Page 1

INVESTIGATION: Town of Berlin and the

BLOOD DRIVE: The Blood Bank

fire company ask state officials to look into events that led to a police officer having to drive the ambulance from a fatal crash scene PAGE 4A

of Delmarva calls on donors to give a pint at the Ocean City convention center next Tuesday and Wednesday PAGE 1B

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: BUSINESS . . . . . . . . . . 32A CLASSIFIED . . . . . . . . . 38A ENTERTAINMENT . . . . . . 5B LEGALS . . . . . . . . . . . . 13B

LIFESTYLE . . . . . . . . . . . 1B OPINION . . . . . . . . . . . 18A OUT&ABOUT . . . . . . . . 10B SPORTS . . . . . . . . . . . . 25A

ANOTHER SEASONAL VISITOR (THE FLU) MAKES AN APPEARANCE…PAGE 9A

Ocean City Today JANUARY 11, 2013

WWW.OCEANCITYTODAY.NET

FREE

City looks into bringing back groups eliminated by majority vote in 2010 Political insurrection comes full circle with commission reinstatement debate ZACK HOOPES ■ Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2013) The first tangible effects of November’s counter-coup in City Hall may soon materialize, as the City Council voted this week to schedule a OC Councilman discussion regarding Joe Mitrecic the possible re-instatement of subcommissions, which were controversially eliminated in 2010 by the then-insurgent council majority.

“I would ask that we … discuss the viability of each one and the possibility of reinstating one or all of them.” COUNCILMAN JOE MITRECIC about a Ocean City Council vote to discuss sub-commissions that were eliminated in 2010

“I would ask that we set in, for an upcoming work session, the discussion of the committees and commissions,” said Councilman Joe Mitrecic, “to discuss the viability of each one and See EFFICIENCY on Page 8A

Former Bdwk. store owner faces 10 years Liang Lin pleads guilty to selling counterfeit items NANCY POWELL ■ Staff Writer

A ‘WHEEL’ BIG TASK

OCEAN CITY TODAY/NANCY POWELL

Secure on a raised and caged platform, Jim Bruzzese paints the Ferris wheel on the Ocean City pier Wednesday.

(Jan. 11, 2013) The former owner of two stores on the Boardwalk pleaded guilty in federal court last week to trafficking in counterfeit goods.

Liang Lin, 34, a Delaware resident, entered the plea in U.S. District Court in Baltimore on Jan. 3. He faces a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison and a $2 million fine. Sentencing is scheduled for March 27. See LIN on Page 8A


Page 1

2A NEWS

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013

NEWS 3A

Commercial values dip 6 percent, but limited effect expected ZACK HOOPES ■ Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2013) Though it has been more than four years since the beginning of the 2008 economic recession, and despite signs of a gradual recovery, the effects of the market dip, at least for tax purposes, are still being figured out. But the man who does the figuring, Worcester County Assessor Bob Smith, reported relative calm this week after having mailed new assessments for the county’s “group one” sector of properties at year’s end. Although the re-assessment has seen considerable drops in home values for Berlin, Ocean Pines, and other areas of the county, the effect on the resort has been limited, given that group one encompasses only Ocean City’s commercial property below 25th Street. “We prefer to expect no complaints, but the number of calls for commercial property right now has been at a minimum,” Smith said. Although some properties have leveled out or even risen in value, most have gone down. But the aggregate loss, Smith estimated, was only around 6 percent for the city’s downtown commercial property. “I can tell you that the overall assessment is less this year than it was last time for the same area,” Smith said.

Despite the impression that re-assessments will mandate a huge dip in value, Smith said this is mostly reflective of residential sales, given the bottomed-out real estate market. “Commercial can almost be a standalone,” he said. “It can do pretty good even with the market in the residential doing as bad as its doing. Depending on the community, you just have to get people to keep coming into your restaurant or store or whatever [regardless of the market for the real estate itself].” Maryland assessments are done on a three-year cycle. New values for property assessed in a given calendar year go into effect in July of the following year, when governments collect property taxes as revenue for the new fiscal year, which runs on a July-through-June cycle. Thus, Smith’s assessments done in 2012 will have an effect in July 2013 – the beginning of FY14 – when the city and county levy property taxes. “It’s going to affect us somewhat, but not a lot,” said Ocean City Budget Manager Jennie Knapp. “It’s not a big hit, comparatively speaking.” Relative, of course, to the 2011 reassessments that saw the Town of Ocean City to lose $1.6 billion – about 15 percent – of its total assessed value, and subsequently raise its FY13 tax rate from 39.5 to 45.85 cents per $100 of assessment, order to bring in the same

amount of money. While increases in value are phased in, for tax purposes, over the three years between assessments, decreases are effective immediately in their entirety. This gives property owners the immediate full benefit of lower taxes, but shields them from sudden hikes if their property gains value rapidly. On the other hand, it means that governments face revenue drops immediately. “It’s designed to be the best for the taxpayer, not for the municipality,” Knapp said. But the brunt of the 2011 decrease was in residential property. Knapp said if Smith’s estimate of a 6 percent decrease for the south end commercial holds true, the city would lose only about a half million dollars in tax revenue. Due to assessment appeals, and any construction that occurs between now and July, the loss will likely be a bit less. Further, since residential and northend commercial properties were re-assessed in the last cycle – what Smith identifies as “group 3” – the next reassessment cycle of “group 2” will not affect Ocean City at all. “What happened to us last year [in terms of decreases] should be it,” Knapp said. What would really shore the city up would be a return in the residential market. But this is tied less to homeowner-

ship and more to property investment, given that - according to Smith – 91 percent of the residential properties in the resort are not owner-occupied. Due to the pre-2008 real estate bubble, Ocean City has been living on a stock of largely unsold housing. But, according to Smith, this excess has gone from about 1,800 units down to about 1,000 over the past years. “That doesn’t mean we’re out of the water yet, it just means that the water is getting more shallow,” he said. Jennifer Cropper-Rines of the Coastal Association of Realtors told the city’s Economic Development Committee this week that, while prices for 2012 were down 6 percent, sales were up 8 percent. The inventory of unsold homes is now estimated at a 14-month supply, down from an 18-month inventory. “The bulk of the properties that are selling are under $400,000,” CropperRines said. “The high-end market is still a little slow to catch up.” According to the CAR’s November 2012 report, condo sales for the year through November were up 5.6 percent over the same period in 2011. Units under contract were up 14.1 percent, and the market glut had shrunk considerably, with 25 percent fewer listings. For single-family properties, settled sales were up 18.3 percent, contracts up 12.7 percent, and listings down 13.7 percent.

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Ocean City Today

4A NEWS

JANUARY 11, 2013

Town, fire co. officials call for investigation of Berlin crash response STEWART DOBSON ■ Editor/Ocean City Today SHEILA CHERRY ■ Associate Editor, Bayside Gazette (Jan. 11, 2013) Both the town of Berlin and the Berlin Fire Company have asked investigators from the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems to review the emergency response to a fatal accident on routes 818 and 50 that occurred Dec. 26. Specifically, the parties are asking why a Berlin police officer had to drive one of the three ambulances that responded to the call, when other emergency and firefighting personnel were on the scene. Both the town and the fire company have received confirmation that MIEMSS officials have received their requests and documentation. The accident claimed the life of Stephen Mumpower, 26, who was a passenger in a Toyota driven by Amberle Booker, 25, as the two were heading north on Route 818, the stretch of road that leads out of downtown Berlin and to Route 50. Booker pulled into the path of Christopher Keenan, 24, who was headed west in a Dodge, toward Salisbury, according to a witness at the scene. Although both parties calling for the investigation agree that Berlin Police Lt. Robert Fisher responded to a request to

Department, Lt. Robert Fisher, was required to drive the ambulance while members of the Berlin Fire Company stood around watching.” William’s letter, a copy of which was obtained by the Bayside Gazette, went on to suggest that the circumstances that put Fisher behind the wheel were related to animosity within the company between some of its members and an EMS who filed a workplace harassment complaint with the town in February 2012. After recounting the turmoil between the town and the fire company since then, Williams wrote, “All of this history is significant because the EMS provider who allegedly requested assistance at the fatal accident on December 26, 2012 was the same provider that made a report of workplace abuse to Town officials in February, 2012.” Fire company officials, however, vehemently deny that no assistance was given to the EMS, but did ask MEIMSS Region IV Administrator John Barto in Easton, Md., to find out why Fisher drove the ambulance as two responders in the back administered care to the crash victim. Asked to comment, Fitzgerald bristled at the allegations and said, “We have heard the same wild allegations and that was why we asked for the independent review of the accident.” A witness to the events said when the EMS arrived with an ambulance – two

drive an ambulance to Atlantic General Hospital, they disagree on what transpired at the scene and the events leading to Fisher being pressed into service. While Berlin Fire Chief Marc Brown said having a police officer driving an ambulance from an accident scene was not a normal occurrence, under the conditions on the day of the accident it was not unusual at all for the responder to make the request to an officer they know on a day-to-day basis. Fire Company President David Fitzgerald added that the training required for a police officer at Fisher’s rank would make him qualified to drive an emergency vehicle. Brown commended Fisher for going “above and beyond” by driving Mumpower from the scene to the Berlin hospital. But, in a letter to the state Emergency Medical Services medical director, Dr. Richard Alcorta, Mayor Gee Williams, with the support of the Town Council, said, “It is alleged that several emergency responders of the Berlin Fire Company failed to assist, after repeated requests by a career Berlin EMS staff member who was providing emergency care to an accident victim. “The request was to ask a fellow member of the fire company to drive the ambulance to the hospital,” the letter reads. “It is alleged that as a result of that failure to assist, a member of the Berlin Police

others were on the scene and took the two other crash victims to Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury — as emergency medical personnel were working to extricate Mumpower from Booker’s vehicle. Once that was done, the witness said, the victim was placed on a stretcher, the EMS began providing care and asked for assistance and a driver. Two other personnel helped EMS with the stretcher, the witness said, and one got into the ambulance to continue offering aid. Although the EMS asked several times for a driver, the witness said, no one responded, until Fisher was approached and agreed to drive. For his part, Fisher, who was there doing accident reconstruction, did not want to be drawn into the discussion over the circumstances of the accident. “I was just trying to do a good deed,” he said. Various witnesses put the number of rescue people on the scene at between 18 and 23. However, Brown said he had collected 20 to 22 statements from providers who were at the scene, either officially or because they heard the accident call. According to Brown, when the 911 call came in, it was dispatched as a motor vehicle accident and then almost immediately reported as an accident involving several vehicles “with entrapment,” meaning one or more victims were unable See WHY COP on Page 5A

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013

NEWS 5A

Leaner OC Experience promo Why cop drove ambulance is a concern gets reluctant council approval Continued from Page 4A

ZACK HOOPES ■ Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2013) With the potential debut of Ocean City’s travel and trade show exhibit only weeks away, the City Council moved this week to approve an even more scaled-back version of the OC Experience, the Sparks Productions project that caused a row last month after city officials suggested killing it and adapting aspects of Sparks’ idea to its own promotion. “We looked at how we could refine it, reduce the costs, and — my biggest concern — bring the project in under budget,” said city Tourism Director Donna Abbott this week. The three local events that the booth was to appear at have been eliminated, although Spark had previously agreed to do them free of charge. Instead, the outof-town show schedule, previously cut to three venues, will again see four events. The first will be in Philadelphia on Jan. 26 and 27, with shows in Baltimore, Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio scheduled in February and March. Further, costs have been reduced to less than $70,000. This covers Hoffman’s services and the physical construction of the booth, which the city will own.

“I think David [Recor, the City Manager], Donna, and Brad [Hoffman, Spark President] have worked together to modify this proposal … to come up with the best package possible,” said Mayor Rick Meehan. The project was pitched nearly two years ago, when Hoffman proposed a tractor-trailer that would travel to tourism conventions and trade shows around the county to promote the resort. The original price tag was upwards of a quarter of a million dollars, and the project remained bogged down for many months A second proposal in February 2012 by Hoffman offered an elaborate trade show booth, sans vehicle, with extensive photo and video features, at a reduced price tag of roughly $180,000. The council instructed Hoffman to work with the city’s Tourism Department, the Tourism Advisory Board, and the resort’s advertising agency, MGH, to complete the final design. The subsequent recommendation, presented in March, suggested that the city could halve the size of its booth and still make a splash at most shows where its competitors — such as Virginia Beach and Atlantic City — also had a presence.

to leave the vehicle. If confirmed, he said, “entrapment tells you that you will need to use more tools, more equipment, and more personnel.” The first ambulance came from the Berlin Fire Company fully staffed with two responders, Brown said. The second ambulance also came from Berlin, but with one responder, a paramedic, he said, and the third came from Ocean Pines fully staffed with two responders. Fitzgerald pointed out that the number of responders that a volunteer fire company can send to an accident scene depends on how many volunteers are available at the time. Adding to the challenges that the responders were facing that day was

the weather. Fitzgerald said that the accident occurred during a torrential nor’easter. How many of the responders at the scene were qualified to drive the ambulance and what left the EMS without a driver from within the ranks of rescue personnel are what the company and the town are asking MEIMSS to find out. Information obtained by state officials would likely be forwarded to the MIEMSS Incident Review Committee to determine if any action is warranted. According to the MEIMSS Web site, the committee consists of the MIEMSS chief of compliance, the state EMS medical director, and one of the agency’s assistant attorneys general.

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6A NEWS

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Prayer breakfast speaker goes unannounced after ’12 controversy This year’s speaker could also present divisive topic ZACK HOOPES ■ Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2013) Besides bacon, eggs, and good fellowship, prospective attendees at this year’s OC Mayor’s Prayer Breakfast can add another attraction to their list – mystery. As a result of last year’s controversial choice, the name of the guest speaker for this year’s event – set for Thursday, Jan. 17 – will not be released beforehand. “I’m not giving names out anymore,” said event director Bruce Spangler. “After what happened last year, it’s just not worth it.” Briefly before the January 2012 event, Spangler announced that retired Lt. Gen. William “Jerry” Boykin would be the breakfast’s keynote speaker. But despite his popularity as a decorated military commander and ordained minister – he was billed as such by Spangler – Boykin also previously expressed a number of anti-Muslim and far-right political views that caused a storm of objection from both inside and outside the resort community. However, Spangler was confident that attendance, which is typically near 400, would still be high this year. Despite the

public not knowing who was speaking, the event has a long history of success. “This is our 23rd year putting on a good event,” Spangler said. “It’s not going to make a difference [if the speaker is billed or not].” Spangler said he had looked into a number of speakers, many of whom had stories of redemption to tell with regards to their checkered pasts. As with Boykin, Spangler said he feared public backlash at speakers’ previous positions, which he said would detract from the less divisive topics on which they had been asked to speak at the Ocean City event. “The Lord can forgive anybody. That’s the whole point,” Spangler said. In 1993, Boykin became popular for leading elite Delta Force commando units during the ultimately failed and bloody attempt to capture Somali warlord Osman Atto in Mogadishu, as depicted in the film “Black Hawk Down.” But as his position in the spotlight brightened, Boykin began to become a central figure and advocate for a number of far-right causes. After the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, but before his 2007 retirement, Boykin gave a number of interviews and opinions that framed the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan in Biblical terms. In 2003, he went so far as to explain his motivation in the fight against Atto, who is still currently operating in Soma-

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lia and is active in its transitional government, by stating “I knew that my God was a real God and his was an idol.” The comments earned him a rebuke from then-President George W. Bush, and a censure from the Pentagon, which found that he had consistently failed to portray his views as his own and not official military analysis. In 2010, he co-authored a report for the neoconservative Center for Security Policy that alleges “most mosques in the United States already have been radicalized,” and that “most Muslim social organizations are fronts for violent jihadists.” The Pentagon and State Department again publicly chastised Boykin. This past July, after his appearance in Ocean City, Boykin was named the executive vice president of the Family Research Council, an organization that opposes rights for homosexuals and was classified in 2010 by the Southern Poverty Law Center, and by extension the Federal Bureau of Investigation, as an anti-gay hate group. However, a speaker who operates under assumptions viewed by many as dubious may again be in the offing for the prayer breakfast. Although this year’s guest will remain unnamed until the event, Spangler has released a synopsis of the session, which discusses the Biblical ramifications of

American-Israeli relations. Specifically, Spangler’s preview links natural disasters and social upheaval to a lack of support for Israeli land rights, using the example – often cited by Zionist supporters in America – of the 1991 “perfect storm” striking President George H.W. Bush’s Maine home briefly after he supported Israeli concessions in the Madrid land-for-peace agreements. “You’ll find out that this isn’t just coincidence. It’s unbelievable,” Spangler said. “The Bible is predicting everything we’re going through.” “He has it documented,” Spangler said of this year’s speaker. “You can make your own determinations, but when you start seeing all these things come to pass, it’s more than just a coincidence.” The breakfast will be held at the Clarion on 101st Street. This year’s event will follow the same general format as in the past, with a buffet breakfast served beginning at 7 a.m. Mayor Rick Meehan will deliver a welcome message, followed by scripture readings and songs. The featured speaker will be last, ending at 9:15. Tickets cost $16, and will not be sold at the door. Spangler asked that those who wish to attend notify him by Monday, Jan 14, either by e-mailing him at ocmayorsprayerbreakfast@comcast.net, or by calling at 443-235-2669.

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013

NEWS 7A

OC Experience will make debut in Philadelphia late this month Continued from Page 5A

A final price tag of $85,000 for Spark to create the booth and staff it at four national-level shows was unanimously approved. Hoffman also offered to staff the booth at four additional, local shows at no extra cost. But at the Dec. 17 meeting of the mayor and City Council, the city’s stance changed significantly from the overt enthusiasm displayed in March. Tourism Director Donna Abbott suggested that the city take on only two shows and use the pre-existing Rodney the Lifeguard marketing materials developed by MGH instead of Hoffman’s project. As was revealed at the meeting, there appeared to be much confusion over who was responsible for developing a formal memorandum of understanding between the city and Spark, and who exactly had the right to modify the show schedule. Hoffman’s final proposal actually gave an $83,000 price tag for three shows, but it was Abbott who had cut the schedule. The idea that the MOU was a conditional factor for the project only came up through “the fact that I was called back in here to give an update and was blindsided by another option,” Hoffman said at the meeting. “This was Spark Productions intellectual property,” he added. “I moved this idea forward with the mayor and council

and the Tourism Department. I scaled it down to the price that they wanted. It was designed to go to the travel shows I articulated. Donna Abbott did not study those shows. I studied those shows.” “I feel it’s very disingenuous in many ways and on many levels, when that was not the intent of council [to support the project],” Hoffman said last month. Although a motion was made and seconded to go with Abbott’s alternative, the council ultimately decided to table the issue and have Abbott and Recor meet with Hoffman as soon as possible to work on an MOU that would provide parameters satisfactory to all. Last week, Hoffman reported that such an agreement had been reached. Despite the reconciliation, Meehan, who was not at the December meeting that caused the initial uproar, said the

A 3.07:0/ 37

video of the session was “painful to watch.” “Unfortunately, this was an item that was passed onto this council by a previous council,” he said. Limited buy-in had been achieved from staff and other stakeholders, leading to confusion, and Meehan said he felt that city staff and local associations may have been “better equipped” for the trade show task. He also objected to the idea that the city was planning to unjustly benefit from Spark’s work, particularly with regards to Hoffman’s assertion that he had worked to direct Abbott to the trade shows she had scouted and booked for the project. “I don’t think that was proprietary,” Meehan said. “I was the one that asked her [Abbott] to attend the Washington trade show. Brad had never given any indication via his research that he had at-

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tended shows in recent years … I’m not really sure they fell into his expertise.” Nevertheless, Meehan said he appreciated that Hoffman had subsequently worked to “modify your idea to fit the concept,” and suggested that council “follow through with a commitment … made in their previous vote.” Council Secretary Mary Knight told Hoffman, though while she still had reservations about the efficacy of trade shows in general, relative to Internet solicitation, “never did I doubt your professionalism.” “A lot of people don’t trust what they hear from strangers, but they do what they hear from friends,” said Councilwoman Margaret Pillas. “You [Hoffman] are a friend of Ocean City and I know that you’ll come across that way [at the shows].”

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Ocean City Today

8A NEWS

JANUARY 11, 2013

Efficiency, transparency, political influence have kept commission issue in limbo had already been distilled and formulated into a recommended solution. The adoption of commission polices was thus somewhat of a foregone conclusion for the other four members who lacked the information to judge otherwise. “Four people are sitting here hearing from the minority [about what the whole body should do],” said Pillas. The counter-argument, however, is that the commissions streamline the process by allowing information to be digested before the full meeting, so that suggestions and ideas are ready by the time a decision is debated in full session. For instance, Mitrecic said, a report from the Parks and Recreation Department could’ve been heard in commission, so that the department could have come to the full council session and kept it abreast of any potential problems and

full council for a decision. All reports are now presented in open session, before the entire body. Despite the removal of the dominant faction in the 2012 election, when Hall and Hall lost and Dare and Mitrecic earned seats on the dais, the remaining members appear to have not changed their stance on the commission issue, despite now being a small minority. “People don’t hear the discussion when it’s in the commission meetings,” Pillas said. “The function of the commissions was always here. That was never dissolved. It’s just that the viewing audience and taxpayers got to sit in on the meeting.” When the decision was made in 2010, the rationale for the move was that the three-person commissions were presenting information to the full council that

Continued from Page 1A

the possibility of reinstating one or all of them.” Fittingly, the problem Mitrecic was seeking to remedy was one caused by the loss of his 2010 re-election bid to Councilman Brent Ashley. Mitrecic’s ouster allowed Ashley — along with Joe Hall, Margaret Pillas, and Jim Hall — to create a four-member voting block that bucked the previous administrative norms. The oft-called “new majority” developed a relationship of mutual antagonism with Dennis Dare, then city manager, and Mayor Rick Meehan. In November 2010, the victors’ first act was to dissolve the city’s commission system, whereby separate sub-committees of three council members hear reports from city staff or interested parties and present the information back to the

armed with only the relevant information. “If we still had the Recreation and Parks Commission, they could’ve passed on the report through the commission … and expressed our concern over the surf beach schedule,” Mitrecic said. “The staff still has to go to the commission and put their time in whether it’s a three-person council commission or a seven-person council commission,” Pillas replied. “If the time is going to be spent anyway, why not spend it on television in front of the community?” The rest of council decided to save its breath, however, for a scheduled discussion at a later date, voting unanimously to add it to the next agenda. “I wasn’t going to debate it tonight – I think that’s what the discussion is for,” Meehan said.

Lin caught buying counterfeit jewelry Continued from Page 1A

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Lin owned and operated Hot Topik at 410 S. Atlantic Ave. and Everything $5.99 and Up at 806 S. Atlantic Ave. He also operated stores in Delaware. According to the press release issued by the U.S. Attorney’s Office, Lin admitted that from at least June 2010 through September 2011, he sold or tried to sell counterfeit merchandise, including purses, shirts, jewelry, perfume, hats and shoes that bore trademarks such as Michael Kors, Coach, Gucci, Louis Vuitton and Chanel. During the summer of 2011, undercover investigators saw large quantities of counterfeit merchandise in Lin’s stores on the Boardwalk and they purchased several counterfeit items, including a counterfeit Coach purse. On Aug. 17, 2011, federal search warrants were executed at both of Lin’s stores in Ocean City and approximately 8,000 counterfeit items were seized. Two days later, an investigator again saw counterfeit merchandise for sale at Everything $5.99 and Up. Some of that merchandise was the same type as items seized earlier. On Sept. 1, an investigator purchased a counterfeit Coach purse at the store. On Jan. 30, 2012, Lin was stopped when he tried to re-enter the United States from Canada. Although he declared that he only bought liquor at a duty fee shop in Canada, investigators searching his vehicle found approximately 869 pieces of counterfeit jewelry bearing trademarks such as Chanel. The U.S. Attorney’s Office said that manufacturers whose goods were counterfeited estimated that the lost retail value of the goods seized and sold was between $200,000 and $400,000. The estimated retail value of the counterfeit merchandise, based on prices in Lin’s stores, was $153,585.


Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013

NEWS 9A

Vaccinations urged as flu cases on rise statewide NANCY POWELL ■ Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2012) Many people in the area are getting that achy, feverish feeling, sore throat and fever that come with the flu. As of Wednesday, 50 people had tested positive for the flu in the emergency room at Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin and 22 people had tested positive at its 12 offices. “We saw double that amount of people in the emergency room with symptoms, but who did not test positive,” said Toni Keiser, vice president of public relations for the hospital. Five of those patients were admitted to the hospital. The flu outbreak this season started earlier and is affecting more people, Keiser said. Last season, nine people tested positive for the flu at the hospital or any of its offices. The first case was in February and the final case was in midApril. The first case this season was a person who tested positive on Nov. 20. To help prevent the flu, Atlantic General Hospital’s staff administered 5,214 free flu shots this season. Although the flu is spreading, it is not too late to be vaccinated. Flu vaccine is still available at many locations, including the Worcester County Health Department, said Debra Stevens, community health director of the Worcester County Health Department, on Tuesday. Anyone who wants a flu vaccine may call the health department in Snow Hill at 410-632-1100, in Berlin at 410-6290164 or Pocomoke at 410-957-2005 for an appointment. “It is important to note that the CDC [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention] has stated the vaccine strain is a good match for what is circulating this year,” Stevens said. “Get vaccinated, continue to do diligent hand washing and stay home when you are sick!”

FLU SYMPTOMS/TREATMENT: According to the American College of Emergency Physicians, the typical symptoms of flu include fever, sore throat, runny nose and upper respiratory symptoms, headache, fatigue and muscle or body aches. To recover quickly, physicians recommend drinking plenty of liquids, getting rest and, if diagnosed early, taking antiviral medication.

In a press release issued Wednesday by the American College of Emergency Physicians, the message was the same. “Call in sick!” stated the press release, which added that staying away from others is one of the best ways to help prevent the spread of the disease. If people who are sick do not stay home, they put themselves at greater risk of worsening their health condition, such as developing pneumonia. The press release also said emergency room physicians nationwide were “seeing significantly higher numbers of patients with flu symptoms compared to this time last year.” There are no specific numbers for flu cases in Worcester County because the flu is not a case-specific reportable disease. Although doctors diagnose the flu, the state does not require them to report case by case, Stevens said. “However, the state does track several indicators of flu activity including sentinel providers, doctors who do report any visits of persons with influenza-like illnesses even if [they are] not tested for flu, emergency room visits, etc.,” Stevens said. The state level information Stevens was talking about is available in a weekly report online at http://ideha.dhmh. maryland.gov/influenza/fluwatch/SiteP ages/Home.aspx. “Indicators in the state are going up, meaning that flu activity is continuing to increase, activity started earlier than last year and is at higher levels than last year’s reports at this time,” Stevens said.

Adults should seek emergency care if they experience any of the following symptoms: z Difficulty breathing z Pain/pressure in the chest or abdomen z Sudden dizziness z Confusion z Severe or persistent vomiting z Flu-like symptoms that improve, but then return with fever/increased cough Specifically for children: z Fast breathing or troubled breathing z Bluish skin color z Not drinking enough fluids z Not waking up or not interacting z Being so irritable that the child does not want to be held z Flu-like symptoms that improve, but then return with fever/increased cough z Fever with a rash In addition to all of the symptoms above, an infant who has any of the following signs should be taken to get emergency care. z Irritability or being inconsolable z Inability to eat or drink z Trouble breathing z No tears when crying z Significantly fewer wet diapers than what is normal z Persistent fevers

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10A NEWS

Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013

Health officials ask residents to report all flu cases online Continued from Page 9A

MAKING ROOM

OCEAN CITY TODAY/ZACK HOOPES

Demolition is under way at the properties owned by Fat Daddy’s restaurant, between Dorchester and Talbot streets on Baltimore Avenue. With much of the buildings having been condemned and unusable for some time, Fat Daddy’s owners Ed and Lisa Braude have been able to secure funding for a new, mixed-use project on the site, which will feature an expanded restaurant as well as retail space and housing.

A new online version of the Maryland Resident Influenza Tracking Survey, a system designed to measure influenzalike illness in the state based on illness directly reported by residents each week, may be found online at flusurvey. dhmh.md.gov. Although most influenza surveillance systems rely heavily on information from health care providers, Maryland’s new online system allows people who might not see a doctor or other healthcare professional to provide information to estimate incidences of the illness. According to the CDC, influenza activity is increasing in the United States and most of the country is experiencing high levels of influenza-like illness. The CDC states that current levels of influenza-like illness are nearing what were peak levels of influenza-like illness during moderately severe seasons in past years. CDC data shows that Region 3, which includes Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia and the District of Columbia, had 1,688 cases of A (H3) flu since Sept. 30, 2012, through Dec. 29, 2012. Nationwide in that time period, there were 10,612 cases of that flu and an additional 5,621 cases of type A flu that were not sub-typed. Like the Worcester County Health Department, the CDC continues to recommend flu vaccinations for people who have not yet had a flu shot this season.

Nonprofit session set for Thursday (Jan. 11, 2013) The Community Foundation, with Wor-Wic Community College and the Maryland Association of Nonprofit Organizations, will present the seventh annual Nonprofit Resource Day on Thursday, Jan. 17, at the Community Foundation Nonprofit Support Center. Cost is $30 for the event, 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., and lunch is included. The program will feature Dr. Tracey Durant, director of professional development for Maryland Nonprofits. She will present the Maryland Nonprofits’ Board Excellence workshop. Continuing education credits will be provided by Wor-Wic through the Maryland Higher Education Commission. Nonprofit executives and board members are encouraged to attend. The program will highlight important aspects of board governance, including legal and social accountability of the board of directors, the roles and responsibilities of board members, trustees and staff, the board’s role as an employer and its relationship to staff and effective board development. Call 410-742-9911 or visit www.cfes.org/events for information.


Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013

NEWS 11A

State panel gives green light to offshore wind farm land survey ALEXANDER PYLES ■ The Daily Record Newswire (Jan. 11, 2013) Maryland energy officials have checked another item off a long list of tasks the state must complete before it can produce power through offshore wind turbines. The Board of Public Works on Wednesday unanimously approved a contract that will allow the state to survey the ocean floor 10 miles off the coast of Ocean City. Florida-based Coastal Planning & Engineering Inc. will “conduct a highresolution geophysical survey” of the area designated by the U.S. Department of the Interior as the location where energy-producing wind turbines could be built, according to the state spending panel’s agenda. The $3.3 million award authorizes Coastal Planning & Engineering to conduct the survey and provide the state with data that can turn over to a future developer. The data will help that developer speed construction and operation of the wind farm, said Abigail R. Hopper, acting director of the Maryland Energy Administration. Before ultimately voting to approve the contract along with Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown and Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp, Comptroller Peter Franchot showed some concern that the state was picking up a tab that should rightfully belong to a future developer. “Why do we feel compelled to subsidize [their development]?” Franchot asked. Hopper said companies might be reluctant to apply to develop an offshore wind farm without some investment by the state. She added that nine companies have told federal regulators they are interested in developing such a farm in Maryland waters. An application should be ready for distribution in the first quarter of 2013, and the land could be leased this summer, Hopper said. The federal Bureau of Ocean En-

ergy Management in November announced that an area off the coast of Virginia and a shared area off the coast of Massachusetts and Rhode Island were ready to be leased for development. Hopper said Wednesday that Maryland would not be far behind. Legislation pushed by Gov. Martin O’Malley last year that would have guaranteed wind energy developers a market while limiting the cost of wind energy production to consumers passed in the House of Delegates, but did not come to a vote in the Senate Finance Committee. O’Malley intends to introduce a similar bill in the General Assembly session that begins next week. Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr., D-Calvert and Prince George’s, appears committed to getting offshore wind legislation to the floor of his chamber in 2013. The longtime presiding officer has said he could shuffle the lineup of the Finance Committee in order to find the votes necessary to bring the legislation up for debate in the full Senate. “I am going to try and move the wind bill this year,” Miller said in an interview Wednesday. While the state works to establish its own regulatory framework, federal inaction had threatened to derail offshore wind energy production until late New Year’s Day, when Congress included an extension of tax credits for wind energy production and investment in its fiscal cliff agreement that also prevented broad federal tax increases and spending cuts. If an offshore wind farm is built off Ocean City, it would constitute a “very small percentage of Maryland’s energy mix,” Hopper said. The state’s Renewable Portfolio Standard, pushed by O’Malley, requires 20 percent of Maryland power to come from renewable resources by 2022. How much of that would come from offshore wind depends largely on the legislature.

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Ocean City Today

12A NEWS

JANUARY 11, 2013

Morris sentenced to five years for thefts in Bishopville, Snow Hill NANCY POWELL ■ Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2013) The 36-year-old woman who was found guilty of thefts in Bishopville and Snow Hill was sentenced last Friday to five years in prison. Jennifer Lee Morris, of no fixed address, was arrested in March 2012 for crimes she committed in November and December 2011 and in February 2012. Morris broke into a home in Bishopville on Nov. 18, 2011, and stole an Xbox 360, a notebook computer, an electric guitar, a digital camera, an MP3 player and a cello.

On Dec. 6, 2011, she broke into a home in Snow Hill and stole a handgun, $100 in cash, baseball cards, jewelry and an engraved wooden box with ashes of the homeowner’s pet. On Feb. 1, Morris broke into another home in Snow Hill by smashing the glass on the front door with a concrete block. Inside, Morris stole a computer, a 42inch television and other items. She is believed to have been with an accomplice during the crimes. Investigators were able to find Morris and her alleged accomplice after a 9-yearold boy in Tennessee looked on YouTube to learn how to find his stolen iPad. Using

an app called “Find my iPhone,” which uses GPS technology, the boy located his stolen iPad and his father notified police. The alleged accomplice, John Docherty, was arrested less than an hour later. Morris fled, but was apprehended later in New Jersey. Docherty was held in jail in Tennessee on $600,000 bond. He was also wanted for crimes in Florida and there is a warrant for his arrest for the Worcester County crimes. In Circuit Court in Snow Hill in October, Morris entered Alford pleas to three counts of theft from $1,000 to $10,000. Technically regarded as a guilty plea, an

Alford plea is used when a defendant does not admit guilt, but acknowledges that the prosecution has sufficient evidence for a conviction. In exchange for her pleas, the state did not prosecute three counts of first-degree burglary plus third- and fourth-degree burglary charges. After hearing the facts of the case, Judge Thomas C. Groton found her guilty of the theft charges. Last week, he sentenced her to five years in prison on each charge. The sentences will run concurrently. Groton recommended that restitution of $6,142.41 be part of her parole after leaving prison.

Man accused of intentionally hitting couple with car in Berlin NANCY POWELL ■ Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2013) A 20-year-old Bridgeville, Del., man was arrested Saturday after he allegedly struck a man and a woman with his truck on purpose after leaving a party at the Masonic Lodge in Berlin. Deputies of the Worcester County Sheriff’s Office went to the Masonic Lodge on Trappe Road after receiving a report that pedestrians had been struck at about 10:50 p.m.

The description of the vehicle, a silver Toyota Tacoma, was broadcast and officers with the Maryland Natural Resources Police stopped the truck a short time later on Trappe Road. A person who had witnessed the collision was taken to the scene of the traffic stop where they identified the truck and one of its passengers, Cedrick Lamar Fooks, as being the driver at the time the truck struck the pedestrians. According to the Worcester County Bureau of Investigation, the witness told police that Fooks intentionally swerved

the truck into the victims. Those victims, who had non-life threatening injuries, were taken to Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury to be treated. Deputies charged Fooks with two counts each of first- and second-degree assault. They also charged him with various traffic offenses, including driving without a license, reckless driving and failure to remain at the scene of an accident involving bodily injury. Fooks was taken to the Worcester County Sheriff’s Office in Snow Hill, where an investigator with the Worcester

County Bureau of Investigation interviewed him. The investigation revealed that Fooks and three companions went to Berlin to attend the party at the Masonic Lodge. At the lodge, Fooks allegedly got into a fight with a man. After that fight, Fooks got into the truck and started driving up and down the road until he saw the man with whom he had been fighting. According to the Worcester County Bureau of Investigation, Fooks aimed the truck at the man and struck him and his female companion.

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013

POLICE BRIEFS

Alleged assault An Ocean City woman who reportedly admitted hitting a man, but said it was in selfdefense, was charged Jan. 3, with second-degree assault. According to the charging document, Mary Susan Ruckman pushed and slapped the man. The document states the man had a red, raised swollen scratch under his left eye and a large raised circular lump on his neck.

Concealed knife An 18-year-old Selbyville, Del., woman was charged Jan. 5 with having a concealed dangerous weapon and possession of marijuana. An Ocean City police officer who had been doing paperwork while parked in the bus lane at about 11:45 a.m. pulled over the driver of a Kia Kio in the adjacent lane because she did not pull over into another lane as required by state law to provide increased safety to law enforcement personnel, firefighters and emergency service personnel. There was room for the driver to change lanes, the officer wrote in the charging document.

As he approached the Kia, the officer detected the odor of marijuana. He had the driver and passenger exit the vehicle and sit on the curb. Frisking the passenger, Chanel Ajee Handy, the officer found a utility knife in her right front pocket. Handy reportedly said she carried the knife with her all the time. Searching the car, the officer found a burnt marijuana cigarette on the seat where Handy had been sitting.

Biting alleged During a domestic argument shortly before 11 p.m. Jan. 3, a 42-year-old Ocean City woman allegedly hit a man in the head and bit him on his chest. Victoria Rose Desilver was charged with second-degree assault.

Alleged burglary Brian Daniel Sterner, 37, of no fixed address, was charged Jan. 1, with fourth-degree burglary. Ocean City police were called to a 14th Street address because Sterner was allegedly slumped over in his wheelchair outside. When police arrived, he was not outside, but they located him inside a unit using the resident’s computer. Sterner said he had worked for the man

Aliyah Hill pleads guilty; not sentenced in armed robbery NANCY POWELL ■ Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2013) Although Aliyah Jasmine Hill pleaded guilty in Circuit Court last Thursday to conspiracy to commit armed robbery, her public defender wants her to be sentenced in Juvenile Court. Hill, of Edwardsville, Pa., was just 17 when she and four others from Pennsylvania drove in a stolen car to Worcester County and stopped at the Raceway Citgo at the intersection of routes 50 and 589 to commit a robbery on Aug. 3, 2012. Hill remained in the car with the driver, Sarah Jean Gryskevicz, 19, and a young man. Two other young men, including Hill’s boyfriend, entered the business. Inside, her boyfriend demanded money and held a gun to the clerk’s head while the second man kept watch at the door. After getting their loot, the two returned to the car and Gryskevicz headed toward Ocean City. In the resort, she led police on a high-speed chase north on Coastal Highway. One young man jumped out at 100th Street before she crashed the car at 120th Street. Hill and one of the young men ran to the beach, where they tried to blend in with the beachgoers, but some of those beachgoers pointed her out to police, who arrested her. All five suspects were charged with conspiracy to commit armed robbery, conspiracy to commit robbery, robbery,

reckless endangerment, theft of less than $1,000, use of a firearm in the commission of a violent crime and two charges each of first- and second-degree assault. The three young men pleaded guilty to armed robbery and two, including Hill’s boyfriend, were sentenced to 20 years in prison, with 10 years suspended. The third young man was sentenced to 15 years, with all but four years suspended Gryskevicz also pleaded guilty to armed robbery and was sentenced to 10 years in prison, with all but three years suspended. In exchange for the guilty pleas, the Worcester County State’s Attorney’s Office did not prosecute other charges against the defendants. In Circuit Court on Dec. 6, Hill’s public defender, Thomas Adducci, asked for a reverse waiver for his client, who had been charged as an adult, but wanted to be tried as a juvenile because she was 17 at the time of the crime. Judge Richard Bloxom denied the request because Hill had lived with her boyfriend, without parental supervision, for at least one year before the crime. In court last Thursday, Adducci made a motion for Hill, who turned 18 on Dec. 10, to be sentenced in Juvenile Court although she had pleaded guilty in the adult court. Judge Bloxom did not rule on the motion that day. If Hill is sentenced in Juvenile Court, she could not be sentenced to a state penitentiary.

NEWS 13A

INVENTORY

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Ocean City police are investigating an apparent balcony fall last Thursday at the Golden Sands condominium. At about 9 a.m., police and paramedics went to the 109th Street condominium after a report that a person fell from the 22story building. On arrival, they found the body of a 63-year-old man. The body was taken to the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner of Maryland in Baltimore for an autopsy. Police did not release the man’s name.

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Ocean City Today

14A NEWS

JANUARY 11, 2013

Traffic stop results in major marijuana bust on Route 113 NANCY POWELL ■ Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2013) Failure to obey a Maryland traffic law led to a driver’s arrest and the discovery of more than 350 pounds of marijuana near Berlin last week. The amount of marijuana recovered was “the largest one to my knowledge on the Eastern Shore,” Lt. Earl Starner said during a press conDonald Gayle ference at the Berlin barrack of the Maryland State Police on Jan. 4. Donald P. Gayle, 54, of New Brunswick, N.J., was driving a Toyota Sienna van south on Route 113, north of Germantown Road at about 4:30 p.m. on Dec. 30. A state trooper was stopped in his unmarked patrol vehicle, and the emergency red and blue lights were activated. Gayle drove past the patrol car, but he did not move over into an available lane, which is a violation of the state’s “moveover law.” The trooper stopped Gayle for that violation south of Germantown Road. When he was talking to Gayle, the trooper observed a number of unspecified factors that indicated possible criminal activity. A Berlin Police Department offi-

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OCEAN CITY TODAY/NANCY POWELL

More than 350 pounds of packaged marijuana is displayed on a table at the Maryland State Police barrack in Berlin last Friday.

and charged with possession of marijuana with the intent to distribute, distributing a large amount of marijuana, possession of marijuana and importing marijuana into the state. Following Gayle’s arrest, police contacted ICE Homeland Security Investigations and an agent responded to assist. Worcester County State’s Attorney Beau Oglesby said during last Friday’s press conference that Gayle has a prior conviction involving drugs and because of

cer who was nearby stopped as a backup and the trooper called for a state police K9 team to respond. The dog gave a positive alert for the presence of drugs. Because of that alert, troopers searched the van and discovered five large nylon duffle bags, each containing three large cellophane-wrapped packages of suspected marijuana. The combined weight of the packages of marijuana was more than 350 pounds. Gayle was taken to the police barrack

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that the penalty of 25 years in prison could double. Oglesby also said the investigation is continuing. Investigators want to determine where the marijuana originated and where it was going. Eventually, the marijuana, which has a street value of nearly $400,000, will be destroyed, Starner said. The large drug bust made people safer, said Capt. Ronald Lewis, commander of the Eastern Troop of Maryland State Police. “People are safer today because of what happened in Maryland,” Lewis said. “This makes a major impact for our country.” Maryland’s move-over law requires drivers approaching from the rear of a stopped emergency vehicle with its lights activated to make a lane change, if possible, so it doesn’t pass immediately adjacent to the emergency vehicle. Drivers should move to another lane in the same direction only if the lane is available and the move can be made safely and without impeding other traffic. If moving to another lane is not possible, the driver should slow when passing the stopped emergency vehicle. The intent of the law, which went into effect Oct. 1, 2010, is to increase safety for law enforcement officers, firefighters and emergency rescue personnel working along the state’s roads.

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013

Resort man charged with six-burglaries at Montego Bay NANCY POWELL ■ Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2013) After a nine-month investigation into multiple burglaries in Montego Bay, Ocean City police on Jan. 3 charged a 20year-old resort man with the crimes. Alexander George Ellis allegedly committed the six burglaries in May 2012. In each case, the method of Alexander Ellis entry was the same — he or his accomplice threw a landscaping rock through a window. In one case, police found two DVDs and a water bottle next to a shrub near an air conditioning unit. The window above the unit had been broken. The resident said $10 in change and approximately 15 VHS movies, valued at about $309, were stolen. The cost to replace the window was $800. In another case, approximately $3 to $5 in change and $30 to $40 worth of costume jewelry was taken. At another residence, approximately $30 in change and costume jewelry valued at about $200 were taken. And at yet another residence, a woman’s watch and a Tupperware container full of house keys were taken. Keys and a plastic tote bag were stolen at another residence. Nothing appeared to have been taken at two residences, although someone had rummaged through some of the belongings. During the initial investigation, police developed information from evidence, including DNA on a water bottle and in blood collected at several crime scenes, and enlisted the assistance of the Montego Bay Neighborhood Watch Association. That information pointed to Ellis as the man responsible for a burglary involving the theft of the woman’s watch, which was found in Ellis’ bedroom when police served a search warrant at his residence. Ellis pleaded guilty Nov. 2 to thirddegree burglary in Circuit Court in Snow Hill and was sentenced to three years in prison, with all but six months suspended. During the past several months, police began to receive analysis of forensic evidence obtained at several of the crime sites. As a result of that evidence, combined with evidence obtained during the investigation, they charged Ellis with the six remaining burglaries. They also identified a second suspect, a boy, from Washington, D.C., who was Ellis’ accomplice during the commission of all seven of the crimes. The boy has been charged through the Department of Juvenile Services.

NEWS 15A

Residents may drop off trees through Jan. 20 (Jan. 11, 2013) The Solid Waste Division of Worcester County will accept undecorated Christmas trees through Jan. 20. County residents may deposit the trees at the Central Landfill in Newark and the Berlin, Pocomoke and Snow Hill Homeowners Convenience Centers at no cost. Businesses and organizations that sold trees will not be permitted to drop off trees at the convenience centers, but may take them to the Central Landfill where applicable tipping fees will be assessed. The trees will be ground into mulch for use as cover at the Central Landfill. For more information, contact Recycling Manager Ron Taylor at 410632-3177.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/NANCY POWELL

Discarded Christmas trees are left in the municipal parking lot at 100th Street on Wednesday.

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16A NEWS

Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013

Necessity,exhaustion push 138th Street substation forward ZACK HOOPES ■ Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2013) Despite offering a number of caveats to soften the blow – and admitting that mistakes had been made along the way – the City Council gave its unanimous approval Monday night to the controversial expansion of the 138th Street substation, with the final concession that, in the end, electricity has to come from somewhere. “Sometimes you have to do things for the good of the people that are not very popular with some other people,” said Councilman Joe Mitrecic before he moved to approve Delmarva Power and Light’s usage request. “All we can offer now is that we have to have electricity,” said Councilwoman Margaret Pillas. The council did, however, place some conditions on the final zoning approval that seemed to allay the fears of those living near the substation. Within 60 days of the activation of the substation’s new equipment, Delmarva Power will need to commission an accredited agency to conduct baseline noise and electromagnetic field (EMF) readings for all properties within 300 feet of the substation. From then on, readings must be taken and submitted to the city twice per year, once in January and once in July, to monitor the station’s effects.

The necessity of the reading requirement was largely the result of a long, arduous approval process for the expansion project, which saw considerable dissent from residents of the surrounding Caine Woods community who were concerned about adverse affects on both their property values and personal well-being. “I want something on record so that you have the assurance that your house is worth what you think it is, not [less] because it’s next to an EMF or sound field,” said Council Secretary Mary Knight. The city’s say in how the power company uses its land comes from the fact that utility distribution facilities are considered “conditional uses” in “R2a” residential zoning areas, the designation that applies to the neighborhood surrounding the station. Conditional uses are ones that are permitted in a given zone, but must be specifically approved by the city before they can be implemented, as they may have an undue impact on the intended function of the district. “What you have to find is that the burdens of this use are more severe at this particular location than would be at other locations that have the same zoning [in order for the use to be denied],” City Solicitor Guy Ayres previously advised council. The proposal regards the expansion

of the Delmarva Power substation, which encompasses the block between 137th and 138th Streets and Derrickson and Sinepuxent Avenues. Half the property has contained a substation since 1974, and since then Delmarva Power bought and demolished the four homes on the other half of the block to make way for an expansion of the station. Delmarva Power public affairs head Jim Smith previously explained that the expansion was needed to install a Static Var Compensator at the facility. “In layman’s terms, it’s a booster pump,” he said, noting that the city’s power comes entirely from plants far to the north and flows down through Delaware. Delmarva Power has no lines running across the bay bridge to the north or at the Chesapeake’s southern end at the bay bridge-tunnel between Virginia’s Eastern Shore and Virginia Beach. Because the transmission is so long and because Ocean City’s population fluctuates rapidly, the grid is often unable compensate quickly enough, resulting in voltage drops and spikes. The SVC would level this out, Smith said. After reviewing the project in early August, the city’s Planning and Zoning Commission recommended that the council approve it but a strong negative reaction from the community caused the council to send the project back to P&Z for additional information. On Dec. 11, P&Z recommended the project a second time. But much of the contention regarding the proposal arose not from the rationale of installing a needed piece of electrical equipment, but from the allegations that the company, and possibly the city, were not being forthright in the information they were presenting. The second round of P&Z hearings presented no new information, other than to debate the validity of details being presented as fact or, in some cases, as sheer belief. “So nobody really did or said anything different [during the second process]?” Pillas asked. “All of this was brought out the first time and it was brought out the second time. “It didn’t seem to please the people in the neighborhood the first time and I imagine it didn’t the second time either,” she said. That displeasure continued to be voiced this week, even after the council voted to grant final approval. The reality of noise and EMF levels again proved a sore point, particularly the testimony on the latter that had been given by Dr. William Bailey, an expert Delmarva Power had brought in to address the issue. “Dr. Bailey’s EMF levels [which he had submitted to P&Z as evidence] were calculations. They weren’t anywhere near what DP&L gave me at my actual house,” said Caine Woods resident Donna Moulton regarding the estimated impact of the equipment. “And they were already bumping up against the [maximum allowable] noise

levels. This was the fall; this was not July [when the cooling fans are active],” Moulton added. “We’re letting DP&L give us the readings. How do we know they’re correct, unless we have someone else check them?” asked resident Richard Hansen. The council continued to pledge that it would take action if noise or EMF levels exceeded what DP&L had guaranteed, but only to the limited satisfaction of residents. “Yes, you can go through the process, but in the meantime I’m listening to it,” Moulton said. “I don’t want to take them [DP&L] to court and wait.” The city can, theoretically, fine the company up to $1,000 per day for nose violations, according to Ayres. Caine Woods homeowner and former councilman Vince Gisriel continued to object that the city failed to advertise the public hearings for the issue for two successive weeks, in violation of its own policy. But this does not make the proceedings invalid under state statutes, according to Ayres. “The law in Maryland is very clear that technical violations will not invalidate the hearing as long as satisfactory notice is given to the public,” he said. Despite Gisriel’s insistence that, theoretically, some members of the public could have gone un-notified due to the gap in formal advertising, “Coming up with some hypothetical person who may or may not exist and who may or may not have heard about it [the hearing] doesn’t cut the mustard,” Ayres said. But the discussion did lend some validity to the complaint by residents that, by the time they knew about the company’s plans, the houses near the substation had already been demolished and the expansion was a foregone conclusion. According to city Zoning Administrator R. Blaine Smith, the city was aware of Delmarva Power’s designs in early 2011, when a hearing was first held to reintroduce conditional uses back into the R2a district. Utility uses were not listed in the city’s 1993 comprehensive zoning overhaul, because it was assumed that no major changes would need to be made to existing structures. However, when the company decided to install the SVC, it asked the city to put the conditional use clause back into the zoning. Although the change was a general one to the city code and affected all R2a areas, the specific necessity behind the hearing was not widely publicized, according to Smith. “We did not advertise it as a site-specific change … although we knew what site it pertained to,” he said. “Had we notified the neighborhood, specifically, in that R2a regulation change, it probably would’ve let them know what was going on.” Moulton said she would prefer to see more comprehensive notice given, “so that this doesn’t happen again.”


Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013

NEWS 17A

St. Louis project a new paradigm for city’s Public Works Dept. ZACK HOOPES ■ Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2013) Despite the effects of budgetary cutbacks – both short-term and long-term – the city’s long-awaited renovation of St. Louis Avenue, according to Public Works Director Hal Adkins, is “cranking full steam right now.” “We’re shooting to have it wrapped up by the first of May,” Adkins said. The current work is just the first phase of reconstruction, covering 10th to 17th Street. The portion of the avenue below 10th will be done after the 2013 summer season has passed. A renovation of St. Louis has been discussed by city officials for several years, although the initial plans for the work were considerably more grandiose than they are currently. With the goal of setting the avenue up to expand as a downtown residential neighborhood and commuter thoroughfare, City Engineer Terry McGean’s initial layout for the street featured underground cable to eliminate the use of telephone poles, as well as widened sidewalks and bicycle lanes, and a traffic circle at the First Street intersection to eliminate snarls caused by the dog-leg in the street. However, because of budgetary constraints, the project has been continually scaled down, something that McGean previously described as a “permanent

OCEAN CITY TODAY/ZACK HOOPES

St. Louis Avenue is currently closed between 13th and 15th streets, as the road bed is excavated and new water, sewer, drainage and electrical lines are installed.

compromise solution.” This past spring, the city issued a bond of $4.5 million to cover a minimum amount of upgrades. Key among those will be water and sewer mains, storm drains, and the installation of underground electrical conduit that could support enhanced street lights with buried cables. Originally included in the project, the lighting ele-

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ment was nixed by council last year over cost concerns, but may be added back into the project if grant money for the work can be procured by the Ocean City Development Corporation, the nonprofit that sponsors both public and private redevelopment efforts. Most importantly, the street will not only be repaved, but the road bed will be

dug up, backfilled, and leveled to prepare the avenue for several more decades of hard use. Although impossible to do completely piecemeal, Adkins said he was “trying to minimize the amount of closure, where possible” along the road. Despite heavy work in the 14th and 15th Street areas, Adkins said access to the Harbor Island and Teal Drive neighborhoods would not be cut off. Adkins had previously compared the St. Louis renovation to the 1989 reconstruction of Baltimore Avenue – in both cases, electrical conduit is installed in anticipation of future lighting improvements, an option that City Council chose for St. Louis on Adkins’ recommendation. But what is very different between the two projects is who, exactly is doing them. The construction and excavation of St. Louis is being done under contract by George & Lynch of Dover. But in 1989, the Baltimore work was done by the city’s Public Works Department itself. “I would, and I did all throughout the ’80s, ’90s, and early 2000s, tackle these projects myself,” Adkins said. His department previously featured a robust construction division, which, during the city’s boom years, rivaled the largest of private contractors. See SCALED-BACK on Page 20A

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Ocean City Today

OPINION www.oceancitytoday.net

PAGE 18A

JANUARY 11, 2013

Manager, not council rules over personnel Inserted in the course of a City Council discussion on Monday was a comment by Councilman Joe Mitrecic, who said, in essence, that the council should not involve itself in discussions of personnel promotions and similar employee matters. That was curious because, one, the City Council hasn’t had that authority ever since it switched to the council/city manager form of government some 30 years ago, and, two, the comment did not necessarily fit into the discussion taking place at the time. Under the city charter, all promotions, demotions, hirings and firings – with a couple of exceptions – come under the authority of the city manager. He, not the council, is empowered to make those decisions. Excluding its authority over specific positions, the city manager and the police chief being among them, the council’s personnel involvement is restricted. According to the city code, the “The City Manager is the chief administrative officer of the town. [He or she] hires, supervises and discharges all town employees, except department heads, subject to personnel regulations and other laws of the town and the state.” This was done, way back when, to prevent elected officials from meddling in operations and, perhaps, to keep their personal politics out of who is promoted and who isn’t. Apparently, however, that has not been the case and now council members, not just Mitrecic, are publicly backing away from that practice. Goodness knows promises were made during the fall election campaign, as they always are by everyone, and it’s not too big of a stretch to conclude that some attempts have been made to fulfill those promises. That kind of thing, however, isn’t helpful from a management perspective and more often than not it just gets people into more trouble than they bargained for.

Ocean City Today P.O. Box 3500, Ocean City, Md. 21843 Phone: 410-723-6397 / Fax: 410-723-6511.

MANAGING EDITOR ...................... Brandi Mellinger ASSISTANT EDITOR ............................ Lisa Capitelli STAFF WRITERS.......... Nancy Powell, Zack Hoopes ACCOUNT MANAGERS ...................... Mary Cooper, ...................................... Sandy Abbott, Julie Schmidt CLASSIFIEDS/LEGALS MANAGER .... Terry Burrier SENIOR DESIGNER .............................. Susan Parks GRAPHIC ARTISTS ...... Corey Gilmore, Kelly Brown PUBLISHER .................................... Stewart Dobson ASSISTANT PUBLISHER ...................... Elaine Brady COMPTROLLER .............................. Christine Brown ADMIN. ASSISTANT .................................. Gini Tufts Ocean City Today is published weekly by FLAG Publications, Inc. at 8200 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, Md. 21842. Ocean City Today is available by subscription at $150 a year. Visit us on the Web at www.oceancitytoday.net.

READERS’ FORUM

Community thanked for support Editor, We want to express our appreciation to everyone who participated in and/or attended the American Legion Auxiliary, Unit 166 Luncheon Bingo held at the Post. We wish to thank everyone for their support and for the donations of cash and items to raffle. Thank you to our Bingo Committee — Bonnie Hansen, Kate Gray, Chris Hawkins and Tina Preziotti — for all of their planning and hard work to make this event a success. Thanks to all of our volunteers who devoted their time and talents in preparing the baskets that were raffled and for all of the generous donations for the door prizes. Also, we want to thank all of “the guys” for their help in the kitchen, on the bingo floor and with the clean-up. And finally, we want to express our appreciation and heartfelt thanks to the following businesses and sponsors that contributed to the event. Without their support, this event would not have been possible. They are Canvass Designs, Seacrets, Kendall Designs, Bank of Ocean City, Hooters of West Ocean City, Steve and Adele Deaver, Paul and Chris Hawkins, Woody Barnhart, Sunset Grille, Sarge and Rosie Garlitz, J.T. Novak LLC, 19th Hole restaurant, John P. Quinn, Summer Beach Condos, Maridel Motel, Kay Gubosh, The Shark on the Harbor, Bliss Salon, D.A. Kozma Ltd., Racetrack Auto, Dumser’s, Higgin’s Crabhouse, Boardwalk Fries, The Green Turtle, Amer-

ican Legion Riders #166, Sons of the American Legion #166, and the American Legion bartenders from Post 166. The proceeds from this event will be used for the various local charities that our auxiliary supports. This event truly demonstrated what can be accomplished when the Ocean City business community and the “Legion family” come together to help those less fortunate. Tammy Matrey, president American Legion Auxiliary, Unit 166

Coastal Hospice grateful for honors Editor, As president of Coastal Hospice and Palliative care, I would like to thank the greater Ocean City community for honoring our organization as the Best Local Charity and recognizing our annual Blues on the Bay event as the Best Local Charity Event. This recognition came from the results of the Greatest Around Ocean City community-driven poll. The stated mission of this poll is to help promote awareness, commerce and tourism to Ocean City and surrounding areas. Greatest Around Ocean City asked the community to vote for whom they thought was the best in a variety of categories, including nonprofit groups and charity events. During the voting period, more than 180,000 votes were cast in all categories. Coastal Hospice has had the privilege of serving patients and their families

throughout Worcester County for more than 30 years. On behalf of a dedicated staff and corps of volunteers, I want to thank all those who voted to name Coastal Hospice as one of the best. It is a wonderful way to begin 2013. Alane Capen, president Coastal Hospice

Hair of the Dog race a success Editor, I would like to send an enthusiastic and heartfelt letter of thanks from the Quiet Resorts Charitable Foundation for the tremendous community support of the Hair of the Dog race. Early on New Year’s Day morning, more than 650 athletes and plus hundreds of spectators, party-goers and volunteers gathered on the Bethany Beach boardwalk for the Second Annual Hair of the Dog race. The 5k/10k run and walk is one of our fundraising events which help us to continue awarding scholarships to local students and grants to local organizations in our efforts to enhance the community for residents and visitors alike. I am delighted to report that thousands of dollars were raised for the people and programs the QRCF supports. Start to finish, the Hair of the Dog was a great time for a great cause. We received amazing support from the Town of Bethany Beach, you and our sponsors: 3rd Wave Brewing Company, Bethany Beach Books, Boyden Design, Continued on Page 19


Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013

OPINION 19A

READERS’ FORUM

By Stewart Dobson A story about the sentencing of a woman who stole a number of things from an area home, including a cello, proves that the expression is true, even among thieves: no matter what they take, there’s always room for cello. It does make one wonder, though, how someone would go about hocking a hot cello, although seldom has anyone ever described a cello, or cello music, as hot. It isn’t as if the possessor of such a stolen instrument can stand in the shadows along a city street, emerging only when a likely customer happens by and saying, as he swings open the flap of his coat to display his wares, “Psst, buddy, want to buy a cello? Then, too, how would anyone know what a cello customer looks like, since the word is they look like everyone else, which means no matter how alert you might be, you just never know when a cellist is sneaking up on you. On the other hand, one would have to be more than moderately stupid to abscond with a full-size cello, which is exactly 48.5 inches tall overall, and therefore difficult to stash under the seat of any normal getaway car and prone to discovery in a routine patdown “Soooo,” says Ofc. Murphy, “what’s that bulge under your jacket? You wouldn’t be carrying a concealed cello, now would you lad?” *** A recent opinion survey conducted by Public Policy Polling, a highly respected North Carolina outfit has been getting a great deal of air time and press about its poll that compared the popularity of Congress to any number of otherwise unfavorable things. It’s so bad, what with Congress having a 7 percent approval rating lately, that comparing the public’s favorable/unfavorable opinion of Congress to other aggravations has become something of a parlor game. For instance, the company’s poll shows that Congress is less popular than root canals, head lice, NFL replacement refs, and, yes, even colonoscopies. The difference between Congress and a colonoscopy, after all, is significant. With a colonoscopy you have trained experts sticking it to you.

Continued from Page 18 Coastal Point, Delaware Wave, DiFebo’s, Giant Food, Harris Teeter, Just Hooked, Law Offices of Scott & Shuman, P.A., Leslie Kopp, Loftus Wealth Strategies, Mango’s, Ocean View Vet, Rehoboth Beach Sports, Sedona, State Farm – Denise Beam, Tidewater Physical Therapy, Tidepool Toys and Games, Transformative Dynamics, and Yuppy Puppy. We also received tremendous support from local and visiting athletes, spectators, and volunteers. A true community-building event happened and we kicked off the 2013 with gusto. I would like to extend special thanks to Hair of the Dog chairs Eunice Carpitella, Faith Denault, Jackie Inman, and Michael Loftus, and committee members Ann Kangas, Marian Parrott, and Karen Taylor, and race director Rick Hundley. They contributed hundreds of hours organizing what all will agree was a successful and lucrative event. At the after-race party at Mango’s as a special feature, we presented CHEER’s Meals on Wheels program with a $25,000 contribution, the largest single gift in our all-volunteer organization’s 11year history. In all, we have awarded nearly $500,000 to date, and anticipate giving more soon. In fact, there is another opportunity to support the QRCF’s programs at BunnyPalooza! on March 30, the next run/walk in our series. More information can be found at www.Bunny paloozarun.com. Thanks again to all for the past and future support. K. William Scott, Esq., president Quiet Resorts Charitable Foundation

Citizens urged to write representatives Editor, Congress and President Obama have set the inheritance tax trigger at $5 million and indexed it to inflation. They also indexed the alternate minimum tax (AMT) to inflation.  This legislation limits some of the penalty to those that have achieved wealth that they subsequently pass it on to their heirs.  It also limits the penalty on those that are in the in process of achieving their wealth. Now that those inequities have been addressed and alleviated, it is time to eliminate the inequity our government has fostered upon the majority of retired Social Security recipients. In 1983 a retired individual with income over $25,000 or a retired couple with income over $32,000 was considered well off.  Consequently Congress amended the Social Security law to tax up to 80 percent of their Social Security benefits. The triggers, $25,000 and $32,000, include municipal bond interest that is usually not taxed and it also includes the Social Security benefit itself, which contains funds from wages that have already been taxed previously as earned income. Now in 2013, approximately 30 years after the enactment of the amendments, our government is still shamefully imposing the same $25,000 and $32,000 triggers and still taxing up to 80 percent of the Social Security benefits on retirees in those income brackets. Retirees today, in those income brackets, are far from being well off.  In fact that they are struggling to

pay their inflated healthcare premiums, inflated cost of gas for their cars and the inflated cost just to put food on the table. Any adjustments or amendments Congress makes to the current Social Security law should include fixing this inequity. At best the entire concept should be scraped, or at the very least, indexed to inflation. Please write to President Obama and your Congressional representatives and urge them to include a fix for this inequity within the framework of any of their current negotiations on our fiscal future. Norman Katz Ocean Pines

Hard work and planning appreciated Editor, As a member of the North Ocean City business community, I would like to thank the mayor and City Council as well as the Recreation and Parks staff for a job well done this holiday season. The Winterfest of Lights was wonderful and the addition of fireworks on New Year’s Eve made the evening very special for residents and visitors alike. The entire atmosphere around Northside Park was welcoming, entertaining and most of all, very friendly. This will keep people coming back for years to come. Thanks again for the hard work and excellent planning. Michael James, managing partner Carousel Hotel, Ocean City

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Ocean City Today

20A NEWS

JANUARY 11, 2013

McLaughlin out of taxi biz, has city support in beach franchises ZACK HOOPES ■ Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2012) The recent spate of activity in the city’s taxi medallion market continued this week, as embattled resort businessman Patrick McLaughlin sold all three of his fleet licenses, but said he has no plans to get out of any of his other interests on the island following his recent tax troubles. “I made a business decision to sell the medallions. I do not plan to divest any other business interests,” McLaughlin wrote in an e-mail this week. All three medallions sold for $5,000 each, with two going from McLaughlin to Coastal Cab and one going to Nite Club Taxi. The council approved the sale, and the city will receive a 25 percent transfer fee - $1,250 apiece, $3,750 in total – from the sale. The medallion system in the resort was introduced in early 2010, in what the council said was an attempt to control the proliferation of scantily regulated taxi operations on the island, while also raising revenue. Possessing a medallion gives one the right to operate a cab, but it also comes with both a financial cost and certain restrictions – most notably, cabbies being subjected to random drug testing. When first implemented, the city sold 170 medallions for $1,500 apiece, with

the expectation that medallion prices would rise as market demand grew, creating a steady revenue stream for the city while also limiting the number of cabs on the street. But prices have not been as predictable as the city hoped. In November, City Clerk Kelly Allmond described medallion prices as “all over the place,” with an almost irrelevant mean price of $2,800. The city’s fee also has a set minimum of $500, meaning that cabbies will essentially have to pay a higher tax rate if they sell their medallions for less than $2,000. Recently, the council had attempted to deny a low-priced sale and exercise its right to buy back the medallion but balked when seller Ruben Ortega explained that the intervention would compromise other business dealings he had with the medallion’s buyer. McLaughlin has had business troubles of his own. On Oct. 5, he was sentenced to 10 months in prison for failing to file tax returns and employment tax withholdings. McLaughlin operates 85 N Sunny, the resort’s largest beach equipment rental, which had won rights to 50 percent of the beach. He also owns two beach photo companies and, until recently, a taxi business. McLaughlin apparently dodged $20,000 in Social Security and Medicare

withholdings for 85 N Sunny. His total IRS tab for all four businesses, though, was $296,701.46. This has led several other owners of beach equipment rental operations to allege that McLaughlin’s dominance of the business is due to his tax evasion. The rights to rent umbrellas and chairs on the beach are auctioned off by the city. But McLaughlin said he was never convicted of outright fraud and has already rectified his financial obligations. “I was not charged with tax fraud,” he stated. “I pled guilty to two misdemeanor counts of failure to file tax returns. All returns have been filed and all tax has been paid. I am in current compliance with my federal and state tax obligations and I have worked and continue to work with qualified professionals to ensure that I remain in compliance going forward.” Subsequently, McLaughlin actually gained rights to additional sections of beach in this year’s franchise auction. The Dec. 5 bidding saw rights to 14 of the 18 north-end parcels up for grabs, with McLaughlin winning four of the plots and optioning another, which he already holds, for a second term of three years. According to City Clerk Kelly Allmond, the auctions results will come up for approval at the end of the month. She said she anticipated no reason for the city to reject McLaughlin’s bids. “I have kept the city advised of my sit-

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uation and I am very grateful that the city has supported my efforts to remain a viable and contributing member and employer of the Ocean City business community,” McLaughlin wrote. “I accept complete responsibility for my conduct, I accept the consequences of my actions, and I look forward to putting this matter behind me.”

Scaled-back project being performed by contractor, not city Continued from Page 17A

Conveniently, however, the city’s infrastructure growth lasted about as long as the men who physically did it. “When I came here, a lot of those guys in the construction division had already been here five or 10 years,” said Adkins, who has worked for the city for almost 30 years. “They all reached eligibility for retirement before I had. Incidentally, that coincided with the recession, so we had to make the decision of whether to replace them or to eliminate the positions and start using more outside contractors.” Ultimately, the city chose to let the construction division dwindle and began outsourcing the work. “We cut that department in half, basically,” Adkins said. Fortunately, he said, the recession has also made business-starved construction firms readily available at low cost. Retirement continues to be one of Adkins’ major hurdles. Thirty-nine percent of the wastewater and solid waste divisions will be eligible to retire in the next two years, he said. More than half of his management staff has put in more than 30 years with the city. “None of them are leading me to believe that they have any interest in leaving, at least immediately,” Adkins said. Regardless, the next several years will inevitably see a high amount of turnover in staff that manages the city’s core services.

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CALENDAR 10

SENIOR SLANT PAGE 3B

CROSSWORD 9

DINING GUIDE 11

ENTERTAINMENT 5

Lifestyle Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013

FOOD FOR THOUGHT By Deborah Lee Walker PAGE 4B

www.oceancitytoday.net

PAGE 1B

Greek Church will maintain beachblessing tradition Sat. LISA CAPITELLI n Assistant Editor (Jan. 11, 2013) St. George Greek Orthodox Church’s 14th annual Epiphany & Blessing of the Waters, an ancient Orthodox Christian tradition, will take place Saturday, Jan. 12. Services will begin at 8:30 a.m. at the church on 88th Street in Ocean City. The Divine Liturgy will be presided by Metropolitan Evangelos of New Jersey. His Eminence Metropolitan Evangelos is the metropolitan and spiritual leader of the Greek Orthodox Metropolis of New Jersey. The Metropolis is comprised of more than 50 parishes in New Jersey, the greater Philadelphia area, Delaware, Maryland and Virginia. The Blessing of the Waters will follow immediately after on the beach at 90th Street. It will start between noon and 1 p.m., according to event coordinator Mike Vasilikos, depending on when the services at the church end. The blessing was originally scheduled at the pier near the inlet in downtown Ocean City. Plans changed after the pier was damaged during Hurricane Sandy. The purpose of the Blessing the Waters (Agiasmos) is to remember Jesus Christ’s baptism in the Jordan River and the beginning of His public ministry. Two crosses will be tossed into the ocean. Boys will chase one, and girls will retrieve the other. The two youths who find the crosses will have a blessed year. The public is invited to attend the service and Blessing of the Waters. Approximately 100-150 people attend annually, Vasilikos said. For more information, call 410-524-0990.

Capt. Kevin Kirstein of the Ocean City Police Department, is swabbed with an antiseptic by phlebotomist Donna Macaron before donating blood during the 14th annual Beach Blanket Blood Drive last year at the Ocean City convention center. The town of Ocean City and the Coastal Association of Realtors sponsor the annual blood drive for the Blood Bank of Delmarva, a non-profit, community service program that provides blood for the 16 hospitals in Delaware and on Maryland’s Eastern Shore.

‘OC CARES’ Hundreds expected for annual Beach Blanket Blood Drive

LISA CAPITELLI n Assistant Editor (Jan. 11, 2013) It’s no secret the resort community is a generous one. Next week, the Blood Bank of Delmarva will demonstrate just that, when it presents its 2013 Beach Blanket Blood Drive, “OC Cares.” “We’ve had such great support in that area,” Christine Serio, external communications specialist for the Blood Bank of Delmarva said of the

Ocean City event, held annually at the convention center on 40th Street. “We appreciate how much they care about their community by donating blood.” Last year, nearly 600 people donated blood during the resort’s two-day event; organizers hope to attract at least 700 donors this year. “Obviously, the more the better,” she said. “In the last few years we’ve seen a little bit of a growth and we’re expect-

ing it to continue.” This will be the 15th year the Blood Bank has held the drive in Ocean City. The 2013 blood drive is scheduled for Tuesday, Jan. 15, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Wednesday, Jan. 16, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Those interested in donating blood may contact the Blood Bank to make an appointment, which is encouraged, by calling 1888-8BLOOD8 or online at www.delmarvablood.org. See BLOOD on Page 7B

n One in three people will need blood during their lifetime. n One pint of blood can save up to three lives. n More than 4.5 million patients need blood transfusions each year in the U.S. and Canada. n 43,000 pints: amount of donated blood used each day in the U.S. and Canada. n Someone needs blood every two seconds. n The No. 1 reason blood donors say they give is because they ‘want to help others.’ — www.americasblood.org


Ocean City Today

2B LIFESTYLE

JANUARY 11, 2013

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013

LIFESTYLE 3B

Residents, visitors rave about resort’s newest NYE attraction If I wrote about all the ills that befall local seniors, this column would be a bore. I’m making an exception with my friend of many years, Sarah Gray. Sarah, a “tea/sodatoter,” has an incredible sense of humor. Early on, I teased her about the fact that every retired cop in OC from the Washington area knew her. Sarah, who is the ultimate volunteer and well loved socializer around our town, was the victim of a very bad fall last week. As bearer of good news, I’m delighted to report that Sarah is home nursing her aching bones with her sense of humor intact. Whoops, I almost forgot Sarah worked in Washington’s main police headquarters for years before retiring to OC by the sea. Life on our shore is never a bore. Bingo ain’t my game, but I try not to miss the fundraisers, such as the upcoming bingo/luncheon on Feb. 6, at the St. Andrew Parish Center. Proceeds to benefit St Lukes/St. Andrew Parish. A delicious lunch will be served at 11:30

SENIOR SLANT

Kemps watch Northside Park fireworks from home IRISH KEMP ■ Contributing Writer (Jan. 11, 2013) As that old song goes, “What were you doing New Year’s, New Year’s Eve?” The Kemps finally followed through on their oft-repeated vow to stay home. After checking out all the activities at the festival of lights, we headed home, pulled up a couple of comfortable chairs to the sliding glass door and watched Northside Park’s dazzling display of fireworks at midnight. How cool is that? What a great way to welcome the New Year. Amazing this year how many folks opted to stay home. Why not? According to the polls, OC’s festival tops the list of favorite holiday exhibits nationwide. “Dis iz de’ place to be.” Maybe next year they’ll add a bodaciously humongous train and garden display. We have many locals, I’m sure many locals would help, the likes of Lux Luxenberger, the Murphys and Hares, and our local fire department guys.

PHOTOS COURTESY IRISH KEMP

The Fertig family of Kenneth Square, Pa., above, joined thousands of other visitors for the Winterfest of Lights at Northside Park. (Left) The Rev. Kennedy with his grandnephew and the little one’s mother, Dee.

See IT’S STILL on Page 7B

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Ocean City Today

4B LIFESTYLE

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Guess what, Lamb? You’re about to experience a new perspective on a situation you long regarded quite differently. What you learn could open more opportunities later. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) The Bold Bovine is tempted to charge into a new venture. But it might be best to take things one step at a time, so that you know just where you are at any given point. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) It’s a good time to go on that fun getaway you’ve been planning. You’ll return refreshed, ready and, yes, even eager to tackle the new challenge that awaits you. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) The Moon Child loves to fantasize about magical happenings in the early part of the week. But the sensible Crab gets down to serious business by week’s end. LEO (July 23 to August 22) What goes around comes around for those lucky Leos and Leonas whose acts of generosity could be repaid with opportunities to expand into new and exciting areas of interest. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Your concern about your job responsibilities is commendable. But you need to take some quiet time to share with someone who has really missed being with you. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Aspects favor getting out and meeting new people. And as a bonus, you might find that some of your newly made friends could offer important business contacts. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) You might take pride in wanting to do everything yourself. But now’s a good time to ask family members to help with a demanding personal situation. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Pay more attention to the possibilities in that workplace change. It could show the way to make that long-sought turn on your career path. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Your need to succeed might overwhelm obligations to your loved ones. Ease up on that workload and into some well-deserved time with family and friends. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Love rules for amorous Aquarians who can make good use of their ability to communicate feelings. Don’t be surprised if they’re reciprocated in kind. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Fishing for compliments? No doubt, you probably earned them. But it’s best to let others believe they were the ones who uncovered the treasure you really are. BORN THIS WEEK: Your good works flow from an open, generous heart. Nothing makes you happier than to see others happy as well.

Writer reminds readers: don’t judge book by cover FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Weightloss is challenging; keeping it off can be harder DEBORAH LEE WALKER ■ Contributing Writer (Jan. 11, 2013) The flow of fate is an isolated path in the eye of the beholder. The window of perception lifts the spirit to a venue of the unknown and only the progression of time will determine the next chapter in one’s life. I am heading west without prejudice in hopes of a second chance. Billowing clouds obscure the present and allow my mind to dance in a whimsical fashion. The azure stretch of horizon seems endless; maybe this is a premonition of my uncertainty. I am confined, but not helpless; arrival time is scheduled in three hours. Physicality is not a reflection of the inner soul and should not be a deciding factor in fellowship. Pinpointing actuality is not always feasible, but somewhere in the timeline of my existence, food became my favorite companion. Isolation is not a sign of loneliness; can it possibly be the opposite? Before I know it, I hear, “This is your captain speaking. We will be arriving at the gate in approximately eight minutes.

The weather in Tucson, Ariz., is sunny with an expected high of 98 degrees. Thank you for choosing Southwest Airlines. We know you have many options and we appreciate your business. Have a great day.” The thought of saying “goodbye” to my dearest friend is more than I can bear. Before I hop into a cab, I grab the largest Hershey’s chocolate bar with almonds. “Please, God, forgive me even though I know what I am indulging in is against my goal.” And just as I utter these words, I cannot help but question my intention of asking for forgiveness when I am willfully committing a no-no. Trust me, I did not dwell on my personal ethics very long. In fact, it only took a few seconds for me to forget about repenting for my transgressions. Creamy, luscious chocolate swirled in my mouth and I am totally oblivious to the rest of the world. The only thing that brings me back to reality is the distinct crunch of toasted almonds. Delectable sweets, comforting carbohydrates and fine wines are about to vanish from my table. Oh well, c’est la vie and welcome the world of diets. Remnants of indulgence are completely nullified and I am greeted by the gracious, professional staff at Canyon

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AN OCEAN CITY TRADITION

HOROSCOPE

JANUARY 11, 2013

Ranch. This luxurious spa is known for its award-winning service and facilities. Six weeks flew by and my experience was more than I ever dreamed possible. Pampering was highlighted with a daily message. Aerobic classes eventually occupied five hours of my daily schedule. A size 24 was shredded down to a size 10. I arrived with four suitcases and left with five — skin products, clothes and mementos concluded this healthy getaway. Unfortunately, my time at Canyon Ranch has come to an end and I must head back to the airport. My driver is polite and compliments me on my weight loss. Whether he really notices it or is “buttering” me up for a larger tip remains to be seen. The ride in the cab is quiet, but my mind is full of thought. The philosophy of dieting is simple, then why is losing weight so difficult? Desires are cognitive tendencies of our instincts. What makes matters worse, unhealthy fast food is convenient in our chaotic schedules. The icing on the cake: what void is food fulfilling? There is no wrong answer because every response is personal. I have lost close to 100 pounds and am very proud of myself, but I know the real challenge will be keeping the weight off without my attentive support system. Back to reality also increases the stress level, which is another factor in See WHILE on Page 7B

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Ocean City Today

ENTERTAINMENT www.oceancitytoday.net

JANUARY 11, 2013

PAGE 5B

APPEARING LIVE 19TH HOLE BAR & GRILL 9636 Stephen Decatur Highway West Ocean City 410-2139204 Jan. 11: Chris Chris Button Button, 6-10 p.m. Jan. 12: Melissa Alesi, 6-10 p.m. ADOLFO’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT 13th Street and the Boardwalk in the Beach Plaza Hotel 410-289-4001 Every Friday and Saturday: Rhonda Apple and Dale Britt BJ’S ON THE WATER 75th Street and the bay 410-524-7575 Jan. 11: Full Circle, 9 p.m. Jan. 12: Funkalicious, 9 p.m. Jan. 16: Two Guys & A Mama, 5-8 p.m. COTTAGE CAFÉ Route 1, Bethany Beach, Del. 302-539-8710 Every Friday: DJ Bump, 5-8 p.m. Every Tuesday: Pub Party Trivia w/DJ Bump, 6-9 p.m.

FAGER’S ISLAND 60th Street and the bay 410-5245500 Jan. 11: DJ Hook, 9 p.m. Jan. 12: DJ Groove Jan. 13: Everett Spells Jazz Brunch w/Everett Spells, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. HARBORSIDE BAR & GRILL 12841 S. Harbor Road West Ocean City 410-213-1846 Jan. 11: Ladies Night w/DJ Billy T, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Jan. 12: Simple Truth, 2-6 p.m.; DJ Jeremy, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Jan. 13: Opposite Directions, 2-6 p.m.; DJ Billy T/DJ Bigler, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Jan. 17: Opposite Directions, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. HIGH STAKES Route 54, Fenwick Island, Del. 302-537-6971 Jan. 11: Lowercase Blues Jan. 12: DJ Rupe HOUSE OF WELSH 1106 Coastal Highway, Fenwick Island, Del. 888-666-0728 302-541-0728

Every Friday: DJ Norm, 3-6 p.m.; Tony Vega, 6-10 p.m. Every Saturday: Tony Vega, 6-10 p.m. Every Sunday: Tony Vega, 6-10 p.m. Every Monday: DJ Norm, 6-9 p.m. Every Wednesday: DJ Norm, 6-9 p.m. OCEAN CLUB NIGHTCLUB In the Horizons Restaurant In the Clarion Fontainebleau Hotel 101st Street and the ocean 410-524-3535 Jan. 11-12: New Censation, 9:30 p.m.

NEW CENSATION Ocean Club Nightclub: Friday and Saturday, Jan. 11-12, 9:30 p.m.

SEACRETS 49th Street and the bay 410-524-4900 Jan. 12: Full Circle, 5-9 p.m.; Band showcase w/ Green Line Inbound, Beat City, Under the Covers, 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. SMITTY MCGEE’S Route 54 West Fenwick Island, Del. 302-436-4716 Every Tuesday: Let’s Do Trivia, 7 p.m. Every Thursday: Randy Lee Ashcraft, 8 p.m. Every Friday: Randy Lee Ashcraft and the Saltwater Cowboys, 8 p.m.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Designing Windows, located on 82nd Street, received a second-place award in the General Business-Indoor category of the Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce’s holiday lighting display contest. Accepting the award during the chamber’s Business After Hours on Jan. 3, at BJ’s on the Water on 75th Street, from left, are owner Debbie Priestley, Joan Parker, Stacey Simpson and Bridget Ebaugh. (Right) Rob and Linda DiMaio took home the top award in the Residential category.

LOWER CASE BLUES High Stakes: Friday, Jan. 11


Ocean City Today

6B ENTERTAINMENT

JANUARY 11, 2013

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Welcoming guests to the Business After Hours, from left, are Karen Turner (Bank of America), Chuck Davis (Orkin) and Chamber Executive Director Melanie Pursel. OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Representing Gregory & Associates, LLC at the Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce Business After Hours on Jan. 3, at BJ’s on the Water on 75th Street, above from left, are Nancy Jones, Michele Ford and Emilee Snader. (Right) Young Professionals Committee of Ocean City President Anna Giles (Merrill Lynch), left, and Secretary Alison McCarty (BB&T) inform attendees about the organzation. The group brings together emerging young professionals, ages 21-39. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/YPsofOC.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Old Pro Golf owners, Judy and Herb Schoellkopf, also attended the event.

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JANUARY 11, 2013

Ocean City Today

Blood donations accepted Jan.15-16,in resort Continued from Page 1B

Walk-ins are also welcome. Donors must be 17 or older, weigh at least 110 pounds and be in good health on the day of the donation. Anyone who received a body piercing or tattoo in the last 12 months will not be accepted. Serio said many people give blood annually, but there are also a number of first-time donors each year. Donors will begin the process by answering questions about their medical history and lifestyle. They will then receive a mini-physical to check blood pressure, pulse and iron count before the actual donation begins. The entire process takes about an hour. The blood donation only lasts from five to 10 minutes, Serio said. “It’s a simple, painless process, and it goes pretty quickly,” she said. After the donation is complete, participants are asked to spend 15 minutes resting in the canteen area where a variety of snacks will be offered. Blood donors will also receive a free T-shirt.

After the blood is tested and deemed safe, the Blood Bank of Delmarva provides blood and blood products to 16 hospitals on the Delmarva Peninsula. More than 300 blood donors are needed every day in this area to meet the needs of the 16 hospitals, Serio said. “In 58 years, we’ve never had a blood shortage, thanks to the very generous blood donors.” One in three people will need blood during their lifetime. More than 4.5 million patients need blood transfusions each year in the U.S. and Canada. One pint of blood can save up to three lives. According to the Blood Bank of Delmarva Web site, blood donations are separated into three components: red blood cells, platelets and plasma. Red blood cells are primarily used for trauma victims. Platelets are used for cancer and leukemia patients. Plasma is mainly used for burn victims. The Beach Blanket Blood Drive was established in 1999 to promote blood donations in the winter, a time when blood

While eating healthfully can be expensive,therearealternatives FOOD FOR THOUGHT Continued from Page 4B

weight management. Eating healthfully is very expensive. Collard greens are cost effective and delicious. Serve the emerald, colored leaves in soups, stews and side dishes. Make sure you remove the tough veins before cooking. If one happens to have fresh beets, cut the tops off and add to the collard greens. Beet tops add flavor, texture, and color. The following recipe is based on one bunch of the South’s favorite greens. Sautéed Collard Greens 1 bunch of washed collard greens, veins removed 3 teaspoons canola oil 1 teaspoon minced garlic

1 1/2 cups chicken stock splash white vinegar 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes 1 teaspoon bacon dripping (optional) 1. In a large saucepan, sauté garlic in canola oil over low heat. 2. Add stock, vinegar, and bacon drippings, turn the heat to medium-low and allow to come to a simmer. 3. Add remaining ingredients, cover, and cook until tender. 4. Occasionally stir greens and an additional amount of chicken stock may be necessary (depending on the amount of collard greens). Secret Ingredient: Selfishness. “He who is wrapped up in himself makes a mighty small package” … Unknown.

WHAT: OC Beach Blanket Blood Drive WHERE: Roland E. Powell Convention Center, 40th Street WHEN: Tuesday, Jan. 15, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Wednesday, Jan. 16, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. WHO: Donors must be 17 or older, weigh at least 110 pounds, have not received a body piercing or tattoo in the last 12 months and be in good health. FOR INFORMATION: www.delmarvablood.org. Appointments, call 1-8888BLOOD8. Walk-ins accepted.

supplies traditionally decrease as donors are kept away by colds and flu, bad weather and holiday travel. Nearly 83,000 blood donations are needed each year for patients across Delmarva. This year, about 20,000 patients will need blood transfusions. Last year, approximately 48,000 people on Delmarva donated blood, producing about 80,000 blood products (red blood cells, platelets and plasma). The Blood Bank of Delmarva operates four blood centers — Salisbury in Maryland, and Dover, Wilmington and Newark in Delaware — as well as more than 30 established mobile donation locations. For additional information, call 1-888-8BLOOD8, or visit www.delmarvablood.org or www.facebook.com/delmarvabloodbank.

LIFESTYLE 7B

SENIOR SLANT

It’s still OK to don your favorite team colors this winter Continued from Page 3B

a.m. followed by an afternoon of bingo and socializing. For tickets ($25), call Pat Luckett at 302-4360351. Organizations and entrepreneurs take note. What better way to advertise? Sponsor a game for $40 and your organization’s name will be printed on the program. Don’t wait or hesitate to buy your tickets as these events are sellouts. For more info, call the parish office at 410-2500300. Sporting, courting, loitering or just out cavorting around town, I found Bob Jones and Phyllis, Don and Dot Smith, Carol and Rob Robinson, Ray and Carlee Archer, Joe Curtin, Del and Whitey Leutner, anniversary celebrators Nancy and Bill McCullough, George and Joan Saur and Theresa Smith. Trust me, the town is full of Redskins and Raven srooters. Win or lose, sport your colors next week to show your appreciation of a job well done. C U in OC.


Ocean City Today

8B LIFESTYLE

Holiday program benefits veterans (Jan. 11, 2013) Start the year off by thanking a veteran with a Valentine’s Day card. For the 13th year, cards will be sent to four veteran rehab medical centers to thank soldiers for their sacrifices and to let them know they are loved, appreciated and not forgotten. All area schools, clubs, businesses, organizations and individuals are invited to participate with purchased cards (no youth cards), but homemade cards are particularly appreciated. No postage is necessary. Cards should be addressed to “a veteran.” Valentines may be dropped off in Ocean Pines as Re/Max Office at 11049 Racetrack Road, Copy Central or the Ocean Pines library on Cathell Road, or the Ocean Pines Community Center in White Horse Park. The deadline is Monday, Jan. 28. Linda Dearing and the Copy Central staff will then send the cards, along with some candy, to Charlotte Hall Veterans Hospital, Baltimore Rehab Center, Baltimore VA Medical Center and Perry Point Hospital. For more information, call 410641-7391 or e-mail at louetta@mcclaflin.com. This project is sponsored by Caring for America, a mission of the Republican Women of Worcester County.

JANUARY 11, 2013

More than 95k visit illuminated holiday displays In 20th year, Winterfest of Lights raises more than $502,000 in 48 nights LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (Jan. 11, 2013) On New Year’s Day, 506 passengers boarded the Winterfest Express for a trip through the illuminated Northside Park, wrapping up the 48-night holiday spectacular. The 127th Street Winterfest of Lights displays, which contained as many as 1 million lights and more than 100 twinkling, shining, glittering and animated scenes, were viewed by 95,599 people, according to Tom Shuster, director of the Ocean City Recreation and Parks Department. An average of 1,991 people rode the train through the park each night. The overall total was a bit less from the record 107,405 passengers who took the 12-minute train ride last year when Winterfest of Lights was open for 46 days. It broke the previous attendance record of 93,937, set in 2001. Revenue generated during the 2011-12 festival was nearly $513,000. The 20th annual Winterfest of Light’s attendance marks the second highest total.

“We were really pleased with [Winterfest of Lights]. The turnout was very good and the crowd was consistent throughout the season,” Shuster said. “I brought someone to Winterfest of Lights for the first time and they were awed by it. It’s nice to see it through someone else’s eyes who hasn’t seen it before.” Approximately $502,000 in revenue was generated during the 2012-13 festival. Attendance during the final weekend of the 20th annual event was strong, with 3,557 riders on Friday, Dec. 28, 1,437 on Dec. 29, 2,325 on Dec. 30, 3,120 on New Year’s Eve, and 506 passengers on the last night, Jan. 1. The biggest night overall was the day after Thanksgiving, Friday, Nov. 23, when 7,538 people rode the train. The second largest attendance night was Saturday, Dec. 1, when 6,918 enjoyed the festivities. The fairly mild temperatures and good weather was a factor in the overall attendance, Shuster said. The weather only affected one night, Dec. 26, when Winterfest of Lights was closed early due to rain. Winterfest of Lights has become a tradition for families. Many visit each year to take the guided open-air tour through the park accompanied by holiday music. Some existing displays were refurbished and upgraded this year, and many of the lights were replaced with LED (Light

Emitting Diodes) bulbs, which are energy efficient, have greater brilliance, are more vibrant and last longer than other lights. New light displays were added as well, including a tornado that was incorporated into the Wizard of Oz Emerald City scene. A group of private donors also purchased a “Happy Hanukkah” display and Menorah. This year, to celebrate the 20th anniversary of Winterfest of Lights, there was a fireworks display at midnight on New Year’s Eve. “It was awesome,” Shuster said of the 8-minute display presented by American Fireworks of Hudson, Ohio. “It was a great show and it was very well received.” Shuster estimated that 700-1,000 people gathered in the parking lot at Northside Park to watch. Because the fireworks display was so well received, Shuster said $10,000 has been included into the budget for a show during the 2013-14 Winterfest of Lights. It will have to be approved by the mayor and City Council. Crews began unpacking displays from trailers and setting up the winter wonderland in mid-September. There is a different layout for the Winterfest of Lights displays each year in order to keep it new and fresh for riders. It also challenges them to find their favorite See ADDED on Page 9B


JANUARY 11, 2013

Ocean City Today

LIFESTYLE 9B

Added fireworkswell received; in budget for 2013 Winterfest Continued from Page 8B

display in a new location. Some of the displays featured at Northside Park included the 12 Days of Christmas, Santa, his sleigh and eight flying reindeer, fairy tale characters, toy soldiers, crabs, marlins, “Jaws,” a penguin village and dinosaurs. The heated tent at Winterfest kept visitors warm as they listen to music and wait for the Boardwalk trams to take them through the enchanted park of lights. The tent was home to the Winterfest Village and Yukon Cornelius’ Gift Shop filled with ornaments, stocking stuffers, souvenirs and holiday gifts. Visitors also had the opportunity to have their photo taken with Santa, grab a

warm beverage or snack. Winterfest of Lights has received many accolades over the years. For several consecutive years, it has made the list as one of the Top 100 Events in North America by the American Bus Association this year. This list includes the best events for group travel in the United States and Canada. The Ocean City attraction was ranked No. 1 in 2008 on the Professional Travel Guide Editor’s Top 10 of the nation’s largest and best holiday lights displays. In 2006, Winterfest of Lights was No. 2 in the country in the “America Online City Guide’s Top 11 Lighting Displays.” The Disney-MGM Studios display in Orlando topped the list.

The 127th Street Winterfest of Lights displays, which contained as many as 1 million lights and more than 100 twinkling, shining, glittering and animated scenes, were viewed by 95,599 people, during the 48-night run. The festival opened Nov. 15, and the final night was Jan. 1.

CROSSWORD

Answers on page 13B


Ocean City Today

OUT&ABOUT www.oceancitytoday.net

PAGE 10B

FRIDAY, JAN. 11 OCEAN PINES BOOK OF THE MONTH — Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 1 p.m. Group will discuss “Never Let Me Go” by Kazuo Ishiquro. All are welcome. Info: 410-208-4014. BINGO — Knights of Columbus, 99th Street (rear of St. Luke’s Church) in Ocean City. Doors open at 5 p.m. and games begin at 6:30 p.m. Refreshments for sale. Info: 410524-7994.

SATURDAY, JAN. 12 FAMILY GAME DAY — Pocomoke library, 301 Market St., 9 a.m. to noon. Play old family favorites. Reserve your place: 410957-0878. WE DO ROBOTICS — Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 10:30 a.m. Children, 8 years and older, can build, create and program their own robotic creations. Pre-registration is needed for this free program. Register: 410-208-4014. PANCAKE BREAKFAST — VFW, Post 8296,

104 66th St., bayside in Ocean City, 8-11 a.m. A $5 donation for all-you-can-eat pancakes or 2-2-2, two eggs, two pancakes and two bacon slices, includes coffee and juice. Bloody Marys cost $3. Info: 410-524-8196. SCRAPBOOKING DAY — Sponsored by Willards Volunteer Fire Company Ladies Auxiliary, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Event costs $30. Breakfast, lunch and dinner provided. Prizes. RSVP: Danielle, 443-880-8590. NEW YEARS INDOOR FLEA MARKET — Ocean Pines Community Center, 235 Ocean Parkway, 8 a.m. to noon. Vendor space includes one table and two chairs. Spaces cost $15 for Ocean Pines residents and $20 for non-residents. Register: 410-641-7052.

SUNDAY, JAN. 13 STAR PARTY — Meet at fire pit outside Assateague Visitor Center, 6-9 p.m. Activities include Jr. Ranger Night Explorer, telescopic star gazing and dark skies presentation. Take warm clothes, flashlight and binoculars. Free program. Info: Christina Hulslander, 443-614-3547; Jay Johnstone, 410-629-6607; www.nature.nps.gov/night/; or assateagueislandalliance@gmail.com.

PHIL PERDUE ON PIANO JAN. 12, 26 BRYAN CLARK RETURNS JAN. 19

BREAKFAST SAT. & SUN. 7 A.M. 1 P.M. LUNCH SAT. & SUN.11:30 - 1:00 P.M. DINNER/LITE FARE MON.-THURS. 5 P.M. FRI., SAT. & SUN. 4 PM. Large Parties Welcome ALL NIGHT SUNDAY - THURSDAY

LOCALS’ FAVORITE FOR 57 YEARS The Courtyard by Marriott Hotel Parking 15th St. & Baltimore Ave. Ocean City, Maryland 410.289.7192 for Reservations www.captainstableoc.com

SATURDAY AND SUNDAY

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Any $75 Check

Cannot be combined with other coupons/vouchers/discount.

MONDAY, JAN. 14 WRITING FOR WELLNESS — Ocean Pines library, small meeting room, 11107 Cathell Road, 1:30 p.m. Writing group that uses expressive writing exercises to stimulate writing process for creative expression and to process emotions. No prior writing experience needed. Info: 410-208-4014. TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING Berlin group No. 169, Atlantic General Hospital, conference room 2, 9733 Healthway Drive in Berlin, 5:30-7 p.m. TOPS is a support and educational group promoting weight loss and healthy lifestyle. It meets weekly. Info: Edna Berkey, 410-629-1006. DELMARVA SWEET ADELINE CHORUS MEETS WEEKLY — The Delmarva Sweet Adeline Chorus, under the direction of Carol Ludwig, meets each Monday from 7-9 p.m., at the Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway, White Horse Park. Women interested in learning and singing in a barbershop format are welcome. Info: 410-208-4171. HAND DANCING — House of Welsh, 1106 Coastal Highway, Fenwick, Del. Free lessons from 6-7 p.m., open dancing 7-10 p.m. No cover

JANUARY 11, 2013

charge. Info: DC Hand Dance Club, 302-5410728.

TUESDAY, JAN. 15 BEACH BLANKET BLOOD DRIVE — Sponsored by Blood Bank of Delmarva, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Ocean City convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway. Appointments, call 1-888-8BLOOD8. Walk-ins accepted. Info: www.delmarvablood.org. LAP TIME — Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10:30 a.m. Children, infants to 2 years old, will be introduced to songs, games, finger plays and movement activities. Parents and caregivers will learn new ways to interact with their toddlers. Info: 410-208-4014. YOUNG AND RESTLESS — Pocomoke library, 301 Market St., 10:30 a.m. Creative science, art and music activities for children 3 to 5 years old. Dress for a mess. Reserve your place: 410957-0878. MUSIC OF THE WW2UNES — Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 2 p.m. Musicians Frank Nanna, Dave Dalfonso and Carol Wolek take attendees back to the 1940s. Info: 410208-4014. Continued on Page 13B


JANUARY 11, 2013

Ocean City Today

Ocean City Today

Get a Direct Link to Your Business

DINING GUIDE ■ CREDIT CARDS: V-Visa, MC-Master Card, AE-American Express, DIS-Discover ■ PRICE RANGE: $, $$, $$$ ________________________________ ■ 19TH HOLE BAR & GRILLE, 9936 Stephen Decatur Highway, West Ocean City 410-213-9204 / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual and family-friendly, featuring great American cuisine for breakfast, lunch and dinner at affordable prices. Open seven days a week, year-round. Happy hour daily, 3-7 p.m. Entertainment Friday through Sunday. ■ 32 PALM, 32nd Street, in the Hilton Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2525 / www.ocmdrestaurants. com / $$ / V-MC-AEDIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Western Caribbean cuisine, Eastern Shore favorites, gourmet and tasty liquid desserts. ■ ADOLFO’S, 13th Street, on the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410-289-4001 / www.ocadolfos.com / $$ / V-MC-AE / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Northern and southern Italian dishes, prepared fresh daily. Quiet, intimate atmosphere for couples, room for large families or choose to enjoy our outside seating with views of the ocean. ■ BJ’S ON THE WATER, 75th Street, Ocean City 410-524-7575 / www.bjsonthewater.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Open year-round. Entire dining menu served 11 a.m. to 1:30 a.m., seven days a week. Daily specials, daily duck feeding. Entertainment every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. No cover. Available for parties and banquets. Indoor and outdoor dining. ■ BLUE FISH JAPANESE & CHINESE RESTAURANT AND SUSHI BAR, 94th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3983 / www.bluefishoc.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Japanese and Chinese restaurant and sushi bar with beer, wine and cocktails. Dine in, take out and delivery available. Open Monday-Friday, 11:30 a.m.; Saturday and Sunday, noon. ■ CAPTAIN’S TABLE RESTAURANT, 15th Street and the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410-289-7192 / www.captainstableoc.com / $$-$$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Family-owned, serving fine seafood, steaks and poultry on the third floor of the Courtyard by Marriott. Open 7 days a week, serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. ■ DEVITO’S ITALIAN DELI AND SUB SHOP, 143rd Street, Ocean City 410-250-1122 / $ / V-MC / No reservations required / Italian cold cuts pizza, sandwiches and subs for lunch and dinner. ■ DUFFY’S TAVERN, 130th Street, Montego Bay Shopping Center, Ocean City 410-250-1449 / $ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Unique Irish tavern serving the best steaks, seafood and over-stuffed sandwiches. A local’s favorite with authentic Irish specialities, including shepard’s pie and corned beef and cabbage. Outdoor seating available. Open for lunch and dinner. ■ FAGER’S ISLAND RESTAURANT & BAR, 60th Street on the bay, Ocean City 410524-5500 / www.fagers.com / $$-$$$ / VMC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted in the dining room only / Children’s menu / Full bar / Upscale restaurant on the bay. Casual fine dining, fresh fish, prime rib and seafood. Lighter fare menu served on our decks or inside.

OUT&ABOUT 11B

■ FRESCO’S, 82nd Street, Ocean City 410-524-8202 / www.ocfrescos.com / $$$$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / On the bay, serving seafood, steaks and pasta in an intimate atmosphere. Reservations highly recommended. ■ GALAXY 66 BAR & GRILLE, 66th Street, Ocean City 410-723-6762 / $$$$$ / V-M-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Contemporary restaurant offering light fare and full entrees. Award- winning wine list, signature drinks and cocktails. ■ GIUSEPPE O’LEARY, Sunset Avenue, West Ocean City 410-213-2868 / www.submarinaoc.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AEDIS / No reservations required / Full bar / Featuring homemade Italian cuisine in a cozy atmosphere. Open year-round. Happy hour food and drink specials Monday-Friday, 4-7 p.m. ■ GREENE TURTLE NORTH, 116th Street, Ocean City 410-723-2120 / www.thegreeneturtle.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / The Turtle, est. 1976, is an Ocean City tradition with a friendly staff, great food and something for everyone! Menu favorites are homemade crab cakes, kids’ menu, salads, burgers, wings and more! Featuring weekday lunch specials and happy hour, 50 high-def flat screen TVs, game room, gift shop, carry out, party trays, nightly drink specials, Keno, MD lottery, DJs with dance floor. Open 11 a.m. to 2 a.m., year-round. ■ HALL’S SEAFOOD & STEAK, 60th Street, Ocean City 410-524-5008 / www.Halls-OC.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Serving Ocean City’s finest breakfast buffet and all-you-can-eat sea-food buffet. Open 7 days a week, all summer. New menu serving old favorites and new treats. ■ HARBORSIDE BAR & GRILL, 12841 S. Harbor Road, West Ocean City 410-2131846 / www.ocharborside.com / $$ / VMC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Open seven days a week, 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. Casual waterfront dining serving seafood, steaks, sandwiches, salads, wraps and pasta. Home of the “Original Orange Crush.” Entertainment Thursday through Sunday. ■ HARPOON HANNA’S RESTAURANT & BAR, Route 54 and the bay, Fenwick Island, Del. www.harpoonhannasrestaurant.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual waterfront restaurant serving lunch, dinner. Fresh fish, seafood, steaks, sandwiches and all-you-can-eat Alaskan crab legs. Open year-round. ■ HEMINGWAY’S AT THE CORAL REEF, 17th Street, in the Holiday Inn Hotel & Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2612 / www.ocmdrestaurants.com / $$$ / V-MCAE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Elegant dining room, Floridian/island-style cuisine. Seafood, tropical salsas, grilled steaks, pork chops, grilled pineapple, banana fritters, entree salads. ■ HIGH STAKES BAR & GRILL, Route 54, Fenwick Island, Del. 302-537-6971 / $-$$ / V-M-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Carry-out available / Full bar / Casual dining, daily happy hour and daily food specials. Live entertainment. ■ HOOTERS, three Ocean City locations: 123rd Street, Ocean City 410-250-7081, Fifth Street, on the Boardwalk, Ocean

Add a QR Code to your Dining Guide listing and give your patrons a direct link to your Web site, Facebook page, App, etc. Cost is $15 for current advertisers ~ $25 for new listings Contact a Sales Representative at 410-723-6397

City 410-289-2690 and Route 50, West Ocean City 410-213-1841 / www.hootersofoc.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS. Fresh new menu items include ground chuck burgers, green salads, world famous chicken wings with 11 flavorful sauces, healthy choice sandwiches and seafood. Fun children’s menu. Relaxed beach atmosphere. Full bar. Large flat screen TVs, attentive service by delightful Hooters girls. Wingfest: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3-6 p.m., featuring 50-cent wings and awesome drink specials. Like us on Facebook. This is why we say Hooters makes you happy. ■ HORIZONS OCEANFRONT RESTAURANT, 101st Street, Ocean City 410-5243535 / www.clarionoc.com / $-$$ ($20-45) / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Open tables / Children’s menu / Full bar / Proud to have Chef Shawn Reese creating beach-inspired dishes in both oceanfront restaurants, Horizons and Breaker’s Pub. New all-day menu, available 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m., features many favorites, as well as exciting new creations with a local flare. Deluxe Sunday breakfast buffet open yearround and AUCE prime rib, crab legs and seafood buffet available most weekends. ■ HOUSE OF WELSH, 1106 Coastal Highway, Fenwick Island, Del. 1-800-311-2707 / www.houseofwelsh.net / $, $$ / V-MC-AEDIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Specializing in steaks and seafood. Open daily. Happy hour all day and night. Entertainment Wednesdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. Casual attire. ■ JOHNNY’S PIZZA PUB, 56th Street, Ocean City 410-524-7499 / www.johnnys56.com / $ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Pizza, subs, wings, salads, beer, live music, high definition TVs, surf, movies, BlueRay. ■ JR’S THE ORIGINAL PLACE FOR RIBS, 61st and 131st streets, Ocean City 410250-3100, 410-524-7427 / www.jrsribs.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / The place for ribs since 1981. Family-friendly dining. Angus steaks, jumbo lump crab cakes, prime rib, seafood, chicken. Early bird. ■ JULES FINE DINING, 118th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3396 / www.ocjules.com / $$, $$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Local fare, global flair. Fresh seafood year-round, fresh local produce. ■ OCEAN PINES YACHT CLUB, 1 Mumfords Landing Road, Ocean Pines 410641-7501 / www.oceanpines.org, www.theclubsofoceanpines.com / $$ / VMC-AE / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Ocean Pines Yacht Club and Marina is open to the public for casual waterfront dining. Fresh local menu, on-site catering and Sunday brunch. ■ P.G.N. CRABHOUSE, 29th Street, Ocean City 410-289-8380 / $ / V-MC-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Beer, wine / The Kaouris family has been serving the finest crabs, seafood, steaks and chicken to Ocean City locals and visitors since 1969. ■ PHILLIPS CRAB HOUSE, 20th Street, Ocean City 410-289-6821 / www.phillipsseafood.com / $$ / V-MC-AEDIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / The original Phillips, serving the finest seafood since 1956. Complete with all-you-can-eat seafood buffet, a la carte menu and carryout counter. Daily

early bird specials and plenty of free parking. ■ PHILLIPS SEAFOOD HOUSE, 141st Street, Ocean City 410-250-1200 / www.phillipsseafood.com / $$ / V-MC-AEDIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Just minutes to the Delaware line. All-you-can-eat seafood buffet, a la carte menu and carryout counter. Daily early bird specials and plenty of free parking. ■ PONZETTI’S PIZZA, 144th Street, Ocean City www.ponzettispizza.com / $ / MC / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Italian dinners, subs and homemade pizza. Happy hour Monday through Friday, 3-6 p.m. Sports bar, live music on weekends. Light fare served till 1 a.m. Carry out available. ■ POPEYE’S LOUISIANA KITCHEN, Route 50, West Ocean City 443-664-2105 / $ / V-MC / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Family restaurant. Eat-in, carry out or drive-thru. Open seven days, year-round. Every Tuesday, two-piece chicken for 99 cents. Every Wednesday, free kids meal with purchase of combo. ■ REFLECTIONS RESTAURANT, 67th Street, in the Holiday Inn Oceanfront, Ocean City 410-524-5252 / www.ocmdrestaurants.com / $$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Tableside flambé dining. Casually elegant, cuisine prepared tableside in the European tradition. Private dining rooms. Eclectic chef’s specials accompanied by an award-winning wine list. ■ SEACRETS, 49th Street, Ocean City 410-524-4900 / www.seacrets.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Island atmosphere. Soups, salads, Jamaican jerk chicken, appetizers, sandwiches, paninis, pizza and fresh seafood. ■ SMITTY McGEE’S, 37234 Lighthouse Road, West Fenwick Island, Del. 302-4364716 / www.smittymcgees.com / $$ / VMC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / No children’s menu / Full bar / Casual. Big menu, including hot wings and drinks. ■ THE COTTAGE CAFE, Route 1 (across from Sea Colony), Bethany Beach, Del. 302-539-8710 / www.cottagecafe.com / $, $$ / V-MC-AE / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Seafood, kids’ menu, happy hour specials. Lunch and dinner daily. Breakfast buffet on weekends. ■ THE STERLING SEAFOOD GRILL & OYSTER BAR, 67th Street, in the Holiday Inn Oceanfront, Ocean City 410-524-5252 / www.ocmdrestaurants.com / $$ / V-MC-AEDIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Fabulous raw bar serving the freshest raw oysters and clams, steamed shrimp, crab legs, mussels and oyster stew, made to order. “Fresh off the grill” items include rockfish, tuna, mahi mahi and salmon. Happy hour specials daily, 4-6 p.m. ■ WHISKERS PUB, 120th Street, OC Square, Ocean City 410-524-2609 / www.whiskerspub.com / $ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Old World saloon-type feel, Whisker’s is famous for its Certified Angus® burgers and delicious casual fare, as well as its entertaining atmosphere and photo lined walls of famous and infamous “whiskers.” Enjoy flat screen TVs to watch your favorite sports. Open year-round, 11:30 a.m. to 2 a.m., serving lunch and dinner daily. Happy hour every day 4-7 p.m. Nightly food specials.


12B OUT&ABOUT

Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013

SDHS STUDENTS RECOGNIZED BY BALTIMORE RAVENS

ACADEMIC GOALS Donovan Roos, left, Alyssa Clark, center, and Renee Fohner, students in Cindy Leitgeb’s secondgrade class at Ocean City Elementary School, write their 2013 academic goals. 

For the sixth time in eight years, Stephen Decatur High School students were honored by the Baltimore Ravens for outstanding service to the school and surrounding communities as part of the NFL franchise’s annual Honor Rows program. One hundred National Honor Society students and Presidential Service Award recipients were treated to on-field passes, a jumbotron appearance and tickets to the Dec. 16 game against the Denver Broncos. Pictured are National Honor Society officers Connor Neville, Devynn Detzer, Ashley Trice and Noah McAleer.

GAME VIPS Stephen Decatur High School honored “VIPs of the Game” between quarters of the Dec. 20 basketball triple-header against Pocomoke High School. Recipients were art teacher Christy Powell and senior Tim VanVonno. Throughout the winter sports season, Stephen Decatur will be recognizing those who have made outstanding contributions to the school and community. Honorees are presented lifetime passes to Stephen Decatur High School events. Pictured are VIP Program coordinator Amy Fenzel-Mergott, Powell, VanVonno and Principal Tom Zimmer.

DISSECTION LESSON During their study of the human body, seventh-grade science students at Stephen Decatur Middle School dissect chicken wings to view the bones, muscles and skin. Omer Peled, Zerrick Collins, Tiffany Blankenship and Montrel Moore take notes and measurements while dissecting their chicken wing.

LONGBOARD WINNER POPEYES FUNDRAISER

MBS FOURTH-GRADERS RECOGNIZED

Salah Hassanein, right, owner of Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen in West Ocean City, presents Buckingham Elementary School Principal Roger Pacella a $150 check, proceeds from a Dec. 12 fundraiser to benefit the Berlin school.

Cub Scout leader Peter Kangas presents Tommy Kangas and T. J. Gulyas, fourth-graders at Most Blessed Sacrament Catholic School, with the Cub Scout Catholic Emblem Award and certificate after a recent school Mass at St. John Neumann Church.

Brianna Watts, a seventh-grader at Stephen Decatur Middle School, is the winner of a longboard raffled off by the National Honor Society. The proceeds of the raffle helped to fund an “Adopt a Family” activity for the holidays.


Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013

OUT&ABOUT Continued from Page 10B ‘MISTER DON’ LEADS THE MUSIC FUN! Berlin library, 220 N. Main St., 10:30 a.m. For children 2 to 5 years old. Info: 410-641-0650. YOGA — James G. Barrett Medical Office Building, rotunda, 10231 Old Ocean City Boulevard, Berlin, 5:30-6:45 p.m. All levels welcome. Cost is $72 for eight sessions or $10 drop-in fee for first time. Info: Georgette Rhoads, 410-6419734 or grhoads@atlanticgeneral.org. LADIES NIGHT OUT CPR TRAINING — White Marlin Club, 9659 Golf Course Road, West Ocean City, 5:30 p.m. Only 45 minutes and you’re CPR trained. Cost is $30. Register: Patti Miller, 443-880-7795 or patti@peckmiller.com. WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSION FOR WOMEN MEETING — Worcester County Board of Education, 6270 Worcester Highway, Newark, 56:30 p.m. Open to the public and women of all ages are encouraged to attend. Volunteers sought for short-term assignments such as grant writing and event planning. Info: 410-641-1951.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 16 BEACH BLANKET BLOOD DRIVE — Sponsored by Blood Bank of Delmarva, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Ocean City convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway. Appointments, call 1-888-8BLOOD8. Walk-ins accepted. Info: www.delmarvablood.org. PLAY TIME — Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 10:30 a.m. Parents and children, infants to 5 years old, explore educational toys together in an interactive, free play program. Info: 410-524-1818. HYPERTENSION CLINICS — Sponsored by Atlantic General Hospital and takes place at Walgreen’s, Bethany Beach, Del., 10 a.m. to noon and at Walgreen’s, Selbyville, Del., 1-3 p.m. Free blood pressure screening and health information. Info: Dawn Denton, 410-641-9268. WEIGHT LOSS SURGERY SEMINAR — Berlin Main Place Complex, 9956 N. Main St., Berlin, 5-6 p.m. Receive information about the lap band and gastric sleeve weight loss procedures. Pre-register: 410-641-3960. ‘SWEET 16’ RELAY FOR LIFE — Route 50 Diner in the Francis Scott Key Hotel, 12806

Ocean Gateway, West Ocean City, 6 p.m. Cancer survivors, their caregivers and anyone registered or interested in registering for the May 10 Relay For Life event, hosted by Frontier Town, are welcome to attend. BINGO — Every Wednesday at Ocean City Elks Lodge 2645, 138th Street across from Fenwick Inn. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., games start 6:30 p.m. A $1,000 jackpot available, food, snacks and non-alcoholic beverages. No one under 18 years allowed in the hall during bingo. Info: 410250-2645. DELMARVA HAND DANCING CLUB — Meets every Wednesday at Skyline Bar & Grille at The Fenwick Inn, 138th Street and Coastal Highway in Ocean City. Beginner and intermediate lessons, 5:30-6:30 p.m., followed by dancing until 9 p.m. Jitterbug, swing, cha-cha to the sounds of the ’50s, ’60s and Carolina beach music. All are welcome. Discounted food and drink prices. Info: 302-337-3638. TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, Wednesdays, 4:45-6 p.m. TOPS is a support and educational group promoting weight loss and healthy lifestyle. It meets weekly. Info: 302-436-3682. SUICIDE GRIEVERS’ SUPPORT GROUP Worcester County Health Department, 9730 Healthway Drive, Berlin, third Wednesday of each month, 6 p.m. Open to anyone who has lost a friend or loved one to suicide. Free of charge. Info: 410-629-0164 or www.jessespaddle.org.

ADULT KNITTING AND CROCHETING GROUP Pocomoke library, 301 Market St., 11 a.m. An informal monthly group for people who love to knit or crochet to gather and share ideas, patterns and projects. Info: 410-957-0878. BEACH SINGLES — Every Thursday, Beach Singles 45-Plus meets for happy hour at Harpoon Hanna’s, Route 54 and the bay, Fenwick Island, Del., 4 p.m. Info: Arlene, 302-436-9577 or Kate, 410-524-0649. BINGO — American Legion Post 166, 2308 Philadelphia Ave., in Ocean City, every Thursday, year round. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., games start at 7 p.m. Food available. Open to the public. Info: 410-289-3166. WORCESTER COUNTY TEA PARTY MEETING Ocean Pines Community Center, 235 Ocean Parkway. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., meeting begins at 7 p.m. All interested citizens are invited to attend. Worcester County Tea Party is a grassroots organization, not affiliated with any political party. Info: 410-430-7282, WorTeaParty@gmail. com or WorcesterCountyTeaParty.com.

ONGOING EVENTS SUNDAY NIGHT SERENITY AL-ANON FAMILY GROUP MEETING — Berlin Nursing & Rehabilitation Center, 9715 Healthway Drive, 7:30 p.m. WEDNESDAY NIGHT BAYSIDE BEGINNINGS AL-ANON FAMILY GROUP MEETING — Ocean Pines Community Center, 235 Ocean Parkway, 7:30 p.m.

THURSDAY, JAN. 17 OC MAYOR’S PRAYER BREAKFAST — Buffet breakfast, 7-9:15 a.m., Clarion Resort Hotel, 101st Street. Ocean City Mayor Rick Meehan will deliver welcome message, followed by scripture readings and songs. Guest speaker will be last. Tickets, $16, sold in advance only. Info: 443-235-2669 or ocmayorsprayerbreakfast@ comcast.net.

Crossword answers from page 9B

STORY TIME — Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10:30 a.m. Stories, rhymes, finger plays, music and crafts for children 2-5 years old. Info: 410-208-4014. PLAY TIME — Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., 10:30 a.m. Parents and children, infants to 5 years old, explore educational toys together in an interactive, free play program.

Fax 410-213-2151

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SUBSTITUTED TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY KNOWN AS NO. 202 32ND STREET, UNIT #201 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 CASE NUMBER 23-C-12-000260 Covahey, Boozer, Devan, and Dore, P.A. 11350 McCormick Road, Executive Plaza III, Suite 200 Hunt Valley, MD 21031 (443) 541-8600 Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from Livio Cristiani recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 4399, folio 634, and Declaration of Substitution of Trustees recorded among the aforementioned Land Records substituting Thomas P. Dore, Mark S. Devan, Gerard F. Miles, Jr., Shannon Menapace, and Erin Gloth as Substituted Trustees, the Substituted Trustees will offer for sale at public auction, at the Courthouse Door, Snow Hill, Maryland on Tuesday, January 29, 2013 at 11:00 AM: All that lot of ground and the improvements thereon situate in Worcester County, State of Maryland, as described in the Deed of Trust recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, in Liber 4399, folio 634, also being further described in a Deed recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 3065, folio 104. The improvements thereon consist of a dwelling. The property will be sold in “AS IS” condition, subject to any existing building violations, restrictions and agreements of record. Neither the Substituted Trustees nor their respective agents, successors or assigns make any representations or warranties, either expressed or implied with respect to the property. The Substituted Trustees shall convey insurable title. TERMS OF THE SALE: A deposit in a form acceptable to the Substituted Trustee in the amount of $8,000.00 will be required of the purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note or its assigns, at the time and place of sale. Unless the purchaser is the Holder of the Note or its assigns, the balance of the purchase price shall be paid immediately with available funds within twenty (20) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County. Time is of the essence. The purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note or its assigns, shall pay interest at the rate of 6.00000% per annum on the unpaid portion of the purchase price from the date of sale to date of settlement. Real property taxes and assessments shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Ground rent, water and/or sewer charges public or private, if any, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes shall be paid by the purchaser. Purchaser shall have the responsibility of obtaining possession of the property. In the event settlement is delayed for any reason, there shall be no abatement of interest. If the purchaser defaults, the entire deposit is forfeited. The Substituted Trustees shall resell the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulting purchaser shall be liable for


14B LEGAL NOTICES

Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013

Legal Notices the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of both sales, attorney fees, all other charges due, and incidental and consequential damages. In the event the Substituted Trustees do not convey title for any reason, purchaser’s sole remedy is return of the deposit. The Substituted Trustees shall have the right to terminate this contract in the event the Holder or its Servicer has entered into any agreement with, or accepted funds from, the mortgagor. Upon termination of the contract, Purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return of the deposit. Thomas P. Dore, Mark S. Devan, Gerard F. Miles, Jr., Shannon Menapace, and Erin Gloth, Substituted Trustees Tidewater Auctions, LLC (410) 825-2900 www.tidewaterauctions.com A-4348565 01/10/2013, 01/17/2013, 01/24/2013 OCD-1/10/3t __________________________________ Covahey, Boozer, Devan, & Dore, P.A. 11350 McCormick Road, Executive Plaza III, Suite 200 Hunt Valley, MD 21031 (443) 541-8600

SUBSTITUTED TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY KNOWN AS NO. LOT 268 WAR DANCER LANE BERLIN, MD 21811 CASE NUMBER 23-C-12-001299 Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from Bob Yi and Sue Yi recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 4527, folio 697, and Declaration of Substitution of Trustees recorded among the aforementioned Land Records substituting Thomas P. Dore, Mark S. Devan, Gerard F. Miles, Jr., Shannon Menapace, Erin Gloth, and Christine Drexel as Substituted Trustees, the Substituted Trustees will offer for sale at public auction,  at the Courthouse Door, Snow Hill, Maryland on Tuesday, January 29, 2013 at 11:00 AM: All that lot of ground and the improvements thereon situate in Worcester County, State of Maryland, as described in the Deed of Trust recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, in Liber 4527, folio 697, also being further described in a Deed  recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 4527, folio 692.  The improvements thereon consist of a dwelling. The property will be sold in “AS IS” condition, subject to any existing building violations, restrictions and agreements of record.  Neither the Substituted Trustees nor their respective agents, successors or assigns make any representations or warranties, either expressed or implied with respect to the property.  The Substituted Trustees shall convey insurable title. TERMS OF THE SALE:   A deposit in a form acceptable to the Substituted Trustee in the amount of $48,000.00 will be required of the purchaser, other than the  Holder of the Note or its assigns, at the time and place of sale.  Unless the purchaser is

the Holder of the Note or its assigns, the balance of the purchase price shall be paid immediately with available funds within twenty (20) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County. Time is of the essence. The purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note or its assigns, shall pay interest at the rate of 7.50000% per annum on the unpaid portion of the purchase price from the date of sale to date of settlement.  Real property taxes and assessments shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.  Ground rent, water and/or sewer charges public or private, if any, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.  Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes shall be paid by the purchaser.  Purchaser shall have the responsibility of obtaining possession of the property.  In the event settlement is delayed for any reason , there shall be no abatement of interest.  If the purchaser defaults, the entire deposit is forfeited.  The Substituted Trustees shall resell the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser.  The defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of both sales, attorney fees, all other charges due, and incidental and consequential damages. In the event the Substituted Trustees do not convey title for any reason, purchaser`s sole remedy is return of the deposit.  The Substituted Trustees shall have the right to terminate this contract in the event the Holder or its Servicer has entered into any agreement with, or accepted funds from, the mortgagor.  Upon termination of the contract, Purchaser`s sole remedy shall be return of the deposit. Thomas P. Dore, Mark S. Devan, Gerard F. Miles, Jr., Shannon Menapace, Erin Gloth, and Christine Drexel, Substituted Trustees Tidewater Auctions, LLC (410) 825-2900 www.tidewaterauctions.com OCD-1/10/3t __________________________________ Covahey, Boozer, Devan, & Dore, P.A. 11350 McCormick Road, Executive Plaza III, Suite 200 Hunt Valley, MD  21031 (443) 541-8600

SUBSTITUTED TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY KNOWN AS NO. 429 NORTH 14TH STREET , UNIT 10 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 CASE NUMBER 23-C-12-001639 Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from Nancy Yentzer and Rodney L. Yentzer recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 4386, folio 473, and Declaration of Substitution of Trustees recorded among the aforementioned Land Records substituting Thomas P. Dore, Mark S. Devan, Gerard F. Miles, Jr.,

Shannon Menapace, Erin Gloth, and Christine Drexel as Substituted Trustees, the Substituted Trustees will offer for sale at public auction, at the Courthouse Door, Snow Hill, Maryland on Tuesday, January 29, 2013 at 11:00 AM: All that lot of ground and the improvements thereon situate in Worcester County, State of Maryland, as described in the Deed of Trust recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, in Liber 4386, folio 473, also being further described in a Deed  recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 3890, folio 362.  The improvements thereon consist of a dwelling. The property will be sold in “AS IS” condition, subject to any existing building violations, restrictions and agreements of record.  Neither the Substituted Trustees nor their respective agents, successors or assigns make any representations or warranties, either expressed or implied with respect to the property.  The Substituted Trustees shall convey insurable title. TERMS OF THE SALE:   A deposit in a form acceptable to the Substituted Trustee in the amount of $49,000.00 will be required of the purchaser, other than the  Holder of the Note or its assigns, at the time and place of sale.  Unless the purchaser is the Holder of the Note or its assigns, the balance of the purchase price shall be paid immediately with available funds within twenty (20) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County. Time is of the essence.  The purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note or its assigns, shall pay interest at the rate of 5.62500% per annum on the unpaid portion of the purchase price from the date of sale to date of settlement.  Real property taxes and assessments shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.  Ground rent, water and/or sewer charges public or private, if any, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.  Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes shall be paid by the purchaser.  Purchaser shall have the responsibility of obtaining possession of the property.  In the event settlement is delayed for any reason , there shall be no abatement of interest.  If the purchaser defaults, the entire deposit is forfeited.  The Substituted Trustees shall resell the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser.  The defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of both sales, attorney fees, all other charges due, and incidental and consequential damages. In the event the Substituted Trustees do not convey title for any reason, purchaser`s sole remedy is return of the deposit.  The Substituted Trustees shall have the right to terminate this contract in the event the Holder or its Servicer has entered into any agreement with, or accepted funds from, the mortgagor.  Upon termination of the contract, Purchaser`s sole remedy shall be return of the de-

posit. Thomas P. Dore, Mark S. Devan, Gerard F. Miles, Jr., Shannon Menapace, Erin Gloth, and Christine Drexel, Substituted Trustees Tidewater Auctions, LLC (410) 825-2900 www.tidewaterauctions.com OCD-1/10/3t __________________________________ Morris/Hardwick/Schneider 9409 Philadelphia Road Baltimore, MD 21237 410-284-9600

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 7 SURFERS WAY BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Sharon L. Shirk, dated December 20, 2006 and recorded in Liber 4846, folio 694 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, Snow Hill, on JANUARY 29, 2013 AT 3:00 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Worcester Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $16,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within 10 days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester Co. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. If the purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid ten (10) days of ratification, the purchaser relinquishes their deposit and the SubTrustees may file an appropriate motion with the court to resell the property. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale. Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Sub-Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall be charged against and paid from the forfeited


JANUARY 11, 2013

Ocean City Today

LEGAL NOTICES 15B

Legal Notices deposit. In the event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property regardless of any improvements made to the real property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate of 6.5% per annum from the date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Sub-Trustees. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser shall be responsible for physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward. The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Noteholder to determine whether the borrower entered into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees that upon notification by the Sub-Trustees of such event the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit returned without interest. If the Sub-Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or good and marketable title, or the sale is not ratified for any reason by the Circuit Court including errors made by the Sub-Trustees, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit without any interest. This property will be sold subject to a 120 day right of redemption by the Internal Revenue Service. Mark H. Wittstadt, Gerard Wm. Wittstadt, Jr., Deborah A. Holloway Hill, Sub. Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 OCD-1/10/3t __________________________________ COHN, GOLDBERG & DEUTSCH, LLC ATTORNEYS AT LAW 600 BALTIMORE AVENUE SUITE 208 TOWSON, MARYLAND 21204

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 449 DUELING WAY BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from David A. Patrick, Jr. and Terri Lynn Patrick, dated March 20, 2006 and recorded in Liber 4670, Folio 268 among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, with an original principal balance of $283,950.00, and an original interest rate of 5.875%, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Substitute Trustees will sell at public auction at the Courthouse door for the Circuit Court for Worcester County, on January 30, 2013 AT 2:00PM

ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and the improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $29,000.00 by certified funds only (no cash will be accepted) is required at the time of auction.  Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County.  The purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note, its assigns, or designees, shall pay interest on the unpaid purchase money at the note rate from the date of foreclosure auction to the date funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees.  In the event settlement is delayed for any reason , there shall be no abatement of interest.  Real estate taxes and all other public charges, or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, condo/HOA assessments or private utility charges, not otherwise divested by ratification of the sale, to be adjusted as of the date of foreclosure auction, unless the purchaser is the foreclosing lender or its designee.  Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses, and all other costs incident to settlement, shall be borne by the purchaser.  Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property.  Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale forward. If the purchaser shall fail to comply with the terms of the sale or fails to go to settlement within ten (10) days of ratification of the sale, the Substitute Trustees may, in addition to any other available legal remedies, declare the entire deposit forfeited and resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed in connection with such a motion on himself and/or any principal or corporate designee, and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper by regular mail directed to the address provided by said bidder at the time of foreclosure auction.  In such event, the defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of resale, reasonable attorney’s fees, and all other charges due and incidental and consequential damages, and any deficiency in the underlying secured debt.  The purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property. If the Substitute Trustees cannot convey insurable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be the return of the deposit. The sale is subject to post-sale confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale.

In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of his deposit without interest. Edward S. Cohn, Stephen N. Goldberg, Richard E. Solomon, Richard J. Rogers, Randall J. Rolls, and David W. Simpson, Jr., Substitute Trustees Mid-Atlantic Auctioneers, LLC (410) 825-2900 www.mid-atlanticauctioneers.com OCD-1/10/3t __________________________________

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY KNOWN AS 7645 DOWNS ROAD NEWARK, MARYLAND 21841 SALE TO BE HELD AT THE COURTHOUSE DOOR OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY ONE W. MARKET STREET SNOW HILL, MARYLAND 21863 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 2013 AT 1:00 P.M. Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust and Security Agreement dated January 4, 2005 and recorded in the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland at Liber 4339, Folio 208 (the “Deed of Trust”), the undersigned Substitute Trustees, at the request of the beneficiary of the Deed of Trust (the “Noteholder”), will offer for sale at public auction at the courthouse door of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, One W. Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863, at 1:00 p.m. on Wednesday, January 23, 2013, the real property and improvements thereon known as 7645 Downs Road, Newark, Maryland 21841 (Tax I.D. No. 04-001362) (the “Property”), which is more particularly described as follows: Item One All that tract or parcel of cleared land, situate in the Fourth Election District of Worcester County, State of Maryland, on the westerly side of but not binding upon U.S. Highway No. 113, leading from Newark to Berlin, and on the westerly side of but not binding upon a macadam road leading from the westerly side of U.S. Highway No. 113 to Ironshire Station, and also being easterly of but not binding upon the Maryland, Delaware and Virginia Railroad, containing 40 acres of land, more or less; SUBJECT, NEVERTHELESS, to an easement or right of way, in common with others, at all times and for all purposes, with or without vehicles, over and across the premises hereby described, along a strip 20 feet in width, beginning at the westerly end of the right of way coming from said U.S. Highway No. 113-lronshire Station Macadam Road to the easterly end of the property hereby described and from said point running along and across the long established lane

leading to the residence buildings on the property hereby described at a point near a pear tree; thence northerly parallel to and 30 feet distant easterly from a chicken house for a distance of 450 feet, more or less; thence around the northerly end of said chicken house and at a distance of 30 feet therefrom for a distance of 500 feet, more or less, to the edge of wood lands now or formerly owned by Roy C. Timmons and wife. Item Two All that tract or parcel of land lying and being situate in the Fourth Election District of Worcester County in the State of Maryland, on the northwesterly side of the State highway leading from Snow Hill to Berlin, more particularly described with reference to a certain plat entitled, “Boundary Survey For Robert K. Ewell, Fourth Tax District, Worcester County, Maryland” dated December 9, 1997, made by L.E. Bunting Surveys, Inc. (the, “Plat”) which is recorded in the plat records for Worcester County, Maryland, as follows: BEGINNING for the same at a point where the northeasterly corner of the lands of Roy C. Timmons intersects with the westerly right of way line of U.S. Route 113 and southeasterly corner of the lands herein described, said point of beginning being located where an iron pipe is to be set 24.89 feet in a northwesterly direction from a concrete monument found within the right of way of U.S. Route 113, all as shown on the Plat; thence, from said point of beginning running by and with the aforesaid lands of Roy C. Timmons N 52° 30’ 51” W, a distance of 1361.12 feet to an axle and stone found on the southwesterly corner of the property hereindescribed; thence, running N 31° 25’ 29” E 304.27 feet to a concrete monument found where the southerly line of the lands of Robert J. and Connie L. Bassett and the westerly line of the lands herein conveyed intersect and terminus of the center line of a certain 25’ wide right-of-way as shown on the Plat; thence, running by and with the lands of Robert J. and Connie L. Bassett N 31° 18’ 14” E 1056 feet to an iron pipe found where the northerly line of the lands of Robert J. and Connie L. Bassett intersects the westerly line of the lands herein conveyed; thence, running N 36° 33’ 20” E 848.97 feet to a concrete monument found at the northwest corner of the lands herein conveyed; thence, running S 83° 35’ 36” E by and with the southerly rightof-way line of a private road as shown on the Plat 897.53 feet to a point where an iron pipe is to be set on the westerly right-of-way line of Downs Road; thence, running by and with the westerly right of way line of Downs Road the following courses and distances: S 06° 46’ 55” W 467.18 feet, S 06° 06’ 48” W 1147.65 feet, S 04° 49’ 56” W 148.05 feet, S 27° 27’ 18” W 145.04 feet, to a point where an iron pipe is to be set where the westerly right of way line of Downs Road intersects with the northerly right of way line of U.S. Route 113, as shown on the Plat; thence running by and with the northerly right of way line of U.S. Route 113 on a curve with a radius of 2912.79 feet bearing N 49° 28’


16B LEGAL NOTICES

Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013

Legal Notices 04” E for an arc length of 174.82 feet and a chord length of 174.79 feet to a point where an iron pipe is to be set as shown on the Plat; thence continuing by and with the northerly right of way line of U.S. Route 113 S 47° 44’ 54” W a distance of 858.18 feet to the point of beginning, said land containing 78.52 acres of land more or less. SAVING AND EXCEPTING from the above-referenced parcels 3.1945 acres of land, more or less, conveyed to the State of Maryland, to the use of the State Highway Administration of the Maryland Department of Transportation, by Deed dated May 4, 2009 and recorded in Liber 5298, Folio 82. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY The Property is believed to comprise approximately 105.12 acres, more or less. There are also believed to be a single family dwelling and farm buildings located at the rear of the Property. The current use of the Property is believed to be a sand, gravel and clay excavation site. NOTES All information contained herein as to the nature and description of the Property has been obtained from sources deemed reliable and believed to be accurate. The Substitute Trustees, the Noteholder and their respective agents make no representations or warranties with respect to such information, and each bidder is responsible for independently determining the validity and accuracy of any information provided herein or any other information or materials upon which each bidder relies in submitting a bid. TERMS OF SALE A deposit in the form of a cashier’s or a certified check in the amount of Fifty Thousand Dollars ($50,000.00) will be required from the purchaser at the time and place of sale. The deposit will not earn interest in the hands of the Substitute Trustees. The Noteholder, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a deposit. Immediately after the sale, the successful bidder shall execute and deliver a contract of sale with the Substitute Trustees, copies of which shall be available for inspection immediately before the sale. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a cashier’s or certified check, or such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine acceptable, in their sole discretion, at settlement, which must occur within twenty (20) days following ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, unless such period is extended by the Substitute Trustees, time being of the essence. If payment of the balance of the purchase price does not take place within such period of time aforesaid, in addition to any other legal or equitable remedies available to them, the Substitute Trustees may declare the entire deposit forfeited and resell the Property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. In such event, the defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of both sales, attorneys’ fees and all other charges incurred by the Substitute Trustees. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed in

connection with a motion to resell the Property on himself and/or any principal or corporate designee, and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper by regular mail directed to the address provided by the bidder at the time of the sale. If the Property is purchased by someone other than the Noteholder, interest shall be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate of five percent (5%) per annum from date of sale to the date of settlement, or such date that funds are received by the Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser if settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes, water bills, and all other municipal liens and charges and all other public charges and assessments payable on an annual basis, if any, shall be adjusted to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. The purchaser shall pay all settlement costs, including title examination charges, title insurance premiums, county and state recordation and transfer taxes and recording costs. The purchaser shall pay all costs incidental to the conveyance of the Property. The purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the Property. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. If the Noteholder is the purchaser of the Property at the sale, the amount bid at the sale by the Noteholder shall be a credit against the indebtedness secured by the Deed of Trust. The Substitute Trustees reserve: (1) the right to accept or reject any or all bids, (2) the right to modify or waive the requirements for bidders’ deposits and terms of sale and/or settlement; (3) the right to withdraw the Property from the sale prior to acceptance of the final bid(s); and (4) the right to cancel or postpone the sale. The Property is sold in “AS IS, WHERE IS” condition, subject to all encumbrances, rights, reservations, covenants, conditions, easements, restrictions and statutory liens, if any, having priority over the Deed of Trust, as they may lawfully affect the Property. The Property is also sold subject to the right of redemption of the United States of America, if such right exists, and all applicable condominium association organizational documents or other regimes, all existing housing, building and zoning code violations, all environmental problems and violations which may exist on or with respect to the Property, and all matters that an accurate survey or physical inspection of the Property might disclose. Neither the Substitute Trustees nor any other party make any warranty or representation, either express or implied, of any kind or nature regarding the Property, including, without limitation, the description, use, physical condition, subdivision, zoning, environmental condition, compliance with applicable laws, ordinances, or regulations, or fitness for a particular purpose. The purchaser shall assume the risk of loss or damage immediately after the auction of the Property. If the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey all or any portion of the Property, by reason of any defect in the title or otherwise, the sole remedy

of the purchaser at law or in equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit. Upon refund of the deposit to the purchaser, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claims against the Substitute Trustees. The conveyance of all or any portion of the Property by the Substitute Trustees to the purchaser at settlement shall be by deed without covenant or warranty of any kind whatsoever. Jeffrey S. Greenberg Nikolaus F. Schandlbauer Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 OCD-01/03/3t __________________________________

NOTICE OF SALE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND $4,675,000* CORRECTIONAL OFFICERS RETIREMENT SYSTEM PENSION CONTRIBUTION REFUNDING BONDS, 2013 SERIES (TAXABLE) Electronic bids via PARITY will be received for the above-captioned issue of general obligation bonds (the “Bonds”) of the County Commissioners of Worcester County, Maryland (the “County”) by the Finance Officer of Worcester County at the offices of the Finance Officer, Worcester County Government Building, Room 1103, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland, 21863, until 10:30 a.m. (E.S.T.) on Tuesday, January 15, 2013. Dated Date and Interest Payment Dates. The Bonds will be dated as of the date of delivery of the Bonds. Interest on the Bonds will be payable on December 1, 2013 and semiannually thereafter on June 1 and December 1 until maturity. Principal Amounts and Principal Payment Dates. The Bonds will be issued in serial form, as described below. The Bonds will be issued in the aggregate principal amount of $4,675,000* and will mature on December 1 in the following years and in the following amounts, subject to adjustment as hereinafter provided: Principal Year of Maturity* Amount* 2018 $105,000 2019 270,000 2020 275,000 2021 285,000 2022 290,000 2023 300,000 2024 305,000 2025 315,000 2026 325,000 2027 335,000 2028 350,000 2029 360,000 2030 375,000 2031 385,000 2032 400,000 General Obligations. The Bonds will be the unconditional general obligation of the County and will be issued upon its full faith and credit, which will be irrevocably pledged to

the prompt payment of the principal of and interest on all of the Bonds as the same become due. Book Entry Form; Payment. The Bonds will be issued in book-entry form by issuing a single bond for each maturity registered in the name of Cede & Co. as nominee for The Depository Trust Company or its successor (“DTC”) and immobilized in its custody under DTC’s “FAST” system (provided that if DTC so requests or if DTC is replaced as the depository for the Bonds, replacement bonds will be issued in the denominations of $5,000 or any integral multiples thereof). Principal of the Bonds will be payable at maturity or upon earlier redemption to DTC or its nominee as registered owner of the Bonds. Transfer of principal and interest payments to participants of DTC will be the responsibility of DTC, and transfer of principal and interest payments to beneficial owners of the Bonds by participants of DTC will be the responsibility of such participants and other nominees of beneficial owners. The County will not be responsible or liable for such transfers of payments or for maintaining, supervising or reviewing the records maintained by DTC, its participants or persons acting through such participants. The principal of the Bonds will be payable at the designated corporate trust office of Manufacturers and Traders Trust Company (the “Bond Registrar”), initially in Buffalo, New York, upon presentation and surrender of the Bonds. Payment of interest on the Bonds, at the rates specified by the successful bidder in its bid via PARITY, shall be made by the Bond Registrar on each interest payment date to the person appearing on the registration books of the County maintained by the Bond Registrar as the registered owner thereof, by check of draft mailed to each such registered owner at his, her or its address as it appears on such registration books on the record date for the Bonds, which shall be the fifteenth day of the month next preceding each interest payment date. Notwithstanding the foregoing, while the Bonds are registered under DTC’s book-entry only system, payment of the principal of and interest on the Bonds shall be made by the Bond Registrar to DTC or its nominee in accordance with the procedures of DTC. Authorization and Use of Proceeds. The Bonds are being issued pursuant to the authority of Sections 13E and 14 through 21, inclusive, of Article 25B of the Annotated Code of Maryland, Section 24 of Article 31 of the Annotated Code of Maryland and Appendix HH of the Code of Public Local Laws of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to a resolution adopted by the Board of County Commissioners of Worcester County, Maryland (the “Board”) on January 2, 2013 (the “Resolution”). The proceeds of the sale of the Bonds are being used (1) to reimburse the County for its payment of the outstanding balance of the County’s new entrant liability to the Maryland State Retirement and Pension System with respect to the participation of the County’s correctional


JANUARY 11, 2013

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Legal Notices officers in the Correctional Officers Retirement System, and (2) to pay costs of issuance of the Bonds. Mandatory Sinking Fund Redemption. The successful bidder for the Bonds may designate term bonds for the Bonds maturing on and after December 1, 2027 in accordance with the section of this Notice of Sale captioned “Right to Specify Term Bonds.” Term Bonds shall be subject to mandatory sinking fund redemption by the County at a redemption price equal to 100% of the principal amount thereof, together with accrued interest to the date fixed for redemption at the rate stated in the Term Bonds to be redeemed. Each such mandatory sinking fund redemption shall be made on the date on which a sequential maturity included as part of a Term Bond would otherwise have been payable and in the amount of the maturing principal installment for the Bonds, determined as described in this Notice of Sale, for such principal payment date. Optional Redemption. The Bonds maturing on or after December 1, 2023 shall each be subject to redemption prior to their respective maturities, in whole or in part, at the option of the County, on or after December 1, 2022, either as a whole at any time or in part from time to time on any interest payment date, but only upon payment of a redemption price equal to 100% of the principal amount of the Bonds to be redeemed, together with accrued interest thereon to the date fixed for redemption at the rate or rates stated in the Bonds to be redeemed. Notice of and Procedure for Redemption. The procedures for redemption of the Bonds, including the requirements for giving notice of such redemption, are described in the Preliminary Official Statement (hereinafter defined) and are incorporated herein by reference. Adjustments. The aggregate principal amount of the Bonds and the principal amount of each maturity are subject to adjustment by the County, both before and after the receipt of bids for their purchase. Changes to be made prior to the sale will be through TM3 News Service not later than 9:30 a.m. (E.S.T.) on the date of sale (or as soon thereafter as is reasonably practical) and will be used to compare bids and select a winning bidder. Changes to be made after the sale and the maturity amounts for the Bonds will be communicated to the successful bidder by 5:00 p.m. (E.S.T.) on the date of the sale, will be made only as necessary to effect the reimbursement, and will not reduce or increase the aggregate principal amount of the Bonds by more than 10% from the amount bid upon. In addition, the final maturity schedule for the Bonds will be communicated to the successful bidder by 5:00 p.m. (E.S.T.) on the date of the sale. The dollar amount bid for principal and any amount bid for premium by the successful bidder will be adjusted proportionately to reflect any reduction or increase in the aggregate principal amount of the Bonds, but the interest rates specified by the successful bidder for all matu-

rities will not change. The successful bidder may not withdraw its bid as a result of any changes made within these limits. TERMS OF SALE Electronic Bids. Electronic bids will be received via PARITY pursuant to this Notice of Sale until 10:30 a.m. (E.S.T.), but no bid will be received after the time for receiving bids specified above. To the extent any instructions or directions set forth in PARITY conflict with this Notice of Sale, the terms of this Notice of Sale shall control. For further information about PARITY, potential bidders may contact PARITY (212) 849-5021. Bidders may only submit bids electronically via PARITY. Each prospective bidder shall be solely responsible to submit its bids via PARITY as described above. Each prospective bidder shall be solely responsible to make necessary arrangements to access PARITY for the purpose of submitting its bid in a timely manner and in compliance with the requirements of this Notice of Sale. Neither the County nor PARITY shall have any duty or obligation to provide or assure access to PARITY to any prospective bidder, and neither the County nor PARITY shall be responsible for proper operation of, or have any liability for delays or interruptions of, or any damages caused by, PARITY. The County is using PARITY as a communication mechanism, and not as the County’s agent, to conduct the electronic bidding for the Bonds. The County is not bound by any advice and determination of PARITY to the effect that any particular bid complies with the terms of this Notice of Sale and in particular the bid parameters set forth herein. All costs and expenses incurred by prospective bidders in connection with their submissions of bids via PARITY are the sole responsibility of the bidders; and the County is not responsible, directly or indirectly, for any of such costs or expenses. If a prospective bidder encounters any difficulty in submitting, modifying or withdrawing a bid of the Bonds, he should telephone PARITY (212) 8495021 and notify the County’s Financial Advisor, Davenport & Company LLC by facsimile at (410) 296-8517 and by telephone at (410) 296-9426. Electronic bids must be submitted for the purchase of the Bonds (all or none) via PARITY. Bids will be communicated electronically to the County at 10:30 a.m. (E.S.T.), on January 15, 2013. Prior to that time, a prospective bidder may (1) submit the proposed terms of its bid via PARITY, (2) modify the proposed terms of its bid, in which event the proposed terms as last modified will (unless the bid is withdrawn as described herein) constitute its bid for the Bonds, or (3) withdraw its proposed bid. Once the bids are communicated electronically via PARITY to the County, each bid will constitute an irrevocable offer to purchase the Bonds on the terms therein provided. For purposes of the electronic bidding process, the time as maintained on PARITY shall constitute the official time. Bidding Constraints. Each bidder shall submit one bid via PARITY at a

price of not less than par, based on the aggregate principal amount of the Bonds, on an “all-or-none” basis. Each bid must specify the rate or rates of interest to be paid on the Bonds, in multiples of one-eighth or one-twentieth of one percent (1/8 or 1/20 of 1%). Bidders may specify more than one rate of interest to be borne by the Bonds; but all Bonds maturing on the same date must bear interest at the same rate. The maximum interest rate specified may not exceed 5.50% and the difference between the minimum and maximum interest rates may not exceed 3.0%. Bidders are requested to specify the true interest cost (computed in accordance with the terms of this Notice of Sale) in their bid for the Bonds. A bid for the purchase of the Bonds at a price of less than 100% of par or more than 110% of par, or a bid for the Bonds that specifies split or supplemental interest rates, will not be considered. The County will also not consider and will reject any bid for the purchase of less than all of the Bonds. All bids must be unconditional. By submitting a bid for the Bonds, the bidder agrees, if it is the successful bidder for the Bonds, (1) provide full and complete pricing information with respect to the Bonds to the County in a timely manner so that the County may fulfill its obligation relating to the delivery of the Official Statement to the purchaser of the Bonds within seven business days following the award, including, without limitation, the offering price(s), interest rate(s), selling compensation, delivery dates and other similar information; (2) comply with the requirements of SEC Rule 15c2-12 (the “Rule”), applicable federal and state securities laws and the applicable rules of the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board (the “MSRB”) in connection with the offer and sale of the Bonds; and (3) within three business days after the final Official Statement becomes available, cause copies thereof to be filed with the MSRB. Good Faith Deposit. A good faith deposit (the “Deposit”) is required in connection with the sale and bid for the Bonds. The Deposit may be provided in the form of (i) a federal funds wire transfer in the amount of $46,750 to be submitted to the County by the successful bidder not later than 3:00 p.m. (E.S.T.) (the “Deposit Deadline”) on the date of sale or (ii) a financial surety bond (a “Surety Bond”) from an insurance company acceptable to the County and licensed to issue such a bond in the State of Maryland in the amount of $46,750, each option as described in more detail below. The Deposit of the successful bidder will be retained by the County to be applied in partial payment for the bonds and no interest will be allowed or paid upon the amount thereof, but in the event the successful bidder shall fail to comply with the terms of its bid, the proceeds thereof will be retained as and for full liquidated damages. If a federal funds wire transfer is used, the County shall distribute wiring instructions for the Deposit to the successful bidder upon verifica-

tion of the bids submitted by the bidders and prior to the Deposit Deadline. If the Deposit is not received by the Deposit Deadline, the award of the sale of the Bonds to the successful bidder may be cancelled by the County in its discretion without any financial liability of the County to the successful bidder or any limitations whatsoever on the County’s right to sell the Bonds to a different purchaser upon such terms and conditions as the County shall deem appropriate. If a Surety Bond is used, it must be submitted to the County prior to 5:00 p.m. local time on the day prior to the date for receipt of bids, and must be in form and substance acceptable to the County, including (without limitation) identifying the bidder whose Deposit is guaranteed by such Surety Bond. If the Bonds are awarded to a bidder utilizing a Surety Bond, then such successful bidder is required to submit its Deposit to the County not later than 12:00 p.m. local time on the next business day following the award in accordance with wire instructions delivered by the County to such bidder. If such Deposit is not received by that time, the Surety Bond may be drawn by the County to satisfy the Deposit requirement. Award of Bonds. The County will not consider and will reject any bid for the purchase of less than all of the Bonds. THE RIGHT IS RESERVED TO REJECT ANY AND ALL BIDS AND TO WAIVE ANY IRREGULARITY OR NON-CONFORMITY IN ANY BID. Bids will be opened promptly after 10:30 a.m. (E.S.T.) (as determined in accordance with the time as maintained on PARITY) on January 15, 2013. The award, if made, will be made as promptly as possible after the bids are opened to the bidder offering the lowest interest rate to the County. The lowest interest rate shall be determined in accordance with the true interest cost (“TIC”) method by doubling the semiannual interest rate (compounded semiannually) necessary to discount the debt service payments from the payment dates to the date of the Bonds and to the price bid, excluding interest accrued to the date of delivery. If two or more bidders have made bids, each of which represents the lowest true interest cost to the County, then the Bonds shall be awarded to the bidder offering the highest premium and, if the highest premium is offered by two or more such bidders or if no premium is bid by any such bidders, then the Bonds may be awarded, with their consent, in a ratable portion among such bidders, or the County, in its discretion, may award all of the Bonds to one bidder. The judgment of the County shall be final and binding upon all bidders with respect to the form and adequacy of any bid received and as to its conformity to the terms of this Notice of Sale. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER SHALL MAKE A BONA FIDE PUBLIC OFFERING OF THE BONDS AT THE INITIAL REOFFERING PRICES AND SHALL PROVIDE THE RELATED CERTIFICATION DESCRIBED UNDER “DELIVERY OF BONDS”


18B LEGAL NOTICES

Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013

Legal Notices BELOW. Postponement of Sale; Change in Bidding Constraints. The County reserves the right to postpone, from time to time, the date established for the receipt of the bids. Any such postponement will be announced by TM3 News Service by notice given not later than 3:00 p.m. (E.S.T.) on the last business day prior to any announced date for receipt of bids. If any date fixed for the receipt of bids and the sale of the Bonds is postponed, any alternative sale date will be announced via TM3 News Service at least 48 hours prior to such alternative sale date. In addition, the County reserves the right, on the date established for the receipt of bids, to reject all bids and establish a subsequent alternative sale date. On any such alternative sale date, any bidder may submit a sealed bid or electronic bid via PARITY for the purchase of the Bonds in conformity in all respects with the provisions of this Notice of Sale except for the date of sale and except for the changes announced by TM3 News Service at the time the sale date and time are announced. CUSIP Numbers. It is anticipated that the CUSIP identification numbers will be printed on the Bonds, but neither the failure to print such number on any Bond nor any error with respect thereto shall constitute cause for a failure or refusal by the successful bidder to accept delivery of and pay for the Bonds in accordance with the terms of this Notice of Sale. Legal Opinion. The issuance of the Bonds will be subject to delivery of the approving opinion of Miles & Stockbridge P.C., Baltimore, Maryland, and copies of their opinion shall be substantially in the form set forth as an exhibit to the Preliminary Official Statement referred to below. The opinion will be delivered upon request, without charge, to the successful bidder for the Bonds. Delivery of Bonds. The Bonds will be delivered on January 31, 2013, or as soon as practicable thereafter, at the expense of the County, for the account of the successful bidder, through the facilities of DTC in New York, New York, upon payment of the amount of the successful bid (including any premium), plus the accrued interest to the date of delivery, less the deposit theretofore made. Payment for the Bonds shall be made in federal funds. The Bonds will be issued by means of book-entry system with no physical distribution of bond certificates made to the public. The successful bidder for the Bonds, as a condition to delivery of the Bonds of such issue, shall be required to deposit the bond certificates with DTC, registered in the name of Cede & Co., its partnership nominee. As a condition to the award of the Bonds, the successful bidder shall be required to communicate to the County the initial offering prices at which a bona fide offering of Bonds has been made to the public, which prices are to be shown on the cover of the Official Statement (the “Initial Offering Prices”). Closing Documents. The Bonds will be accompanied by the customary closing documents, including a no-lit-

igation certificate, effective as of the date of delivery, stating that there is no litigation pending against the County affecting the validity of the Bonds. It shall be a condition to the obligation of the successful bidder to accept delivery of and pay for the Bonds that, simultaneously with or before delivery and payment for the Bonds, such successful bidder shall be furnished a certificate or certificates of the President of the Board and the Chief Administrative Officer of the County to the effect that, to the best of their knowledge and belief, the Official Statement (hereinafter defined) (and any amendment or supplement thereto) (except for the any information furnished by the successful bidder, as to which no view will be expressed) as of the date of sale and as of the date of delivery of the Bonds does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact and does not omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements therein, in light of the circumstances under which they were made, not misleading and that between the date of sale and the date of delivery of the Bonds there has been no material adverse change in the financial position or revenues of the County, except as reflected or contemplated in the Official Statement (and any amendment or supplement thereto). Preliminary Official Statement. The Preliminary Official Statement of the County concerning the Bonds (the “Preliminary Official Statement”) is in a form “deemed final” by the County for purposes of SEC Rule 15c2-12(b)(1) (the “Rule”) but is subject to revision, amendment and completion in the final Official Statement. Official Statement. As soon as practicable after the award of the Bonds to the successful bidder therefor on the day of sale, the County will authorize the final Official Statement for the Bonds (the “Official Statement”). By submitting its bid for the Bonds, the successful bidder agrees to provide the County with pricing information and such other information as the County may require in order that the County may provide the successful bidder with a final Official Statement in compliance with the Rule. Whether or not any such information is included in the Official Statement (and any amendment of supplement thereto), such successful bidder shall be responsible to the County and its officials in all respects for the accuracy, fairness and completeness of such information, and for all decisions made with respect to the use or omission of such information in any re-offering of the Bonds, including the presentation or exclusion of any such information in any documents, including the Official Statement. Within seven (7) business days after the award of the Bonds to the successful bidder, the County will deliver to the successful bidder an Official Statement, which is expected to be substantially in the form of the Preliminary Official Statement. The successful bidder will also be furnished, without cost, with up to 200 copies of the Official Statement and any amendments or supplements thereto. The successful bidder may obtain ad-

ditional copies at such successful bidder’s own expense. The County will undertake to provide the successful bidder with further additional information to be included in the Official Statement, when in the opinion of the County or of Bond Counsel, such additional information constitutes a material change to the Official Statement. The County will take such steps as are necessary to arrange for amending and supplementing the Official Statement in connection with the disclosure of such additional information; provided, however, that the County shall have no obligation to provide such additional information after the date which is twenty-five (25) days after the “end of the underwriting period”, as such term is defined in the Rule. Continuing Disclosure Agreement. In order to assist bidders in complying with the SEC Rule 15c2-12(b)(5), the County will execute and deliver a continuing disclosure agreement on or before the date of issuance of the bonds pursuant to which the County will undertake to provide certain information annually and notices of certain events. A description of this agreement is set forth in the Preliminary Official Statement and will also be set forth in the Official Statement. Additional Information. The Preliminary Official Statement of County Commissioners of Worcester County, Maryland, concerning the Bonds, and copies of this Notice of Sale may be obtained from Mr. Harold L. Higgins, Finance Officer, Worcester County Government Building, Room 1103, Snow Hill, Maryland, 21863, or from the County’s Financial Advisor, Davenport & Company LLC, 8600 LaSalle Road, Suite 324, Towson, Baltimore, Maryland, 21286 (410-2969426). COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND By: James C. Church President of the Board of County Commissioners * Preliminary, subject to change as provided herein. OCD-01/03/2t __________________________________

NOTICE OF SALE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND $9,630,000* CONSOLIDATED PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT REFUNDING BONDS 2013 SERIES (TAX-EXEMPT) Electronic bids via PARITY will be received for the above-captioned issue of general obligation bonds (the “Bonds”) of the County Commissioners of Worcester County, Maryland (the “County”) by the Finance Officer of Worcester County at the offices of the Finance Officer, Worcester County Government Building, Room 1103, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland, 21863, until 11:00 a.m. (E.S.T.) on Tuesday, January 15, 2013.

Dated Date and Interest Payment Dates. The Bonds will be dated as of the date of delivery of the Bonds. Interest on the Bonds will be payable on August 1, 2013 and semiannually thereafter on February 1 and August 1 until maturity. Principal Amounts and Principal Payment Dates. The Bonds will be issued in serial form, as described below. The Bonds will be issued in the aggregate principal amount of $9,630,000* and will mature on August 1 in the following years and in the following amounts, subject to adjustment as herein provided: Year of Principal Amount* Maturity* 2013 $1,310,000 2014 1,255,000 2015 1,545,000 2016 1,590,000 2017 1,645,000 2018 1,120,000 2019 1,165,000 General Obligations. The Bonds will be the unconditional general obligation of the County and will be issued upon its full faith and credit, which will be irrevocably pledged to the prompt payment of the principal of and interest on all of the Bonds as the same become due. Book Entry Form; Payment. The Bonds will be issued in book-entry form by issuing a single bond for each maturity registered in the name of Cede & Co. as nominee for The Depository Trust Company or its successor (“DTC”) and immobilized in its custody under DTC’s “FAST” system (provided that if DTC so requests or if DTC is replaced as the depository for the Bonds, replacement bonds will be issued in the denominations of $5,000 or any integral multiples thereof). Principal of the Bonds will be payable at maturity to DTC or its nominee as registered owner of the Bonds. Transfer of principal and interest payments to participants of DTC will be the responsibility of DTC, and transfer of principal and interest payments to beneficial owners of the Bonds by participants of DTC will be the responsibility of such participants and other nominees of beneficial owners. The County will not be responsible or liable for such transfers of payments or for maintaining, supervising or reviewing the records maintained by DTC, its participants or persons acting through such participants. The principal of the Bonds will be payable at the designated corporate trust office of Manufacturers and Traders Trust Company (the “Bond Registrar”), initially in Buffalo, New York, upon presentation and surrender of the Bonds. Payment of interest on the Bonds, at the rates specified by the successful bidder in its bid via PARITY, shall be made by the Bond Registrar on each interest payment date to the person appearing on the registration books of the County maintained by the Bond Registrar as the registered owner thereof, by check of draft mailed to each such registered owner at his, her or its address as it appears on such registration books on the record date for the Bonds, which shall be the fifteenth day of the month next preceding each


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Ocean City Today

LEGAL NOTICES 19B

Legal Notices interest payment date. Notwithstanding the foregoing, while the Bonds are registered under DTC’s book-entry only system, payment of the principal of and interest on the Bonds shall be made by the Bond Registrar to DTC or its nominee in accordance with the procedures of DTC. Authorization and Use of Proceeds. The Bonds are being issued pursuant to the authority of Sections 13E and 14 through 21, inclusive, of Article 25B of the Annotated Code of Maryland, Section 24 of Article 31 of the Annotated Code of Maryland, Sections 9-601 to 9-699, inclusive, of the Environment Article of the Annotated Code of Maryland, and the Code of Public Local Laws of Worcester County, Maryland, Section PW-5-204, and pursuant to a resolution adopted by the Board of County Commissioners of Worcester County, Maryland (the “Board”) on January 2, 2013 (the “Resolution”). The proceeds of the sale of the Bonds are being used (1) to refund all or a portion of the County’s Consolidated Public Improvement Bonds, 1998 Series, the County’s Consolidated Public Improvement Bonds, 2002 Series, and the County’s Consolidated Public Improvement Project and Refunding Bonds, 2004 Series, and (2) to pay costs of issuance of the Bonds. No Optional Redemption. The Bonds are not subject to redemption prior to their stated maturities. Adjustments. The aggregate principal amount of the Bonds and the principal amount of each maturity are subject to adjustment by the County, both before and after the receipt of bids for their purchase. Changes to be made prior to the sale will be through TM3 News Service not later than 9:30 a.m. (E.S.T.) on the date of sale (or as soon thereafter as is reasonably practical) and will be used to compare bids and select a winning bidder. Changes to be made after the sale and the maturity amounts for the Bonds will be communicated to the successful bidder by 5:00 p.m. (E.S.T.) on the date of the sale, will be made only as necessary to effect the refunding, and will not reduce or increase the aggregate principal amount of the Bonds by more than 12% from the amount bid upon. In addition, the final maturity schedule for the Bonds will be communicated to the successful bidder by 5:00 p.m. (E.S.T.) on the date of the sale. The dollar amount bid for principal and any amount bid for premium by the successful bidder will be adjusted proportionately to reflect any reduction or increase in the aggregate principal amount of the Bonds, but the interest rates specified by the successful bidder for all maturities will not change. The successful bidder may not withdraw its bid as a result of any changes made within these limits. TERMS OF SALE Electronic Bids. Electronic bids will be received via PARITY pursuant to this Notice of Sale until 11:00 a.m. (E.S.T.), but no bid will be received after the time for receiving bids specified above. To the extent any instructions or directions set forth in PARITY conflict with this Notice of Sale, the terms of this Notice of Sale

shall control. For further information about PARITY, potential bidders may contact PARITY (212) 849-5021. Bidders may only submit bids electronically via PARITY. Each prospective bidder shall be solely responsible to submit its bids via PARITY as described above. Each prospective bidder shall be solely responsible to make necessary arrangements to access PARITY for the purpose of submitting its bid in a timely manner and in compliance with the requirements of this Notice of Sale. Neither the County nor PARITY shall have any duty or obligation to provide or assure access to PARITY to any prospective bidder, and neither the County nor PARITY shall be responsible for proper operation of, or have any liability for delays or interruptions of, or any damages caused by, PARITY. The County is using PARITY as a communication mechanism, and not as the County’s agent, to conduct the electronic bidding for the Bonds. The County is not bound by any advice and determination of PARITY to the effect that any particular bid complies with the terms of this Notice of Sale and in particular the bid parameters set forth herein. All costs and expenses incurred by prospective bidders in connection with their submissions of bids via PARITY are the sole responsibility of the bidders; and the County is not responsible, directly or indirectly, for any of such costs or expenses. If a prospective bidder encounters any difficulty in submitting, modifying or withdrawing a bid of the Bonds, he should telephone PARITY (212) 8495021 and notify the County’s Financial Advisor, Davenport & Company LLC by facsimile at (410) 296-8517 and by telephone at (410) 296-9426. Electronic bids must be submitted for the purchase of the Bonds (all or none) via PARITY. Bids will be communicated electronically to the County at 11:00 a.m. (E.S.T.), on January 15, 2013. Prior to that time, a prospective bidder may (1) submit the proposed terms of its bid via PARITY, (2) modify the proposed terms of its bid, in which event the proposed terms as last modified will (unless the bid is withdrawn as described herein) constitute its bid for the Bonds, or (3) withdraw its proposed bid. Once the bids are communicated electronically via PARITY to the County, each bid will constitute an irrevocable offer to purchase the Bonds on the terms therein provided. For purposes of the electronic bidding process, the time as maintained on PARITY shall constitute the official time. Bidding Constraints. Each bidder shall submit one bid via PARITY at a price of not less than par, based on the aggregate principal amount of the Bonds, on an “all-or-none” basis. Each bid must specify the rate or rates of interest to be paid on the Bonds, in multiples of one-eighth or one-twentieth of one percent (1/8 or 1/20 of 1%). Bidders may specify more than one rate of interest to be borne by the Bonds; but all Bonds maturing on the same date must bear interest at the same rate. The maximum interest rate specified may not exceed 5.50% and the difference between the mini-

mum and maximum interest rates may not exceed 3.0%. Bidders are requested to specify the true interest cost (computed in accordance with the terms of this Notice of Sale) in their bid for the Bonds. A bid for the purchase of the Bonds at a price of less than 100% of par or more than 112% of par, or a bid for the Bonds that specifies split or supplemental interest rates, will not be considered. The County will also not consider and will reject any bid for the purchase of less than all of the Bonds. All bids must be unconditional. By submitting a bid for the Bonds, the bidder agrees, if it is the successful bidder for the Bonds, (1) provide full and complete pricing information with respect to the Bonds to the County in a timely manner so that the County may fulfill its obligation relating to the delivery of the Official Statement to the purchaser of the Bonds within seven business days following the award, including, without limitation, the offering price(s), interest rate(s), selling compensation, delivery dates and other similar information; (2) comply with the requirements of SEC Rule 15c2-12 (the “Rule”), applicable federal and state securities laws and the applicable rules of the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board (the “MSRB”) in connection with the offer and sale of the Bonds; (3) furnish to the County before the delivery of the Bonds such information as shall be necessary to enable the County to determine the “issue price” of the Bonds in accordance with the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended; and (4) within three business days after the final Official Statement becomes available, cause copies thereof to be filed with the MSRB. Good Faith Deposit. A good faith deposit (the “Deposit”) is required in connection with the sale and bid for the Bonds. The Deposit may be provided in the form of (i) a federal funds wire transfer in the amount of $96,300 to be submitted to the County by the successful bidder not later than 3:00 p.m. (E.S.T.) (the “Deposit Deadline”) on the date of sale or (ii) a financial surety bond (a “Surety Bond”) from an insurance company acceptable to the County and licensed to issue such a bond in the State of Maryland in the amount of $96,300, each option as described in more detail below. The Deposit of the successful bidder will be retained by the County to be applied in partial payment for the bonds and no interest will be allowed or paid upon the amount thereof, but in the event the successful bidder shall fail to comply with the terms of its bid, the proceeds thereof will be retained as and for full liquidated damages. If a federal funds wire transfer is used, the County shall distribute wiring instructions for the Deposit to the successful bidder upon verification of the bids submitted by the bidders and prior to the Deposit Deadline. If the Deposit is not received by the Deposit Deadline, the award of the sale of the Bonds to the successful bidder may be cancelled by the County in its discretion without any financial liability of the County to

the successful bidder or any limitations whatsoever on the County’s right to sell the Bonds to a different purchaser upon such terms and conditions as the County shall deem appropriate. If a Surety Bond is used, it must be submitted to the County prior to 5:00 p.m. local time on the day prior to the date for receipt of bids, and must be in form and substance acceptable to the County, including (without limitation) identifying the bidder whose Deposit is guaranteed by such Surety Bond. If the Bonds are awarded to a bidder utilizing a Surety Bond, then such successful bidder is required to submit its Deposit to the County not later than 12:00 p.m. local time on the next business day following the award in accordance with wire instructions delivered by the County to such bidder. If such Deposit is not received by that time, the Surety Bond may be drawn by the County to satisfy the Deposit requirement. Award of Bonds. The County will not consider and will reject any bid for the purchase of less than all of the Bonds. THE RIGHT IS RESERVED TO REJECT ANY AND ALL BIDS AND TO WAIVE ANY IRREGULARITY OR NON-CONFORMITY IN ANY BID. Bids will be opened promptly after 11:00 a.m. (E.S.T.) (as determined in accordance with the time as maintained on PARITY) on January 15, 2013. The award, if made, will be made as promptly as possible after the bids are opened to the bidder offering the lowest interest rate to the County. The lowest interest rate shall be determined in accordance with the true interest cost (“TIC”) method by doubling the semiannual interest rate (compounded semiannually) necessary to discount the debt service payments from the payment dates to the date of the Bonds and to the price bid, excluding interest accrued to the date of delivery. If two or more bidders have made bids, each of which represents the lowest true interest cost to the County, then the Bonds shall be awarded to the bidder offering the highest premium and, if the highest premium is offered by two or more such bidders or if no premium is bid by any such bidders, then the Bonds may be awarded, with their consent, in a ratable portion among such bidders, or the County, in its discretion, may award all of the Bonds to one bidder. The judgment of the County shall be final and binding upon all bidders with respect to the form and adequacy of any bid received and as to its conformity to the terms of this Notice of Sale. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER SHALL MAKE A BONA FIDE PUBLIC OFFERING OF THE BONDS AT THE INITIAL REOFFERING PRICES AND SHALL PROVIDE THE RELATED CERTIFICATION DESCRIBED UNDER “DELIVERY OF BONDS” BELOW. Postponement of Sale; Change in Bidding Constraints. The County reserves the right to postpone, from time to time, the date established for the receipt of the bids. Any such postponement will be announced by TM3 News Service by notice given not later


20B LEGAL NOTICES

Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013

Legal Notices than 3:00 p.m. (E.S.T.) on the last business day prior to any announced date for receipt of bids. If any date fixed for the receipt of bids and the sale of the Bonds is postponed, any alternative sale date will be announced via TM3 News Service at least 48 hours prior to such alternative sale date. In addition, the County reserves the right, on the date established for the receipt of bids, to reject all bids and establish a subsequent alternative sale date. On any such alternative sale date, any bidder may submit a sealed bid or electronic bid via PARITY for the purchase of the Bonds in conformity in all respects with the provisions of this Notice of Sale except for the date of sale and except for the changes announced by TM3 News Service at the time the sale date and time are announced. CUSIP Numbers. It is anticipated that the CUSIP identification numbers will be printed on the Bonds, but neither the failure to print such number on any Bond nor any error with respect thereto shall constitute cause for a failure or refusal by the successful bidder to accept delivery of and pay for the Bonds in accordance with the terms of this Notice of Sale. Legal Opinion. The issuance of the Bonds will be subject to delivery of the approving opinion of Miles & Stockbridge P.C., Baltimore, Maryland, and copies of their opinion shall be substantially in the form set forth as an exhibit to the Preliminary Official Statement referred to below. The opinion will be delivered upon request, without charge, to the successful bidder for the Bonds. Delivery of Bonds. The Bonds will be delivered on January 31, 2013, or as soon as practicable thereafter, at the expense of the County, for the account of the successful bidder, through the facilities of DTC in New York, New York, upon payment of the amount of the successful bid (including any premium), less the deposit theretofore made. Payment for the Bonds shall be made in federal funds. The Bonds will be issued by means of book-entry system with no physical distribution of bond certificates made to the public. The successful bidder for the Bonds, as a condition to delivery of the Bonds, shall be required to deposit the bond certificates with DTC, registered in the name of Cede & Co., its partnership nominee. As a condition to the award of the Bonds, the successful bidder shall be required to communicate to the County the initial offering prices at which a bona fide offering of the Bonds has been made to the public, which prices are to be shown on the cover of the Official Statement (the “Initial Offering Prices”). Furthermore, as a condition to the delivery of the Bonds, the successful bidder shall

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be required to furnish to the County a written certificate acceptable to the County’s bond counsel to the effect that the successful bidder has made a bona fide public offering of the Bonds at the Initial Offering Prices and that a substantial portion of each maturity of the bonds has been sold to the public (excluding bond houses, brokers and other intermediaries) at the respective Initial Offering Prices. Such certifications shall be made based on actual facts known to the successful bidder as of the sale date. For purposes of the successful bidder’s certificate, a substantial portion of the Bonds is as least 10% in par amount of each maturity of the Bonds. If the successful bidder cannot deliver the certificate as described above, the County’s bond counsel will be required to evaluate the facts and circumstances of the offering and sale of the Bonds to confirm compliance with statutory requirements of avoiding the establishment of an artificial price for the Bonds. Closing Documents. The Bonds will be accompanied by the customary closing documents, including a no-litigation certificate, effective as of the date of delivery, stating that there is no litigation pending against the County affecting the validity of the Bonds and a Tax Certificate and Compliance Agreement signed by the Finance Officer of the County. It shall be a condition to the obligation of the successful bidder to accept delivery of and pay for the Bonds that, simultaneously with or before delivery and payment for the Bonds, such successful bidder shall be furnished a certificate or certificates of the President of the Board and the Chief Administrative Officer of the County to the effect that, to the best of their knowledge and belief, the Official Statement (hereinafter defined) (and any amendment or supplement thereto) (except for the any information furnished by the successful bidder, as to which no view will be expressed) as of the date of sale and as of the date of delivery of the Bonds does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact and does not omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements therein, in light of the circumstances under which they were made, not misleading and that between the date of sale and the date of delivery of the Bonds there has been no material adverse change in the financial position or revenues of the County, except as reflected or contemplated in the Official Statement (and any amendment or supplement thereto). Preliminary Official Statement. The Preliminary Official Statement of the County concerning the Bonds (the “Preliminary Official Statement”) is in a form “deemed final” by the County for purposes of SEC Rule 15c2-12(b)(1) (the “Rule”) but is subject to revision, amendment and completion in the final Official Statement. Official Statement. As soon as practicable after the award of the Bonds to the successful bidder therefor on the day of sale, the County will authorize the final Official Statement for the Bonds (the “Official Statement”). By submitting its bid for the

Bonds, the successful bidder agrees to provide the County with pricing information and such other information as the County may require in order that the County may provide the successful bidder with a final Official Statement in compliance with the Rule. Whether or not any such information is included in the Official Statement (and any amendment of supplement thereto), such successful bidder shall be responsible to the County and its officials in all respects for the accuracy, fairness and completeness of such information, and for all decisions made with respect to the use or omission of such information in any re-offering of the Bonds, including the presentation or exclusion of any such information in any documents, including the Official Statement. Within seven (7) business days after the award of the Bonds to the successful bidder, the County will deliver to the successful bidder an Official Statement, which is expected to be substantially in the form of the Preliminary Official Statement. The successful bidder will also be furnished, without cost, with up to 200 copies of the Official Statement and any amendments or supplements thereto. The successful bidder may obtain additional copies at such successful bidder’s own expense. The County will undertake to provide the successful bidder with further additional information to be included in the Official Statement, when in the opinion of the County or of Bond Counsel, such additional information constitutes a material change to the Official Statement. The County will take such steps as are necessary to arrange for amending and supplementing the Official Statement in connection with the disclosure of such additional information; provided, however, that the County shall have no obligation to provide such additional information after the date which is twenty-five (25) days after the “end of the underwriting period”, as such term is defined in the Rule. Continuing Disclosure Agreement. In order to assist bidders in complying with the SEC Rule 15c2-12(b)(5), the County will execute and deliver a continuing disclosure agreement on or before the date of issuance of the bonds pursuant to which the County will undertake to provide certain information annually and notices of certain events. A description of this agreement is set forth in the Preliminary Official Statement and will also be set forth in the Official Statement. Additional Information. The Preliminary Official Statement of County Commissioners of Worcester County, Maryland, concerning the Bonds, and copies of this Notice of Sale may be obtained from Mr. Harold L. Higgins, Finance Officer, Worcester County Government Building, Room 1103, Snow Hill, Maryland, 21863, or from the County’s Financial Advisor, Davenport & Company LLC, 8600 LaSalle Road, Suite 324, Towson, Baltimore, Maryland, 21286 (410-2969426). COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND

By: James C. Church President of the Board of County Commissioners * Preliminary, subject to change as provided herein. OCD-01/03/2t __________________________________ COHN, GOLDBERG & DEUTSCH, LLC ATTORNEYS AT LAW 600 BALTIMORE AVENUE SUITE 208 TOWSON, MARYLAND 21204

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 502 BONNEVILLE AVENUE POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Theresa L. Stoudmire and Vincent Stoudmire, Personal Representative, dated March 21, 2008 and recorded in Liber 5082, Folio 198 among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, with an original principal balance of $106,051.93, and an original interest rate of 1.700%, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Substitute Trustees will sell at public auction at the Courthouse door for the Circuit Court for Worcester County, on January 23, 2013 AT 2:00 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and the improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale:  A deposit of $11,000.00 by certified funds only (no cash will be accepted) is required at the time of auction.  Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County.  The purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note, its assigns, or designees, shall pay interest on the unpaid purchase money at the note rate from the date of foreclosure auction to the date funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees.  In the event settlement is delayed for any reason , there shall be no abatement of interest.  Real estate taxes and all other public charges, or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, condo/HOA assessments or private utility charges, not otherwise divested by ratification of the sale, to be adjusted as of the date of foreclosure auction, unless the purchaser is the foreclosing lender or its designee.  Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses, and all other costs incident to settlement, shall be borne by the purchaser.  Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property.  Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to


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Legal Notices the property from the date of sale forward. If the purchaser shall fail to comply with the terms of the sale or fails to go to settlement within ten (10) days of ratification of the sale, the Substitute Trustees may, in addition to any other available legal remedies, declare the entire deposit forfeited and resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed in connection with such a motion on himself and/or any principal or corporate designee, and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper by regular mail directed to the address provided by said bidder at the time of foreclosure auction. In such event, the defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of resale, reasonable attorney’s fees, and all other charges due and incidental and consequential damages, and any deficiency in the underlying secured debt.  The purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property. If the Substitute Trustees cannot convey insurable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be the return of the deposit. The sale is subject to post-sale confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of his deposit without interest. Edward S. Cohn, Stephen N. Goldberg, Richard E. Solomon, Richard J. Rogers, and David W. Simpson, Jr., Substitute Trustees Mid-Atlantic Auctioneers, LLC (410) 825-2900 www.mid-atlanticauctioneers.com OCD-01/03/3t __________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 16 64TH ST. A/R/T/A 16 64TH ST., UNIT #402 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Daniel J. Monahan and Maria F. Monahan dated March 3, 2006 and recorded in Liber 4660, Folio 1 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $402,600.00 and an original interest rate of 6.50000% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester

Co., at the Court House Door, Snow Hill, on JANUARY 16, 2013 AT 2:00 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and described as Unit 402, Oceanscape Condominium and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $43,000 in cash, cashiers check or certified check is required at time of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current real property taxes will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All past due property taxes paid by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All transfer taxes shall be paid by the Purchaser. Purchaser shall pay all applicable agricultural tax, if any. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Jacob Geesing, Carrie M. Ward, David W. Simpson, Jr., Substitute Trustees OCD-12/27/3t __________________________________

PLANNING AND ZONING COMMISSION

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 110, Zoning, of the Code of the Town of Ocean City, Maryland, notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be conducted by the Planning and Zoning Commission in the Council Chambers of City Hall located at 301 Baltimore Avenue in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland on: WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 2013 At 7:00 pm To consider amending Section 110664 of the Code of the Town of Ocean City, Maryland, to include miniature golf as item (7) as a use permitted conditional use in the DMX, Downtown Mixed Use, Zoning District. APPLICANT: PLANNING & ZONING COMMISSION (FILE #12-14100003) No oral or written testimony will be accepted after the close of the public hearing. Public hearings that are not completed at one meeting may be continued without additional advertised notice provided the Commission Chairman announces that the hearing will be continued and gives persons in attendance an opportunity to sign up for written notice of the additional hearing dates. For further information concerning this public hearing, please contact the Department of Planning and Community Development, Room 242, City Hall, 301 Baltimore Avenue, Ocean City, MD 21842. Phone 410-289-8855. PLANNING AND ZONING COMMISSION PAM GREER BUCKLEY, CHAIRPERSON WILLIAM E. ESHAM, III, ATTORNEY OCD-1/3/2t __________________________________ REGAN J. R. SMITH ESQ WILLIAMS, MOORE, SHOCKLEY & HARRISON LLP 10441 RACETRACK ROAD SUITE 2 BERLIN, MD 21811

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 14965 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF RAYMOND CLINTON MCALLISTER JR. Notice is given that Randall G. McAllister, 10102 Orchard Road, Berlin, MD 21811; Steven Ray McAllister, 21862 Shockley Road, Milford, DE 19963, was on December 21, 2012 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Raymond Clinton McAllister Jr. who died on November 17, 2012, with a will.

Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 21st day of June, 2013. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Randall G. McAllister Steven Ray McAllister Personal Representative True Test Copy Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: January 03, 2013 OCD-1/3/3t __________________________________ WILLIAMS, MOORE, SHOCKLEY & HARRISON PA RAYMOND C. SHOCKLEY 3509 COASTAL HIGHWAY P.O. BOX 739 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842

NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 14968 Notice is given that the Circuit court of Fairfax County, VA appointed Jason P. Long, 9427 Lake View Drive, Berlin, MD 21811 as the Executor of the Estate of Joyce K. Long who died on April 20, 2012 domiciled in Virginia, USA. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following Maryland counties: Worcester County. All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for Worcester County with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine


Ocean City Today

22B LEGAL NOTICES

JANUARY 11, 2013

Legal Notices months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred. Jason P. Long Foreign Personal Representative Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of first publication: January 03, 2012 OCD-1/3/3t __________________________________ BARBARA R. TRADER 122 EAST MAIN STREET P.O. BOX 4095 SALISBURY, MD 21803-4095 SMALL ESTATE

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 14984 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF MATTIE T. CORDDRY Notice is given that Barbara R. Trader, 122 East Main Street, Salisbury, MD 21801, was on January 03, 2013 appointed personal representative of the small estate of Mattie T. Corddry who died on December 24, 2012, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within 30 days after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having an objection to the probate of the will shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within six months after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having claims against the decedent must serve their claims on the undersigned personal representative or file them with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Thirty days after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within thirty days from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Any claim not served or filed within that time, or any exten-

sion provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Barbara R. Trader Personal Representative True Test Copy Register of Wills for Worcester County Charlotte K. Cathell Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: January 10, 2013 OCD-1/10/1t __________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, Maryland 20707 301-490-3361 Laura H.G. O’Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. Matthew J. Schiftic and Robin Schiftic Defendants IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Civil No. 23C12000878

NOTICE ORDERED, this 26th day of December, 2012 by the Circuit Court of WORCESTER COUNTY, Maryland, that the sale of the property at 10330 Harrison Road, Berlin, Maryland 21811 mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported by Laura H.G. O’Sullivan, et. al, Substitute Trustees, be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 28th day of January, 2013 next, provided a copy of this notice be inserted in some newspaper published in said County once in each of three successive weeks before the 21st day of January, 2013, next. The report states the amount of sale to be $184,683.64. Stephen V. Hales CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND STEPHEN V. HALES Clerk of the Circuit Court For Worcester County P.O. Box 40 Snow Hill, MD 21863-0040 OCD-1/3/3t __________________________________

NOTICE TO BIDDERS Purchase of New Vehicles Worcester County, Maryland The Worcester County Commissioners are currently accepting bids for the purchase of five (5) new public safety vehicles for the Sheriff’s Office. Bid specification packages and bid forms are available from the Office of the County Commissioners, Room 1103 - Worcester County Government Center, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863, or may be obtained online at www.co.worces-

ter.md.us or by calling the Commissioners’ Office at 410-632-1194 to request a package by mail. Sealed bids will be accepted until 1:00 PM, Tuesday, January 22, 2013 in the Office of the County Commissioners at the above address, at which time they will be opened and publicly read aloud. Envelopes shall be marked "Vehicle Bid" in the lower left-hand corner. After opening, bids will be forwarded to the Department of Public Works for tabulation, review and recommendation to the County Commissioners for their consideration at a future meeting. In awarding the bid, the Commissioners reserve the right to reject any and all bids, waive formalities, informalities and technicalities therein, and to take whatever bid they determine to be in the best interest of the County considering lowest or best bid, quality of goods and work, time of delivery or completion, responsibility of bidders being considered, previous experience of bidders with County contracts, or any other factors they deem appropriate. All inquiries shall be directed to William Powell, Fleet Management Superintendent, at 410-632-5676. OCD-1/10/1t __________________________________ Cohn, Goldberg & Deutsch, LLC Attorneys at Law 600 Baltimore Avenue, Suite 208 Towson, MD 21204 410-296-2550 Pile #: 437370 Edward S. Cohn Stephen N. Goldberg Richard E. Solomon Richard J. Rogers David W. Simpson, Jr. 600 Baltimore Avenue, Suite 208 Towson, MD 21204 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs v. Robert Davis Jeannie Keefer 311 Robin Drive Ocean City, MD 21842 Defendants IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23-C-12-001231

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 26th day of December, 2012, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported, will be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 28th day of January, 2013, provided a copy of this notice be published in a newspaper of general circulation in Worcester County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 21st day of January, 2013. The Report of Sale states the amount of the foreclosure sale price to be $235,807.39. The property sold herein is known as 311 Robin Drive, Ocean City, MD 21842. Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, Maryland STEPHEN V. HALES Clerk of the Circuit Court

For Worcester County P.O. Box 40 Snow Hill, MD 21863-0040 OCD-1/3/3t __________________________________

NOTICE Sealed BIDS for the construction of Boardwalk VMS Signs - 2013 will be received by the Mayor and City Council at the Office of the City Manager until January 29, 2013 – 11:00 AM and then opened and read aloud at a Council Work Session this date. The CONTRACT DOCUMENTS may be examined at the office of the City Engineer, located in City Hall, 3rd Street & Baltimore Avenue, Ocean City, Maryland 21842. Copies of the CONTRACT DOCUMENTS may be obtained at the office of the City Engineer located in City Hall, 3rd Street & Baltimore Avenue, Ocean City, Maryland. The Work to be performed under this contract includes in general: furnishing and installing two new variable message signs and relocating two existing variable message signs along the Ocean City Boardwalk. OCD-1/10/1t __________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bathesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555 Carrie M. Ward, et al. 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. DOUGLAS D. GALLOWAY SANDRA J. MCALISTERGALLOWAY 2307 Point’s Reach, Unit #2307 Berlin ARTA Ocean Pines, MD 21811 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23-C-12-000271

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 4th day of January, 2013, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 2307 Point’s Reach, Unit #2307, Berlin ARTA Ocean Pines, MD 21811, made and reported by Howard N. Biernam, Substitute Trustee, will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 4th day of February, 2013, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 28th day of January, 2013. The report states the purchases price at the Foreclosure sale to be $359,000.00. Stephen V. Hales Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland


Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013

LEGAL NOTICES 23B

Legal Notices True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, Md. OCD-1/10/3t __________________________________ Law Offices of Jeffrey Nadel 4041 Powder Mill Road, Suite 415 Calverton, Maryland 20705 240-473-5000 Jeffrey Nadel Scott Nadel 4041 Powder Mill Road, Suite 415 Calverton, MD 20705 Substitute Trustees Plaintiff Dianne M. Sinclair Warren L. Sinclair 108 A Franklin Avenue Berlin, MD 21811 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Civil No. 23C12001326

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 27th day of December, 2012, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported, will be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 28th day of January, 2013, provided a copy of this notice be inserted in a weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 21st day of January, 2013. The Report of Sale states the amount of the foreclosure sale price to be $218,913.00. The property sold herein as known as 108 A Franklin Avenue, Berlin, MD 21811. Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, Md. OCD-1/10/3t __________________________________ IN THE ORPHANS’ COURT FOR (OR) BEFORE THE REGISTER OF WILLS FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND IN THE ESTATE OF: CATHERINE T. RINAMAN ESTATE NO. 14982

NOTICE OF JUDICIAL PROBATE To all Persons Interested in the above estate: You are hereby notified that a petition has been filed by Alfred J. Szczerbicki, Esq., 28 Allegheny Avenue, Suite 500, Towson, MD 21204. A hearing will be held at Worcester County Court House, Court Room 4, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, MD 21863 on 01/29/2013 at 10:00 AM. This hearing may be transferred or postponed to a subsequent time. Further information may be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills. Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills

Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Phone: (410) 632-1529 Newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Publication Date: 01/10/2013 OCD-1/10/2t __________________________________

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS TOWN OF OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 110 of the Code of Ocean City, Maryland, hereinafter referred to as the Code, same being the Zoning Ordinance for Ocean City, Maryland, notice is hereby given that public hearings will be conducted by the Board of Zoning Appeals for Ocean City, Maryland in the Council Chambers of City Hall located on Baltimore Avenue and Third Street, in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland on: THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 2013 at 6:00 p.m. POSTPONED FROM 12/13/12 Pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-93(2), Powers, of the Code, an appeal has been filed pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-94(3)(c) requesting a special front yard exception to maintain existing setback; pursuant to Section 110-94(2)(c) requesting a special exception to loading requirements for an onsite loading zone which provides 10’-6’ height clearance instead of 14’ as required by Code; and pursuant to Section 110-94(2)(b) requesting a special exception to parking requirements to allow 25 compact parking spaces (8’ x 18”). The sites of the appeal are described as Lots 10 and 11, Block 5; and Lot 11, Block 18 of the Sinepuxent Beach Company Plat, 1891; the lots in Block 5 can be further described as located on the west side of Atlantic Avenue (Boardwalk), between 4th and 5th Streets and locally known as 407 Atlantic Avenue; and the parking lot in Block 18 is further described as located on the west side of Baltimore Avenue, between 4th and 5th Streets and locally known as 411 Baltimore Avenue, in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland. APPLICANT: ROCCO DIFILIPPO (BZA 2357 12-09400020) at 6:10 p.m. Pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-93(2) and (3), Powers, of the Code, an appeal has been filed pursuant to the provisions of Section 11094(2)(b) requesting a special parking exception to waive three (3) parking spaces and to allow for three (3) compact parking spaces; and pursuant to Section 110-95(1)(a) requesting a variance to the side yard setback to allow placement of an elevator, mechanical room, and storage room, providing a minimum 3 foot setback instead of 10 feet as required by Code;

and pursuant to Section 30-553(8)h(ii) requesting a variance to allow the landscape areas provided between the vehicular use area and public rightof-way on the westerly property line to be 2.5 feet in width instead of 5’ as required by Code. The site of the appeal is described as Lot 8, Block 11N, Redevelopment Plat of Block 11N, further described as located on the northeast corner of 10th Street and Baltimore Avenue, and locally known as 8-10th Street, in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland. APPLICANT: ARDESHIR SASSAN – (BZA 2358 12-09500005) at 6:20 p.m. Pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-93(2), Powers, of the Code, an appeal has been filed pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-94(3)(a) requesting a special yard exception to the rear yard, allowing a setback of 3.57 feet instead of 5 feet as required by Code; and pursuant to Section 110422(1)(i) allowing the new dwelling to maintain 6.10 feet between structures instead of 10 feet as required by Code. The site of the appeal is described as Lot 25B, Section A of the Warren’s Park Plat, further described as located on the north side of Bay Overlook Lane, and locally known as 42 Bay Overlook Lane, in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland. APPLICANT: WARREN’S PARK INC/RESORT HOMES – (BZA 2359 12-04900021) Further information concerning the public hearings may be examined in the office of the Department of Planning and Community Development in City Hall. Alfred Harrison, Chairman Heather Stansbury, Attorney OCD-1/10/2t __________________________________

RFP NOTICE The Mayor and City Council of Ocean City, Maryland are accepting sealed proposals on the following item(s): REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL FOR BOND COUNSEL Sealed proposals must be in the City Manager’s Office, City Hall, 301 Baltimore Avenue, Ocean City, Maryland no later than 11:00 A.M. Tuesday, February 26, 2013. Mailed proposals must be received by this time as postmarks will not be considered. The proposals will be acknowledged by the Mayor and City Council at their regular Work Session on Tuesday, February 26, 2013 at 1:00 P.M., at City Hall, Council Chambers first floor, Ocean City, Maryland. Copies of these proposal packages are available at the Town of Ocean City Finance Department, 301 Baltimore Avenue, Ocean City, Maryland or by calling (410) 289-8858. Dawn Leonard Administrative Office Associate II Finance Department

301 Baltimore Avenue Ocean City, Maryland 21842 410-289-8858 dleonard@oceancitymd.gov OCD-1/10/1t __________________________________ MYESHA R. CRADDOCK ESQ. THE CRADDOCK LAW OFFICE, LLC 8100 SANDPIPER CIRCLE #108B BALTIMORE, MD 21236

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 14915 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF MARLENE NOEL Notice is given that Mardini Ladic Jr., 204 Heathersage Drive, Marietta, PA 17547, was on January 04, 2013 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Marlene Noel who died on September 22, 2012, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 4th day of July, 2013. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Mardini Ladic Jr. Personal Representative True Test Copy Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: January 10, 2013 OCD-1/10/3t __________________________________

LEGAL ADVERTISING Call: 410-723-6397 • Fax: 410-723-6511 or E-mail: legals@oceancitytoday.net


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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013


Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013

NEWS 21A

MHLA predicts new opportunities, but also legislative clog, for state tourism ZACK HOOPES ■ Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2013) With the new year and a new General Assembly convening on Wednesday, local prognosticators say that the local tourism industry will have to lobby actively for state support and to prepare for the possible benefits that Hurricane Sandy damage to beach resorts north might bring to Ocean City and its environs. January’s breakfast meeting for the Governor’s Economic Development Committee of Ocean City was held this week at the Clarion, and featured a briefing from Maryland Hotel and Lodging Association President David Reel. Most important, Reel told the room, was for concerned parties to make their voices heard in Annapolis regarding the state’s shrinking tourism budget. “I know there’s a lot of cynicism out there that politicians don’t listen,” Reel said. “But from someone who’s been there, let me tell you, grassroots lobbying is a powerful thing. It makes a difference when people show up.” To that end, the MHLA is a partsponsor of this year’s “Tourism Day in Annapolis.” On Friday, Feb. 8, those interested will convene at the state’s capital to lobby the State Senate and House of Delegates for the needs of the tourism in-

dustry. Reel invited any interested parties in Ocean City to sign up for the sessions. “Now is the opportunity to get our tourism budget increased and to get some favorable legislation,” agreed the event’s host, Clarion owner Dr. Lenny Berger. To the industry’s advantage, Reel said, this year’s 90-day regular legislative session in Annapolis will likely be less mired down with some of the familiar quandaries. “The budget issue will not dominate like it did last year,” he predicted. For the most part, Reel said, much of last year’s fighting was the result of the capital’s Republican minority combating its Democratic majority by taking issues to referendum. But with the relative success of Democrat-backed policies at the polls this past November, such a laborious tactic may no longer be prudent. “Voters approved a number of things, such as same-sex marriage, in-state tuition for illegal immigrants, and the casinos,” Reel said. “The governor and the General Assembly now know that controversial bills passed will be held up by the general public. The referendum was seen as a real hurdle, but frankly it isn’t.” However, much of this attention may be deflected to what Reel saw as the two hot-button issues for the coming year – gun control, in wake of the Sandy Hook,

Conn. school shooting, and the possible move by the O’Malley administration to abolish the death penalty in Maryland. Also much talked-about was the possibility that destruction of resort areas in New Jersey by Hurricane Sandy could drive more visitors south to Ocean City. “There is a lot of anecdotal evidence that those people will be coming down,” Reel said. However, he cautioned, the most heavily storm-damaged areas of northern New Jersey had never had a strong hotel lodging element, being more grounded in residential property. Thus, Reel said, the turnover of additional traffic coming from the north may not be as rich as some believe. “We have a lot more hotels, but not that many more people,” Berger said. Many resort property owners have expressed a similar sentiment that the resort’s glut of housing from its pre-2008 success is now dragging it down. “We have vacant hotels, and that’s a problem. We need to bring people in when our rates are high,” Berger said. Reel also said he was anxious to see how the state’s addition of a casino in Prince George’s county would pan out. While local racetrack and gaming venue Ocean Downs is the state’s lowest-grossing, with just under $50 million in revenue for 2012, its position is relatively secure due to its geographic isolation.

Meanwhile, the Perryville casino, which grosses $98.6 million, has said that its business is being usurped by Baltimore’s Maryland Live!, which raked in almost $230 million for the year. However, the owners of Maryland Live! were actively involved in lobbying against the state’s sixth casino, saying that site would do to them exactly what they were doing to Perryville. “Maryland Live! is definitely putting a red light on Perryville, so it’ll be interesting to see, when they open up in Prince George’s, if it has a ripple effect,” Reel said. Worcester County Economic Development Director Bill Badger said he is working to have the county receive more money from the state’s Small, Minority, and Women-Owned Business Program, which is largely funded through casino taxes. In 2012, gaming contributed more than $5.6 million to the fund, which Badger said has a current pool of about $7.5 million. Worcester receives little of that money, although Ocean Downs contributed almost $750,000 of taxes to it this year. Regardless, Badger said, Worcester remains extremely capable in garnering new business investment. “Our county is still number one in the state for the attraction of wealth,” he said.

DECEMBER 2012 CASINO REVENUE GROSS GAMING REVENUE

%

Total Dec 2012

Total FY2013 Year to Date

Hollywood Dec 2012

Hollywood 2013 Fiscal YTD

Ocean Downs Dec 2012

Ocean Downs 2013 Fiscal YTD

Maryland Live Dec 2012

# OF MACHINES

1,500

800

4,750

WPU

$128.09

$134.51

$244.15

Maryland Live 2013 Fiscal YTD

TOTAL

100

$45,243,882.61

$263,551,877.79

$5,956,140.98

$36,256,645.97

$3,335,925.98

$26,491,583.04

$35,951,815.65

$200,803,648.78

Education Trust Fund

49.25

$22,282,612.18

$128,782,383.44

$2,933,399.43

$17,710,892.59

$1,642,943.54

$12,924,628.82

$17,706,269.21

$98,146,862.03

Casino Share

33

$14,930,481.28

$86,972,119.75

$1,965,526.54

$11,964,693.20

$1,100,855.58

$8,742,222.43

$11,864,099.16

$66,265,204.12

Horse Racing Purse Account

7

$3,167,071.79

$18,448,631.45

$416,929.87

$2,537,965.21

$233,514.82

$1,854,410.81

$2,516,627.10

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5.5

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$327,587.75

$1,994,115.52

$183,475.93

$1,457,037.08

$1,977,349.86

$11,044,200.69

Race Tracks Facility Renewal Account

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$5,629,074.20

$104,232.47

$779,996.84

$58,378.70

$586,078.51

$629,156.77

$4,262,998.85

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$119,122.81

$725,132.93

$66,718.52

$529,831.64

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$4,016,072.93

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$3,953,278.16

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$397,373.75

$539,277.23

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Md. casinos see highest take since July (Jan. 11, 2013) Maryland casinos generated $45.2 million in December on the strength of Maryland Live Casino at Arundel Mills mall best month ever. The monthly revenue figure was released Monday by the Maryland State Lottery and Gaming Control Agency. Maryland Live, the state’s largest casino with 4,750 slot machines, generated $35.9 million last month. Casino officials attributed the revenue increase to starting 24/7 operations and a “strong holiday week in general.” The Casino at Ocean Downs’ revenue was up 10.9 percent year-over-year, as the 800-machine slots parlor generated

$3.3 million in December. Hollywood Casino Perryville, the state’s first casino, saw revenue dip 37.1 percent year-over-year to less than $6 million last month. The 1,500-machine casino’s slide has been attributed to the opening of Maryland Live in June. The casino revenue total is Maryland’s highest since July, when Ocean Downs was still drawing Eastern Shore vacationers. More than $22 million of last month’s revenue goes to the state’s Education Trust Fund. Maryland Live is the only casino in the state that is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. All casinos were able to start operating 24/7 on Dec. 27, but Ocean Downs and Hollywood decided on more limited hours.

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Ocean City Today

22A NEWS

JANUARY 11, 2013

Commission to discuss septic regulations and subdivisions Septics Bill designed to protect Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic coastal bays NANCY POWELL ■ Staff Writer

DOWNTOWN UTILITY BOX PAINTED The Hotel Monte Carlo and Ocean City Development Corporation partnered to paint another Delmarva Power utility box located on Third Street, east of Baltimore Avenue in downtown Ocean City. The OCDC commissioned local artist Todd Leasure to paint this box. This box is the 22nd Delmarva Power utility box painted under the OCDC Public Art Program. Other painted utility boxes can be viewed at the OCDC Web site, www.ocdc.org. Pictured with Leasure is Clara Ziman, partner of Hotel Monte Carlo.











 





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(Jan. 11, 2013) The Worcester County Planning Commission will hold a work session Thursday, Jan. 17, to discuss the informational workshops held on the Septics Bill and a proposed change to the county code to permit up to seven lots in minor subdivisions. The Septics Bill, formally named the Sustainable Growth and Agricultural Preservation Act of 2012 or Senate bill 236, was designed to protect the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic coastal bays and their associated rivers and streams by limiting the amount of development served by septic systems. It aims to do that by requiring the use of its tier system. All local units of government must map the land into one of four tiers, but the bill only applies to residential subdivisions. The four tiers relate to the use of onsite sewage disposal systems and where they may be used. Failure to adopt a tier system would mean that the county could only authorize minor residential subdivisions that would be served by on-site sewage disposal systems, community sewage systems or shared systems. Major residential subdivisions would only be authorized if served by a public sewage system. If the commissioners adopt the state’s tier system, there could minimal effects or none at all. That is because a provision in the law allows counties meeting a minimum population density requirement in rural areas to allow major subdivisions on septic systems in all areas except for those served by a public sewer system. To take advantage of that provision, the

commissioners must first designate the tiers. Accomplishing that requires obtaining state approval and then incorporating it into the county’s comprehensive plan. Staff of the county’s Department of Development Review and Permitting worked on maps showing where the tiers would apply. The maps show areas currently served by sewer, areas planned for sewer and areas not planned for sewer service plus areas dominated by forest and agricultural uses. The department then held informal workshops in November in Berlin, Snow Hill and Pocomoke so the public could see the maps. Although many people from Ocean Pines attended the workshop in Berlin, the Septics Bill does not affect those property owners because the land is already developed. Members of the Planning Commission will review public comments on the tier maps on Thursday and will make a recommendation for the Worcester County Commissioners to adopt them or not to adopt them. The county commissioners will schedule a public hearing on their adoption. The Planning Commission will also discuss a draft bill proposed by County Commissioner Virgil Shockley that would change the definition of a minor subdivision to allow a maximum of seven lots, rather than the five lots as currently defined. Shockley proposed the bill in December because, he said, it would ensure that future generations can continue to live and work on family farms. The proposed bill, Commissioner Madison Bunting said, would also help protect farming in the county because farmers could sell two or three lots during tough economic times and continue to farm. After reviewing the bill, the Planning Commission will make a recommendation regarding it to the county commissioners, who will schedule a public hearing on it.

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Community Resource Day for homeless, Jan. 30 in Snow Hill (Jan. 11, 2013) The Worcester County Homeless Committee will hold a Community Resource Day for homeless people or people at risk of homelessness from 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 30, at Snow Hill Christian Church on Bay Street and Park Row in Snow Hill. The Community Resource Day is an opportunity for people to have one-onone time with people representing groups that provide services such as housing, counseling, treatment and health care. In addition to the regular soup kitchen, people attending the event will also have access to personal hygiene products such as soap and toothpaste that are not nor-

mally provided at food pantries. Donations are needed for the success of the event. Local businesses and individuals are encouraged to donate personal hygiene products, especially individually wrapped toilet paper, paper towels, diapers and baby wipes. The items will be distributed at the Community Resource Day in December and at future Community Resource Days throughout the winter. Monetary donations are also accepted. To donate or for more information about donations, contact Donna Taylor with Worcester Youth and Family Counseling Services at 410-641-4598.


Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013

NEWS 23A

Construction on West OC townhomes to start next month NANCY POWELL ■ Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2013) A subdivision in West Ocean City will have new townhomes on the water near the Route 50 bridge. Seaside Village was first approved in 2005 and that approval was amended two years later. Since then, condominiums and restaurants have been built. Now, plans call for townhomes that will be “fee simple” and built by a different developer. “It’s just a paper exercise,” project manager Dave Rovansek told the Worcester County Planning Commission in Snow Hill on Jan. 3. “We want to make the project feasible again in today’s market,” said Josh Mastrangelo of The Evergreene Companies, a homebuilder and development company based in Virginia that is developing the property. “Condo financing is today’s market is difficult.” Fee simple is the most common form of real estate title, in which the owner has absolute ownership. The other form of residential ownership is condominium ownership, which is common in Ocean City because of the number of condominiums. In condominiums, owners share common elements such as a swimming pool. Prices at the Seaside Village Towns start in the high $200,000s. Private boat slips are available.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/NANCY POWELL

Townhomes of a different design will be built at the vacant lots shown here in Seaside Village. (Right) The sales office is open at Seaside Village in West Ocean City for prospective buyers of townhomes to be constructed there.

Plans call for 32 townhomes to be built and construction is expected to begin in February, sales manager Wendy O. Baker said Tuesday. The townhomes range in size from 1,800 to 2,000 square feet, but exterior features such as sunrooms or outdoor kitchens may be added and that would increase the square footage. See SEASIDE on Page 24 PHOTO COURTESY WENDY BAKER

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Ocean City Today

24A NEWS

JANUARY 11, 2013

Seaside Village to feature 32 homes Continued from Page 23

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Sea gulls are perched on a wooden fence near Somerset Street in downtown Ocean City Sunday. The birds and visitors flocked to the beach and Boardwalk on a mild winter day. Temperatures were even warmer in the days that followed.

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The interior of the three-level townhomes can be configured to the buyer’s preference and the number of bedrooms they desire. Having four bedrooms is feasible. Evergreene is also developing the Broad Marsh project at 70th Street in Ocean City. That project, with 46 townhomes, has the same timeline and a similar style, Baker said. The company also has the Watermark project in Bethany Beach, Del., and the Shoal Harbor in Rehoboth Beach, Del. The residential project in West Ocean City was started several years ago by Blue Water Development, a local company that sold it several years ago. Blue Water developed the Seaside Village commercial area that includes Chick Fil-A, Popeye’s, Chipotle and Applebee’s, the first restaurant to be built there. The Planning Commission approved the site plan for the residential planned community and then approved both the preliminary and final plat review contingent on the Worcester County Commissioners’ approval of a private road that may or may not be built. Commissioner Brooks Clayville said it was the first time the Planning Commission had approved both the preliminary and final plat during the same meeting.

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Ocean City Today

SPORTS www.oceancitytoday.net

JANUARY 11, 2013

PAGE 25A

Woodard and Collick break SD records

Seahawks take fourth at Iron Horse Duals

LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (Jan. 11, 2013) The day before students returned from Christmas break, 17 teams competed in an indoor track meet at the Worcester County Recreation Center in Snow Hill on Jan. 2. Caesar Rodney of Delaware won the boys’ competition with 134 points. Stephen Decatur was second, scoring 95 points. “We only won two events, but we scored a lot of points. Between the 300(-meter race) and the long jump, we scored 36 points, and we had a couple second places, which is helpful, too,” said Decatur Coach Jody Stigler. “I didn’t expect much with it being the first meet back, but I was pleased with the performance.” Senior Kyle Kelly earned first-place honors in the 300meter race. He crossed the finish line in 37.6 seconds. Sophomore Jakhai Woodard was victorious in the long jump. His winning jump, 21 feet 1.25 inches, broke the school record (20 feet .5 inch) and earned him a No. 6 ranking in the state. Senior Khaalid Collick also broke a Decatur record. He recorded a distance of 40 feet .75 inch in the triple jump event. The previous school record was 39 feet 5 inches. He finished in second place during last week’s meet. The Lady Seahawks tied with Middletown High School of Delaware for sixth place. Both teams scored 35 points. Caesar Rodney won the girls’ competition with 110 points. “We were missing some of our key contributors and that hurt us,” Stigler said. No Decatur athlete scored a first-place finish. Stigler said he was impressed by junior Chloe FauntLeRoy’s first-time performance in the 500-meter race. Her time of 1:29.22 was good for second place. The next indoor track meet is scheduled for Jan. 16, at the Worcester County Recreation Center.

LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Worcester Prep freshman Wyatt Richins drives by a Delmarva Christian player during last Friday’s game in Berlin. Worcester won 55-39.

SQUAD CONTINUES TO IMPROVE Prep coach pleased with Mallards’ performance LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (Jan. 11, 2013) The Worcester Prep boys’ basketball team went on a 9-0 run to start last Friday’s game against the Delmarva Christian Royals and never looked back. The Mallards won the competition in Berlin, 55-39. “I was very happy with the game overall, except for the third quarter, [when] we just got destroyed on the boards,” said Prep Coach Keith Geiger. “[In practice],

we had worked on our manto-man defense, talking, handling the screens, defending the post, etc., and we definitely improved in those areas.” The Mallards led 14-4 at the end of the first quarter and increased their lead to 29-12 at the halftime break. Worcester had a 43-29 advantage with one quarter remaining. Senior co-captain Harrison Brennan was the top producer with 14 points, five rebounds and five assists. “In my opinion, Harrison

played his best game of the year. He played very good defense, talked and led the team,” Geiger said. Junior Ryan Nally, who Geiger said played his best defensive game of the season, chipped in with 15 points. Senior Zander Farr had 10 points and 11 rebounds. “We desperately need to focus on defensive rebounding for the next few games, but overall, I’m very proud of way the guys have been getting better every game,” See GEIGER on Page 29A

SD swimmers drown competition LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (Jan. 11, 2013) The Stephen Decatur swimming coaches couldn’t be happier with the Seahawks’ performances Tuesday at the Pocomoke YMCA, as the boys’ and girls’ teams each

won nine of 11 races just days after returning from a twoweek Christmas break. The Decatur boys’ squad outscored the Indian River Indians 116-46. Seahawks who won their individual events were seniors Shayne Custodio (100-meter

butterfly, 58.49 seconds; 200IM, 2:15.89) and Zack Keiser (500m freestyle, 6:43.96), and juniors Jake Middleton (200m freestyle, 2:03.06; 100m freestyle, 54.2 seconds) and Collin Bankert (100m breaststroke, 1:18.08). See DECATUR on Page 27A

(Jan. 11, 2013) Several of the top wrestling teams in the state competed in the Iron Horse Duals, held Jan. 4-5, at C. Milton Wright High School in Bel Air, Md. Stephen Decatur Coach Todd Martinek was pleased with the Seahawks’ overall performance. The Berlin squad went 4-3 during the tournament. Decatur earned victories over Patterson Mill (44-30), Bel Air (37-35), Liberty (40-30) and Parkville (48-31). The Seahawks lost a close battle with LaPlata, 39-37, and the team also fell to North Carroll 43-31. Huntingtown topped Decatur 42-28 to take third place in the tournament. The Seahawks finished fourth out of 13 squads. “We wrestled some good competition and proved that we are one of the best teams in the state,” Martinek said. “We wrestled over 100 matches so it showed some strengths and some weaknesses [and] we will work on those weaknesses...in practice. The varsity [wrestlers] did well and I was able to plug some JV kids in to keep us healthy. They did a nice job as well.” Junior Nate Rosenblatt (113-pound weight class) and senior Kaelan Patterson (152) won all seven of their matches to go unbeaten during the Iron Horse Duals. The Seahawks are scheduled to compete in the 18th annual Bob Rowe Memorial Classic, Jan. 11-12, at the Wicomico Youth & Civic Center in Salisbury. The tournament honors former Wi-Hi Coach Bob Rowe and serves as a fundraiser for the school’s wrestling program. Martinek, who was battling strep throat this week, said several Decatur grapplers are either hampered by bronchitis or the flu. See SEAHAWKS on Page 27A


Ocean City Today

26A SPORTS

JANUARY 11, 2013

Decatur boys’ team falls to Washington; tops Snow Hill next day Seahawks perform much better against Eagles than against Jags, coach says LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (Jan. 11, 2013) The Stephen Decatur boys’ basketball team fought to make a comeback against Washington on Monday, but their efforts weren’t enough to

take down the Jaguars, who outscored the Seahawks 78-71 on their own court. “Our defense did not show up. It’s hard to beat a team when you give up 18 lay-ups,” Decatur Coach Mark Engle said after the Berlin match-up. “And we missed 20-plus lay-ups or shots right around the basket.” The Seahawks had a 14-11 lead in the final minute of the first quarter, but the Jaguars tied the score with a threepointer. Washington went on an 8-0 run at

the start of the second quarter to pull ahead 22-14. Senior Jesse Engle was fouled and sank his two shots, but seconds later, the Jaguars answered with a lay-up. Soon after, sophomore Collin Gaynor hit a three pointer, junior Tyler Hunter scored and Engle nailed a three to cut Washington’s advantage to one point (25-24). The visiting team led 29-27 at halftime. The Jaguars maintained a slight lead

throughout the third quarter and after eight minutes, they were ahead 47-45. Washington outscored Decatur 31-26 in the fourth quarter. Engle (five assists) and Hunter (12 rebounds) each scored 23 points for the Seahawks. Despite their sluggish start Tuesday against the Snow Hill Eagles, Coach Engle said the Seahawks performed much better than the day before, especially on defense. Decatur won the game, 65-36. The Eagles had a 13-10 advantage at the end of the first quarter, but the Seahawks outscored their opponent 19-10 in the second and led 29-23 at halftime. Decatur tallied 23 points in the third quarter, while Snow Hill logged eight, and in the fourth, the visiting team scored 13, and held the Eagles to five. “We got warmed up in the second quarter and had an explosive third quarter,” Engle said. “I was proud of the way the kids played in the second half. They buckled down and played solid defense and only gave up 13 points.” Gaynor led Decatur with 13 points, seven rebounds and four steals. Hunter had 12 points and seven rebounds. The Parkside Rams are scheduled to visit Berlin today, Friday, for a 5:30 p.m. match-up against Decatur.

Annual Super Bowl Scramble at Eagle’s Landing is Feb. 3 OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Stephen Decatur junior PJ Copes, above, makes a lay-up during Monday’s game against Washington in Berlin. Tyler Hunter, a junior, right, shoots over a Washington player.

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(Jan. 11, 2013) Before the big game, Feb. 3, join Eagles Landing for an 18hole tournament and tailgate party. Golfers can enjoy a round of golf. “This event is very popular for locals and visitors alike and sells out each year,” said Bob Croll, head golf professional at Eagle’s Landing. “The Super Bowl Scramble is a great way for people to get outdoors and enjoy a round of golf before participating in the festivities of the big Super Bowl game in the evening.” Each Super Bowl Scramble team consists of a coach, quarterback, running back and wide receiver. Scoring is done in a traditional football manner, with points awarded for touchdowns, field goals and extra points. In addition, penalties are issued for safeties, and 30 percent of the “A” player’s handicap is counted as the team offense. The tailgate party, which includes breakfast, begins at 9 a.m., followed by a shotgun-start “kick-off” at 10 a.m. The cost is $50 per player, and includes green fees, a cart rental and entrance into the tailgate party. Also included is “Throw the Bomb” on the third hole and Melanie’s Blitz Soup served at half time. Prizes will be awarded. For more information or to sign up, please call Eagles Landing at 410-2137277.


Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013

SPORTS 27A

Decatur swimming teams have busy month ahead Continued from Page 25A

Custodio, Keiser, sophomore Chris Poole and junior Cory Campbell took first place in the 200-meter medley relay race (2:00.19). And Bankert and Middleton joined Campbell and Poole for the 200meter freestyle relay race, which the boys won in 1:44.36. Custodio, Bankert, Keiser and Middleton also out-raced their competition in the 400-meter freestyle relay (3:57.73). “After a long break, it was a good meet to get back into the swing of things. It went very well,” said Decatur Coach Damien Sanzotti. “We had some best times and there were some times that could be improved. We’re looking forward to our busy schedule this month. It will be tough with not much practice time in the pool, but the boys will get meet experience.” The Lady Seahawks earned a 104-64 victory. Girls who finished first in their individual events were seniors Julia Wellen (200m freestyle, 2:25.35) and Cailey O’Brien (100m breaststroke, 1:25.66) and sophomores Madison Tinus (100m butterfly, 1:11.04), Kailey Mihavetz (100m freestyle, 1:08.32) and Molly Wooten (500m freestyle, 6:19.99; 200IM, 2:42.14). Freshman Hailey Williams, sophomore Maria Zweifel, Wellen and Tinus earned first-place honors in the 200meter medley relay race (2:13.05). Sophomore Katie Bear joined Wellen, Zweifel and Tinus for the 200-meter freestyle relay event, which they won in 1:57.83. Wellen, Williams, Zweifel and Tinus teamed up for the 400-meter freestyle relay event and the girls were victorious, completing the race in 4:23.94. Coach Jenny Miller said she entered some swimmers into events they had not competed in, so she can determine races in which the girls excel. “They did really well. Every time I give them [a challenge], they rise to the occasion,” Miller said. “We’re doing much better than we were at this point last year.” Decatur is slated to take on Sussex Tech at 5 p.m. Tuesday, at the Pocomoke YMCA.

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He still expects the squad to be competitive this weekend. “It will be a three-team race — us, Sussex Tech and Sussex Central — but we are sick and beat up,” Martinek said Tuesday. “[I] give the edge to Central, but you never know.” Sussex Central won the 2012 tournament, while Decatur placed fourth and Sussex Tech seventh.

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Ocean City Today

28A SPORTS

JANUARY 11, 2013

Lady Seahawks improve to 10-1; to play No. 1 Rams today in Sby. Decatur girls’ squad earns victories over Wash. Jags and SH Eagles this week LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (Jan. 11, 2013) Back-to-back victories this week boosted the Stephen Decatur girls’ basketball team’s record to 10-1. The Lady Seahawks traveled to Princess Anne on Monday to take on the Washington Jaguars, and they came home with a 58-48 victory. Decatur secured a three-point lead at

the end of the first quarter, and outscored the Jaguars 17-4 in the second to go into the halftime break on top 29-13. “It was hard for us to get into an offensive rhythm in the first quarter. In the second quarter, we were passing more and penetrating more,” Decatur Coach Amy Fenzel-Mergott said. The Seahawks looked tired in the second half, which resulted in a handful of errors, Fenzel-Mergott said. Washington netted 15 points in the third quarter and Decatur tallied 10. In the final quarter, the Jaguars outscored the Seahawks 20-19. “We did some things really well and there were some things we had mental breakdowns with,” Fenzel-Mergott said.

“We get up and start to relax. In basketball, you can’t do that because the other team can always come back.” Senior co-captain Abbey Schorr led Decatur with 31 points and 17 rebounds. On Tuesday, Decatur hosted the Snow Hill Eagles. Each team donned pink socks for breast cancer awareness. Seahawk senior co-captain Monique Wise also designed T-shirts for her team. Pink heart-shaped balloons, streamers and posters were displayed throughout the gym. Money raised through a 50/50 raffle, a bake sale and a portion of admission will be donated to Women Supporting Women, a local agency that provides support and services for Eastern Shore breast cancer survivors and their families. The Seahawks were dominant from the tip-off. They led 18-4 at the end of the opening quarter and 33-10

at halftime. Decatur scored 19 in the third quarter and held Snow Hill to four points. The Seahawks won 69-25. Schorr (nine rebounds), Wise (six rebounds, three steals) and freshman Dayona Godwin (10 assists) scored 12 points apiece. “We were running our offense and getting good shots, and we were making our shots,” Fenzel-Mergott said. “The girls were hustling and they did a good job getting the offensive and defensive rebounds. Our defense also did a good job stopping their No. 1 player (ShecQuan Bailey). She only had nine points.” The Seahawks are scheduled battle the Parkside Rams today, Friday, in Salisbury. The Rams are the top team in the Bayside South Conference, while Decatur is tied with Mardela for second.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Stephen Decatur senior Abbey Schorr takes a shot during Tuesday’s game in Berlin. Schorr had 12 points and nine rebounds.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Stephen Decatur freshman Dayona Godwin dribbles the ball up the court during Tuesday’s game in Berlin. Godwin had 12 points and 10 assists in Decatur’s 69-25 victory.

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013

SPORTS 29A

Lady Mallards suffer first loss at hands of Del. Christian Royals just stood still. Everyone was looking at everyone else to do something, and that’s not us,” Rogers said. “We usually have five people on the court, guns blazing, ready to go. “I think the girls underestimated them,” she said. “It was the first time we played a team that has quick little guards like us and our kids weren’t ready for it.” Sophomore Sophie Brennan was the Mallards’ top scorer with eight points. Junior Frankie Willing and senior co-captain Meredith Smith netted seven points apiece. “I told the girls, ‘I think this is like a blessing in disguise,’” Rogers said. “‘Undefeated,’ that word is like the curse. You play with so much more pressure. “So now that we have a loss under our belt they’re a little humbled and they know they have to keep working hard,” she said. The Gunston Day Herons are scheduled to visit Berlin today, Friday, for a 4 p.m. game against Worcester.

LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (Jan. 11, 2013) The Worcester Prep girls’ basketball team failed to put the pieces together during last Friday’s game against Delmarva Christian — the girls’ first competition after a two-week Christmas break. The visiting Royals won the contest, 32-26, handing the Mallards their first loss of the season. “I knew it during warm-ups. We had the most ‘off’ warm-up,” Prep Coach Page Rogers said after the Jan. 4 match-up. “Everyone was out of sorts. It was just a really off day and [the Royals] probably played the game of their lives.” Delmarva Christian led 13-8 at the end of the first quarter and by the halftime break, had pulled ahead 20-11. The Royals had a seven-point cushion (27-20) going into the fourth quarter. “We were so flat and we were playing very timid. When one person would have the ball, the other four people on the court

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Worcester Prep sophomore Sophie Brennan makes a move past a Delmarva Christian player during last Friday’s game in Berlin. Brennan scored eight points in Worcester’s 32-26 loss.

Geiger: Things we have been doing in practice are starting to pay off for team Continued from Page 25A

Geiger said. “We need to keep getting better … if we are going to continue to win.” On Monday, the Mallards hosted the St. Thomas More Ravens and again took it to their opponent early. The Prep team outscored St. Thomas More 218 in the opening quarter and led 35-26 at halftime. Worcester had built a 55-38 lead by the end of the third quarter and won the game 7142. “I thought it was the best game we’ve played so far. The things we have been doing in practice are starting to pay off,”

Geiger said. “There are still little things to improve, especially defensive rebounding, but overall, I’m very proud of the team. “Playing man-to-man defense is hard, and running like we do is hard,” he said. “I’m asking a lot out of them, but they are responding really well, and we’re winning … I think that if we continue getting better on defense, we can be hard to stop because of our transition game.” Farr led the team with 20 points, and Nally contributed 19. Junior Matt Reilly logged 13 points and 11 rebounds and Brennan tallied nine points and eight assists.

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“Harrison has become the leader the last two games,” Geiger said. “He plays great defense, passes when he needs to pass and shoots when it’s appropriate.” The Gunston Day Herons are scheduled to travel to Berlin today, Friday, for a 5:30 p.m. match-up against the Mallards.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Worcester Prep senior Josh Moyer puts the ball in the basket during last Friday’s game against Delmarva Christian in Berlin. Worcester won 5539.

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Ocean City Today

BUSINESS www.oceancitytoday.net

PAGE 32A

REAL ESTATE REPORT

JANUARY 11, 2013

Renovations under way at uptown shopping center include new façade and storefronts

Mortgagemess resolution will continuein ’13

— Lauren Bunting is a member of the Coastal Association of Realtors and a licensed REALTOR® with Bunting Realty, Inc. in Berlin.

Brennan, Ott cited for Dec. figures Broker Dr. Carl E. Ortman has announced RE/MAX Premier Properties’ top producers for December. The top listing agent is Edie Brennan and the top sales producer is Marlene Ott with more tan a $1 million in sales. Ortman also announced that the company reached its goal of $80 million in sales volume for 2012.

LAUREN BUNTING ■ Contributing Writer (Jan. 11, 2013) In a multi-billion dollar deal, $10.3 billion to be exact, Fannie Mae and Bank of America have reached a comprehensive resolution covering current and future repurchase obligations related to loans that were originated between Jan. 1, 2000, and Dec. 31, 2008, as reported by Fannie Mae. The agreement breakdown allows for a cash payment from Bank of America to Fannie Mae of $3.55 billion, and an additional $6.75 billion going toward the repurchase of approximately 30,000 loans, which have the potential to cause significant future losses to Fannie Mae. In addition to the $10.3 billion, Bank of America will pay $1.3 billion to resolve loan servicing compensatory fee obligations. “A favorable resolution of this long-standing dispute between Fannie Mae and Bank of America is in the best interest of taxpayers,” Bradly Lerman, executive vice president and general counsel of Fannie Mae, said in a statement. “Fannie Mae has diligently pursued repurchases on loans that did not meet our standards at the time of origination, and we are pleased to have reached an appropriate agreement to collect on these repurchase requests.” Included in the negotiations and final resolution, Fannie Mae approved Bank of America’s request to transfer the servicing rights of approximately 941,000 loans from Bank of America to specialty servicers. Analysts have estimated that Bank of America has paid out some $40 billion for mortgage settlements since the crisis began, with most of these losses stemming from their purchase of Countrywide Financial in 2008.

BUSINESS BRIEFS

Bank of OC promotes Kotzur, Parker OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

The Ocean City Square Shopping Center, located bayside between 118th and 120th streets, is under renovation. Upgrades include a façade facelift and new signage. Also, the dark brown wood will be removed and the storefronts will be all glass.

FACELIFT LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (Jan. 11, 2013) With new management in place, the Ocean City Square, located between 118th and 120th streets bayside, is currently undergoing renovations to give the shopping center a major facelift. “It will have a more clean, modern updated look,” said on-site property manager Randall Coburn. Ocean City Square, constructed in 1983, was built to serve residents who live in the northern end of the resort as well as visitors, and it continues to do so, according to Coburn. “It’s one of the oldest and largest shopping centers on the island and we’re not going anywhere,” Coburn said. “We’re just a stable center.” The shopping center includes national and international businesses such as Food Lion, Dunkin Donuts, Burger King, Minuteman Press, Sherwin-Williams and Long & Foster Real Estate. It also has a number of local businesses, including Paws & Claws, Whisker’s Pub, Jules Restaurant, Sam’s Bar-

ber Shop, Dolle’s Candyland and O.C. Nails. Coburn was chosen in March to manage the more than 101,000-square-foot property on 9.66 acres. Renovations, which will cost approximately $500,000, were put on hold until after the busy summer tourist season and the fall. Phase 1 of the renovation project began Dec. 1. The dark brown wood below the red roof is being replaced with Dryvit siding. The Exterior Insulation and Finishing System (EIFS) provides exterior walls with an insulated finished surface and waterproofing in an integrated composite material system. The wood surrounding the storefronts is in the process of being replaced by glass and aluminum framing. From the ground up, the businesses will feature all-glass fronts. “It gives [the shopping center] more brightness. It’s more inviting,” said Long & Foster’s Lisa Coleman, the leasing agent for the property. Tenants will also get new signage. The box signs are

being replaced by channelletter signs, which have a 3D appearance. Phase 1 should be completed by the end of February, weather permitting. Businesses will remain open during renovations. Phase 2, which will include landscaping and lighting upgrades, is scheduled to begin in the spring. Retail, office and medical space is available in the shopping center. Sizes range from 600 to 4,850 square feet and the shopping center has more than 650 parking spaces. Coleman said the landlord is negotiable and flexible with rent and is offering great incentives. “Ideal tenants would be a high-end furniture store or a high-end clothing store, and I’d love to have a card shop back or a news center. A beer and wine shop would be fabulous to have,” Coleman said. “Another restaurant would be great. Maybe Mexican or Italian? We’re looking for year-round businesses.” Business owners interested in renting space in the shopping center should call Coleman at 410-524-1700.

Wayne Benson, president and CEO of Bank of Ocean City, along with the board of directors, announced the promotion of Jason Parker and Samuel Kotzur. Berlin native Parker, who joined the bank in 2003, has been named assistant vice president. Parker is a graduate from Wilmington University with a Bachelor of Science degree in finance. He is the branch manager of the 59th Street location in Ocean City. His other duties include commercial/consumer/residential lending and business development. He lives in Berlin with his wife, Kristin, and newborn daughter, Claire. Samuel Kotzur was promoted to assistant vice president-loan department manager. Kotzur is a graduate of Slippery Rock University in Pennsylvania with dual degrees in business management and marketing. His duties include loan document preparation and review, oversight of lending compliance with both governmental regulations and bank lending policies/procedures and management of the loan department. He lives in Ocean City.

ResortQuest names top Dec. producers ResortQuest Real Estate recently announced its December top producers for its southeast Sussex County, Del. locations. Tammy Hadder and Anna Meiklejohn of the Marketplace at Sea Colony office were top listing agents. Other top listing volume awards for individuals were Hadder and Meiklejohn of the Marketplace at Sea Colony; Cindy Spieczny of the West Fenwick; Steve Alexander of the Edgewater/Sea Colony; Pam Pridgeon of the Bethany Beach; and Tabatha Moore of the Village at Bear Trap Dunes. William Hand of the Marketplace at Sea Colony office was top sales agent. Top individuals were Hand of Marketplace at Sea Colony; Dayna Feher of the Bethany Beach; Marc Grimes of the Bear Trap Dunes, Anne Powell and Jen Hughes of the West Fenwick; and Gail Phelan of the Edgewater/Sea Colony.


JANUARY 11, 2013

Ocean City Today

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NEWS 33A


Ocean City Today

34A NEWS

OBITUARIES Mary D. Zentgraf CRISFIELD — Mary D. Zentgraf, 78, died peacefully on Sunday, Dec. 16, 2012, at Alice B. Tawes Nursing Home in Crisfield. Born in Newville, Pa., she was the daughter of the late Walter Knaube and Pearl Nace Knaube. Ms. Zentgraf owned and operated A Woman’s Touch Cleaning Service for many years in the Baltimore area. After relocating to Ocean City, she opened Rainbow Learning Center, where she provided loving care and education to many children throughout the years. Her favorite things were spending time with family, flowers and gardening, and living in Ocean City. She was preceded in death by her husband of 50 years, Robert F. Zentgraf Sr., in 2003; a brother, Vincent Knaube; and a sister, Janet Kruger. She is survived by her three children, Donna Nefferdorf and her husband, Bob, of Marion, Robert Zentgraf Jr. and his wife, Beverly, of Glen Burnie, and Lori Simon of Ocean City; eight grandchildren, Heather Brooks and her husband, John, April Saathoff, Robert Zentgraf III, Justin Zentgraf, Logan Zentgraf, Amber Markov, Bryan Simon and his wife, Stacey, and Bethany Simon; and five greatgrandchildren, Annika Saathoff, Savanna Brooks, Avery Simon, Chloe Simon and Brynn Simon. She is also survived by two sisters, Ardella Gray and Yvonne Ruff, and many nieces and nephews. A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 12, at Berlin First Baptist Church, 613 Williams St., Berlin, Md. 21811. Beatrice Mary Paglierani OCEAN CITY — Beatrice Mary Paglierani, 74, passed away peacefully of pancreatic cancer on Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2013, at her home surrounded by her loving family. Born June 23, 1938, in San Francisco, Mrs. Paglierani has lived in Ocean City since 1963. She was born to the late Henri and Yola Di Gregorio. Henri passed on 40 years ago, but her mother, Yola, only B. Paglierani recently died in 2011, at the age of 91, one day shy of her 92nd birthday. “Bea” is survived by her loving husband, Louie, who built and developed much of old downtown Ocean City. He as a general con-

tractor and she as his partner, secretary and interior decorator, hand-built their first project, the Sun Tan Motel, still on Second Street. They also built, owned or operated many other famous landmarks, restaurants, Boardwalk locations and condominiums around town, during the last 48 years. In December 2012, the high school sweethearts celebrated 55 years of marriage. She is survived by her loving and devoted daughter, Dina Paglierani and her husband, John Persico of Ocean City; her son, Dino Paglierani of Tampa, Fla.; her half sister, Linda Di Gregorio of Millbrae, Calif.; her nephew, Joey Paglierani, his wife, Brittany, and their two children, Grant and Troy of Ione, Calif.; her brother-in-law, Gary Paglierani of Fresno, Calif.; and her cousins, Jenny Breitmeyer of Modesto, Calif., Geri Di Gregorio of Fort Myers, Fla., and Marie and her husband, Charles Ceremi of Reno, Nev. Mrs. Paglierani had many friends who looked to her as their second mother and best friend. Notably, Pam Stanton, her devoted and always dedicated caregiver, Anna Ward, the late Sandy Cropper and Angela Vermillion. A private viewing and burial was held last week. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, 2141 Rosecrans Ave., Suite 7000, El Segundo, Calif. 90245 (www.pancan.org) or the Johns Hopkins Pancreatic Cancer Center, 600 Wolfe St., Baltimore, Md. 21231. Roman D. Miller PITTSVILLE — Roman D. Miller, 71, died Thursday, Jan. 3, 2013, at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury. Born in Dover, Del., he was the son of the late David B. Miller and Cassie A. Miller. He is survived by his wife of 40 years, Louise E. Miller; children, Willis Miller of Felton, and Barbara Miller and Susan Harrington, both of Dover; three grandchildren; and a great grandson. Also surviving are two brothers, David Miller and Samuel Miller, and a sister, Suzanne Miller, all of Dover; as well as numerous nieces and nephews. Mr. Miller had been an owner, trainer and driver of standard bred harness racing horses. He was a member of the Cloverleaf Racing Association. A memorial service will be held from 1-4 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 11, at the Pittsville Volunteer Fire Company in Pittsville. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Roman D. Miller Memorial Fund, c/o Farmers Bank of Willards, 7233 Main St., Willards, Md. 21874. Arrangements are being handled by Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin.

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Herman Albert Zenk Jr. OCEAN PINES — Herman Albert Zenk Jr., 93, went to his rest Thursday, Jan. 3, 2013, at his home in Ocean Pines. Born in North Braddock, Pa., he was a son of the late Herman Albert Zenk Sr. and Clara Steigerwald Zenk. He is preceded in death by his wife of 69 years, Elva Irene Zenk, and is survived by his loving family and many good friends. Mr. Zenk was a U.S. Army veteran. As a resident of the Eastern Shore for 26 years, he reveled in his life as a loving husband, father and grandfather. A Mass of Christian Burial was offered Monday, Jan. 7, at St. John Neumann Catholic Church in Ocean Pines. Internment followed in Maryland Veteran’s Cemetery Eastern Shore, where military honors were provided. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary, P.O Box 1755, Salisbury, Md. 21802. Arrangements were handled by Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. William Edward Fisher Jr. SALISBURY — William Edward Fisher Jr., 89, died Friday, Jan. 4, 2013, at Coastal Hospice at the Lake in Salisbury. Born in Berlin, he was the son of the late William E. Fisher, Sr. and Edna Birch Fisher. He was preceded in death by his wife, Alice Donnelly Fisher; four stepbrothers, Clarence, Wilson, Norman and James Birch; a stepsister, Miriam Birch William Fisher Cropper; and numerous nieces and nephews. He was also preceded in death by beloved companion, Joe Ann Ewell Keyser. Mr. Fisher, a lifelong resident of Berlin, was a World War II Army veteran. He had worked for Silco, and was a regional manager when he retired. He loved traveling and meeting people. He had friends at every stop in his territory. Mr. Fisher and his wife had owned the Spindrift Apartments in Ocean City for many years. He spent winters in Vero Beach, Fla., where he enjoyed the warm weather and golf. He was also an accomplished wood worker and took many trips to the Lancaster, Pa. area to admire the workmanship and develop new ideas. A funeral service was held Wednesday, Jan. 9, at Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. The Rev. Dr. Olin Shockley officiated. Interment followed in Evergreen Cemetery. A donation in his memory may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association, 1850 York Road, Suite D, Timonium, Md. 21093. Geraldine J. Smith OCEAN CITY — Geraldine J. Smith, 85, of Ocean City and formerly of Perry Hall, Md., died Saturday, Jan. 5, 2013, at Brandywine Assisted Living off Fenwick Island. Born in Oak City, N.C., she was the daughter of the late Joshua Mac and Clara T. (Moye) Johnson.

JANUARY 11, 2013 She was a member of St. Michael Lutheran Church in Perry Hall, Md. Mrs. Smith is survived by a daughter, Diane Cikanovich and her husband, Christopher, of Ocean City; two grandchildren, Marilyn VanDerMark and Kenneth Cikanovich; and two great-grandchildren, Tyler and Evan VanDerMark. She was preceded in death by her husband, Gilbert K. Smith. A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Jan. 12, at St. Michael Lutheran Church in Perry Hall. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to St. Michael Lutheran Church, Chapel Restoration Fund, 9534 Bel Air Road, Perry Hall, Md. 21236. James Franklin ‘Jim’ Robinson OCEAN PINES — James Franklin “Jim” Robinson, 85, died Sunday, Jan. 6, 2013, at Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin. Born in Charlestown, W.Va., “Bucket” was the son of the late Frank Edgar Robinson and Mary Teresa Hammerschmidt Robinson. He was preceded in death by his wife, Kathleen Marie Lease Robinson in 2012, and by a granddaughter, Melanie McKenzie in 2003. Mr. Robinson is survived by his daughter, Robin Jo McKenzie, of Smithsburg, Md.; two grandchildren, Jessica Wilson of Smithsburg and Angela McKenzie of Frederick, Md.; and three great-grandchildren, Tyler McKenzie and Lanie McKenzie of Frederick, Md., and Kaylei Keefer of Cumberland, Md. Mr. Robinson had retired from the United States Postal Service, where he had worked for many years as a postal carrier. He was a United States Army veteran, and a member of St. Luke’s Catholic Church in Ocean City. He had been a member of the Ocean City and Cumberland Elks. A Mass of Christian burial was held Thursday, Jan. 10, at St. Luke’s Catholic Church on 100th Street in Ocean City. Interment followed in Sunset Memorial Park in Berlin. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the American Kidney Foundation, 11921 Rockville Pike, Suite 300, Rockville, Md. 20852. Arrangements are being handled by Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. Albert Joseph Sgro OCEAN PINES — Albert Joseph Sgro of Ocean Pines, a retired Baltimore County educator, passed away suddenly on Sunday, Jan. 6, 2013, after a brief illness. Born June 3, 1925, in Indiana, Pa., Mr. Sgro was one of 11 children. He is survived by his wife of 61 years, Betty Graziano Sgro; three sisters, Ann Nastasi, Florence Marshall and Catherine Shimmel; as well Albert Sgro as nieces, nephews and extended family members. Mr. Sgro served in the Navy during World War II at the headquarters of Admiral Chester Nimitz. After the war, he graduated from Indi-


Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013

OBITUARIES ana University of Pennsylvania. He was a highly respected educator in Baltimore County Public Schools for 27 years, serving as a teacher, department chair, assistant principal and principal. After his retirement from Baltimore County Public Schools, Mr. Sgro had successful careers as a real estate counselor at Grempler Realty, and as an employment administrator at Martin Marietta Aerospace. However, Mr. Sgro never really retired as he kept active at his church, St. John Neumann Catholic Church, and served in many capacities. He was also active in the community, and was the 2011 award winner of the Dispatch’s Charitable Souls Campaign for “being on the front lines” of charity work. In addition, Mr. Sgro received the Order of Merit from the Dio-

NEWS 35A

cese of Wilmington in October 2007, in recognition of outstanding service to the diocese. Mr. Sgro also worked hard to care for his extended family as needed, and spoiled his many nieces and nephews wonderfully. “Uncle Albert” will be missed sorely by his large, extended family. A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 12, at St. John Neumann Catholic Church, 11211 Beauchamp Road, Berlin. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that donations be made to St. John Neumann Catholic Church, and designated for the most Blessed Sacrament School Scholarship Fund. Arrangements are being handled by Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin.

Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2013. She is survived by her husband, Paul H. St. André, and one niece, Mary Ellen of Maryland . She was preceded in death by her sister, Deloris. Mrs. St. André was a member of St. Luke’s Catholic Church in Ocean Gloria André City. Service and interment will be private for the family. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to St. Luke’s Catholic Church, 100th Street, Ocean City, Md. 21811. Arrangements were handled by Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin.

Gloria Marie St. André OCEAN CITY — Gloria Marie St. André, 82, died peacefully at her home in Ocean City on

Johnny William Cloudie Willis WILLARDS — Johnny William Cloudie Willis, 85, of Willards, died peacefully at home on

Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2013. He was the son of the late Cloudie Milton Willis and Lee Etta Layton Willis. Mr. Willis was preceded in death by his wife, Gloria Mae Nottingham Willis in 2000. He is survived by two sisters, Pauline Evelyn Johnny Willis Strah and Etta Mae Timmons of Pennsylvania, as well as several nieces and nephews, and Rosalie Palmer, his long-time caregiver and guardian. Mr. Willis had been a member of Minuteman WWII, a private civilian group, as well as the WWII Airfare-Strategic Air Command. Services and interment will be private for the family. Arrangements are being handled by Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin.

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MONTEGO BAY NEIGHBORHOOD STUNNING OCEAN CITY HOME This fully furnished 2-bedroom, 1 ½-bath home is located in the Montego Bay community in North Ocean City. Sold with a deeded 40’ x 90’ lot this home is steps away from a community pool/tennis/shuffleboard/min. golf complex and features an open floorplan, a fireplace, central air, hardwood flooring and a full size washer & dryer. Community amenities include pools, tennis, shuffleboard, min. golf and a bayfront boardwalk with fishing & crabbing piers. HOA fee $199. The property is being offered at $139,999.

193 OYSTER LANE

This beautiful rancher in located in North Ocean City and is just 4 blocks to the beach. This custom-built house offers 3BR/3BA, 1560 sq. ft., a sunroom, cathedral ceilings, ceramic tile flooring throughout, a gas fireplace, surround-sound in the L.R., a kitchen island with a wine cooler, 2 refrigerators, 2 dishwashers, an ice-maker, Corian counter-tops, pocket doors, marble-top vanities and much more. Outside there is a large cement patio, a utility shed, an outside shower and a 2-car parking pad. The lot is professionally landscaped. The home is being offered at $385,000.

Call Michael “Montego Mike” Grimes

Montego Bay Realty

Call Michael “Montego Mike” Grimes

montegomike@verizon.net www.montegobayrealty.com

108 S. Ocean Drive • Ocean City, MD

800-745-5988 • 410-250-3020 108 S. Ocean Drive • Ocean City, MD

800-745-5988 • 410-250-3020

“It’s Your Lucky Day!” Let Us Manage Your Rental Property! Offering professional, locally owned & operated property management services ü ü ü ü ü

Tenant screening and credit check Processing of rental payments & disbursements Handling of repairs / maintenance / cleaning Multiple Listing System (MLS) participation Advertising of property in local papers

Call 410-641-3611, or visit shamrockrealty.com

13213 NANTUCKET ROAD

Montego Bay Realty montegomike@verizon.net www.montegobayrealty.com


Ocean City Today

36A NEWS

JANUARY 11, 2013

OC CHAMBER LIGHTS AWARDS (Jan. 11, 2013) The 2012 Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce Lights Awards were presented Jan. 3, during Business After Hours at BJ’s on the Water on 75th Street. The decorating contest winners are: General Business – Indoor: First place, Coldwell Banker 120th Street Second place, Designing Windows, 82nd Street

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Vicki and Charlie Barrett, owners of Inn on the Ocean on 10th Street and the Boardwalk, receive the award for best indoor decorations at a hotel or motel from Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Melanie Pursel, left.

General Business – Outdoor: Homeworks, 85th Street

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

First place for hotel/motel outdoor decorations went to the Atlantic House Bed & Breakfast, located at 501 North Baltimore Avenue. Pursel presents the award to owners Brian and Josephine McCarthy.

Restaurant – Indoor: Fat Daddy’s, 82nd Street Restaurant – Outdoor: The Original Greene Turtle, 116th Street Hotel / Motel – Indoor: First place, Inn On The Ocean, 10th Street and Boardwalk Second place, Coconut Malorie, 59th Street Hotel / Motel – Outdoor: Atlantic House Bed & Breakfast, 501 North Baltimore Avenue

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Coldwell Banker representative Kelley Bjorkland, right, accepts the award for the 120th Street office. Coldwell Banker took first placehonors in the Indoor Decorations category for businesses.

Residential: Rob and Linda DeMaio

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013

AIR CONDITIONING

BLINDS & SHADES

NEWS 37A

BLINDS & SHADES

436-4400 227-5529

CARPET CLEANING Cleaning Management Service, Inc.

Independent Sales Representative Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club & Unit Leader P: 443.234.5262 E: snowhillavon@comcast.net

24 Hour Service â&#x20AC;˘ Free Estimates New Carpet & Flooring Sales Carpet Dyeing â&#x20AC;˘ Drapery & Upholstery Cleaning Carpet Patches & Repairs â&#x20AC;˘ Truck Mounted Carpet Steam Cleaning Emergency Carpet Drying â&#x20AC;˘ Portable Service For High Rise Condos

Call The Experts With Over 30 Years Experience

410-250-6002 â&#x20AC;˘ 800-310-8908 MHIC #12169

COSMETICS Christine Brown

occarpets.com

FLOORING

CONSTRUCTION Ceramic â&#x20AC;˘ Marble â&#x20AC;˘ Glass â&#x20AC;˘ Installation Reliable, Quality Work ore

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www.startavon.com Reference Code: cbrown 2272 HOME IMPROVEMENT

Tile and Construction

Repairs to Large Installations We Return Every Call!

John 443-497-1351

www.cameliotileco.com

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ROVEMENTS G.W. HOLLMAN HOME IMPR

BAYSIDE BUILDERS COMPLETE HOME IMPROVEMENT CONTRACTOR LICENSED AND FULLY INSURED â&#x20AC;˘ FREE ESTIMATES ALL WORK DONE BY OWNER

â&#x20AC;˘ Flat Roof Specialist â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘Roofingâ&#x20AC;˘Sidingâ&#x20AC;˘Windowsâ&#x20AC;˘Doorsâ&#x20AC;˘Custom Homes â&#x20AC;˘Additionsâ&#x20AC;˘Repairsâ&#x20AC;˘Kitchensâ&#x20AC;˘Bathsâ&#x20AC;˘Tile Work â&#x20AC;˘Decksâ&#x20AC;˘Custom Inside Trim Workâ&#x20AC;˘Hardwood Floors



Cell: 410-713-8599

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JANUARY 11, 2013

38A

Classifieds now appear in Ocean City Today & the Bayside Gazette each week and online at oceancitytoday.net and baysideoc.com.

HeLP wAnTeD

HeLP wAnTeD

RenTALS

RenTALS

RenTALS

RenTALS

Front Desk/Reservation/ Audit person-for busy Condo Bldg in OC. Schedule and manage housekeepers. Seasonal/ part time to full time. Responsible, reliable, professional phone skills, customer friendly. Exp with computer and Roommaster System. Start in Feb. 2013. References and back ground check required. Sal commensurate with experience. Send resume to job.oceancity@yahoo.com

Now accepting applications for Hotel Front Desk Mgr., Housekeeping Mgr. & Experienced Maintenance. Apply online at TheHotelMonteCarlo.com No Phone Calls Please.

Winter Rental: two bedroom apartment; great location in West Ocean City. $875/mo., January to June. Call 631-9493342.

Winter Rental-135th Street2BR/1BA, full kitchen, LR, W/D, parking $500/mo. + Sec. Dep. Call 443-235-6770

Cute, YR Efficiency, 32nd St. OC-with cable, HBO, W/D. Need good credit or steady job. No/Smoking $750/mo. 443-504-4460

Year round, furn., 3/BR townhouse 123rd St., $1200/ mo. Washer/dryer central a/c, outdoor pool. Utilities and Security Deposit extra. No/Pets. Resort Rentals, 410-5240295.

If your New Year’s resolution was to make more Monday, Avon and a $10 investment can help. Work F/T or P/T, set your own hours, and make up to 50% commission. Call your Avon Representative Christine @ 443-880-8397 or visit www.start.avon.com Use reference code: cbrown2272 to sign up online or email snowhillavon@comcast.net.

Part/Time Lead Generator$9/hr. + Incentives. Interested applicants should fax their resume to 410-641-1437 or call our office at 410-641-1434. P/T Office help needed in busy Real Estate office. R.E. license helpful but not necessary. Computer experience a must. 410-713-2665. Arctic Heating & Air Conditioning is hiring a Full Time Maintenance Technician Benefits following 90 days of employment. Competitive pay, please fax resume to 410-6411437 or call our office at 410641-1434. Nite Club Taxi is hiring F/T & P/T Drivers. Call Michael 443373-1319.

Dunkin Donuts Now Hiring

Kitchen Help

Dunkin Donuts Now Hiring

Location: 9919 Golf Course Road, OC, MD

Assistant Manager and Co-Managers

Please apply online at: www.delmarvadd.com

In our Ocean Pines and West Ocean City locations. Please apply online at: www.delmarvadd.com

Applications or resumes will not be accepted thru Email or fax.

Applications being accepted for YR, 3BR/2BA, unfurnished apt. $650/mo. + utils. Sec. Dep. Req’d. No/Pets Call 410352-5488 Leave message please Y/R-3BR/2BR in Ocean Pines-$950/mo. + $950 Sec. Dep. 410-430-2501 Y/R, Bishopville, waterfront mobile 3BR/2BA home. No pets/smoking $850/mo. Call Howard Martin Realty 410352-5555. WR 1BR/1BA-Ocean block, 69th St.-W/D, DW, cable/ water included. $500/mo. + electric No smoking/pets. Call Jack 410-596-7873 No answer/leave message. YR rooms, $125-$150 North OC. Util incl, W/D, cable, Furnished. Move in Today! Call 410-250-0050 Berlin - 2BR/BA House on West Street. New/paint, new/ carpet, W/D DW and fenced in yard. $1100/mo. + Sec. Dep. 443-783-4535 for appt. Summer Rental 312 Sunset Dr. Newly remodeled. 2BR/1.5BA. New appliances. Large new kitchen. Large living room. May 10Sept. 10. $12,000. Sec. dep. $2000. Call 410-428-7333. www.SunsetTerraceRentals.com

Off season/year round rental-Room-in WOC, single family home, A/C, cable, newly remodeled. $100/week. 443373-1319 or 240-281-5288 Sunset West-2BR/2BA Unit for Rent-Living space all on one floor. $1000/mo. Call 410726-8528 YR, 8th Street, Bayside 2BR/1BA-W/D, great view. No Smoking/Pets $1000/mo. + Sec. Dep + Util. Also, 2/seasonal boat slips for rent April thru Oct. $2800 + $3500. 443235-1843 Winter Rental - Two Pristine Condos. 3BR/3BA and 2BR/ 2BA. Call Bill 443-373-7232. Winter OC Rooms for Rent! Lg. rms. $100. Furnished and all utilities. Call 410-430-1746. Year round Rentals - 1 & 2 Bedroom Apt. in OC starting at $600/month. 2-3 BR house in west OC on Rt. 50 starting at $800/month. Call Dale 443-736-5589 or email to dale@ocrooms.com OC Yearly Rental. Fully furnished 1BR/1BA condo. 127th St. bayside. The Raffles. $800/ month + utilities. References required 1-410-320-4017/1410-827-3170

Year Round Ocean City Condo - Gullway Villas, $975/ mo. - Price Reduced! 2BR/1BA, W/D. Pool, parking. jlaw32@gmail.com or Jason 443-373-1419. YR WOC, 4BR/4.5BA Penthouse, unfurnished, elevator, pool & tennis. 3BR/2BA Oceanfront Condo, furnished, $1300/mo. Available now! Income verification req’d. Call 443-521-3202.

Maryland

800-922-9800 Delaware

800-442-5626 Owned & Operated by NRT LLC

cbvacations com

Come Join Our Winning Team!

HOTEL RESERVATION SALES We are looking for capable and aggressive hotel reservation sales members. Ability to adapt and understand multiple properties a must. Hotel and sales experience a plus. Must be available to work all shifts, including weekends and holidays in a busy environment. Email resume to: duran.showell@carouselhotel.com or come in and complete an application at the front desk. We require satisfactory pre-employment drug testing and background check.

Carousel Resort Hotel & Condominiums 11700 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 EOE

ReAL eSTATe ReAL eSTATe Keenwick Sound home on lake, built 2003, remodeled 2012. Enviably large double Master bedroom w/FP. $399,000. Call Howard Martin Realty 410-352-5555

WR or YR - 2BR/2BA Bright, spacious, newly remodeled, Furnished House in WOC. Nr Harbor. Potential studio in loft. Vaulted ceilings, fireplace & deck. 240-620-3041

Home on 1 acre- 10 min. to OC. No city taxes. Good shape, needs updating. With 20% down P&I only $700/mo. Why rent? Call Howard Martin Realty 410-352-5555

It’s not too early to advertise your summer rentals.

Yearly & Seasonal Rentals We Welcome Pets 7700 Coastal Hwy 410-524-7700 www.holidayoc.com

Single Family Mobiles Starting at $600 Single Family Homes Starting at $950 Condos Starting at $895 Apartments Starting at $650

CALL US TODAY! 410-208-9200

Share 3BR house-with elderly woman in OP. $300/mo. All inclusive. Call 443-986-1738

Berlin - 4BR/2BA - Remodeled Rancher, hardwood floors. Large yard, shed. $1300/mo. Call Bunting Realty 410-6413313

Rentals Yearly • Weekly • Seasonal

ROOMMATeS ROOMMATeS

Open 7 Days A Week for property viewing in: * Berlin * Ocean City * * Ocean Pines * * Snow Hill *

PUT COLOR in YOUR CLASSiFieDS! CALL 410-723-6397

GET IT RENTED HERE! 410-723-6397 www.oceancitytoday.net www.baysideoc.com

Now you can order your classifieds online


Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2013

CLASSIFIED AD NETWORK Serving the Newspapers of Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia since 1908.

CRST offers the Best Lease Purchase Program! SIGN ON BONUS. No Down Payment or Credit Check. Great Pay. ClassA CDL required. Owner Operators Welcome! Call: 866-5905014

MARYLAND STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING NETWORK

HELP WANTED: SALES

AUCTIONS

WANTED: LIFE AGENTS; Earn $500 a Day; Great Agent Benefits; Commissions Paid Daily; Liberal/Underwriting; Leads, Leads, Leads LIFE INSURANCE, LICENSE REQUIRED. Call 1-888-713-6020

Wanted To Purchase Antiques & Fine Art, 1 item Or Entire Estate Or Collection, Gold, Silver, Coins, Jewelry, Toys, Oriental Glass, China, Lamps, Books, Textiles, Paintings, Prints almost anything old Evergreen BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Auctions 973-818-1100. Email Advertise your product five (5) evergreenauction@hotmail.com days per week in our Daily AUTOMOBILE DONATIONS Classified Connection in 13 daily newspapers in Maryland, DONATE YOUR CAR RECEIVE Delaware and DC. Buy 4 $1000 GROCERY COUPONS Weeks/Get 2 Weeks Free of FAST FREE TOWING - 24hr Charge. For just $199 per day Response UNITED BREAST reach 2.8 Million readers with CANCER FOUNDATION Free just one phone call. Call 1-855Mammograms & Breast Can- 721-6332 x 6 or email us at cer Info www.ubcf.info 888- wsmith@mddcpress.com. The 332-9533 Daily Classified Connection will DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, give you ad placement in The Washington Post and The BalRV'S. LUTHERAN MISSION timore Sun newspapers 5 days SOCIETY. Your donation helps per week for just $995.00 for local families with food, cloth- one week of ad placement. ing, shelter. Tax deductible. MVA licensed. LutheranMis- NEED TO ADVERTISE NOW sionSociety.org 410-636-0123 Before the End of Year! Advertise your product in 105 newsor toll-free 1-877-737-8567. papers in Maryland, Delaware HEALTH & BEAUTY and DC. Reach 4.1 Million P E L V I C / T R A N S V A G I N A L Readers with just one ad! Call MESH? Did you undergo trans- 1-855-721-6332 x 6 or email vaginal placement of mesh for wsmith@mddcpress.com. pelvic organ prolapse or stress Place your ad TODAY! urinary incontinence between EDUCATION 2005 and present time? If the patch required removal due to MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES complications, you may be en- NEEDED! Train to become a titled to compensation. Call Medical Office Assistant. No Johnson Law and speak with Experience Needed! Training female staff members 1-800- & Job Placement available at CTI! HS Diploma/GED & Com535-5727 puter needed. 1-877-649-2671 HELP WANTED-DRIVERS EDUCATION SERVICES Drivers-HIRING EXPERIENCED/ INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRI- ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE VERS! Earn up to $.51 per Mile! from Home. *Medical, *BusiNew Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 ness, *Criminal Justice, *HosYear OTR Exp. Req. - Tanker pitality. Job placement assisTraining Available. Call Today: tance. Computer available. Fi877-882-6537 www.Oakley- nancial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 877-206-4290 Transport.com. www.CenturaOnline.com DRIVERS REGIONAL MISCELLANEOUS FLATBED HOME Every Weekend, AIRLINE MECHANIC â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Train 40-45 CPM for high paying Aviation MainClass A CDL Required tenance Career. FAA approved Flatbed Load Training program. Financial aid if qualiAvailable fied - Job placement assis1st Seat Sign On Bonus tance. CALL Aviation Institute 1-800-992-7863 ext.160 of Maintenance (866) 823www.mcelroytrucklines.com 6729.

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Commercial Storefront - Teal Marsh across from Food Lion in West OC, great exposure, 1400 sf rent from $750/month NNN. Herring Creek Professional Center, 1000 sf. from $550/ month NNN. Call Dale 443-736-5589 or email to dale@ocrooms.com

Office Space w/bathroom in West Ocean City, RT/50 West near UPS store. Parking, electric/sign. Move-in ready! 1000/ sq. ft. $700/mo. Call 240-4477554

Seasoned Firewood for sale$150/cord + delivery. Parker Plant Depot 410-835-8197 Please leave message.

Upscale Mid-town Office Space in O.C. for Lease. Flexible floor plan. From 650 to 5,150 sq. ft. Call Brian 443-880-2225

Prime Office Space for Rent - On the corner of Main St. & Broad St., Berlin. 1250 sq.ft. Second floor unit with exclusive deck. Central air conditioning & heat. Recently remodeled. Starting at $1100/ mo. for long term lease. Call Russell 443-497-2729.

Bishopville Movers Inc. Fast, reliable service. 410-352-5555.

IN SEARCH OF IN SEARCH OF

Videos/Pictures of car accident on July 3, 2009 @10:27 PM near intersection of Rt. 50 & Golf Course Rd. Reward. L/M 443-880-4367

SERVICES

SALE FOR FOR SALE Lane Cedar Chest-Measures 53â&#x20AC;?x18â&#x20AC;?x17â&#x20AC;? deep, on wheels. $100. Great for storage. Call 410-641-5754

ED SMITH REAL ESTATE SCHOOL

Puzzle Place Daycare has immediate openings for ages 19 mos. and older. Structured curriculum in my home. Crafts, story time, lesson time and outside play. Accredited daycare license with 25 years experience. 410-641-1952

Pre-Licensing Real Estate Classes

FURNITURE

FURNITURE

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Pt. 1 Feb. 19, 20, 21, 2013 Pt. 2 Feb. 27, 28, Mar. 1, 2013 8 am till 5:30 pm Limited Space Website/Registration www.edsmithschool.com 410-213-2700

Advertise in MDDC Maryland, Delaware and D.C.: 105 papers with a circulation of more than 4.5 million!

For only $495 Deadline is Wednesday of the week prior to publication.

Call 410-723-6397 for more information

SERVICES

New Queen-size mattress sets for sale-$199.00 Call 410641-5307

JUMPINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; JACK FLASH

FURNITURE WAREHOUSE -- NEW AND USED Pick-Up & Delivery Available

410-250-7000

146th Street, Ocean City

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Ocean City Today

40A NEWS

Winner of the Wine Spectator’s Award of Excellence for 15 Years and The Best of Excellence Award for 2010 & 2011!

JANUARY 11, 2013

The Horizons Oceanfront Restaurant and Ocean Club feature Oceanfront Dining at its Finest with American and Continental Cuisine, serving Breakfast 7am - Noon, Lunch 11am - 2pm and Dinner 5pm - 10pm

ALL DAY MENU Served 7am - 11pm

NEW CENSATION

SUNDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY

ON THE EDGE

$9.95 & $12.95 Dinner Specials 5-10pm 50% OFF Dinner Menu Entrees 5-7pm Specials Excluded

THURSDAY Lobster Lunacy 5-7pm 1 lb. Lobster $18.95

FRIDAY & SATURDAY $5.95 LUNCH SPECIALS DAILY 11 am-2 pm

30% OFF Dinner Menu Entrees 5-7PM

HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS DAILY 4-7 pm

Prime Rib Special 5-10PM 12oz - $28 • 16oz - $34

$5.50 - $7 Food Specials $9.95 Raw Bar Specials Steamed Shrimp Oysters or Clams on the Half Shell

DRINK SPECIALS $3 Rail Drinks • $4 Margaritas $1.75 Drafts & $2.25 Domestic Beers

Valentine’s Day Dinners Thursday, February 14th & Friday, February 15th Two Course Dinner

Three Course Dinner

$30 per person

$35 per person

Regular menu is also available. Reservations suggested.

Specials Excluded

SUNDAY 5-10pm New York Strip, Delmonico, & Filet Mignon - 1/2 Price CATCH OF THE DAY $12.95

DELUXE BREAKFAST BUFFET Sunday 7am-1pm

Adults $14.95 • Children 4-12 $9.95 3 & Under FREE

Divisional Playoffs Weekend SATURDAY January 12th 4:30 pm & 8pm

SUNDAY January 13th 1pm & 4:30pm

18 HI-DEF TVs & 2 Jumbo HI-DEF TVs

Food & Drink Specials during the Games

01.11.13  

Ocean City Today is the newspaper for Ocean City, Md. and the Maryland beach resort area, including West Ocean City, Berlin and Ocean Pines,...

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