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SPRING 2019

New Look at Diversity


F E AT U R E S 4 President’s Message Jared C. Shelton, FACHE 5 Regent’s Message Ken Hutchenrider, FACHE ACHE Texas - Northern Regent 6 Member Spotlights 26 Event Encore 38 National News 40 Calendar of Events 42 Membership Annoucements

10 Smart Justice Program 14 Why Healthcare Leaders Need to Take a New Look at Diversity in Their Organizations


Editors

Joan Clark, FACHE Chris Grossnicklaus Naveena Reddy

Contributing Writers Creative Direction

Marty Heath Craig Premo Audrianne Schneider

Advertising/ Subscriptions

info@achentx.org

Caleb Wills, calebsemibold.com

Questions and Comments: ACHE of North Texas Editorial Office, c/o Executive Connection 300 Decker Drive, Suite 300 | Irving, TX 75062 p: 972.413.8144 e: info@achentx.org w: achentx.org 2019 Chapter Officers President

Jared Shelton, FACHE President, Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Allen

President Elect

Scott Hurst, FACHE Executive Director naviHealth

Immediate Past President

Kevin Stevenson, FACHE IntegraNet Health Executive Vice President

Secretary

Amanda Thrash VP of Professional & Support Services Texas Health Plano

Treasurer

Dustin Anthamatten VP, Operations Methodist Charlton Medical Center

2019 ACHENTX Board of Directors Jennifer “J” Alexander Operations Mgr, Imaging Systems & Services UT Southwestern Kyle Armstrong, FACHE President, Baylor Scott & White Medical Center Jaquetta Clemons-Davis, FACHE INTEGRIS Felixia Colón, FACHE Regional Vice President Schumacher Clinical Partners Jennifer Conrad Director of Healthcare Business Development EYP Health Fraser Hay President, Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Hurst-Euless-Bedford Ken Hutchenrider, FACHE President, Methodist Richardson Medical Center, ACHE Regent Ben Isgur Director, Health Research Institute PricewaterhouseCoopers Valerie Johnston, FACHE Associate Professor Texas Christian University Martin Ostensen Faculty, University of North Texas Health Science Center

The ACHE of North Texas e-magazine, The Executive Connection, is published triannually and includes information on the latest regulatory and legislative developments, as well as the quality improvement and leadership trends that are shaping and influencing the healthcare industry. Readers get indepth reporting on the issues and challenges facing hospital and health system leaders today. We make it our job to tell you about the great things the organization and Chapter are doing every day to ensure the health of our community. If you have any news and updates that you want to share with other members, please e-mail your items to info@northtexas.ache.org. Microsoft Word or compatible format is preferable. If you have a graphic or picture that you'd like to include, please send it as a separate file. The following are the types of information that our members shared in past ACHE of North Texas magazines, Advocacy Issues, Legislative Issues, Educational Opportunities, Awards / Achievements, Promotions (Members On the Move), Committee Updates, journal submissions, conference submissions, and workshop participations, sharing mentoring experiences, etc.

Thomas Peck, FACHE President, Tom Peck Communications Nancy Vish, FACHE President, Baylor Heart and Vascular Hospital


President’s Message Have you ever experienced something so incredible that you had a hard time comprehending what you saw? As a young child, I have a vivid memory of the first time I walked onto a Major League Baseball stadium and saw that perfectly manicured field with the greenest grass I’d ever seen. I couldn’t believe what I was seeing, and I couldn’t stop talking about it, much to the chagrin of those sitting around me! My first few months as chapter president of ACHE of North Texas have yielded a similar feeling: I am truly in awe of the incredible generosity and dedication of our volunteers, committee chairs, and board members. And just like the first time I saw a big-league ball field, I am inspired to tell everybody around me about what makes this chapter so great: our people! As you may know, ACHE of North Texas has only one employee, our wonderful executive director, John Whittemore. Although John does a lot of heavy lifting for our chapter, there is so much work done by our own chapter members. During the 2019 calendar year our chapter will put on roughly 30 different events ranging from networking events to education events to our mentorship program and much more. When you add it up, there are thousands of hours that go into doing everything we need to do as a chapter to accomplish our mission of being the premier healthcare leader organization of North Texas. The bulk of this work is done by our own chapter members who give of themselves above and beyond the responsibilities of their careers and personal lives. You may be asking yourself: what would cause a person to do this? What is their “why”? I decided to poll a few of our dedicated chapter volunteers

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to get their take. Board member “J” Alexander said that volunteering to help ACHENTX fits with her “mission to empower leaders and raise the level of healthcare awareness” while also allowing her “to grow in an environment that is supported by local healthcare professionals.” Committee chair Amy Walz mentioned that “leading the Mentorship Program is something I’m personally very passionate about and has allowed me to give back.” And Clint Sanders, vicechair of the Membership & Networking committee said, “I have been personally impacted by ACHE via mentorship, guidance, and advice and I hope that I can pay that forward to others by my volunteerism.” The underlying “why” for these wonderful leaders, as it is for all volunteers within ACHENTX, is a commitment to advancing our members and healthcare management excellence. By doing so, together we will improve the health of the patients and communities we are privileged to serve. If you aren’t currently serving as a volunteer with ACHENTX, I’d encourage you to consider doing so this year. I believe that the time you invest in serving will be far surpassed by the relationships you build, knowledge you acquire, and sense of accomplishment in raising the bar for healthcare in North Texas. I look forward to serving you this year as chapter president and having a first-row seat to see what great things ACHE of North Texas will accomplish in 2019. Jared C. Shelton, FACHE President, ACHE of North Texas President, Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Allen

A Publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives of North Texas Chapter | SPRING 2019


Regent’s Message Spring is upon us and it is a great time to think about ACHE and growing your potential as a seasoned Healthcare Administrator. No matter the stage of your career, continuing education and Board certification are always important steps in assuring you are a strong part of our healthcare ecosystem. Another positive step is mentorship. Whether as a mentor or mentee, it is always good to have a network of people to rely on for career advice and problem solving. I still rely on previous mentors as a group who I can bounce ideas with and seek guidance as I go through my career. I would highly recommend either becoming a mentee of mentor and helping to prepare yourself for your next steps and growing in healthcare management. Even as a mentor, I am always delighted as to how much I receive from the interaction with a fellow healthcare leader who is my mentee. As the old adage goes, See one, Do one, Teach one, we all can still learn valuable lessons and suggestions as we perform our leadership roles. As always, if I can do anything to help you please do not hesitate to call. Ken Hutchenrider, FACHE ACHE Regent for Texas – Northern President, Methodist Richardson Medical Center


Member Spotlight Susan Watson

What are you doing now? I’m seeking a new opportunity right now due to a recent lay-off.

How long have you been a member of ACHE? I joined ACHE last October (2018).

I am a healthcare operations executive that cultivates trust for building successful teams. I have experience leading and developing clinical ancillary and support departments in acute care hospitals. I also have a passion for building new programs and services that bring volume and revenue to the facility. I am looking for a position that will utilize my contagious enthusiasm and upbeat demeanor to lead, excite, and inspire their teams.

Why is being a member important to you? Has ACHE membership been a benefit to you in your career? I enjoy networking with other professionals in the healthcare arena. Every time I attend an event, (even those not designated as an education event), I learn something new. I have been able to meet people from all parts of our industry, many of whom I would not have encountered in my day-to-day work life. I think being connected in this way allows me to see the ‘big picture’ and gives me a better perspective on the business of healthcare.

In your opinion, what is the most important issue facing Healthcare today? Healthcare in our country is still a very segmented system. It’s extremely difficult for the average patient to navigate. Historically, patients relied on their primary care physicians to guide their care, but this is changing as we see the shift to more retail and online health service offerings, which are more readily available and easier to access. When care is received in so many places, it’s challenging to maintain a complete and accurate medical record. This fragmented system puts the provider at a disadvantage when making a diagnosis, ordering procedures, or determining a treatment plan. Oftentimes, the result is a duplication of services, which ultimately drives up the overall cost of care. As we continue to see more retailers (CVS, Amazon, Apple, etc.) enter the healthcare space, it seems this segmented system will worsen. Perhaps we need more focus on the communication streams (interfaces) from all these sources and work toward an easily accessible universal electronic medical record.

Additionally, I love the continuing education that is offered. The topics have been relevant and interesting. Plus, this program allows me to collect those CEUs. What advice would you give early careerists or those considering membership? I would definitely recommend joining and staying active in the local ACHE chapter. Membership offers so many benefits and resources that will help in the advancement of your career. You will also meet so many other healthcare leaders across the region. I would encourage early careerists or new graduates to enroll in the mentorship program for an even deeper experience. The chapter can also help you on that journey toward Fellow status. Tell us one thing that people don’t know about you. I am a direct descendent of Davy Crockett. Yes, the one who died at The Alamo!.


Member Spotlight Marc Gelinas, MHA, FACHE

What are you doing now? I am a senior consultant with The Oncology Group helping hospitals, cancer centers and oncology practices with strategic planning, financial analysis, hospital-physician integration models, and operations assessments. In your opinion, what is the most important issue facing Healthcare today? The most important issue facing healthcare today is the transition from traditional fee-for-service care to valuebased services. However, in order to be successful, a number of infrastructure pieces must be in place. Healthcare providers must have the technology to provide them with the data necessary to track their activities and make evidencebased decisions. You have to have reliable data to make quality improvements. With both physician and nursing shortages, providers must be able to use the right people to provide the best care. At the same time, it will be difficult to shift from caring for individuals to more population health management, especially since payors still trying to how to reimburse for it. How long have you been a member of ACHE? I have been a member for 40 years. My first job after graduate required that senior managers join ACHE and pass the membership exam within 3 years.

Why is being a member important to you? Has ACHE membership been a benefit to you in your career? ACHE has provided a valuable source of education, helping me continuously learn about the skills to be an executive, the trends I needed to follow, and the organizations that provided the models of organization and management worth emulating. ACHE also provides for the best networking opportunities to develop relationship with other successful executives and managers. I learn more at ACHE conferences from my colleagues than I could learn anywhere else. Being a Fellow is a credential that everyone recognizes and respects because they know what it takes to achieve it. What advice would you give early careerists or those considering membership? Join early and participate regularly. Who you know throughout your career is at least as important as what you know. ACHE will help you meet all of the people you should know who are leaders in the field. Those relationships will be very valuable throughout your career. Also, ACHE will help you become a lifelong learner. Both of these benefits will help you become and remain successful. Tell us one thing that people don’t know about you. I started out in life as a physical therapist. That clinical knowledge and experience treating patients has helped me more readily gain the respect and trust of physicians and other clinicians.

A Publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives of North Texas Chapter | SPRING 2019

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Member Spotlight Al Cordova

Briefly describe your career. I served as a U.S. Navy Officer and Aviator from 1970-1976, which included two tours in Viet Nam. I then shifted gears to pursue a career in healthcare management. Upon earning a MHA from Duke University I went on a 38-year run as a healthcare executive. Over the course of my career, I held positions of VP, Sr. VP, Executive Director, CEO, in a variety of healthcare settings and models -- Kaiser Permanente, Harvard Pilgrim Healthcare, independent for-profit medical groups, and a PPM (PhyCor). In the last 12 years I dedicated myself to serving the underserved. I worked at JPS in charge of their community health centers, and then ended my career by serving as a CEO of a Federally Qualified Health Center in WA State. Why did I pursue the healthcare profession? The Viet Nam war taught me that there is no honor in war. I felt the need to make amends by dedicating the rest of my life to doing some good for fellow man. Healthcare management appealed to me because I could do some good and have an impact on the health and well-being of populations on a larger scale. I also come from a family of caregivers.

If you had the power to do so, what one thing would you do to reform our healthcare system? Expand access to healthcare for the underserved, persons without insurance or underinsured, who do not have the means to pay providers’ “charges”, which in most cases is far above what providers get paid from health insurance companies. What is the best advice you gave to your children and early careerists? The importance of education; to persevere -- to get up and move forward when knocked down by life’s circumstances, and to be humble. What is the most valuable benefit you have received as an ACHE member? I consider ACHE to be a premier professional association. I have benefited greatly from attending their wide-range of valuable educational programs over the years that helped advance my career. What is one thing members don’t know about you? I co-own with other partners a condo in Maui, Hawaii.


Member Spotlight Andrew Smith

Why is being a member important to you? Has ACHE membership been a benefit to you in your career? ACHE has been instrumental in my development and education as a leader. It’s easy to focus on a very narrow aspect of healthcare that you work in daily. ACHE provides opportunities to meet with new people, hear new ideas, and see what other leaders do beyond your area of expertise. I always leave an ACHE event thinking about something that I had never thought of before, and that is how you grow as a leader.

What are you doing now? I am a Director of Operations for Baylor Scott & White HealthTexas Provider Network, and I support about one-third of our Primary Care practices in North Texas. My clinics are primarily in Dallas and Ellis Counties, and I have about two dozen clinics that I work with, spanning from North Dallas to Waxahachie. I love partnering with my physicians and my team of practice managers to solve challenging issues and work towards improving the patient experience. In your opinion, what is the most important issue facing Healthcare today? We have made healthcare too complicated for everyone involved—for patients, families, providers, and our own employees. Because of the complexity of the industry, it is difficult for us to adopt ideas from other industries and apply them to healthcare. We need leaders who can solve problems by looking at the end goal and work backwards to create solutions that are innovative and break traditional thinking in the industry. The first organizations that learn think like a patient (or like an employer who ultimately pays the bills for many of our patients) without regard for how we have always done things in the past will be the organizations that succeed moving forward. How long have you been a member of ACHE? I started as a student member in graduate school and have continued my membership as an early careerist. In total I have been a member for nearly 10 years.

What advice would you give early careerists or those considering membership? First—Dive in. I waited a few years to engage meaningfully with ACHE, and I regret not taking advantage sooner. As an example, I somewhat cautiously took a chance and enrolled as a mentee in the mentorship program, but I had such a great experience that I’m signing up as a mentor this year. It’s going to be fun being on the other side helping someone else. Second—Be a sponge! Learn anything and everything that you possibly can and just soak it all in. See new things and talk to new people. You will walk away a better leader as a result. I have never felt that my time was not well-spent if I was outside of my comfort zone. Tell us one thing that people don’t know about you. I am a trained storm spotter! I’ve been a huge weather nerd since college. My wife probably thinks I’m nuts when I run outside to watch when it storms.

A Publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives of North Texas Chapter | SPRING 2019

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SMART JUSTICE PROGRAM – DALLAS COUNTY


One way that health systems locally are teaming up in conjunction with the Dallas Fort Worth Hospital Council and their foundation to address health issues among some of our most chronically ill in Dallas County is through the Smart Justice Program. The Smart Justice Program is a Dallas County based provider partnership that:

1. identifies patients with high use of emergency departments, inpatient mental health services and the justice system who suffer with mental and behavioral health diagnoses; 2. enhances timely and informed treatment of patients presenting to the emergency department through the use of real time health information exchange; and 3. supports expanded outpatient treatment programs focusing on treating Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) eligible patients with the aim of providing the right care at the right time for eligible patients.

A Publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives of North Texas Chapter | SPRING 2019

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The project began as a grant initiative of the Caruth Foundation. A gift was provided to Meadows Policy Institute to form two projects – the Right Care project, funding trained mental health providers to accompany police officers to dispatched calls in the community in which it was likely that one or more of the involved individuals was known to suffer with mental health diagnoses – and the Smart Justice Project described in this article. Smart Justice has multiple goals. First, program partners provide informed and effective care coordination to patients in emergent mental health crises. Partners also provide additional resources for care management in the outpatient clinic environment. Finally, all participants seek to reduce the disruption created in patients’ lives caused by undertreated or undermanaged mental health diagnoses – including encounters with law enforcement. Smart Justice partners include the North Texas Behavioral Health Authority (NTBHA), Meadows Policy Institute, Dallas County, the Dallas-Fort Worth Hospital Council Education and Research Foundation, Loopback Analytics, numerous contracted outpatient mental health providers through NTBHA, Texas Health Resources, Parkland Health and Hospital System, Methodist Health System and Baylor Scott and White Health. The program was originally funded by a grant from the Caruth Foundation and is now sustained entirely by contributions from the partners. How It Works When an eligible Smart Justice program patient presents to an emergency department, a real time information exchange occurs between the emergency room provider and the North Texas Behavioral Health Authority. When information is available concerning the presenting patient, a notification that the patient is in the emergency room is given to all the patient’s providers engaged in the Smart Justice program. Notifications include the patient’s: 1) outpatient/clinic provider name and contacts, 2) most recent medications, 3) outpatient treatment plan, and 4) current diagnoses. The information is then used by providers to treat the patient’s emergent needs and coordinate care between the patient’s caregivers in the inpatient (if necessary), outpatient emergency, and outpatient clinic environments. Further, if a patient is found to be potentially eligible for enhanced services from NTBHA, providers are notified of this eligibility.


All providers then facilitate the patient’s access to enhanced NTBHA services while the patient is being treated in the emergency department. The program and the partnerships necessary to provide information for the treatment of patients who often use the emergency department for mental health care is unique to the Dallas County area. Expansion planning is currently underway for Tarrant, Denton and Collin county providers. Results to Date Partners meet monthly to review utilization patterns and outcome metrics for patients in the program and improvements are made to workflow and outpatient responses to notifications. For the first 8 months of start up operations there is a significant reduction in patient emergency room time and inpatient admissions for Smart Justice patients receiving notifications and subsequently qualifying for ACT services. A full year of information will be available for program outcome evaluation in October 2019. On a recent Friday evening around 10:30 pm, one patient in the program made her second visit to an emergency room on that same day. She was a patient with NTBHA, and after she was medically cleared, her NTBHA provider came to the emergency room to assist her in her next treatment steps for her mental health and related issues. They left the emergency room together at around 1 am. This kind of hands-on patient service is possible due to the investment of donors and providers in the community and their willingness to share information and coordinate care to best meet the needs of our patients. Questions If you are interested in learning more about the Smart Justice program, please contact Kristin Tesmer, JD, FACHE, President of the DFWHC Foundation at ktesmer@dfwhcfoundation.org.

A Publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives of North Texas Chapter | SPRING 2019

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Why Healthcare Leaders Need to Take a New Look at Diversity in Their Organizations Division of Member Services, Research American College of Healthcare Executives


A Publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives of North Texas Chapter | SPRING 2019

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Introduction and Overview Healthcare organizations have been addressing issues of workplace diversity for decades. Almost certainly your organization has a stated policy of nondiscrimination in the hiring and promotion ofexecutives, and diversity programs are in place. Why revisit the issues of diversity and inclusion in your organization now? There are reasons for healthcare leaders to take a fresh look at their approach to inclusion and cultural competence in their organizations. Fully developing staff talent, treating staff fairly and being respectful of cultural issues in interactions with staff and patients are simply the right things to do. But, in addition, the U.S. Census Bureau predicts that within the next 30 years, the United States population—and, therefore, the patient population and workforce—will be mostly nonwhite. Further, as healthcare organizations become increasingly complex, the demand for capable leaders is increasing. Organizations need to make sure policies are in place to attract, retain and develop the most capable staff and to deliver high-quality, culturally competent patient care to be successful in a country with rapidly changing demographics. In the summer of 2014, ACHE conducted the fifth in a series of surveys comparing the career attainments of male and female healthcare executives by race/

ethnicity. The previous surveys were conducted in 1992, 1997, 2002 and 2008. Participants in the 2014 survey were sampled from the memberships of ACHE, the National Association of Health Services Executives, the National Forum for Latino Healthcare Executives and the Asian Health Care Leaders Association. The survey also was endorsed by Institute for Diversity in Health Management. The survey results indicated that, although some strides have been made, a lack of parity still exist between white and minority executives with respect to compensation and career attainments. Disparities also existed in perceptions of racial/ethnic equity, with minority executives being much less likely than white executives to report that race relations in their organizations were good. Minority executives were also less likely than their white counterparts to report satisfaction with their career progress and more likely to report that their careers had been negatively impacted by discrimination. This white paper summarizes key findings from the 2014 survey and presents results of an analysis that identified diversity programs associated with minority executives feeling more positively about race relations in their organizations. We also present recommendations for addressing one of the most important roadblocks to inclusion: unconscious bias.


Findings In the summer of 2014, ACHE sent surveys to white, black, Hispanic and Asian healthcare executives, asking them about a number of career-related topics such as their education, career progress, career experiences and attitudes about their current organizations. Useable responses were received from 1,409 executives; the overall response rate was 30 percent. We should note that because those in the study were sampled from member lists, the results are indicative but not necessarily representative of all healthcare executives. The following are some key findings from the survey. More complete results from the study can be found at www.ache.org/pubs/ research/2014-Race-Ethnicity-Report.pdf.

1. COMPENSATION

17 percent lower than that of white men, respectively.

When level of education and number of years of experience are controlled, Asian and white men earned similar compensation. Black and Hispanic men earned less.

A higher proportion of white men than minority men had attained CEO positions, but black and Asian men are closing the gap.

Again, controlling for education level and years of healthcare management experience, white, Hispanic and Asian women earned similar salaries. Black women earned less.

One of the positive findings from the 2014 study is that, when education level attained and years of experience are controlled, Asian and white men answering the survey earned virtually the same median salary in calendar year 2013: about $192,000 and $184,400, respectively (please see Exhibit 1). However, 2013 median salaries for Hispanic and black men, adjusting for education and experience, were 8 and

2. CAREER ATTAINMENTS

A higher proportion of white male executives (32 percent) held a CEO position at the time of the 2014 survey than did black, Hispanic or Asian men (20 percent, 25 percent and 9 percent, respectively). (Please see Exhibit 2.) This may be due in part to the fact that minority men had attained fewer years of healthcare management experience than white men (Exhibit 1). However, the proportion of black men in CEO positions was 62 percent of that of white men, a

Another positive finding from the study is that, adjusting for education level and years of experience, the median salaries for white, Hispanic and Asian women in calendar year 2013 were virtually the same: about $141,600, $141,900 and $143,600, respectively. However, the adjusted median salary of black women was 13 percent less than that of white women.

Exhibit 1. Predicted mean total compensation 2013, controlling for education and years of experience, and median years in healthcare management 25

Median number of years in healthcare managment

20.8

20

$184,444

$169,829

15 13

13.6

13

$153,004

13.5 $141,563

10

9

$180,000

19

18.4

11

$143,577

$141,899

9.2

$157,759

$159,912

$160,000

9.1

$140,000

12.5 $155,444

$131,933

5

$120,000

$123,131

Males Black

White

Hispanic

Females Asian

Median compensation contrilling for education and experience

$200,000 $191,961

All

Median compensation controlling for education and experience

Note: The actual (uncontrolled) median income for each race/ethnic and gender group is available in the full report in the Research area of ache.org

A Publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives of North Texas Chapter | SPRING 2019

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Exhibit 2. Current position by race/ethnicity (percent in each position) Men

Women

All

Black

White

Hispanic

Asian

Black

White

Hispanic

Asian

Black

White

Hispanic

Asian

CEO

20%

32%

25%

9%*

8%

14%

11%

11%*

14%

22%

20%

9%*

COO/Sr. VP

16%

19%

19%

17%

11%

19%

19%

13%

13%

19%

19%

15%

VP

23%

20%

13%

18%

20%

19%

19%

8%

21%

16%

16%

13%

Dept. Head

30%

16%

31%

36%

36%

31%

31%

38%

33%

31%

31%

37%

Manager

2%

3%

1%

5%

7%

6%

6%

7%

4%

3%

3%

6%

Dept. Staff

8%

6%

8%

12%

18%

11%

11%

18%

13%

9%

9%

15%

Consultant

1%

1%

3%

0%

3%

3%

4%

2%

2%

4%

1%

3%

1%

1%

0%

0%

2%

1%

2%

1%

1%

Other

*Chi-square significant p < .05

◊ Less than 0.5%

significant improvement over 2008 when this figure was 47 percent. Similarly, the proportion of Asian men in CEO positions was 28 percent of that of white men, up from 15 percent in 2008. A higher proportion of white women than minority women had attained CEO positions, but the gap is widening for black and Hispanic executives. The proportion of white women executives in CEO positions in 2014 (14 percent) was almost the same as it was in 2008. However, in 2014, the proportion of black women holding CEO positions was 57 percent of that of white women; a drop from 2008 when it was 77 percent. Similarly, the proportion of Hispanic women occupying CEO positions was 78 percent of that of white women in 2014; a drop from 92 percent in 2008. The proportion of Asian women in CEO positions was roughly the same in the 2008 and 2014 studies.

3. JOB SATISFACTION Men and women in all racial/ethnic groups are largely satisfied with their jobs. Another piece of good news from the study is that, within all racial/ethnic groups, most healthcare executives are happy


Exhibit 3. Aspects of job satisfaction by race/ethnicity (percent satisfied or very satisfied) Black

White

Hispanic

Asian

The amound of job security I have

74%

78%

78%

78%

The amount of pay and fringe benefits I recieve for what I contribute to this organization

58%

68%

67%

64%*

The sanctions and treatment I recieve when I make a mistake

64%

74%

71%

70%*

The degree of respect and fair treatment I recieve from thos who supervise me

76%

82%

82%

83%*

The degree of respect and fair treatment I recieve from the employess I supervise

87%

92%

90%

88%*

The amount of independent thought and action I can exrcise in my job

81%

86%

87%

85%

Overall, how satisfied are you in your present position

78%

84%

86%

82%

*Chi-square significant p < .05

with their jobs. About three-quarters or more of the study respondents said they were satisfied with their position, almost all identify with their organization by saying “we” rather than “they” when speaking about their companies and more than half intend to stay in their current jobs in the coming year.

Healthcare

Some minority executives were less satisfied with aspects of their jobs. Black respondents reported being less satisfied with their compensation, how they are treated when they make mistakes and the respect and treatment they receive from supervisors than were members of any other racial/ethnic group in the study (please see Exhibit 3).

4. PERCEPTIONS OF RACIAL/ETHNIC PARITY AND RELATIONS

goes by one name.

There are clearly differing perceptions between white and minority respondents about the degree to which healthcare organizations have reached racial/ethnic parity in the workplace. Black respondents were about twice as likely as white respondents (81 percent versus 40 percent) to say that more effort is needed to increase the proportion of racial/ ethnic minorities in senior positions in their organizations SM

MedicalCityHealthcare.com


Exhibit 4. Feelings about organizational race relations by race/ethnicity (percent agree or strongly agree) Black

White

Hispanic

Asian

Race relation on my organization are good

53%

83%

76%

76%*

Minority managers usually have to be more qualified than others to get ahead in my organization

69%

6%

22%

29%*

The quality of relationships between minority and white managers here could be improved

52%

17%

24%

28%*

The quality of relationships between minorites from different racial.ethnic groups could be improved

52%

22%

31%

38%*

A greater effort should be made in my organization to increase the percentage of racial/ethnic in senior healthcare managment posistions

81%

40%

53%

59%*

*Chi-square significant p < .05

in their organizations (please see Exhibit 4). Asian and Hispanic respondents fell between these two extremes, with slightly more than half agreeing that more effort is needed to increase diversity among senior executives. Black respondents were also significantly less likely to feel positively about race relations and relations between managers in their organizations when compared to white respondents or members of the other racial/ethnic minorities in the study.

5. CAREER EXPERIENCES Minority respondents were less likely to report satisfaction with their career progress than white respondents, and more likely to report that discrimination had negatively impacted their careers. Over 80 percent of white respondents reported being satisfied with their career progress, as were more than 75 percent of Asian and Hispanic respondents. However, only 67 percent of black respondents were satisfied with how they were meeting their career goals. Almost half of black respondents said their careers had been negatively impacted by racial/ethnic discrimination, as compared to about onequarter of Asian and Hispanic respondents and ten percent of white executives.

6. WHAT ARE ORGANIZATIONS DOING? The survey results give us an idea of how prevalent different types of diversity initiatives are in healthcare organizations (please see Exhibit 5). The most common type of diversity program appears to be social gatherings for employees, which were reported by roughly three-quarters of survey respondents as being offered by their organizations. More than half of respondents reported that their organizations had affirmative action plans, and about half or a little more said

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Exhibit 5. Percent agreeing with the statment: Race relations in my organization are good by race/ethnicity and presence or absence of diversity initiatives Black

White

Asian

Prevalence of diversity program (all resondents)

In place

Not in place

In place

Not in place

In place

Not in place

Social gathering for employees

75%

57%

41%*

90%

67%*

81%

65%*

Plan to increase the number of ethnically, culturally and racially diverse executive on the senior leadership team

31%

64%

49%*

73%

72%

86%

73%*

Policy of seeking diversity in candidates considered for hire

53%

61%

47%*

74%

74%

82%

69%*

Mentoring program

54%

57%

50%

81%

69%*

83%

70%*

Strategic of business objective to increase diversity and inclusion

43%

66%

47%*

78%

72%

78%

75%

Diversity evaluations for managers

21%

62%

51%

91%

73%*

80%

75%

Affirmative action plan

65%

60%

45%*

78%

71%

78%

77%

Diversity committee

46%

61%

46%*

74%

75%

79%

73%

Affinity groups

34%

64%

49%*

79%

75%

83%

72%

A manager responsible for diversity

45%

60%

47%*

72%

77%

75%

78%

Diversity training for managers at least every 3 years

51%

60%

49%*

79%

72%

83%

73%

A portion of excutive compensation tied for diversity goals

10%

57%

52%

71%

74%

84%

75%

*Chi-square significant p < .05

(please see Exhibit 4). Asian and Hispanic respondents fell between these two extremes, with slightly more than half agreeing that more effort is needed to increase diversity among senior executives. Black respondents were also significantly less likely to feel positively about race relations and relations between managers in their organizations when compared to white respondents or members of the other racial/ethnic minorities in the study.

5. CAREER EXPERIENCES Minority respondents were less likely to report satisfaction with their career progress than white respondents, and more likely to report that discrimination had negatively impacted their careers.

Over 80 percent of white respondents reported being satisfied with their career progress, as were more than 75 percent of Asian and Hispanic respondents. However, only 67 percent of black respondents were satisfied with how they were meeting their career goals. Almost half of black respondents said their careers had been negatively impacted by racial/ethnic discrimination, as compared to about onequarter of Asian and Hispanic respondents and ten percent of white executives.

6. WHAT ARE ORGANIZATIONS DOING? The survey results give us an idea of how prevalent different types of diversity initiatives are in healthcare organizations

(please see Exhibit 5). The most common type of diversity program appears to be social gatherings for employees, which were reported by roughly threequarters of survey respondents as being offered by their organizations. More than half of respondents reported that their organizations had affirmative action plans, and about half or a little more said their organizations offered mentoring programs, diversity training for managers or a policy of seeking diversity in candidates considered for hire. Less than half of respondents said their organizations had a diversity committee, a manager responsible for diversity, a strategic or business objective to increase diversity, affinity groups or different types of diversity incentives for managers.

A Publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives of North Texas Chapter | SPRING 2019

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Recommendations We analyzed the relationship between the existence of diversity programs and the likelihood that minority executives would describe race relations in their organization as good (please see Exhibit 5). That, combined with other results from the survey, leads us to make the following recommendations to healthcare organizations looking to increase diversity and inclusion. Ensure equity in pay. Salary is by no means the only—or even, sometimes, the most important—reason that people choose and remain in their jobs. It is, however, a tangible sign of the value the organizations place on individual staff members. Organizations need mechanisms to periodically review compensation and ensure that each executive’s pay is based on his/her qualifications and responsibilities and in no way reflects biases relative to his/her gender or race/ ethnicity. Sponsor social gatherings for employees. The study showed that the existence of social gatherings for employees were significantly related to minority executives feeling more positive about race relations in their organizations. Establish mentoring programs. About three-quarters or more of minority executives in the 2014 survey reported having a mentor at some point in their careers. When asked to name best practices to promote diversity in healthcare organizations, respondents mentioned mentoring programs. Further, the existence of mentoring programs was positively related to Hispanic and Asian respondents feeling good about race relations in their organizations. Mentors who provide advice, model positive behaviors and introduce protégés into networks of other executives are having a powerful impact on the field. Yet only about half of survey respondents reported that mentoring programs are in place where they work. Healthcare organizations need to consider instituting or expanding effective mentorship programs. Implement a policy of seeking diversity in candidates considered for hire. Both black and Asian respondents were more likely to feel that race relations in their organizations were good if their employers had a policy of seeking diversity in candidates considered for open and new positions. To help ensure diverse slates of candidates at the senior level, organizations need to factor diversity into their recruitment for positions at all levels. Increase the diversity of the senior leadership team. The commitment of top leaders was hdrinc.com/delta


mentioned by a number of survey respondents as being critical to the successful creation of diverse and inclusive organizations. Further, black and Asian respondents were significantly more likely to feel positively about race relations in the workplace in organizations attempting to increase diversity in the senior leadership team. The desire to have healthcare management reflect the populations they serve should apply all the way to the top of the organization. Offer residency and fellowship programs. Based on the 2014 survey findings, it appears that more than half of those who participated in a healthcare management residency were eventually hired by that organization. Even higher proportions of those who took fellowships were hired by the sponsoring organization. Residency and fellowship programs have benefits for the organizations that offer them; leaders get the opportunity to work with a new executive before making a permanent hiring decision about him or her. Healthcare organizations need to consider offering residency and fellowship opportunities to qualified graduates to assist their launch into careers in healthcare management.

Addressing Unconscious Bias Most healthcare organizations are trying to do the right thing with respect to diversity and inclusion in their workforces. Overt racial/ethnic bias in hiring and promoting staff is illegal, unacceptable in our society and counter to providing quality care and maintaining a successful organization. However, unconscious biases can be having a larger impact in healthcare workplaces than might be supposed. Human beings are innately biased. In an earlier time these biases were helpful, keeping humans safe from threats to their survival. More recently, they can keep people away from unpleasant and unproductive situations. However, biases can also be kneejerk, overly conservative, “broad brush,” unconscious reactions that are not substantiated by fact. If not examined, biases can lead us astray in the workplace. Take, for example, the landmark study conducted in 2002 by researchers at the University of Chicago and MIT (Bertrand and Mullainathan 2002). Using identical resumes, they demonstrated that fictitious job applicants with the first names Emily and Brendan were significantly more likely to be asked for interviews than applicants with the first names Lakisha and Jamal for a variety of positons at various levels. Further, an increase in Emily’s or Brendan’s qualifications resulted in an increase in the frequency with which they were offered job interviews but had no effect on how often Lakisha and Jamal were invited for interviews. Results were no better in organizations advertising themselves as “Equal Opportunity

Employers” or which were federal contractors. Unfortunately, human beings are notoriously poor at recognizing their own biases (e.g., Banaji, Bazerman and Chugh 2003, Cook Ross 2008). This has led to the development of a number of tools to assess unconscious bias, including the Implicit Association Test (IAT). This web-based self-assessment tool, developed by Mahzarin Banaji at Harvard University and Anthony Creenwald at the University of Washington, asks users to associate words with images appearing on the computer screen. Collective results from more than a million test-takers indicate, among other things, a preference for white people over black people and people who are non-Muslims to those who are Muslims (Dreaschlin 2007). Research indicates that diversity will not occur on its own—it needs strong leadership and purposive management to create andmaintain an inclusive organization (e.g.,Dreaschlin 2007). It is simply more comfortable to be around people like ourselves, and leaders need to make sure they understand their own biases as well as require the leaders and managers who report to them to do the same. Leaders also need to ensure that policies are in place not only to promote diversity but also to identify and correct unconscious bias if it occurs. The sidebar on the next page contains suggestions for combating unconscious bias in the workplace. References and Additional Sources Banaji, M. R., Bazerman, M. H. & Chugh, D. (2003). How (Un) ethical Are You? Harvard Business Review 81(12): 56–65. Bertrand, M. & Mullainathan, S. (2004). Are Emily and Brendan More Employable Than Lakisha and Jamal? A Field Experiment on Labor Market Discrimination. American Economic Review 94(3): 991–1013. Dreaschlin, J.L. (2007). Diversity management and cultural competence: research, practice, and the business case. Journal of Healthcare Management 52(2): 79–86. Ross, H. J. (2015). 3 Ways to Make Less Biased Decisions. Harvard Business Review Retrieved from https://hbr. org/2015/04/3-ways-to-make-less-biased-decisions Ross, Howard (2008). Proven Strategies for Addressing Unconscious Bias in the Workplace. Diversity Best Practices 2(5): 1–18. Wilkins, M. M. (2015). Why Executives Should Talk About Racial Bias at Work. Harvard Business Review Retrieved from https:// hbr.org/2015/04/why-executives-should-talk-about-racialbiasat-work

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8 Ways to Identify and Combat Unconscious Bias The following are suggestions compiled from several resources1 about how you can identify and combat unconscious bias in your healthcare organization. 1. Set a clear vision. The success of any organizational enterprise ultimately rests with the commitment of top leaders. Leaders need to set a clear vision, making sure that expectations are understood and resources are available to see the vision through. The vision to create a diverse organization needs to include not only statements about organizational intentions with respect to fairness to all employees and potential employees, but also acknowledge the existence of unconscious bias without painting those with this normal human reaction as “bad,” and makes it clear that combatting these biases is part of the organization’s approach to diversity. 2. Identify unconscious biases. The first step is to understand your own biases. Several tools exist to do this; one that is widely used is the Implicit Association Test developed by Banaji and Creenwald at Harvard University and the University of Washington. This web-based self-assessment asks users to link words with images on the computer screen. This test can be accessed at https://implicit.harvard.edu. Others in your organization might be encouraged to perform their own self-assessments using this or another tool. These tests are designed for self-development, not to generate measures to be reported to others. 3. Look at the data. Data are an excellent source of information about whether unconscious biases are driving decisions about hiring, promotion and consideration of staff for development activities. One good source of data are diversity statistics on your workforce. To what extent does your organization, from entry level to the senior leadership team, reflect the diversity of the community it serves? Further, you might consider an audit of resumes submitted, those selected for interviews and those of staff hired to ensure that education and experience are weighted fairly. A similar audit could be done with candidates for promotion or selection into leadership training programs.

4. Ask the hard questions. We are all familiar with the “gut feeling” one can get after reviewing a resume. However, before deciding on which resumes will pass to the next level, consider asking some hard questions such as: Does this person remind me of myself? Does this person remind me of someone I know, and is that positive or negative? Are there things in this resume that particularly influence my judgment and, if so, what are they and are they relevant to the job? 5. Examine your interviewing and promotion processes. As you and your management team single out those for interviews, hiring, leadership development and promotion, are you compiling lists based on names or qualifications? Make sure that you begin these decisions with a full list of those with relevant qualifications. 1 This list was compiled from the following sources: Banaji, Bazerman and Chugh 2003; Ross 2015; Ross 2008; Dreaschlin 2007 6. Conduct employee surveys. Conducting companywide, anonymous employee surveys (that adhere to good survey practices such as containing unbiased questions and being collected from a representative sample of employees) can be a good mechanism for uncovering potential biases as well as employee concerns regarding organizational diversity. 7. Have a mechanism for complaints. In addition to creating a formal system that protects “whistle blowers” and deals fairly with both complainers and those who are the subjects of complaints, consider offering an anonymous complaint channel for those who feel they have been subject to bias or discrimination, or other unfair acts not covered by law that impede creation and maintenance of an inclusive or fair workplace (e.g., bullying). 8. Choose words carefully. Words are highly impactful for shaping attitudes. Rather than talking about removing discrimination or “protected classes,” focus on fair treatment and respect in the workplace, which benefits all staff.


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EVENT ENCORE

Fall After Hours Networking Event November 29, 2018 A successful year for chapter events came to a close with the Fall After Hours Networking Event on November 29. The happy hour was held at the Statler Hiltonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rooftop bar, Waterproof, which offered a spectacular view of downtown and all the holiday hustle and bustle. It was visual proof of just how far downtown Dallas has come in the last few years. Our intrepid Membership & Networking Committee planning team made sure everyone was taken care of when it came to libations and hors dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;oeuvres. Familiar faces mixed with first-time guests as we wrapped up the year and started looking ahead to 2019.

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A Publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives of North Texas Chapter | SPRING 2019


A Publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives of North Texas Chapter | SPRING 2019

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EVENT ENCORE

ACHENTX Life Fellow Retirees Luncheon December 6, 2018 The boardroom at Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Hurst-Euless-Bedford was filled with more than 20 people for the Life Fellows-Retirees luncheon. Introductions included sharing a career challenge, which included started and running a health plan, forming a health system and overseeing a post-acute organization. Suggestions and insights were shared concerning how ACHE continues to evolve to meet the needs of emerging health care leaders and the connection between the national office and local chapters. Attendees were encouraged to share their experience and knowledge through the mentorship program and upcoming events designed to increase networking and relationship building. ACHENTX extends thanks and appreciation to those who attended and to Fraser Hay, FACHE, and Texas Health HEB for hosting the event.


EVENT ENCORE

Breakfast with the Vice President, Dr. William Daniel January 15, 2019 By Marty Heath and Will Daniel, MD, VP of health system affairs, chief medical and quality officer, UT Southwestern

UTSW Eastern Campus The leadership of UTSW Medical Center was concerned. Although the medical school is nationally respected, the Medical Center was not reporting elite quality metrics and was not considered in the same tier as national health systems they consider peers. So they took a team approach to turn things around. They set an audacious goal: to match or better clinical outcomes in high impact areas against the most highly respected health systems in the country: the US News and World Report Honor Roll. The approach was built on a few foundational principles. It began with a focus on living their values: excellence, compassion, teamwork and innovation. They committedto

A Publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives of North Texas Chapter | SPRING 2019

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EVENT ENCORE

Breakfast with the Vice President, Dr. William Daniel (contâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d)

a program of continuous improvement and enterprise alignment. Finally, they agreed that the ultimate value equation would not only produce better outcomes for patients and their families, but better cash flow for the health system. The team implemented technical advancements as a first step, then standardization of procedures, and leads to high reliability organizing is the third step. Process checklists were implemented to achieve standardization of the work across all shifts; measurement and reporting on process compliance created the feedback which allowed them to successfully hit their goals for improved outcomes. Results: Effective teamwork saves lives. The UTSW team has observed impressive improvement of outcomes in sepsis, cardiac care, pneumonia, lengths of stay following transplants. Furthermore, the team has reduced nursing turnover and seen higher reimbursement by more accurately documenting comorbidities. Training together built resilience and effectively addressed issues


EVENT ENCORE

A Publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives of North Texas Chapter | SPRING 2019

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EVENT ENCORE

ACHE New Horizon’s 2019 Scottish Rite Hospital, Dallas February 13, 2019 by Marty Heath

Moderator: John Allen, FACHE, Director of Practice Operations, Cook Children’s Medical Center, Ft. Worth, TX Panelists: • Bernie O’Donnell, Lead Consultant and CEO, Performisys LLC, Dallas • Mike Waters, LFACHE, Retired President and CEO, Hendrick Health System, Abilene, TX • Benjamin Isgur, FACHE- Leader, PWC Health Research Institute, Dallas, TX • Margaret Base- Executive Search Consultant, Witt Kieffer, Irving, TX The New Horizons event is an annual opportunity for healthcare administration professionals in transition to connect with each other, with recruiters and to learn from thought leaders in the industry. More than 75 people took advantage of the opportunity to get input on their resumes, practice interviewing and talk job search strategies with representatives of all the major health systems in North Texas and talent acquisition specialists from other healthcare employers. This year’s panel discussion focused on the challenge of keeping up with the ever- changing field of healthcare.

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The panelists noted that there are a great variety of channels for staying informed. Beyond the usual array of publications like Becker’s or Modern Healthcare, the panelists noted that many local consumer newspapers and news organizations provide detailed coverage of healthcare developments, in part because the industry is of vital interest to so much of the population. PWC has a policy think tank that offers a freely available publication focused on new developments. But getting involved with an organization like ACHE is one of the best ways to develop the relationships and to get the information from the people actually driving a lot of the change. The panel agreed that there is no industry in greater need for innovation than healthcare. The challenge of creating higher value at lower cost is driving great innovations from nontraditional angles. It’s a truism that all healthcare is local—but globalization of work force and in the form of medical tourism are having an impact. Blockchain technology is beginning to shape thinking about privacy and data security. New companies and alliances are emerging, and vertical integrations, such as CVS and Aetna have the potential to disrupt the industry. Of course, the political implications of managing cost, quality and access keep healthcare as a hot-button issue for the economy and the culture.

A Publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives of North Texas Chapter | SPRING 2019


A Publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives of North Texas Chapter | SPRING 2019

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EVENT ENCORE

Networking Blitz February 19, 2019


A Publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives of North Texas Chapter | SPRING 2019

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EVENT ENCORE

ACHENTX First Quarter Education Event February, 28 2019

The first quarter education event on Thursday, Feb. 28, at Maggiano’s Little Italy in Plano, explored alternative care models, meeting community needs and increasing value. The first panel topic, The Value of Developing and Implementing Alternative Care Models, was moderated by Kevin Stevenson, MBA, FACHE, Executive Director, North Texas Region, for IntegraNet Health. Panelist Scott Hurst led with the data point that approximately 10,000 people per day turn 65 and that the first 90 days after a CMS patient leaves the hospital are important. Janelle Shepard reinforced that medical homes must be educated, with everyone understanding the payment models – but most importantly, looking at the social determinants of health and behavioral health components – we must look at the whole person. Bob McCullough outlined some alternative service models for behavioral health so that care could begin immediately instead of weeks into the future. The second panel, Behavioral Healthcare: Approaches to Increasing Value for the Organization and Meet Community Needs, was moderated by Benson Chacko, FACHE, Vice President, Operations, Methodist Dallas Medical Center. Panelists shared their perspectives of the behavioral health crisis in DFW and the need for the

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medical community to come together to determine next steps to address some solutions, which are not necessarily bricks and mortar (i.e., virtual, telephonic, mobile assessment teams). The discussion also included the need to look at behavioral health as another vital sign – a regular measurement, handled in the PCP office, just like blood pressure – and to get rid of the stigma. Secondary prevention through early intervention – it will take the entire medical community working together. Each panel included a robust Q&A session. Common themes include that data is key, the significant shift to outpatient services and we need to work together and remain open to new ways of doing things (i.e., digital platforms) to care for patients. The event concluded with two donations to the ACHE Leadership Fund in honor of the panelists and moderators. ACHENTX extends thanks and appreciation to the moderators and panelists who made this event so engaging, to Smith & Nephew for hosting, and to the members and guests who attended.

A Publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives of North Texas Chapter | SPRING 2019


A Publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives of North Texas Chapter | SPRING 2019

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National News Complimentary Resources for the BOG Exam Available AFor Members starting on the FACHE® journey to board certification and the FACHE credential, several resources are available. These complimentary resources include quarterly Advancement Information webinars, designed to supplement other Board of Governors Exam study resources, such as the Board of Governors Review Course or Online Tutorial.

Opportunity to List Your Postgraduate Fellowship As a healthcare leader, you know how crucial it is to attract and develop highly qualified professionals in your organization. If your organization is offering a postgraduate fellowship, we encourage you to add it to ACHE’s complimentary Directory of Postgraduate Administrative Fellowships at ache.org/Postgrad. You may add a new listing or update a previous one at any time by completing the online listing form. The directory can help you gain exposure and start attracting top-notch applicants to your program. Questions? Please contact Audrey Meyer, membership coordinator, at (312) 424-9308, or via email at ameyer@ache. org, Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Central time.

ACHE Call for Nominations for the 2020 Slate

ACHE’s 2019–2020 Nominating Committee is calling for applications for service beginning in 2020. ACHE Fellows are eligible for any of the Governor and Chairman-Elect vacancies and are eligible for the Nominating Committee vacancies within their district. Those interested in pursuing applications should review the candidate guidelines for the competencies and qualifications required for these important roles. Open positions on the slate include: • Nominating Committee Member, District 1 (two-year term ending in 2022) • Nominating Committee Member, District 4 (two-year term

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ending in 2022) • Nominating Committee Member, District 5 (two-year term ending in 2022) • Four Governors (three-year terms ending in 2023) • Chairman-Elect Please refer to the following district designations for the open positions: • District 1: Canada, Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont • District 4: Alabama, Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas • District 5: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming Candidates for Chairman-Elect and Governor should submit an application to serve that includes a copy of their resume and up to 10 letters of support. For details, please review qualifications for open positions that are listed in the Candidate Guidelines, including guidance from the Board of Governors to the Nominating Committee regarding the personal competencies of Chairman-Elect and Governor candidates and the composition of the Board of Governors. Candidates for the Nominating Committee should submit a letter of self-nomination and a copy of their resume. Applications to serve and self-nominations must be submitted electronically to jnolan@ache.org and must be received by July 15. All correspondence should be addressed to Charles D. Stokes, FACHE, chairman, Nominating Committee, c/o Julie Nolan, American College of Healthcare Executives, 300 S. Riverside Plaza, Ste. 1900, Chicago, IL 60606-6698. Following the July 15 submission deadline, the committee will meet to determine which candidates for Chairman-Elect and Governor will be interviewed. All candidates will be notified in writing of the committee’s decision by Sept. 30, and candidates for Chairman-Elect and Governor will be interviewed in person on Oct. 24. To review the Candidate Guidelines, visit ache.org/ CandidateGuidelines. If you have any questions, please contact Julie Nolan at (312) 424-9367 or jnolan@ache.org.

A Publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives of North Texas Chapter | SPRING 2019


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Thursday, April 25

Second Quarter Education Event: Panel 1: Leading a Successful Multigenerational Organization Panel 2: On the Executive Track, Leading People Who are More Experienced Than You

Methodist Dallas Medical Center

3-7:30pm

Saturday, May 4

DME Exchange Community Event

DME Exchange Community Event

8am-12pm

Thursday, May 16

North Texas and East Texas ACHE Chapters’ Joint Education Event Panel 1: Ethical Challenges in Healthcare Leadership Panel 2: Closing Gaps in Patient Care Plans Panel 3: Leading Information Safety: Planning for Data Privacy and Security Panel 4: Ensuring Your Community’s Emergency Preparedness

First Baptist Church, Terrell, Texas

7:30am-4pm

Friday, May 17

Board of Governors’ Exam Review Course

CHRISTUS Health Headquarters, Las Colinas

8:30am-4pm

Tuesday, May 21

Breakfast with the President - Fraser Hay, FACHE

Texas Health HEB

7:30-9am


Thursday, June 20

Local Program Council Event Panel: The Value of Developing and Implementing Alternative Care Models

Texas Health Neighborhood Care and Wellness, Willow Park

3:30-5pm

Thursday, August 22

Third Quarter Education Event: Panel 1: Rethinking the Ambulatory Care Network Panel 2: Population Health Management: Justice, Access, and Financial Implications

Colonial Country Club, Fort Worth

3-7:30pm

Tuesday, October 1

Annual Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Breakfast

La Cima Club, Las Colinas

7:30-9:15am

Tuesday, October 15

Breakfast with the President: Kyle Armstrong, FACHE

Baylor Scott & White Medical Center - McKinney

7:30-9am

Thursday, October 24

Fourth Quarter Education Event: Panel 1: Care for the Uninsured and Underinsured Panel 2: Understanding Implicit Bias and its impact on Healthcare Leadership

TBD

3-7:30pm

A Publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives of North Texas Chapter | SPRING 2019

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ACHENTX’S

NEWEST

FELLOWS

NOVEMBER Tami Hlus-Hawkins, FACHE

DECEMBER Daniel V. Bent, FACHE Gregory Jacob, FACHE Kimberly Anderson, FACHE

WELCOME ACHENTX’S NEWEST MEMBERS NOVEMBER Beth Hudson, DNP, RN Emily H. Fletcher Farhana Abdullah James Hearn Jeanette Porter, PA-C Jessica Rahm Judy Parson Kevin Orsak Mariah Atiya Mark S. Ballard Martin J. Marshall, II Paulette R. Grimes, BS Rick Fernandez, MBA Ron Parent Ryan J. Blas, RN Tedra L. Williams, RN Thomas W. Methvin Tim Newell

DECEMBER Barbara S. Peace, MBA, BSN, RN Brian Crowley, MBA

Candace Forbes Connor Bazis Corey Jackson David D. Williams Jennifer L. Shaulin Joseph G. Kennedy Micahel Defour Mika C. Davis Sasha Manouchehripour Shan Varghese Sheeba John, MBA, MHA

JANUARY Alan C. Heller Allison E. Tarrant Amber D. Bethea Ana Hutchins Celestine W. Leach Emily B. Dykes, MHA Eric C. Horne, PharmD Harry Lemming I. Manosha Wickremasinghe, MD Jennie Evans Jessica Miller

Kylie Haines Leslie Brennan Meagan Bailey Metasebia Abera Rhonda Ross, MSN, RN Sahana Sharan, MD, MBA Sandi Gill, RN, MHA Saul Cordero Simone Turner Stacey C. DiSpigno Taryn Lee Titiksha Vats, MS, BS, M.T. Tracy L. Donahue Trevor O. Clifton

FEBRUARY Andrew Flanagan Brian Sims Cequila Greer Donald A. Adam Eric Reynolds, MSHA Gary Holderby Gregory Fratantoni Haas S. Nye, MHA

Jacob Daggett Jake Williams, MSHA John DuBard Karey Johnson, MBA Karina Lupercio Katie A. Fiedler Kory Booher Leah D. Boom Louis Broussard, III Melissa Mireles Michael C. Ball Michael I. Serber, MBA Michael Lemnitzer, CPA, CCP Michele M. Napoliello, MBA, CMPE Nathan Hozer Ozioma Olowu, PharmD Phillip Kendzior Rimmel Shekha Rudy Rodriguez Sybille Kabangu Tysha Powell, AuD Xixi Flores


RECERTIFIED FELLOWS NOVEMBER Dennis W. Walker, FACHE Edward D. Bittner, FACHE Gail R. Heroman, RN, FACHE J. Clinton Hailey, JD, FACHE James T. Couch, FACHE Jeffrey P. Reecer, FACHE Jill A. Bayless, FACHE Kenneth R. Ross, FACHE Kirk King, FACHE Kristin Tesmer, FACHE Matthew R. Malinak, FACHE Nick Kagal, FACHE Patrick R. Rohan, FACHE Sandra G. Reeves, FACHE Stan C. Morton, FACHE Stephen J. Pottoore, DHA, FACHE Tina D. Hicks, FACHE William J. Roberts, FACHE

DECEMBER

JANUARY

April T. Audain, FACHE Barbara E. Anspach, RN, FACHE Ekta Pathare, FACHE Eric H. McDaniel, FACHE Jan K. Althouse, FACHE Kevin J. Smith, FACHE Melvin G. Alexander, CPA, FACHE Michael J. King, CPA, FACHE Nora G. Fraser, RN, FACHE Pamela J. Stoyanoff, CPA, FACHE Sean Kamber, FACHE Valerie Johnston, PhD, FACHE Xavier Villarreal, FACHE

Brian A. Craft, FACHE Cindy K. Schamp, FACHE Dani-Bree Bialek, FACHE G. Scott Manis, FACHE Michael D. Thornsberry, MD, FACHE Monte K. Parker, FACHE

FEBRUARY Christi T. Nguyen, RN, FACHE Karen Murray, FACHE Marc A. Gelinas, FACHE Martin K. Heath, FACHE Robert A. Di Domizio, FACHE Steven C. Bristow, FACHE

MEMBERS WHO RECENTLY PASSED THE BOARD OF GOVERNORSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; EXAM NOVEMBER

Jason Naranjo, FACHE

A Publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives of North Texas Chapter | SPRING 2019

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ACHE of North Texas - The Executive Connection e-Magazine - Spring 2019  

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