a product message image
{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade

Page 1

The global forum for EAP professionals

BALEAP Professional Issues Meeting

Integration:

We’re all in this together!

Saturday 28 March 2020 City Campus East 1, School of Business & Law Northumbria University


A word of welcome I’d like to extend a warm welcome to you all to our Professional Issues Meeting at Northumbria University in Newcastle. Thank you for coming all this way - I’m sure that the varied thoughtprovoking presentations, workshops and posters will make it worth your while. Higher education is currently responding to and driving rapid change on many levels. These changes are reflected in the themes of the work presented here today, which include technological change, changes in the student body, changes in modes of delivery and assessment practices to name but a few. As we diversify and transform, we often seek to integrate different aspects of our role, and different skills we have to enhance the learning environment and experience and the quality of the education we offer. How we do so is what we are discussing today, with a focus on innovative practice for the future. The day is divided into 20-minute presentations (morning and afternoon) and 1-hour workhops (after lunch). There will also be poster presentations in the main foyer. Please take the time to visit the posters during breaks and lunchtime - abstracts and speaker information are available on page 26. With climate change an ever-growing issues in today’s world, our aim is to provide as sustainable a conference as possible and for this reason we have decided to provide a meat-free buffet. This programme is also designed to be digitally interactive, so you can easily access information on your electronic device, allowing us to cut down on use of paper. Although paper cups will be available, we would encourage you to bring along a reusable cup for refreshments. We hope you thoroughly enjoy the day!

Carrie McCullock, Head of Northumbria Language Centre


Contents

1

Information about the day

3

Building floor plan

4 Timetable 5

Opening Plenary - Professor Helen Spencer-Oatey

6

11:25-11:55 session (20 minute presentations)

10

12:00-12:30 session (20 minute presentations)

14

13:30 - 14:30 session (1 hour workshops)

18

14:45-15:15 session (20 minute presentations)

22

15:20-15:50 session (20 minute presentations)

26

Poster presentations

29

Closing remarks

30

BAAL conference @ Northumbria University

31 References


How to find us

City Campus City Campus

The BALEAP PIM will be held at City Campus East 1 (CCE1) - The School of Business & Law. CCE1 is located at no. 5 on the city campus map. Reception/

Parking Parking

Reception/ Information Information

e

e

Electric Vehicle CycleElectric Vehicle Food and Parking Drink Charge Point Charge Point

Cycle Parking

15

P

ad

19

rS na

lco Fa

et

tre

e

P

(M)

New Bri

6

5

ess Clinic To The Busin ge Student and Newbrid on ati Accommod

30 31 32

et

Manors Metro Station

33

ra Du

Architecture Studios Burt Hall Campus Services CIS Building City Campus East 1 – Business and Law Student Central Ask4Help CCE Restaurant & Deli, 1880 Café City Campus East 2 – Design School Claude Gibb College House Drill Hall Ellison Building A Block Ellison Building B Block Ellison Building C Block Ellison Building D Block Ellison Building E Block Ellison Gardens Ellison Terrace Occupational Health Glenamara House Library Student Central Ask4Help Student Support and Wellbeing Lipman Building Lovaine Halls Muslim Prayer Facility Nixon Hall Northumberland Building Café Central University Library Digital Commons Northumbria Nursery Pandon Building Pandon Grab and Go Sandyford Building Taste Café Security, Mail and Transport Shop Central Sport Central Squires Annexe Squires Building Squires atm Workshops Students’ Union Santander Sutherland Building Trinity Building The University Gallery Gallery North The University Collection The Woon Gallery of Asian Art Wynne-Jones Building inc Chaplaincy and Faith Advice Centre The Zone

s dio Stu n nn tio Wi dent oda Stu comm Ac

23 24 25 26 27 28 29

dge Stre

d

a Ro nt

15 16 17 18 19

22

5

A167

E

P

rway

To Monument Metro Station

e lac

nP

o llis

18

13 14

20 21

6

atm

l Moto

et re

12

D

33

e

P

Centra

11

St

d

oa tR

an ur

10b

20 P

(M)

ge

E

23

e

e

s dio Stu n nn tio Wi dent oda Stu comm c A

P

4

1lac

nP

o llis

10c

A167

lle Co

9

12

e

torway

et re St

2

30

P

34

10a 18

31

et re

ge

11

33

20

al Mo Centr

hum

rt No

atm

rlan

13

21 3

P

10e

10c

oad 4 10d dR

be10b

23

1

le

To Haymarket Metro Station

3419

10a

31

8

l Co

2 9

25

St

ad

To Haymarket Metro Station

6 7 8 9 10a 10b 10c 10d 10e 11 12

13

21 3

P

10e

be

30

16

e

d 10d oa24 d RP rlan

um

rth

No

7

Accessible Automated External Building DefibrillatorEntrance

Santander P Accessible Branch Parking

Accessible Area Entrance Building

Branch

17

16

atm

8

ace

Pl ary’s

Smoking

Santander Subway

1 2 3 4 5

29 25

atm

24

Smoking Starbucks Subway Area

ar

P

ATM

Starbucks Machine

n lco Fa

o rd R dyfo

o rd R

14

e

atm

et

atm

Food and ATM Drink Machine

tre

San

dyfo

e Plac

St M

et

San

ary’s

29

32 22

14

7

26

tre

28

32 22 27

P

yS Da

26

27

St M

yS Da

15 28

17

atm

34

ess Clinic To The Busin ge Student id and Newbr ion at Accommod

To Monument Metro Station

eet dge Str

New Bri

Manors Metro Station

P Accessible Parking 1 2 3 4 5

6 7 8 9 10a 10b 10c 10d 10e 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32

33 34

By car At weekends, the City Campus East car park, accessible from New Bridge Street, is available on a pay and display basis. SATNAV postcode for City Campus East is: NE2 1UY. Other nearby car parks include Manors Multi-Story Car Park, with a day charge of £7.00.

By metro The closest Metro station is Manors, which requires a transfer at Monument. CCE1 is also within 10 minute walk from Haymarket Metro Station, through the University campus and over the footbridge. The Tyne and Wear Metro can be accessed from Newcastle Central Railway Station and costs £2.00 for a single Zone A ticket or £3.20 for a day ticket.

By foot City Campus East is around 20 minutes walk from Newcastle Central Railway Station. For directions on Google/Apple Maps, you can use the postcode NE2 1UY. More travel details can be found on our University webpage: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-atnorthumbria/visit-northumbria/getting-here/getting-here/getting-here/ 1

Architecture Stu Burt Hall Campus Service CIS Building City Campus Eas Student Central Ask4Help CCE Restaurant City Campus Eas Claude Gibb College House Drill Hall Ellison Building A Ellison Building B Ellison Building C Ellison Building D Ellison Building E Ellison Gardens Ellison Terrace Occupational He Glenamara Hous Library Student Central Ask4Help Student Support Lipman Building Lovaine Halls Muslim Prayer F Nixon Hall Northumberland Café Central University Librar Northumbria Nu Pandon Building Pandon Grab an Sandyford Buildi Taste Café Security, Mail an Shop Central Sport Central Squires Annexe Squires Building Squires Worksho Students’ Union Santander Sutherland Build Trinity Building The University G Gallery North The University C The Woon Galle Wynne-Jones Bu Faith Advice Cen The Zone


Our exhibitors Our exhibitors for the BALEAP PIM on Integration will be set up in the foyer of CCE1 between 9:30 10:00. Please visit the stalls to learn more about available resources.

WiFi Here are the steps to get you setup and on your way: • •

From your device connect to the network WiFi Guest Open a web browser

Note: If you receive a Certificate notice, select ‘Proceed Anyway’ to continue • • •

From The Cloud landing page locate the box Get online at Northumbria University and click ‘Go’ Scroll down to select ‘Create Account’ Enter your details and your account will be created.

You will then be connected to WiFi Guest

Food & Drink Food and refreshments will be available throughout the day. The BALEAP PIM @ Northumbria University is a sustainable event. A meatfree buffet lunch will be served in the main foyer from 12:30-13:30, with seating available in the CCE1 cafe.

Social Media Get involved in ongoing discussion using the following hashtag:

#EAPintegration 2


City Campus East - School of Business & Law Floor plan

3


BALEAP Professional Issues Meeting (PIM) - Saturday 28 March 2020 Northumbria University, City Campus East, School of Business & Law (CCE1)

Integration: We’re in the this together!

Timetable 9:30 – 10:00

Registration and Publishers’ stands

CCE1 Foyer

10:00 – 10:10

Welcome and announcements

CCE1 003

10:10 – 11:10

Plenary Speaker – Professor Helen Spencer-Oatey Centre for Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick Fostering Integration: Why is it important and how can we enhance it?

CCE1 003

11:10 – 11:25

Break

11:25 – 11:55

CCE1-007

CCE1-024

CCE1-223A

CCE1-223B

Sarah Mattin & Vicky Collins

Lisa Hale

Lucy Marriott

Helen Costello

Oxford Brookes University

University of Sunderland

Durham University

Integration not segregation: Creating a community of foundation students that have more similarities than differences

Integrating digital pedagogies and assessment methods

Stakeholder integration on a Mexican pre-sessional

Ivan Ghio, Marina Elosegui Garcia & Daniel Walker

Lisa Robinson

Izabela Marianna Handzlik

University of Nottingham

INTO Newcastle University

Thinking about feedback: Reactions and revisions

University Chinatown?: The educational challenges that Chinese students face as international students in the UK

20-minute presentations

University of Reading One cohort, one task, but 15 different academic disciplines: How to integrate subject specificity on an EGAP Pre sessional Programme.

11:05 – 12:00

Changeover

12:00 – 12:30

Sandra Leigh

20-minute presentations

University Nottingham CELE The knowledge triangle

University of Birmingham Advancing equality and diversity (E&D) in the EAP classroom: a case study at the University of Birmingham

12:30­­ – 13:30

Lunch

CCE1 Foyer

12:45 - 13:30

BALEAP Annual General Meeting

CCE1-003

13:30 – 14:30

CCE1-213

CCE1-410

CCE1-224C

CCE1-221

Kinga Maior

Aleks Palanac

Michèle Le Roux

University of Glasgow

University of Leicester

Integrating technology in EAP through assessment with Socrative

Working with refugee trauma in the EAP classroom

Cardiff University ELP/ Durham University DCAD

Victoria Jack, Bijia Xing, Aishwarya George, Caroline Crang, Ella Mycross & Yoshikazu Sakimoto

1-hour workshops

Integrating soul and role: An invitation to explore our divided professional lives in a Circle of Trust.

University of York Transcultural communication: Language and locus of integration in diversifying HE

14:30 – 14:45

Break

14:45 – 15:15

CCE1-007

CCE1-024

CCE1-223A

CCE1-223B

Alison Leslie

Jane Carnaffan and Caroline Burns

Carrie McCullock

Paula Villegas Verdu

Northumbria University

University of Sheffield ELTC

International postgraduate students, their academic skills and their sense of academic-self

Integrating content and academic literacy: Perceptions and practicalities

20-minute presentations

University of Leeds We are all in this together!: Collaborating on an inclusive approach to academic literacy in the discipline

Northumbria University Getting to know me, getting to know you: Developing materials to enhance intercultural conversations based on a non-essentialist model of culture

15:15 – 15:20

Changeover

15:20 – 15:50

Iwona Winiarska-Pringle

Stefani Goga

Bill Guariento

Chris Smith

University of Glasgow

Oxford Brookes University

University of Glasgow

University of Sheffield ELTC

20-minute presentations

Expectations and experiences of speaking in EAP, content and social spaces

Meeting the needs of a diverse student body: A focus on undergraduate nursing students

Integrating the global north & south via pre-sessional telecollaboration

Integrated language tests and assessments: What, why and how

15:50 – 15:55

Changeover

15:55 – 16:25

Plenary discussion/Q&A

CCE1-003

Back to Contents

4


10:10 - 11:10 CCE1-003

Opening Plenary

Fostering integration: Why is it important and how can we enhance it? Professor Helen Spencer-Oatey, University of Warwick

Many universities throughout the world are seeking to enhance the diversity (linguistic, national, ethnic, social, religious etc.) of their staff and student community, yet most are paying proportionately much less attention to their integration. Yet as a British Council (2015, p.4) report argues with regard to internationalisation, “having a diverse student body does not mean the education or even the campus is global in nature. What comes as an essential part of a global education is the inclusion of international students in communities and classes.” In this talk, I focus on integration in the classroom. After an initial introduction, I report on the findings from a large-scale study on students’ aspirations and experiences of interaction and integration in their classes. 2360 domestic and international students from six universities across four countries completed an instrument known as the Global Education Profiler, which asks respondents to answer questions in two ways: ‘Importance to me’ and ‘My actual experience’. Some fascinating differences emerged in students’ ratings of these two aspects, both within and across groups (of various kinds). I explain these findings and explore their implications for classroom teachers and our role in helping foster ‘global graduate’ skills in our students. In the second half of my talk, I introduce some resources we have developed at the University of Warwick to help address participation issues in the classroom, and especially the challenges of working in groups.

A reference list for all abstract citations is provided at the end of the programme booklet (see pages 31-34)

Speaker biography Helen Spencer-Oatey, University of Warwick, helen.spencer-oatey@warwick.ac.uk Helen Spencer-Oatey is Professor in the Centre for Applied Linguistics at the University of Warwick, UK. Having worked in China for many years, her main research interests are in intercultural education and intercultural interaction and she has published widely in these areas (e.g. Intercultural Interaction, Palgrave, with Peter Franklin; a range of articles in journals such as Higher Education, Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, Journal of Pragmatics, and her forthcoming book Intercultural Politeness, CUP, with Dániel Kádár). She is particularly committed to the applied relevance of her research and, with colleagues, she has developed a range of resources for practitioners, both within higher education and beyond, many of which are available on the GlobalPeople website. One of her current projects is on ‘Academic and social integration on campus’ and to help with this, she and Daniel Dauber have developed the Global Education Profiler (GEP) – a diagnostic tool for both staff and students on perceptions and experiences of internationalisation, which is now commercially available worldwide via i-graduate.

@HelenOatey

Back to Contents

Back to Timetable

5


11:25 - 11:55 CCE1-007

20 minute presentation

One cohort, one task, but 15 different academic disciplines: How to integrate subject specificity on the EGAP Pre-sessional programme Sarah Mattin & Vicky Collins, University of Reading

The importance of discipline specificity in EAP teaching is now widely acknowledged given the vast literature demonstrating how discourses vary across disciplines (Hyland, 2018). However, much provision, particularly on Pre-sessional pathways, still takes an EGAP approach due to operational constraints and the student demographic. In this presentation we address the challenge of how to integrate discipline specificity on an EGAP Pre-sessional through the development of a new component entitled ‘Preparing for Research and Enquiry’ which aims to engage postgraduate students with research in their intended disciplinary field. This arose from a university wide three-year review of academic programmes which prompted discussion within our own department of how to develop the ‘ability to consume and appraise research critically’ (UoR Curriculum Framework 2017: 2) from the Pre sessional stage of students’ UK educational journey. We realised that in addressing this aim, we also had the opportunity to integrate discipline-specificity on our EGAP Pre-sessional to better connect students with their disciplinary field. We will outline the rationale for the design of the ‘Preparing from Research and Enquiry’ component, in particular how we sought to accommodate the different academic disciplines within one task, and also induct students who have not previously studied in their intended discipline i.e. those entering ‘conversion’ degrees. The talk will be of particular relevance to Programme Leaders of Pre sessional provision in similar institutional contexts. A reference list for all abstract citations is provided at the end of the programme booklet (see pages 31-34)

Speaker biography Sarah Mattin, University of Reading, s.mattin@reading.ac.uk Sarah Mattin is an EAP Lecturer at the International Study and Language Institute (ISLI), University of Reading. During the academic year, her main responsibility is developing and teaching discipline specific academic skills provision for the Insessional Academic English Programme, overseeing courses for the Department of English Language and Linguistics, the Institute of Education, Henley Business School (UG) and the Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences. In the summer, she is a Course Director for the Pre-sessional English Programme. Her professional interests include the development of writing skills for practitioner-focused academic study and management and leadership in EAP.

Vicky Collins, Collins, University of Reading, v.collins@reading.ac.uk Vicky Collins is an EAP Lecturer at the International Study and Language Institute (ISLI), University of Reading. She works with a range of different student cohorts in her roles as Pre sessional coordinator, Module Convenor for Modern Britain 1 (study abroad students), and leading the academic skills provision for PGT Management, Accounting and Finance students. Her professional interests include curriculum design and an exploration of genres of academic writing in the Business school.

Back to Contents

Back to Timetable

6


11:25 - 11:55 CCE1-024

20 minute presentation

Integration not segration: Creating a community of Foundation students that have more similarities than differences Lisa Hale, Oxford Brookes University

In this session, we will share how at Oxford Brookes University we have adapted our International Foundation Programmes to include both international and home students. To make our International Foundation programmes more sustainable due to a decrease in international student numbers and with increased interest from home students wanting to study a generic foundation programme to allow them to progress to an undergraduate one, from 2015, we have accepted these home students on our International Foundation programmes. The feedback on this integrated approach from both students and staff has been positive, as has feedback from our External Examiner and results from a recent small-scale tracking project. To achieve this integration, we have reviewed all aspects of the programmes, from the overall structure to the modules themselves, and from the pedagogy and assessment to student support. In this session, we will present some of the positives but also challenges that we have faced and look at how we are addressing them. Then we would like to open the session up to see what others are doing. A reference list for all abstract citations is provided at the end of the programme booklet (see pages 31-34)

Speaker biography Lisa Hale, Oxford Brookes University, lhale@brookes.ac.uk Lisa Hale is the Programme Lead for Pathways Programmes at Oxford Brookes University.

Back to Contents

Back to Timetable

7


11:25 - 11:55 CCE1-223A

20 minute presentation

Integrating digital pedagogies and assessment methods Lucy Marriott, University of Sunderland

Breaking the Boundary from Paper to Digital, old to new, traditional to innovative, introducing any new initiative or development will always present boundaries to change albeit invisible in a tangible sense. Resistance to change is a real phenomenon that exists in all walks of life and managing that change is crucial to the success of any new development or innovation. When introducing new technology which will replace or even support a traditional paper based approach to assessment and teaching methods, there are many aspects to consider. There is a certain scepticism among students and staff about the use of eportfolios for example, for various reasons, lack of understanding, technical knowledge or a belief in the traditional, meaning effective training is required to engage with the eportfolio and use of other technological methodologies. The technical aspect of the use of electronic methods can serve to increase student engagement (Dedger, Hicks, Parks 2013) using eportfolios as an example again, they have multi modal functionality e.g. digital recordings, videos, podcasts, vlogs, online discussions etc. As well as the submission of written work and indeed delivery of feedback which appeals to a variety of teaching and learning styles and mixed method approaches. Utilising technology also enables access from a variety of locations, students and staff can work from their homes or the library and storing work electronically allows for greater flexibility and ownership. There are many advantages of introducing technology into teaching, learning and assessment making integration of modern methodologies worthwhile A reference list for all abstract citations is provided at the end of the programme booklet (see pages 31-34)

Speaker biography Lucy Marriott, University of Sunderland, lucy.marriott@sunderland.ac.uk Lucy Marriott works as a Senior Lecturer in EAP at the University of Sunderland, to include co-ordinating the In-sessional provision and as Course Director for the Pre-sessional courses. Currently she is undertaking a Professional Doctorate and the focus of her research is facilitating the change from paper based traditional teaching and assessment methods to a more modern digital approach.

Back to Contents

Back to Timetable

8


11:25 - 11:55 CCE1-223B

20 minute presentation

Stakeholder integration on a Mexican Pre-sessional Helen Costello, Durham University

This talk details the challenges of integrating the cultural working practices, assumptions and norms of the multiple stakeholders involved in delivering pre-sessional courses in Northern Mexico. For the past 3 years, Durham University has set up and delivered 5 eight-week pre-sessional courses in Northern Mexico. These pre-sessionals are a collaboration between the International Offices at the three UK universities, the Mexican Science and Technology Council (Conacyt), the Mexican National Bank, Citibanemex and the pre-sessional management team at Durham University. As can be imagined, there are challenges to running a pre-sessional at distance and setting up the programme in unfamiliar contexts. Added to that, the integration of the aims and aspirations of the stakeholders, which may or may not coincide, add to the complexity of the project. This talk aims to detail how to we navigated the tension of the differing valuation of the project by the stakeholders involved, including our own understanding of what success means in such a project. The ideal outcomes for the stakeholder can be financial, academic or political and unifying these to deliver a pre-sessional that successfully integrates such disparate strands, involves careful diplomacy and an understanding that successful leverage may involve soft power and creative solutions rather than the traditional modes of discourse familiar within universities. Lessons learned have afforded us an insight into successful integrative practices in a multi-stakeholder project. A reference list for all abstract citations is provided at the end of the programme booklet (see pages 31-34)

Speaker biography Helen Costello, Durham University, helen.costello@durham.ac.uk Helen Costello works at Durham University and teaches on a variety of programmes. She first taught on a pre-sessional in the summer of 2014 and is now involved in the management of pre-sessional courses both in Durham and Mexico.

Back to Contents

Back to Timetable

9


12:00 - 12:30 20 minute presentation CCE1-007

The knowledge triangle Sandra Leigh, University of Nottingham CELE

EAP practitioners are engaged in the dynamic and complex process of preparing students for academia. Unsurprisingly, there are many stakeholders involved in the process. Hence, this presentation focuses on the triadic relationship between EAP students, staff and subject specific lecturers in the socialisation experiences of students. Based on an investigation into the impact of EAP education on the first-year experiences of a group of post-EAP students at a Russell Group UK university, this paper proposes that for successful and effective contribution to student integration, EAP staff must develop dialogic relations with former students and subject lecturers to exploit their expertise and improve EAP practice. The fundamental aim of such relationships is for EAP students, practitioners, and subject lecturers to be accessible to each other and engage in regular communication. Moreover, such collaborative relationships with former students will help to transform traditional perceptions of students as passive participants to active agents who can legitimately contribute to both the development of EAP practice and their own socialisation experiences. This presentation will examine the unique perspective that each group within the triad can offer and how each community can positively influence each other to enhance student integration and ultimately, ensure more explicit and sensitive socialisation practices. However, the longevity of such relationships are often sabotaged by practical issues, lack of incentives and misconceptions about what each party can bring to the table. The presentation will therefore also address some of the challenges of maintaining collaboration between former EAP students, practitioners and subject lecturers. A reference list for all abstract citations is provided at the end of the programme booklet (see pages 31-34)

Speaker biography Sandra Leigh, University of Nottinhgam CELE, sandra.leigh@nottingham.ac.uk Sandra Leigh is an EAP practitioner and Assistant Professor at the University of Nottingham. She has considerable experience teaching in Lebanon, the UAE and the UK. She has taught Foundation, Presessional and Insessional students for over ten years serving as tutor, course leader, course coordinator and module convenor for a variety of EAP programmes and modules. Her research interests include international student experiences, students’ post-EAP experiences and feedback.

Back to Contents

Back to Timetable

10


12:00 - 12:30 CCE1-024

20 minute presentation

Advancing equality and diversity (E&D) in the EAP classroom: A case study at the University of Birmingham Ivan Ghio, Marina Elosegui Garcia & Daniel Walker, University of Birmingham

Creating a positive environment where both teachers and learners feel inspired and share mutual respect for one another is an important prerequisite for successful learning (Dörnyei 2001). Moreover, the ongoing process of internationalisation in HE (Blight et al 1999, Knight 1997) requires international students and teachers to be able to understand and accept differing viewpoints and needs, acknowledge, accept and respect different cultures, and manage uncertainty (Brinkman and Van Weerdenburg 2014). Therefore, it is argued that EAP teachers in particular have an obligation to act as intercultural mediator in order to promote international students’ integration and acculturation. The BIA’s E&D team, which includes an ex-foundation student, now acting as the BIA’s specially assigned E&D student ambassador, promotes these goals by developing and delivering targeted training for both teachers and students. This talk reports on a workshop organized for foundation students to familiarize themselves with the UK Equality Act (2010), facilitate their integration in their new cultural setting, and provide a springboard for classroom discussions on E&D-related topics. In a seminar-like format, students were invited to engage in a dialogue about the protected characteristics, reflect on their own cultural background, and question any assumptions underlying their customary thinking and/or behavioral patterns. A pilot has shown that this approach is fruitful: students’ attendance was positive and their understanding improved. Students were also able to raise critical questions and receive informative, comprehensive answers. Ways to widen student participation and how students can disseminate this knowledge amongst their peers will be finally explored. A reference list for all abstract citations is provided at the end of the programme booklet (see pages 31-34)

Speaker biography Ivan Ghio, University of Birmingham, i.ghio@bham.ac.uk Ivan Ghio is currently teaching EAP in the BIA department at the University of Birmingham. He also teaches on various undergraduate courses in the department of English Language and Applied Linguistics and has recently been supervising MA students on the TESOL MA course. His main research interests comprise Corpus Assisted Critical Discourse Analysis, Pragma-Stylistics and Social Theory. His latest research lies at the intersection of language and medicine, focusing on the linguistic representation of HIV and AIDS post 1996 in the public and private discourse in the UK.

Marina Elosegui Garcia, University of Birmingham, m.eloseguigarcia@bham.ac.uk Marina Elosegui Garcia is an EAP tutor, CPD Coordinator and part of Equality and Diversity team in the BIA department at the University of Birmingham. She has previously lectured in foreign language teaching and didactics, development of the plurilingual competence in a minority language context and education in innovative learning environments amongst others at Mondragon University in Spain. Her recent research focuses on oral competence of learners of TEFL in a blended learning context. Her research interests lie in innovation and intervention in multicultural and multilingual societies (in the fields of Education and Communication) and blended learning course design and delivery.

Daniel Walker, University of Birmingham, drw808@student.bham.ac.uk Daniel Walker is currently studying Aerospace engineering at the University of Birmingham. He is an Equality and Diversity Student Ambassador for student services and the Birmingham International Academy. His interest lies in the LGBTQ community, looking at the intersectionality and lack of inclusion for QTIPOC and Queer people with disabilities within the community as a whole. His latest work has been on providing educational lectures that cover the basics of EDI, as well as more in-depth understanding of EDI in HE.

Back to Contents

Back to Timetable

11


12:00 - 12:30 20 minute presentation CCE1-223A

Thinking about feedback: Reactions and revisions Lisa Robinson, University of Nottingham

Feedback has the power to transform the higher education learning experience (Gibbs & Simpson, 2004; O’Donovan, Rust & Price, 2016), but also the potential to demotivate students (Ferris, 2003). So how do we know if we are getting it right? Do students get it? Does it prompt agency and, ultimately, improve writing? Focusing on academic writing interim feedback for EAP pre-sessional students, this presentation explores student (re)actions; that is reactions to feedback and the opportunities for action to revise drafts. I will share think-aloud data as students encounter electronic asynchronous feedback and consider their comprehension, reactions and revisions. This integration of student voices and tutor feedback practice offers an insight into the affective, informative and formative impact of our feedback.

A reference list for all abstract citations is provided at the end of the programme booklet (see pages 31-34)

Speaker biography Lisa Robinson, University of Nottingham, lisa.robinson@nottingham.ac.uk Lisa Robinson is a lecturer on the MA TESOL in the School of Education, University of Nottingham. She has previously taught pre-sessional EAP for over a decade at the Centre for English Language Education (CELE). Her interests include curriculum and syllabus design, teacher education and support, tutor observations, academic writing feedback and becoming a better teacher.

Back to Contents

Back to Timetable

12


12:00 - 12:30 20 minute presentation CCE1-223B

University Chinatown?: The educational challenges that Chinese students face as international students in the UK Izabela Marianna Handzlik, INTO Newcastle University

According to the Higher Education Statistical Agency (HESA), in the academic year 2016-17, 81% of students studying in the UK Higher Education are from the UK. 6% are from the rest of the EU and 13% are from the rest of the world. It is worth noting that the number of Chinese students far exceeds any other nationality among all non-UK students (both EU and non-EU). Almost one third of non-EU students in the UK is from China. Most importantly, this is the only country showing a significant increase in student numbers (14% rise since 2012-13) (HESA 2018). Having these trends in mind, this presentation aims to provide further details regarding international student statistics in the UK HE, based on HESA upcoming data releases in January 2020. The introductory section of this presentation will be followed by contributor’s reflection on the major differences between the Chinese and UK higher education systems, which may have serious implications for Chinese students’ (academic) integration in the UK. Particular attention will be drawn to practical strategies and solutions which can be implemented by lecturers in the academia to meet Chinese students’ educational needs and, as a result, make the diverse university environment more inclusive. All suggested practices are based on both the subject literature review and presenter’s professional experience of working with Chinese students, gained at the University of Limerick (Ireland), INTO Queen’s University Belfast and INTO Newcastle University. Note: The initial results of this project were presented during Newcastle University Learning and Teaching Conference 2019 (poster presentation). A reference list for all abstract citations is provided at the end of the programme booklet (see pages 31-34)

Speaker biography Izabela Marianna Handzlik, INTO Newcastle University, izabela.handzlik@newcastle.ac.uk Dr. Izabela Handzlik is a Deputy Programme Manager for International Foundation Business and Humanities programme and a Module Leader in Sociology. Prior to this, she cooperated with Warsaw and Dublin-based language schools and training companies, INTO Queen’s University Belfast, the University of Limerick in Ireland (Sociology Department) and three Warsaw-based higher education institutions: Kozminski University, University of Warsaw (Centre for Migration Research) and University of Social Sciences and Humanities, where she graduated from the Interdisciplinary Doctoral Programme, majoring in Sociology. Additionally, she holds a BA and first class honours MA degree in English Studies. Izabela’s research interests include, among others, culture and literature of English-speaking countries, social inequalities, sociology of globalisation, Muslim communities in Europe and the USA, migration studies as well as Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA). Her teaching interests focus on Introduction to Sociology, Classical and Contemporary Sociological Theory, Sociology of Globalization, Sociology of Work and English for Academic Purposes.

Back to Contents

Back to Timetable

13


13:30 - 14:30 CCE1-213

1 hour workshop

Integrating technology in EAP through assessment with Socrative Kinga Maior, University of Glasgow

Due to growing demand in Higher Education based on our students’ preferences and expectations of integrating technology seamlessly into their studies with a view to succeed in their career accomplishments (Dahlstrom, 2012), blended learning has received significant attention in the past decade. This workshop will focus on Socrative, one of the most popular online platforms used at tertiary level (Wash, 2014). Previous research indicates that Socrative is preferred by most students with regards to informal and formative assessment (Lim, 2017) and engagement with learning (Kaya and Balta, 2016). Therefore, in order to encourage its application in the EAP classroom, I would like to invite the workshop participants to try it as students by taking a 5-8 minute test on a general topic familiar to everyone (citations using Harvard Referencing). Then, we will follow with an evaluation of the platform and data analysis as tutors. The workshop will conclude with a discussion of the benefits and challenges of Socrative’s suitability for enhancing both formative and summative assessment in different contexts (e.g. writing/listening tests). Your individual and group feedback will be shared live on Padlet as we progress through the workshop (see https://padlet.com/kinga_maior/SocrativePIM). Therefore, please bring a laptop/iPad or a mobile device that you are comfortable typing on or can take photos of your handwritten notes for sharing. This Padlet will be publicly available 24/7 during and after the BALEAP PIM. It is hoped that the workshop’s collated findings can contribute to the positive integration of technology for assessment in EAP.

A reference list for all abstract citations is provided at the end of the programme booklet (see pages 31-34)

Speaker biography Kinga Maior, University of Nottingham, kinga.maior@glasgow.ac.uk Kinga Maior is a graduate of the University of Glasgow in the fields of Adult Education and TESOL with 20 years teaching experience. She is currently working as an EAP tutor at her alma mater. Her current research interests are gamification and the use of technology in the EAP classroom.

Back to Contents

Back to Timetable

14


13:30 - 14:30 CCE1-410

1 hour workshop

Working with refugee trauma in the EAP Classroom Aleks Palanac, University of Leicester

As an increasing number of universities are starting to actively facilitate opportunities for forced migrants to benefit from the opportunities afforded by their institutions (through initiatives such as Universities of Sanctuary and Refugee Welcome Schools and Universities), a growing number of EAP practitioners are finding themselves faced with the issue of how best to meet the needs of learners whose backgrounds and needs are often difficult, complex and riddled with potentially traumatic experiences. In order to address this concern, this workshop will explore how, although not usually trained therapists themselves, EAP practitioners have an opportunity to create some of the psycho-social conditions in which refugee students who have experienced trauma might begin to recover and even grow from their experience, thereby enabling them to maximise their learning potential and, ultimately, many other opportunities on offer in their universities and beyond. There will be time for participants to consider the applicability of a number of suggested strategies to their own institutional contexts, exploring ways in which classrooms can become safe spaces in which trauma symptoms might be reduced, and in which post-traumatic growth might be actively fostered. A reference list for all abstract citations is provided at the end of the programme booklet (see pages 31-34)

Speaker biography Aleks Palanac, University of Leicester, ap417@le.ac.uk Currently an EAP Practitioner at the University of Leicester, Aleks Palanac is heavily involved in its University of Sanctuary initiative, particularly pertaining to widening participation for asylum seekers and refugees through an English language pathway. She has delivered teacher training to volunteer English language teachers of refugees in the UK and in Greece, and is currently conducting British Council ELTRA funded inter-disciplinary research into how trauma-informed pedagogies can be applied in EAP classes in a University of Sanctuary context.

Back to Contents

Back to Timetable

15


13:30 - 14:30 CCE1-224C

1 hour workshop

Integrating soul and role: An invitation to explore our divided professional lives in a Circle of Trust. Michèle le Roux, Cardiff University ELP/Durham University DCAD

I extend an invitation to EAP practitioners to reflect on academic identity in a gathering that intentionally breaks the constraints of the “conference genre” – its discourse, space, and time. The invitation is made in response to the “growing tension between HE’s intellectual, critical, theoretical and moral purposes, and those that are more practical and economic in nature and orientated towards providing a service to society… a disjuncture between what we ourselves regard as meaningful practice and what we are instead expected to comply with.” (Kreber, 2013) The invitation is extended to those in precarious work environments, those whose vocational identities are being disintegrated/ deconstructed, and those who feel that our position/predicament within the neoliberal university entails a loss of authenticity, “a shared sense that aspects of our professional lives have become increasingly separated from this core characteristic of what it means to be truly human.” (ibid.) I do not propose to talk about this predicament in the public forum – not analysing, fixing or saving – but rather to invite practitioners into a Circle of Trust, inspired by the writings of educationalist Parker Palmer and the practices of the Centre for Courage & Renewal which he has established. Participants are invited to “hear each other into speech” about their experience of their working lives as “a divided life” and to explore possibilities for re-integrating Soul and Role within the community of trust we will create. In this workshop, up to 30 participants are invited to enter into the reflective and inner, but also communal, practices of the Circle of Trust, within which openness, integrity and confidentiality are honoured. The invitation to participants, then, is to position themselves, intentionally, for a time, outside the conference arena – a place of display, performance and presentation – and simply to “show up” in a space that is resource-rich and charged with expectancy, bringing to the circle an inner disposition to openness and transformation. A reference list for all abstract citations is provided at the end of the programme booklet (see pages 31-34)

Speaker biography Michèle le Roux, Cardiff University ELP/Durham University DCAD, lerouxm1@cardiff.ac.uk Michèle le Roux is an EAP teacher, trainer and curriculum developer. She currently works as EAP Programme Co-ordinator at Cardiff University, MATESOL supervisor and assessor for Durham University, and online tutor for the Open University of Catalunya. She is also qualified in Catechesis, in Spiritual Accompaniment and in the facilitation of Non-violent Communication and Circles of Trust. She seeks to position herself with integrity at the interface of these two professional identities and to build bridges, resilience and community.

Back to Contents

Back to Timetable

16


13:30 - 14:30 CCE1-221

1 hour workshop

Transcultural communication: Language and locus of integration in diversifying HE Victoria Jack, Bijia Xing, Aishwarya George, Caroline Crang, Ella Mycross & Yoshikazu Sakimoto, University of York

The integration of students from different backgrounds represents a challenge within diversifying higher education, particularly in undergraduate cohorts where students have limited experience of collaborating with students who are different from themselves. Students and staff report selfsegregation in lectures and seminars not only between what are sometimes labelled “home” and “international” students but also between students from different socio-economic, “ethnic”, linguistic, regional, educational backgrounds of different ages, personalities and abilities (Turner, 2009; Rose-Redwood, 2013, Spencer-Oatey et al 2017) . The response of the Writing and Language Skills Centre at the University of York was to make transcultural communication the focus of a creditbearing optional and elective level 6 module accessed by both visiting and registered students across faculties. During this student-led workshop, delegates will learn from members of a diverse group of 3rd years about their experiences developing and directing the transcultural communication module content, engaging in shared learning and collaborating to generate their own assessment criteria (Orsmond et al: 2000). Delegates will also have the opportunity to consider the curriculum choices they/their students would make and how they/their students would define and assess effective transcultural communication. We will also develop our understanding of the relevance of transcultural communication in decolonising the curriculum (Le Grange; 2016) and developing appropriate androgogy for a diverse community of students and staff assuring integration and inclusive collaborative learning (Semper & Blasco; 2018). A reference list for all abstract citations is provided at the end of the programme booklet (see pages 31-34)

Speaker biography Victoria Jack, University of York, victoria.jack@york.ac.uk Victoria Jack is a part-time, “mature” PhD researcher in transcultural communication in diversifying higher education and full-time manager of the Writing and Language Skills Centre at the University of York. Her work is dedicated to empowering students to participate in active partnerships with other students and university teaching staff aimed at decolonising the curriculum and assuring integration and inclusivity in HE teaching and learning interventions. Bijia Xing (Kate) is a third year student of Education. She is from China and is here for her undergraduate degree. She had a series of multi-cultural communication experiences and aspires to work in a transcultural setting. Aishwarya George is a 3rd year student of Computer Science. She is from India and has a wide range of cultural experiences and influences. She plans to work in Human Resources after graduating. Caroline Crang is a third year BA Education student. Having grown up a third culture child in six countries, she is fascinated by cultural differences and similarities. She hopes to spend her future as a primary teacher, though hasn’t yet decided where Ella Mycross is a final year student of Italian and Linguistics. She is from Manchester and has just spent a year abroad in Italy as part of her course of study. She plans to work in Japan next year as an English Language Teacher. Yoshikazu Sakimoto is a professor of Business Administration in the Department of Commerce, Nihon University, Tokyo, Japan where he leads lectures and seminars for under- and post-graduates. He is currently a visiting resesarch scholar of the York Management School, Universty of York researching business history, especially global value chain from a historical perspective. Dr Yoshikazu particpated as a student in the Transcultural Communication module to gain first-hand experience of teaching and learning in a diverse setting.

Back to Contents

Back to Timetable

17


14:45 - 15:15 CCE1-007

20 minute presentation

We are all in this together!: Collaborating on an inclusive approach to academic literacy in the discipline Alison Leslie, University of Leeds

This presentation will share an initiative within in-sessional provision at the University of Leeds underpinned by a belief that collaboration between EAP and subject tutors results in closer integration of academic language and literacies in the curriculum and better outcomes in terms of student education (Wingate and Tribble, 2012; Wingate, 2015 and 2016). However this integration does not come without challenges. Lessons learnt from designing and team teaching seminars for a core MA module in the School of Sociology and Social Policy will be reflected on from the perspectives of all direct stakeholders: the EAP and subject tutors, home and international students. As academic language and literacies are embedded in these seminars, this is an innovative approach to delivering an inclusive syllabus which is resulting in increased student engagement. However the integration has also highlighted the common challenges of building a strong relationship between EAP and subject tutors such as changes to staffing and workloads (Fenton-Smith and Humphreys, 2015; Green, 2016) and fostering a shared sense of student agency in advancing in the discipline rather than reinforcing ‘them’ and ‘us’ identities around support. These issues are ones we continue to explore together as we share our commitment to inclusive student education and steer the current drive for internationalisation in the School. A reference list for all abstract citations is provided at the end of the programme booklet (see pages 31-34)

Speaker biography Alison Leslie, University of Leeds, a.s.Leslie@leeds.ac.uk Alison Leslie works as a Lecturer in EAP at the University of Leeds. She is currently seconded to the School of Sociology and Social Practice to lead the Language Centre’s pre- and in-sessional provision for students in this department. Her research interests include evaluating the impact of in-sessional provision, inclusive teaching and global citizenship education.

Back to Contents

Back to Timetable

18


14:45 - 15:15 CCE1-024

20 minute presentation

Getting to know me, getting to know you: Developing materials to enhance intercultural conversations based on a non-essentialist model of culture Jane Carnaffan & Caroline Burns, Northumbria University

Intercultural communication is currently promoted by higher education institutes as being essential for success at university and beyond (Jones, 2013). It is argued that students must relate to one another socially to feel a sense of belonging to the community, while academic achievement often depends on successful multicultural teamwork. Employers also emphasise the need for intercultural competence (British Council, 2013). Yet, divides between students of different national and ethnic groups persist, and employers continue to see a skills deficit in this area (Spencer-Oatey, 2017). Intercultural communication is taught in various ways across diverse disciplines, including EAP provision, student support services and subject specialisms. We argue that teaching too often hinges on outdated, simplistic models of culture, which emphasise national identity and cultural difference. This can lead to stereotyping and division, and does not produce the communication skills employers currently require (Kassis-Henderson, Cohen and McCulloch, 2018). Moreover, those tasked to deliver input on, for example, ‘cross-cultural communication’ rarely come together to reflect on their practice across institutions. This project aims to leverage cutting-edge theory in intercultural communication, where culture is conceived as fluid, dynamic, contested and ambiguous and where the complexity of identity is explored and celebrated to build bridges between self and other and improve teamwork (Burns, 2018). It also brings together academics and student support professionals from two UK universities to develop teaching and learning resources for intercultural communication based on a nonessentialist model of culture (Holliday, 2011). This presentation will report on the initial findings of the project, focusing on materials under development and student responses and staff reflections on these. A reference list for all abstract citations is provided at the end of the programme booklet (see pages 31-34)

Speaker biography Jane Carnaffan, Northumbria University, jane.carnaffan@northumbria.ac.uk Dr Jane Carnaffan has taught English for Academic Purposes for about 20 year at Northumbria University and other institutions. She also taught Human Geography for 5 years at Newcastle University. She holds a PhD in Human Geography (Tourism and Development) from Newcastle University. She is currently teaching courses on Academic Writing and Study Skills at Northumbria University. Her research interests are in widening participation and internationalisation of university education in the UK and intercultural communication.

Caroline Burns, Northumbria University, caroline.burns@northumbria.ac.uk Dr. Caroline Burns (EdD, MA TESOL, PGCE Modern Languages, SFHEA) has taught English for Academic Purposes and Spanish Language for 18 years at Northumbria University. Her doctoral study was a narrative inquiry, exploring staff and student experiences of internationalisation in a post-1992 UK university. Her research interests are in developing inclusive, values-led approaches to internationalisation of higher education, particularly internationalisation at home, intercultural communication, identity, inclusive pedagogies and Widening Participation.

Back to Contents

Back to Timetable

19


14:45 - 15:15 CCE1-223A

20 minute presentation

International postgraduate students, their academic skills and their sense of academicself Carrie McCullock, Northumbria University

Many of us teaching in-sessional EAP courses are aware of research into International students studying at university in the UK or elsewhere. Studies have reported many issues students face. These include transition itself, culture shock, motivation, adaption, intercultural communication, issues with socialising, language acquisition, academic performance, writing conventions, gender issues and changes in requirement in terms of what is expected of them as students in the UK (see: Coertjens et al., 2017; Kaufold ,2015; Hennerby et al., 2012; Menzies et al., 2015; Morgan, 2014; Pike & Harrison, 2011; Quan et al., 2013; Rientes et al., 2011 and Schartner, 2016,). However, in reviewing the literature there seems to be little on international students’ sense of academic-self in relation to the tasks required of them at a postgraduate level. Academic-self is defined by Lent, Brown & Gore (1997: 308): “Academic self-concept is commonly viewed as incorporating “attitudes, feelings and perception” relative to one’s intellectual or academic skills. As such it represents a mixture of self-beliefs and self-feelings regarding general academic functioning.” Research that focuses on academic-self may reveal more about how students approach academic tasks that are required to complete their courses of study. This presentation aims to provide some initial findings from the first phase of data collection consisting of questionnaires and individual one-to-one interviews from my PhD research. In relation to the topic of integration, the data reveals how students are making sense of and attempting to integrate into the new study arena in which they have chosen to embark. A reference list for all abstract citations is provided at the end of the programme booklet (see pages 31-34)

Speaker biography Carrie McCullock, Northumbria University, carrie.mccullock@northumbria.ac.uk Carrie McCullock is Head of the Language Centre at Northumbria University. She leads a large team of EAP and Modern Foreign Languages tutors who teach pre-sessional, in-sessional, short courses, Unilang - Languages and degree teaching. She has worked at Northumbria for 18 years. She is currently studying for a PhD, which is the topic of her presentation. In her free time, she is a singer-songwriter and more recently performs regular jazz gigs, as well as singing at open mic nights. Her other passion is experimental grain free baking and cooking.

Back to Contents

Back to Timetable

20


14:45 - 15:15 CCE1-223B

20 minute presentation

Integrating content and academic literacy: Perceptions and practicalities Paula Villegas Verdu, University of Sheffield ELTC

This session combines perspectives from research and reflections from practice in order to discuss an integrated approach that enhances undergraduate students (UG1) academic literacy. Integrating content subjects and academic literacy support can be challenging from a conceptual and practical point of view, but it can better prepare students to acquire their disciplinary discourse (McWilliams & Allan, 2014) while enhancing their motivation by using authentic materials (Dörnyei & Ottó, 1998). In this session, we elaborate on how a content subject from Urban Studies was selected to pilot an integrated delivery of content and language via team teaching. We briefly discuss the rationale underpinning this combined approach. We further explore the practicalities of our teaching and syllabus design for the integrated language support sessions. We then discuss students’ perceptions, collected via questionnaires and focus groups, as well as our own perceptions as practitioners. This session will conclude by talking about potential future directions for this integrated approach. A reference list for all abstract citations is provided at the end of the programme booklet (see pages 31-34)

Speaker biography Paula Villegas Verdu, University of Sheffield ELTC, p.villegas@sheffield.ac.uk Paula Villegas works as an EAP Lecturer and Assistant Director of Studies at The English Language Teaching Center, The University of Sheffield. Her research interests include LCT, academic literacies, FL, autonomy, and motivation.

Back to Contents

Back to Timetable

21


15:20 - 15:50 CCE1-007

20 minute presentation

Expectations and experiences of speaking in EAP, content and social spaces Iwona Winiarska-Pringle, University of Birmingham

Study Abroad (SA) experience can contribute the development of students’ intercultural knowledge, independence, and in particular linguistic gain in the target language (Benson, 2013). Indeed, research into the expectations of mobility students often highlights improvement in speaking skills as the prime motivation behind the decision to go abroad (Magnan & Back, 2007; Goldoni, 2013). Yet, the realities of being a target language user in academic and social spaces can prove such expectations to be unrealistic, as immersion without opportunities for practice in and outside of classrooms tends to be insufficient for significant improvements in linguistic proficiency ( Blaj-Ward, 2016 DeKeyser, 2007; Goldoni, 2013, Tran & Pham, 2016 ) leading to frustration, disappointment and a sense of isolation. This presentation will explore some of the key themes emerging from a scholarship project exploring international students’ expectations and experiences of engaging in spoken interactions in formal academic environments (EAP and content courses), informal academic spaces (e.g. study groups) and social interactions. The project involved undergraduate Study Abroad students from diverse disciplinary backgrounds who attended in-sessional credit-bearing EAP courses at the University of Glasgow in 2019. My intention was to gain a better understanding of the undergraduate teaching and learning context in my institution and contribute to the development of the course design. While some themes emerging from the study are similar to those reported in the SA literature, (e.g. integration issues with home students), others were unexpected and led to the changes of the curriculum and assessment rebalancing of the focus between oracy and literacy. A reference list for all abstract citations is provided at the end of the programme booklet (see pages 31-34)

Speaker biography Iwona Winiarska-Pringle, University of Birmingham, iwona.winiarska-pringle@glasgow.ac.uk Iwona Winiarska-Pringle teaches and designs EAP courses at the University of Glasgow. In 2017 she became a Higher Education Academy Fellow. Her scholarship interest are oracy skills, assessment, and feedback.

Back to Contents

Back to Timetable

22


15:20 - 15:50 CCE1-024

20 minute presentation

Meeting the needs of a diverse student body: a focus on undergraduate Nursing students Stefani Goga, Oxford Brookes University

The Academic English department at Oxford Brookes recently delivered an academic writing course for a cohort of first-year Nursing undergraduates. This course was developed at the request of the Nursing faculty in response to historic poor performance in the first written assignment. The students in question were highly representative of the Widening Participation (WP) profile. As such, the course addressed a wider institutional agenda of building provision in the WP area (Oxford Brookes University, 2008). The development of this course speaks to the changing landscape of EAP in UK Higher Education. This includes the growing demand for embedded instruction in disciplines and also the merging of EAP, with its focus on international students, with wider Academic Literacies support accessible to the whole student body (Wingate and Tribble, 2012). The presentation will highlight the challenges of writing materials for a diverse audience, comprising international and home students, and also for a disciplinary group whose needs and practices have been underresearched (Gimenez, 2008). The aim of the presentation is to make recommendations for similar courses with a comparable student profile. A reference list for all abstract citations is provided at the end of the programme booklet (see pages 31-34)

Speaker biography Stefani Goga, Oxford Brookes University, sgoga@brookes.ac.uk Paula Villegas works as an EAP Lecturer and Assistant Director of Studies at The English Language Teaching Center, The University of Sheffield. Her research interests include LCT, academic literacies, FL, autonomy, and motivation.

Back to Contents

Back to Timetable

23


15:20 - 15:50 CCE1-223A

20 minute presentation

Integrating the Global North & South via Pre-sessional telecollaboration Bill Guariento, University of Glasgow

In the past two decades, the importance to the UK HE system of overseas students has grown dramatically, though the notable growth in numbers hasn’t necessarily led to more meaningful intercultural exchanges, even on the pre-sessional courses that form the first point of contact for many incoming students. These students tend to be from relatively privileged backgrounds, provenance is largely limited to certain markets that are easily-accessible to student-recruiters (Chinese and Saudi students predominate), and above all their course materials often fail to engage what Crosbie (2014: 97) terms the “cosmopolitan subjectivities [which] can be transformative for the individuals concerned.� Peer-to-peer telecollaborative link-ups with students in the Global South can address these issues in ways that are mutually beneficial, in terms both of content and of language-practice, while offering UK-based students the opportunity to view their chosen fields through a social justice prism. The University of Glasgow has, since 2015, combined its pre-sessional English language programme with Global South universities, initially in Gaza, extended then to two partners in Chile; the EAST Telecollaboration Project (Rolinska et al, 2017). Following up a BALEAP webinar from March 2019, this talk brings the EAST Project up to date, with the addition of a partner-institution from Malawi last summer. It outlines the language strengths we have found among many Global South students, and shows that participants can successfully overcome communication challenges, even in distributed environments. Our hope is that other UK HE institutions may be interested in developing similar initiatives. A reference list for all abstract citations is provided at the end of the programme booklet (see pages 31-34)

Speaker biography Bill Guariento, University of Glasgow, william.guariento@glasgow.ac.uk Bill Guariento teaches at English for Academic Study, the University of Glasgow. He convenes the Science, Engineering and Technology bridging programme each summer and, as part of his liaison brief with the School of Engineering, has written and delivered subject-specific EAP courses in Libya, China and Chile.

Back to Contents

Back to Timetable

24


15:20 - 15:50 CCE1-223B

20 minute presentation

Integrated language tests and assessments: What, why and how Chris Smith, University of Sheffield ELTC

Many common models of language test use a format in which the skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking are assessed separately, creating component scores. Recently there has been renewed interest in integrated tests in which two or more skills are combined together, for example readinginto-writing. Assessments such as these are particularly intriguing for EAP because academic writing usually relies on discussing source texts. This talk will begin by discussing what separate and integrated tests are. I will present some examples of reading into-writing test and other integrated assessment, discussing how different skills are included in the test construct. I will then discuss why integrated assessments are desirable in EAP. The reasons why include: improving the test construct, improved authenticity of the assessment, positive washback on EAP courses, and better coverage of the model of language proficiency, as defined by the CEFR. I will also discuss some reasons why not to use integrated assessments, namely reliability and UKVI requirements, and how these issues can be resolved. Finally, I will discuss how integrated assessments can be designed, considering source texts and output tasks, but focussing in more detail on the design of ratings scales and marking criteria for integrated assessments and how scores are reported. I will also outline how integrated assessments can be used formatively to generate useful developmental feedback. A reference list for all abstract citations is provided at the end of the programme booklet (see pages 31-34)

Speaker biography Chris Smith, University of Sheffield ELTC, chris.r.smith@sheffield.ac.uk Chris Smith is a Pre-sessional Academic Director at the ELTC, Univeristy of Sheffield. He is also working on a doctorate of education, specialising in testing and assessment. He has previously presented at BALEAP and IATEFL on assessment, feedback and flipped learning.

Back to Contents

Back to Timetable

25


Poster presentations Poster presentations will be held during breaks 11:10-11:15/14:30-14:45 and in the lunchtime period 12:3013:30 in the foyer of CCE1. Details are provided below, along with the corresponding stand numbers. A reference list for all abstract citations is provided at the end of the programe booklet (see pages 31-34)

1 2

3

Dan Bernstein, University of the Arts London, d.bernstein@arts.ac.uk ‘In situ’: Language teaching and learning in the art and design studio The UAL Language Development Programme has a tradition of tailoring student support to specific courses a current pilot is exploring the benefits and challenges of a deeper integration of EAP work and EAP staff into the life of the courses. In this pilot, which began with foundation students (Norton & Bernstein, 2019) and has expanded to involve various degree courses, the manner, content, and timting of the EAP provision is extremely varied. It can include: taught classes following lectures; small-group break-out sessions; informal one-to-one turoials; co-teaching with subject teams etc. A key element of much of the EAP work in the pilot is that it takes place ‘in situ’, i.e. in the studio spaces where teaching and learning usually happen as part of the art and design courses. Our rationale is grounded in our understanding of our particular context and is informed by theories of Situated Learning (Lave & Wagner, 1991) and Academic Literacies (e.g. Lills, 2003). This poster will give examples of what our ‘in situ’ language teaching has looked like in practice so far, discuss issues arising from the pilot, and ask whether principles from our approach can be applied in EAP work with other disciplines.

Deborah Burns, Northumbria University, d.burns@northumbria.ac.uk Integration of Fashion and Film: student collaboration on in-sessional EAP programmes to provide opportunities for critical self-reflection Reflective writing is an increasingly important method of assessment in UK HE, and is particularly frequently employed in work-based learning (Heyler, 2015). Accordingly, ‘engaging in reflection is a vital part of learning for university students and its practice should be embedded in course design’ (Quinton, 2010: 1). Given this, critical self-reflection must also be incorporated into EAP programmes, especially where students are required to submit written accounts of such work for assessment. This poster will recount an innovative, student-led project at Northumbria University, which involved the integration of Level 4 international students from two disciplines: Fashion and Film and TV Production. Both cohorts are frequently assessed on critical self-reflective accounts of their practice. As a result, the EAP tutor needed to create a scenario upon which to focus students and enable deeper-level, critical self-reflection. The poster will provide an account of how the two groups collaborated, bringing together their expertise in their fields and combining their knowledge to produce a one-minute ‘Fashion Film’. This collaboration then formed the basis of structured critical self-reflection.

Angela Hakin, King’s College London, angela.f.hakim@kcl.ac.uk Embedding academic litaracy in the disciplines: A case study The development of academic literacy is crucial to student success in university, yet though it is central to student success, the development of academic literacy has been left to students to acquire implicitly or pushed out of discipline courses to study skills, language or writing centers. These approaches to supporting academic writing in university, called the academic socialization and study skills approaches, respectively, by Lea and Street (1998) neglect the discipline-specific and contextual nature of disciplinary genres and the literacy needs of novices to academic discourse communities whose members’ practices, conventions, and expectations are often opaque. In contrast to this generic writing provision, Wingate (2015) advocates for an integrated, discipline-specific approach to academic literacy instruction in which literacy experts and subject lecturers collaborate and team teach. In this embedded approach, literacy experts collaborate with and advise subject lecturers on how and where to integrate literacy instruction, but it is integrated into subject teaching and assessment rather than taught separately in add-on courses. While examples of this type of academic literacy support can be found in the Australian context, there have been few examples of this type of provision at the institutional level in the U.K., and little is known about the transition from generic in-sessional skills provision to collaboration between literacy experts and subject lecturers in embedded literacy instruction. To address this, this MA research explores the transition from generic in-sessional support to embedded discipline-specific literacy instruction in one U.K. university and the collaboration between EAP tutors and subject lecturers toward this end. Through the collection of interview and observational data, as well as institutional policy documents, this case study identifies issues particular to the transition from generic in-sessional provision to embedded, discipline-specific literacy instruction and opportunities for collaboration between EAP practitioners and subject lecturers throughout this transition.

26


Poster presentations Poster presentations will be held during breaks 11:10-11:15/14:30-14:45 and in the lunchtime period 12:3013:30 in the foyer of CCE1. Details are provided below, along with the corresponding stand numbers. A reference list for all abstract citations is provided at the end of the programe booklet (see pages 31-34)

4 5

6

Angela Hulme The University of Leeds, a.l.hulme@leeds.ac.uk Principles underpinning an EAP programme designed in collaboration with subject departments An EAP programme developed together with academic departments is increasingly seen as the best way to meet the needs of students progressing to university study. Designing such a programme is a complex process, particularly when it involves collaboration with subject specialists. An essential element of any course design process is to establish the principles underpinning its design (Basturkmen, 2010, Cleaver, 2016, Kember and Kwan, 2000). This poster will aim to explore the underlying principles of a pre-sessional postgraduate course designed by EAP practitioners in conjunction with lecturers from schools at the University of Leeds. It will report on findings from a small-scale study into the programme drawing on data from institutional documentation and interviews carried out with course designers. Whilst there was some variation, it was possible to identify a common core of principles which underpinned the programme. I would like to consider to what extent it is desirable to adopt a shared set of principles when designing subject-specific courses and the implications this may have for maintaining a discipline-specific focus.

Liz MacDougall, Abertay University, l.macdougall@abertay.ac.uk The only constant in the universe is change: from Language Centre to Learner Development to ....? In 2014 I was tasked with creating a new service that aimed to work across boundaries to develop our students’ academic literacies, from pre-arrival to postgraduate level. This has involved a number of changes to the way we work, from how to create a cohesive team from individuals with very different backgrounds and expectations, to how best to establish partnerships with academic divisions, other professional services teams, and external partners. In addressing these changes we have realised repeatedly that what unites us is greater than that which divides us! In particular, we have found that international students and those who come directly from college (approximately a third of Abertay students) share many of the same needs, and EAP practitioners’ training and experience is applicable in multiple areas. I will outline the key difficulties I’ve faced in leading the team, and how we have worked to create a more inclusive and integrated service that provides better support, not only for the students, but also for academic staff, our recruiters and our local and international partners. In February 2020 professional services at Abertay will undergo a major restructuring exercise, and so I will also look at how we are planning for this.

Jill Northcott, University of Edinburgh ELE, jill.northcott@ed.ac.uk Developing in-sessional support with Law School staff for LLM students This poster presentation covers many of the central concerns for those working with content specialists in various subject areas to develop and run academic skills and literacy development courses for PG students. Beginning from the dual premises that literacy and content knowledge development are inseparable, and that discipline specialists need help from language specialists to make the tacit knowledge of the genres of their disciplines visible, the challenges involved in cooperation are explored. Law as a discipline presents some very specific challenges for EAP/subject specialist collaboration. The centrality of the importance of a good command of language for academic success is well-recognised by both parties but there are differences in the ways in which this is conceptualised in the two different communities of practice. The widespread view of the inseparability of law and language leads to law academic identity involving claims of expertise in both areas. Working within a department with a strong tradition of cooperation with Law School colleagues which is beginning to reorientate itself towards the adoption of a CEM model (Sloan and Porter 2010) approach to insessional academic development provision, development and implementation of new insessional provision is also a good opportunity for reflection and evaluation of CEM within the ESP tradition.

27


Poster presentations Poster presentations will be held during breaks 11:10-11:15/14:30-14:45 and in the lunchtime period 12:3013:30 in the foyer of CCE1. Details are provided below, along with the corresponding stand numbers. A reference list for all abstract citations is provided at the end of the programe booklet (see pages 31-34)

7 8

Kana Oyabu, Kanazawa University, Japan, oyabu@staff.kanazawa-u.ac.jp EAP-EMI liaison at institutional level: Analyzing records of meetings between EAP and EMI course managers The wave of English Language Instruction (EMI) has reached Japan, and many Japanese universities started introducing EMI courses. It is said that in L2 environment, coordination between EAP staff and EMI subject staff is important to provide support for students (and subject-staff) who have to cope with language-related difficulties as well as subject-related hurdles. (Iyobe & Lin, 2017) However, interaction between EAP staff and subject staff is still very limited in Japan. (Brown, 2016) This presentation reports an EAP-EMI liaison endeavor of a Japanese university. In 2019/2020 academic year, English language staff of this university met with groups of departmental staff to seek liaison possibilities. Reflecting an institution-wide approach of EMI education in this university, each group of departmental staff consist of the head of department, the head of departmental education, and the head of EMI promotion (who is also active in departmental EMI himself/herself). There have been some studies about liaison between EAP staff and subject staff in Japan, but a study of an institution-wide liaison involving course managers and practitioners between the two parties is rare. By analyzing records of 17 meetings (one meeting per department), we have identified problems caused by lack of interaction between EAP and departmental staff as well as promising areas for a successful liaison. There are common streams concerning the introduction of departmental EMI across departments, but each department also has different issues concerning EMI. In the presentation, we also wish to present issues specific to particular departments.

Hugh Whitby, Northumbria University, hugh.whitby@northumbria.ac.uk Re-integrating displaced Syrians into academic life One aspect of the Syrian War often overlooked is the fate of the universities and the academics who have been forced into exile. CARA (Council for At-Risk Academics) was set up in 1933 to protect academics from Nazism and remains busy after all these years. Since 2016, CARA’s Syrian programme has been providing support to Syrian academics now mostly in Turkey attempting to re-establish their professional lives. The programme aims to support Syrian academics especially in their efforts to get their work published in international journals. This has involved for many a need to improve their competence with English and much of the early work in the programme has been to offer EAP training and Academic Skills Development. This takes place through one to one weekly online sessions and intensive language workshops held periodically in Istanbul. While the levels of language proficiency may be low, a central challenge is to ensure teaching content is relevant and enables participants to develop their academic and intellectual abilities. Other difficulties involve internet connections and the complicated lives participants often lead but they have responded very positively to the teaching. As EAP practitioners the experience is removed from the familiar and raises questions about our approaches to teaching and towards our own students. This poster will introduce the context of the CARA Syrian programme and pose these questions for your consideration and discussion.

Back to Contents

Back to Timetable

28


Closing remarks Northumbria Language Centre staff would like to extend their thanks for your attendance and engagement with the conference theme of integration and sharing your knowledge and experience through the day. We hope that the talks, workshops and posters allow for further thought and discussion. We expecially like to thank our plenary spreaker Professor Helen Spencer-Oatey for her stimulating contributions to the day. We’d also like to think all the staff and volunteers at Northumbria University and the BALEAP organising team for helping with the planning and smooth running of the PIM. We would like to invite you to the BAAL conference also being held at Northumbria University in the first week of September - details over page. We hope you have all enjoyed the day and have a safe journey home!

Post-conference drinks Delegates are also invited for post-conference drinks at Stack Newcastle, a 10-minute walk from the conference venue and 10-minute walk to Central Station. Food and drink are not provided, but there are a variety of vendors, bars and food-stalls catering for many tastes. Much of the Stack event space is based outdoors, but has shelter and heaters. Nevertheless, a warm coat is advisable. Use of the above venue may be weather dependent; we will update attendees on the day of the PIM.

Back to Contents

Back to Timetable

29


Join us at Northumbria University as we host the 2020 BAAL Conference. We are delighted to be hosting the 2020 BAAL Conference at Northumbria University from the 3rd to the 5th of September 2020.

Challenges and Opportunities in Applied Linguistics 53rd Annual Meeting of the British Association for Applied Linguistics (BAAL 2020) Northumbria University 3rd - 5th Sept Plenary speakers David Bock, ICREA & Universitat Pompeu Fabra Zhu Hua, Birbeck Constant Leung, King’s College London Pit Corder Lecture Emma Marsden, University of York Visit our event page: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/about-us/news-events/ events/2020/09/baal-2020/ Enquiries: baal2020.northumbria@gmail.com

30


References A reference list for the abstracts provided within this programme booklet is provided below: Basturkmen, H. (2010). Developing courses in English for specific purposes. London: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 137-145. Benson, P., Barkhuizen, G., Bodycott, P., & Brown, J. (2013). Second language identity in narratives of study abroad. Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke Blaj-Ward, L. & SpringerLink (2017), Language Learning and Use in English-Medium Higher Education, Springer International Publishing, Cham Blight, D., Davis, D., & Olsen, A. (1999). The Internationalisation of Higher Education. In H. Keith (Ed.), Higher Education Through Open and Distance Learning. London: Routledge. Brinkman, U., & Van Weerdenburg, O (2014). Intercultural Readiness Four Competences for Working Across Cultures. London: Palgrave. British Council (2013). Culture at Work. https://www.britishcouncil.org/sites/default/files/culture-at-work-report-v2. pdf Brown, H. (2016). English-medium instruction in Japan: Discussing implications for language teaching. In P. Clements, A. Krause, & H. Brown (Eds.), Focus on the learner (pp. 419–425). Tokyo: JALT. Burns, C. A. (2018). Developing a sense of self-in-the-world: staff and student narratives from a post-1992 university in the north of England. Unpublished EdD thesis. Newcastle University. Byrne, B. M. (2002). Validating the Measurement and Structure of Self-Concept, American Psychologist, 57(11), pp. 897-909. doi:10.1037/0003-066X.57.11.897 Chadsey, T. & Jackson, M. (2012). Principles and Practices of the Circle of Trust Approach, New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 130, pp. 3-14. Cleaver, E. (2016). Curriculum 2016 briefing note A: using a threshold concepts approach to inform curriculum design. Learning Enhancement and Academic Practice. https://nanopdf.com/download/thread-through-yourprogramme-and-what-other-threshold-concepts_pdf. Coertjens, L., Brahm, T., Trautwein, C., & Lindblom-Ylänne, S. (2017). Students’ transition into higher education from an international perspective. Higher Education, 73(3), 357-369. doi:10.1007/s10734-016-0092-y Collentine, J. G. (2009). Study abroad research: Findings, implications, and future directions. In M. H. Long & C. J. Catherine (Eds.), The handbook of language teaching (pp. 218–233). New York, NY: Wiley. Crosbie, V. (2014). Capabilities for Intercultural dialogue, Languages and Intercultural Communication, 14(1), pp. 91107. Dahlstrom, E. (2012). ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology. EDUCAUSE Center for Applied Research. https://library.educause.edu/~/media/files/library/2012/9/ers1208.pdf?la=en De Chazal, E. (2012). The general – specific debate in EAP: which case is the most convincing for most contexts? Journal of Second Language Teaching and Research, 2(1), pp. 135–148. DeKeyser, R. M. (2007). Study abroad as foreign language practice. In R. M. DeKeyser (Ed.), Practice in a second language: Perspectives from applied linguistics and cognitive psychology (pp. 208–226). Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press. Diamond, A. (2013) Executive functions, Annual Review of Psychology, 64, pp. 135-168. Dörnyei, Z. (2001) Motivational strategies in the language classroom. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Dörnyei, Z., & Ottó., I. (1998). Motivation in action: A process model of L2 motivation. Working papers in Applied Linguistics, 4, pp. 43-69. Dreger, K.S, Hicks, D. & Parkes, K.A. (3013) Eportfolio as a measure of Reflective Practice, International Journal of Eportfolio, 3(2), pp. 99-115. Fenton-Smith, B., & Humphreys, P. (2015) Language specialists’ views on academic language and learning support mechanisms for EAL postgraduate coursework students: The case for adjunct tutorials, Journal of English for Academic Purposes 20, pp. 40-55.

31


Ferris, D. (2003). Response to student writing: Implications for second-language students. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Flowerdew, J. (2016). English for Specific Academic Purposes (ESAP) Writing: Making the case. Writing & Pedagogy, 8(1), pp. 5–32. Gibbs, G., & Simpson, C. (2004). Conditions under which assessment supports students’ learning. Learning and Teaching in Higher Education, 1, pp. 3–31. Gimenez, J., (2008). Beyond the academic essay: Discipline-specific writing in nursing and midwifery. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 7, pp. 151 – 164. Goldoni, F. (2013). Students’ immersion experiences in study abroad. Foreign Language Annals, 46, pp. 359–376. Green, S. (2016). Teaching Disciplinary Writing as Social Practice: Moving Beyond ‘text-in-context’ Designs in UK Higher Education, Journal of Academic Writing, 6(1), pp. 98-107. Hanning, J. (2017) 8 Key Executive Functions. https://www.learningsuccessblog.com/8-key-executive-functionsinfograph Harvard University (2020) Executive Function & Self-Regulation. https://developingchild.harvard.edu/science/keyconcepts/executive-function/ Hennebry, M., Lo, Y. Y., & Macaro, E. (2012). Differing perspectives of non-native speaker students’ linguistic experiences on higher degree courses. Oxford Review of Education, 38(2), pp. 209-230. doi:10.1080/03054985. 2011.651312 Heyler, R. (2015) Learning through reflection: The critical role of reflection in work-based learning (WBL). Journal of Work-Applied Management 7(1). pp. 15-27 Hyland, K. (2006). Specificity revisited: how far should we go now? English for Specific Purposes, 21, pp. 385–395. Hyland, K. (2018). Sympathy for the devil? A defence of EAP. Language Teaching, 51(3), pp. 383-399. Iyobe, B., & Li, J. (2017). Factors for success and sustainability of an elective English-medium instruction program. In A. Bradford & H. Brown (Eds.), English-medium instruction in Japanese higher education: Policy, challenges, and outcomes (pp. 203-212). Bristol: Multilingual Matters. Jones, E. (2013. Internationalisation and employability: the role of intercultural experiences in the development of transferable skills. Public Money and Management, 33(2), pp. 95-104. Kassis-Henderson, J., Cohen, L., & McCulloch, R. (2018) Reflexivity: Navigating the Complexity of Cultural and Linguistic Identity. Business and Professional Communication Quarterly, 81(3), pp. 304–327. Kaufhold, K. (2015). Conventions in postgraduate academic writing: European students’ negotiations of prior writing experience at an English speaking university. Journal of English for Academic Purposes. 20, pp. 125-134. Kaya, A. and Balta, N., 2016. Taking Advantage of Technologies: Using the Socrative in English Language Teaching Classes. International Journal of Social Sciences and Educational Studies, 2(3), pp. 4-12. Kember, D., & Kwan, K. (2000). Lecturers’ approaches to teaching and their relationships to conceptions of good teaching. Instructional Science, 28, pp. 469-490. Knight, J. (1997). Internationalisation of Higher Education: A Conceptual Framework. In J. Knight & H. de Wit (Eds.) Internationalisation of Higher Education in Asia Pacific Countries. Amsterdam: EAIE/IDP. Kreber, C. (2013) Authenticity in and through Teaching in Higher Education: the Transformative Potential of the Scholarship of Teaching. Abingdon, Routledge. Lave, J., & Wenger, E. (1991). Situated learning: legitimate peripheral participation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Le Grange, L. (2016). Decolonising the University Curriculum, South African Journal of Higher Education, 30(2). pp. 1-12. Lent, R. W., Brown, S. D., & Gore, P. A. (1997). Discriminant and Predictive Validity of Academic Self-Concept, Academic Self-Efficacy, and Mathematics-Specific Self-Efficacy. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 44(3), 307315. doi:10.1037/0022-0167.44.3.307

32


Lillis, T. (2003). Student Writing as ‘Academic Literacies’: Drawing on Bakhtin to Move from Critique to Design’, Language and Education, 17(3), pp. 192-207. Lim, W.N. (2017). Improving Student Engagement in Higher Education through Mobile-Based Interactive Teaching Model Using Socrative, Proceedings of the IEEE Global Engineering Education Conference (EDUCON). Athens, Greece, 2017. Athens: IEEE, pp. 404-412. Magnan, S. S., & Back, M. (2007). Social interaction and linguistic gain during study abroad. Foreign Language Annals, 40, 43–61. Marsh, H. W., & Martin, A. J. (2011). Academic self-concept and academic achievement: Relations and causal ordering. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 81(1), pp. 59-77. doi:10.1348/000709910X503501 McWilliams, R., & Allan, Q. (2014). Embedding Academic Literacy Skills: Towards a Best Practice Model, Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice, 11(3). http://ro.uow.edu.au/jutlp/vol11/iss3/8 Meer, N. & Chapman A. (2015). Co-creation of Marking Criteria: Students as Partners in the Assessment Process, Business and Management Education in HE, pp. 1-15. Menzies, J. L., Baron, R., & Zutshi, A. (2015). Transitional experiences of international postgraduate students utilising a peer mentor programme. Educational Research, 57(4) 403-419. doi:10.1080/00131881.2015.1091202 Michalec, P., & Brower, G. (2012) Soul and Role Dialogues in Higher Education: Healing the Divided Self, New Directions for Learning and Teaching, 130, pp. 15-25. Norton, J. & Bernstein, D. (2019). Situating language learning in the art and design studio. InForm: A Journal for International Foundation Professionals, 19, pp. 4-6. O’Donovan, B., Rust, C., & Price, M. (2016). A scholarly approach to solving the feedback dilemma in practice. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 41(6), pp. 938–949. Orón Semper, J.V., & Blasco, M, (2018). Revealing the Hidden Curriculum in Higher Education, Studies in Philosophy & Education, 37, pp. 481–498. Orsmond, P., Merry, S, & Reiling, K. (2000). The Use of Student Derived Marking Criteria in Peer and Selfassessment, Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 25(1), pp. 23-38. Oxford Brookes University (2008). University strategy 2010 – 2020: Green Paper. https://www.brookes.ac.uk/ Documents/About/Green-Paper-Final---greenpaper-final/ Palmer, P. (1993) To Know as We are Known: Education as a Spiritual Journey. Harper, San Francisco. Palmer, P. (2000) Let Your Life Speak: Listening for the Voice of Vocation. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco. Palmer, P. (2004) A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco. Pike, A., & Harrison, J. (2011). Crossing the FE/HE divide: the transition experiences of direct entrants at Level 6. Journal of Higher Education. 35(1), pp. 55-67. Quan, R., Smailes, J., & Fraser, W. (2013). The transition experiences of direct entrants from overseas higher education partners into UK universities. Teaching in Higher Education, 14(4), pp. 414-426. Quinton, S. (2010). Feeding forward: Using feedback to promote student reflection and learning - a teaching model. Innovations in Education and Teaching International, 47(1), pp. 125-135. Rolinska, A., Guariento, W., & Al Masri, N. (2017) Establishing and sustaining EAP student partnerships across borders, British Council ELT research paper. Rose-Redwood CA., & Rose-Redwood, R. (2013). Self-Segregation or Global Mixing?: Social Interactions and the International Student Experience, Journal of College Student Development, 54(4), pp. 413-429 Schartner, A. (2016). The effect of study abroad on intercultural competence: A longitudinal case study of international postgraduate students at a British University. Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, 37(4), pp. 402-418. Sloan, D, & Porter, E. (2010). Changing International student and business staff perceptions of in-sessional EAP: using the CEM model. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 9, pp.198-210. Sovic, S. (2009). Hi-bye friends and the herd instinct: international and home students in the creative arts. Higher Education, 58(6), pp. 747–761. 33


Spack, R. (1988). Initiating ESL students into the academic discourse community: how far should we go? TESOL Quarterly 22(1), pp. 29–52. Spencer-Oatey, H. (2017). Global Skills and Employer Perspectives. https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/al/globalpad/ openhouse/interculturalskills/employer_perspectives.pdf Spencer-Oatey, H., Dauber, D., & Williams, S. (2014). Promoting integration on campus: Principles, practice and issues for further exploration. UCKISA with the University of Warwick Spencer-Oatey, H., Dauber, D., Jing, J., & Wang, L. (2017). Chinese students’ social integration in the university community: hearing the students’ voices. Higher Education, 74, pp. 739–756. Tran, L. T., & Pham, L. (2016). International students in transnational mobility: Intercultural connectedness with domestic and international peers, institutions and the wider community. Compare, A Journal of Comparative and International Education, 46, pp. 560–581 Turner, Y. (2009). “Knowing me, knowing you” is there nothing we can do? Pedagogic challenges in using group work to create an intercultural learning space. Journal of Studies in International Education, 13(2), 240–255. UK Government (no date) Children with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND). https://www.gov.uk/ children-with-special-educational-needs University of Reading (2017). University of Reading Curriculum Framework Wash, P.D. (2014). Taking advantage of mobile devices: Using Socrative in the classroom. Journal of Teaching and Learning with Technology, 3(1), pp. 99-101. Wingate, U. (2015). Academic Literacy and Student Diversity: The Case for Inclusive Practice. Bristol: Multilingual Matters. Wingate, U. (2016) Academic literacy across the curriculum: Towards a collaborative instructional approach, Language Teaching, 51(3), pp. 1-16. Wingate, U. and Tribble, C. (2012). The best of both worlds? Towards and English for Academic Purposes/ Academic Literacies writing pedagogy, Studies in Higher Education, 37(4), pp. 481-495. Zajda, J., & Rust, V. (2016). Research in Globalisation and Higher Education Reforms. New York: Springer.

Back to Contents

Back to Timetable

34


#EAPintegration

Accredited by the BALEAP PIM Integration 28 March 2020

for the teaching of English in the UK

beleap.pim@northumbria.ac.uk 35

Profile for Northumbria University

BALEAP Professional Issues  

BALEAP Professional Issues