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POISED: Despite sharing a ballot

OC CRUISIN’: Thousands of

with some heavy hitters, ‘Frank’ Adkins vows to stay in the race for Ocean City Council PAGE 15

the most beautiful classics and hot rods have made their way to OC for a weekend full of activities PAGE 49

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: BUSINESS . . . . . . . . . 46 CLASSIFIED . . . . . . . . 70 ENTERTAINMENT . . . . 53 LEGALS . . . . . . . . . . . 72

LIFESTYLE . . . . . . . . . 49 OPINION . . . . . . . . . . 20 OUT&ABOUT . . . . . . . . 61 SPORTS . . . . . . . . . . . 38

LATE START, BIG FINISH: MALLARDS SLAY DRAGONS 5-1…PAGE 38

Ocean City Today WWW.OCEANCITYTODAY.NET

OCTOBER 5, 2012

FREE

SARANDONONSHOREFOR‘SUMMER’ Actress will be in resort throughout weekend for shoot ZACK HOOPES ■ Staff Writer

Council President Jim Hall

A

cademy Award-winning actress Susan Sarandon made her first official appearance this week as part of the cast of “Ping Pong Summer,” the independent film now shooting in Ocean City. Sarandon’s work in the resort coincides with that of two of her co-stars – Hollywood notables Lea Thompson and John Hannah – who also attended a briefing Monday to discuss the film’s progress. “Provided the weather holds out, we can’t mess this up now,” said the film’s writer and director, Michael Tully. Although Sarandon will only be on set for a week, the production will be in town until the end of October with See THOMPSON on Page 31

Jim Hall files to retain seat; hopes to stay conservative Resort council president weighs in on top issues ZACK HOOPES ■ Staff Writer

OCEAN CITY TODAY/ZACK HOOPES

“Ping Pong Summer” director Michael Tully, seated at right, discusses the film’s progress on Monday during a conference at the Hilton Suites. The film’s six-week shoot in Ocean City is slated to wrap at the end of this month. Seated next to Tully are two of the film’s stars, Lea Thompson and John Hannah. Standing, at rear, are producers Michael Gottwald and George Rush. (Inset) Susan Sarandon.

Collections continue for victims of Bradley condo fire NANCY POWELL ■ Staff Writer (Oct. 5, 2012) The board of directors of the Bradley on the Bay condominium is supporting the fundraising efforts of a woman who is trying to help people displaced by the Sept. 26 fire at the 37th Street complex. They came to the defense of Monica Hanshaw after hearing a man is claiming she must not use the name of the complex. In an example of no good deed goes unpunished, Hanshaw, who is spearheading the relief efforts, was disheartened by the man’s reaction.

Hanshaw said Monday that one of the condominium association members went to Fager’s Island, her place of employment, to complain because he or his family or the association was not contacted to be helped. She said she did not know if he and his family were victims or if he lived elsewhere in the 37th Street condominium complex. “I don’t even know if he’s a victim,” Hanshaw said. “This is to help all victims.” She said the man told her she may no longer use the name of the condominium complex in her fundraising efforts and that See RELIEF on Page 14

OCEAN CITY TODAY/NANCY POWELL

Items will be removed from the Bradley on the Bay condominium complex to determine if any are salvageable. The top floor was ravaged by fire last Wednesday, and the bottom floors were damaged by smoke and water.

(Oct. 5, 2012) Ocean Council President Jim Hall filed for re-election this week, the last likely candidate to confirm that he will indeed be part of the electoral battleground over the next month. Hall has served for almost 26 years on City Council. But the last six are the ones that will likely make the biggest difference for Hall’s record in this election. He was one of the first, by his own account, to begin pressing for reductions during the post-2006 real estate decline and the 2008 national recession. In 2010, a new council majority was formed, further enabling Hall’s influence on city policy. Newcomer Brent Ashley joined Jim Hall, as well as Joe Hall and Margaret Pillas, in siding together on a number of major — and controversial — changes, most notably revisions to the city’s salary and benefits structure, which followed an exceptionally bitter fight amongst council. Continued on Page 16


2 NEWS

Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

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Ocean City Today

NEWS 3

Skating experiment begins on city’s pine-board promenade

ZACK HOOPES ■ Staff Writer

ZACK HOOPES ■ Staff Writer (Oct. 5, 2012) Boards rolled down the boards – legally – for the first time this week, after the City Council gave its final approval Monday to allowing skateboards on the Boardwalk concurrent with bicycle hours. But despite the relative victory for skate enthusiasts, the tone this week remained one of restraint, given that lifting the Boardwalk ban is intended as a litmus test for a possible further opening-up of the skate prohibition on the city’s streets and sidewalks. “I’m a mom, so I told them at the beginning, ‘Behave, don’t skate off the rails and the benches … be smart about it,’” said Nicole Hills of ocshoremaga-zine.com, who organized a kickoff skate down the Boardwalk on Tuesday evening. “But these kids deserve a chance. You might always have that one percent that takes it too far, but at least give it a shot.” The journey towards skate liberalization began in July, when the council voted to widen the city’s antiquated definition of “boogie boards” to allow a number of new varieties of soft-top body boards to be used on the city’s beaches. The same, it was said, could be done with skateboards, since skateboard technology and technique has changed greatly since the city’s code was written in the 1970s. Over the past decade or so in particular, “longboard” skateboards have surged in popularity. Longboards are thin,

OCEAN CITY COUNCIL BREIFS

(Oct. 5, 2012) The Ocean City Council discussed the following matters during its Oct. 1 session:

Building code revision

OCEAN CITY TODAY/ZACK HOOPES

Skateboarders glide along the Boardwalk — legally — for the first time Tuesday. The Ocean City Council gave its final approval Monday night for an ordinance that allows skateboards to be used, for transportation purposes only, during the same hours that bicycles are normally permitted.

flat, and have a longer wheelbase, designed for better maneuverability and retention of momentum when cruising down streets and sidewalks. They are intended for transportation rather than stunts. Councilman Doug Cymek had suggested two weeks ago that the council begin by allowing skateboarding on the Boardwalk during the times when bicycles are already permitted. Bikes may be ridden on the boards at any time during the offseason, and from 2-11 a.m. only, from

Memorial Day to Labor Day. “I think this is something we could do immediately to send a good message that we’re trying to work with the citizens,” Cymek had said. However, “we’d have to make it very clear that this is for transportation only, not performing,” he added. Councilman Brent Ashley has been the only one consistently opposed to the measure, citing the possibility that the move will only embolden the scofflaw See KICKOFF on Page 5

Council moved to give final approval to an ordinance revising the city’s building codes to align with new state-mandated guidelines for energy efficiency and hurricane protection. City Engineer Terry McGean had noted that the new codes would increase building costs in some areas, and decrease them in others. While energy standards would boost expense, the city would see a considerable savings from the fact that much of the MidAtlantic has been removed from what is known as the ‘windborne debris region’ on hurricane maps, meaning that windows on residential and most commercial structures would not require impact-resistant glazing. There had been some apprehension in the construction industry regarding the changes, and Councilman Doug Cymek had asked McGean to give the council last week with a more full run-down of the new code. McGean said although the new codes seemed to be inconsistent in the wind levels that they placed the city under, the actual calculated loads had remained the same and would not affect the ratings of windows, other than the glazing requirement. This had allayed the fears of at least one window manufacturer who had spoken to council. Continued on Page 4


Ocean City Today

4 NEWS

NO HALLS, NO WAY! DON’’T T GAMBLE WITH THE FUTURE OF YOUR TOWN!

THE NEW MAJORITY’S “FISCALLY CONSERVATIVE” SPENDING: Decision to remove Former City Manager Dennis Dare from office after 29 years of service… Cost to the Town $306,468 Potential penalties Mayor Meehan saved the town by vetoing 7 of the 11 new ordinances introduced by The New Majority in November 2010… Meehan saved the Town $1.5 million 2 additional ordinances vetoed by Mayor Meehan because of the potential cost to the taxpayer: Closing the Defined Benefit Pension System… Cost to the Town $50,000 in the first year, as much as $950,000 in 2030 Closing the Retiree Health Care Plan… Cost to the Town $800,000 in 2011 and an additional $800,000 in 2012 Fiscal Year 2013 budget includes a one-cent decrease from the proposed property tax rate, saving the average taxpayer $20… Cost to the Town $863,000 “If you want to look at it badly, you can. You can see me as some sort of gambling degenerate, if that’s what you’re looking for.” – Joe Hall, (Ocean City Today 4/27/12)

TE’S DEBA ATE TE JOIN US FOR A CANDIDATE’S OPEN TO THE PUBLIC The FOP w would ould like to invite ALL CANDIDATES to attend!

Tuesday, October 30, 2012, 6:00 PM Grand Hotel & Spa, 2100 Baltimore Avenue City, cean City, MD 21842 Ocean Candidates, please RSVP to ocmd.fop10@gmail.com This message has been authorized and paid for by The Fraternal Order of Police, Ocean City, Lodge 10. This message has not been authorized or approved by any candidate. Glen McIntyre, President

OCTOBER 5, 2012

OCEAN CITY COUNCIL BREIFS Continued from Page 3 Cymek asked Monday that council implement the new codes as of Nov. 1. “This will allow builders and contractors to choose the code that best suits them in this period,” he said.

HSA contribution adjusted Council moved to approve a change that will see the city contributing four percent more annually to the Health Savings Accounts of employees in the High Deductible Health Plan. Since the plan was established last year, the city’s policy has been to make an annual contribution to the employees’ accounts equal to the deductible in the corresponding insurance program. Last week, the city’s benefits planner, Bolton Partners, noted that federal law has increased the minimum deductible allowed for HSAs to still qualify for preferential tax treatment. This increases deductibles from $1,200 to $1,250 for individuals and from $2,400 to $2,500 for couples or families. Bolton recommended that the city correspondingly increase its annual contribution. 18 employees have enrolled in the plan so far.

Grant application Ocean City Development Corporation Executive Director Glenn Irwin requested the council to back his application for state funding to partially redevelop the Fat Daddy’s restaurant location on Baltimore Avenue just north of Dorchester Street. “We wish to partner with Fat Daddy’s for a new mixed-use project,” Irwin said. “This is a brand new program from the state that just came out a few weeks ago.” The state has $2.5 million under the Maryland Strategic Demolition and Smart Growth Impact Fund, of which Irwin would request $90,000 to cover demolition costs for the upper floors of the property. These floors, he said, had been used for seasonal employee

housing, but have been condemned for some time, making the building essentially two-thirds uninhabitable. Fat Daddy’s owners Ed and Lisa Braude have attempted to secure financing for the project, but have been unsuccessful. If the state is able to sponsor the initial demolition, however, Irwin said the project is much more likely to get further support from lenders. Mayor Rick Meehan asked Irwin if he had reservations about gutting a building that was a “historic landmark.” “Actually, I’m probably the only one that considers that a landmark,” Meehan said, noting that the current Fat Daddy’s location is where he opened his first retail store in Ocean City some decades ago.

Server replacement OKd Council approved a sole source purchase of a new AS/400 computer system, bypassing a formal bid process and using the only vendor – SPS VAR, LLC – that City Engineer Terry McGean said both sells certified IBM products and is qualified to transfer the software and data from the city’s existing system to the new device. “This is the system that we run all our accounting on, our utility billing, our building permits,” McGean said. “It’s basically the critical piece of operating software in the Town of Ocean City.” Although IBM still supports the city’s current hardware, it can no longer be upgraded. “The size of the AS/400 used to be about like that podium. Now it’s smaller than a desktop PC,” McGean said. The city’s aging system, he noted, has reached a point where it will be more expensive to maintain that it will be to replace. The city currently pays over $13,000 per year in service charges, but the new system will come with three years of service included in the $36,768.93 cost.

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Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

NEWS 5

Kickoff ride held for skaters; additional revisions anticipated walk just below the pier and skating its entire length. A skate contest was also held inside Swirled World at Second Street. “I just thought, as a parent, that you can’t punish a whole group because of a certain stigma,” Hills said. “Most of the crime in this city is caused by drinking, but we don’t close the bars.” While she herself is not, Hills’ partner in the Website, Jeremy Brink, is an avid skateboarder. “I can’t even tell you how many times I’ve been yelled at for skating here,” said Brink, who grew up in Ocean City. “When I was younger, it was my only way to get around.” “It’s really not about making the younger voters happy. It’s become an allages thing,” Hills said.

Continued from Page 3

skaters who already cause property damage on the boards. Ashley also objected to the move this week to pass the change as an emergency ordinance, meaning that it would not have to go through a second formal reading in another two weeks. “I thought emergency passage was for something really pressing. What’s the hurry with this,” he asked. But Mayor Rick Meehan contended that there was no reason to hold off on an experimental measure. “If we find that it’s not compatible with the Boardwalk, or there’s some problem, we can have as much time as possible to change it before next season,” he said. Several dozen skaters of all ages turned out of Hills’ event, beginning at the Board-

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Ocean City Today

6 NEWS

WORCESTER COUNTY BRIEFS NANCY POWELL ■ Staff Writer (Oct. 5, 2012) The Worcester County Commissioners discussed the following topics during their Oct. 2 meeting in Snow Hill.

Land present The commissioners voted unanimously to give land on the south side of Belt Street in Snow Hill to the town. The land measures 64.2 feet wide by 130 feet deep and comprises 8,345 square feet. It is adjacent to the train station. “We utilize it all the time,” Snow Hill Mayor Charlie Dorman said.

Pusey store The commissioners awarded the work to demolish the old Pusey Country Store to Miller’s Land Service for $23,848. That business submitted the second lowest bid. The lowest bid, $16,700, was submitted by Harry White Movers, but did not meet all of the specifications. The commissioners a few months ago declared the old store, on Route 12 just outside the town limits of Snow Hill, to be a public nuisance because of its dilapidated condition. The old Bishopville store recently was demolished for the same reason. “The Bishopville one went very well,” Ed Tudor, director of the Department of Development Review and Permitting. “The store came down in about 90 minutes.” Continued on Page 11

OCTOBER 5, 2012

DNR reps discuss pond project with residents NANCY POWELL ■ Staff Writer (Oct. 5, 2012) Bishopville residents were told Tuesday evening that work to improve water quality and facilitate fish passage in their pond would begin in the near future. “We expect permits to be issued quickly,” Kevin Smith of the Maryland Department of Natural Resources told a gathering of about 50 people at the Bishopville Fire Hall. The long-awaited project could be under construction before the end of this year and the work is expected to take fewer than three months, he said. “We’ve had years of back and forth and review,” Smith said. One delay was the need to study whether proposed changes would have any detrimental effect on the bridge and road. Lack of funds was also a problem. The final plan for the project calls for the stream to run under the bridge and into the pond. All metal sheeting will be removed from the dam, but the concrete foundation will remain and boulders will be added. A series of step pools and rock weirs will be constructed from the tidal segment of Buntings Branch to the nontidal segment. A portion of the pond will remain upstream from the weirs and behind a sand berm constructed adjacent to the weirs. The pond, now about five acres, will be reduced to about three acres. Construction will be divided into five phases, Smith said. The first phase will be

BOB BAKER For City Council Focused On Our Future www.Baker4Council.com Info@Baker4Council.com 410-390-8619

OCEAN CITY TODAY/NANCY POWELL

Bishopville residents gather Tuesday evening at the fire hall to learn the latest plans to clean the pond and aid fish passage.

the placement of sediment and erosion controls. The second phase will be the installation of the berm and the upper portion of the weirs. The third phase will be the completion of the berms and the fourth phase will be the installation of weirs below the bridge. The fifth and final phase will be the dredging of a portion of the pond. Fish are not the only creatures to benefit from the improvements at the pond. “Right now, the only way for turtles to

get up is to cross the road,” said Roman Jesien, science coordinator for the Maryland Coastal Bays Program. Those turtles frequently get run over on the road, he said. After the work is completed, the turtles will be able to go up to the pond without crossing the road. Bishopville resident David Herr asked if people would be able to walk at the site of the berms, but was told no. See WORK on Page 7

My Background/Qualifications I am an independent thinker with a proven track record of getting things done by working with others to accomplish goals for the good of all. My reason for running is that I want to make Ocean City a premier destination for vacationers, as well as making it a desired location for living year-round. I was awarded a Bachelor of Science Degree in Finance in 1984 and an M.B.A. in 1989, both from the University of Baltimore. I have 27 years of experience as a business and finance professional. I worked in a number of industries and held executive positions covering Business Development, Financial Analysis, Strategic Planning, Mergers & Acquisitions, Marketing and served as President of a $25 million franchise company, Mailcoups, a subsidiary of ADVO, Inc. In 2005, Entrepreneur Magazine recognized this company as one of the top 500 Franchises in the country. I retired from my career in 2007. My wife, Vonnie, and I realized our goal of moving to Ocean City permanently. I have joined Vonnie, a CPA, to establish Baker & Associates, LLC, a local accounting/management firm specializing in Condominium/Homeowner Associations.

MY POSITIONS ON ISSUES IMPACTING OCEAN CITY

I am an avid supporter of “no-kill” animal shelters. Vonnie and I dedicate time each week to the Humane Society in West Ocean City.

The Family Image Is Being Eroded: The growth, both in size and frequency, of the car and

motorcycle events have created significant challenges. Safety issues are a real concern as drag racing, excessive speeding and spinning tires on virtually all of our streets are going unchecked. The behavior of some (not all) of the participants and the excessive amount of noise is becoming much more than just a nuisance to our residents and visitors who are not here for these events. The Town Officials need to take a zero tolerance stance towards “out of control” behavior.

Sustainability Is Reached With A Strong Residential Base:

Ocean City has much to offer residents and visitors. Much effort goes towards boosting tourism. Similar efforts need to be applied to retaining permanent and part-time residents. Encouraging people to live in Ocean City can only be beneficial to our community and our economy. There is no reason that we, as in other cities, can’t have thriving tourism and a substantial residential population.

The Budgeting Process Should Include An In-Depth Marketing Plan For Ocean City: Our annual budgeting process needs to be expanded to a multi-year Strategic

Planning process that includes an in-depth Marketing Plan that goes well beyond just advertising. This Plan would clearly lay out how to improve Ocean City as a premier family resort, in order to attract families from other destination choices that are available to them.

Conservatism Is Key To The Future: Going to the taxpayers to increase taxes needs to be

the last source for revenue. Fiscal conservatism is not just about the amount of tax dollars being spent but it is also about accountability for how the tax dollars are spent. With property values decreasing and health and pension benefits rising, we are seeing some states, counties and municipalities on the verge of bankruptcy. Ocean City's financial future depends on its voters and taxpayers insisting on a conservative approach to managing money from their elected officials.


Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

NEWS 7

Commissioners praise Badger’s first-year accomplishments NANCY POWELL ■ Staff Writer (Oct. 5, 2012) The Worcester County Commissioners praised the county’s new Economic Development director Tuesday for his accomplishments during his first year on the job. In particular, the commissioners praised Badger for organizing the Sept. 27 bus tour to highlight places of potential economic development. More than 50 developers, Realtors, investors and others visited the former Perdue site in Showell, the closed Steer Inn in Taylorville and sites in Ocean City, Berlin and elsewhere in the county. “You exceeded my expectations,” said Bud Church, president of the commis-

sioners. “I was impressed with the quality of the people you brought in. Thank you for doing an excellent, excellent job.” Badger, who has been on the job in Worcester County for only 10 months, has worked in economic development for 29 years. “I understand how important jobs are,” he said. Melanie Pursel, executive director of the Ocean City Chamber of Commerce, characterized last Friday’s tour as “outstanding. It was well-run and executed.” The commissioners presented Badger a proclamation recognizing Oct. 15-19 as the state’s second annual Economic Development Week. The commissioners have also taken steps to hire a department deputy director.

Work could begin by end of year Continued from Page 6

“It’s not meant to be publicly assessable,” Smith said. A much earlier version would have been assessable. In 2002, the plan called for the pond to be reduced to two acres, to be deepened to 8 or 10 feet and to be separated from two streams that would join to become one before going under the road and out to the river. People would have

been able to walk in an area between the pond and the streams. An even earlier option, discussed in 2001, would have added an adjustable gate to the dam so the pond’s water level would have been lowered during the downstream fish migration system. There would have been a rather disagreeable odor while the submerged vegetation would be open to air when the water level dropped.

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Ocean City Today

8 NEWS

OCTOBER 5, 2012

Operation Medicine Drop nets 134 pounds of unused meds (Oct. 5, 2012) Worcester County’s Operation Medicine Drop drug take-back program, held Sept. 29, netted 134 pounds of expired or unused medications throughout the county in a four-hour period. “We collected 217 pounds of medications during our spring 2012 event and another 134 pounds this past weekend,” said Assateague COASTKEEPER Kathy Phillips. “In addition, this year Worcester County Sheriff’s Office and the Ocean City Police Department offered two permanent drop off boxes at the Ocean Pines Police Station and the Ocean City Public

Safety Building, which collected 311 pounds of medications between May 30 and Oct. 1, so we saw a total of 662 pounds of medications kept out of our waterways in 2012.” Recent research by the U.S. Geological Service now confirms that some flushed drugs pass largely unaltered through our wastewater treatment plants and enter our Bays and other waters. Recent studies have found ‘inter-sex’ largemouth bass, with both male and female reproductive organs, in ponds and lakes on Delmarva, an indicator of biological interference from pharmaceuticals in our waterways.

Route 50 bridge maintenance to result in brief closures Thurs. (Oct. 5, 2012) Weather permitting, the State Highway Administration will perform routine maintenance work on the Harry W. Kelley Memorial Bridge (Route 50 bridge) over the Sinepuxent Bay in Ocean City from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 11. Crews will open the bridge periodically for test openings that should last no longer than those needed for normal boat opening. If inclement weather prevents the maintenance work, it will occur the next day, Friday, Oct. 12, during the same hours.

While SHA and its transportation partners work hard to maintain safe traffic mobility in work zones, each driver needs to actively modify his or her driving style to help prevent crashes. Stay alert and look for reduced speed limits, narrow driving lanes and highway workers. Slow down and don’t follow too closely. Maryland now features free 511 traveler information. Call 511 or 1-855-GOMD511 or visit www.md511.org for current travel information. Sign up to personalize travel route information through MY511 on the website.

Unused medications, if not properly disposed of, can find their way into the community, posing a health threat to families, especially small children who often ingest medications mistaking them for candy. Unused medications also pose a safety threat to the community if narcotic, or controlled prescriptions, find their way into the wrong hands. Detective Jeffrey Johns, with the Worcester County Criminal Enforcement Team, has been tracking the controlled prescription pills collected at both drop boxes that are commonly possessed by drug addicts, drug seekers and drug dealers who often illegally obtain/abuse these controlled medications. “The Ocean City drop box has yielded 1,895 individual controlled prescription pills with a street value of approximately $10,135 dollars,” Johns said. “The Ocean Pines drop box has yielded 2,696 individual controlled prescription pills with a street value of approximately $20,889 dollars.” The Ocean City permanent drug drop box is located in the front lobby of the Ocean City Police Department, at 65th Street.The Ocean Pines permanent drug drop box is located in the front lobby of the Ocean Pines Police Department, at 239 Ocean Parkway. Both are open the public 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. “Both these permanent drug drop boxes were sponsored by the National Association of Drug Diversion Investigators (NADDI) and funded by the Ocean

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City Elks Lodge Drug Awareness Program, and we greatly appreciate their support,” Johns said. “We encourage Worcester County residents to use these permanent drop boxes and we’re working with local agencies to acquire at least one more box in the south end of the county,” Phillips said. “This is a huge benefit to the community and gives folks an option to clean out their medicine cabinets more often. Properly disposed medications keep our communities safe and our waterways.” For more information visit www.actforbays.

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Ocean City Today

NEWS 9


10 NEWS

Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012


Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

NEWS 11

PURSEL AND BADGER PRESENTED WITH PROCLAMATION Worcester County Commissioners present a proclamation to Melanie Pursel, Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce executive director, and Worcester County Economic Development Director Bill Badger (second and fifth from left) on Oct. 2, recognizing the week of Oct. 15-19 as Economic Development Week in the county. The county and other jurisdictions are partnering with the Maryland Economic Development Association for the second annual Economic Development Week to celebrate the people, projects and programs that pave the way for new strategies and innovations that lead to job creation and investment in our economy.

WORCESTER COUNTY BRIEFS Continued from Page 6 It will be several weeks before the Pusey Country Store is demolished, Tudor said.

Budget transfers The commissioners approved the fiscal year budget transfer requests from Budget Officer Kathy Whited. Basically, the budget transfers move budgeted funds from where they were unspent to areas where they were needed. They totaled $114,419.

Housing rehabilitation The commissioners approved a letter to the Community Development Administration of the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development signifying their intent to con-

tinue the countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s participation in the Maryland Housing Rehabilitation Program. The program is offered through the state Special Loans Program and is targeted to Maryland residents with acceptable credit whose income is below 80 percent of the state median income.

Travel expenses The commissioners approved the request of the University of Maryland to encumber $2,133.20 from fiscal year 2012 to fiscal year 2013 so the funds may be used for travel expenses in fiscal year 2013. The travel funds allow the faculty to provide training programs to county citizens. They also provide educational programs for county 4-H youth. The money was unspent during fiscal year 2012. It is money that the county pays the university on a semi-annual basis for the salaries, benefits and travel for the Worcester County Extension.

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12 NEWS

Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012


Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

NEWS 13

SDHS ROYALTY Stephen Decatur High School homecoming queen, Liz Brittingham and king, Dallas Harrington are recognized during halftime of last Friday’s football game against the Queen Anne’s Lions. Decatur lost 23-7.

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Ocean City Today

14 NEWS

OCTOBER 5, 2012

Relief fund created to assist families displaced by Bradley blaze Continued from Page 1

Firefighters from Ocean City, Berlin, Showell, Ocean Pines and Bethany Beach, Del., battled the blaze at Bradley on the Bay condominium building for more than four hours last Wednesday.

he is trying to get a lawyer involved. She does not know why. “This is so absurd,” she said. “Who would ever knock someone down for trying to help?” Because of the man’s complaints, she changed the name of the Facebook page she started in order to raise funds for the six displaced families. It had been facebook.com/BradleyOnTheBayCondoFireReliefFund, but now it is facebook.com/ OCMDANGELS. Since then, the president and vice president of the board of directors at Bradley on the Bay called to apologize and offer their support. The man who complained, Hanshaw said, had no authority to tell her to cease using the condominium’s name. As of earlier this week, only one family

Fire victim does not know condition of family’s items NANCY POWELL ■ Staff Writer (Oct. 5, 2012) Cesar Alvana has not returned to his rented unit at Bradley on the Bay since the Sept. 26 fire. He was not there when the fire ripped through the third-floor units. His secondfloor unit sustained major water damage and he wonders what might be salvageable. “I don’t know yet,” he said Wednesday. He will not know the condition of his

items, such as the television, stereo and laptop computer, until he gets a call from Royal Plus, which he said will be removing them from the unit and putting them in the parking lot. “Maybe not good,” he said. Until Royal Plus removes his items, Alvana said he won’t know what items he and his family might need. So far, they have received clothes and a crib because of Monica Hanshaw’s efforts to assist the fire victims. Alvana, his wife, Rebecca, and their

three daughters, ages 8, 5 and 5 months, had lived in their “beautiful” two-bedroom unit at Bradley on the Bay at 37th Street for three years. After the fire, the Red Cross housed them for three nights at the Days Inn. Now they are staying temporarily with his brother in West Ocean City. Alvana, a cook at the Captain’s Table and Outback Steakhouse, has applied to move into an apartment on 28th Street and hopes to find out next week if his application is accepted.

had contacted Hanshaw about the assistance. Although she and some of the fire victims work at the same place, Fager’s Island, they do not work the same shift and she did not know their last names. The Red Cross helped the victims initially, but the organization maintains the privacy of the people they assist and does not give out their identities. Even Hanshaw does not know who they are, except for one family. That family consists of a father and mother and three children, but others know of the available assistance collected by Hanshaw because her Red Cross contact has told them. Hanshaw has been putting donated items in donated storage space at OC Mini Storage in West Ocean City. “We will eventually disperse it to the families,” Hanshaw said. “We’re just trying to help people with nothing.” She expects more families to make contact once they are in permanent housing and have space for the donated items. WalMart gift cards are especially welcome, she said. Donations may be taken to Fager’s Island and Fish Tales in Ocean City and Outback Steakhouse and OC Floor Gallery in West Ocean City. OC Floor Gallery collected items during a live radio broadcast from there on Saturday and the Coconut Malorie donated sheets, towels and blankets. People may also make a deposit to the Bradley on the Bay Fire Relief Fund at any Bank of Ocean City branch. The funds will be divided equally among the families.

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Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

NEWS 15

Adkinsstays in race despite tight field; backs unionization ZACK HOOPES ■ Staff Writer (Oct. 5, 2012) John Franklin “Frank” Adkins was the first person to file for City Council. Although not an incumbent, Adkins has been a familiar face at City Hall for some time. He is a retired electrician. ■ OCEAN CITY TODAY: What made you want to run? ■ FRANK ADKINS: I first started to get wary back when they changed the benefits. There was a budget item for background checks, background checks on five police officers who were in the budget to start school in January, and they refused to hire them because they wanted to change the retirement benefits. Well, they’d already spent $50,000 dollars of taxpayer money for the background checks. Five people would not have made any difference in that retirement system. I’m not opposed to changing the retirement system, but you don’t throw away $50,000 of taxpayer money. I don’t know about you, but that’s a lot of money to me. And that got me mad. I think firing Dennis [former City Manager Dare], that started that group Citizens for Ocean City, was the straw that broke the camel’s back. I’ve been asked by several people to withdraw because they’re afraid I’ll divide the vote. I don’t think I will win and I can’t help it that I’d split the vote. But I got in this with my money, my time, and good, bad, or indifferent, it’s going to the end. I’m hoping that Mary gets re-elected, that Doug gets re-elected, and I think that Dennis will be the number one vote getter. And I hope Joe Mitrecic gets in, because he lost by only 40 voters or so last time. ■ OCT: Right, it was a very slim margin. Do you support those four because … ■ ADKINS: Dennis knows everything about the city. Politicians, I hate them. If I had my way, I’d fire every senator, every congressman. If you couldn’t get along with people in this office, they’d fire you. In 1978, I got hired by Delmarva Power as a ground-man, the lowest position. They have a fouror five-year apprentice program, and I went through that. The school was always on company time, on the job training. I still have a masters’ electrical license in Maryland and Delaware. I don’t advertise, I do work for friends and people I know. I drove a bus for about seven years, in the late ’80s and early‘90s. It wasn’t physical work, it was more mental. 25 mph down the bus lane, you couldn’t take your eyes off the road. The last year, I worked for one week. I got spit on and a beer thrown at me, and I said ‘I’m done.’ ■ OCT: Do you think the city has a problem with the volume of visitors, and do we have a way to handle that? ■ ADKINS: We have to have visitors to live, everybody does. But we can’t throw away taxpayer money. Look at my taxes this year – I paid $4,598 in property tax. That’s city, state, and county. My taxes actually did not go up, but what went down was the Homestead Tax Credit. I had a $1,500 the year before, this year I had a little over $100. That’s what hurt. I went to the budget hearings. In the last authorization, they wanted to lower the tax rate a penny, taking it out of the savings account. That was just political, it didn’t do anything for the taxpayer. Save $20? I can’t buy a meal in this town for $20? Continued on Page 26

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Ocean City Today

16 NEWS

INTERVIEW WITH JIM HALL Continued from Page 1

Because Ashley had unseated former Council President Joe Mitrecic, the new majority was able to vote Jim Hall in as the new head of council, making him the de-facto leader of policy movement that has garnered similar levels of praise and scorn. n OCEAN CITY TODAY: Why do people in general, or why did you specifically, get into politics? Why are you still in it, given the volume of flak that you can catch or have caught? n HALL: Because I’m crazy. No, seriously, I had, and still have, a lot of things that I’d like to get accomplished. I like the town and I like being part of the decision-making process. It’s in my blood; it has been for 26 years. Most importantly, I think the residents can live here and pay a lot less in taxes. I think we have enough visitors, enough guests – and we tolerate a lot from those folks – so I think the residents here could live for a lot less money. I’d like to continue on lowering the tax rate, lowering the fees and raising the benefit to the guy who wants to live and retire here. n OCT: The move to knock a penny off the tax rate was an issue earlier on with regards to how much taxpayers would actually save versus how much would be pulled from the city’s operating reserve. n HALL: That money belongs to the taxpayer. We have a very substantial reserve. I think what some of the members on the council don’t understand is that people are hurting. If you’re not on a fixed salary or fixed retirement, you might not relate to that. But I think the regular mom and pop voter who lives in Montego Bay, Caine Woods, or downtown are concerned about their 401(k), their

savings, their retirement, and outliving the money they’ve saved. I’m a plain, on-the-street worker and I’m telling you I’m hurting, and people are worried about their money. This election is all about money. They’re trying to make it about personalities, but it’s not, it’s about money. n OCT: Do you think that the city has or could have enough of a permanent resident base to make our year-round population more sustainable, given that it’s been going down a bit over the past few years? n HALL: I think some are being chased away. I think people are aggravated about the noise on the weekends. We keep inviting more and more guests here, and sometimes it’s at the expense of those who live here and came for a quiet retirement. The plus side of those visitors is that they help keep the tax rate down. But I call it a tipping point and I think at some time the council is going to have to address the tipping point. n OCT: As far as the political scene goes, how is it that you’ve come to be associated with Brent (Ashley) and Joe (Hall) and this “new regime” that people either love or hate? n HALL: For 23 years, I was on the other side, the “three side,” when Vince Gisriel was here, when George Feehley was here. Sometimes you’re on the three, sometimes you’re on the four, sometimes you’re on the six or the one. There’s no coalition per se, it’s just that since 2006 and particularly the last election, I’ve been saying, “The world’s changing” to the administration. Things are changing out there, and people are worried about gas prices and food prices. And the administration is saying, “No, everything’s fine, don’t worry, there’s plenty of money coming in, and if we ever get low we’ll just raise the tax rate.” This is a quote from the administration, “We have something that no one else has: we have the ability to raise taxes.” I object to that. I think just

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the opposite, that we ought to lower taxes. We have a safe place to live, a clean place to live and we ought to have an affordable place to live. That’s what this election’s about. You have four big spenders running for office, and you have four conservatives on the council right now. Whichever way this goes, it’s going to be the spenders versus the conservatives. n OCT: Going forward, what specifically would you want to see done other than what you’ve already gotten through? n HALL: We addressed the health benefits, the pensions and the tax rate. We gave money back and we gave bonuses to the employees. I’m going to tell you that unionizing the employees is a bad idea. And I hope you get that statement from all the Council members, it’s not just throwing it to the voters. I truly believe some seasoned, well-trained union negotiator is going to set the tax rate for Ocean City. A guy from Baltimore City is going to come and dictate the tax rate for Ocean City and I think that’s wrong. n OCT: Regardless, it’s an issue that’s up to the voters. So if it does happen, will it be workable? n HALL: Obviously, whatever the voters do we’ll carry out their wishes to the best of our ability. I just don’t think it’s necessary, I think the employees will be sorry to have those dues taken out of their pay every week. They are very fairly paid, and they deserve raises in a timely manner, benefits in a timely manner, and I don’t think this [the union] is what they’re going to ultimately want. But right now, if that’s their desire... For me, I made an administration change of one employee in 26 years. I don’t think there’s a great fear of everybody losing their job. I know the mayor said it last night (Monday), that the reason this is going on is this great fear factor. That just hasn’t happened. We made an administration

OCTOBER 5, 2012

change (removing City Manager Dennis Dare) because he was going in the wrong direction. We made changes in pay and benefits, but we didn’t touch current employees. This is only for new employees. So what’s really changed? n OCT: The retirement and pension changes, given the financial results thus far, would you consider them? n HALL: A smashing success, yes. And we’ve gotten no credit for that. This is the most important thing: what seemed like chaos was actually planned and calm. We couldn’t get it done through other methods, so we put 10, 11, 12 ordinances up on the table and said. “Okay, here’s the motion, we’re going to second it, now you have to do something about it.” And what happened in six months? They’re almost all passed, to the benefit of the employees, and most importantly it ensures that when these folks retire, the money will be there. It really safeguards them. This is not a defined benefit where maybe the money won’t be there at the end. Look what happened to Enron, to GM. Those people’s pensions are gone. We want to make sure that doesn’t happen. n OCT: One of the things that I hear frequently is the whole issue of actuarial studies and that there’s some sort of future progression that could go awry with this resetting of the pension system. Do you worry that the city could hit some sort of cliff in the next 10 years as we try to close out the plans? n HALL: Just the opposite. A defined benefit guarantees the employee a rate of return on their investment. If you don’t hit the rate of return, the taxpayer has to make up the difference. With a 401(k), you ride the stocks up and you ride the stocks down. The taxpayer doesn’t have to come out of his pocket with money. The taxpayer in Montego Bay’s stock portfolio is the same as the city employee’s. Things go

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Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

INTERVIEW WITH JIM HALL

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down, things go up. He can make a little money or a lot of money. One of the reasons the administration didn’t want us to change, is this: if you quit after 10 years and go to work for a car dealership, that money’s [in a 401(k) yours. What we put into the plan, and what you put into the plan. In a defined benefit, you can’t take the part that we [the city] put in. You only take the part that you put in. We were told that many times. That’s not proper. That money’s supposed to be yours. n OCT: One of the concerns about that, particularly from the police, is setting things up so that people can move around. Adapting to a tougher economy where people change jobs. They want people to come here and train here and make an investment. Is that something that can be remedied? n HALL: The fact is that they’re not leaving. Our administration told us – and this goes to the administration change that we made – that if you’re going to make these changes, we won’t get anybody to apply for jobs, everyone will leave, we won’t get any qualified applicants. The opposite has happened. We’re getting more qualified applicants, hundreds of applications for every job from custodian to police chief. Everything that the administration predicted when we made these changes, the opposite has happened to the benefit of the taxpayers. You heard it from the lady that came two weeks ago and told us about the health benefits. These were well-thought-out decisions that we

made, and we said to the administration, “You make the changes and take the credit. Jim Hall doesn’t want the credit, Margaret (Pillas) doesn’t, Brent doesn’t, Joe Hall doesn’t.” But they said “No.” And after four years of them saying no to me, I said, “Okay, then I’ll do it. Now I have enough votes and I’ll go ahead and make the changes. They’re to the benefit of the taxpayers, and that’s who we work for.” And while we’re on health benefits, despite the rumors, my health is fine. I had a heart attack; they put a stent in and unclogged the artery. I was never even sick. I was screaming to get out of the hospital after three days. n OCT: Going back to what seems to be the linchpin of a lot of discussion, which is Dennis (Dare). I know you said before you wanted to discuss exactly what went on. n HALL: I’ve been using the word “administration.” I signed – and I’m the only one that did, because I’m the council president – a confidentiality agreement, as did Dennis. So Dennis and I can’t talk about what went down. I can only say we made an administration change. I went to the administration and asked them to make changes, and they said “no.” So we made a change and this was the effect. I’ll tell you, if you’ve ever had to fire a family member or a cousin or a girlfriend from your family business to save your business, that’s what making an administration change was to me. I’m very sorry that I had to do it. It’s one of the hardest decisions I’ve Continued on Page 18

NEWS 17

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Ocean City Today

18 NEWS

INTERVIEW WITH JIM HALL Continued from Page 1 ever made. But in my opinion, in order to change the direction of the town and save the town from intoxicating spending, I made the call. n OCT: So you can’t discuss the specifics, but you’re characterizing that administration as being openly reluctant to certain cost-saving measures? n HALL: Yes. n OCT: Is there the impression still amongst the administration that the city will bounce back and that there will be some sort of recovery to the type of government that was? n HALL: The city’s back. It’s been back. People still have their jobs, it’s safe, it’s clean, and people are happy. People will be okay. But we need to continually make decisions that make it easier for taxpayers and retired taxpayers to get by in this town. I think we can make it more affordable for people to live here. n OCT: This line of conservatism is going to have to continue for the purpose of sustainability? n HALL: Yes. And we can do more. We were able to trim 100 employees through retirement, through bonus incentives, through the DROP program. And we didn’t replace them, or all those pickup trucks or take-home cars. And it’s had a tremendous effect on our cash flow. Where did we get an extra 100 employees? Why? The administration added them. When you look back, this all started when I found out that the administration was buying a fire truck in 2006. Covertly, they put in the capital budget that they were going to buy a fire truck. And the plan was to get rid of the volunteers and have an all-paid fire company. And that hurt the volunteers to this day. They’re reeling from that. I wrote a letter to the paper and said, “Don’t let those volunteers go.” You saw it at the Dough

Roller fire and you saw it the other night down there [at Bradley on the Bay]. They were packed with volunteers. Someone – I’ll say the “administration” – tried to go around us, hire a fire chief, hire a guy to come in an organize the change, and boot out the volunteers, and I will never forget that. From that time on, I started paying attention to these things that were not discussed in the budget, but were already in the budget. That would’ve been a $7.5 million per year mistake. If not for a few people, that would’ve gone through and you would’ve not had volunteer firemen in this town. n OCT: And you think having an all professional fire company is symptomatic of a tendency to want to expand the city’s control and scope of governance? n HALL: What triggered that is that a lot of guy’s wives now work. So if they’re watching the kids and the fire whistle goes off, in the time before the husband or the wife, whichever one is a volunteer, jumped on the fire truck and the other stayed home. Well, they can’t do that now. The volunteer fire company went to the administration and said, “We think we should get a couple paid guys in each house, just in case. We can man it most of the time, but just in case, can we have a few fighters and a truck ready to go?” Something that the administration was always pissed off about and lamented all the time was that they had no control over the volunteers. They wanted to control their spending, when they wanted to buy a truck, the houses, the men. That would’ve given the administration a pay raise as well. Because he or she commanded more people and thus deserved a pay raise. That’s how it works. n OCT: The discontent amongst employees that is often discussed. What’s been your take on the alleged dissatisfaction?

n HALL: The bee’s nest is being stirred. You heard the mayor do it again last night. He just announces, “This is why they’re upset …” They’re being stirred by the administration. We know for a fact that the administration went into Thursday staff meetings and stirred them up, every week: “Hey, these guys just got in, but you only have to put up with them for two more years. When the election comes we’ll get rid of them.” That’s what stirs the bees up.” n OCT: The other big thing that gets thrown around is that Dennis’ firing is alleged to have taken place too abruptly and behind closed doors. That there was this sort of Soviet-esque “purge” mentality. n HALL: When Brent was new, he and Joe took Dennis out to lunch. Just to say, “We’re on the council now, and we do have a majority. We’re not nincompoops. We’re not being forceful, but please just include us in your decisions and tell us what’s going on. Not just Rick’s people, not just Mary and Doug, we’re on the council here to serve too.” Dennis basically thumbed his nose at two sitting council members, and they left saying, “Is that the way we’re going to be treated?” There’s a perception down there that I have a cast of characters on my side. I have a different makeup of people. Doug (Cymek) and Mary (Knight) and Lloyd (Martin), they just go together. They’re a social group, they do everything together. We don’t do anything together. n OCT: You’re saying it’s purely a policy-oriented relationship? n HALL: We go down there and we do what seems like a good idea. We did the fireworks – and this is mundane, but MGH and the fireworks are kind of the same thing – by saying, “If you haven’t shopped for insurance in the past four years, you’re stupid.” We’d been with Zamboni for a few years, why wouldn’t we look and see what’s

OCTOBER 5, 2012

out there? Somebody came in and gave us a good price, had done a good job [elsewhere], and we put our hands up and said, “Why not, seems like the right thing?” They gave us a better price, and the fireworks ended up being better or at least as good as before. We got criticized like crazy for that. That wasn’t pre-planned; it wasn’t the majority trying to pull anything. The four of us thought that was a good idea. Simple decision. Then the advertising contract comes up. We think it’s a good idea to give him notice, shop it, and maybe he’ll just end up getting it again. We thought that was a good idea. We got so much [criticism for that]. We thought, “Why one more year? There must be some hook here.” It’s a $4 million contract and they make 10 percent per year. n OCT: There’s a clear back-and-forth with the salary and benefit costs. The FOP achieves a certain level of pay and benefits, and then everyone else feels they deserve the same thing. Equality with public safety is a big motivation. So why cut it off now and say, “We’re not going to go any further with the escalation?” n HALL: We didn’t think the union was good for anybody. The voters decided on that. We were opposed to the FOP. We had fought it election after election, and the last time it came up everybody laid down and let them have it. With the FOP, what’s it really done for them? There’s not more job security with the union. The City Manager can still fire anyone. They say that this is job security, but for what? Having a union doesn’t mean you don’t get fired. But you’re right, if I was a general employee, I would ask why they get it and I don’t. I pick up trash, but I’m just as important. I’m a welder, but I’m as important to the town as a cop is. I agree with that completely. But I think it’s a mistake for the town in general.

ON TTHE HE B BALLOT: ALLO OT: FACT:

Ocean City Voters... Educate yourself on the facts beffore voting on this imp por ortant ballot question q . PAID FOR BY THE GREATER OCEAN CITY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE & OCEAN CITY HOTEL-MOTEL-RESTAURANT ASSN.


Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

NEWS 19

City solicited for outside course management at Eagle’sLanding marketing of golf programs, attention to detail with respect to course conditioning, customer service as well as the implementation of cost controls.” The essential value of turning operations over to an outside management company, like BCG, is an economy of scale when it comes to certain fixed costs such as booking systems, marketing, and human resources, Waldron stated. The notion of turning over the city’s golf operations to a third party may seem attractive, given that Eagle’s Landing has become a political issue of late. Three week ago, Councilman Brent Ashley traded barbs with Mayor Rick Meehan over accountability measures for the city’s complimentary play system. While the purpose of the passes – to promote the city’s golf tourism base by offering free rounds as giveaways for charities and official events – didn’t seem to be in question, Ashley seemed to be concerned how the city was vetting to whom and for what the cards were being given. “There’s no accountability with these cards,” Ashley said at the time. He went on to cite the practice as another example “of the loosey-goosey accounting of taxpayers’ money” and the “country club attitude that has permeated city spending.” Meehan contended that he had tightened up the system during his time as in-

ZACK HOOPES ■ Staff Writer (Oct. 5, 2012) A scant few days after the extended controversy over the city’s distribution of free golf passes, the city has again been solicited to divest itself, at least operationally, from the golf business it has established at the Eagle’s Landing municipal golf course in West Ocean City. An email to city officials from Rob Waldron of Billy Casper Golf, dated Sept. 21, offers to discuss extending the company’s services to Ocean City. BCG is a golf management company, which operates by running golf courses for their owners, often local governments. The company is compensated either by a flat management fee or through some sort of profit-sharing agreement. “I trust Eagle’s Landing benefitted from the early spring weather this golf season. Unfortunately we all know this was an anomaly. Municipal golf courses across the country have been fighting downward trends in rounds and revenue while faced with escalating operating expenses resulting in lower profit contributions to municipalities,” Waldron’s letter read. “At Billy Casper Golf, we have been able to buck this trend with most of our municipal facilities through creative

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Ocean City Today

OPINION www.oceancitytoday.net

PAGE 20

OCTOBER 5, 2012

Play It Safe might need more support Let’s put local politics and government aside for a week and look at something that generates no controversy, produces no disputes about its effectiveness and has no agenda other than to do the job it set out to do. Ocean City’s “Play It Safe” project, which is entering its 24th year, is that something. It was back in the late 1980s, when many people in the resort were just about fed up with the often unruly newly graduated high schoolers who descended on the town in early June, that the idea was born to give them a program that would keep them out of trouble and give them something fun to do. The Worcester County Health Department and the Ocean City Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Committee, with the aid of local government, launched “Play It Safe,” which might have seemed to some like a singularly uncool alternative to running around with wild abandon. The doubters, however, were not just proven wrong, but overwhelmingly wrong. From an inauspicious beginning, with just three events and 350 participants, Play It Safe has gone on to entertain 149,000 teens, with more than 8,600 participating in last year’s 50-plus events. The program’s expansion, of course, mirrors the expanding support of its efforts by area business operators and the community itself. It also should be said that Play It Safe’s leadership has done remarkable job over the years. Because of that, it would be a shame if Play It Safe suddenly found itself short on money in the coming year because of government’s fiscal issues and this is why its next edition might require additional help from businesses and residents. With one of its major fundraisers approaching and other solicitations sure to follow, it would be in everyone’s best interest to do what they can to help. No one is saying that Play It Safe is facing an urgent situation or that it is somehow in jeopardy, because it isn’t. All that’s being said here is that this is a worthwhile endeavor that has done more than most people would have imagined and that it is definitely worth keeping that way by patching whatever financial potholes it might encounter in the new year.

Ocean City Today P.O. Box 3500, Ocean City, Md. 21843 Phone: 410-723-6397 / Fax: 410-723-6511.

MANAGING EDITOR ...................... Brandi Mellinger ASSISTANT EDITOR ............................ Lisa Capitelli STAFF WRITERS.......... Nancy Powell, Zack Hoopes ACCOUNT MANAGERS ...................... Mary Cooper, ...................................... Sandy Abbott, Julie Schmidt CLASSIFIEDS/LEGALS MANAGER .... Terry Burrier SENIOR DESIGNER .............................. Susan Parks GRAPHIC ARTISTS...... David Hooks, Corey Gilmore PUBLISHER .................................... Stewart Dobson ASSISTANT PUBLISHER ...................... Elaine Brady COMPTROLLER .............................. Christine Brown ADMIN. ASSISTANT .................................. Gini Tufts Ocean City Today is published weekly by FLAG Publications, Inc. at 8200 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, Md. 21842. Ocean City Today is available by subscription at $150 a year. Visit us on the Web at www.oceancitytoday.net.

READERS’ FORUM

Gospel fest a success Editor, The fourth annual Rev. Dr. Charles A. Tindley Gospel fest was held Saturday, Sept. 15, at the Berlin Multipurpose Building. The festival was a success due to the several area businesses and organizations. The Rev. Dr. Charles A. Tindley Gospel Fest Committee would like to thank the following persons, businesses and organizations: the Worcester County Arts Council, Henry Fine Arts, the Maryland State Arts Council, Berlin Shoebox, Calvin B. Taylor Bank, Absolute Sports, Bank of Ocean City, Worcester County Tourism, Donaway Furniture, Mr. and Mrs. Gee Williams, Town of Berlin, Purnell’s Used Furniture Warehouse and the Tindley Family. The Rev. Dr. Charles A. Tindley Gospel Fest Committee Gabriel Purnell, chairman

Parents thank children for care Editor, We wish to thank our children for excellent care during our illness. In January 2012, both my husband and I became extremely ill in North Carolina. We spent January and February in Southeastern Medical Center — my husband with heart stints replaced and seeds placed in his lung for lung cancer; I was be-

tween congested heart failure and dehydration. Also failing with rapid heartbeat and pulmonary hypertension. When we were released from the hospital, neither of us could even stand up. Our youngest son, Danny, and his wife, Cindy, came and packed us up and took us to Ocean City. And for the next month they gave us excellent, around the clock care. It got to where I was concerned for their health because of the never-ending care we received. They put us back on our feet. We then moved to our oldest son’s home, where Ernie and his wife, Diana, welcomed us again with kindness, concern and love. They also gave us excellent care. While our two grandsons, Cory and Connor, gave up space for us and often helped us with meals, coffee, medicines and moving my oxygen tanks around. Our daughter, Ruth, would often come and fix meals, do our laundry, clean our room and with her husband, Brian, did all our pharmacy runs and any shopping we needed. All of them split taking their father for his radiation treatments in Salisbury. And when the treatments ended, we were back in good health and returned to our home in North Carolina. And so we want everyone in Ocean City to know about the wonderful children we have. The caring loving children that God has blessed us with. With all the wickedness in the world, it’s good to praise the good people. May

God always bless them. Elizabeth and Ernest Chavis Pembroke, N.C.

Public works employees praised Editor, I wanted to take a moment to compliment one of Ocean City’s Department of Public Works employees on going beyond the call of duty to help me, a Worcester County property owner. I made the mistake of accidentally throwing my car keys in the Dumpster at my condominium building, Ocean Break at 122nd Street and Assawoman Drive. I realized it almost immediately, but in the two minutes it took me to run back down from my condominium unit, an employee had dumped the contents as part of his regular route on Sunday, Aug. 19. I caught this employee on 123rd Street and explained the problem. He was helpful above and beyond the call of duty. He explained the only thing we could do was go back to 65th Street and he could dump the contents of his load and perhaps since the keys were at the top, we might find them. I quickly took him up on this offer as the 20-plus keys and personal items on the ring would have been very difficult to replace. We went back to 65th Street and this employee and his coworker helped me sift through the dumped load. Sure enough, we found the keys in less than Continued on Page 21


Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

OPINION 21

READERS’ FORUM human behavior? It never ceases to amaze me when some of the council members say some of the things that they do. And usually it is just for political reasons. Yet, it leaves you with the impression that these people are not very bright. For example, during last week’s work session, councilman [Brent]Ashley was discussing the idea that when you allow skateboarding on the Boardwalk there will be some type of collateral damage to city property. Councilwoman [Mary] Knight promptly accused Ashley of being negative. She said she was positive. Actually in the past, the mayor, too, has made similar remarks about certain individuals on the council being negative while he, too, was positive. To the successful problem solver, there is a huge difference between being “negative” and being “objective.” And

Continued from Page 20

By Stewart Dobson With so many states involved in gun control debates, and whether this would be a better country if we were all packing heat (No house salad? Go ahead, make my day), what I want to know is why you can get a permit to carry a handgun but can’t get a permit to carry brass knuckles? It’s true, this state and many others expressly prohibit the possession of brass knuckles, along with throwing stars, switchblades, blackjacks and nunchaku, otherwise known as nunchucks. Incidentally, no one seems to know the origin of the word nunchucks, although I am positive that it does not refer to any kind of animal that lives on the grounds of a convent. More likely, it’s ancient Chinese for “Puts big knot on head.” Anyway, you can’t get a permit to carry them or any of the other aforementioned “dangerous weapons,” as the law refers to them, because they are, well, dangerous, although I have always said that brass knuckles don’t punch people, people punch people. Guns, meanwhile, are classified as “deadly weapons,” which must mean they are less dangerous because you can get a permit to carry one if you’re a good citizen who has a decent reason, such as “I frequently encounter other human beings.” If, on the other hand, you said, “I frequently encounter human beings and they’re all out to get me,” you probably wouldn’t pass muster. But does anyone else think this is strange? I mean, how much damage could I do with a set of brass knuckles that makes them worse than a .44 magnum? Is someone going to say, “Oh, but you might do some serious dental damage to another person and we all know that nothing beats a great smile?” Besides, whoever heard of brass knuckles accidentally discharging? “Gee, I don’t know, officer. I was just standing there minding my own business when these brass knuckles went off on their own and popped someone. I swear, I didn’t even know the safety was off.” And then there are those throwing stars. First of all, even if you could get a permit, which, of course, you can’t, it isn’t like they would be all that handy. The last thing you would want is to carry these pointy things around in your pocket, unless you were up for an inadvertent and very unpleasant operation of sorts. Let’s say you are accosted by someone with evil intent and you say, as you thrust your hand into your pocket, “Wait just a minute, sir, I’m armed with … yowwweeeeee!” None of these laws makes sense and I honestly don’t understand how this happened. In fact, it turns out you can’t even carry concealed pepper spray with the intent to harm someone, which means it’s perfectly legal to have as long as you don’t intend to use it. “Gee, officer, I have it just in case I can get the house salad.”

five minutes. I have told numerous people I have newfound respect for the Ocean City Department of Public Works. Both employees should be commended for the extra effort in helping me solve a major problem. I especially appreciate this employee taking the time to interrupt his route on a Sunday to help me through what would have been a major problem. William S. Corey Jr. Ocean City

Nothing wrong with objective thinking Editor, I must admit I do like to watch the Ocean City Council meetings. Where else can one get so much entertainment for free and learn so much about

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councilman Ashley was being objective. He realizes with relaxed skateboarding laws there will be some damage as a byproduct. After all, kids will be kids. Ashley was just trying to make the point that perhaps if you are going to allow skateboarding on the Boardwalk, that perhaps a fund should be set up to repair the probable damage. A good problem solver always sees the downside to any action. They aren’t being negative, but rather they are being objective or just plain realistic. They want to be prepared for as many problems that might arise as possible. I think Councilwoman [Margaret] Pillas, in defending Ashley, used the term “reality check,” which to me is the same as being objective. The taxpayers of Ocean City ought to be glad that they have thinkers like Ashley and Pillas on the council. These two Continued on Page 22

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READERS’ FORUM Continued from Page 21

individuals see beyond the here and now. They have vision, which all great leaders have. On the other hand, maybe Knight and [Mayor Rick] Meehan ought to take a crash course on problem solving and they, too, will learn that there is a tremendous difference between being negative and being objective. Once they learn the difference between the two terms, maybe they won’t be so quick to accuse one of their fellow members of being negative just to score political points. They should welcome objective thinking. There are hundreds of individuals as well as their loved ones who wished there were some objective thinking prior to April 10, 1912, when the invincible “Titanic” sank. There is nothing wrong with objective thinking. As a matter of fact, it is essential to today

Ocean City Today economic environment. Taxpayers ought to be glad that the majority of the council are questioning the issues they face each day. David Clogg, ChFC Timonium, Md.

Disappointed with attempts to clean streets Editor, I support the town of Ocean City moving forward with its proposed plan to establish a committee (mentioned in August news publications). [I am a] city resident who returned from an out-oftown business trip late this past Sunday, Sept. 30, and [was] aware of the events that did take place during the last weekend of September. I am ever so convinced that the town of Ocean City does need to support its seemingly adopted Work Committee that it mentioned and announced in the news in early August. If Ocean City were to en-

force littering laws and nab persons for littering, I believe the town would have more money than they would know what to do with. While riding my bicycle in the area that I did — 62nd Street and onward, almost to the Delaware line — early this week, what I was able to view was trash, garbage and rubbish on virtually every single block I encountered (the few blocks that I noticed not much activity on I believe were brought about because of individual staffing personnel tending to their grounds). Bicycling up and down Coastal Highway on three different occasions, and on Monday, I was able to view that on virtually every single block that I biked (55th to 130th) an overwhelming amount of different types of trash inside bushes and shrubbery, on the sidewalk, or laying along or in the middle of the street. Items include, but are not limited to, beer bottles, plastic soda bottles, juice bottles, cigarette

OCTOBER 5, 2012

packs, cigarette butts, diapers, used rubbers etc. I do most certainly understand that living here in this lovely resort town of Ocean City affords the opportunity for its residents to consistently be greeted by many positive benefits for a vast majority of the year — friendly people, fair weather, residents being neighborly and respectful towards each other. As the week began, just after the last full weekend of Ocean City “closing its doors for the season,” I must say that I am disappointed overall with what I failed to see in the town’s attempt to clean up streets, including Coastal Highway. During the eight years that I have been living here in this great east beach town called Ocean City, this city seems to always get an “annual bashing” of sorts on the very last weekend in September. For the tourists, it’s their last hurrah; for some residents, it means to get out your broom and dust pan for a few hours so that when family comes to visit, at least your street doesn’t appear to be the laughing stock amongst my guests. Personally, had I had family coming into town to visit me this week, I truly would have been utterly embarrassed. The condition that I saw today on multiple blocks on streets, sidewalks and on and inside shrubbery was truly embarrassing to me as an Ocean City resident. Perhaps keeping the turquoise colored garbage cans along both sides of Coast al Highway could also prove to be beneficial. If the town of Ocean City plans on endorsing/recognizing events at the end of summer because it is financially beneficial to the city, then such organizations or committees need to organize a plan for cleaning up today from the tourists and not tommorrow. I wonder about any city official who may have had family visiting recently and may appreciate my words. I did spend just over an hour’s time cleaning up the streets covering one block to the north and also south of where I reside. Douglas Antos Ocean City

‘Operation Medicine Drop’ successful Editor, Assateague Coastal Trust and Assateague COASTKEEPER would like to thank the Worcester County Sheriff’s Office, the Berlin Police Department, the Ocean Pines Fire Department, the Ocean City Fire Department, Ocean City Police Department, Maryland State Police, Worcester County Health Department and the volunteer members of ACT for helping to make the Sept. 29 “Operation Medicine Drop” event so successful. Local residents who cleaned out their medicine cabinets of unused medications made their homes safer, and through everyone’s efforts, we helped to keep hundreds of pounds of pharmaceuticals out of our waterways. We encourage Worcester County residents to take advantage of the permanent drop-off boxes now located at the Ocean City Public Safety Building on 65th Street, and also at the Ocean


Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

READERSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; FORUM Pines Police Department throughout the year. Please donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t flush your unused medications. Kathy Phillips, executive director Assateague Coastal Trust Berlin

OCFD offers fire safety tips for Oct. Editor: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 3 a.m. You and your family are awoken to a beeping smoke alarm. You are tired and confused from the effects of the smoke. You know you need to reach safety but, when you head for the front door, you find that escape route is blocked by a quickly-spreading fire. What do you do? While this scenario is one we hope you never encounter, the statistics tell us that many people doâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;every day. The 2011 data is still being calculated by the

National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). According to the NFPA, in 2010, one home structure fire was reported every 85 seconds. That added up to 369,500 home structure fires, which caused 13,350 injuries and 2,640 deaths. We also know that most fatal fires kill one or two people. However, in 2010, 19 home fires killed five or more people, resulting in 101 deaths. The numbers are frightening; however, there is something you can do to help ensure your familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s safety should a fire break out in your home: Have Two Ways Out! The Ocean City Fire Department is teaming up with NFPA during Fire Prevention Week, Oct. 7-13, to urge residents to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Have Two Ways Out!â&#x20AC;? This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theme focuses on the importance of fire escape planning and practice. Only one-third of Americans have both developed and practiced a home fire escape plan. And of the three-quarters of Americans who do have an es-

OPINION 23

cape plan, less than half have actually practiced it. As we saw in the scenario above, fire is unpredictable. Seconds can mean the difference between life and death. We want to ensure that Ocean City residents, and everyone across Delmarva, see this message. Preparation is an important part of being able to deal with an emergency, and it is crucial you take steps to prepare your family for the potential of a home fire by having an escape plan and practicing it. Although preparing for the unexpected is difficult, reviewing the information below, and taking action based on it, could save lives. The Ocean City Fire Department recommends the following tips for planning your familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s escape. If you have children, make this a family activity: n Make a map of your home. Mark a door and a window that can be used to get out of every room. n Choose a meeting place outside in

front of your home. This is where everyone can meet once theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve escaped. Draw a picture of your outside meeting place on your escape plan. n Sound the smoke alarm and practice your escape drill with everyone living in your home. n Keep your escape plan on the refrigerator and practice the drill twice a year or whenever anyone in your home celebrates a birthday. If your family is all adults: n Walk through you home and identify two ways out of each room, choose a meeting place outside in front of your home and practice your escape drill twice a year. To learn more about â&#x20AC;&#x153;Have Two Ways Out!â&#x20AC;? visit the Town of Ocean Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fire Department web site at www.oceancitymd.gov/fire_department Ryan L. Whittington Public Information Officer Ocean City Fire Department

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Shuster says city links currently on upswing; BCG handles Pines Continued from Page 19

terim city manager. Last week, the council voted to codify Meehan’s policies, and some even stricter revisions. That discussion was not the first, however, to imply that the golf course is worth more to the city as a wheel-greaser for public relations and political niceties than it is as an actual moneymaker. But city Parks and Recreation Director Tom Shuster said that now would be a less wise time to turn operations over, given that the course’s business is increasing. “Every few years, the Casper group will send out a letter saying that they’re up for consideration for this,” Shuster said. “But from an operations standpoint and from a bottom line standpoint, we’re actually better off running the golf course ourselves.” Following a dip with the economy, Shuster said that Eagle’s Landing has been on the upswing for the past three years. Fiscal year 2012 saw 35,751 rounds played, up 3,101 rounds from FY11. Green and cart fees were similarly up $117,000, and pro shop and concessions sales up $27,000. The golf course is run as a separate “enterprise fund” within the city’s budget, Shuster noted. “We have to propose a budget each year that is either balanced or produces some revenue in

excess of projected expenses,” he said. Final numbers from FY11 indicate that, from a total operating cost of $1,948,542, a slight profit of $77,917 was turned. “A private operation can only do better than us if they do one of two things: either they drastically reduce their costs or increase their revenues,” Shuster said. “Typically, this means reducing staff or increasing rates.” A move to slash staffing costs seems to be alluded to in the literature included in Waldron’s proposal. An article from “Golf, Inc. Magazine” on operational privatization stresses the reduced personnel hassles that come with less governmental oversight. “The payroll cost structure is higher [for municipal courses] than incurred by daily-fee courses,” the article states. “Fringe benefits and retirement packages can aggregate up to 30 percent of base salaries. With higher labor costs, municipalities are often forced to reduce marketing and capital investment.” Billy Casper Golf has managed the Ocean Pines Golf and Country Club since the fall of 2010, when it was brought on in hopes of correcting the $200,000 loss the course was operating under. But since then, the course has still been troubled by a lack of capital improvement funds and reportedly poor greens conditions.


Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

NEWS 25

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Ocean City Today

26 NEWS

$20,000 out per year, I’ll be 85 when it runs out. I’m not opposed to changing the system, but let’s do it so it’s fair to the employees. And let’s have a discussion, not just come up with four people making this decision. That’s what the problem was. If the city wants to go to an all 401(k) system, that’s fine. I think the law is that you can put up 15 percent before taxes and 15 percent after. If the city wants to do that, let’s match it dollar for dollar up front. ■ OCT: Do you think that’s the major catalyst for what people say is a discontent amongst employees? ■ ADKINS: It started with the changes. I think the tipping point was Dennis. I had met Dennis twice that I know of, that Sunday they had an open house a year and a half ago, and I flew back and asked him for a meeting in his office and asked him what was going on. He said, “I can’t tell you what’s going on. They’ve made up their minds, they’re going to do all this.” ■ OCT: You were in a union, so do you think a union for the general employees is a good idea at this point? ■ ADKINS: I think they deserve a contract like

INTERVIEW WITH FRANK ADKINS Continued from Page 15 ■ OCT: What other things would you do to keep those costs down? ■ ADKINS: I’ll give you an example. Flying J and Pilot are two big truck stops that I use over the winter, because I have an RV. Those companies are putting in compressed natural gas so that trucks can run on natural gas. Right now, the conversion for natural gas compared to diesel, natural gas is $1.89 per gallon, compared to $4 a gallon for diesel. We have a fleet in this town that comes back to the same location every day. We could save a lot by converting them. And we’re going to get natural gas – Eastern Shore has been bought out. ■ OCT: The changes to pensions and retirements that are a big issue right now, do you think those were a good idea? ■ ADKINS: I had a 401(k) program that I had to convert to an IRA. I put into it up to 5 percent of my salary, and the company would match it 50 cents on the dollar with company stock. But I’ve got less than $200,00 in that now. If I take

OCTOBER 5, 2012

the police and fire. That’s what they’re interested in, a contract knowing that the City Council can’t just come up and change everything on a whim. I belonged to two local unions. There’s an election every three years for president, board of directors, executive board. That’s how locals work, they don’t follow the national whatever. The national may get into politics and back candidates, but locals are run by local people. It’s like the FOP and the firefighters, they elect their own locals and this one will probably do the same. And that’s all they want, they want it in writing. When I drove the bus, they gave me a manual, and at the bottom it said, “subject to change without notice.” ■ OCT: Kind of defeats the purpose? ■ ADKINS: When one person asks for a raise, they fire him. When 300 ask, they pay attention. That’s the point. Those four people fired Dennis without knowing he had a contract. To me, that’s incompetence. You’re not going to fire a man with a contract and then have to pay the balance of that contract, which is basically what they did. ■ OCT: I guess the argument has been that removing Dennis saved more money, because he was reluctant to cost-cutting measures.

■ ADKINS: I think it was more personal. I mean, he cut the payroll down, he had reduced the city budget. Margaret said that Dennis never gave her all the information. I find that hard to believe. I’ve been to the meetings, I’ve been to the budget hearings, and I listened to all of it. They almost want to micro-manage things, and that’s what you hire a city manager for. ■ OCT: Do you think that the city is on a sustainable path right now? ■ ADKINS: I can’t tell you how many times I’ve gone to eat and someone’s asked me for my zip code. They’re taking a survey. The city needs to do that – if all my people are coming in from Baltimore, I don’t want to advertise in Baltimore, I want to advertise in Jersey. A few years ago, Guy Perdue told me, “You know, we’re within 600 miles of two-thirds of the population of the United States.” Six hundred miles is an overnight truck ride. That’s a lot of people. You look at what the police, the firefighters have given up over the last four years. Those people are here to work with the city. The four people that did all that stuff, they were just looking to get re-elected. ■ OCT: Do you think the salaries need to be restored. ■ ADKINS: Upper management is paid to high. What caused that is that when a 10 percent raise was given, the guy at the top got $3,000 and the guy at the bottom got 30 cents. At Delmarva Power, the union I came from, there was one scale. You know what everyone gets paid. *EDITOR’S NOTE: Dare’s contract called for separation pay of 120 days.

City Hall innuendo moves in circles as election approaches ZACK HOOPES ■ Staff Writer

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(Oct. 5, 2012) Fact and hearsay became increasingly difficult to distinguish at Monday night’s City Council session, as the meeting wore on into a public commentary section that reinforced the impression that this year’s electoral politics would be best described by Collective Soul’s debut album, “Hints, Allegations, and Things Left Unsaid.” The theme of the evening seemed to be the question of whether politically charged personal disputes could or should be aired on the council floor. First up to bat was Joe Groves of the activist group Citizens for Ocean City, who criticized Councilman Joe Hall for asking him in front of the council two weeks ago about his group’s goals and intentions. “I believe it’s okay to have an opposing view, but unfortunately some of you don’t believe that … it shows a disrespect to do so,” Groves of his grilling by Hall. “I was called up to answer personal questions that had nothing to do with city business.” Groves’ group was under suspicion by Hall for the fine line it treads regarding its tax registration as a 501(c)4 interest group. Although the group’s stated goals are to increase transparency and voter turnout, Groves has noted that it is overwhelmingly supportive of Mayor Rick Meehan and his political allies, and critical of Hall and his. See CHRIST on Page 37


Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

POLICE BRIEFS

Break-ins From Aug. 28 through Sept. 4, numerous reports of break-ins to vehicles in the Pocomoke City area were reported to the Pocomoke City Police Department, Worcester County Sheriff’s Office, and the Maryland State Police. The cases were all forwarded to the Worcester County Bureau of Investigation for additional investigation. During the investigation, detectives identified the suspect as Bryan Andrew McDuffie, 25. McDuffie matched the surveillance video of the suspect who attempted to use a stolen credit card at the Royal Farms in New Church, Va., and was charged with the thefts. McDuffie was charged with six counts of being a rogue and vagabond, four counts of theft less than $1,000, two counts of theft less than $100, second-degree burglary, credit card theft and attempted fourth-degree burglary. He was taken before a District Court Commissioner in Snow Hill where he was ordered held on $20,000 bond.

Eighth DUI

Mitchell, who refused field sobriety tests and was charged with driving under the influence. He was also charged with resisting arrest. Police said Mitchell was also in violation of not having his vehicle equipped with a vehicle interlock device.

Retaliation A 29-year-old Manassas, Va., man was arrested Sept. 30 after allegedly threatening a man with a broken beer bottle. According to the charging document, the victim was visiting friends in a unit near Sixth Street and Philadelphia Avenue when someone in a house across the street shined a laser pointer at him. Someone then retaliated by firing a paintball gun. Then, a group of about 20 people crossed the street and started threatening the victim and his friends. Michael Daniel Burke approached the victim and threatened him by waving a broken beer bottle at his face and chest, the charging document stated. Burke reportedly told police that someone shot paintballs at him and his friends so they want to confront them. When they ar-

NEWS 27

rived, several people they wanted to confront acted like they had guns, so he broke a beer bottle for protection.

Disorderly conduct A Pennsylvania man was arrested after dancing in the street near 41st Street at about 12:10 a.m. and asked females to expose their breasts. Police said Glenn Allen Peak Jr., of Spring City, was attired in a Tshirt and had a towel wrapped around his waist. He bumped into one woman, almost causing her to fall. Police charged him with disorderly conduct.

Domestic assaults As the result of a domestic incident in Ocean Pines on Sept. 22, Sheila Jean Elliott, 63, of Ocean Pines, was charged with one count of second-degree assault. She was released on her own recognizance. In an unrelated incident, Douglas M. Owens, 45, of Ocean Pines, was charged Sept. 23, with domestic assault. He was re-

leased on his personal recognizance. In another unrelated incident, Daniel E. Cantoran, 28, of Ocean Pines, was charged with second-degree assault Sept. 16. He was held in the Worcester County jail on $5,000 bond.

Assault A 31-year-old Ocean City woman was charged Sept. 29 with second-degree assault after a domestic dispute at a Sunset Drive residence. Police were called to the unit at about 3:15 a.m. They tried to help get the issue resolved, but Trisha Lyn Parker and the victim started to argue again and she threw a fire extinguisher at him, according to the charging documents.

Burglary Ocean Pines police charged Andrew Joseph Downes, 24, of Ocean Pines with burglary and drug charges as a result of an incident that occurred Sept. 21. Police charged him with fourth-degree burglary, possession of marijuana and possession of paraphernalia.

Maryland State Police charged a 35-yearold Denton man with his eighth DUI after stopping his vehicle at about 5 p.m. Sept. 29 on Route 50 at Caleb Road. Police had received two calls from the Casino at Ocean Downs about the driver, Sean Aaron Mitchell, who was removed from the casino because he was intoxicated, disorderly and combative. The duty officer, Sgt. Romano, left the barrack and took a stationary position at the barrack crossover in an effort to located Mitchell’s vehicle. He saw Mitchell driving a 2012 Ford Raptor pulling a trailer with a Jet Ski. Romano stopped the vehicle because of unspecified traffic violations and stopped

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Director Michael Tully on hip-hop, short shorts and being a dork ZACK HOOPES ■ Staff Writer (Oct. 5, 2012) A Maryland native, “Ping Pong Summer” writer and director Michael Tully has been working on the idea for the movie since he was in high school, 20 years ago. Previously known for dark, complex films such as “Silver Jew,” (a documentary about the New York City band, The Silver Jews), Michael Tully “Cocaine Angel” and “Septien,” Tully admits that “Ping Pong Summer” will be a significant departure for him. Describing the film as a “sincere coming of-age comedy” about a listless young boy’s interest in table tennis and hip-hop, and his life-changing family vacation, Tully has drawn parallels between his script and the 1984 movie, “The Karate Kid,” which shares a similar young-underdog theme. ■ OCEAN CITY TODAY: You want to sit down? ■ MICHAEL TULLY: Well, the only thing bad about the shoot is that I don’t have legs anymore. So today and tomorrow I’m trying to stay

off my feet as much as possible. ■ OCEAN: I imagine that’s hard, since you’re the director. ■ TULLY: Right now, we’re going to run with Susan to location. It’s adrenaline, how to balance that. I’ll sleep in November when I’m home with my wife and cat. ■ OCEAN: Has that been hard? I know Amy Sedaris and Robert Longstreet were here for a day. Is it going really fast? ■ TULLY: I’m really glad that Susan came Saturday, even though she’s shooting Wednesday. We’re not going to have a ton of time together, but we talked for a couple hours and she got to come to the set the other day, even if just for an hour. She’s a legend and has been doing this for so long. Amy left after only one day, but it was like she’d been here for months. She was like, “I’ll be friends with Robert for the rest of my life.” She even bought some of the book and artwork that our crewmembers have written and made. It’s vital to me, and especially for this movie, which is a fun film, but even if we were making a psychodrama, I don’t work well if people are in a bad mood. ■ OCEAN: And the weather has held out? ■ TULLY: It’s funny. That was the biggie, because we only had Amy and Robert on Saturday. We could maybe use Sunday, but the forecast on Friday night was that we were going

to get rained out. But we got our day. It’s terrifying and kind of freaky. Once you get through it and you know it’s going well … I guess that’s why people say movies are magic, because so much is left to chance. But there are things you can control. Our art department is incredible. Costumes, makeup hair, our electric team is great. So if you look at it that way, it is pretty easy if you assemble the right people. And you do get your days, and you do trust your script, but hire actors that are better than the script and let them bring their personalities. In some ways its freaky magic and in some ways its actually very practical. ■ OCEAN: In scale and type, this is obviously different from the other stuff you’ve done. Tully: I would say what’s different is these names, right there – Susan Sarandon, Lea Thompson, John Hannah. And Mayor (Rick) Meehan, too [who introduced the cast at the panel]. That is different. In the sense of the crew morale, and the sense that everyone’s working together – actually, after the past two days, one of our producers came up to me and gave me a fist bump, like, “Oh, we are making a weird movie.” There is no compromise of vision for one second. The thing that’s great is that, like the last film that I paid for with a credit card and a friend’s checkbook, the creative spirit is not different one fraction. ■ OCEAN: When you came, were there surprises as far as what’s still here? Is the ’80s Ocean City as you had it still here, does it now seem more ’80s on screen? ■ TULLY: The crewmembers that came to the Boardwalk were like, “Oh, now I know why you want to shoot here.” They aren’t from here, they didn’t grow up here, but they felt it. So there’s something to be said for that, more than myself, because I have kept coming to Ocean City as an adult. Maybe not every summer, living in New York, but when I come down here I get a chance. So my memory is kind of merged with the present. It’s hard for me to separate. A lot of these locations we’re shooting in were locations that I went to in 1985 with my family. I think it’s more telling when crewmembers who have never been here understand how ’80s it feels. In a really good, well-preserved way. Not in a lame way. ■ OCEAN: Why ping pong, why that of all things to be the center? ■ TULLY: It’s dorky and cool at the same time – the exact same time. You’re hitting a little white

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plastic ball and moving around. It’s kind of corny, if you step back. But when you’re doing it, it’s fun. And, not to sell Ocean City short by making that comparison. But it’s kind of the same sense of, like, I’m on the Boardwalk and I say, “Hey, that guy’s funny looking.” And then I stuff my face with a funnel cake. It’s ironic and it’s not at the same time. And with the hip-hop element, it’s just personal to me. It’s not like I sat down and said, “What are three things we can put in the pot to make a quirky Sundance movie?” It’s very personal, not autobiographical, but personal. I grew up as a dork in Mt. Airy, listening to Run-DMC and the Fat Boys and wanting to be a breakdancer and playing ping-pong in my garage. My hope is that it’ll feel like it’s coming from a sincere place. ■ OCEAN: Was it just serendipity that Susan Sarandon was also into making ping-pong kind of nerdy cool again? I was living in New York when she opened SPiN, the ping-pong bar, and everyone thought, “That’ll never go over.’ But it seems to have taken off. ■ TULLY: The mentor figure in these movies is always a male. I just thought it would be interesting to make it a female. And then you think of a woman of a certain age who is also a great actress, and then the third asterisk is “co-owns ping pong clubs.” That’s kind of the world giving us an idea. I won’t speak for her, but I think she didn’t just like the ping-pong element, it was the whole coming-of-age element as well. It’s just really cool timing, and even for her to watch my last weird movie as a test to see if she wants to work with this guy — and she dug it. That wasn’t made for the 97 percent of people, it was kind of for the three weirdoes in the room. ■ OCEAN: Do you feel like the young actors in particular are connecting with the whole ’80s vibe? I know you said that, even though it’s set in 1985, that these are things that kids have always done and can relate to. Have they taken to it in that sense, the whole American vacation theme? ■ TULLY: Emmi lives here, but to all the kids it seems fairly universal. To the point where it even seems like, “Can we make an original film from this premise?” We’ve seen it before so much. But all stories are that, it’s just a matter of bringing a personality. Which is why I think combining hip-hop, ping-pong, the ’80s, and Ocean City is what will make this different. You could make this story in any town, whether it be a lake or an ocean or a ski resort, even. But the kids seem great. I’m trying to preserve their energies. It’s not about, “Here’s how you would act in the ’80s.’ You’d act the same. The adjectives are just different. Maybe the short lines go down further now, too, but that’s about it.

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Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

NEWS 31

Thompson, Hannah and local actors also filming; no weather issues thus far Continued from Page 1

its cast of largely unknown child stars. Other supporting adult actors such as Amy Sedaris and Robert Longstreet have already been in and out of town to shoot their scenes, as most of the adult roles in the film are relatively brief. In pitching the film to the resort, Tully had stressed his desire to maintain the film’s authenticity by using area youth – the sort of kids who could’ve been in Ocean City during the summer of 1985, when the film takes place – as the major players. Most of the teenage cast are Marylanders, with Ocean City local Emmi Shockley playing the love interest of the film’s young male leads. ”It’s really exciting. This is my town and I love acting,” Shockley said. The entire cast was complimentary of the area and the reception they had received from the town. “The script is a sweet, generous story. It really represents what you have here,” Sarandon said. In early August, the City Council reluctantly approved a grant of $100,000 to help with the film’s funding, on the recommendation of the city’s Tourism Advisory Board. The film’s producers had previously noted that much of their budget had relied on subsidies from the Maryland Film Office, which ended up being unavailable. The Worcester County Commissioners matched the city’s contribution, and the film also sought funds from local investors as well. The movie’s overall

Emmi Shockley

budget is comparatively low, around $1.5 million, due largely to the willingness of key actors, including Sarandon, to work for minimal pay on what was described as an independent “passion project.” Municipal reluctance to back the project was partially allayed by the promise that the film would feature Ocean City with a sort of vivid, tourist-friendly nostalgia.

“We’re making one of the strangest and most interesting commercials ever for a resort – in the form of a feature film,” Tully joked Monday. He also added that he had gotten over his initial hesitancy about the movie being too specific to its location. “You’re really not supposed to write the location into your screenplay,” Tully said. “I used to think that the more specific you were, the less universal the film would be … but I’ve come completely around on that.” “The more responsible you are, the more you honor you pay to the environment, the more people will connect. I love the idea of showing this in Rotterdam with people not even knowing that a place like this exists.” A large portion of the young cast seemed to still be in shock about their potential landfall roles. “I just auditioned for it and I guess Michael liked me,” said Marcello Conte, a New Jersey native who is playing the male

lead. “I never thought I would be in a movie with Susan Sarandon and all these other great stars.” “I never thought I was going to be in a movie with you, either,” Sarandon quipped. Shockley will be portraying Stacy Summers, a “very, very pretty” 16-year-old, according to the film’s character synopsis. She drives a white VW convertible, and is a love interest for both of the movie’s key male characters. She is somewhat highstrung, constantly drinking Slurpees and adding an unknown substance to them. “They said initially that they saw me as Stacy,” Shockley said. “She has this part of her character that’s mysterious … I like it a lot. It’s a fun character, you have to figure her out.” A Worcester Prep student, Shockley has been dividing her time between set and the classroom. “I went to two classes this morning,” she said. “It’s such a fun set to be on … there’s none of that tension or anything to make you nervous.”

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Ocean City Today

32 NEWS

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WOC to get desired crosswalks NANCY POWELL ■ Staff Writer (Oct. 5, 2012) Crosswalks are expected to be installed at Route 50 and Golf Course Road by next spring. The need for crosswalks was the primary issue of the West Ocean City Association, whose members have been concerned about the safety of pedestrians crossing the highway as motorists drive the last mile or so into Ocean City. Also concerned was the State Highway Administration, which had been looking at the need of installing crosswalks even before being contacted, Ken Cimino, SHA assistant traffic engineer, said at the group’s gathering at Applebee’s on Sept. 27. Applauding the work of the association, Cimino said, “This is a perfect case of how government works. I can’t tell you enough how important it is for people to be active.” Cimino said an SHA study showed the need for crosswalks on the north side and the south side of Route 50 and the east leg of Golf Course Road. “We’re now moving forward with design and installation,” he said. The project has been funded for the design and construction Cimino also said the SHA did an inhouse pedestrian study at the three main intersections between Route 611, also known as Stephen Decatur Highway, and the Route 50 bridge in August. He did not know the details. “I just got the draft report to see what

the recommendations are,” he said. The goal, however, is to have pedestrian signals and crosswalks on Route 50 at Route 611 in addition to the coming improvements at Route 50 and Golf Course Road. Longer-range plans include a sidewalk on the south side of Route 50 in the easterly direction from Route 611 to the bridge. After installation of the sidewalk, a pedestrian crosswalk would be installed on the west side of Golf Course Road. Like the countdown pedestrian signals in Ocean City, the pedestrian signals in West Ocean City “will be activated by a push-button,” Cimino said. The amount of time a pedestrian has to cross a street is based on the width of the roadway, Cimino said. After the activation of the pedestrian signal, pedestrians will have 3.5 seconds per foot to walk across the road because the average pedestrian walks 3.5 feet per second. West Ocean City businessman Ed Ellis appreciated the installation of crosswalks, but said there is a significant difference between traffic going into Ocean City and traffic leaving Ocean City. Inbound traffic is going faster, perhaps, because the drivers are eager to reach the resort and Ellis suggested the SHA install rumble strips to slow those drivers. Rumble strips, Cimino said, “are great for infrequent travelers,” but not so great for others, especially for nearby residents because of the noise they generate. He said the SHA would get complaints if rumble strips were installed.

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Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

NEWS 33

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Ocean City Today

34 NEWS

OBITUARIES Marlene Pike Noel NAPLES, Fla. — Marlene Pike Noel, 79, died Saturday, Sept. 22, 2012, at her home. Born in Baltimore, she was the daughter of the late Mardini Ladic Sr. and Helen Johnson Ladic. She was preceded in death by her husbands, Jesse A. Pike and Joseph Noel Sr. She had lived most of her life in Ocean City, before moving to Naples, Fla., three years ago. She was a member of the 102 Worcester Order of the Eastern Star in Snow Hill. Mrs. Noel will be dearly missed by her family, including her sisters, Jane Ladic and Elaine M. Stricker of Naples, and Kimberly Wynkoop of Frederick, Md.; brothers, Mardini Ladic Jr. of Pennsylvania, Glenn Ladic of Naples; stepdaughter, Vicki Pike-Jarratt of Bradenton, Fla.; as well as many loving nieces and nephews. A funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 6, at Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. Friends may call from 68 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 5, at the funeral home, and one hour prior to the service on Saturday. The Rev. Dr. Harry Wolpert will officiate. Also participating in the service will be the 102 Worcester Order of the Eastern Star. Interment will follow in Sunset Memorial Park in Berlin. Lillie Taylor Andrews BERLIN — Lillie “Nana” Taylor Andrews, known far and wide as “Nana,” passed away Monday, Sept. 24, 2012, after a short illness. The daughter of Lillian and Stanley Taylor of Havre de

Grace, Md., she was a longtime resident of the Ocean City-Berlin area. When she was younger, Ms. Taylor started the High Steppers and Bel Air Lassies Majorette Groups. She loved her L. Andrews job as a lifeguard and reserve police officer in Ocean City. She always had a smile and a silly story to tell. She was predeceased by both parents; a brother, Ralph; and a daughter, Mary. She is also survived by a daughter, Doris Goins; and son-in-law, Jake Goins. She had seven grandchildren, 14 great-grandchildren and one great-great-granddaughter. In lieu of flowers, send donations for the establishment of a memorial bench to be placed on the Boardwalk in Ocean City. Make checks payable to Taylor Bank, and send to P.O. Box 520, Ocean City, Md. 21843. In the “memo” line, write Bench for Lillie Andrews” so that it will be earmarked for this purpose. Joan Catherine Gomez DELMAR, Md. — Joan Catherine Gomez (née Schubert), 78, died Saturday, Sept. 29, 2012, at home in Delmar, Md., after a brief illness. Born and raised in Baltimore (May 18, 1934), Mrs. Gomez was the daughter of the late Adam F. and Mary M. Schubert. She was the youngest of eight children. She attended the Sacred Heart of Jesus School and the Catholic High School in Baltimore. In the late 1950s, she moved to Salisbury with her beloved husband, the late

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Dr. Andres Cruz Gomez. Mrs. Gomez was an active parishioner of St. John Neumann Catholic Church in Ocean Pines. She enjoyed her grandchildren, her garden and her pets. She raised and trained Standardbred racehorses at her farm, St. Francis Meadows. Mrs. Gomez is survived by her children, Joan Victoria Gomez of Cockeysville, Michele Lynn Gomez of Baltimore, and Andrew Schubert Gomez of Delmar; sons-in-law Patrick Hartman and Jeffrey Trulick; and grandchildren, Cpl. Joseph Gomez-Bell (U.S. Marines), Andres Gomez Hartman, Victoria Gomez, Adam Trulick, and Catarina Trulick. She is also survived by one sister, one brother and many nieces and nephews. A Mass of Christian burial was held Wednesday, Oct. 3, at St. Luke’s Catholic Church. Interment was private. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made in Mrs. Gomez’s memory to one of the following animal rescues: Second Wind Adoption Program, Inc. for horses and small animals, RR 2, Box 24A, Jockey Camp Road, West Union, W.Va. 26456 or Arden’s Arc Rescue, 3038 Dillion St., Baltimore, Md. 21224. Alan J. Rothstein OCEAN CITY — Alan Jon Rothstein, 71, died Sunday, Sept. 30, 2012, at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. Born and raised in Trenton, N.J., he was the son of the late Louis Rothstein and Marie Cerone Rothstein. He is survived by his loving wife of 50 years, Sheila Sherman Rothstein; daughters, Stacy Ewart of Redondo Beach, Calif., and Cheryl Goldsby of Leesburg, Va.; and and sons-in laws, Glen Ewart and Dan Goldsby. He was adored grandfather to Emily Ewart, Kyla Goldsby and Logan Goldsby. He leaves a sister, Gayle Libke of Hobe Sound, Fla., and numerous relatives and many friends who loved his sense of humor and great cooking. Mr. Rothstein had been a systems analyst and had owned and operated TriStar Computer, Inc. in northern Virginia before retiring to Ocean City 10 years ago. A celebration of life will be held at a future date in Ocean City. In lieu of flow-

ers, a donation in his memory may be made to Children’s House by the Sea, P.O. Box 3627 Ocean City, Md. 21843 Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. Clarence William Sharp Jr. OCEAN PINES — Clarence William Sharp Jr., 79, of Ocean Pines and formerly of Baltimore died Sunday, Sept. 30, 2012, at Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin. Born June 22, 1933, in Baltimore, he was the son of the late Clarence William Sharp and Sybil Pfieffer Sharp. Mr. Sharp graduated in 1951 from Catonsville High School, where he met his wife, the late Lois Ruckert Sharp. After attending Johns Hopkins University and transferring to the University of Virginia, where he graduated in 1957 with a law degree, he entered the Army and later the Army Reserve. Mr. Sharp went on to become a lawyer in the Baltimore and Annapolis areas. He rose to the rank of assistant attorney general for the state of Maryland, Chief of the Criminal Division, and later opened a private practice specializing in appellate work in Annapolis. He retired to the Eastern Shore with his wife to be closer to the beach and their family. While in good health, Mr. Sharp was an avid golfer and swimmer. He loved the beach, the bay and watching the ducks swim outside his window. Mr. Sharp is survived by his daughter, Sandra Sharp, and his two grandchildren, Courtney Baxter and Christopher Markiewicz of Ocean Pines. He was preceded in death by his son, Clarence William Sharp III of Reno, Nev., and his wife, Lois Ruckert Sharp, of Baltimore. The family is planning a private burial. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, 6 Herndon Ave., Annapolis, Md. 21403. Arrangements are in the care of Burbage Funeral Home.

— Obituaries for publication may be sent to editor@oceancitytoday.net. Photos are welcome. There is no charge.

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Ocean City Today

NEWS 35

Dinner buffet and auction to benefit 2013 Play It Safe project LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (Oct. 5, 2012) The Ocean City Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Committee will again present a “Magnifico!” Italian feast buffet and silent auction to benefit the Play It Safe 2013 project, on Monday from 4-7 p.m. at Hall’s Restaurant on 60th Street. Play It Safe provides high school graduates with alcohol- and drug-free activities during the first three weeks of June, all at no cost to the visiting teens. Coordinated by the Worcester County Health Department and the Ocean City Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Committee, with support from the town of Ocean City and local businesses and organizations, the project was started as an effort to prevent the abuse of alcohol and drugs by high school-aged resort visitors. The annual Italian feast buffet at Hall’s Restaurant is one of Play It Safe’s major fundraisers. The cost is $12 for adults and $5 for children ages 4-9. Children 4 and younger eat free. Tickets will be available at the door. “The Hall family donates everything to us and all of the money from ticket sales and the silent auction goes to the Play It Safe program,” said Donna Greenwood, chairwoman of the Ocean City Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Committee and Play It Safe co-organizer. “They’ve been big supporters of Play It Safe.” The silent auction will feature gift baskets, gift certificates to restaurants and re-

tail shops and golf packages. The money raised on Monday will help fund the Play It Safe events and pay for refreshments offered during the free activities. For more information about the event or to donate silent auction items, call Greenwood at 410-289-7060 or Al “Hondo” Handy at 410-250-0125. “We’re coming up on our 24th year of Play It Safe and we’ll have some challenges this year. It’s really important for us to raise money this year because we don’t know what money we’ll get from the state, if any. No funding has come through yet, but we haven’t lost hope,” Greenwood said last week. “Last year we lost almost half of our funding from the state because of cuts. We’re an all-volunteer committee and we’re trying our best to keep things going. We’re hopeful they’ll fund it at the same level they did last year.” The 23rd annual Play It Safe project took place May 31 to June 16. “It went very well. Everything just seemed to fall into place,” Greenwood said after the activities wrapped up. Added Lois Twilley, community health educator for the Worcester County Health Department in Snow Hill and Play It Safe coordinator, “As usual, the participants seemed very appreciative and they enjoyed the events.” Twilley retired as a community health educator in June, and at this time, there has been no one hired to replace her as Play It Safe coordinator. When Play It Safe debuted 23 years ago,

it had just three events and 350 participants. Since its inception, more than 149,000 teenagers have signed up for the program’s free activities. In 2012, 8,620 teens hailing from 18 states attended Play It Safe events. The 2012 program featured more than 50 events, including kayaking, windsurfing, paintball, basketball, tennis, rock climbing, pizza-eating contest, karaoke, moonlight bowling, laser tag, tie-dying Tshirts, beach volleyball and indoor and outdoor miniature golf. Participants could also visit Splash Mountain Water Park at Jolly Roger on 30th Street and ride the Tidal Wave roller coaster at Trimper’s Rides and Amusements. A new event this year was a pizza and a dance party at Pizza Tugos. Wristbands, available during each event, allowed the new grads to ride the resort bus free. The ability to ride the bus at no cost was a hit with both parents and teens, Greenwood said.

“The parents are so appreciative of the city for allowing their kids to ride the bus for free,” Greenwood said. Teens also received T-shirts, food, drinks, giveaways and prizes at competitive events. Prizes were donated by local businesses. Up until 2011, approximately 75,000 “Passport to Fun” booklets were distributed to high schools across Maryland and the surrounding areas. These booklets contain the Play It Safe calendar of events, coupons to use at resort businesses, a First Aid guide, where to get medical help, Ocean City ordinances and Maryland laws and information on how to have a safe time while in town. This year, because of state funding cuts, only 30,000 booklets were printed and distributed to lodging facilities, real estate offices and businesses in and around the Ocean City area, Greenwood said. For more information about Play It Safe, visit www.playitsafeoceancity.com.

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Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012


Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

NEWS 37

Christ says city has stalled on request for credit card statements Continued from Page 26

Citizens for Ocean City had previously held a reception that, according to Groves, “happened to coincide” with former City Manager Dennis Dare’s candidacy announcement. Although a 501(c)4 is allowed to endorse candidates and hold events that are complimentary to a candidate’s stance on certain issues, it is not allowed to directly donate to or manage a political campaign. No one on the council responded to Groves, but as soon as he sat down, like clockwork, local landlord Tony Christ stepped forward to renew the saga where it had left off. Christ said his lawyer had checked with the state regarding Citizens for Ocean City’s current tax filings, and found that it is not a 501(c)4, but is registered as a 501(c)3. Such a group is reserved for charitable non-profits, and would be “explicitly forbidden from participating in political campaigns,” Christ said. Groves acknowledged that, but said the group has or is in the process of changing its status. Christ also raised concerns about a recent request he had filed under the Freedom of Information Act to receive the credit card statements from the city accounts used by Meehan and Dare. Although he submitted the request 10 days ago, Christ said he had thus far received nothing. When he inquired, Christ said, he was told that the expenses were part of a general fund budget that would have to be itemized and notated before distribution. “I was told today that the reason my request was taking too much time was that the items would have to be explained before they were given to me, presumably by you, Mr. Mayor,” Christ said. Christ also implied that he knew of some sort of questionable transaction on the card, in the amount of $700 from BJ’s restaurant. Meehan then brought the journey full circle. “I’m not sure this is the forum to interview me,” he said, echoing Groves’ earlier complaints. But he did address the issue, noting that his city credit card is mainly for travel expenses incurred during the media and promotional tours he does. Meehan also said he suspected the charge Christ was alluding to was actually from Fresco’s, and was from the dinners the mayor and the council held with city manager candidates during the spring hiring process. “I can’t wait for those results to come out so you can review them and make them public. It’s only for travel purposes or for the city manager process. Those are really the only things I can remember [that are on the statements],” Meehan said. Further, the mayor countered, he believed Christ was simply agitating for its own sake. Meehan said he had been told, by a mutual acquaintance, that Christ had asked the person to “come down and watch me [Christ] mess with the council.” When asked by Christ who this person was, Meehan made another sharp turn into a previous council squabble. “I’m going to have to take Brent’s line on this one. I won’t compromise the confidentiality of that source,” Meehan said, referring to Councilman Brent Ashley’s previous response when asked by former

Council President Joe Mitrecic if Ashley had been alluding to him when he alleged that he had been told that a former council president was using golf passes for personal benefit. Councilman Doug Cymek cautioned that records research was not necessarily guaranteed to be instantaneous. “My understanding is that there’s a certain reasonable amount of time given to this,” Cymek said. City Solicitor Guy Ayres said that, legally, the city is obligated to provide two hours of research as a due matter of public service. Past that, those requesting information could be charged at an hourly rate. Just as an impasse seemed to have been reached – much to the audible relief of the audience – city resident John Medlin noted that an online system for viewing of city financial documents was discussed some years ago, to his recollec-

tion, but never implemented. Although council seemed to be hazy on such a discussion, Councilwoman Margaret Pillas said she remembered the idea being presented in 2006, when the city issued a number of purchasing cards to employees. “The idea, as it was presented, was that they need some way to go out and buy a nail or whatever they needed [on the job],” Pillas said. City Manager David Recor interjected that such a system was not out of the realm of possibility. “Boynton Beach, I know, has a wonderful structure in place where departments – when public records are created – put them on the records management page, and the public knows they can go to that page and access the records themselves,” Recor said. “You have to realize that that doesn’t

happen overnight, though. That is a policy decision that you can make and we can pursue as an organization. We can make credit card transactions available on a database, by departments or by employee. We can do a lot of things if we’re willing to allocate the resources to make it happen.” Recor also suggested that Christ’s request be cleared up immediately. “That’s a matter of simply making a copy of the statements for that period. It doesn’t require any explanation,” he said. On Thursday morning, Christ contacted Ocean City Today to report that he had received the statements. Council President Jim Hall, however, suggested that Recor was unlikely to find the commitment and follow-through to the records-posting idea after the political hunting season had ended. “Something tells me that on Nov. 7, this won’t be an issue,” he said.

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Ocean City Today

SPORTS www.oceancitytoday.net

PAGE 38

OCTOBER 5, 2012

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LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (Oct. 5, 2012) The Stephen Decatur golf team narrowly edged out the Washington Jaguars by five strokes to win Tuesday’s nine-school match at the Green Hill Yacht & Country Club in Quantico, Md. “We’ve got eight first places and Washington has come in second all eight times. [Tuesday] was the closest they’ve ever come to us,” Decatur Coach D e c a t u r Coach Jim Jim Krall Krall said. Senior Joe Iacona led the Seahawks with a 39. His score earned him medalist honors. Also contributing to the victory were juniors Andrew Urban (41) and Matt Ruggiere (45), and sophomore Delaney Iacona (46). Decatur recorded a 171 and Washington scored a 176. “Joe and Andrew played their normal solid games on a challenging course,” Krall said. “The other two were a little frustrated, shooting about five strokes about their average.” Unbeaten in the Bayside South, Decatur will face the Kent Island Buccaneers, the North’s leader, during Tuesday’s conference championship match at GlenRiddle Golf Club in Berlin. The 18hole match will begin at 1 p.m. “We know they’re very good. To beat them, we have to come fully-loaded and play our best,” Krall said. Two days later, on Oct. 11, Decatur and Kent Island will join the 16 other conference teams for the District VIII tournament at the Hyatt Regency in Cambridge. In 2011, Decatur finished second, two strokes behind Kent Island. The district tournament is a qualifier for the state championship, set for Oct. 22-24, at the University of Maryland. If a team (four players) scores a 336 or lower during a district event, it advances to states. If a male golfer cards 84 (94 for females) or lower, he may qualify as an individual.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Worcester Prep sophomore Molly Soulé (11) challenges a Salisbury School player during Tuesday’s game in Berlin. Soulé scored one goal in Worcester’s 5-1 victory.

FORTYMINUTES,FIVEGOALS After slow start, Lady Mallards pick up pace in second half; earn 5-1 win LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (Oct. 5, 2012) The Worcester Prep Lady Mallards trailed the Salisbury School Dragons 1-0 at halftime of Tuesday’s soccer game in Berlin, but the home team rallied in the final 40 minutes,

netting five goals to win 5-1. “We played very well in the first half; we just couldn’t finish,” said Prep Coach Carol Hartnett. “The difference in the second half was that we were connecting the dots and setting up our opportunities.” The Mallards attacked the Salisbury goal from the first

whistle of the second half. Sophomore Molly Soulé evened the score about five minutes into the half off a cross from junior Frankie Willing. Willing, junior Lilly DiNardo, senior Alex Bruder and freshman Julie D’AntoSee HARTNETT on Page 42

Mallards ruin Royals in double overtime LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Worcester Prep junior J.B. Loomis, left, sprints past a Salisbury School player during Tuesday’s competition in Berlin. Loomis scored one goal in Worcester’s 7-3 win.

(Oct. 5, 2012) The Worcester Prep boys’ soccer team scored a 4-1 double-overtime victory over the Delmarva Christian Royals on Monday, and the following day, a 7-3 win over the Salisbury School Dragons. The Prep squad traveled to Georgetown, Del., on Monday to battle Delmarva Christian. Junior Lucas Payne scored midway into the first half to give the Mallards a 1-0 lead. The Royals tied it at 1-all eight minutes before the halftime break. See DESPITE on Page 40

A variety of classes are available at the Worcester County Recreation Center in Snow Hill to meet a diverse range of fitness needs. BOSU Explode will take place Monday and Wednesday, 5:30-6:30 p.m. The BOSU ball is an effective tool used by fitness professionals. One side is completely flat, while the opposite side is a half Swiss ball. This combination provides an unstable surface, though the device itself remains stable. The BOSU ball is an excellent tool for strength and balance training because it forces the body to utilize numerous stabilizer muscles all at one time.  BOSU Explode class will incorporate cardio, strength, agility and balance training seamlessly into one, non-stop workout. Early Bird Fitness Class takes place Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 9-9:40 a.m. and includes walking, strength training, and exercise focusing on flexibility and coordination. Lunch Time Fitness is held each Monday, Wednesday and Friday, from noon to 12:30 p.m. The moderate level class is part of a partnership between WCRP and the Health Department and includes step, strength and flexibility exercises. Classes cost $35 per person, per class for each 12-week session. Those who enjoy working out on their own are invited to walk/jog or personalize a fitness routine at the recreation center. The facility includes a climate controlled, 40,000square-foot gymnasium with a four-lane walking track and multi-purpose courts. The shock-absorbing cushioned floor provides a surface that is ideal for walkers and joggers and particularly those who suffer from arthritis or have past injuries. This service is free to all, and shower facilities are available. For more information, contact Myro Small at 410-632-2144, Ext.109 or e-mail msmall@co.worcester.md.us.

Tourney benefits ‘Sunshine Fund’ On Sept. 19, Ocean Pines Golf & Country Club, in Berlin, was the site for the first golf tournament to benefit the Ocean Downs Sunshine Fund, established to support Ocean Downs’ employees during times of financial hardship. Seventy golfers played 18 holes of golf, enjoyed breakfast, lunch, light fare, raffles, prizes and a silent auction.


OCTOBER 5, 2012

‘Determined’ Lady Mallards squad shut out Herons and Yellow Jackets LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (Oct. 5, 2012) Worcester Prep field hockey Coach Jenny Frostrom is quite pleased with her squad’s progress this season. “The team is working very well together and is determined to have a successful season,” Frostrom said. “So far, they are on track to have a great one. We must Prep Coach keep the momentum.” Last Friday in CentreJenny Frostrom ville, the Lady Mallards edged out the Gunston Day Herons, 2-0. Junior Hannah Esham scored off a pass from Meg Lingo in the first half. Seconds before the halftime break, Lingo, a junior, went one-on-one with the Gunston goalie and scored to put Worcester on top 2-0. Claire Brown, the team’s lone senior, blocked a stroke in the first half. Junior Maddy Pilchard recorded a save in the second half. “We dominated the game, keeping the ball on our end most of the game,” Frostrom said. “We had many scoring opportunities, including 12 corners, but both goals were scored on fast breaks. “Gunston played a tight defense,” she said. “We played a great passing game and communicated well.” On Monday, the Mallards traveled to Eastville, Va., for a game against the Northampton Yellow Jackets. Lingo tallied the only goal in Worcester’s 1-0 victory. “We had many scoring opportunities, with numerous corners and shots block by Northampton’s defense,” Frostrom said. “Meg Lingo was an outstanding player throughout the game. She had many carries down the field and had the most shots on goal.” Frostrom said sophomore Jordie Loomis and junior Sarah Arrington also had excellent drives on goal. “Our entire offensive line fought hard inside the circle, creating beautiful give and goes, but we could not get past Northampton defense,” the coach said. Brown stopped three Yellow Jackets’ shots. The Mallards will take a trip to Westover today, Friday, to play the Holly Grove Eagles.

Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

40 SPORTS

OCTOBER 5, 2012

Mallards record Seahawks suffer 23-7 homecoming loss to QA 62-stroke win over Salisbury LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor

LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (Oct. 5, 2012) The Worcester Prep golf team won Tuesday’s match against the Salisbury School Dragons by 62 strokes. It rained early in the day, but the weather cleared up in time for competition at the Ocean City Golf Club. The Mallards scored a 171 in the victory, while Salisbury tallied a 233. Leading Worcester were seniors Patrick Dowling (40), Scott Gee (43) and Matt Prep Coach Middleton (44), who tied with junior Billy Kevin Gates Brittingham (44). “It was wet out there. The conditions were not great, but I though we did well,” said Prep Coach Kevin Gates. “We’ve had a lot of rain-outs this year and that’s set us back. We lost a few matches before the season that didn’t get rescheduled. “The more you play the better you get, but we haven’t played that much,” he said. Worcester’s next match is set for Monday, on the road against the Salisbury Christian Jaguars.

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(Oct. 5, 2012) In 2011, the Stephen Decatur football team upset Queen Anne’s during the Lions’ homecoming celebration with a 34-31 overtime win. The Lions hadn’t lost a Bayside Conference match in four years and had a 37-game regular season winning streak going before falling to the Seahawks that unforgettable night. “We cut their win streak last year and I’m sure their players and coaches haven’t forgotten,” Decatur Coach Bob Knox said prior to last Friday’s game. With an eye for vengeance, the unbeaten Lions traveled to Berlin Sept. 28 for battle — this time, during Decatur’s homecoming. As if written for a film, Queen Anne’s got its revenge, spoiling the Seahawks’ celebration with a 23-7 victory. The visiting team scored twice in the opening quarter to lead 14-0 and Queen Anne’s tacked on three additional points with a field goal 2:35 before the halftime break.

See QUEEN on Page 43

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Stephen Decatur junior Andrew Borradaile (4) breaks away from a pack of players during last Friday’s game in Berlin. Queen Anne’s spoiled Decatur’s homecoming celebration, winning 23-7.

Despite fatigue, Mallards slay Dragons in Berlin Continued from Page 38

Neither team scored in the second half to send the game into overtime. “We had a lot of chances in the second half. We hit almost every piece of woodwork you could without [the ball] going in,” said Prep Coach Terry Underkoffler. “We had a lot more opportunities than [Delmarva Christian], but we just couldn’t cash in. And their goalkeeper made some really good saves to keep them in the game.” About two minutes into the second 10minute overtime period, the Royals were called for a handball in the box. The Mallards were awarded a penalty shot and junior Ryan Nally capitalized. Senior Gordon Abercrombie blasted the ball from 30 yards out into the upper corner to put Worcester on top 3-1.

With two minutes remaining, junior J.B. Loomis tallied the Mallards’ fourth goal. Prep goalie Zander Farr, a senior, stopped four Royals’ shots. The next day, Salisbury School visited Berlin for competition. Thirty seconds into the game, the visiting team made their presence known with the first goal of the match-up. Prep senior Seth Conboy tied the score less than two minutes later. “We played double overtime the day before and I just think we weren’t ready,” Underkoffler said. Nally and Noah Conboy, a junior, netted shots in the first half to boost Worcester’s advantage 3-1. Two minutes into the second half, senior Alec Zarif extended the lead to three

goals. Seth Conboy, Loomis and sophomore Matt Klepper tallied goals to push the Mallards ahead 7-1. The Dragons scored two goals in the final 10 minutes of competition. Farr played in goal during the first half and for the opening 10 minutes of the second half. He recorded two saves. Freshman Charlie Pritchard finished the game, cashing in four saves. “They were determined not to lose that game. We had some good opportunities and when we got ahead we went after it pretty well,” Underkoffler said. “The attacking part is there. They’re keeping possession better and they’re finding ways to get in there and score.” The Mallards are scheduled for a trip to Westover today, Friday, to take on the Holly Grove Eagles.


Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

SPORTS 41

Seahawks step up in second half; top Mardela Warriors 8-2 Decatur squad scores six goals in final 40 minutes to edge out its opponent LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (Oct. 5, 2012) The Stephen Decatur boys’ soccer team had its share scoring opportunities in the first half of Monday’s game against the Mardela Warriors in Berlin, though the Seahawks only netted two shots. The home team stepped up in the second half of play, scoring six goals to win the match 8-2. Senior Kaelan Patterson gave Decatur a 1-0 lead less than three minutes into the game. The Seahawks continued to pressure the Mardela goal, but they just couldn’t move the ball past the keeper. At the 26-minute mark, Decatur senior Andrew Ternahan was fouled and awarded a penalty shot. It ricocheted off the post and the follow-up shot sailed over the goal. About 12 minutes before the halftime break, junior Nick White was unmarked when he received the ball. He tapped it past the Warriors’ goalie charging to challenged him, and shot into an open net to put Decatur on top 2-0. Minutes later, the Seahawks suffered an unfortunate mishap when a ball passed

back to sophomore goalie Sean Colgan from junior defender Jared King went into the goal. Decatur headed into halftime ahead 2-1. “We were 0-10 [scorDecatur Coach ing] on corner kicks in the first half. We were J. Greenwood having finishing issues and we weren’t hustling,” said Decatur Coach Jamie Greenwood. “At halftime we talked about taking more intelligent shots, our number of touches on the ball — we were taking too many touches in the first half, playing the ball to the 6-yard mark and being more active off the ball, and they did that in the second half.” Junior Zak Hoshino scored four minutes into the second half, but shortly after, Mardela cut Decatur’s lead to one. The Seahawks tallied five goals in the final 25 minutes to secure an 8-2 victory. Hoshino, juniors David Bernal-Clark, Danny Beck and Jeb Kvarda and senior Aldo Santana each scored goals. Colgan stopped one Mardela shot in the first half. Junior Logan Thumma made two saves in the second half. “We picked up the pace of play in the second half,” Greenwood said. The Washington Jaguars will travel to Berlin on Monday for a 4 p.m. game against the Seahawks.

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OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Stephen Decatur senior Andrew Ternahan (22) shields the ball from Mardela player during Monday’s game in Berlin. Decatur won 8-2.


Ocean City Today

42 SPORTS

Hartnett rotates Mallards to ‘wear down’ Salisbury Continued from Page 38

nio each scored in the second half. “It was not only a huge conference win, but it was a huge comeback from a 1-0 deficit,” Hartnett said. “They not only came back and tied the game, but they continued the momentum. It was just a great overall effort. The girls displayed the character we know Prep Coach they have.” Carol Hartnett Hartnett has been pleasantly surprised by freshman goalie Grace Tunis’ improvement as this is her first time playing the position. Tunis stopped 11 Salisbury shots on Tuesday. The Dragons operated a “run and gun offense” and Hartnett said junior sweeper Alissa Talbert did a good job quarterbacking the Worcester defense. The Mallards were also able to “wear [Salisbury] down,” Hartnett said, as she continuously made substitutions to keep fresh legs on the field. “I’m proud of them,” she said. “We’re just going to keep moving forward and progressing.” The Salisbury Christian Jaguars will come to Berlin on Monday for a 4 p.m. game against Worcester.

OCTOBER 5, 2012

Girls struggle to find net in 3-1 loss to Parkside Bunting: we dominated, but we couldn’t put the ball away against Rams LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (Oct. 5, 2012) Capitalizing on scoring opportunities and on opponents’ mistakes were key factors in Tuesday’s girls’ soccer game between the Stephen Decatur Lady Seahawks and Parkside Rams. “I thought we played well, particularly in the second half. We out-shot them in the first half, but we were playing too

much kickball and we wore ourselves down chasing,” Decatur Coach Misty Bunting said after her team’s 3-1 loss to Parkside in Salisbury. “The kids were pumped Decatur Coach up and ready. They wanted that game, but Misty Bunting [Parkside] took advantage of our mistakes and we didn’t take advantage of theirs.” Parkside led 1-0 at halftime and tacked on a second goal in the second half. Shortly after, Decatur sophomore Jenna Leitgeb cut the Rams’ lead to one. The home team tallied a third goal and held on to win 3-1.

“In the second half, the girls came back, they fought and they didn’t give up,” Bunting said. “We had more opportunities in the second half, but we couldn’t find the back of the net. It was frustrating because we dominated, but we couldn’t put the ball away.” Decatur junior goalie Ashley DePaul stopped 12 Parkside shots. On Tuesday, the Seahawks will again travel to Salisbury, this time to play the Wi-Hi Indians. “They’re a team we can’t take lightly. They have a solid keeper and they’re going to come out strong and we need to do the same,” Bunting said. “It’s going to be a really tough game, but we know what we need to do to win.”

Lady Seahawks take down Warriors in three games LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (Oct. 5, 2012) The Stephen Decatur volleyball team served up a dominating performance on the road Tuesday against the Pocomoke Warriors. The visiting Lady Seahawks scored 25 points in the first game and limited the home team to eight. “I thought we looked good in the first game. We were talking and we were moving our feet,” said Decatur Coach Sarah Zimmer. “Everything was definitely flowing.”

The high level of play continued during the second game, which the Seahawks won 25-5. “They did a great job. They worked well together,” Zimmer said. Decatur Coach Decatur took the third game 25-7 to secure the Sarah Zimmer victory. “They all looked comfortable and confident in what they were doing,” Zimmer said. “Pocomoke played the ball over the net quickly a few times and we adjusted well. Moving our feet and talking were a

big part of tonight and they did well.” Juniors Taylor Black and Katie VanBruggen tallied nine and eight aces respectively. Casey Ortiz, a senior, had six kills. Senior setter Ashley Trice recorded eight assists. Defensive specialist Alexis Martinek, a senior, dug four Pocomoke hits. “[During] our last couple of games, we’ve been more consistent in our play,” Zimmer said. “They’re starting to play smarter than they were at the beginning of the season.” Decatur will host the James M. Bennett Clippers on Tuesday at 5:30 p.m.

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Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

SPORTS 43

Queen Anne’s arrives ready to battle after 2011loss to Decatur Continued from Page 40

After the score, Decatur senior Tim VanVonno returned the kick 78 yards to jump-start his team’s offensive charge. The Seahawks picked up a couple yards on several plays and on fourth-and2 near the 20-yard line, quarterback Collin Macomber ran three yards for a first down. The senior quarterback threw the Decatur Coach ball to VanVonno on the next play and Decatur Bob Knox was on the board with about 50 seconds left in the quarter. Fletcher Case’s kick was good as the home team trailed by 10 points at halftime. Queen Anne’s picked up six points in the third quarter and held Decatur scoreless. “I think we were distracted by homecoming. There were events all week at school,” Knox said. “The kids may have underestimated Queen Anne’s. We beat them at their homecoming and they came down to pay us back. We got smacked in the mouth early and didn’t recover.” The Decatur squad also committed 13 penalties. “You can’t win with 13 penalties, and a few of them were in crucial situations,” Knox said. Offensively, Knox said it was the Seahawks’ worst rushing stats he could remember in his 29 years at the helm. Decatur ran the ball 16 times, earning 31 yards — 28 courtesy of Macomber. The quarterback was 8-for-14, throwing for

Ladies lose 1-0 to Saints in final minute Monday

98 yards. VanVonno made three catches for 52 yards. He ran the ball 131 yards on three kickoff returns. “We didn’t have a stellar offensive performance,” Knox said. “We just didn’t execute.” Junior Marwan Saleh led the Decatur defense with eight tackles and two assists. Senior Colin May made four tackles and assisted with three. Sophomore Shawn’ye Jones recorded four tackles and two assists. The Seahawks will travel to Easton to take on the Warriors tonight, Friday. “Easton is 3-2 and getting better every week. We’re 2-3 and not improving,” Knox said. “We have to be more physical and more disciplined than them.”

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Stephen Decatur junior P.J. Copes (26) is surrounded by Queen Anne’s players during last Friday’s game in Berlin. Queen Anne’s spoiled Decatur’s homecoming celebration, winning 23-7.

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LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (Oct. 5, 2012) Monday’s field hockey game between the Stephen Decatur Lady Seahawks and St. Michaels Saints was scoreless until the final minute, when the home team netted a shot to secure a 1-0 victory. “They came out ready [to play], but unfortunately fell back into a slump, especially in the second half,” said Decatur Coach Michelle Fluty. The Saints scored with 1:27 remaining in the competition. “Unfortunately, it is the same mistakes in the past games that cost us the win once again. The refusal to mark up consistently is really hurting our ability to play solid defense,” Fluty said. “Also, we went from taking 13 shots in the first half to only four in the second half. We will need to continue to work on these same skills in order to be successful in our upcoming games.” Junior Abby Friedman split time in the goal with freshman Sophia Clementi. Friedman recorded two saves and Clementi stopped three Saints’ shots. The Seahawks will travel to Salisbury on Monday to battle the Parkside Rams.

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Ocean City Today

BUSINESS www.oceancitytoday.net

PAGE 46

OCTOBER 5, 2012

REAL ESTATE REPORT

BUSINESS BRIEFS

Know where property lines start and stop

Shamrock names top August agents Shamrock Realty Group named Rosie Beauclair as top sales agent and Linda Westerside-Barron as top listing agent for August. Beauclair joined Shamrock Realty Group in 2007, and has consistently been a top producer. Westerside is a seasoned agent who has been with Shamrock since 2009 and also continues to be a top performer. Beauclair and Westerside-Barron are both licensed to sell real estate in Maryland and Delaware.

LAUREN BUNTING ■ Contributing Writer (Oct. 5, 2012) Whether purchasing an existing home or a vacant lot, you should know exactly what you are buying, and where your lot lines start and stop in relationship to your neighbor — something a plat does not provide. In order to determine this, you will need to have a survey completed, but the exact type of survey you’ll need depends on many factors. Below you’ll find a synopsis of the different kinds of surveys available. The Location Drawing is what some companies request because they are inexpensive, but you get what you pay for. These drawings are not certified like an actual Location Survey is. The Location Survey is the most common type of survey, and it is a field measured survey showing boundary lines of the property, permanent markers on all corners of the property, details of any improvements along with their dimensions, and/or any encroachments across the boundary lines. These are used for both vacant lots and existing homes. The previous two types of surveys are examples of horizontal drawings; however, the next step you may need if building a new home is a vertical survey called a Topography Survey. This survey provides builders/architects with all of the various elevations throughout the lot so they can determine key points in compiling building plans. Another survey you may be required to have if building a new home and in order to obtain building permits from your county is called a Site Plan — and, if your area of disturbance is more than 5,000 square feet, you will also need a Storm Water and Sediment Erosion Control document along with the Site Plan. Once all of your approvals are in place, your builder may See DIFFERENT on Page 47

Real estate company licensed in Maryland OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Angie Gillis, owner of Encore Events, designed this fall table setting at her Berlin home. Creating tablescapes for clients is just one example of what the company offers. Encore Events, a division of A Change of Space Design Studio, Inc., specializes in “unique creations using natural elements.” (Below) Encore Events design studio is located in the Decatur Business Center, off Route 611 in West Ocean City

CREATIVE MIND AT WORK Business specializes in ‘unique creations using natural elements’ LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (Oct. 5, 2012) When life throws a wrench in your plans, you adjust. That is just what Angie Gillis did. Gillis, of Berlin, worked as an interior designer and decorator for more than 20 years. As the economy took a downturn, naturally, her business was affected. “It was time for me to consider what to do next. I closed the interior design studio and started to create my new business plan for Encore Events,” she said. “I was fortunate enough to have one of my amazing client, the Sharpleys, ask me to create the wedding of a lifetime for their oldest daughter, Katie, and soon to be son-in-law, Kevin Morland, so that is exactly what I did. I worked on this particular wedding for about 18 months and from the smallest of detail to the largest of backdrops, Encore Events proudly provided this couple with ‘a wedding of a lifetime.’ “I knew when I was asked to do this project, it was exactly what I was supposed to be doing. Able to use my amazing studio that had just been totally remodeled and the warehouse as well, this was a

Delaware resort real estate firm Prudential Gallo Realtors announced this week that it is now licensed to conduct business in Maryland. Prudential Gallo Realtors has joined the Coastal Association of Realtors, located in Berlin. The Multiple Listing Service of the Coastal Association covers properties in Somerset, Wicomico and Worcester counties in Maryland. Prudential Gallo Realtors was founded in Rehoboth Beach in 1979, by Bette and Sal Gallo. Now with four locations in Bethany Beach, Lewes and Rehoboth Beach, the company serves customers and clients in residential and commercial sales and rentals. To learn more, contact Broker Mary Cerami at 302-537-2616 or 1888-624-6974, or visit the Web site at www.PruGallo.com.

AGH announces new staff

fantastic direction for me to take,” she said. “I knew I could not turn off my creative mind, so I began Encore Events.” Gillis will host a grand opening celebration and ribbon cutting for the new business venture this Saturday, from noon to 5 p.m., at her design studio, located in the Decatur Business Center, off Route 611 in West Ocean City. Gillis and her team will be in the studio, which is environmentally friendly, earthy and green, filled with different woods, recycled and reclaimed materials, and at the warehouse behind the store. Some of the team members will be working on projects for an upcoming wedding. Guests at-

tending the event will have an opportunity to see the group creating some unique items, Gillis said. Refreshments will be served. Mark Frostrom of The Marriage Carriage, will provide horse and buggy rides. There will also be a drawing to win a bridal bouquet, with wedding booking. Visitors, area residents and business owners are invited to learn more about Encore Events, a division of A Change of Space Design Studio, Inc., specializing in “unique creations using natural elements.” “What Encore Events offers each and every bride, client [and] company, is the ability to See GRAND on Page 47

Atlantic General Hospital recently appointed the following to the medical staff: ■ Jessica Colyer, M.D., received her medical degree from The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pa. She completed her residency and fellowship in pediatrics at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, D.C., where she became chief resident in pediatrics. Dr. Colyer is a member of the American Medical Association and the American College of Cardiology and is certified by the American Board of Pediatrics. ■ Christa Fistler, M.D., received her medical degree from Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pa., completed her residency at Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, and her fellowship at University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md. Dr. Fistler is board certified in critical care medicine and pulmonary disease. Dr. Fistler is a member of the American College of Chest Physicians, American Medical Association, American Thoracic Society and Society of Critical Care Medicine. Dr. Fistler will be joining the telemedicine providers team.


OCTOBER 5, 2012

Ocean City Today

BUSINESS 47

REAL ESTATE REPORT

Different types of surveys offered Continued from Page 46

GRAND OPENING

PHOTO COURTESY TED PAGE

Shamrock Realty opened its new offices on Grays Corner Road in Berlin with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. On hand for the event are realtors Jim Volk, Marilyn Bushnell, Julie Sadler, Phyllis Fennessy, Linda Westerside and Jack Tellman, Sales Manager Pam Wadler (associate broker), Office Manager Jeff Wadler, Gary James, owner and president of T&G Builders and Shamrock Realty and Maureen James.

Grand opening for Encore Events Saturday in WOC Continued from Page 46

create a setting that is as unique as the individual, group, company or event is. That is what we specialize in,” Gillis said. “We not only provide distinctly created floral arrangements, [offering] a wide variety and style of flowers from all over the world, [but] we provide everything that makes an event memorable — flowers, lighting, backdrops that are constructed onsite in my warehouse, just behind the studio. We have many items from all over the world that we use as props to create the most unusual and unexpected settings in this area.” Each and every detail is important to Gillis and her team, she said. They build and make by hand most of their favors and table items onsite, as well. “If imagination needs to be a part of an event or gathering of any sort, Encore Events is the only place to come,” she said. “We do everything from weddings, receptions, corporate events, private dinner parties, birthday parties, anniversary parties, to baby showers and set design and creation. We are the only event service business like this in the area.” Gillis said her business has done exceptionally well since she launched it several months ago. She is working on a number of clients’ events and brides have weddings booked well into next year, she said. Gillis said she is excited and so proud of the company’s accomplishments to date. “I am no longer providing interior design services nor creating furniture, just amazing backdrops for our events. Designing the events is taking up all of my time and I want to focus on this business the way I had focused on the interior design so that I can give each and every client 100 percent of me and the most amazing event they could have ever imagined,” she said. “We provide this wonderful service at every price range. No matter how simple or elaborate the need, it is guaranteed to be amazing for all who are a part of it.” Gillis also recently launched “The Burlap Bag,” which includes all flowers and items needed to create the perfect table setting in a client’s own home or for an event or dinner party. All of the items

are wrapped in a burlap bag. Customers can either take the items home and create their own tablescape, or hire Gillis to design the setting. Clients may also order “AirFlair” 36inch round balloons with handmade streamers and materials that hang below,

which can be coordinated with any event. “As you can see, we are up to tons of great things,” Gillis said. For more information about Encore Events or Saturday’s grand opening, call 410-726-8662 or e-mail angie@acosdesign.com.

request what’s called a Stake-Out, where the surveyor visits the site and literally puts stakes in place to show the location of the foundation. Furthermore, some banks and counties require an actual Foundation Location, which is a certified Location Survey of the foundation once it’s in place. The next phase of surveys you may need if building a new home are the AsBuilt Survey and possibly an Elevation Certificate if the property is located within a flood plain requiring flood insurance. The As-Built Survey is basically a Location Survey after a new home is built, showing exactly where the house and any other structures were built on the lot. Costs for surveys vary, but if you are building a new home, most surveyors will provide a package price to complete all necessary surveys from the initial Location Survey all the way through the building process. — Lauren Bunting is a member of the Coastal Association of Realtors and a licensed REALTOR® with Bunting Realty, Inc. in Berlin.

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Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

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CALENDAR 61

SENIOR SLANT PAGE 57

OCTOBER 5, 2012

CROSSWORD 56

DINING GUIDE 60

ENTERTAINMENT 53

Lifestyle Ocean City Today

BEER FEST More than 50 local, regional craft brews will be on tap for inaugural tasting event at 45th St. Taphouse

FOOD FOR THOUGHT By Deborah Lee Walker PAGE 52

www.oceancitytoday.net

PAGE 49

EndlessSummer Cruisin’ features 2,500 customs, hot rods, classics

LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor

LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor

(Oct. 5, 2012) Approximately two-dozen local and regional breweries will offer more than 50 beers for tasting during the 45th Street Taphouse’s inaugural Beer Fest, set for Saturday from 1-7 p.m. “We wanted to showcase the beers and what we do here at the Taphouse. Nobody in Ocean City carries the number of craft beers on tap that we do,” said Jeff Burton, 45th Street Taphouse general manager and executive chef. “We have 36 beers on tap in the restaurant. Six or seven are domestic and we have about 30 craft beers.” Many of the beers the restaurant offers on draft will be featured during Saturday’s beer festival in the 45th Street Village parking lot. Some of the companies that will be represented are Evolution, Dogfish Head, Burley Oak, Fordham, Harpoon, Eastern Shore Brewing, National Bohemian, Starr Hill and Lancaster Brewing. “We are super excited to be part of a beer festival in our back yard. Ocean City deserves more local beer festivals and we are proud to serve beer that represents the people of Ocean City,” said Bryan Brushmiller, owner of Burley Oak Brewery in Berlin. Burley Oak will feature several brews during the festival, including its Aboriginal Gangster IPA; Bunker C, a robust porter; Rude Boy, an imperial red ale; and Just The Tip-Kolcsh, Brushmiller said. The Berlin brewer will also present a special cask of Bunker C with Costa Rican coffee beans. Three bands — Pompous Pie, Willowbrook and Mood Swingers — will perform throughout the day. DJ Wood will be the festival emcee. Tickets cost $25 in advance or

(Oct. 5, 2012) Custom and classic cars, hot rods, street machines and trick trucks will be featured this weekend during the 15th annual Endless Summer Cruisin’ at the inlet parking lot. The fall car show continues to be one of the largest in the eastern region, according to coorganizer Butch Patrick Meredith Herbert of Special Event Productions Inc., as the 2011 event included approximately 2,200 vehicles. Organizers were able to accept an additional 200 cars last year by using the south parking lot and one of the halls at the Ocean City convention center. “It was the most cars we’ve had for the October show,” she said. “We’re excited to be able to use the inside of the convention center again this year.” For 2012, approximately 2,500 cars will be showcased during Endless Summer Cruisin’ at the inlet parking lot, which will take place in conjunction with the 32nd annual Hot Rod & Custom Car Show at the convention center on 40th Street. “We have sold out with 2,500 cars this year. It’s the most cars we’ve taken because we have access to the convention center and [its] parking lot,” Herbert said. “This is the second year we’ve combined the shows. It was a big hit last year so we decided to do it again this year.” The October Cruisin’ event, which began Thursday, is open to all years, makes and models of

Burley Oak Brewery owner Bryan Brushmiller holds Costa Rican coffee beans used in a special “Bunker C” porter cask.

$30 at the gate. They may be purchase at the Taphouse restaurant on Ninth Street and the Boardwalk, at the 45th Street location or at any Sunsations store. A 5-ounce sampling glass will be provided. Guests must be 21 or older. Food and T-shirts will also be sold. “I’m excited about the event. It should be a lot of fun,” Burton said. A “meet the brewers social” is scheduled to take place from 7-9 p.m. the night before the festival. The $25 cost includes a sampling of exclusive brews paired with Taphouse food. Representatives from Burley Oak, Dogfish Head, Evolution, Fordham, Eastern Shore Brewing and Harpoon are scheduled to participate in this evening’s event. For more information, call the 45th Street Taphouse at 443-6642201. A portion of the festival proceeds will benefit Believe in Tomorrow Children’s Foundation. The organization’s Respite Housing Program provides critically ill children and their families a much-needed getaway to the beach from the everyday stresses of a child’s medical illness.

See EDDIE on Page 58


50 LIFESTYLE

Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012


Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

LIFESTYLE 51

Annual ‘Harbor Day’event focuses on resort maritime traditions LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (Oct. 5, 2012) Learn about Worcester County’s maritime heritage and traditions on Saturday, during the fifth annual Harbor Day at the Docks celebration at the Commercial Fishing Harbor in West Ocean City. The Sunset Avenue harbor will be transformed to create the feeling of a fishing village, with hand-painted signs on old pieces of wood, crab pots, ropes, nets, nautical displays and activities for the whole family, according to Melanie Pursel, executive director of the Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce and co-organizer of the event. “It is an authentic maritime heritage festival that celebrates the commercial and sportfishing industries. It is an opportunity for locals and visitors to interact with real fishermen and talk with them about their trade, actually see the vessels up close and how our community was built on this industry,” Pursel said. “Someone new to the event will find a unique experience to interact with the fishermen, see fine maritime-related artwork and crafts and embrace the history of our region. They may also get to enjoy fresh seafood, music and free kids’ activities.” The festival will take place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and include an assortment of activities designed to educate visitors about the commercial and recreational fishing industries, marine aquaculture,

safety at sea and local seafood processing. All activities are free. Susan Jones, executive director of the Ocean City Hotel-Motel-Restaurant Association, is also one of the event organizers. She said an estimated 5,000 people participated in Harbor Day festivities last year. “Attendance has grown each year. It continues to be popular as more people learn about it,” Jones said. “There’s something for all ages.” Added Pursel, “After five years, people are now looking forward to the event each fall and say that it is different from any other festival that they have attended. We have tried to keep it authentic while still entertaining and fun.” Scheduled activities on Saturday include “dock to plate” seafood cooking demonstrations by Adam Sanders of Jules Restaurant, John Martin of Martin Fish Company and Shark on the Harbor executive chef and owner, Travis Wright. Each will use fresh, local ingredients. Also on the lineup are Crabology 101, which offers a close look at the crustacean and the art of crab picking, presented by Donald Manning of Phillips Foods Inc; fish cleaning and oyster shucking demonstrations; lobster banning; net mending; maritime storytelling; and crafts for children. Hooper’s Crab House, located in West Ocean City, will take its 24-foot truck to the festival, where crabs, clams, shrimp and mussels will be steamed on-site for the first time.

At 1 p.m., Hooper’s will host a crabpicking contest. General manager Ryan Intrieri said he contacted some picking houses in the area and they may send some representatives to participate in the competition. Contestants will have three-and-a-half minutes to pick crabmeat. The person who generates the most meat will receive $200. Second-place prize is $125 and the third-place finisher will take home $75. Fourth- and fifth-place pickers will earn $25 each. The meat will be auctioned off after the contest. The competition is open to professional and amateur pickers. To register, call Hooper’s at 410-213-1771 or sign up on Saturday. There is no cost to participate. “We’re looking forward to participating and hopefully it’s a great success,” Intrieri said. Also new this year is the Fishmobile, a converted bookmobile, with live specimens from local waters. This traveling marine science exhibit allows children to touch and hold living animals and learn how an oyster reef is created. Music will be provided by Bryan Russo, DJ Jeremy and The Jolly Roving Tars, who play authentic maritime music. Visitors can tour a working United States Coast Guard vessel, and get up close and personal with boats docked at the harbor by taking a kayak tour provided by Ayers Creek Adventures. Standup paddleboarding will also be available.

Vendors will be on hand selling nautical-themed merchandise and Art League of Ocean City members will be painting in plein air-style throughout the harbor. Food will also be for sale. “We have close to 40 vendors this year. It’s the most we’ve ever had,” Jones said. The day will end at 5 p.m. with a blessing of the fleet, during which Pastor Sean Davis will offer blessings for the fishermen and their families. “[Harbor Day] was started because there was nothing else like it in the area. Many people did not realize that we have an actual working harbor and these fisherman have spent their lives on the ocean bringing us amazing seafood over the years,” Pursel said. “We also wanted to embrace and honor the heritage of Ocean City with interpretive signage that is now prominent along the harbor, specifically, one design explains how the inlet was formed, thus creating the harbor and the industry for us as we see it today. In addition, sportfishing has become wildly popular and draws visitors from all over.” Parking is limited along Sunset Avenue, so visitors are encouraged to park at the West Ocean City Park and Ride lot on Route 50 and take a free shuttle bus offered by the Francis Scott Key Family Resort. Harbor Day is a partnership of the HMRA, the Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce and Worcester County Tourism. For more information about Harbor Day and a schedule of events, visit www.ocharborday.com.

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52 LIFESTYLE

HOROSCOPE ARIES (MARCH 21 TO APRIL 19) You might feel compelled to get involved on the “right side” of a seemingly unfair fight. But appearances can be deceptive. Get the facts before going forth into the fray. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Bullying others into agreeing with your position could cause resentment. Instead, persuade them to join you by making your case on a logical point-by-point basis. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Resist pushing for a workplace decision you might feel is long overdue. Your impatience could backfire. Meanwhile, focus on that still-unsettled personal situation. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Your aspects favor doing something different. You might decide to redecorate your home, or take a trip somewhere you’ve never been, or even change your hairstyle. LEO (July 23 to August 22) You might want to take a break from your busy schedule to restore your energy levels. Use this less-hectic time to also reassess your plans and make needed changes. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) What you like to think of as determination might be seen by others as nothing more than stubbornness. Try to be more flexible if you hope to get things resolved. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Watch that you don’t unwittingly reveal work-related information to the wrong person. Best to say nothing until you get official clearance to open up. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) With things settling down at work or at home, you can now take on a new challenge without fear of distraction. Be open to helpful suggestions from colleagues. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Your creativity can help resolve an emotional situation that might otherwise get out of hand. Continue to be your usual caring, sensitive self. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) You could impress a lot of influential people with the way you untangle a few knotty problems. Meanwhile, a colleague is set to share some welcome news. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Aspects favor recharging your social life and meeting new people. It’s also a good time to renew friendships that might be stagnating due to neglect on both sides. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Congratulations. Your talent for working out a highly technical problem earns you well-deserved praise. The weekend could bring news about a friend or relative. BORN THIS WEEK: Your sense of justice makes you a strong advocate for the rights of people and animals alike.

OCTOBER 5, 2012

Celery versus celeriac: what’s the difference? FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Members of same family, but celeriac is a variety of celery DEBORAH LEE WALKER ■ Contributing Writer (Oct. 5, 2012) The question of the day: are celery and celeriac the same? Celery root, or celeriac, and celery are members of the same family, but celeriac is a special variety of celery that is cultivated especially for its large root. The history of celeriac dates back thousands of years. It is believed to come from Egypt and into our culinary history via Southern Europe. Apium graveolens was originally used for medicinal and religious purposes. It was not until the 17th century that celery root was cultivated as a food product. Do not be judgmental the first time you are introduced to this member of the Apiaceae family. The root’s ugly duckling appearance — brown overtones and bumpy exterior — does not exactly excite one’s palette. But once the tough skin is peeled, an impeccable, white delight emerges. The root vegetable has a distinctive taste that can be described as a cross between celery and parsley with a nutty twist. It does not contain as much water as its cousin, celery, and the texture is similar to potatoes. The subtlety of the

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flavor makes it a perfect pairing with numerous ingredients. Celeriac is grown during the cool season and is in its prime in the fall. The growing period is long and can take up to 200 days to fully mature. When fully grown, the portion of the plant, which grows above the ground, looks much like common celery. When selecting celeriac in the store, consumers should look for a smooth service with no soft spots. Soft areas indicate decay. Another way to determine if celery root is fresh is to simply pick it up and feel for heaviness. If the root is dry, it will be very light in weight. Because the roots and dirt-filled crevices have been trimmed away, you will lose at least a quarter during the peeling process. Usually, one pound of celeriac will yield about two cups. Once peeled, celery root tends to discolor and oxidize quickly. Many cooks marinade it with lemon juice. Celery root can be eaten raw or cooked. Its diversity is a key factor when planning a menu. Celery root puree is a popular choice on top chef competitions. Celeriac is also trendy in French, Italian and Asian cooking. Celeri remoulade is a classic French dish I have had the pleasure of sampling. Celeriac should not be thicker than a matchstick cutting. Lemon juice, home-

made mayonnaise, Dijon mustard, crème fraiche and parsley are the main components. Of course, variations are part of a chef’s repertoire and always welcomed. Celeriac can be purchased online and some upscale food markets carry the product. If you are heading to the Bay Bridge, Wholefoods Market in Annapolis stocks it. Apple, fennel and celeriac make a refreshing fall salad. The fennel adds an anise flavor, which contrasts nicely with the tartness of the Granny Smith apples. Walnut adds extra crunch while raisins sweeten the salad. Apple, Fennel and Celeriac Slaw 1/2 cup mayo 1/2 cup Greek yogurt 2 tablespoons Dijon 1 tablespoon cider vinegar 1 teaspoon celery seed 1 small bulb celeriac (cut into matchstick sizes) 2 Granny Smith apples (cut into matchstick sizes) 1/2 bulb fennel, cut into matchstick sizes 1/4 cup combined chopped walnuts and raisins Kosher salt and fresh ground pepper to taste Secret Ingredient: Variety. “Variety is the very spice of life; that gives it all its flavor” … William Cowper.

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ENTERTAINMENT www.oceancitytoday.net

OCTOBER 5, 2012

PAGE 53

NEW CENSATION Ocean Club Nightclub: Friday and Saturday, Oct. 5-6

APPEARING LIVE 19TH HOLE BAR & GRILL 9636 Stephen Decatur Highway West Ocean City 410-213-9204 Oct. 5: Scott Glorioso, 6-10 p.m. Oct. 6: John Remy, 6-10 p.m. 45TH STREET TAPHOUSE BAR & GRILLE 45th Street and the bay 443-664-2201 Oct. 5: 2 Guys & A Mama, 8 p.m. to midnight Oct. 6: Beerfest w/ Willowbrook, Mood Swingers, Pompous Pie, 1-7 p.m.; Zion, 8 p.m. to midnight ADOLFO’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT 13th Street and the Boardwalk in the Beach Plaza Hotel 410-289-4001 Oct. 5: Rhonda Apple and Dale Britt (dinner hours)

Oct. 6: Dale Britt on Piano BJ’S ON THE WATER 75th Street and the bay 410-524-7575 Oct. 5: Tommy Edward, Melissa Rose, 9 p.m. Oct. 6: No Byscuyts, 9 p.m. Oct. 10: 2 Guys & A Mama, 5-8 p.m. COCONUTS BEACH BAR & GRILL 37th Street oceanfront 410-289-6846 Oct. 6: Kevin Poole & Joe Mama, 2-6 p.m. Oct. 7: Overtime, 2-6 p.m. COTTAGE CAFÉ Route 1, Bethany Beach, Del. 302-539-8710 Every Friday: DJ Bump, 5-8 p.m. Every Tuesday: Pub Party Trivia w/DJ Bump, 6-9 p.m. Oct. 6: Monkee Paw, 10 p.m. to 1 a.m.

FAGER’S ISLAND 60th Street and the bay 410-524-5500 Oct. 5: Kevin Poole, 5-9 p.m.; DJ Hook, 9 p.m. to 2 a.m.; Electric Company, 10 p.m. Oct. 6: Opposite Directions, 59 p.m.; DJ Groove, 9 p.m. to 2 a.m.; The Loop, 10 p.m. Oct. 7: Jazz Brunch w/Everett Spells, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Oct. 8: Deck Party w/DJ Batman, 5-9 p.m.; DJ Rob Cee, 9 p.m. to 2 a.m.; Opposite Directions & Friends Oct. 10: Euro Night w/DJ Rob Cee, 11 p.m. GALAXY 66 66th Street, bayside 410-723-6762 Skye Bar Oct. 5: DJ Groove, 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. Oct. 6: DJ Rob Cee, 10 p.m. Oct. 7: Live music, 4-8 p.m.; DJ, 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. Oct. 8: DJ Wax, 10 p.m. to 2 a.m.

THE LOOP Fager’s Island: Saturday, Oct. 6, 10 p.m. HARBORSIDE BAR & GRILL 12841 S. Harbor Road West Ocean City 410-213-1846 Oct. 5: Red Solo Cup Night w/DJ Billy T, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Oct. 6: Simple Truth, 2-6 p.m.; DJ Jeremy, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Oct. 7: Opposite Directions, 2-6 p.m.; DJ Billy T/DJ Bigler, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Oct. 11: Opposite Directions, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. HIGH STAKES Route 54, Fenwick Island, Del. 302-537-6971 Oct. 5: Bobby Burns, 4 p.m.; DJ Zman, 9 p.m. Oct. 6: Bobby Burns, 4 p.m.; DJ Rupe, 9 p.m. Oct. 11: Baltimore Bob, 4 p.m. HOUSE OF WELSH 1106 Coastal Highway, Fenwick Island, Del. 888-666-0728 302-541-0728 Every Friday: DJ Norm, 3-6

p.m.; Tony Vega, 6-10 p.m. Every Saturday: Tony Vega, 6-10 p.m. Every Sunday: Tony Vega, 6-10 p.m. Every Monday: DJ Norm, 6-9 p.m. Every Wednesday: DJ Norm, 6-9 p.m. JOHNNY’S PIZZA & PUB 56th Street, bayside 410-524-7499 Oct. 5: DJ Rupe, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Oct. 6: Debbie Caldwell, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. OC TRADING CO. 401 S. Baltimore Ave., Somerset Plaza 443-664-2512 Every Friday: Rock & Roll, Reggae Jam, 7-9 p.m. OCEAN CLUB NIGHTCLUB In the Horizons Restaurant In the Clarion Fontainebleau Hotel

101st Street and the ocean 410-524-3535 Oct. 5-6: New Censation SEACRETS 49th Street and the bay 410-524-4900 Oct. 5: Garden State Radio, 10 p.m. to 2 a.m.; John McNutt Band, 5-9 p.m.; Second Majesty, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Oct. 6: Big Bang Baby, 10 p.m. to 2 a.m.; Full Circle, 5-9 p.m.; Jon Maurer Band, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Oct. 11: Wild and Scenic Film Festival, 1-4 p.m. and 5-9 p.m. SMITTY MCGEE’S Route 54 West Fenwick Island, Del. 302-436-4716 Every Tuesday: Let’s Do Trivia, 7 p.m. Every Thursday: Randy Lee Ashcraft, 8 p.m. Every Friday: Randy Lee Ashcraft and the Saltwater Cowboys, 8 p.m.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/COREY GILMORE

The second annual “Zombie Crawl” was held last Saturday on the Boardwalk in Ocean City. Approximately 60 “undead” participated in the event, which benefited Maryland Food Bank and Veterans America. Taking part in the event, above from left, are Brian Tyrie, Tobey Humble, and Brian Davis. (Left) Also joining the festivities, from left, are Trae Feather, Tassia Feather, Catherine Gillis, and Mike Roslan.


54 ENTERTAINMENT

Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Assisting Wine Festival on the Beach organizer Chris Nokes, second from right above, during the 17th annual event last Saturday, from left, are Jean Geddes, Lisa Benish and Tim Stedman. (Left) Heidi Orris, left, and Karen Hutter sip wine during the festival. OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Shannon Reilly-Mobilia and her husband, Adrian Mobilia, owners of Fenwick Wine Cellars, located off Route 54 in Fenwick Island, Del., were one of nearly two-dozen vineyards and wineries to participate in the 17th annual Wine Festival on the Beach, held Sept. 28-29, in Ocean City.


Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

ENTERTAINMENT 55

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Bride-to-be Sandi Holmes, above center, is joined by bridesmaids, from left, Jennifer Schmoll, Wendy Fischer, Ashley Black and Danielle Potter last Saturday during the wine festival. (Right) Carlieta Belton and T.K. Forrester enjoy the festivities in the inlet parking lot.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

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Cassandra and Sean Rox sample wines offered during the event.

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56 LIFESTYLE

Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

PINWHEELS FOR PEACE In honor of International Day of Peace, students at Berlin Intermediate School created hundreds of pinwheels and placed them outside of the school on Sept. 21. On that day, more than 3.5 million pinwheels were spinning in 40 countries. The project has been important for art advocacy, uniting students, schools, and is a part of anti-bullying and anti-violence campaigns. Pictured are David Cherry, Kaitlyn Peters, Noelle Davis, Sarah Hyatt, Shelby Evans, Grace Schwendeman, Chy’na Riley, Kaliegh Redner and Halle Friedman.

Ceremony provides respectful disposal of ‘retired’ U.S.flags (Oct. 5, 2012) The fifth annual Flag Retirement Ceremony, sponsored by the American Legion and Scout Troop 261, will be held at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 10, at the Worcester County Veterans Memorial at Ocean Pines. To donate a flag to be officially “retired,” contact chairman Fred Muela at 301-802-5234 or drop them off at the Prudential Pen Fed Realty office at the South Gate of Ocean Pines, to the attention of Sharyn O’Hare.

CROSSWORD

Answers on page 58


Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

LIFESTYLE 57

Husband, credit cards go missing at Sunfest SENIOR SLANT

Columnist ‘luv’perfectsKemp kids’ vanishing act after years IRISH KEMP ■ Contributing Writer (Oct. 5, 2012) “Shades of deja vu!” Like father, like kids. During Sunfest last week, I dropped my luv, Skip, off at a Boardwalk bench while I checked out the time of the next show. How could I have forgotten to warn him not to move an inch? A bodaciously humongous amount of friends assured me that he was in the same spot when they stopped to chat; he told them he was waiting for me. A few minutes later when I went to retrieve him, he had disappeared. Obviously, over the years, he had perfected the kids’ vanishing act. Worry, why do I let myself worry? It’’s blasphemous, I know but it reminded me of Mary and her one. At least when her kid wandered away, she knew he didn’t have her car keys and credit card. All Mary had to do was check out the temple. I wondered if she worried after she found out he could make wine outta’ water? It’s time to chill out and enjoy fall’s gorgeous “changing of the leaves” show. Harpoon Hanna’s adult-plus seasonal deck party last Wednesday was a standing room only event. Pete and Barbara Rendina, George and Barbara Gantz, Phyllis and Lou Weidner and the dancing Mooneys, Jim and Mary, put on a floor show. That “double over the shoulder, around the neck” move by the dancing Mooneys, the likes of what is rarely seen in

these parts, was spectacular. Witnesses to this awesome dance move — Rosy Bird, Cal Hook, Naomi Popoli, Bob Pizza and Betty, Lynn Henning, Bill Shorts, Ken McFarlin, Betty Dolan, Bill Shorts, Rob and Carol Robinson, Sarah Gray, Judy and Ray and Pete and Kathy Weaver — were warned not to try this at home. ’Tis true, the Mooneys were invited to the local “so you think you can dance” show by Simon. H’mmm! Or was that “Ping Pong’s” Susan Sarandon? Oh yeah kids, I’m losing it. Would you believe I hung over a hot, cardboard stove for hours, baking 65 cupcakes, with icing, of course, to celebrate the inimitable (that’s good, Bob) almost live, Bob Burns’ September birthday, only to discover I had the wrong date. It would be so nice if everybody comes to Hanna’s 3-6 p.m. happy hour on Wednesday, Oct. 5, with an iced cupcake (tiny candle optional) to celebrate Bob’s birthday, as well as those of October birthday kids, Barbara Giles, Dick Kahn, Evelyn Pitarra, John Staley, Ceil Addicks, Bernie Bowerman, Pat Luckett, Ed Coady, Jack Nickels and Neil and Lee Taylor. Bob just learned the last words to the song. About my cupcakes, they didn’t rise to the occasion. Invite a birthday kid to the Hibernians ladies card party and luncheon at St. Andrew’s Center on Tuesday, Oct. 9. For tickets ($20), call Maureen O’Brien at 443-614-5221 or 302908-1498. UNO players welcome. C U in OC Today!

PUB OPEN 11AM DINING ROOM 4PM

PHOTOS COURTESY IRISH KEMP

Sharon, Steve, Pam, Carol and Ron Somerville, above, enjoy all the things Sunfest had to offer. Held Sept. 2023, the fall festival featured live music, food, and a number of arts and craft vendors. (Left) Cris and Dave Fairbanks love the social scene in Ocean City.

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Ocean City Today

58 LIFESTYLE

OCTOBER 5, 2012

O p e n E v e r y D a y 1 1 : 30 a m - 2 a m Ha p py H ou r E v e r y Da y 4 - 7 pm Ki tch en Op en S un -Th ur s ‘ti l 10 p m F r i . & S a t . ‘ t i l m i d ni g h t

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Daily Specials

Continued from Page 49

M o n da y & F r i da y: F re s h C at c h S a tu r d a y: T w i n S o f t S h e l l D in n e r S u n d ay : Po t R o as t w / Po ta to e s & S a l a d $ 9 . 9 5 We dn e s d a y: M e at l o a f w / M as h e r s & S a l ad $ 9 . 9 5 Tuesd a y: 1 /2 $ B ur ger s 5 -1 0 pm

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LIVE RACING ACTION

cars. A similar show held each May features hot rods, customs and classics made 1976 and earlier. Those attending the event this weekend will have the opportunity to meet Butch Patrick, who played Eddie Munster on “The Munsters” television show. Patrick will be available to meet fans today, Friday, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Sunday 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the inlet parking lot, and Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., inside the convention center. A Munster display will be set up inside the convention center today and Saturday, featuring the Munster Koach, Drag-u-la and little Eddie’s go kart replicas. Also on display at the 40th Street venue during the annual Hot Rod & Custom Car Show, held Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., are the “Fun ’55” Chevy Watermelon Pickup, “Brilliant Yellow” ’36 Ford Coupe and the “Classic Muscle” ’65 Ford Mustang Fastback. AAA Mid-Atlantic, General Motors Performance Division, Miller Electric, Slide-Lok, Flowmaster Exhausts and Summit Racing Equipment are just some of the companies that will offer automotive products. The Maryland State Lottery will also have prizes and giveaways. The Endless Summer Cruisin’ Boardwalk parade of cars will kick off today’s activities at 8 a.m. The cars will roll along the boards, beginning at 27th Street and ending at the inlet parking lot. There will also be a parade at 8 a.m. Saturday. Car trophies and awards will be presented, with the grand finale ceremony scheduled for Sunday at 2 p.m. Business owners, event sponsors, community leaders and town representatives will select the winners. Endless Summer Cruisin’ hours are Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., at the inlet parking lot. Hot Rod & Custom Car Show hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and Saturday at the Ocean City convention center. Admission costs $10 per day. Children 14 and younger will be admitted free when accompanied by an adult. For more show information, visit www.endlesssummercruisin.com. Hundreds of additional cars are expected to arrive in Ocean City this weekend with visitors who want to take part in

LIVE RACING MONDAY – THURSDAY UNTIL OCTOBER 29 Crossword answers from page 56

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31

1-888-887-5687 | harringtonraceway.com |

WHERE WINNERS PLAY!


Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

LIFESTYLE 59

NOMINATED FOR MDS BEST BAR/TAVERN - 2 YEARS IN A ROW

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S u n d a y A l l D a y & N i g h t 1 / 2 P r i c e E n t r e es $ 2 . 0 0 su r c h a r g e f o r S t e a k & C r a b C a k e & C r a b L e g s S p e c i a l s a r e n o t t o b e c o m b i n e d w i t h o t h e r d i sc o u n t s o r c o u p o n s 1 / 2 P r i c e e n t r e e s n o t v a l i d o n C o l u m b us w e e k e n d S ome re st r ic t ion s app ly. N o s ub st i tu t ion s , d in e- in on ly.

FRIDAY NIGHT • Red Solo Cup Night

L I VE M U S I C T h u r s d a y - S u n d a y

H A PP Y H O U R M O N - F R I 4 - 7 P M $ 2 Do m . Dr a f t s / R a i l Dr i n k s F o od Sp e c ia l s on : S hr im p• Cl am s• M u ss e ls • W in g s The Pink Ribbon Pinups, a local fundraising group that assists young people battling cancer, will be at Oasis Bar & Grill on Saturday for the “Rods & Rockers on Wheels” Vintage Car & Bike Show.

Vintagecar showand pinup contest ontap Sat. in Whaleyville the festivities that will be going on in and around town. During the four days, there will be sponsored car shows at additional locations around town such as restaurants and businesses. n Car enthusiasts are invited to downtown Berlin Saturday for a car show from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Main Street. Registration will take place from 8-11 a.m. The cost to register is $10. The first 50 to sign up for the car show will receive a commemorative dash plaque. The event is free for spectators. Trophies will be awarded at 2 p.m. For information, call the Berlin Chamber of Commerce at 410-641-4775 or email chamberinfo@berlinchamber.org. n The “Rods & Rockers on Wheels” Vintage Car & Bike Show, previously held at The Steer Inn Tavern on Route 589 in Taylorville, will take place this year at Oasis Bar & Grill in Whaleyville, on Saturday from 1-6 p.m. The show is open to all hot rods, classics, antiques, rat rods, trucks, vintage bikes and deadbeaters, ages 1975 and older. Registration will be onsite the day of the event. The cost is $10 to participate. Custom trophies, along with cash prizes and gift certificates will be awarded to the winners. Food and beer will be available for purchase. Kid Davis & The Bullets will provide the musical entertainment. “The Scarred and Dangerous Thrill Show” will also entertain the crowd. Participants in the pinup model contest will be competing for the title of Miss Rods & Rockers. The first-place contestant will also win a stocked party bus (beer and wine) tour for 15 people. The contest will begin at 3 p.m. The Pink Ribbon Pinups, a fundraising group that supports breast cancer awareness, will have a booth, where ladies will sell merchandise and host a 50/50 raffle. For more information, call 410-6414488.

WELCOME ENDLESS SUMMER CRUISERS

Fine Italian Fare with an Eastern Shore Flair Book your holiday parties in our beautiful dining room and enjoy the magnificent view

Saturday Lunch 11:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Sunday Brunch 11 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. Dinner at 5

Friday Evenings Around The Piano Bar with Rhonda Apple & Dale Britt Dale Britt on Piano Saturday Evening Dine Alfresco With A Fabulous Ocean View! Happy Hour Mon.-Fri. In The Classic Parlor Lounge


60 LIFESTYLE

Ocean City Today

Ocean City Today

Get a Direct Link to Your Business

DINING GUIDE ■ CREDIT CARDS: V-Visa, MC-Master Card, AE-American Express, DIS-Discover ■ PRICE RANGE: $, $$, $$$ ________________________________ ■ 19TH HOLE BAR & GRILLE, 9936 Stephen Decatur Highway, West Ocean City 410-213-9204 / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual and family-friendly, featuring great American cuisine for breakfast, lunch and dinner at affordable prices. Happy hour day 3-7 p.m. Entertainment Wednesday through Sunday. Sunday brunch with Louis Wright. ■ 32 PALM, 32nd Street, in the Hilton Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2525 / www.ocmdrestaurants. com / $$ / V-MC-AEDIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Western Caribbean cuisine, Eastern Shore favorites, gourmet and tasty liquid desserts. ■ ADOLFO’S, 13th Street, on the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410-289-4001 / www.ocadolfos.com / $$ / V-MC-AE / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Northern and southern Italian dishes, prepared fresh daily. Quiet, intimate atmosphere for couples, room for large families or choose to enjoy our outside seating with views of the ocean. ■ BJ’S ON THE WATER, 75th Street, Ocean City 410-524-7575 / www.bjsonthewater.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Open year-round. Entire dining menu served 11 a.m. to 1:30 a.m., seven days a week. Daily specials, daily duck feeding. Entertainment every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. No cover. Available for parties and banquets. Indoor and outdoor dining. ■ BLUE FISH JAPANESE & CHINESE RESTAURANT AND SUSHI BAR, 94th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3983 / www.bluefishoc.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Japanese and Chinese restaurant and sushi bar with beer, wine and cocktails. Dine in, take out and delivery available. Open Monday-Friday, 11:30 a.m.; Saturday and Sunday, noon. ■ CAPTAIN’S TABLE RESTAURANT, 15th Street and the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410289-7192 / www.captainstableoc.com / $$$$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Family-owned, serving fine seafood, steaks and poultry on the third floor of the Courtyard by Marriott. Open 7 days a week, serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. ■ DEVITO’S ITALIAN DELI AND SUB SHOP, 143rd Street, Ocean City 410-250-1122 / $ / V-MC / No reservations required / Italian cold cuts pizza, sandwiches and subs for lunch and dinner. ■ DUFFY’S TAVERN, 130th Street, Montego Bay Shopping Center, Ocean City 410250-1449 / $ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Unique Irish tavern serving the best steaks, seafood and over-stuffed sandwiches. A local’s favorite with authentic Irish specialities, including shepard’s pie and corned beef and cabbage. Outdoor seating available. Open for lunch and dinner. ■ FAGER’S ISLAND RESTAURANT & BAR, 60th Street on the bay, Ocean City 410524-5500 / www.fagers.com / $$-$$$ / VMC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted in the dining room only / Children’s menu / Full bar

OCTOBER 5, 2012

/ Upscale restaurant on the bay. Casual fine dining, fresh fish, prime rib and seafood. Lighter fare menu served on our decks or inside. ■ FRESCO’S, 82nd Street, Ocean City 410524-8202 / www.ocfrescos.com / $$-$$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / On the bay, serving seafood, steaks and pasta in an intimate atmosphere. Reservations highly recommended. ■ GALAXY 66 BAR & GRILLE, 66th Street, Ocean City 410-723-6762 / $$-$$$ / V-MAE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Contemporary restaurant offering light fare and full entrees. Award- winning wine list, signature drinks and cocktails. ■ GIUSEPPE O’LEARY, Sunset Avenue, West Ocean City 410-213-2868 / www.submarinaoc.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Full bar / Featuring homemade Italian cuisine in a cozy atmosphere. Open year-round. Happy hour food and drink specials Monday-Friday, 4-7 p.m. ■ GREENE TURTLE NORTH, 116th Street, Ocean City 410-723-2120 / www.thegreeneturtle.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / The Turtle, est. 1976, is an Ocean City tradition with a friendly staff, great food and something for everyone! Menu favorites are homemade crab cakes, kids’ menu, salads, burgers, wings and more! Featuring weekday lunch specials and happy hour, 50 high-def flat screen TVs, game room, gift shop, carry out, party trays, nightly drink specials, Keno, MD lottery, DJs with dance floor. Open 11 a.m. to 2 a.m., year-round. ■ HALL’S SEAFOOD & STEAK, 60th Street, Ocean City 410-524-5008 / www.HallsOC.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Serving Ocean City’s finest breakfast buffet and all-you-can-eat sea-food buffet. Open 7 days a week, all summer. New menu serving old favorites and new treats. ■ HARBORSIDE BAR & GRILL, 12841 S. Harbor Road, West Ocean City 410-2131846 / www.ocharborside.com / $$ / V-MCAE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Open seven days a week, 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. Casual waterfront dining serving seafood, steaks, sandwiches, salads, wraps and pasta. Home of the “Original Orange Crush.” Entertainment Thursday through Sunday. ■ HARPOON HANNA’S RESTAURANT & BAR, Route 54 and the bay, Fenwick Island, Del. www.harpoonhannasrestaurant.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual waterfront restaurant serving lunch, dinner. Fresh fish, seafood, steaks, sandwiches and all-you-caneat Alaskan crab legs. Open year-round. ■ HEMINGWAY’S AT THE CORAL REEF, 17th Street, in the Holiday Inn Hotel & Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2612 / www.ocmdrestaurants.com / $$$ / V-MC-AEDIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Elegant dining room, Floridian/island-style cuisine. Sea-food, tropical salsas, grilled steaks, pork chops, grilled pineapple, banana fritters, entree salads. ■ HIGH STAKES BAR & GRILL, Route 54, Fenwick Island, Del. 302-537-6971 / $-$$ / V-M-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Carry-out available / Full bar / Casual dining, daily happy hour and daily food specials. Live

Add a QR Code to your Dining Guide listing and give your patrons a direct link to your Web site, Facebook page, App, etc. Cost is $15 for current advertisers ~ $25 for new listings Contact a Sales Representative at 410-723-6397

entertainment. ■ HOOTERS, three Ocean City locations: 123rd Street, Ocean City 410-250-7081, Fifth Street, on the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410-289-2690 and Route 50, West Ocean City 410-213-1841 / www.hootersofoc.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS. Fresh new menu items include ground chuck burgers, green salads, world famous chicken wings with 11 flavorful sauces, healthy choice sandwiches and seafood. Fun children’s menu. Relaxed beach atmosphere. Full bar. Large flat screen TVs, attentive service by delightful Hooters girls. Wingfest: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3-6 p.m., featuring 50-cent wings and awesome drink specials. Like us on Facebook. This is why we say Hooters makes you happy. ■ HORIZONS OCEANFRONT RESTAURANT, 101st Street, Ocean City 410-524-3535 / www.clarionoc.com / $-$$ ($20-45) / V-MCAE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Open tables / Children’s menu / Full bar / Proud to have Chef Shawn Reese creating beach-inspired dishes in both oceanfront restaurants, Horizons and Breaker’s Pub. New all-day menu, available 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m., features many favorites, as well as exciting new creations with a local flare. Deluxe Sunday breakfast buffet open year-round and AUCE prime rib, crab legs and seafood buffet available most weekends. ■ HOUSE OF WELSH, 1106 Coastal Highway, Fenwick Island, Del. 1-800-311-2707 / www.houseofwelsh.net / $, $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Specializing in steaks and seafood. Open daily. Happy hour all day and night. Entertainment Wednesdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. Casual attire. ■ JOHNNY’S PIZZA PUB, 56th Street, Ocean City 410-524-7499 / www.johnnys56.com / $ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Pizza, subs, wings, salads, beer, live music, high definition TVs, surf, movies, BlueRay. ■ JR’S THE ORIGINAL PLACE FOR RIBS, 61st and 131st streets, Ocean City 410250-3100, 410-524-7427 / www.jrsribs.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / The place for ribs since 1981. Family-friendly dining. Angus steaks, jumbo lump crab cakes, prime rib, seafood, chicken. Early bird. ■ JULES FINE DINING, 118th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3396 / www.ocjules.com / $$, $$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Local fare, global flair. Fresh seafood year-round, fresh local produce. ■ OCEAN PINES YACHT CLUB, 1 Mumfords Landing Road, Ocean Pines 410-641-7501 / www.oceanpines.org, www.theclubsofoceanpines.com / $$ / V-MC-AE / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Ocean Pines Yacht Club and Marina is open to the public for casual waterfront dining. Fresh local menu, on-site catering and Sunday brunch. ■ P.G.N. CRABHOUSE, 29th Street, Ocean City 410-289-8380 / $ / V-MC-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Beer, wine / The Kaouris family has been serving the finest crabs, seafood, steaks and chicken to Ocean City locals and visitors since 1969. ■ PHILLIPS CRAB HOUSE, 20th Street, Ocean City 410-289-6821 / www.phillipsseafood.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS

/ No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / The original Phillips, serving the finest seafood since 1956. Complete with allyou-can-eat seafood buffet, a la carte menu and carryout counter. Daily early bird specials and plenty of free parking. ■ PHILLIPS SEAFOOD HOUSE, 141st Street, Ocean City 410-250-1200 / www.phillipsseafood.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Just minutes to the Delaware line. All-you-can-eat seafood buffet, a la carte menu and carryout counter. Daily early bird specials and plenty of free parking. ■ PONZETTI’S PIZZA, 144th Street, Ocean City www.ponzettispizza.com / $ / MC / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Italian dinners, subs and homemade pizza. Happy hour Monday through Friday, 3-6 p.m. Sports bar, live music on weekends. Light fare served till 1 a.m. Carry out available. ■ REFLECTIONS RESTAURANT, 67th Street, in the Holiday Inn Oceanfront, Ocean City 410-524-5252 / www.ocmdrestaurants.com / $$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Tableside flambé dining. Casually elegant, cuisine prepared tableside in the European tradition. Private dining rooms. Eclectic chef’s specials accompanied by an award-winning wine list. ■ SEACRETS, 49th Street, Ocean City 410524-4900 / www.seacrets.com / $$ / V-MCAE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Island atmosphere. Soups, salads, Jamaican jerk chicken, appetizers, sandwiches, paninis, pizza and fresh seafood. ■ SMITTY McGEE’S, 37234 Lighthouse Road, West Fenwick Island, Del. 302-4364716 / www.smittymcgees.com / $$ / V-MCAE-DIS / No reservations required / No children’s menu / Full bar / Casual. Big menu, including hot wings and drinks. ■ THE COTTAGE CAFE, Route 1 (across from Sea Colony), Bethany Beach, Del. 302-539-8710 / www.cottagecafe.com / $, $$ / V-MC-AE / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Seafood, kids’ menu, happy hour specials. Lunch and dinner daily. Breakfast buffet on weekends. ■ THE STERLING SEAFOOD GRILL & OYSTER BAR, 67th Street, in the Holiday Inn Oceanfront, Ocean City 410-524-5252 / www.ocmdrestaurants.com / $$ / V-MC-AEDIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Fabulous raw bar serving the freshest raw oysters and clams, steamed shrimp, crab legs, mussels and oyster stew, made to order. “Fresh off the grill” items include rockfish, tuna, mahi mahi and salmon. Happy hour specials daily, 4-6 p.m. ■ WHISKERS PUB, 120th Street, OC Square, Ocean City 410-524-2609 / www.whiskerspub.com / $ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Old World saloon-type feel, Whisker’s is famous for its Certified Angus® burgers and delicious casual fare, as well as its entertaining atmosphere and photo lined walls of famous and infamous “whiskers.” Enjoy flat screen TVs to watch your favorite sports. Open year-round, 11:30 a.m. to 2 a.m., serving lunch and dinner daily. Happy hour every day 4-7 p.m. Nightly food specials.


Ocean City Today

OUT&ABOUT www.oceancitytoday.net

OCTOBER 5, 2012

FRIDAY, OCT. 5 15TH ANNUAL ENDLESS SUMMER CRUISIN CAR SHOW AND BOARDWALK PARADES — Ocean City inlet parking lot, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. More than 2,000 hot rods, street machines customs and more. Country’s top national names showcasing products in manufacturers midway at inlet. Butch Patrick, best known as little Eddie Munster on “The Munsters,” available for meet and greets, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. One-day general admission costs $10 for adults. Children 13 and younger admitted free with adult. Tickets include admission into 32nd annual Hot Rod & Custom Car Show at Ocean City convention center. Boardwalk parade, 8-9 a.m., beginning at 27th Street and continuing south to inlet. Info: infoevent@aol.com; www.endlesssummercruisin.com or Meredith Herbert, 410-798-6304. HOT ROD & CUSTOM CAR SHOW — Ocean City convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Showcasing some of hottest show cars around, plus R&M Custom Car Builder display and vendor showroom. “Munster” display featuring the Munster Koach, Drag-u-la and little Eddie’s go kart replicas. One-day general admission costs $10 for adults. Children 13 and younger admitted free with adult. Tickets include admission to the 15th annual Endless Summer Cruisin Car Show at the Ocean City Inlet parking lot. Info: www.endlesssummercruisin.com or

Meredith Herbert, 410-798-6304. 33RD ANNUAL MID-ATLANTIC SURF FISHING TOURNAMENT — Beach at Ocean City. Participants must be pre-registered, have a permit to drive on the beach and hold a valid Maryland Saltwater Fishing License. Info: 410-251-2203 or http://oceancitysurfanglersmd.com. BINGO — Knights of Columbus, 9901 Coastal Highway (rear of St. Luke’s Church) in Ocean City. Doors open at 5 p.m. and games begin at 6:30 p.m. Refreshments for sale. Info: 410-524-7994. ONE MARYLAND ONE BOOK PROGRAM BASED ON THE CELLIST OF SARAJEVO’ — Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., 7 p.m. Conductor and Concert Master of the Salisbury Symphony Orchestra, Dr. Jeffrey Schoyen performs on the Cello and talks about the history of the instrument. Free and open to the public. Info: 410-632-3495. For copies of “The Cellist of Sarajevo,” contact the library. FALL/WINTER GRAND OPENING — Atlantic United Methodist Church Thrift Shop, 105 Fourth St., in Ocean City, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Info: 410-289-4458. TENNIS TOURNAMENT — Sea Colony Tennis Center, Racquet Lane, Bethany Beach, Del. Registration begins at 8 a.m., rain or shine. Cost is $70 per person and includes play in the com-

PAGE 61

pass draw round robin format (by level) tournament, as well as breakfast and lunch. There will also be a Chinese auction, 50/50 and raffles. This is a Pink Ribbon Classic series event. Proceeds benefit American Cancer Society. Info: www.stridesoceancity.org. LIVING WELL WORKSHOP — Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway, 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Free, six-week workshop that teaches how to live a quality life with chronic disease. Chronic conditions include diabetes, arthritis, migraine headaches, back pain, heart disease or any condition that hinders you. Pre-registration required: Laura Small, 410-629-6820.

SATURDAY, OCT. 6 15TH ANNUAL ENDLESS SUMMER CRUISIN CAR SHOW AND BOARDWALK PARADES — Ocean City inlet parking lot, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. More than 2,000 hot rods, street machines customs and more. Country’s top national names showcasing products in manufacturers midway at inlet. One-day general admission costs $10 for adults. Children 13 and younger admitted free with adult. Tickets include admission into 32nd annual Hot Rod & Custom Car Show at Ocean City convention center. Boardwalk parade, 8-9 a.m., beginning at 27th Street and continuing south to inlet. Info: infoevent@aol.com; www.endlesssummercruisin.com or Meredith Herbert, 410-798-6304.

HOT ROD & CUSTOM CAR SHOW — Ocean City convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Showcasing some of hottest show cars around, plus R&M Custom Car Builder display and vendor showroom. “Munster” display featuring the Munster Koach, Drag-u-la and little Eddie’s go kart replicas. One-day general admission costs $10 for adults. Children 13 and younger admitted free with adult. Tickets include admission to the 15th annual Endless Summer Cruisin Car Show at the Ocean City Inlet parking lot. Info: www.endlesssummercruisin.com or Meredith Herbert, 410798-6304. Butch Patrick, best known as little Eddie Munster on “The Munsters,” available for meet and greets, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. One-day general admission costs $10 for adults. Children 13 and younger admitted free with adult. Tickets include admission to the 15th annual Endless Summer Cruisin Car Show at the Ocean City Inlet parking lot. Info: www.endlesssummercruisin.com or Meredith Herbert, 410-798-6304. 33RD ANNUAL MID-ATLANTIC SURF FISHING TOURNAMENT — Beach at Ocean City. Participants must be pre-registered, have a permit to drive on the beach and hold a valid Maryland Saltwater Fishing License. Info: 410-251-2203 or http://oceancitysurfanglersmd.com. HARBOR DAY AT THE DOCKS — West OC Commercial Fishing Harbor Area, 13399 Sunset Ave., West Ocean City, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Family-friendly Continued on Page 62

Lunch Specials MONDAY - FRIDAY 11am-2pm

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NEW DINNER SPECIALS Starting at 4 p.m. MONDAY 3 Course Dinner $10.95 TUESDAY Chicken Parmesan Served with Salad & Dessert $9.95 WEDNESDAY Buy 1 Entrée Receive 50% Off Second Entrée THURSDAY Ladies Night ½ Price Bottles Wine

HARBOR DAY Home of the Fighting Irish

NOTRE DAME VS. MIAMI Saturday, 7:30pm 1/2 Price Wings During the Game

Visit our booth on Saturday at the Harbor West Ocean City


Ocean City Today

62 OUT&ABOUT

OUT&ABOUT Continued from Page 61 program highlighting local maritime culture and traditions. Seafood cooking demonstrations, fish cleaning techniques, live entertainment and more. Free admission. Info: Amy Tingle, 410-2896733; inquire@ocvisitor.com; or www.ocharborday.com. BERLIN FALL CRUISERS — Classic cars line the streets of downtown Berlin, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Info: chamberinfo@berlinchamber.org; 410-6414775; or www.berlinchamber.org. OC SOFTBALL TOURNAMENT — Northside Park, 200 125th St., in Ocean City. Facility usage: ball fields 1, 2 and 3, Northside Park. Info: 410-250-0125. COMMUNITY HEALTH FAIR — Community Center, in White Horse Park, 8 a.m. to noon. AGH will provide health-related screenings including cholesterol, hearing, foot checks and bone density heel exams. Others include diabetes, stroke as-

sessment, respiratory with dermascan and carotid added this year. PRMC mobile health van performing blood pressure, stroke risk assessments and pulse oximetry. Also featuring community health related vendors doing additional screenings and education. All are welcome. Admission is free. Info: 410-641-7717 or Dawn Denton, 410-641-9268. Vendor space: 410-641-7052.

tablished writers share their fiction, nonfiction and creative writing projects. Critiques and appreciation, market leads and writing exercises. Free and open to the public. Info: 410-641-0650.

FARMERS MARKET — White Horse Park, 239 Ocean Parkway in Ocean Pines, every Saturday, 8 a.m. to noon. Produce, farm fresh eggs, organics, pork, chicken and lamb, live crabs, herbs, baked goods, fresh cut flowers, jelly and honey and more. Info: 410-641-7717.

RELAY FOR LIFE FALL FESTIVAL — Community Church at Ocean Pines, 11227 Racetrack Road, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Pony rides, dunk tank, moon bounce, games and food. Sponsored by Little Lambs Learning Center. Info: Joanne Jones, 410726-8446.

FALL COMMUNITY YARD SALE — The Parke at Ocean Pines, in the driveways of residents, 7 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Clothes, lamps, artwork, household items, electronics, furniture and more. Info: 410-641-7717.

FLEA MARKET — Ocean City Marlin Club, 9659 Golf Course Road, 8 a.m. to noon. Antiques, furniture, holiday decorations, kitchen stuff, home decor, lamps, pictures, books, and more. Proceeds benefit Bertha Holloway Scholarship Fund.

WRITE IT! CREATIVE WRITING FORUM — Berlin library, 220 N. Main St., 10 a.m. Novice and es-

BENEFIT GOLF TOURNAMENT — Nassawango Golf Course, 3940 Nassawango Road, Snow

STORY TIME — Delmarva Discovery Center, 2 Market St., Pocomoke City, 11 a.m. This month’s topic is “Snakes.” Hear stories, sing songs and do a craft. Info: 410-957-9933.

OCTOBER 5, 2012

Hill. Registration begins at noon with shotgun start at 1 p.m. Four person scramble. Cost is $300 per team. Buffet during scoring along with door prizes and first, second and third place team prizes. Register: Delmarva Discovery Center, 410-957-9933. PANCAKE BREAKFAST — VFW, Post 8296, 104 66th St., bayside in Ocean City, 8-11 a.m. A $5 donation for all-you-can-eat pancakes or 2-2-2, two eggs, two pancakes and two bacon, includes coffee and juice. Bloody Marys cost $3. Info: 410-524-8196. OUTDOOR FLEA MARKET — Bethany United Methodist Church, 8648 Stephen Decatur Highway, Berlin, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Breakfast, lunch, soups and baked goods. Table rental: 410-6290926. OYSTER FRITTER SANDWICH FUNDRAISER — Northern Worcester County Senior Center, 10129 Old Ocean City Boulevard, Berlin, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Also soup, hot dogs, chips, sodas and desserts. Sandwiches cost $8. Call ahead or-

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BURLEY OAK BREWING CO. FEATURING Braised Pork Shank, with Bunker C Porter Sauce Kasseler Ham with Grain Mustard Cream Knackwurst Bratwurst Weisswurst Nüern Berger Braised Red Cabbage Caraway Scented Sauerkraut Spatzle Traditional Potato Salad

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Meet Brewmaster Bryan & Learn about his Craft Beers

1 Mumfords Landing Rd, Ocean Pines, MD 21811


Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

OUT&ABOUT ders: Debbie Ritter, 410-632-1277, Ext. 105. Proceeds benefit the Seniors of Worcester County. FRIED CHICKEN BUFFET — Mt. Pleasant Church, 35639 Mount Hermon Road, Willards, 11 a.m. Chicken, vegetables, beverages and desserts. Cost is $11 for adults, $5 for children and children 5 and younger eat free. Bake table and carry-outs.

SUNDAY, OCT. 7 15TH ANNUAL ENDLESS SUMMER CRUISIN CAR SHOW AND BOARDWALK PARADES — Ocean City inlet parking lot, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. More than 2,000 hot rods, street machines customs and more. Country’s top national names showcasing products in manufacturers midway at inlet. Butch Patrick, best known as little Eddie Munster on “The Munsters,” available for meet and greets, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. One-day general admission costs $10 for adults. Children 13 and younger admitted free with adult. Tickets include admission into 32nd annual Hot Rod & Custom Car Show at Ocean City convention center. Info: infoevent@aol.com; www.endlesssummercruisin.com or Meredith Herbert, 410-798-6304. OC SOFTBALL TOURNAMENT — Northside Park, 200 125th St., in Ocean City. Facility usage: ball fields 1, 2 and 3, Northside Park. Info: 410-250-0125. CELEBRATION OF MUSIC — Atlantic United Methodist Church, 105 Fourth St., in Ocean City, 3 p.m. Special concert service in honor of June Todd for 50 years as music director and organist at

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Village of Fenwick ~ 300 Coastal Highway (2 blocks north of Rt. 54 intersection) 302.581.0039 • HaHas FrozenYogurt.com

AUMC. Featuring a combined choir AUMC Chancel Choir, Pine Tones and guests. Food and refreshments following concert. Info: 410-289-7430.

MONDAY, OCT. 8 HOME OF THE BRAVE: GIFT SHOWER, TOUR Home of the Brave, 8622 Sandyfield Road, Berlin, 4:30-6:30 p.m. Light refreshments, music and a tour. Donations of gift cards, passes for activities and meals are encouraged. Following items also needed: paper/plastic products, snacks, snack bars, coloring books, crayons and sticker/activity books. RSVP: Lou Ann Trummel, 410-208-9514 or jetlat@verizon.net. TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING — Berlin group No. 169, Atlantic General Hospital, conference room 2, 9733 Healthway Drive in Berlin, 5-6:30 p.m. TOPS is a support and educational group promoting weight loss and healthy lifestyle. It meets weekly. Info: Edna Berkey, 410-629-1006. DELMARVA SWEET ADELINE CHORUS MEETS WEEKLY — The Delmarva Sweet Adeline Chorus, under the direction of Carol Ludwig, meets

each Monday from 7-9 p.m., at the Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway, White Horse Park. Women interested in learning and singing in a barbershop format are welcome. Info: 410-208-4171. HAND DANCING — House of Welsh, 1106 Coastal Highway, Fenwick, Del. Free lessons from 6-7 p.m., open dancing 7-10 p.m. No cover charge. Info: DC Hand Dance Club, 302-5410728. ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT ITALIAN FEAST AND SILENT AUCTION — Hall’s Family Restaurant, 5909 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, 4-8 p.m. Auction will feature dinners, golf packages, gift baskets as well as a 50/50. Tickets cost $12, available at door. Benefiting the Play It Safe 2013 project. Info: 410-289-7060 or www.PlayItSafeOceanCity.com. FRIENDS OF THE OCEAN PINES LIBRARY MEETING — Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10 a.m. Refreshments available at 9:30 a.m. Program presented by Tina Pearson, the owner and operator of Home of the Brave. A short business meeting will follow. Public is welcome. Info: 410-208-4014.

OUT&ABOUT 63

TUESDAY, OCT. 9 YOUNG AND RESTLESS FOR CHILDREN AGES 3-5 YEARS — Berlin library, 220 N. Main St., 10:30 a.m. Creative science, art and music activities. Dress for a mess. Registration is necessary by calling 410-641-0650. LAP TIME FOR CHILDREN 2 YEARS AND YOUNGER — Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10:30 a.m. Children introduced to songs, games, finger plays and movement activities. Parents and caregivers learn new and fun ways to communicate with their toddlers. Registration is necessary by calling 410-208-4014. 6TH ANNUAL CARD PARTY — St. Andrew’s Catholic Center, 14401 Sinepuxent Ave., Ocean City, 10:30 a.m. Tickets cost $20 and includes a full buffet lunch, desserts and beverages (coffee, tea, soda). Proceeds benefit The Ladies Ancient Order of Hibernians. Parties of four should bring own card table by 3 p.m., Oct. 8. Tables available for larger parties. Tables available for lunch only. There will be a Chinese auction, baskets of cheer and other raffles and door prizes. Continued on Page 64


Ocean City Today

64 OUT&ABOUT

OUT&ABOUT Continued from Page 63 All welcome. Tickets: Maureen O’Brien, 443614-5221 or 302-988-1498. ADOPT-A-SCHOOL DINNER — Ocean City Marlin Club, 9659 Golf Course Road, West Ocean City. Casual cocktail hour, sit-down dinner, recognition of honored guests and both live and silent auctions. Tickets cost $75 per person or $150 per couple. Tickets: Facebook page, Junior Achievement of Worcester County. Donations: Christine Selzer, 410-213-9084. YOGA — James G. Barrett Medical Office Building, rotunda, 10231 Old Ocean City Boulevard, Berlin, 5:30-6:45 p.m. All levels welcome. Cost is $72 for eight sessions or $10 drop-in fee for first time. Info: Georgette Rhoads, 410-641-9734 or grhoads@atlanticgeneral.org.

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 10 GREAT READS — Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 2 p.m. Informal discussion of recommended titles and authors. Share favorites from any genre. Free and open to the public. Info: 410-208-4014. PLAYTIME FOR INFANTS THROUGH 5 YEAR OLDS — Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10:30 a.m. Foster creativity and confidence with age appropriate toys, games and activities. Develop cognitive, physical and social skills through free play program. Info: 410-208-4014. BARISTA AND BOOKS — Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 10:30 a.m. Stories,

crafts, cocoa and pastries for children 3-5 years old and their caregivers. Freshly brewed coffee for the parents. Info: 410-524-1818. STORY TIME FOR CHILDREN AGES 3-5 YEARS Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 10:30 a.m. Stories, rhymes, finger plays, music and crafts. Info: 410-524-1818. STORY TIME FOR CHILDREN AGES 3-5 YEARS Pocomoke library, 301 Market St., 10:30 a.m. Stories, rhymes, finger plays, music and crafts. Register: 410-957-0878. BINGO — Every Wednesday at Ocean City Elks Lodge 2645, 138th Street across from Fenwick Inn. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., games start 6:30 p.m. A $1,000 jackpot available, food, snacks and non-alcoholic beverages. No one under 18 years allowed in the hall during bingo. Info: 410250-2645. DELMARVA HAND DANCING CLUB — Meets every Wednesday at Skyline Bar & Grille at The Fenwick Inn, 138th Street and Coastal Highway in Ocean City. Beginner and intermediate lessons, 5:30-6:30 p.m., followed by dancing until 9 p.m. Jitterbug, swing, cha-cha to the sounds of the ’50s, ’60s and Carolina beach music. All are welcome. Discounted food and drink prices. Info: 302-337-3638.

THURSDAY, OCT. 11 THE HOME CARE SOLUTION — Berlin Senior Center, 10129 Old Ocean City Boulevard, 11 a.m. Designed to educate older adults on red flags which might signal the need for home care and explain the different kinds of home care.

OCTOBER 5, 2012

Info: 410-641-0515 or Claude or Leslie Lewis, 410-641-0901. WRITING WITH RUTH — Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 1-3 p.m. Local writers help each other hone individual strategies of effective writing and improve the quality and comfort of oral presentation. All writers welcome. Info: 410-524-1818. IT’S JUST YOUR CUP OF TEA! — Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 2 p.m. Enjoy an afternoon of tea, treats, parlor games, poetry and more. Hostess Kelley Rouse helps bring to life the manners, customs, etiquette and rituals of Victorian Society. Take your favorite tea cup and saucer. Victorian dress is suggested but optional. Free and open to the public. Info: 410-208-4014. STORY TIME FOR CHILDREN AGES 3-5 YEARS — Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10:30 a.m. Stories, rhymes, finger plays, music and crafts. Info: 410-208-4014. WILD & SCENIC FILM FESTIVAL — Seacrets, Morley Hall, 49th Street, Ocean City. Showings from 1-4 p.m. and 5-9 p.m. Door prizes and raffles awarded at intermission. Tickets cost $15 in advance or $20 at the door. Hosted by the Assateague Coastal Trust and Assateague Coastkeeper. Tickets: www.ActforBays.org or 410-629-1538. Info: outreach@actforbays.org. ST. LUKE CATHOLIC CHURCH 4TH ANNUAL GOLF TOURNAMENT — Bayside Resort Golf Club, Fenwick Island, Del. Registration starts at noon with a shotgun start at 1 p.m. Cost is $100 for adult players and $50 for youth golfers. Registration: 410-250-0300. Accepting auction items and hole sponsors.

PRE-OPERATIVE CLASS FOR JOINT REPLACEMENT PATIENTS — Location varies, 10 a.m. Prepares all total joint patients for surgery by discussing what to expect the night before surgery, the day of surgery, recovery and leaving the hospital. Register: 410-641-9055. CELIAC SUPPORT GROUP — Atlantic General Hospital, conference room 3, 9733 Healthway Drive in Berlin, 7-8 p.m. Support and information for those affected by Celiac Disease. Info: Betty Bellarin, 410-603-0210. BEACH SINGLES — Every Thursday, Beach Singles 45-Plus meets for happy hour at Lighthouse Sound, 12723 St. Martins Neck Road, Bishopville, 4 p.m. Info: Arlene, 302-436-957 or Kate, 410-524-0649. BINGO — American Legion Post 166, 2308 Philadelphia Ave., in Ocean City, every Thursday, year round. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., games start at 7 p.m. Food available. Open to the public. Info: 410-289-3166. WORCESTER COUNTY TEA PARTY MEETING — Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., meeting starts at 7 p.m. All interested citizens are welcome. Info: 410-430-7282, WorTeaParty@gmail.com or WorcesterCountyTeaParty.com.

ONGOING EVENTS TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING — Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, Wednesdays, 4:45-6 p.m. TOPS is a support and educational group promoting weight loss and healthy lifestyle. It meets weekly. Info: 302-436-3682.

Shamrock Shanty Your Irish & Celtic Connection at the Beach Irish Candy Jewelry Irish CDs Finnians

Sweaters Irish Teas Walking Sticks Perfumes

Phone: 302-537-2220

Fax: 302-537-2022

Email: shamrockshanty@msn.com • www.theshamrockshanty.com Ocean Bay Plaza #3, Fenwick Island, Delaware

Daily Fresh Fish Specials or Your Choice of Preparation

Large Parties Welcome Bryan Clark Performing Oct. 19th

Piano evening with Phil Perdue Oct. 29th

Breakfast 6:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Lunch 11:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Dinner/Lite Fare 4 p.m.

LOCALS’ FAVORITE FOR 57 YEARS The Courtyard by Marriott Hotel Parking 15th St. & Baltimore Ave. Ocean City, Md. For Reservations: 410-289-7192/7191 captainstableoc.com

EARLY BIRD SPECIALS CHILDREN’S MENU HAPPY HOUR DAILY 3-7 P.M. $2 BLOODY MARY’S & MIMOSAS

DRAFT BEER, HOUSE WINE, OR MARYLAND CRAB CHOWDER with the purchase of entreé or 2 appetizers & coupon. Cannot be combined with other coupons/vouchers/EB menu.


OCTOBER 5, 2012

Ocean City Today

LIFESTYLE 65

SDHS STUDENTS SUPPORT CLEAN BEACHES Stephen Decatur High School National Honor Society members participated in the Maryland Coastal Bays Program’s beach cleanup on Sept. 15. Pictured, in first row from left, are Allie Oettinger, Sydney Hudson, Julia Shockley, Sara Prengaman, Zach Keiser and helper Brooke Berquist; and in back row, Madi Mitrecic, Chris Dear, Joe Iacona, Katelynn Knowles and advisor Sabra McIntosh. 

SOULÉ HONORED Meredith Soulé, pictured with Dr. Barry Tull, headmaster of Worcester Preparatory School, was named a semifinalist in the annual National Merit Scholarship Corporation competition. The senior received this honor because of her high scores on the Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test.

OCES SEPTEMBER STUDENTS OF THE MONTH Ocean City Elementary School honored its September “Students of the Month” on Thursday, Sept. 27, with a luncheon sponsored by the Ocean City/Berlin Optimists, the Ocean City/Berlin OptiMs and the OCES PTA. Students received a T-shirt, certificate, pencil and a lunch. Top students, in first row from left, are first-graders Caitlin Williams, Lukas Loring, Christopher Stedding, Eric Braica, Matthew Beck and Cavontay Smith; in second row, second-graders  Hilary Tirado-Cano, Caden Daubach, Arlenni Rodriguez-Carpio, Jessica Beck and Devin Phillips; in third grade, third-graders Brandon Quach, Tristan Weinstein, Jasmi Zavala, Gavin Vent, Tristan Jager, Emily Peters; and in back row, fourth-graders Julianna Fohner, Melis Unal, Danikah Coleman, Gabriella Sodomin, Frances Baptiste and Maddox Bunting.

NATIONAL ENGLISH HONOR SOCIETY INDUCTION Celebrating after the sixth annual National English Honor Society induction ceremony are Stephen Decatur High School juniors Gabi Ortega and Katie VanBruggen. The evening ceremony, held Sept. 19, featured guest speaker Chip Bertino of The Courier newspaper.

FROM THE HEART. FOR THE HEART EVENT Sierra Hall, a fifth-grade student at Worcester Prep, was recently honored for her efforts to make Delmarva communities more aware of the problems of heart disease, the need for everyone to learn CPR, and the importance of having defibrillators available for sports teams. Here, Hall is joined by Former First Lady Laura Bush and others during the “From the Heart. For the Heart” event to benefit cardiology services at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital.


Ocean City Today

66 LIFESTYLE

OCTOBER 5, 2012

Health fair Sat. in Pines Hospitals, organizations line up to offer free tests at Community Center

‘STAND UP, SPEAK UP’ To kick off the new school year, Ocean City Elementary School last month presented “Stand Up, Speak Up,” an anti-bullying program written by a committee of teachers that encourages children to stand up and speak up when they are being bullied or see bullying happening around them. Pictured, from left, are fourth-graders Jabria Lewis, Charlotte Edmunds, Zak Krasner, Chelsea Van Vonno, Frances Baptiste, Gavin Conner, Allison Marx and Teague Quillin, who performed an anti-bullying skit, complete with song and dance, during the pep rally. 

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(Oct. 5, 2012) Atlantic General Hospital’s Healthy Happenings Program and Peninsula Regional Medical Center are collaborating with the Ocean Pines Association’s Communications Advisory Committee to offer a Health Fair to the community. The event will be held Saturday, Oct. 6, from 8 a.m. to noon, in the Ocean Pines Community Center at 235 Ocean Parkway. Atlantic General Hospital will provide various health-related screenings, including cholesterol, hearing, foot checks and bone density heel exams. Others include diabetes, stroke assessment, respiratory, with Dermascan and Carotid being the new screenings added to this year’s free community health fair. The PRMC mobile health van will also be on site performing blood pressure and stroke risk assessment as well as pulse oximetry. Other departments include the Wound Centers from both hospitals plus many others. Information on other health and personal safety topics will also be available including Medicare updates. For the first time, there will be community health related vendors from the area doing additional screenings and education. If you’ve ever wondered about fitness opportunities in Ocean Pines, come to the fair for “one-stop shopping.” Many Ocean Pines community and civic groups will be represented during the event. For Berlin and Ocean Pines residents, this is an opportunity to take advantage of free information and health services. For others, it’s a great opportunity to get a snapshot of your health and pick up valuable tips along the way. All are welcome to attend. For more information, call Dawn Denton at the Community Education office at AGH at 410-641-9268 or for vending space call the Ocean Pines Recreation and Parks Department at 410-641-7052.

Covering the Coast like no one else

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Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

AIR CONDITIONING

BLINDS & SHADES

LIFESTYLE 67

BLINDS & SHADES

436-4400 227-5529

CARPET CLEANING Cleaning Management Service, Inc.

COSMETICS

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Ocean City Today

68 LIFESTYLE

CONSTRUCTION

C AT E R I N G FULL CATERING SERVICES INCLUDING BACKYARD PIG ROASTS & BBQ’S.

“It’s barbeque that’ll make you squeal!”

E CT T RRI CI ACLA L E L EEL C

Ceramic • Marble • Glass • Installation Reliable, Quality Work ore

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AVAILABLE A EMERGENCY SERVICE AV 410-251-3153

Tile and Construction

Repairs to Large Installations John 443-497-1351

Contact Monty at: 717-830-0418

OCTOBER 5, 2012

We Return Every Call! www.cameliotileco.com

FLOORING

Greg Turner, Owner • 25 Years Experience & Service 410-251-3153 HOME OFFICE/FAX: 410-641-8516

HOME IMPROVEMENT Come Check Out Our Current Projects In Montego Bay

WALSH HOME IMPROVEMENT CO. INC. Specializing In: Custom Additions, Kitchens & Baths, And All Types Of Remodeling

KEN WALSH - 410-641-3762 EST. 1977 • MHIC #8465 www.WalshHomeImprovement.com

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OCTOBER 5, 2012

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NORTH OCEAN CITY This 3 bedroom, 2 bath home is located in the Montego Bay community in North Ocean City. Features include an open floor plan, a large front porch, cathedral ceilings, drywall interior, 2" x 6" exterior wall construction, central air, a full size washer & dryer and a 2-car parking pad. The Montego Bay community offers pools, tennis, shuffleboard, miniature golf and a bayfront boardwalk with fishing & crabbing piers. The homeowners association fee is only 102 Sandy Hill Drive $199 a year. Offered at $260,000 furnished.

Call Michael “Montego Mike” Grimes

Montego Bay Realty

108 S. Ocean Drive • Ocean City, MD

montegomike@verizon.net www.montegobayrealty.com

800-745-5988 • 410-250-3020

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MONTEGO BAY COMMUNITY This 3-bedroom, 2-bath home is located in the Montego Bay community in North Ocean City. The property is within steps of a community pool/tennis/shuffleboard/min. golf complex and offers a large sunroom, a huge floored attic, a formal dining room and a master bath with a jetted tub. Recent updates include granite counter-tops & vanity tops and a new kitchen floor. The entire interior was just painted in December of ’11. The homeowner’s association dues are only $199 a year. The property is being offered at $285,000.

165 Oyster Lane

Call Michael “Montego Mike” Grimes

Montego Bay Realty

108 S. Ocean Drive • Ocean City, MD

montegomike@verizon.net www.montegobayrealty.com

800-745-5988 • 410-250-3020


OCTOBER 5, 2012

70

Classifieds now appear in Ocean City Today & the Bayside Gazette each week and online at oceancitytoday.net and baysideoc.com.

help wanted

help wanted

help wanted

help wanted

help wanted

RentalS

Receptionist - Male or Female. Part-time, may lead to full-time. Apply in person 59th Street, OC Real Estate Management. 410524-5781

EVENT COORDINATOR Smart Massage is immediately hiring YR event coordinator for busy West OC office. Multitasker, attention to detail and computer savvy a must. Must be comfortable working under pressure and irregular hours from time to time. Competitive hourly pay, bonuses, medical, dental. 25-40 hour work week. Year round job! Resume to gabriel@smartmassageshop.com

Now hiring Stay at Home Moms, Senior Citizens or anyone who wants to work F/T or P/T, setting your own hours in your area & surrounding areas. For just a $10 investment you can make up to 50%. Call your Avon Representative Christine @ 443-880-8397 or email snowhillavon@comcast.net or sign up online at youravon.com/cbrown2272

Smart Massage is looking for P/T Internet Marketing Specialist for our WOC location. Exp. in SEO, Html, PPC, Website building a must, Graphic Designing a plus! Competitive compensation BOE with YR work avail. Send resume to Gabriel@smartmassageshop.com

Nite Club Taxi is hiring F/T & P/T Drivers. Call Michael 443373-1319.

Apt. for rent Downtown Berlin 2BR/1BA, furnished, balcony. $1,000/mo. Great location, newly renovated. Must see to believe! Call 410600-5575.

Robin Walter Day Spa is now hiring a Hair Stylist, P/T or F/T Massage Therapist & P/T Receptionist. For confidential interview call Laurie 410-2082576.

Dunkin Donuts Now Hiring

Kitchen Help

Full-Time Install Lead Technician - Top Pay. Benefits are provided after 90 days of employment. Interested applicants should fax their resume to 410641-1437. No phone calls please.

In our Ocean City location

Please apply online at: www.delmarvadd.com Applications or resumes will not be accepted thru Email or fax.

HOTEL Assistant Sales Manager • Experienced preferred • Microsoft word • Detail oriented • Excellent benefit package • Competitive wages Send resumes to: Comfort Inn Gold Coast 112th St. & Coastal Hwy. Ocean City, MD 21824 rfelty@comfortgoldcoast.com Fax 410-524-7600

Excellent Opportunity for the Right Person.

Now Hiring

Full-Time, Year Round Chief Engineer Benefits include paid vacation, 7 paid holidays, medical, dental, life & disability insurances & 401K plan. Please apply in person at 2800 Baltimore Ave., Ocean City, Md. 410-289-1100

Now hiring sales reps and promo models for weekend work. Paid travel, $100 a day + bonuses. J-1 welcome. Experienced sales managers for travel also needed for PT/FT salaried position. Please call 443-2917651

Legal Secretary: Busy Ocean City and Ocean Pines law firm has an immediate opening for a motivated and experienced legal secretary. Experience in Estate Planning, Wills and Corporate matters and prior experience in preparation of Real Estate Settlements is preferred. Proficiency in word processing, written and oral communication skills necessary. Please send resume to: P.O. Box 739, Ocean City, MD 21843.

Dunkin Donuts Now Hiring Hiring Y/R, F/T Bartenders, Servers and Delivery Drivers Top Pay, Good Money for a Hard Worker Come in for interview on Wednesday at 11am., 5600 Coastal Hwy.

Construction Helpers Wanted $9-$10 hr. Benefits include: health insurance, 401K, vacation & sick time. Experience is not required but preferred. Please apply online at: www.delmarvadd.net/Dunkin Donuts/Construction.aspx or Apply in Person. Call for Directions: 410-520-0176

The Princess Royale Hotel & Conference Center Located at 91st St. Oceanfront, Ocean City, MD

Top wages, excellent benefits package and free employee meal available to successful candidates.

HELP WANTED

Year Round: Banquet Housestaff, Room Attendants, Servers, Cocktail Servers, Doorman Clarion Resort Fontainebleau Hotel Attn: Human Resources Dept. 10100 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 Phone: 410-524-3535 Fax: 410-723-9109 EOE M/F/D/V

Personal Assistant - Overwhelmed? Can’t do it all? Need help? I’m a multi-task professional. Honest, dependable & responsible. Call Shirley 443386-5776. Will sit with the sick or elderly. Light housekeeping, meals & transportation avail. Ocean Pines resident. Call 302362-7236.

Assistant Manager and Crew Members Assistant Manager starting @ $9/hr. Crew members starting from $8/hr. In our Ocean Pines and West Ocean City locations. Please apply online at: www.delmarvadd.com

YR-2 Bedroom, 1 Bath House, large yard, close to WalMart. $900/month. Call Dale 443-736-5589 or e-mail dale@ocrooms.com OC Vista Sunsets - OC - Y/R 2BR, furn. Bayfront w/deck. $900/mo. + utils. + sec. dep. 410-289-4146 Winter Rental - Two Pristine Condos. 3BR/3BA and 2BR/ 2BA. Call Bill 443-373-7232. Looking for Honest, Responsible Roommate to share remodeled, furnished home in WOC. Near harbor/shopping. $485/month + utils. 240-6203041

---Work At The BEACH... Work With The BEST!!

Employment Opportunities:

JOB wanted JOB wanted

RentalS RentalS

HELP WANTED! Overnight Production Supervisor $10-12/hr. Please apply in person at Dunkin Donuts Office Only. Call for Directions: 410-520-0176

Part-Time Cleaning Person for Restaurant - start date early Oct. 410-641-7501. Apply in person Thurs.-Sun. at the Ocean Pines Yacht Club, 1 Mumford Landing Road, Ocean Pines, MD or email info@oceanpines.org.

• Banquet Houseman • Dishwasher • Hostess AM/PM • Front Desk/Reservations Clerk (Experience preferred and must be able to work a flexible schedule) Applicants may apply online at www.princessroyale.com and click on the job link or in person Mon.-Fri., 9am to 4pm

F/T & P/T Year Round Positions

Rentals

- Exp. Bartenders -

Yearly • Weekly • Seasonal

(Minimum of 2 yrs. exp. in a high volume rest./bar)

- Servers - Kitchen Help - Bar Backs - Food Runners -

Maryland Delaware

800-442-5626 Owned & Operated by NRT LLC

cbvacations com

Please apply online at: www.delmarvadd.com

Manklin Creek, Ocean Pines Condo 2BR/2BA + den, on 2nd floor. Avail. 11/15. W/D, DW. $900/mo. + utils. 410-208-6229 Y/R West OC newly renovated - 2BR/1BA spacious apartment. $850/month + util. Call 410-213-1900. Winter Rentals - 1BR Ocean Block Condos. 69th St. or 135th St. Includes cable. No smoking/pets. Avail. now. $550/mo. + electric. 410-596-7873. Room for Rent. Use of everything. $650/mo. includes utils. Quiet neighborhood. Near bus stop. 443-373-1764. Year Round Rental! Great OC location in Gullway Villas. 2 bedrooms. Unfurnished. Pool. Call 443-373-1419 or email jlaw32@gmail.com. YR WOC, 4BR/4.5BA Penthouse, unfurnished, 3BR/2BA Oceanfront Condo, furnished, 1BR/1.5BA Oceanfront Condo, furnished. Available now! Income verification req’d. Call 443-521-3202. 3BR/2BA Mobile on Water Bishopville, unfurnished. No smoking. No pets. $950/mo. Howard Martin Realty 410352-5555.

Year Round and Winter Rentals Available. 2 and 3 Bedroom properties starting at $750 monthly, plus utilities and security deposit. Resort Rentals, LLC, 410-524-0295

Winter Rental

Yearly & Seasonal Rentals

$14-$17/hr. depending on experience At least 3 years of US driving experience. Location: 9919 Golf Course Road, OC, MD Must have copy of Clean Driving Record when Applying.

Applications being accepted for YR, 2BR/1BA, unfurnished Apt. $595/mo. + utils. Sec. dep. req’d. No pets. Call 410-3525488. Leave message please.

800-922-9800

Apply within at Smitty McGee’s or submit application online at www.smittymcgees.com

Bakery Driver Wanted

7th St., 1 Blk. to Boardwalk Spacious, 2BR/1BA, full kitchen, living room, porch, parking. $600/mo. 1 mo sec. 410-289-7888

We Welcome Pets 7700 Coastal Hwy 410-524-7700 www.holidayoc.com

Available Now-April 1. 312 Sunset Dr. 2BR/1.5BA, newly remodeled, big kitchen/living area. $250/week includes utilities or $800/mo. you pay utilities. Security deposit $1200. Call 410-428-7333 or 410-251-4259 www.SunsetTerraceRentals.com

Ocean Pines and Ocean City We Need Your Rental Properties! Demand exceeds supply. Don’t delay, call us at Ocean Pines - 410-208-3224 Ocean City - 410-524-9411 Long and Foster Real Estate Inc. Resort Rental Division

Now you can order your classifieds online


Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE 71

RENTALS

RENTALS

ROOMMATES

SERVICES

SERVICES

YARD SALE

Downtown - 1BR - Fully furnished Condos for rent Sleeps 6, cable, all utils. included. $650-$750/mo. Avail. now. Call Richard 240-4752822.

Year Round Rentals. 1, 2, 3, 4, Bedroom units available. Call 410-723-0988.

142nd St. Room to Share. $350 includes utilities, cable TV, WiFi. Close to bus station. 443-373-1764.

Advanced Marina 66th St. Ocean City Marine services Outboards, I/O’s, Waverunners Powerwash/Winterization Indoor/Outdoor Storage Shrinkwrap. Call 410-723-2124.

Web site as low as $350.00. PC tune up $50.00 OceanComputerTech.com 410-9419899

Yard Sale - Sat., Oct. 6th, at 8am. 215 Powell Circle, Berlin.

YR - 3BR/2BA - NOC - Furnished, 1800 sq. ft., house. Ready to move in. $1200 + utils. + sec. dep. 410-250-0865 YR Rooms, $125-$150 North OC. Util. incl., W/D, cable, furnished. Move in today. 410250-0865 Winter Rental - 2BR, $600/mo. Utils. included w/limit. Security req’d. Call Neil 847-274-7806. WR or YR - 2BR/2BA Fully remodeled, bright, furnished House in WOC. Nr harbor. Potential studio in loft. Vaulted ceilings, fireplace & deck. $1230/month, includes water. 240-620-3041 Rentals $400/mo., Utils. included. Please call 703-5975373. Winter Rental - Direct Ocean Front - Amazing view. 30th Street, 1BR, furnished. No smoking/pets. Oct.-May. $650/ mo. + utilities W/D. Scott 267638-8211. OC Winter Rental-Avail. Now! New, 3BR, Waterfront House. Furnished. $975/mo. + utils. No smoking/pets/groups. Ref. + sec. dep. req’d. Call Randy 410726-8611. Winter Rental in NOC 3BR/2BA Apt. Newly remodeled, full kitchen, heat/AC. $800/mo. + 1 mo. security dep. 443-373-3333. Year Round Rental-43rd St. 2 large bedrooms, 1 bath Apartment. Coin-op washer and dryer on site. Family friendly building. $900 per month. Call Dale at 443-736-5589 or e-mail to dale@ocrooms.com. Winter Rental - 1st St. and Philadelphia Ave. Large 2 bedroom, 1 bath Apartment. $600/ month, $600 S/D, utilities not included. Call Dale 443-7365589 or e-mail to dale@ocrooms.com.

WINTER RENTAL - OCEAN CITY 2BR/1BA - Sleeps 6, Bayshore Drive. $600/month plus utilities. Non smoking, no pets. Holtz Property Mgmt. 443-359-9863. YR…West OC 10144 Golf Course Rd. 2BR/1BA. Includes CATV, WiFi, Cntrl H&AC, freshly painted, 2nd floor, furn or unfurn. $850. 410-213-8090 YR OC Rental House - 104th St. 4/5BR/4BA, XLarge Rooms, Large Living Room, Kitchen, Parking. Only $1500/mo. 410430-1746 Winter OC Rooms for Rent! Lg. rms. $100. Furnished and all utilities and cable TV included. Call 410-430-1746.

Beautiful Rooms on Lagoon NOC. Walk to beach/mall. Kit. privileges, cable/utilities. Winter rate $95-$120/week. Call after 8 p.m., 410-524-5428

REAL REAL ESTATE ESTATE 3BR/2BA Mobile Home w/ Addition - Large living area. $32,000. Ground rent $350/mo. Includes water, sewer, trash & taxes. Call HOWARD MARTIN REALTY 410-352-5555 1/2 Acre Canal Lot in lovely Bishopville, Holiday Harbor. $79,900. Call Howard Martin Realty 410-352-5555.

Winter or Monthly - til May, N.OC 3BR/2BA, furnished, nice, $900 … W.OC 2BR/1BA, nice, furnished, $700 … both include everything except electric. 410-213-8090

Direct Oceanfront Condo

YR…Tiburon, 139th St. 3BR/ 2BA, includes CATV, WiFi, pool, tennis, freshly painted, cntrl H&AC, 2nd floor, furn or unfurn. $1150. 410-213-8090

410-807-2515

YR 2BR/1BA-142nd Street, $925. Winter Rental-2BR/2BA 142nd Street-$625. Winter Rental-3BR/2BA-28th Street$700. Call 443-880-0510 For Rent Off Season - Waterfront 4BR/3BA, Fenwick Island. $1200/mo. + utils. No smoke/ pets. Go to www.vrbo.com/ 81099 for more info call Lynne at 410-250-6300. For Rentals - Call Us Today! Bunting Realty, Inc. 410-6413313. OC Winter Rental - 1 bedroom Efficiency Apt. Fully furnished. $650/mo. Utilities included. 443-506-2644.

WANTED RENTAL RENTAL WANTED

End Unit, 62nd St. “Calypso” Lge. open sundeck, unobstr. view of ocean. Private parking. Reduced $200,000.

Now $299,900

COMMERCIAL COMMERCIAL Prime Office Space for Rent On the corner of Main St. & Broad St., Berlin. 1250 sq.ft. Second floor unit with exclusive deck. Central air conditioning & heat. Recently remodeled. Starting at $1100/mo. for long term lease. Call Russell 443497-2729. 2 Acres-Commercial, fenced. Great for auto storage, boats, construction, landscapers, etc. $350/mo. Call 410-251-8354, leave message. Office/Warehouse For Rent. WOC. HVAC, 1/2 bath, 1000 sq.ft., $450/mo. + utils. 443235-4851

Upscale Mid-town Office Space in O.C. for Lease.

Executive Couple Looking To Rent - w/option to buy single family home. Prefer WOC on water. Must allow pet. 703622-5181.

Flexible floor plan. From 650 to 5,150 sq. ft. Call Brian 443-880-2225

ROOMMATES

SERVICES SERVICES

Winter Rental-Midtown OC Furnished, large 2BR/1BA W/D, DW, quiet. $575 + utils. + sec. deposit. 443-497-4746 or 410251-8399.

Roommate Wanted to share newly remodeled Condo in North Ocean City. 3BR/2BA, W/D, central air/heat. $350/mo. + 1/3 utilities. 443-373-3333.

“GROW YOUR OWN OYSTERS” Capt. Tom’s Oyster Floats. Custom made on the Eastern Shore. Spat/Supplies/ Instructions. 757-710-0279 bill@oystergardening.com

Winter Rental

Great Inventory of Year Round Rentals

One Corner At A Time

Winter Rental - 4BR/2.5BA. Fully furnished townhouse overlooking bay, lower OC. W/D, under cover parking, pets allowed. $850/mo. + util. Beautiful sunsets. Must see! 301263-5405.

1 & 2 Bedroom Apts. $550-$795 per month. Fully furnished, W/D in downtown OC.

Call 410-430-6284

ROOMMATES

Please call 410-5240900 or visit our Web site @ www.oceancityresort properties.com

Single Family Homes Starting at $875 Condos Starting at $995 Apartments Starting at $650 Winter Rentals Starting at $800 Open 7 Days A Week for property viewing in:

CALL US TODAY! 410-208-9200

* Berlin * Ocean City * * Ocean Pines * * Snow Hill *

Your Classifieds Online www.oceancitytoday.net www.baysideoc.com

S i m p l i f y 410-713-9509 Professional Organizing

createflow.com

Advertise in MDDC Maryland, Delaware and D.C.: 116 papers with a circulation of more than 2.5 million!

For only $495 Deadline is Wednesday of the week prior to publication.

Call 410-723-6397 for more information

FOUND LOST LOST& & FOUND

Puzzle Place Daycare has immediate openings for ages 19 mos. and older. Structured curriculum in my home. Crafts, story time, lesson time and outside play. Accredited daycare license with 25 years experience. 410-641-1952

Lost Kitten taken from Oasis parking lot in Whaleyville on Sept. 30th. Between 3-7pm. Buff color w/cream swirls. Please return him. He’s missed by his brothers & sisters. 443880-3389

Bishopville Movers Inc. Fast, reliable service. 410-352-5555.

SALE FOR FOR SALE

Classified Deadline is Monday @ 5pm FURNITURE

POWER WASHER Industrial w/ Hana motor. 3000psi. 150’ of hose, spray gun. 24’ ladder & disc. Sprayer. $1000/obo. 410603-5038. www.oceancitytoday.net

FURNITURE

JUMPIN’ JACK FLASH

FURNITURE WAREHOUSE -- NEW AND USED Pick-Up & Delivery Available

410-250-7000

146th Street, Ocean City

SALE GARAGE GARAGE SALE Saturday, Oct. 6th, 8am12pm. OC Marlin Club. 9659 Golf Course Rd. Antiques, furniture, holiday/decorations, lamps, pictures, toys. Too much to list.

AUCTIONS The contents of mini storage units will be sold at public. Units to be auctioned: P-23; O-11; O-29; O-41; O-44; O59; O-60; O-100; O-152; O164; O-177; S-30; S-67; S-96; S-130; S-143; S-169; S-181; S-503; S-514; B-8; B11; B-18; B-23; B-30; B-47; B-56; B-60; B-77; B-78; B-82; B-84; B-87. Units being sold due to non-payment of rent. Date: SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2012 Time: 9AM #1 Starting @ Berlin Mini Storage (Rt. 346) #2 OC-Mini Storage (Rt. 611) #3 OC Mini Storage (Rt. 50) Terms: CASH ONLY Auctioneer: Tom Janasek

CLASSIFIED AD NETWORK Serving the Newspapers of Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia since 1908.

MARYLAND STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING NETWORK

AUCTIONS AUCTION - Construction Equipment & Trucks, October 12, 9 AM, Richmond, VA. Excavators, Dozers, Dumps & More. Accepting Items Daily. Motley's Auction & Realty Group, 804-232-3300, www.motleys.com, VAAL #16 550.84± Mountaintop Acres. Sportsman's Paradise! 6 Tracts (45± to 132± Acres) Spectacular views! Summers County, WV. Absolute AUCTION: Oct 20. www.countsauction.com (434) 525-2991 VAAF93 Wanted To Purchase Antiques & Fine Art, 1 item Or Entire Estate Or Collection, Gold, Silver, Coins, Jewelry, Toys, Oriental Glass, China, Lamps, Books, Textiles, Paintings, Prints almost anything old Evergreen Auctions 973-818-1100. Email evergreenauction@hotmail.com SERVICES-MISC. ADVERTISE Your Truck DRIVER JOBS in 105 newspapers for one low cost of $495. Your 25 word classified ad reaches over 4.1 MILLION regional and local readers. Call Wanda today at 1-855-721-6332 x 6 for more information or email her at wsmith@mddcpress.com. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY ADVERTISE YOUR NEXT AUCTION in 105 Maryland, Delaware and DC newspapers for one low cost of $495. Your 25 word classified ad reaches over 4.2 million regional and local readers. For more information call Wanda at 1-855-721-6332 x 6 with the Maryland-DelawareDC Press Association 2.8 Million Eyes will read your ad - 5 days per week - Monday thru Friday in the DAILY CLASSIFIED CONNECTION for just $199 per day. Join the exclusive members of this network today! Place your ad in 14 MAJOR DAILY NEWSPAPERS in Maryland, Delaware and DC. Call 1-855-721-6332x6 or visit our website: www.mddcpress.com. Buy 4 Weeks/Get 2 Weeks Free of Charge

AUTOMOBILE DONATION DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, RV'S. LUTHERAN MISSION SOCIETY. Your donation helps local families with food, clothing, shelter. Tax deductible. MVA licensed. LutheranMissionSociety.org 410-636-0123 or toll-free 1-877-737-8567. EDUCATION MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED! Become a Medical Office Professional now! No Experience Needed! CTI can get you trained & Job Ready ASAP! 1-888-834-2177 ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT TRAINEES NEEDED! Become an Office Support Specialist now at CTI! No Experience Needed! Training program available on Campus or Online. 1-888-589-9684

AIRLINE MECHANIC – Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866) 8236729. EDUCATION SERVICES ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 877-206-4290 www.CenturaOnline.com

EDUCATION/TRAINING Medical Billing Trainees Needed! Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience Needed! Career Technical Inst. gets you trained & job ready ! HS Diploma or Medical Billing Trainees Need- GED & Computer needed. 1ed! Train to become a Medical 877-649-2671 Office Assistant. No ExperiHELP WANTED-DRIVERS ence Needed! Career Technical Inst. Gets you trained & job Drivers - HIRING ready! HS Diploma or GED & EXPERIENCED/INEXPERIENCED Computer needed to qualify. 1- TANKER DRIVERS! Earn up to 877-649-2971 $.51 per Mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Medical Billing Trainees NeedExp. Req. - Tanker Training ed! Train to become a Medical Available. Call Today: Office Professional online at SC 877-882-6537 Train. No Experience Needed! Job Placement when training www.Oakley Transport.com completed. Computer/Internet Teams Split $.513 per mile & HS Diploma/GED needed 1Solos Earn $.437 per mile 888-926-6073 Teams sign on $7,500 Solo sign on $2,000 ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 1 yr OTR Exp. TRAINEES NEEDED! No ExpeCDL-A-HazMat rience needed. Local career 877-628-3748 Training & Job placement assistance. Computer/Internet & HS HELP WANTED – SALES Diploma/GED needed for trainWANTED: LIFE AGENTS: Earn ing. 1-888-926-6073 $500 a Day; Great Agent BeneCOMPUTER TECH TRAINEES fits, Commissions Paid Daily; NEEDED! Become a Certified Liberal Underwriting; Leads, IT Professional now! No Expe- Leads, Leads LIFE INSURrience Needed! Career Techni- ANCE, LICENSE REQUIRED. cal Institute gets you trained Call 1-888-713-6020 and ready to work ASAP! 1REAL ESTATE 877-649-2671 Retirement and Future move? Medical Office Trainee Need- Discover Delaware and our ed! Become a Medical Office gated community. Single family Professional now! No Experi- homes from the mid $30's! ence Needed! Job Training & Brochures available 1-866-629Placement Assistance Avail- 0770 or search www.coolable! Call CTI for details! 1-888- branch.com 834-2177 VACATION RENTALS MISCELLANEOUS OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND. Canada Drug Center. Licensed, Best selection of affordable safe and affordable. Up to 90 rentals. Full/ partial weeks. Call percent savings on your med- for FREE brochure. Open daily. ication needs. Call 1-888-472- Holiday Real Estate. 1-800-6385280 ($25.00 off 1st pre- 2102. Online reservations: scription & free shipping.) www.holidayoc.com


72 LEGAL NOTICES

Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

Legal Notices JAMES E. CLUBB, JR., ESQ. 108 8th Street Ocean City, Maryland 21842

FORECLOSURE SALE 300 ROBIN DRIVE, #305 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND By virtue of a Statement of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to an Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland in Case No. 23-C-12-0978, the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction in front of the condominium building located at 300 Robin Drive. Ocean City. Maryland 21842. on FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2012 AT 10:30 AM ALL that property lying and being situate in the Town of Ocean City, in the Tenth Election District of Worcester County, Maryland, more particularly designated and distinguished as Unit No. 305 in the "KEY WEST VILLAS CONDOMINIUM", together with an undivided percentage interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Condominium Declaration and By-Laws, dated April 21, 1986, and recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, in Liber W.C.L. No. 1298, folio 337, et seq., and pursuant also to the plats described in said Declaration, and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records in Plat Book W.C.L. No. 111, folio 13, et seq., and pursuant to all subsequently recorded Amendments. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, with no warranties or guarantees, and will be sold subject to a Deed of Trust recorded among the aforesaid Land Records in Liber No. 4691, folio 465, said Deed of Trust having had an original principal balance of $129,600.00 on April 11, 2006. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the amount of Twenty Thousand Dollars ($10,000.00) will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in a cashier's or bank check, with the balance to be paid in cash at time of settlement. The date of settlement shall be fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. The undersigned reserves the right to waive the deposit requirements as to the purchaser representing the interest of the party secured by the Statement of Lien. Real property taxes, wastewater charges, and condominium dues will be adjusted to the date of sale and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All costs of conveyancing, including transfer and recordation taxes, shall be paid by the purchaser. The purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining possession of the property. Purchaser agrees to pay to the Seller an Attorney's fee of $250.00 for review of any motion which may be filed with

the Court to substitute a purchaser herein. In the event the undersigned is unable to convey marketable title, the sale will be null and void and the purchaser's sole remedy will be the return of the deposit without interest. For more information, call: James E. Clubb, Jr. Trustee 410-289-2323 OCD-10/4/3t ___________________________________ JOSEPH E. MOORE CHRISTOPHER T. WOODLEY SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES WILLIAMS, MOORE, SHOCKLEY & HARRISON, L.L.P. 3509 Coastal Highway Ocean City, Maryland 21842

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF VALUABLE IMPROVED COMMERCIAL PROPERTY KNOWN AS PINES PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER, NEAR THE INTERSECTION OF CATHELL ROAD AND ROUTE 589, HAVING ADDRESSES OF 11070 CATHELL ROAD AND 11206 FIVE-L DRIVE, NEAR OCEAN PINES COMMUNITY, BERLIN, MARYLAND

land, in Liber 1090, folio 227, et seq., was conveyed by Lloyd O. Whitehead, Trustee in Bankruptcy, to Pines Plaza Limited Partnership. Parcel 2 (Lot 7) Lot No. 7 as shown on the Plat entitled, “Survey and Location Plan for Ocean Pines Shopping Center - Ocean Pines Plaza Limited Partnership Lot 17, 20, 25 and 7 (Resubdivided) Five-L Park” dated March 2, 1996, revised March 21, 1996, and made by AdamsKemp Associates and recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, in Plat Book R.H.O. 146, folio 2, et seq. Being a portion of the land described in the aforesaid Indenture dated May 24, 1985 and recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, as aforesaid, in Liber 1090, folio 227, et seq., from Lloyd O. Whitehead, Trustee in the Bankruptcy, to Pines Plaza Limited Partnership.

AT THE PROPERTY 11070 CATHELL ROAD NEAR MD ROUTE 589 (RACETRACK ROAD) BERLIN, MARYLAND ON OCTOBER 24, 2012 AT 11:45 A.M.

Parcel 3 (Fifteen Foot Right of Way Along Lots 7, 9, Five-L Park) Right-of-Way Easement fifteen (15’) feet wide, for the purpose of laying, maintaining and replacing underground water and/or sewer pipes, which Right-of-Way Easement runs from Resubdivided Lot 7, Five-L Park, as said Resubdivided Lot 7 is shown and depicted on a Plat entitled “Resubdivision of Lot No. 7, Five-L Park” recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, in Plat Book F.W.H. No. 99, folio 18; said Right-of Way Easement being more particularly described in a certain Deed of Exchange dated May 24, 1985, and recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland in Liber 1090, folio 259, et seq., which said Right-of-Way Easement is more particularly shown, described and depicted on the aforesaid “Survey And Location Plan for Pines Plaza Shopping Center - Ocean Pines, Berlin, Maryland Pines Plaza Limited Partnership Lot 17, 20, 25 and 7 (Resubdivided) Five-L Park Third Election District, Worcester County, State of Maryland”, dated March 2, 1996, revised March 21, 1996, and prepared by Adams-Kemp Associates, Inc. (“Survey Plat”) which said Survey Plat is recorded as aforesaid among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, in Plat Book R.H.O. 146, folio 2, et seq.

Parcel 1 (Lots 17, 20 and 25) Lot 17, 20, 25 on a certain Plat entitled “Five-L Park” which said Plat is recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, in Plat Book 53, folio 46, et seq., and also as shown on a Plat entitled, “Survey and Location Plan for Ocean Pines Shopping Center - Ocean Pines Plaza Limited Partnership Lot 17, 20, 25 and 7 (Resubdivided) Five-L Park” made by Adam-Kemp Associates which is recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, in Plat Book R.H.O. 146, folio 2 et seq., being a portion of the land which by Deed dated May 24, 1985, and recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland in Liber 1090, folio 225, et seq., was conveyed by Calvert R. Bregel, authorized attorney to Pines Plaza Limited Partnership. Also being a portion of the land which by Indenture dated May 24, 1985, and recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Mary-

Parcel 4 (Sixty Foot Access and Water and Sewer Easement on Lot 9, Five-L Park) Right-of-Way Easement sixty (60’) feet wide, for the purpose of laying, maintaining and replacing underground water and/or sewer pipes, and for the purpose of access from Five-L Drive to Parcel 3 described above, which Right-of-Way Easement shall run alongside and adjacent to the northwesterly line of Lot No. 9 as said Lot No. 9 is shown on the plat of “FiveL Park” recorded in the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, in Plat Book F.W.H. No. 53, folio 46, et seq., which said easement is located on Lot No. 9, Five-L Park, and which said Right-of-Way Easement is more particularly shown, described and depicted on a certain, “Survey And Location Plan for Pines Plaza Shopping Center - Ocean Pines, Berlin, Maryland Pines Plaza Limited Partnership Lot 17, 20, 25 and 7 (Resubdivided) Five-L Park Third Election District, Worcester

Under and by virtue of the Power of Sale contained in a certain Indemnity Deed of Trust from Berkley Trace, LLC and The Hampton Company, Inc., dated June 30, 2009, and recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, in Liber S.V.H. No. 5302, folio 279, et seq., the Substitute Trustees having been appointed by instrument duly recorded among the Land Records as aforesaid in Liber S.V.H. No. 5945, folio 007, et seq., for purposes of foreclosure, default having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will sell the following described property at public auction, to be held at:

County, State of Maryland”, dated March 2, 1996, revised March 21, 1996, and prepared by Adams-Kemp Associates, Inc. (“Survey Plat”) which said Survey Plat is recorded in the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland in Plat Book R.H.O. 146, folio 2, et seq. Parcel 5 (Right To Use And Maintain Sewer Utility Line Beneath 5-L Drive) The right to use and maintain a sewer utility line installed beneath the bed of 5-L Drive as shown and depicted on the aforesaid plat entitled “Survey And Location Plan For Pines Plaza Shopping Center - Ocean Pines, Berlin, Maryland Pines Plaza Limited Partnership Lot 17, 20, 25 and 7 (Resubdivided) Five-L Park Third Election District, Worcester County, State of Maryland”, dated March 2, 1996, revised March 21, 1996, and prepared by Adams-Kemp Associates, Inc. (“Survey Plat”) which said Survey Plat is recorded in the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, in Plat Book R.H.O. 146, folio 2, et seq. Improvements on the Property The property being sold is improved by a commercial shopping center, on the south side of Cathell Road, near to but not abutting Maryland Route 589 (Racetrack Road) in the immediate area of the Ocean Pines community, in Berlin, Maryland. The site is afforded a frontage of approximately 493 feet along Cathell Road and is directly accessible from said Cathell Road. The site is improved with a multi-tenanted neighborhood shopping center, built approximately 1986, which totals 63,900 square feet more or less of gross building area. The structure is of concrete block and steel construction, situated on a concrete slab, with a brick veneer along the front. The roof is mostly flat and comprised of a mix of tar and chip, metal and rubber membrane. There are 18 commercial units in the shopping center, said units ranging in size from 750 square feet up to 24,650 square feet. In addition, the property contains a free standing five bay car wash facility (one automatic, four self-serve) totaling 3,034 square feet more or less positioned on a pad in front of the shopping center, near to Cathell Road. It includes six vacuum stations and a water recovery system. Site improvements include the asphalt parking lot and drives; concrete sidewalks and curbing, utilities, storm water management, exterior lighting and landscaping. The improvements are believed to be of average quality and appear to be in fair to average condition but, the property is being sold As-Is, without any warranty or representation as to the actual condition thereof. Reference is made to the site for a more complete description. Sewer and Water Matters The property is temporarily connected to the Ocean Pines service area water and waste water system, but is to be permanently connected thereto. On February 7, 2012, the Worcester County Commissioners passed Resolution No. 12-1 which provides for the intended provision of public water and sewer to the Ocean Pines Plaza commercial area from the Ocean Pines sanitary service area. The project which will provide such service will


OCTOBER 5, 2012

Ocean City Today

LEGAL NOTICES 73

Legal Notices consist of a gravity collection system, containing pipe lines of eight inches in diameter, connecting to each property, including the subject property at the street right-of-way. Further information related to such proposed connection, the cost thereof, and the time at which it is proposed, to be built will be provided upon request by the undersigned, Substitute Trustees at 3509 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842. Information regarding such matters can also be obtained from the following persons: John Ross, Deputy Director, Worcester County Public Works Department, (410-641-5251, ext. 112) or Robert Mitchell, Director, Environmental Program for Worcester County, (410-632-1220, ext. 1601). TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of One Hundred Thousand Dollars ($100,000) will be required of the purchaser in the form of cash, certified or cashier’s check at the time and place of sale, or other form of security, at the sole discretion of the Substitute Trustees, with an additional cash deposit for 10% of the sale price within five (5) business days; the balance to be secured to the satisfaction of the Substitute Trustees and represented by a Promissory Note, conditioned upon the conveyance of good and marketable title. The balance in cash will be due at settlement which shall be within thirty (30) days after final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of Worcester County unless said period is extended by the Substitute Trustees, their successors or assigns for good cause shown, time being of the essence. Interest at the rate of ten percent (10%) per annum shall be paid on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The property will be sold subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions, and agreements of record affecting same, if any. Taxes, water charges, sanitary commission charges, assessments and liens or encumbrances for sewer, water, drainage, or other public improvements completed or commenced on or prior to the date of sale or subsequent thereto, if any, are to be adjusted and apportioned as of the date of sale and are to be assumed and paid thereafter by purchaser, whether assessments have been levied or not as of date of settlement. If applicable, the property is sold subject to the imposition of the Agricultural Transfer set forth in the Maryland Code and which shall be Purchaser’s sole responsibility. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, document preparation and title insurance shall be borne by the purchaser. If Purchaser fails to pay the balance of the purchase price following ratification of the sale, the deposit shall be forfeited and the property resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title to the property, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser. Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. The improvements are being sold in an “AS IS” condition, with no warranties expressed or implied, with Purchaser responsible for any and all housing or zoning code violations. Risk of loss passes at date of sale. The Substitute Trustees reserve the right to reject any and all bids in their sole discretion.

For information, please contact the undersigned at (410) 289-3553. Joseph E. Moore Christopher T. Woodley Substitute Trustees 3509 Coastal Highway Ocean City, Maryland 21842 OCD-10/4/3t ___________________________________ JAMES E. CLUBB, JR., ESQ. 108 8th Street Ocean City, Maryland 21842

FORECLOSURE SALE 7601 COASTAL HIGHWAY, #305 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND By virtue of a Statement of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to an Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland in Case No. 23-C-12-0951, the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction in front of the condominium building located at 7601 Coastal Highway. Ocean City. Maryland 21842. on FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2012 AT 10:00 AM ALL that property lying and being situate in the Town of Ocean City, in the Tenth Election District of Worcester County, Maryland, more particularly designated and distinguished as Unit No. 305 in the "Coral Seas Condominium", together with an undivided percentage interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Condominium Declaration and By-Laws, dated June 23, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland in Liber S.V.H. No. 4466, folio 91, et seq., and pursuant to the Condominium Plats recorded therewith in Plat Book S.V.H. No. 200, folio 2, et seq. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, with no warranties or guarantees, and will be sold subject to 1) a Deed of Trust recorded among the aforesaid Land Records in Liber No. 4765, folio 350, said Deed of Trust having had an original principal balance of $407,920.00 on August 15, 2006, and 2) a Deed of Trust recorded among the aforesaid Land Records in Liber No. 4765, folio 371, said Deed of Trust having had an original principal balance of $50,990.00 on August 16, 2006. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the amount of Twenty Thousand Dollars ($20,000.00) will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in a cashier's or bank check, with the balance to be paid in cash at time of settlement. The date of settlement shall be fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. The undersigned reserves the right to waive the deposit requirements as to the purchaser representing the interest of the party secured by the State-

ment of Lien. Real property taxes, wastewater charges, and condominium dues will be adjusted to the date of sale and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All costs of conveyancing, including transfer and recordation taxes, shall be paid by the purchaser. The purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining possession of the property. Purchaser agrees to pay to the Seller an Attorney's fee of $250.00 for review of any motion which may be filed with the Court to substitute a purchaser herein. In the event the undersigned is unable to convey marketable title, the sale will be null and void and the purchaser's sole remedy will be the return of the deposit without interest. For more information, call: James E. Clubb, Jr. Trustee 410-289-2323 OCD-10/4/3t ___________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 12436 W. TORQUAY RD. OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from David Maizel dated August 3, 2009 and recorded in Liber 5463, Folio 406 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $139,858.00 and an original interest rate of 5.56% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, Snow Hill, on OCTOBER 24, 2012 AT 2:10 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $25,000 in cash, cashiers check or certified check is required at time of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current real property taxes will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All past due property taxes paid by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All transfer taxes shall be paid by the Pur-

chaser. Purchaser shall pay all applicable agricultural tax, if any.  Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Jacob Geesing, Carrie M. Ward, David W. Simpson, Jr., Substitute Trustees OCD-10/4/3t ___________________________________ GUY R. AYRES III, Trustee AYRES, JENKINS, GORDY & ALMAND, P.A. 6200 Coastal Highway, Suite 200 Ocean City, MD 21842

TRUSTEE'S SALE OF VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY WEST OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Pursuant to a Power of Sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust under date of September 2, 2005 and recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland at Liber 4528, folio 131, et seq., as amended, and pursuant to an Assignment of Deed of Trust dated May 5, 2011 recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland at Liber 5709, folio 378, and a Deed of Appointment of Substitute Trustee filed therein, the above named Trustee will sell at public auction to the highest bidder on WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2012 AT 10:00 AM AT THE COURT HOUSE (front steps) CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY 1 West Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863 the following property: ALL that certain lot or parcel of land lying and being situate in the Tenth Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland, which are particularly designated and distinguished as Lot 25A, formerly known as Lots 25, 26, 27 and 28, as shown on the plat of the “Charles Lewis Farm” made on August 15, 1924, by Morgan T. Gum, Surveyor, which said plat is recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, in Plat Book O.D.C. No. 50, folio 2. Together with all im-


74 LEGAL NOTICES

Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

Legal Notices provements erected there and appurtenant thereto. The aforementioned Lot 25A is improved by a single family ranch style home, containing 1296 square feet with 3 bedrooms and two baths, and is addressed at 10049 Waterview Drive, Ocean City, MD 21842. Being a part of the property secured by the above referenced Deed of Trust. The above described property is being offered for sale in an “AS IS” condition SUBJECT to all the covenants, agreements, conditions, easements and restrictions as may appear among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of Twenty-Five Thousand Dollars ($25,000.00) in cash or certified check will be required of the purchaser at the time and place of the sale. The balance in cash or certified check will be due upon final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, said balance to bear interest at the rate of seven percent (7%) per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment and shall be paid within twenty (20) days after the final ratification of the sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. All state and county real estate and personal property taxes, sewer and water charges, home owner assessments and all other public charges assessable on an annual basis shall be adjusted as of the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the Purchaser. The cost of title papers, recordation taxes, transfer taxes and recording fees shall be paid by the Purchaser. Possession will be given upon final ratification of the sale or upon payment in full of the purchase price, whichever occurs later. If Purchaser fails to pay the balance of the purchase price following ratification of sale, the deposit shall be forfeited and the property resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting Purchaser. For further information, you may contact Guy R. Ayres III, Trustee, 410 723-1400. OCD-9/27/3t __________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 23 OFFSHORE LA. OCEAN PINES A/R/T/A BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Kathryn T. Skarzinski dated December 27, 2005 and recorded in Liber 4638, Folio 482 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $100,000.00 and an original interest rate of 6.3750% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, Snow Hill, on

scribed in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $9,000 in cash, cashiers check or certified check is required at time of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current real property taxes will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All past due property taxes paid by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All transfer taxes shall be paid by the Purchaser. Purchaser shall pay all applicable agricultural tax, if any. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Jacob Geesing, Carrie M. Ward, David W. Simpson, Jr., Substitute Trustees OCD-9/27/3t ___________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE

OCTOBER 16, 2012 AT 2:00 PM

OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON

ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and more fully de-

105 120TH ST., UNIT #A-3 A/R/T/A 105 EDWARD L. TAYLOR RD. OCEAN CITY, MD 21842

Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Randall R. Henigin and Mary E. Henigin dated April 28, 2006 and recorded in Liber 4701, Folio 671 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $232,000.00 and an original interest rate of 6.625% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, Snow Hill, on OCTOBER 16, 2012 AT 2:10 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and described as Unit No. 35, in Building A-3, Section A, Phase II, in “Club Ocean Villas II, Condominium” and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $27,000 in cash, cashiers check or certified check is required at time of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current real property taxes will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All past due property taxes paid by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All transfer taxes shall be paid by the Purchaser. Purchaser shall pay all applicable agricultural tax, if any. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity,

is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Jacob Geesing, Carrie M. Ward, David W. Simpson, Jr., Substitute Trustees OCD-9/27/3t ___________________________________ Ronald B. Katz, P.A. 11403 Cronridge Dr., Suite 230 Owings Mills, MD 21117 410-581-1131

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE 2-STORY DETACHED HOME 12917 HORN ISLAND DR. OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Gregory A. Grim, dated March 24, 2005 and recorded in Liber 4392, folio 346 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD (Case No. 23-C-12000727) default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Substitute Trustees will sell at public auction ON THE PREMISES, ON WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2012 AT 12:00 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Worcester County, MD, Known as Tax ID #10-367832 and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a 2story detached home containing 5 rooms (3 bedrooms), 2.5 baths, FWA electric heat and central air conditioning. Additional features include a deck & patio. The property and improvements will be sold in an “AS IS” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions, existing buildings and/or environmental violations, agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty either expressed or implied as to the description of the condition of the property or improvements. The property will be sold subject to a prior mortgage, the amount to be announced at the time of sale. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $5,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order, at the time of sale will be required of all purchasers other than the holder of the Deed of Trust. The deposit must be increased to 10% of the purchase price within 2 business days at the office of the auctioneer in the same form as above. Balance of the purchase price is to be paid in cash within ten (10) business days of the final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County. If payment of the balance does not take place within ten (10) business days of ratification, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property. Interest to be paid on unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust note from date of sale to the date funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees, in the event the property is purchased by someone other than the note holder. In the event the settlement is delayed for any reason and the property is purchased by


Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

LEGAL NOTICES 75

Legal Notices someone other than the note holder, there shall be no abatement of interest caused by the delay. Taxes, water rent, ground rent, condominium fees, and/or homeowners association dues, if applicable, to be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. All other public charges and assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges to be adjusted for the current year to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk of loss for the property immediately after the sale. Ronald B. Katz, Eric A. Hartlaub, Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 OCD-9/27/3t ___________________________________ JAMES E. CLUBB, JR., ESQ. 108 N. 8th Street Ocean City, Maryland 21842

TRUSTEE'S SALE OF VALUABLE TIME-SHARE INTERVALS IN THE OCEAN TIME CONDOMINIUM OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND By virtue of a Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. 23-C-12-0980 the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the Ocean Time Condominium building located at 13 136th Street, Oceanside, the following described property located in the Town of Ocean City, in the Tenth Election District of Worcester County, Maryland, on FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2012 AT 11:00 A.M. Units 201 201 203 206 206 301 301 303 304 401 402 402 402 403 406 501 501

Time Intervals 9 15 3 15 46 13 47 46 3 9 7 16 50 16 13 2 46

Each time interval being one week per year of the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Ocean Time Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Condominium Declaration and ByLaws recorded among the Land

Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions as to each condominium unit, and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties or guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of sale per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all recordation and transfer taxes, 2013 maintenance fees and all other incidental settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: James E. Clubb, Jr., Esq. Trustee 410-289-2323 OCD-9/20/3t ___________________________________ JAMES E. CLUBB, JR., ESQ. 108 N. 8th Street Ocean City, Maryland 21842

TRUSTEE'S SALE OF VALUABLE TIME-SHARE INTERVALS IN THE LIGHTHOUSE POINT VILLAS CONDOMINIUM OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND By virtue of a Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. 23-C-12-0981 the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the Lighthouse Point Villas Condominium building located at 14409 Lighthouse Avenue, the following described property located in the Town of Ocean City, in the Tenth Election District of Worcester County, Maryland, on FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2012 AT 11:30 A.M. Units 2 2 5 5 5 6 7 10 10 12

Time Intervals 9 14 4 36 40 2 42 14 44 2

Each time interval being one week per year of the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Lighthouse Point Villas Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Condominium Declaration

and By-Laws recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions as to each condominium unit, and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties or guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of sale per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all recordation and transfer taxes, 2013 maintenance fees and all other incidental settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: James E. Clubb, Jr., Esq. Trustee 410-289-2323 OCD-9/20/3t ___________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 14 139TH ST., UNIT #3W A/R/T/A UNIT #3 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Daniel J. Hubbard and Marian D. Hubbard dated August 30, 2007 and recorded in Liber 4990, Folio 152 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $288,000.00 and an original interest rate of 7.000% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, Snow Hill, on OCTOBER 10, 2012 AT 2:00 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and described as Unit Number 3 in the “El-Gwendo West Condominium Horizontal Property Regime” and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $29,000 in cash, cashiers check or certified

check is required at time of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current real property taxes will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All past due property taxes paid by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All transfer taxes shall be paid by the Purchaser. Purchaser shall pay all applicable agricultural tax, if any. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Jacob Geesing, Carrie M. Ward, David W. Simpson, Jr., Substitute Trustees OCD-9/20/3t ___________________________________ Rosenberg & Associates, LLC 7910 Woodmont Avenue, Suite 750 Bethesda, Maryland 20814 (301) 907-8000 www.rosenberg-assoc.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 73 WINDJAMMER RD. BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Joseph H. Rosen and Arlene M. Rosen, dated June 20, 2006 and recorded in Liber 4739, folio 202 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House


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76 LEGAL NOTICES

OCTOBER 5, 2012

Legal Notices Door, Snow Hill, on OCTOBER 5, 2012 AT 2:30 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and described as Tax ID #03-055922 and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $19,000 by cash or certified check.  Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester Co. Interest to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received in the office of the Sub. Trustees.  There will be no abatement of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser.  TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. All public charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive the foreclosure, including water/sewer charges, real property taxes, ground rent, condo/HOA dues, whether incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges or condo/HOA fees have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.  Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property.  Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the time of sale. If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit without interest.   If the purchaser fails to go to settlement, the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the above-scheduled foreclosure sale.  In the event of default, all expenses of this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited deposit.  The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without reselling the property.  In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.  Trustees’ file number

29296. Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, John A. Ansell, III, Stephanie Montgomery, Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-9/20/3t ___________________________________

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING WORCESTER COUNTY BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS AGENDA

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2012 Pursuant to the provisions of the Worcester County Zoning Ordinance, notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held before the Board of Zoning Appeals for Worcester County, in the Board Room (Room 1102) on the first floor of the Worcester County Government Center, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland. 6:30 p.m. Case No. 12-38, on the application of Timothy Keane, on the lands of Irene Neidhardt and Dyan Gush, requesting a special exception to establish an agritainment facility and requesting a special exception (transient use) for use of land for hayrides and a walking trail in an A-1 Agricultural District, pursuant to Zoning Code Sections ZS 1-105(c)(5), ZS 1-116(c)(3), ZS 1-201(c)(9), ZS 1-305 and ZS 1-337, located at 11039 Worcester Highway (MD Route 575), approximately 1,700 feet north of the intersection of the Ocean Expressway (MD Route 90) overpass and Worcester Highway, Tax Map 15, Parcel 236, Lots 4 and 5, in the Minor Subdivision of Linda L. Sellers, in the Third Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS OCD-9/27/2t ___________________________________

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS BOARD OF PORT WARDENS Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 106, “Waterways,” Article II – “Shoreline Development” of the Code of the Town of Ocean City, Maryland, hereinafter referred to as the Code, same being the Port Wardens Ordinance of Ocean City, Maryland, notice is hereby given that public hearings will be conducted in the Council Chambers of City Hall located at 301 Baltimore Avenue, Ocean City, MD Thursday, October 11th, 2012 At 2:00 PM A request has been submitted to install one (1) boatlift with all associated poles for a maximum channelward extension of 25’. The site of the proposed construction is described as being located at 2818 Tern Drive Unit 14 Parcel # 4717-14-0 -0112-062330 in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: Hidden Oak Farm, LLC Owner: David Sun PW12-082 A request has been submitted to install one (1) boatlift with all associated poles for a maximum channelward extension of 25’. The site of the proposed construction is described as being located at 2818 Tern Drive Unit 16 Par-

cel # 4717-16-0-0112-062136 in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: Hidden Oak Farm, LLC Owner: Dorothy Burie PW12-086 A request has been submitted to install 40’ of new vinyl replacement bulkhead, a 6’ x 40’ parallel dock, a 5’ x 34’ pier, and one (1) boatlift with all associated poles for a maximum channelward extension of 42’. The site of the proposed construction is described as being located at 184 Beachcomber LN Parcel # 8020A-1397B-3-0 -0117190819 in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: Hidden Oak Farm, LLC Owner: Howard Ritchie PW12-087 A request has been submitted to repair 100’ of existing deteriorated timber bulkhead w/vinyl sheeting. All existing structures to remain as is. The site of the proposed construction is described as being located at 1519 Shad Row Parcel # 3378-15-0 -0111041244 in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: J. Stacey Hart & Associates, INC Owner: Arthur Miles PW12-088 A request has been submitted for a permit for a boatlift with four associated wooden piles onto an existing finger pier within tidal wetlands on the property mentioned below. All improvements will not exceed beyond 22’ channelward of the MHW line. The site of the proposed construction is described as being located at 509 Penguin DR Bldg C 104 Parcel # 4469-104-C-0 -0112-062489 in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: McGinty Marine Construction INC Owner: Scott Gibson PW12-089 A request has been submitted for an emergency bulkhead repair for existing bulkhead at 400 and 401 32nd Street and 2901 Philadelphia Ave. The site of the proposed construction is known as Bay Shore Development Corp./Jolly Roger, 12A, LLC described as being located at 2901 Philadelphia Ave. Parcel # 4549 -1-88N-0 -0112049350 in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: Bay Shore Development Corp. Owner: 12A LLC/ 24A LLC PW12-092 Board of Port Wardens Blake McGrath, Chairman Valerie Gaskill, Attorney OCD-9/27/2t ___________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555 Carrie M. Ward, et al. 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. PAOLO R. ARROYO JENNIFER A. ARROYO 204 33rd Street, Unit # 308 Ocean City, MD 21842 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23-C-12-000604

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 18th day of Sept., 2012, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 204 33rd Street, Unit # 308, Ocean City, MD

21842, made and reported by Howard N. Bierman, Substitute Trustee, will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 22nd day of October, 2012, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 15th day of October, 2012. The report states the purchase price at the foreclosure sale to be $145,000.00. Stephen V. Hales Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, Md. OCD-9/27/3t ___________________________________

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS TOWN OF OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 110 of the Code of Ocean City, Maryland, hereinafter referred to as the Code, same being the Zoning Ordinance for Ocean City, Maryland, notice is hereby given that public hearings will be conducted by the Board of Zoning Appeals for Ocean City, Maryland in the Council Chambers of City Hall located on Baltimore Avenue and Third Street, in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland on: THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. Pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-93(2) and110-93(3), Powers, of the Code, an appeal has been filed pursuant to the provisions of Section 11094(2)(b) requesting a special parking exception to parking standards to allow stacked parking for a duplex and to allow the vehicles to back out into the street; and pursuant to the provisions of Sections 110-95(1)(a) and 110905(h) requesting a rear yard variance to construct an open, unenclosed porch over existing, undisturbed tiebacks and deadmen; and to Sections 11095(1)(b) and 110-906(b)(1)a for a variance to lot area to allow (2) subdivided lots for a two-family dwelling with less than 2,500 square feet each. The site of the appeal is described as Lot 11, Block 44N of the J. E. Evans Development Plat, and further described as located on the west side of Edgewater Avenue and north of 5th Street; and locally known as 507 Edgewater Avenue, in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland. APPLICANT: MELVIN & SUSAN BRAUN – (BZA 2353 #12-09400017) at 6:10 p.m. Pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-93(2), Powers, of the Code, an appeal has been filed pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-94(3)(a) requesting a special yard exception to the front yard, allowing a setback of 2.31’, instead of 5’ as required by Code; the same setback as the easterly adjoining property at 219 Flounder Lane. The site of the appeal is described as Lot E-9 of the Isle of Wight Trailer Park Plat, further described as located on the south side of Flounder Lane, and locally known as 221 Flounder Lane, in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland.


Ocean City Today

OCTOBER 5, 2012

LEGAL NOTICES 77

Legal Notices APPLICANT: RESORT HOMES (BZA 2354 #12-09400018) at 6:20 p.m. Pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-93(2), Powers, of the Code, an appeal has been filed pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-94(5) requesting a special use exception to allow outdoor display of merchandise incidental to the on-premise use. The site of the appeal is described as Unit 4, Aquarius Condominium Plat, further described as located on the west side of Coastal Highway, north of 130th Street, and locally known as The Crab Bag T-Shirts, 13007 Coastal Highway, Unit 4, in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland. APPLICANT: NOLEN GRAVES – THE CRAB BAG T-SHIRTS – (BZA 2355 #12-09400019) Further information concerning the public hearings may be examined in the office of the Department of Planning and Community Development in City Hall. Alfred Harrison, Chairman Heather Stansbury, Attorney OCD-9/27/2t ___________________________________

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE Application has been made by the Undersigned for a Class “A” BEERWINE License, 7 Day, By Johnnie Charles Derrickson, 2nd, 10560 Windmill Road, Berlin, MD 21811. For: Pitt Stop Beer & Wine, LLC For the premises known as and located at: T/A: Pitt Stop Beer & Wine 9040 Worcester Highway, Suite B Berlin, Maryland 21811 There will be a public hearing on the application in the Board Room, Room 1102 in the Government Center, Snow Hill, Maryland, on: October 17, 2012 @ 1:00 P.M. The Board welcomes written or oral comment at said public hearing from any interested party. WORCESTER COUNTY BOARD OF LICENSE COMMISSIONERS OCD-10/4/2t ___________________________________

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE Application has been made by the Undersigned for the Transfer of the location of the restaurant Class “B” BEER-WINE-LIQUOR License, 7 Day, By Carrol Lee Marshall, 909 Walnut Street, Pocomoke, Maryland 21851. For: Plaza Tapatia, Inc. For the premises known as and located at: T/A: Plaza Tapatia Restaurant 11007 Manklin Creek Road Suite 9 Berlin, Maryland 21811 From: 12534 Ocean Gateway, Ocean City, Maryland There will be a public hearing on the application in the Board Room, Room 1102 in the Government Center, Snow Hill, Maryland, on: October 17, 2012 @ 1:15 P.M. The Board welcomes written or oral comment at said public hearing from any interested party. WORCESTER COUNTY BOARD OF LICENSE COMMISSIONERS OCD-10/4/2t ___________________________________

PUBLIC NOTICE The motor vehicles described below have been abandoned. The owners and lien holders are hereby informed of their right to reclaim the vehicles upon payment of all charges and costs resulting from the towing, preservation, and storage of the vehicles. The failure of the owners or lien holders to reclaim the vehicles within three weeks of notification shall be deemed a waiver by the owners or lien holders of all rights, title and interest and thereby consent to the sale of the vehicles at public auction beginning Oct. 1, 2012, or to have it otherwise disposed of in a manner provided by law. Line No Year Make Model Color Style VIN Mileage 017-12 1996 CHEVY MONTECARL BLK 2G1WW12MXT9290510 186385 076-12 2000 CHRYSLER 300M BLK 4D 2C3HE66G4YH204842 079-12 1999 FORD TAURUS SIL 4D 1FAFP53U8XA220546 118114 096-12 1996 TOYOTA TERCEL GRN 2D JT2AC52L3T0159348 166812 128-12 1995 PONTIAC SUNFIRE WHI CP 1G2JB1240S7531539 121096 142-12 1999 CHEVY ASTROVAN BLU VAN 1GNDM19W9XB142050 150-12 UNK VERUCCI PREMIER ORG MOPED LFETCA18667000284 626 199-12 1999 NISSAN ALTIMA SIL 4S 1N4DLO1DXXC132725 215-12 2000 KARAVAN TRAILER 5KTWS1117YF004616 N/A 284-12 1995 ISUZU RODEO GRN 4D 4S2CM58V4S4356241 177627 408-12 1979 CHRYSLER BLUE 4S FM41D9F160895 526-12 2002 LOAD RITE BOAT TRL GRAY 4U01C16242A010475 N/A 648-12 1996 FORD EXPLORER GRN SW 1FMDU35P0TUC33575 179154 778-12 2000 MERCURY MOUNT WHITE SU 4M2ZU66EXYUJ32425 182458 914-12 UNK YAMATI UNK ORG 942-12 1996 OLDSMOBILE CIERA TAN 4DSL 1G3AJ85M4T6370901 178432 952-12 2001 DODGE NEON RED 4D 1B3AS46CX1D294350 986-12 1998 CHEVY CAVALIER BLK 4D 1G1JF52TXW7145370 1032-12 1996 HONDA CIVIC RED 2S AC226002/MD 191321 1074-12 1998 CHEVY SUBURBAN RED 4D 1GNFK16R3WJ319175 1156-12 2000 FORD CRWN VICTO TAN 4D 2FAFP73W4YX155071 78875 1157-12 1998 CHEVY MALIBU TEAL 1G1ND52M9WY188852 1274-12 1993 NISSAN ALTIMA WHITE 1N4BU31F3PC123985 1311-12 1999 MERCURY GRD MARQ GOLD 4D 2MEFM75W6XX709384 1345-12 VIP SUPER MOT RED L9NTEACT1B1004650 All vehicles will be sold at auction on-line at www.govdeals.com. For details call 410-723-6643. AUTH: Bernadette DiPino, Chief of Police OCD-9/13/4t ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ WILLIAMS, MOORE, SHOCKLEY & HARRISON PA RAYMOND C. SHOCKLEY 3509 COASTAL HIGHWAY P.O. BOX 739 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842

NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 14854 Notice is given that the Probate court of Harris County, TX appointed Jay Frank May, 401 S. Shaffer Drive, New Freedom, PA 17349 as the Executor of the Estate of Parker May who died on March 20, 2003 domiciled in Texas, America. The Maryland resident agent for service of process is Raymond C. Shockley whose address is 3509 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following Maryland counties: Worcester County. All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for Worcester County with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred.

Jay Frank May Foreign Personal Representative Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of first publication: September 27, 2012 OCD-9/27/3t ___________________________________

PUBLIC NOTICE THE MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL OF OCEAN CITY WILL HOLD A GENERAL ELECTION ON TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2012. AT THAT ELECTION THERE WILL BE PROPOSED CHARTER AMENDMENTS SUBMITTED FOR DETERMINATION BY THE VOTERS. A FAIR SUMMARY OF THE PROPOSED AMENDMENTS IS AS FOLLOWS: THE PROPOSED AMENDMENTS AUTHORIZES THE COUNCIL TO ENGAGE IN COLLECTIVE BARGAINING WITH ALL TOWN DEPARTMENTS, IN ADDITION TO THOSE DEPARTMENTS CURRENTLY LISTED, AND WOULD ELIMINATE THE PROHIBITIONS AND PENALTIES FOR ENGAGING IN COLLECTIVE BARGAINING. NEW MATTER TO BE ADDED TO THE CHARTER IS PRINTED IN ALL

CAPITAL LETTERS AND IS UNDERSCORED. CURRENT MATTER TO BE DELETED IS ENCLOSED BY BOLD FACED DOUBLE PARENTHESES. To amend Article X, Section C-1003 of the town charter – Merit system authorized: right of certain employees to organize and bargain collectively, paragraph C, to include all Town Departments. C. The Council shall have the authority to recognize and engage in collective bargaining with one or more designed bargaining representatives of certain employees of the emergency medical services division of the Ocean City Department of Emergency Services, ((and)) the Ocean City Fire Marshal’s Department, AND ALL OTHER TOWN DEPARTMENTS, and shall have the authority to enter into a binding collective bargaining agreement with said representatives, and shall further have the authority to enact by ordinance or amendment, a system of rules and regulations to govern this process, provided that the Council shall not have the authority to participate in binding interest arbitration with respect to these employees. “Binding interest arbitration” shall be defined herein as the process through which parties negotiating a collective bargaining agreement reach impasse on one or more terms, and call upon a third party to resolve the impasse and set a term of the collective bargaining agreement to which the parties are bound. Binding interest arbitration includes the impasse panel process described in § C-1003.B. Additionally, to amend Article X, Section § C1005 of the town charter by deletion of paragraph B - Prohibitions and penalties.


Ocean City Today

78 LEGAL NOTICES

Legal Notices ((B. No union, association, club, etc., or other collective bargaining organization shall be recognized as a bargaining agent or representative of any city employee, group of city employees or all of the city employees. No dues check off or other withholding of a portion of an employee’s salary shall be permitted except to the extent same is mandatorily required by federal or state tax or social security provisions or other federal or state laws and except to the extent that a program of employee benefits sponsored by the city may allow voluntary withholdings. The provisions of this subsection are not applicable to employees of the Ocean City Police Department, the Emergency Medical Services Division of the Ocean City Department of Emergency Services, and the Ocean City Fire Marshal’s Department, as determined by the Council.)) OCD-10/4/4t ___________________________________

NOTICE OF HEARINGS BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF MARYLAND

OCTOBER 5, 2012

Atlantic United Methodist 47th Annual Church Dinner Fundraiser Proudly Sponsored By the Phillips Family

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF THE MAYOR AND COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF BERLIN, MARYLAND FOR A DECREASE IN ITS ELECTRIC RATES THROUGHOUT ITS SERVICE TERRITORY CASE NO. 9300 An evidentiary hearing on the Application referenced above is scheduled at 3:00 PM on Thursday, October 11, 2012 in the Council Chambers located in the Berlin Town Hall, 10 William Street, Berlin, Maryland 21811. A evening hearing for public comments is scheduled at 7:00 PM on Thursday, October 11, 2012, at the same location. OCD-10/4/1t ___________________________________

Sunday ay, October 14, 2012 Proceeds Benefiit AU AUMC For information Call 410-289-7430

Dinner includes: Largge Platter of Crab Imperial, Baked Ham, Fried Chicken and salads, Cup of Veeggetable Crab Soup, Beveragge, plus Ice Cream for Dessert! Doors open from noon 6:00pm 21st & Philadelphia Avvenue (Main Entrance, 1st Floor) Carry out av availab able 410-2899 7747

OCEAN CITY TODAY Legal Advertising Call TERRY BURRIER 410-723-6397, Fax: 410-723-6511 or E-mail: legals@oceancitytoday.net DEADLINE: 5 P.M. MONDAY

Prices: Agges 15 and Up $22 Agges 6-14 $8 (no crab imperial) Ages 5 and Under Free (reduced portion)

Crab House


OCTOBER 5, 2012

Ocean City Today

LIFESTYLE 79


Ocean City Today

80 LIFESTYLE

Winner of the Wine Spectator’s Award of Excellence for 15 Years and The Best of Excellence Award for 3 Years!

OCTOBER 5, 2012

The Horizons Oceanfront Restaurant and Ocean Club feature Oceanfront Dining at its Finest with American and Continental Cuisine, serving Breakfast 7am - Noon, Lunch 11am - 2pm and Dinner 5pm - 11pm Our Award Winning Restaurant Specializes in a Variety of Certified Angus Beef,® Live Lobster , Fresh Seafood and Poultry

New Censation FULL CIRCLE

ALL DAY MENU Served 7am - 11pm SUNDAY — THURSDAY $9.95 & $12.95 Dinner Specials 5-10pm 30% OFF Dinner Menu Entrees 5-7pm Specials Excluded

SUNDAY & MONDAY 5-10pm New York Strip, Delmonico, & Filet Mignon - 1/2 Price CATCH OF THE DAY $12.95

$5.95 Lunch Specials Mon- Thurs. Food & Drink Specials During NFL Games NFL Sunday Ticket & ESPN College Game Plan

FRIDAY & SATURDAY 5-7pm 20% OFF Dinner Menu Entrees Specials Excluded

THURSDAY Lobster Lunacy 5-7pm 1 lb. Lobster $18.95

BREAKFAST BUFFET

18 HI-DEF TVs/2 Jumbo HI-DEF TVs

Saturday 7am-10:30am

Horizons Wine Festival 20% OFF bottled wines with the purchase of an appetizer or entree. Enjoy the best from our award winning wine list!

Follow the clues and solve the case over dinner. Be a super-sleuth for the night Saturday October 20 7:30 - 10:30 pm $65 for Adults $35 for Children 4-12 Reservations must be made by October 8 • Special Room Rate $115

Adults $10.95 • Children 4-12 $7.95 3 & Under FREE

DELUXE SUNDAY Breakfast Buffet 7am-1pm Adults $14.95 • Children 4-12 $9.95 3 & Under FREE

FAMOUS ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT Prime Rib, Crab Legs & Seafood Buffet

Friday & Saturday 5-9pm Adults $34.95 • Children 4-12 $16.95 3 & Under FREE Reservations Suggested


10.05.12