide selection of products. And if you’re thirsty on a hot summer day, pop open a cold soda from The Summit. Their 37° F freezer is so cold, it might just catch you off guard. As Mr. Poullos confirmed, “It’s this cold, because that is what the customer wants.”

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Creighton Medical Associates – OId Market Clinic 1319 Leavenworth Street • 402.280.5500 the encounter | may/june 2010 9


FEATURE 10 may/june 2010 | the encounter

It’s close to a miracle.


feature

Extreme Makeover Beauty Restored at Sacred Heart Church by Leo Adam Biga | photo by minorwhitestudios.com

I

n today’s parlance, everything “pops” now at historic Sacred Heart Catholic Church as the result of a 2009 restoration that Father Tom Fangman, pastor of the northeast Omaha parish, likes to call “an extreme church makeover.” The $3.3 million project made longoverdue improvements to the 108-yearold church at 22nd and Binney. Designated an Omaha landmark, the church is on the National Register of Historic Places. The parish was founded in 1890 at a nearby location. The land for the present church was donated by Omaha business magnate and philanthropist Herman Kountze. The stone, late Gothic Revival style edifice with a 124-foot spire was erected there in 1902. This long history has been much on the mind of Fangman. The Omaha native has served Sacred Heart for 12 years. As steward of the church, he feels responsible to the rich legacy it represents and for which he is keepsaker. But a poor parish like his that serves an underprivileged neighborhood has few resources. What little it does have goes to Sacred Heart School and the Heart Ministry Center. Supporting the needs of at-risk youth and adults takes precedence. That reality resulted in letting things slide at the church. Two years ago though, Fangman decided repairs could no longer be put off. “We didn’t do it out of luxury, we did it out of necessity,” he said. “Almost everything was in such dire condition that it needed to be redone or made new. Our stained glass windows had been declared dangerous by three companies because the lead was so old it was cracking and bubbling. The windows were falling apart. There were cracks across the ceiling,

and there were times when I’d be saying Mass and paint chips would fall down. “We didn’t know how much longer the boiler was going to work.” The first thing he did was assemble a project team led by: architecture firm RDG; general contractor Boyd Construction; Brother William Woeger with the Omaha Archdiocese; and Sacred Heart members Mike Moylan, a real estate developer, and Stephanie Basham, an interior designer. Specialists from around the nation were brought in along with local experts, including Lambrecht Glass Studio, which restored Sacred Heart’s exquisite stained glass windows, and McGill Brothers Inc., which did cleaning and tuckpointing on the building’s masonry. Rather than do a piecemeal fix over years, the consensus was to tackle the whole job at once. Fangman announced the capital campaign in 2008 and within a year all pledges were secured. “There’s no way our parish ever could afford anything like this,” he said. “We reached out and I spent a lot of that year going out and talking to people.” He made the case and folks responded. “It’s close to a miracle.” For Fangman, caring for the building meant respecting the history of the parish and preserving this place of worship for future generations. “This is an important church in Omaha. It’s pretty sacred to lots and lots of families,” he said. “I just felt like we owed it to the people that started this parish 120 years ago. They built something and gave us something beautiful and lasting, and we have been the recipients of that. I just felt like we owed it to the people that

gave this to us over a century ago and we owe it the people that will come next. “It’s bigger than just what we’re doing today.” Besides, he said, “Sacred Heart deserved a facelift.” Years of crud were meticulously cleaned away. Grime, grit, soot. Decades worth cast a dark veil over the exterior, obscuring the pink limestone that, finally revealed again, resembles the subtle pink marble facing of the Joslyn Art Museum. “The new vividness and brightness is amazing,” said Fangman. “I do feel like I am in the old Sacred Heart, but everything feels so new and preserved. It was very important to the whole team we maintained the integrity of the building.” Even longtime friends tell him they can “hardly believe it’s the same structure.” “It’s exciting to see the pride that our parishioners have in it and in its beauty,” he added. “I still get choked up when I walk in there.” He said the project seemed to encourage neighbors to do fix-ups to their properties. Teams of craftspeople took over Sacred Heart during the intensive six-month project. Floor-to-ceiling scaffolding was put up. Crews worked day and night. To accommodate it all on such a short schedule the church was temporarily closed. Sanctuary items were removed. Services relocated to the school gymnasium across the street. Fangman said area churches were “gracious” in accommodating weddings and funerals. The project’s comprehensive scope encompassed: replacement of the roof, the gutters, the floors and the heating system; laying a new foundation; installing the church’s first air conditioning the encounter | may/june 2010 11


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12 may/june 2010 | the encounter

system; building a baptismal font; restoring the chapel as well as all the church’s extensive stained glass windows, murals and woodwork, including the pews and confessionals. Watching it all unfold with curiosity and appreciation was Fangman. “We were under the wire so much, but everybody came through. We had people who were looking out for us.” And maybe a touch of divine intervention. He said a team of workers from New York City came in on their own one weekend, for free, to paint a chapel backdrop not in the budget. He said a craftsman who worked on the baptismal font described having a spiritual experience that prompted him to relocate his wife and daughter here from Florida. The family now attends Sacred Heart. The daughter is to baptized at the very font her father helped fashion. It’s another example to Fangman of how “there’s so many God-things with this project.” He said the revitalized church is a visible, tangible sign of Sacred Heart’s good works. He hopes more people come there to worship and to support its social justice mission. He prays it also stands as a symbol of revitalization for a community with great needs and sends a signal that Sacred Heart is there to stay. “We’ve been here and were going to continue to be here.” Fangman never knew a makeover project could be so impactful. “When I started, it wasn’t clear to me what it would mean and how beautiful it would all turn out. It turned out better than I ever imagined.” On Nov. 23 Archbishop George Lucas presided at the restored church’s dedication and the altar’s consecration. The restoration project had turned up time capsules from previous events. Just as his predecessors did Fr. Tom composed a letter describing the latest milestone and placed it in a capsule for a future pastor to discover. One more link in an unbroken chain of faith.


t t a l b n e : s s o e i R emor M The

CWS in photos

the encounter | may/june 2010 13


The Soul of the CWS

Timeless images capture the many faces of the CWS and what it has become in 60 years of games played at Rosenblatt Stadium. One of the wonderful things about photography is its ability to take something familiar and show you something new. Take, for instance, this photo, one of roughly 30 in our photographic farewell to the College World Series experience at Rosenblatt Stadium. The camera captures fans in the outfield bleachers tracking a fly ball in the familiar twilight of an afternoon game at the CWS. What it doesn’t show is what truly makes the photo. Instead of the classic scene of the outfielder catching, or not catching, the ball, it shows only a shadow cast against the outfield wall. The play is still in progress. The ball hasn’t arrived. Neither has the outfielder. The outcome remains uncertain. And the teams are unknown. Hit? Home run? Out? We don’t know. And that’s what’s great. The photo is a depiction of that timeless moment of anticipation that any fan who has attended a CWS game has felt. The photo could be, theoretically at least, from any game played in the CWS in the last 60 years. The spirit of that photo, one of thousands taken by www.minorwhitestudios.com, is the sort of artistic take we sought in compiling a timeless tribute to what the CWS has become at Rosenblatt Stadium. As the sun sets on the CWS experience at Rosenblatt, we present a unique look at the aspects of the event that have made it what is has become. The stadium. The fans. The atmosphere. The players. The games. The championships. Consider it a family photo album for the event Omahans have made their own, so much so that it’s become the only NCAA championship event to be held annually in the same city. A new 25-year contract with the NCAA ensures it’ll stay that way, but after this year’s CWS, as we all know, the event will change addresses. For the first time since it arrived in Omaha in 1950, the CWS will be uprooted from the familiar confines of Rosenblatt Stadium and the south Omaha neighborhood it has called home. It will relocate to the shiny new TD Ameritrade Park currently being constructed in what used to be one of the Qwest Center’s parking lots. As far as the fan experience goes, what the new CWS will look like no one knows. It will undoubtedly be different, with some interpreting “different” as more corporate and less like the baseball block party the CWS is currently akin to. Much of that is separation anxiety talking, as die-hard CWS fans don’t want to see the neighborhood charm that partying in homes and parking in yards has engendered. But change is inevitable, and much of what has made the event great will undoubtedly pack its bags and move south to start new traditions and give birth to a new CWS that a new generation of fans will come to know and love. Until then, however, fans seem certain to send the CWS at Rosenblatt out in style. We’re doing our part by offering this photographic tip of the cap to an event and venue that have come to define Omaha. And for that we say to Rosenblatt Stadium, thanks for the memories. CWS? We’ll see you down the road.

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The Vendors The vendors make up the scene as much as the fans and the games. Fans need gear, and vendors are all too happy to supply the hats, the t-shirts, the refreshments and the programs. Gone from the new stadium will be the unofficial parking vendors, those South Omaha homespun capitalists who opened their driveways and lawns to us all these years.

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The Series The College World Series arrived in Omaha in 1950 after stints in Kalamazoo, Mich., and Wichita, Kan. The first CWS at Rosenblatt Stadium – actually called Omaha Stadium at the time, having just opened in 1948 - was attended by 17,805 fans and ended in Texas defeating Washington St., 3-0, for the title. The event proceeded to lose money for 10 of its first 12 years in Omaha, but the city, including Mayor Johnny Rosenblatt, didn’t give up, and the CWS eventually blossomed into the national success and symbol of civic pride it has become.

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At the Brandeis Food Court

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the encounter | may/june 2010 19


The Fans In 2009, the College World Series celebrated its 7 millionth fan. In total the series drew an attendance of 336,076 fans, an average of 22,405 per game. As a testament to its continually growing popularity, the series seems to notch new attendance marks annually. But those fans don’t just come for baseball. Shopping, dining and the occasional trip to the zoo all usually factor into travel plans. That results in an overall annual economic impact, according to 2007 estimates, of more than $41 million for the city.

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The Players Statistics aren’t available for how many autographs have been signed at the CWS over the years, but what is known is that many of those keepsakes, like BerkshireHathaway stock, have dramatically increased in value over the years. Several collegians have gone on to the majors and many, including Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds, to stardom. The series has, indeed, given birth to many big-league dreams, many of which have actually come true.

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The Old Market’s favorite spot for lunch & dinner.

Award-winning food & wine list – open late 7 nights a week. Call for reservations.

M’s Pub

422 S. 11th Street

342-2550

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Italian & Mediterranean specialties served in“the Old Market’s most beautiful dining room,” complemented with the area’s largest selection of Italian wines.

1108 Howard Street

342-2050

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The Old Market’s favorite spot for lunch & dinner.

Award-winning food & wine list – open late 7 nights a week. Call for reservations.

M’s Pub

422 S. 11th Street

342-2550

www.MsPubOmaha.com

the encounter | may/june 2010 23


The Games In 60 years, 108 schools have sent teams to the College World Series. With 33 appearances, no school has made more trips to Omaha than Texas and, thus, no school has won more CWS games than the Longhorns’ 82. Nebraska has played in the CWS three times, with the last appearance being in 2005, and Creighton’s lone appearance came in 1991.

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The Thrill of Victory The Road to Omaha has ended in championship gold for the following schools the most: Southern California – 12 CWS championships LSU – 6 Arizona St. - 5 Texas – 5 (they won one before the CWS moved to Omaha) Miami, Fla. – 4 Cal State-Fullerton - 4 Minnesota – 3 Arizona – 3

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DOWNTOWN FACES

“ S ” I don’t think there’s anyone else doing this in the whole world.

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Julie Reilly: Facilitating a Dream in the Old Market by Stephanie Lynam | Photos by minorwhitestudios.com

trolling downtown past weathered brick warehouses on brick-paved streets, then entering KANEKO at 11th and Jones, one might think they stepped from times past directly into a posh art gallery in New York City, complete with bright lights, bright colors and massive ceramic sculptures created by artist Jun Kaneko. The art gallery described is the Bow Truss area of KANEKO, the beginning phase of a new art complex planned in Omaha’s Old Market. Julie Reilly, KANEKO’s director of development since August 2009, is one of the driving forces of this exciting new project, an inventive idea of Jun and Ree Kaneko. Reilly is responsible for developing the project’s membership, sponsorship and fund-raising programs.


feature “It’s not a museum. It’s not an art gallery. It’s a new kind of institution,” she said. “Jun wanted a space where people can have the openness and freedom to explore new ideas. This is their dream and their reality. They are incredible, visionary people,” Reilly said of the Kaneko’s. Reilly has a life-long appreciation for the arts. Her father worked for the U.S. Department of State, which resulted in overseas living in most of her early years, and her mother was an artist. “From my parents I got the ability to do well in both the arts and the sciences,” she said. Reilly took the job at KANEKO after working as an art conservator of fine objects for 33 years, which involved restoring and preserving art and museum collections. In her distinctive career, she’s worked at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C., Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia, and as director at the Gerald R. Ford Conservation Center at the Nebraska State Historical Society. Hal France, esteemed conductor as well as executive director of KANEKO, was more than pleased when Reilly wanted to be a part of KANEKO. ”It was a godsend that we got Julie Reilly. It was a lucky day,” he said. “I knew we wanted her and we waited for her.” The KANEKO staff is raising $20 million to complete the proposed 70,000-square-foot facility. Kaneko’s artwork is currently located in several Omaha warehouses he owns, and the plan is to move many of these pieces, along with other artists’ work, to

the new complex at 11th and Jones when completed, Reilly said. “I think Omaha is one of the few places KANEKO could happen. Omaha is not arrogant. If someone has a new idea, people are willing to give it a chance,” she said. The unfinished complex will open to the public as early as this summer during the Omaha Farmer’s Market, held May 1 through October 9 when the public can tour the Bow Truss which opened in May 2008, tour the buildings under renovation, and visit the Kaneko-UNO Library (at 12th and Jones) which opened in February 2009. When completed, KANEKO will have exhibits, performances, lectures and symposiums, educational programs and community collaborations. Reilly said she’s excited to have something new to add to the Old Market, which she said was just budding 14 years ago when she moved to Omaha. “I thought it was so important and so cool, and I don’t think there is anyone else doing this in the world,” she said. Outside of KANEKO, Reilly is involved with Restore Omaha, an organization with the mission to help preserve, restore and maintain pre-1950 homes; 2020 Omaha, a group active in the preservation of 20th century buildings; and she serves on the Board of Nebraska Methodist College. She maintains a historic house built in 1908 and likes to garden, read, exercise, dance, go antiquing, and attend the symphony and art openings.

Serving Lunch and Dinner Contemporary and traditional Southwestern jewelry and home decor. Native American pottery, kachina and semi-precious stones set beautifully in gold and silver. Old Market 509 South 11th Omaha, NE (402) 342-1200

Village Pointe 17305 Davenport St. Omaha, NE (402) 289-9999

11.30 am - 10 pm Monday - Thursday 11.30 am - 10.30 pm Friday & Saturday Closed on Sunday

Fifth Avenue 7132 E. 5th Ave. Scottsdale, AZ (480) 663-8444 the encounter | may/june 2010 29


CONDO LIFE

“ W ” Every-

“It’s All Here”:

At Home in the Paxton with Kim Folta and Joe Moise by Kim Carpenter | photos by minorwhitestudios.com

thing is so ac-

cessible.

30 may/june 2010 | the encounter

ater damage, discarded tires, pigeons. When Kim Folta and Joe Moise first visited the Paxton in 2006, they immediately saw past the problems. Instead, they envisioned just how elegant living in one of Omaha’s most iconic downtown buildings could be. Originally the Paxton Hotel, the Art Deco building was designed by architect Joseph G. McArthur and constructed in 1928. Although it fell into disrepair after closing in the early 1960s, meticulous reconstruction has restored the Paxton to its glory. Original stained glass windows were located and returned to the lobby, period light fixtures and mirrors were installed, and other historic features were preserved. In addition, the Paxton has seen the installation of many amenities for residents, including: a gym, rooftop garden, ballroom, heated underground garage, on-site storage units, and access to a private theater that includes oversized leather seating and a movie screen for viewing DVDs and television. Because of that foresight, when Moise, a national customer service director for Union


department

At left: Creamy yellow walls and matching arm chairs warmly greet guests in the couple’s living room; Above: A large dining area accommodates Moise’s marble table with seating for 8+, making it perfect for parties; Right: Shades of purple grace the walls of the condo’s two bedrooms.

Pacific, and Folta, a product development manager at ConAgra Foods, moved into the Paxton a year after their initial visit, their intuition paid off. The couple’s 1,750-square-foot luxury unit includes two bedrooms, two baths, two fireplaces, marble floors — and plenty of charm. Moise and Folta pay homage to the Paxton’s Art Deco architecture and interior design, but with a contemporary twist. The living room, with a 1930s-style blue sofa with two creamy yellow chairs, has a Frank Lloyd Wright feel that echoes throughout their home. The dining room has a formal yet whimsical atmosphere and continues the Art Deco’s modern update. A 4’x8’ rectangular marble table, which Moise found in Mexico, dominates the room. Eight black high-backed chairs with curved brushed silver bases flank both sides. A curvy, multi-armed, and thoroughly contemporary chandelier subtly adds visual punch and flair. The bedrooms have similar flair. The guest bedroom/home office features deep purple walls. Moise was initially doubtful about the color. “I had to start with the second bedroom,” says Folta with a smile. Now Moise likes the effect. “Everyone loves the color,” he admits. “I get reminded of that.” The master bedroom, a lighter shade of purple, is all elegance. A sitting area with deep cocoa small-scale upholstered chairs, a marble fireplace and a flat-screen TV translates into a cozy place to relax. If the couple invites guests to view movies

or television, discreet white pocket doors separate the spaces, providing privacy. The room also features a dark wood armoire and a brushed nickel ceiling fan which lends an added sense of style. Fittingly called the “Aviator,” the fixture has four blades that turn in reverse and are reminiscent of propeller planes from the ‘30s and ‘40s. But as tempting as it might be to remain homebodies, Moise and Folta take full advantage of city living. “One of the things we noticed when we moved here,” says Moise, who was transferred from UP’s St. Louis office, “is that everything is so accessible.” Venues such as the Orpheum, Qwest Center and Holland Performing Arts Center are all within walking distance of the condo, as are numerous restaurants. Moise adds, “We have all the amenities of downtown.” Folta, who has lived in Chicago and New York, agrees. “All the things in Omaha are the same as in a big city,” she observes. “It’s all here.” This passion for their new home has translated into community involvement. Folta is president of Omaha’s Downtown Improvement District, which represents property owners, residents and businesses. Moise is the organization’s treasurer. All these factors combine to make the Paxton the perfect place for the couple. “For us,” reflects Joe Moise, “the building is the best condo downtown.” the encounter | may/june 2010 31


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Merchants Attractions OLD MARKET / DOWNTOWN / RIVERFRONT

ANTIQUES

Antiques & Fine Art...(16th St). ......... 341.9942 Fairmont Antique Mall...H4 .............. 345.1778 Joe’s Collectibles...H5 ..................... 612.1543 Retro Recycle...E5 ............................ 341.1969 Second Chance...G5 ........................ 346.4930

BOOK STORES

Jackson Street Booksellers...H5 .....341.2664 New Realities Books & Gifts...E7 ..... 342.1863 Soul Desires Books & Coffee...G7 ...898.7600

CLOTHING & ACCESSORIES

Lotus ...F4 ......................................... 346.8080 Namaste...E7 .................................... 341.7069 Nebraska Clothing Co...E8............... 346.6114 Nouvelle Eve...E6 .............................. 345.4811 Overland Outfitters...E8 ................... 345.2900 Retro Recycle ...E5 ........................... 341.1969 The Souq Ltd...E7 ............................. 342.2972 Trocadéro...E4 ..................................934.8389

DOWNTOWN HOTELS

Courtyard by Marriott...(10th & Douglas) ....... 346.2200 DoubleTree Hotel...(16th & Dodge)...346.7600 Embassy Suites Hotel...F9 ...............346.9000 Fairfield Inn and Suites (15th & Nicholas) ....... 280.1516 Hampton Inn (12th & Cuming) .......... 345.5500 Hilton Convention Center Hotel .......998.3400 Hilton Garden Inn...(10th & Dodge) .. 341.4400 Holiday Inn (14th & Cuming) ..............341.0124 Homewood Suites (13th & Cuming) 345.5100 Magnolia Hotel...(16th & Howard) ... 342.2222

HOME FURNISHINGS

Crawdad’s...E5 ................................. 341.3930 Habitat .............................................. 342.0044 Julia Russell ...(11th & Douglas) ....... 891.0691 Kraft DC ...(16th & Leavenworth)......342.2790 Room...E7 ......................................... 342.7666 Zongkers Custom Woods ................ 344.7784

GALLERIES

Dr. Ritch Miller DC (2111 Douglas) ... 345.7500 Heartland Pathology (310 S. 16th) ... 346.0195 Old Market Massage ...E3 (@ OM Center) ...... 850.6651 Omaha Dental Spa F6(At the Loft) .. 505.4424 Omaha Healing Arts Center...E3 ...... 345.5078 Omaha Yoga School...E7 ................. 346.7813 The Downtown Dentist...D4 ............. 342.3901 Physical Therapy East & West Physical Therapy...E3 ..345.5078 Psychotherapy, EMDR, Hypnotherapy Jannette Davis, MS, CST .................341.2230 Cynthia Duggin, MSW, LCSW ..........345.5078 Bobby Escolas, CMHT (Hypnotherapist) ...... 990.2979 Jeff Stormberg, PhD (Psychotherapist)......... 393.0642 Tim Swisher, MHR, LMHP, LADC ....341.2230 Pharmacy Depot Drug (1416 Dodge) ................. 544.DRUG Life Coach, Transpersonal Psychology, Herbalist, Biopulsar Tm Analyst Chanell Jaramillo ..............................689.0905

MUSEUMS & ATTRACTIONS

4 Wheels 4 Fun Bike Rentals (J-5) ...... 558.5960 Omaha Children’s Museum...(500 S. 20th) .......... 342.6164 The Durham...J9 ...............................444.5071 Joslyn Art Museum...(24th & Dodge) .............. 342.3300 Henry Doorly Zoo...(3701 So 10th St) ............. 733.8401 Lauritzen Gardens...(100 Bancroft)..346.4002 Magical Journey Carriage Service (E-7)............... 453.6745 Ollie the Trolley ................................. 597.3596 Omaha Symphony Association (16th & Howard).............................................342.3560 Qwest Center Omaha (10th & Capitol)............ 341.1500 Ticket Omaha www.ticketomaha.org ............. 345.0606

1301 Gallery...(13th & Nicholas) .......342.6452 Artists’ Cooperative Gallery...D7 ..... 342.9617 Bemis Ctr. for Contemporary Arts...K4 .......... 341.7130 Fred Simon Gallery...A8 ................... 595.2122 Garden Of The Zodiac...E7 .............. 341.1877 Hot Shops...13th & Nicholas ............342.6452 Images of Nature...D5 ......................341.8460 Jackson Artworks...G6 ..................... 341.1832 Julia Russell ...(11th & Douglas) ....... 891.0691 Omaha ClayWorks...H5 ....................346.0560 Passageway Gallery...E7 .................. 341.1910 Sirens at the Loft...F6 .......................933.3333 White Crane Gallery...E7 .................. 345.1066

OLD MARKET PROPERTIES

HEALTH SERVICES

PUBS & TAVERNS

Acupuncture Ellen Zinn L.Ac. .................................345.5078 Dr. David Bole L.Ac. .........................345.5078 Ayurvedic Healing Dr. Rajesh. ........................................345.5078 Carey Twomey ..................................345.5078 Massage Therapy Sandy Aquila LMT...E3 .....................345.5078 Lisa Christensen LMT...E3 ............... 850.6651 Joyce Linbrunne LMT ....................... 740.0366 Tara Thompson LMT ........................ 706.7398 Medical Dr. John Bartholet, DC...E3 .............. 342.2216 Commercial Optical Co. ...G3 .......... 344.0219 Creighton Family Healthcare ...L1....280.5500 Downtown Chiropractic (2111 Douglas) ......... 345.7500 Derek Fender, DDS...D4 ...................342.3901 Dr. Mark Goodman, MD...L1 ............280.5500 Dr. Stephen Peterson MD...L1..........280.5500 Dr. James Polerecky DDS (19th & Farnam) .... 341.7576

902 Dodge Condos ......................... 884.6200 Brandeis Building .............................934.1224 Farnam 1600 Building ......................342.1616 Grubb/Ellis Pacific Realty ................345.5866 Harney Street Appartments .............934.7510 Old Market Lofts...J7 ........................345.8000 Riverfront Place ................................397.4837 Shamrock Development/Paxton Building ...... 934.7711 Skinner Macaroni Apartments...H1 .346.2346 The Cornerstone.............................. 346.0510 The Greenhouse Apts...A9 ...............341.3200 TipTop Building...(16th & Cuming)....345.8000

Bar 415...E3 .......................................346.7455 Barry O’s ...E8 ..................................341.8032 Billy Frogg’s Grille & Bar...E5 ...........341.4427 Bullpen...G6 ...................................... 502.5150 Dubliner Pub...D4 .............................342.5887 Eat the Worm...F4 .............................614.4240 Embassy Suites Old Market...F9 .... 346.9000 Farrell’s Bar & 9th St. Deli (902 Dodge) ......... 884.8818 J.D. Tucker’s Bar...E8 .......................934.5190 Julio’s...F2 .........................................345.6921 Irie...D7 ..............................................504.4901 Julio’s...F2 .........................................345.6921 Havana Garage Cigar Bar...E8 ......... 871.9528 M’s Pub...E6 ......................................342.2550 Mr. Toad’s...E8 ..................................345.4488 Myth Lounge...F6..............................884.6985 Nomad Lounge...(J8) ........................884-1231 O’Connor’s Irish Pub...F3 .................934.9790 Old Chicago...D6 ...............................341.1616 Old Market Tavern...F8 .....................341.0191

the encounter | may/june 2010 33


Merchants Attractions OLD MARKET / DOWNTOWN / RIVERFRONT

Old Mattress Factory (501 N. 13th).. 346.9116 Rock Bottom Brewery...D6 .............. 614.9333 Sake Bombers @ Blue...E4...............408.5566 Slowdown (729 N. 14th).................... 345.7569 The Stadium Club Sports Bar & Grill...E8....... 359.1290 Stokes Bar & Grill...E5 ......................408.9000 T Henery’s Pub...C6 .........................345.3651 The French Cafe...F7 ........................ 341.3547 The Underground...F7 ......................341.3547 Union Pizzeria & Sports Bar (14th & Cuming). 932.2929 Upstream Brewing Co...G6 .............344.0200 Urban Wine Company...J7 ...............934.0005 Waters Edge Lounge @ Embassy Suites...F9 ..... 346.9000

RESTAURANTS

801 Chophouse at the Paxton...B1..341.1222 Ahmad’s...E8.....................................341.9616 Billy Frogg’s Grille & Bar...E5 ...........341.4427 Blue Sushi Sake Grille...E4 .............. 408.5566 Bullpen Sports Bar & Grill...H5 ........ 502.5150 The Boiler Room...I6 ......................... 916.9274 Delice European Bakery...E4 ...........342.2276 Eat the Worm...F4 ............................. 614.4240 Falling Water Grille @ Embassy Suites...F9 ........ 346.9000 Famous Dave’s...D6 .........................614.9333 Farrells Bar...(902 Dodge) ................884.9947 Flatiron Café...(17th & Howard) ........344.3040 House of Lee...F4 .............................991.9330 Indian Oven...E7 ...............................342.4856 Joe Banana’s ....................................346.7227 Julio’s...F3 .........................................345.6921 La Buvette Wine & Grocery...F7.......344.8627 Liberty Tavern (10th & Davenport) ...998.4321 Little King...H21 ................................344.2264 Lucky’s 10-0-One (10th & Pacific) ...991.1001 M’s Pub...E6 ......................................342.2550 Matsu Sushi...B8 ..............................346.3988 Michael’s at the Market...C6 ............346.1205 Nicola’s...G3 .....................................345.8466 O Dining...A8..................................... 502.7888 O’Connors Irish Pub...F3 ..................934.9790 Old Chicago...D6 ..............................341.1616 Omaha Prime...E7.............................341.7040 Passport Restaurant...H6 ................344.3200 Rick’s Cafe Boatyard........................345.4545 Rock Bottom Brewery...D6 ..............614.9333 Sam & Louie’s Pizza...H6 .................884.5757 Spaghetti Works...F6 ........................422.0770 Spencer’s (at Hilton Garden Inn)......280.8888 The Stadium Club...E8 ..................... 359.1290 Stokes Bar & Grill...(E5) ................... 408-9000 Subway...E4 ......................................341.8814 Sullivan’s Steakhouse (222 S. 15th St.) .......... 342.4432 The Diner...D5 ...................................341.9870 The French Café...F7 ........................341.3547 Trini’s...E7..........................................346.8400 Twisted Fork...E7 ..............................932.9600 Upstream Brewing Co....G6 .............344.0200 V. Mertz...E7......................................345.8980 Vincenzo’s Ristorante...D4 ...............342.4010 Vivace...E6 ........................................342.2050 Wheatfields Express...E4 ................. 991.0917 Zio’s Pizzeria...F4 .............................344.2222

SPECIALTY FOODS & COFFEE

2010 James Beard Award Semifinalist: Outstanding Wine Service

34 may/june 2010 | the encounter

13th Street Coffee C0....G3 ..............345.2883 Aromas...I8........................................614.7009 Bickford Bakery...I8 .......................... 934.7450 Cubby’s Old Market Grocery...H3 ...341.2900 Delice European Bakery...E4 ...........342.2276 Hollywood Candy...F3 ......................884.7688 La Buvette Wine & Grocery...F7.......344.8627 Maggie Moo’s Ice Cream...H21 .......933.5280 MJ Java...B3 & F7 .............................342.5282 Old Market Candy Shop...F8 ...........344.8846 Old Market Eea House...G3 .............934.8538 Patrick’s Market...(E1).......................884-1600

Soul Desires Books & Coffee...G7 ...898.7600 Ted & Wally’s Ice Cream...G5 ........... 341.5827 Uprising Bakery...J7 ......................... 934.7450

SPECIALTY SHOPS

Ashley Collectibles...E3....................934.3100 Big Brain Productions...H5 ..............342.2885 Chameleon...E7 ................................342.4444 Cibola of Omaha...F7 (509 S 11th) ...342.1200 City Limits...E3..................................345.3570 Cornerstone Gem & Bead Co....G3 . 346.4367 Drastic Plastic...F4 ........................... 346.8843 DSR Power Sports...E3 ....................991.1383 Etc. Gifts...F7 ....................................342.2846 Garden Flowers...F7 ......................... 614.5661 Garden Of The Zodiac...E7 .............. 341.1877 Goldsmith Silversmith...F7 ...............342.1737 Homer’s Records...E5 ......................346.0264 Iron Decor & More...G5 ....................346.6123 Jay Welter Cigars...(18th & Jackson)345.1965 Kessler’s...H5 (1125 Jackson) ..........715.5888 Mairzy Doatz...F6.............................. 934.4815 Namaste...E7 .................................... 341.7069 New Realities Books & Gifts...E7 ..... 342.1863 Old Market Habitat Floral...E6 ......... 342.0044 Old Market Sundries...F8 ................. 345.8198 OM Gifts & Imports...E3 ................... 345.5078 Overland Outfitters...F8 ................... 345.2972 Perspective Jewelry...D4.................. 934.4416 Red Square...E7................................ 342.8878 SG Roi Tobacconist...F7 .................. 341.9264 Souq Ltd...E7 .................................... 342.2972 Tannenbaum Christmas Shop...F8 .. 345.9627 Trocadéro...E4 ................................. 934-8389

SERVICES

At the Loft Spa...F6...........................505.4100 Michael Boyle, Attorney...E7 ............359.1000 Centris Federal Credit Union...C3 ...334.2000 Commercial Optical...G3 .................. 344.0219 Dietz United Methodist Church ....... 346.9115 Don Fiedler Law Offices...F7 ........... 346.6263 First National Bank...(F5) ..................885-2574 Fringes Salon & Spa...G8 ................. 345.0404 Greater Omaha Chamber of Commerce...D2 346.5000 Omaha Convention & Visitors Bureau...B8 .... 444.4660 Hair Market Salon...E7 ..................... 345.3692 J P Cooke Rubber Stamps...F2 ....... 342.7175 Klein Law Offices...H3 ...................... 391.1871 Magical Journeys Carriage Service...E7 ........ 453.6745 Movers Not Shakers ......................... 614.9770 Old Market Car Wash...J2 ................ 393.2819 Old Market Encounter ......................884.2000 Old Market Mini Storage .................. 342.0022 Old Market Web Site .....www.oldmarket.com Omaha Healing Arts Center...E4 ......345.5078 Omaha Public Library...(15th & Farnam) ......... 444.4800 Omaha Yoga School...E7 .................346.7813 Pinnacle Bank...(10th & Douglas) ..... 346.9180 Security National Bank...(11th & Howard) .......... 344.7300 Sirens...F6 ......................................... 933.9333 Stinson, Morrison, Hecker LLP...C3 342.1700 Urbane Salon & Spa...B8 .................934.2909 Susie’s Baskets...D4......................... 341.4650 Sutera Law Offices...E6.................... 342.3100 Visions Framing Studio...K4 .............342.0020

THEATRES & ENTERTAINMENT

Blue Barn Theater...G6 ..................... 345.1576 FilmStreams...(14th & Webster) ........ 933-0259 Holland Performing Arts Center...(12th & Douglas) .............................................345.0606 Omaha Symphony...(16th & Howard).............. 342.3836 Opera Omaha...(17th & Farnam)....... 346.4398 Orpheum Theater...(16th & Farnam).345.0606 The Rose...(20th & Farnam) .............. 345.4849


Pinnacle Bank would like to welcome you downtown. owntown. Visit us in the historical Riley Building at 1016 Douglas On The Mall, 402.346.9180 or online at pinnbank.com

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ONGOING EVENT MAY EVENTS Opening 5/1: BODIES…The Exhibition. Find out facts about the human body by visiting the international blockbuster exhibition BODIES…The Exhibition at 10th & Dodge, 1002 Dodge Street. Visited by more than 15 million people in cities around the world, it provides an up-close look at the detailed structure and function of the human body using real threedimensional human bodies that have been meticulously dissected and preserved. Ticket prices starting at $14. w w w. b o d i e s o m a h a . com 5/1 - 5/2: Hot Shops Annual Spring Open House/Open Studios. Hot Shops Art Center. Artist demonstrations, live music, refreshments! Eighty+ artists invite you to visit the studios, view the artwork, and see how it is created! Four “hot shops” featuring glassblowing, pottery, bronze casting, and blacksmithing, as well as over fifty individual studios and four art galleries. Sat/12-8pm; Sun/12-5pm Free. 1301 Nicholas St. 342-6452 www.hotshopsartcenter.com. 5/1 - 5/2: Naturally Green Expo. Omaha Civic Auditorium - Mancuso Hall. The Naturally Green Expo is a two day event designed to

inform, educate and inspire consumers about ways to make our environment, homes and lives greener, safer, healthier and happier places to live. GREEN MATTERS and our goal is to reach people who are passionate about the environment, their health, saving money and about America. 10a.m. - 6 p.m. Free. 1804 Capitol Ave. 888740-6991 www.naturallygreenexpo.com. 5/1 - 10/9: Farmers Market. Old Market. Offers the best selection of fresh produce and meats, as well as a wide variety of unique specialty items: gourmet foods, organic fruits and vegetables, dairy products, cut flowers and bedding plants, handmade jewelry and more. Sat/8am-12:30pm Free. 11th & Jackson. 3455401 www.omahafarmersmarket.org. 5/1 - 5/7: Borderland Abstraction. Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts. Exhibition of new abstraction. Artists include Nils Folke Anderson, Tim Bavington, Nate Boyce, Michelle Grabner, Amy Granat, Mary Heilmann, Matthew Kluber, Takeshi Murata, Ara Peterson, Eli Ping, Eric Sall, Colin C. Smith & Wendy White. Tues-Sat/11am5pm Free. 724 S. 12 St. 341-7130 www.bemiscenter.org.

5/4: River City History Tour: Magic City. The Durham Museum. A tour of “The Magic City” will focus on the growth olf South Omaha, which was founded in 1884 along with the creation of the Union Stockyards. By 1890, South Omaha was the fastest growing city in the country, earning the nickname, “The Magic City.” Tues/6pm $10/members; $15/ non-members. 801 S. 10th St. 444-5071 http:durhammuseum. org. 5/4: An Evening with Garrison Keillor. Holland Performing Arts Center. His famous soothing voice, Midwestern musings, and dry humor have earned Garrison Keillor a Peabody, a spot in the Radio Hall of Fame, and the hearts of millions of Prairie Home Companion listeners every week. 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $25. 13th & Douglas Sts. 345-0606 w w w.T i c k e t O m a h a . com. 5/6: First Thursday Art Talk for May: Andrew Demirjian and Michael Caine. Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts. Current artists-in-residence give presentations of their work and discuss their creative processes. Always insightful, these discussions provide a rare opportunity to meet artists and learn first-hand about their inspirations, approach-

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May/June Calendar of Events 3/31/09 10:27:28 AM

es and techniques. Artists are Andrew Demirjian and Michael Caine. Thurs/7pm. 724 S. 12 St. 341-7130 www.bemiscenter.org. 5/7: Enter The Haggis. Holland Performing Arts Center. Rousing Celtic rock with frenetic hooks. 8pm Tickets start at $25. 13th and Douglas Sts. 5/7: Ryan Berrigan Solo Art Exhibition. Kaneko-UNO Library. A solo show of abstract work by UNO artist Ryan Berrigan MonFri/1-5pm; Sat/10am2pm Free. 1111 Jones St. 932-3486 http://library. unomaha.edu/kaneko/. 5/8: Celestial Message - Music for Healing and Meditation. Holland Performing Arts Center. Featuring Sri Ganapati Sachchidananda Swamiji of Mysore, India, a great musician, singer and composer. Sri Swamiji has been performing in music concerts for Meditation and Healing in India and many countries all around the world. 7:3010pm $15, $50, $100. 13th and Douglas Sts. 522-6670. For more information:Prak ash Raghavan http://www. yogasangeeta.org. 5/8 - 5/9: The Four Bitchin’ Babes. Holland Performing Arts Center. Sharp social commentary, a pinch of PMS, and outrageously fun harmonies from four gifted singer-song-

writers. A perfect Mother’s Day gift! Sat/8pm; Sun/2pm. 13th and Douglas Sts. 5/9: Mother’s Day Brunch. Lauritzen Gardens. 10am-2pm; garden hours are 9am-5pm Call for pricing and reservations. 100 Bancroft St. 346-4002. www.lauritzengardens.org. 5/9: Spring Flower Show. Lauritzen Gardens. A gorgeous indoor floral show allows visitors to experience garden beauty inside during the winter and spring months. Daily/9am-5pm $7/ adults ($6/Nov-May); $3/ages 6-12; free/ members & age 6 & under. 100 Bancroft St. 346-4002. www.lauritzengardens.org. 5/11: River City History Tour: Gritty City. The Durham Museum. The tour of “The Gritty City” through downtown Omaha will point out several historic locations, including the former site of Madame Anna Wilson’s home, The Brandeis Building, and the Paxton Hotel. The tour also includes highlights of the impact of noted individuals and events in our city’s sometimes turbulent history. Tues/6pm $10/ members; $15/nonmembers. 802 S. 10th St. 444-5071. For more information:Brit tany http:durhammuseum. org.

5/14 - 5/15: Omaha Symphony Masterworks: Beethoven’s Fifth. Omaha Symphony. Hold on tight as the thunderous power of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony grabs you and refuses to let go. This is music that shatters boredom and convention, breaking through with intensity that is as fierce and edgy as ever. Hear with fresh clarity the most influential classical piece ever written 8pm $15-$75. Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St. www.omahasymphony.org. 5/15 - 5/16: Spring into Spring Festival. Lauritzen Gardens. Lauritzen Garden’s annual plant sale and spring festival. 9am-5pm $7/adults; $3/children ages 6 to 12; Free/members and chidren under 6. 100 Bancroft St. 346-4002. www.lauritzengardens. org. 5/15: Mrs. Warren’s Profession. Brigit Saint Brigit Theatre Company. Vivie Warren, a product of exclusive 19th-century boarding schools, is ready to earn a living as one of the “new women.” She isn’t, however, ready to encounter her mother, the underwriter of this expensive education. The no-nonsense daughter is soon to learn that Mrs. Warren is also a business woman, with a profession of her own. Fri & Sat/7:30pm; Sun/2pm $22/adults;

the encounter | may/june 2010 35


J.P. COOKE COMPANY

Vincenzo’s Italian Ristorante

Lunch – M-Sat Dinner – 7 Nights Old Market • 1207 Harney 342-4010 1818 N 144th • 498-3889

RUBBER STAMPS PRE-INKED STAMPS INTERIOR SIGNS DESK NAME PLATES NAME BADGES EMBOSSING SEALS

“OLD MARKET”

1311 HOWARD OMAHA, NE 68102 (402) 342-7175 FAX: 402-342-9426

Old Friends, New Art Catch us at our Spring Open House — May 1st and 2nd. Of course, you are welcome any time.

You will find us at Hot Shops Art Center, 1301 Nicholas Street, Omaha, NE 68102 Located on the west side of 13th Street, northwest of the Qwest Center www.hotshopsartcenter.com

We invite you to visit us in our studios ... doors are open, and new work is on tap. Studio 004 Studio 100 Studio 101 Studio 102 Studio 102 Studio 102 Studio 102 Studio 103 Studio 105 Studio 107 Studio 111 Studio 112 Studio 202 Studio 218 Studio 304 Studio 310 Studio 311 Studio 314 Studio 315 Studio 321

36 may/june 2010 | the encounter

Crystal Forge Glassblowing Paula Wallace Fine Art Robinwood Custom Framing Sandy Hagen Meridith Merwald-Gofta K. D. Overholt-Peterson Lori Parrott Skupa Dorothy Tuma Photography Gerry Klein Fused Glass Dan Klima Woodturning & Sculpture Hot Shops Pottery Diane Mattern Painted Light Stained Glass Nancy Lepo Margie’s Glass Beads CKImages Photography Lori Elliott-Bartle Painting & Printmaking Contemporary Fiber Arts dar Vande Voort Mike’s Custom Glassworks

Sponsored by Pinnacle Bank

$18/62+, Student & Military; Group rates available. 614 S. 11 St. 5024910. www.bsbtheatre. com. 5/18: River City History Tour: Millionaires & Mansions. The Durham Museum. The tour of “Millionaires & Mansions” will explore Omaha’s Gold Coast and Cathedral neighborhoods, where the entrepreneurs of early Omaha built their opulent homes. Includes the former homes of influential Omahans such as Arthur Metz, Louis Nash, Sam Mercer, George Joslyn, and Arthur & Zerlina Brandeis. Tues/6pm $10/members; $15/ non-members. 803 S. 10th St. 444-5071. For more information: call Brittany 444-5071. http:durhammuseum. org. 5/22: Hubbard Street Dance Chicago. Orpheum Theater. One of the top modern-dance repertory companies in the world, Hubbard has a sleek and spicy energy that’s just plain fun for dance buffs and newbies alike. 8:00 PM Tickets start at $19. 5/25: River City History Tour: Magic City. The Durham Museum. A tour of “The Magic City” will focus on the growth olf South Omaha, which was founded in 1884 along with the creation of the Union Stockyards. By 1890, South Omaha was the fastest growing city in the country, earning the nickname, “The Magic City.” Tues/6pm $10/members; $15/ non-members. 804 S. 10th St. 444-5071. http:durhammuseum. org. 5/25: Nickelback with Breaking Benjamin, Shinedown and Sick Puppies. Nickelback is a hit-making, multiplatinum band. The band was recently nominated for a Grammy in the category of “Best Hard Rock Per-

formance for Solo, Duo, Group or Collaborative Performances” with vocals for their sizzling track, “Burn It To the Ground”, from their latest release, Dark Horse. 6:30 p.m. $40, $55, $70. w w w.qwestcentero maha.com. JUNE EVENTS 6/1 - 6/30: Hot Shops 10th Anniversary Show. Hot Shops Art Center. Work by Hot Shops artists will be shown in all galleries. Mon-Fri/9am-5pm; SatSun/11am-5pm Free. 1301 Nicholas St. 3426452 www.hotshopsartcenter.com. 6/2 - 6/27: Featured artists Dewaele, Elliott-Bartle, Markoff, Ocken. Artists’ Cooperative Gallery Ltd. Solo exhibits by sculptor Robert Dewaele; painter and printmaker Lori ElliottBartle; and painters Richard Markoff and Virginia Ocken. Opening celebration 7 to 10 p.m. Saturday June 5. Artist demonstrations 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday June 6. Wed/11am-5pm; Thur-Sat/11am-10pm; Sun/12-6pm Free. 405 S. 11th St. 342-9617 http://www.artistscoopgallery.com. 6/3 - 7/1: Out in Film Series. Film Streams at the Ruth Sokolof Theater. Presented in conjunction with LGBT Pride Month 2010, features a variety of artistically innovative films relating in different ways to the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender experience -- from early, important works by acclaimed directors Ang Lee, Gus Van Sant, Pedro Almodóvar, and Wong Kar Wai to groundbreaking dramas (“Longtime Companion”) to pivotal documentaries (“The Times of Harvey Milk”). Also featuring Kimberly Reed’s autobiographical new film “Prodigal Sons,” and a new UCLA restoration and Milestone Films re-release of the groundbreaking


documentary “Word is Out.” $9/general; $7/ seniors, students & teachers; $4.50/Members. 1340 Mike Fahey St. 933-0259 www.filmstreams.org. 6/5 - 6/6: Sand in the City. Qwest Center Omaha. The fun starts with 350 TONS OF SAND dumped into the middle of downtown Omaha! From there, corporate teams compete to build the best 15-ton sand sculpture. The public is invited down for a FREE weekend of fun --- see the sculptures, vote for your favorite, and enjoy great food and an interactive Kid Zone including 2 GIGANTIC sand boxes --- all to benefit the Nebraska Children’s Home Society. Sat/10am-8pm; Sun/11am-5pm Free. Parking lot at North 10th Street and Capitol Ave. 898-7783. http:// www.nchs.org/. 6/5 - 9/12: Landscapes from the Age of Impressionism. Joslyn Art Museum. This exhibition of 40 paintings from the renowned collection of the Brooklyn Museum represents some of the finest examples of late 19th- and early 20thcentury landscapes by celebrated French Impressionist artists and many of their American peers. Tues-Sat/10am4pm; Sun/noon-4pm; closed Mon $8/adults; $6/seniors and college students; $5/youth (ages 5-17); ages 4 and younger free. 2200 Dodge St. 342-3300. www.joslyn.org. 6/10 - 7/3: Rabbit Hole. Blue Barn Theatre. Becca and Howie had the perfect life - a great marriage, beautiful house. But after a tragic accident threatens to tear apart their family, the couple faces tough questions about themselves, their relationships and their place in the universe. $80 adults; $64 ages 65+ & students. 614 S. 11 St.

345-1576. http://www. bluebarn.org. 6/11 - 6/13: 13th Annual Taste of Omaha. Heartland of America Park and Lewis and Clark Landing. Along Omaha’s riverfront, the event showcases area restaurants with exciting live entertainment and activities. Watch cooking demonstrations, browse displays, enjoy music, amusement rides, face painting and much more! Fri & Sat/11am-11pm; Sun/11am-8pm. 8th & Farnam Sts. 346-8003 w w w.t as te ofomaha. info. 6/15: River City History Tour: Millionaires & Mansions. The Durham Museum. The tour of “Millionaires & Mansions” will explore Omaha’s Gold Coast and Cathedral neighborhoods, where the entrepreneurs of early Omaha built their opulent homes. Includes the former homes of influential Omahans such as Arthur Metz, Louis Nash, Sam Mercer, George Joslyn, and Arthur & Zerlina Brandeis. Tues/6pm. 806 S. 10th St. 444-5071 http:durhammuseum. org. 6/15 - 8/24: Tempo of Twilight Concert Series. Lauritzen Gardens. From all-time favorite cover songs to artistic originals, talented local bands will create a memorable musical experience for visitors of all ages. Purchase delicious and affordable meals from the café or bring your own snacks and beverages. Bring blankets or chairs to relax in the garden. 6-8pm; garden hours 9am-8pm on Tues (mid-May thru mid-Sept) $7/adults; $3/ ages 6-12, free/members and children under 6. 100 Bancroft St. 346-4002. www.lauritzengardens.org. 6/19: Playing with Fire Concert. Lewis & Clark Landing. The first date

of the Playing with Fire Concert Series, featuring Hadden Sayers, Carolyn Wonderland and Trombone Shorty & Orleans Ave. Family event Gates open at 4 pm Free; donations accepted. 515 N. Riverfront Drive. For more information:Laura Luger www.playingwithfireomaha.net. 6/19 - 7/1: NCAA College World Series. Rosenblatt Stadium. Team autograph sessions, Fan Fest activities and Opening Ceremonies and fireworks will be Fri 6/18. For information on ticket purchases, including dates they go on sale, please refer to www.cwsomaha.com or call 402-554-4404. Various times $19-$24. 1202 Bert Murphy Drive, I-80, Exit. 554-4404. www. cwsomaha.com. 6/25 - 6/27: Summer Arts Festival. 10th to 15th on Farnam St. 135 of the nation’s finest visual artists, three stages of continuous entertainment including national performers and a large hands-on Children’s Fair. Food, Nebraska craft brews, special events and artist demonstrations. One of the city’s premier destinations for exceptional art, atmosphere and entertainment. Fri & Sat/11am8pm; Sun/11am-5pm Free. Farnam Street 10th to 15th Street. 345-5401. www.summerarts.org. 6/29: River City History Tour: Millionaires & Mansions. The Durham Museum. The tour of “Millionaires & Mansions” will explore Omaha’s Gold Coast and Cathedral neighborhoods, where the entrepreneurs of early Omaha built their opulent homes. Includes the former homes of influential Omahans such as Arthur Metz, Louis Nash, Sam Mercer, George Joslyn, and Arthur & Zerlina Brandeis. Tues/6pm. 808 S. 10th St. 444-5071. http:durhammuseum. org.

YMCA Child Development Center

Look to the YMCA for Quality, Affordable Child Care The Downtown Family YMCA Child Development Center provides all-day educational development for ages 18 months to 5 years. • Open from 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. • Safe & caring learning environment. • Swim lessons included. • Outdoor playground. • Field trips.

• Breakfast, lunch & snack served daily. • Daily tness and nutrition class time . • All staff AED/CPR certied.

Tours given weekdays at 10:30 a.m.

YMCA SUMMER FUN CLUB

There‛s no place like the YMCA this summer. Register your child for Summer Fun Club. This all-day state-licensed child care program is open to children ages 4-12 features weekly themes and includes eld trips, swimming, games and other activities. Visit the YMCA today to register. Downtown Family YMCA• 430 S. 20th St. • Omaha, NE 68102 • 402-977-4329

Cubby’s Old Market Grocery 601 S. 13th St.

the encounter | may/june 2010 37


Oysters • Live Maine Lobster Extensive Scotch Selection Award Winning Wine List

Three Scoops of the Best! 715 N. Saddle Creek Road • 553-9672 • 553-9270 www.mamaspizzaomaha.com Omaha’s Best Pizza! Close to Downtown! Game Room for the kids

At The Paxton

Homemade Onion Rings and House Specials

402.341.1222 • 14th & Farnam • Downtown • www.801chophouse.com

An Omaha favorite for over 25 years!

Des Moines • Omaha • Kansas City

Kitchen: Sun-Thurs 11 am– 10:30 pm • Fri & Sat11 am– Midnight

Naturally Different

The Original Old Market Irish B ar Nightly Specials Live Irish Music Weekends Open 11a.m.

1205 H arney St. 342-5887

dublinerpubomaha.com 38 may/june 2010 | the encounter

100% Vegan

Downtown Omaha’s “new” location for nail care Monday-Saturday: 10am - 7pm 105S. 9th, Unit 309 • Omaha, NE 68102 In the Beebe & Runyan building, just east of the Courtyard Marriott

(402) 595-8805


yourmoment

1510 leavenworth street omaha, ne 68102 402-345-1810

www.minorwhitestudios.com/nite


May/June 2010 The Encounter Omaha Magazine  

May/June 2010 The Encounter Omaha Magazine

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