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BUSINESS JOURNAL OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF NKY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

WINTER 2017

GET MOVING & EXPLORE OUR RIVER CITIES

HEALTHY INNOVATION P. 12 PASSPORT TO COMMUNITY VIBRANCY P. 20 LAURA STACK INTERVIEW P. 30

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Health Management

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CONTENTS

WINTER 2017 VOLUME 36, NUMBER 1

4 Let’s Get To Work By: Trey Grayson 6 Chair’s Letter By: Bob Heil 10 A Day Out on the River Cities By: Katie Scoville 12 Healthy Innovation By: Amanda Nageleisen 14 Build In By: Rachel Wells 17 Stay On Track With SLEEP By: Rachel Folz 20 Keep Your Mental Health In Check By: Kelly Rose 22 Around the Chamber 24 It’s In the Bag By: Emily Gresham Wherle, CCPH 26 Stand For It By: Linda Poynter and Emily Gresham Wherle

— As a community, we are stronger if we better understand one another. — TREY GRAYSON PRESIDENT & CEO, NKY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

29 Emerging 30 30 How Effective Are You? By: Carla Landon 32 Member Milestones 34 Ribbon Cuttings 37 Events 39 What’s Old Is New Again By: Rachel Folz

PHOTO: STEVE FINE

WINTER 2017 | VOLUME 36 NUMBER 1

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LET’S GET TO WORK

By: Trey Grayson President & CEO NKY Chamber of Commerce To Follow: @KYTrey; @NKYchamber

“I WASN’T SURPRISED THAT MOST WERE TRUMP SUPPORTERS. AFTER ALL, WE LIVE IN A CRACKER BARREL COUNTY.”

THIS PAGE PHOTO CREDIT: CHARLIE VANCE, CEO ERIGO EMPLOYER SOLUTIONS

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ONE THING THAT IS CLEAR about this past election is that we are basically a 50-50 country, and that divide is often a bitter one. Furthermore, an unfortunate recent trend is that we are more often choosing to live around people whose political and world views are like our own – what some commentators have called “the Big Sort.” For example, 60% of Americans now live in a county won in November by more than 20 points. Historically, this sorting was defined by the color of our skin, and that still happens. More and more, however, it is also defined by world view, politics, class, culture or education. Some have described this world view divide as cosmopolitan vs. traditional. I have two examples — one data, the other anecdotal — that bring this to life. First, Donald Trump won 76% of counties with a Cracker Barrel, but only 22% of counties with a Whole Foods, a 54-point gap. Yet in 1992, when Bill Clinton won the presidency, that same gap was only 19 points. I can relate to this, as I now live in a county with a Cracker Barrel, Boone, which of course, Trump won by 42 points. And when I worked at Harvard, I lived in a county with a Whole Foods, Middlesex, which of course, Hillary won by 38 points. I love both counties and am glad that I had the chance to live in both. Now, I’m not a big fan of either Cracker Barrel or Whole Foods, but my wife Nancy LOVES both. So, I am confident Cracker Barrel patrons and Whole Foods shoppers could find much in common, if they were to try. ANOTHER STORY BRINGS HOME THIS POINT EVEN MORE VIVIDLY. A few weeks before the election, a high school friend who lives in the neighborhood next to us wrote a Facebook post in which she encouraged her friends to write in a comment how many of their own Facebook friends liked the pages of Trump or Hillary. I wasn’t surprised that most were Trump supporters. After all, we live in a Cracker Barrel county.

But I was blown away by how many responses read like this: 46-1 Trump. 66-4 Trump. 36-0 Trump. (For what it’s worth, mine was closer, 330-251 Trump.) How would your Facebook friends break down? My guess is that most of you would see a similar extreme, and given how Northern Kentucky votes, heavily skewed towards Trump. I believe that this sorting is a big problem, and I think it exacerbates the challenges that we face as a country in coming to grips with a close election like this. It’s hard to accept the loss when you don’t often hang out with people who voted differently than you. Similarly, it’s hard to be a gracious winner. It’s then easy to make assumptions — negative ones — about the other side when you don’t know them. WHAT CAN WE DO ABOUT THIS? I want to challenge everyone reading this to reach out to those who look differently than you, to those who have different beliefs than you, to those who voted different than you. Yes, I want Trump voters to reach out to Clinton voters. And vice versa. I am not asking you to persuade each other about the rightness of your cause or vote. Instead, I want you to reach out to better understand one another. Not everyone who voted for Trump, or who lives in fly-over country, or who watches Fox News, or who yes, eats at Cracker Barrel should be dumped into a basket of deplorables and looked down upon. You might find out that he is quite proud of his local high school soccer team that features players from 14 different countries who speak 7 different languages. By the way, that’s Boone County High School’s soccer team, not too far from our Cracker Barrel on Turfway Road. Similarly, not everyone who gets their news from the New York Times, or immigrated to this country, or celebrates the diversity and energy in a big city, or

NORTHERN KENTUCKY BUSINESS JOURNAL


Sorting is a big problem, and I think it exacerbates the challenges we face as a country.

yes, shops at Whole Foods for their kale and arugula is an elitist snob. You might find out that she too is a Sunday School teacher and a Star Wars nut, who loves spending time with family and friends. Now some of those in the first category really are racist, homophobic, sexist, or xenophobic. And some in the second category really are elitist snobs. I’m not denying either reality. But the full reality is that we all have a lot more in common than we think. Perhaps that’s what made the Black Jeopardy segment on SNL with Tom Hanks a few weeks before the election so

WINTER 2017 | VOLUME 36 NUMBER 1

compelling. Turned out that Hanks, the Trump supporter, wasn’t all that different than his fellow contestants who were African-American. As a community, we are stronger if we better understand one another. As we begin another year, in addition to the usual New Year’s resolutions about eating better, losing weight or getting better organized, let’s also resolve to better understand the perspective of people who aren’t like us. If we do so, I am confident 2017 can be an even greater year.

— SOCIAL CHALLENGE!

TRUMP VS. HILLARY: HOW DO YOUR FACEBOOK FRIENDS BREAK DOWN?

LET’S GET TO WORK!

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CHAIR’S LETTER

By: Bob Heil CEO, KLH Engineers Chair, NKY Chamber of Commerce

“I REMIND MYSELF OF THE WORDS OF MATTHEW KELLY, ‘DON’T LET WHAT YOU CAN’T DO INTERFERE WITH WHAT YOU CAN DO.’”

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THIS ISSUE OF THE BUSINESS JOURNAL FOCUSES ON CREATING A HEALTHY NORTHERN KENTUCKY. There are many great organizations in NKY who focus their energies and resources on this very issue. And we know a healthy NKY starts with individuals making health and wellness a personal priority. If you are like me, not only do you struggle with time to work out, but also your busy schedule does not always allow for healthy food choices when attending event after event with predetermined menus. It would be so easy to throw in the towel and say “my busy schedule does not allow me to make health and wellness a personal priority, so it is what it is.” When I fall into that trap, I remind myself of the words of Matthew Kelly, “Don’t let what you can’t do interfere with what you can do.” As Matthew explains, it is understandable you may not have two hours a day to travel to the health club, work out, shower, and then travel back home. But should that interfere with your ability to get some exercise as part of your daily routine? Or better yet, should that interfere with your ability to leverage your own fitness goals for the benefit of a broader health or community initiatives. Here’s where I’m going with this: 2016 marked the 39th anniversary of the Cincinnati Heart Mini-Marathon. I ran the very first Heart Mini-Marathon in 1978 as a senior in high school. It was a groundbreaking event; Cincinnati was one of the first (if not THE first) city in the country to raise money for a health-related cause through a running event. It’s amazing to see how the event has become such a success for the American Heart Associate and the NKY/

Cincinnati region; driving awareness of the importance of cardiovascular fitness and raising money for heart health research. To underscore the significance of that first race, Bill Rodgers, the greatest marathoner in American history, participated and won the race. How cool did I feel to be competing in the same race as Bill Rodgers! My point is an easy first step to better health is to start with little goals associated with larger fundraising events for health-related causes or other community needs. The opportunities are almost limitless. In addition to the Heart Mini-Marathon, there is HeartChase, both sponsored by the American Heart Association. Other examples include Ride Cincinnati supporting breast cancer research, Paddling for Cancer Awareness involving dragon boat team races at AJ Jolly Park, the Ohio River Paddlefest sponsored by Outdoor Adventure Clubs of Greater Cincinnati, and the DAV 5K run to honor veterans. Then there is Northern Kentucky’s very own River Cities Relay, created by the 2016 Leadership NKY class and supported by the NKY Chamber. Proceeds from the inaugural event supported six different charities in NKY. If you or your company are not already engaged in community charitable fundraising events that also benefit those who participate, I hope you will start off 2017 by making it a personal or company goal to learn more about the opportunities in this great region where we all live and work. The benefits extend in many directions and I think you will find your participation in health-related fundraising events will result in positive health outcomes for yourself. NKY

NORTHERN KENTUCKY BUSINESS JOURNAL


BUILDING A BETTER COMMUNITY STARTS WITH HELPING THE PEOPLE WHO BUILD IT.

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THINGS TO DO

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By: Katie Scoville Account Executive Scooter Media

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A Day Out in the River Cities

Even during the winter it’s easy to get out, get moving and explore our River Cities.

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NORTHERN KENTUCKY BUSINESS JOURNAL


ONE OF THE BEST THINGS ABOUT NORTHERN KENTUCKY IS OUR VIBRANT RIVER CITIES. They’re filled with thriving restaurants, shops, and activities for the whole family. With so much to see, do, and explore, we thought it would be helpful to put together a sample itinerary for a day spent exploring the river cities.

RED BIKE STATION With locations at Newport on the Levee, Mainstrasse and throughout the River Cities.

9:00AM Start the day off with coffee and breakfast at Avenue Brew in Bellevue. Try their famous “This n’ That” casserole or a breakfast sandwich to start the day full of energy. (310 Fairfield Avenue, Bellevue) 9:45AM Bellevue is a quaint and historic river city filled with unique shops that have something for everyone. Stroll down Fairfield Avenue, Bellevue’s main drag, and browse the shops. Stop into Bella on the Avenue, Cozy Cottage, Twice as Nice Antiques, and Schneider’s Sweet Shops to see what catches your eye. NOON By now you’ve probably worked up an appetite, so head over to Newport and stop into Packhouse Meats for lunch. Their menu is filled with delicious hand-packed meatballs that you can have on a salad, over pasta, veggies, or potatoes, or as a slider. Everything is made fresh daily, and there are even vegan and gluten free options. (1004 Monmouth Street, Newport) 1:00PM After lunch head to Axis Alley at Newport on The Levee for a little friendly bowling competition. With sixteen lanes of bowling your whole group will be able to join in the fun. Shoe rental is just $4 and games are $4 per person. (1 Levee Way, Newport)

PHOTO: RUDY HARRIS PHOTOGRAPHY

WINTER 2017 | VOLUME 36 NUMBER 1

3:00PM After you’re done bowling, head across the street to Hofbräuhaus Newport, the first Hofbräuhaus beer hall to open in the United States. Enjoy the traditional German beerhall atmosphere modeled after the original Hofbräuhaus in Munich, Germany. Order traditional German fare like the tasty Imported German Soft Pretzels or a Bavarian Cream Puff. Of course, you’ll also want to sample the traditional German beer, brewed on site using original recipes handed down by the Duke of Bavaria over 400 years ago. (200 E. 3rd Street, Newport)

4:00PM Head back to the Levee to rent a Red Bike and continue exploring the river cities. Ride along the river to James Taylor Park. While you’re there, stop and take pictures with the Cincinnati skyline in the background. Continue on the path across the Fourth Street Bridge into Covington. Take a right off the bridge and explore the historic Licking Riverside District. In honor of Covington’s Bicentennial in 2015, a group put together self-guided tours of the city’s landmarks. Visit COV200tour.com to learn about the Daniel Carter Beard house, the river walk statues along the Cincinnati Bicentennial River Walk, and the Roebling murals on the flood wall. 5:30PM Once you’re done exploring the riverside, ride up to Covington’s historic Mainstrasse Village. You’ll find a Red Bike Station in front of Otto’s to return your bikes. (521 Main Street, Covington) Walk down 6th Street to Covington’s Goebel Park, named for the only Covington native to be elected Governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, William Goebel. The park is best known for the German-style Carroll Chimes Clock Tower, which displays a puppet show of the Pied Piper on the hour April through December. While you’re in the park, visit the Goebel Goats. They’re in their pen for the winter, but in the warmer months they’re used to maintain the park. Head back to the village center and visit unique local businesses like Stoney’s Gift & Toy Shoppe, Ottoman Imports, and MK’s Totebags & Monogramming. 6:30PM After you’re finished browsing the shops, head to Commonwealth Bistro, a new restaurant featuring locally sourced food inspired by Kentucky’s history. The cozy restaurant has an open kitchen, so you can even see your meal being prepared. (621 Main Street, Covington) 8:15PM After dinner, stroll down 6th Street to Madison Avenue to end your day in the river cities with dessert and a nightcap. Hotel Covington, Covington’s newest hotel, recently opened in the old Coppin’s department store building. Drop into the Coppin’s restaurant and try one of their delicious cocktails and desserts. (638 Madison Avenue) It’s impossible to explore all that the River Cities have to offer in just one day. No matter where you choose to go or what you choose to do, you’ll enjoy your time along the Ohio River in Northern Kentucky’s River Cities. NKY

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EDUCATION

Healthy Innovation By: Amanda Nageleisen Director, Public Relations Northern Kentucky University

NKU Health Innovation Center will transform how the region thinks about health. ON NORTHERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY’S HIGHLAND HEIGHTS CAMPUS, a big, beautiful new academic building is rising rapidly from the ground. With its sleek lines, innovative use of light and space, and two-story St. Elizabeth Healthcare Simulation Center, the building will be among the most distinctive in the region. But bricks and mortar only tell part of the story. The Health Innovation Center, which is set to open in 2018, will also be home to cutting-edge academic programs designed to transform how the Northern Kentucky and Greater Cincinnati community thinks about – and takes steps to address – our most pressing population health issues, such as chronic illness and the epidemic of addiction. “Northern Kentucky University is known for our ability to create innovative academic programs that uniquely serve the needs of our community,” said NKU President Geoffrey S. Mearns. “The Health Innovation Center is the University’s most ambitious, and consequential, initiative in our nearly 50-year history.” As the physical structure takes form, the most exciting work is quietly taking place elsewhere on campus as university leaders and faculty experts give shape to the transformational academic programs that will fill the building. “The work that will take place within the Health Innovation Center will be devoted to addressing pressing health issues by preparing students to work in the new multidimensional population health and health care field, where solutions are found by transdisciplinary collaborations that engage a full range of knowledge and break down the silos that isolate expertise,” said Provost Sue Ott Rowlands. The Center will enable NKU to grow existing academic offerings, such as its acclaimed Nursing and Respiratory Care programs. An $8 million philanthropic investment by St. Elizabeth Healthcare will help construct and equip a two-story simulation center that will give students real-world experience with state-of-the-art technology.

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NKU is already expanding its academic portfolio, adding new programs in CRNA (Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist) and Autism and Applied Behavior Analysis this year. Addiction Science, Neuroscience and Health Informatics programs are set to launch in the coming year, and future offerings will include master’s degrees in respiratory care and public health. NKU engaged the region’s health care systems and major employers early in the planning process, recognizing the need to address the challenges that hold our region’s workforce back and also to fill the jobs of the future. “Population health impacts our region tremendously, because it impacts our ability to have a strong, healthy workforce,” Ott Rowlands said. “We can’t solve all of these problems by ourselves, but we can bring people together who, collectively, can solve the problems.” The Health Innovation Center will leverage NKU’s expertise in innovation and transdisciplinary education, convening experts from each of NKU’s six colleges to create teams that will study health care from new perspectives. The approach will combine data analytics, psychology, preventative care, and holistic approaches to help address population health challenges such as addiction and chronic illness. “The future of population health care will increasingly depend upon gathering and analyzing data to determine which practices and policies are improving collective health outcomes,” said Dr. Dale Scalise Smith, dean of NKU’s College of Health Professions. “Our innovative approach will be a model for other educational institutions and communities to emulate.” In fact, that work is already underway: last spring, the inaugural initiative of the Health Innovation Center brought national, regional, and local experts to campus for a three-day event to identify the causes of our region’s heroin crisis and begin to work toward solutions. The event yielded change large and small: from nursing faculty changing the way they teach students to dispense opioids, to a new research consortium that will leverage the top academic minds in the field of opioid addiction to work toward solutions. “We are not simply building a new home for our College of Health Professions – we are leading the way to help address some of our region’s most pressing challenges,” Mearns said. “The Health Innovation Center will foster new approaches to learning and research in order to be innovative, and to generate innovation and leave a lasting impact upon our community.” NKY

NORTHERN KENTUCKY BUSINESS JOURNAL


— The Health Innovation Center is the University’s most ambitious, and consequential initiative in our nearly 50-year history. — GEOFFREY S. MEARNS PRESIDENT, NORTHERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY

WINTER 2017 | VOLUME 36 NUMBER 1

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FEATURE

Build In

Last February, LEGACY, in partnership with the NKY Forum invited nine young professionals seeking or serving in public office to share their stories in a bar in downtown Covington. We wanted to know what it says about our region that so many leaders run, are elected/ appointed and serve in public office.

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NORTHERN KENTUCKY BUSINESS JOURNAL


By: Rachel Wells Communications Specialist, SD1 LEGACY Community Involvement Committee Co-Chair

The inaugural Build In event.

— FOLLOW ON TWITTER!

@LEGACY_NKY

1WINTER 2017 | VOLUME 36 NUMBER 1

DESPITE BUSY WORK, family, volunteer and campaign schedules, not a single one declined the invitation. Each one got up on a low stage, sat side by side on bar stools and passed a couple of microphones down the line. One by one, they told us why they cared. They told us how it feels to ask for campaign money. They told us what their mothers said when they broke the news that gasp! they were going into politics. They made us laugh so we’d understand a public office we barely knew existed. Ultimately, they let us know that this region is a special place for young professionals – one where to build up, all you need to do is build in. Held over drinks to embrace the region’s beer and bourbon heritage, the event did exactly what LEGACY’s new “Build In” event series aims to do: highlight the young talent that’s taking advantage of unique opportunities to move our region forward in a format that engages and motivates fellow YPs. Organized by LEGACY’s Community Involvement Committee, the Build In series was established in 2015 under the leadership of then committee co-chairs Laura Menge and Brandon Hubbard. “I had the idea for the Build In series once I stopped feeling homesick for Boston and Washington, DC and started recognizing the unique – and sometimes more advantageous – assets that our region offers,” Menge said. “Our size, landscape, cost index, companies, urban renaissances and heritage give us an exciting and accessible lifestyle. And in many ways, they give us significantly better opportunities for engagement and leadership. “By highlighting our assets, I wanted to encourage everyone, lifelong residents and fellow transplants alike, to become an ambassador for this place. More, I wanted them to build into it, to leverage opportunities and contacts so they would incorporate themselves as an integral part.”

The inaugural Build In event in 2015 featured speaker Johnna Reeder, president and CEO of Regional Economic Development Institute (REDI) Cincinnati. REDI works to create jobs in the region by engaging businesses interested in growing in or relocating to Greater Cincinnati and connecting them to the resources they need.

— They told us what their mothers said when they broke the news that gasp! they were going into politics. “With her leadership at REDI and transplant story of her own, Johnna Reeder was a natural pick for our first Build In speaker,” Menge said. “The way she presents our region to multinational companies as a compelling location for their business and their staff is important to share. We should all be able to tell that story well.” While Menge and Hubbard have moved on from the Community Involvement Committee, there’s much more in the region to highlight. As the committee’s new co-chairs, lifelong NKY resident Valerie Forsyth and I, a recent transplant from Illinois, plan to pick up where they left off. We’ve learned the Build In lesson and want to reinforce it. We’re already planning the next Build In and have a few ideas for the future, but we also want to hear from you. Who or what motivates you to build in? Who and what in our region reminds you of the incredible opportunities before us and motivates you to build in? Let us know by emailing legacy@ legacyleadership.org, and get all the details on our next Build In by signing up for LEGACY’s newsletter and following us on social media. NKY

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the promise of academic medicine every day. As Cincinnati’s only academic health system, we see more. More hope for people facing complex health problems like Parkinson’s disease and pancreatic cancer. More groundbreaking research leading to new discoveries in stroke and brain tumors. And more advanced treatment options for cancer, heart disease and neurologic disorders. Because we see more, you see health.

Cincinnati

West Chester

For an appointment call (513) 475-8000 l See more at UCHealth.com/WeSee


HEALTH

Stay On Track with SLEEP By: Rachel Folz Director of Digital Marketing Cerkl

just like diet and exercise, sleep is very important to your overall health.”

The number of hours you spend in the sack could be hurting your bottom line. According to the latest National Sleep Foundation guidelines, adults should be getting 7 to 9 hours of restful sleep each night. So what’s standing in your way? Nighttime used to be for rest and relaxation, but our devices keep us busy right up until our eyes close. St. Elizabeth Family Medicine Doctor, Mark Boyd, says lack of sleep hurts your productivity. When you don’t get the sleep you need, your concentration, energy level and mood all take a serious hit. Dr. Boyd says he’s seen this first hand in his practice, “It’s important to know that

If you are struggling to get the rest you need, Dr. Boyd has created this helpful acronym to get you on track, SLEEP. S: Schedule sleep. Dr. Boyd says you should be going to sleep and waking up at the same time all days of the week. L: Light. Our internal clock is run by light. When you wake, Dr. Boyd says it’s wise to open the curtains and let some light in; it will help you wake up. In the evening, avoid light 30 minutes before bed. Your phone, computer and TV are common culprits, although Dr. Boyd admits he has trouble with this one as well. E: Exercise. Just another reason to get moving! Dr. Boyd says early morning or afternoon is the perfect time for

exercise but you should avoid it right before bed. E: Eating. Avoid eating for three to four hours before bed. A drink before bed will help you get to sleep but Dr. Boyd warns that alcohol-fueled sleep is not as restful. P: Pleasant. Make going to sleep an event you look forward to all day. Make your bedroom a haven of rest with a comfortable bed, dark curtains and soft sheets. If you are having trouble getting the rest you need at night, you might be tempted to take up napping. Dr. Boyd says that could start a bad sleep cycle. If you must nap, do it early in the day and only for a short while. Give your co-workers, family and friends the benefit of the best you with a good night’s sleep. NKY

Recommended Hours of Sleep

18–19

16–18 14–17

15–16 12–15

11–13

14 11–14 10–13

10–11

12 11 9–11

9–10

7–8

INFANT 4–11 MONTHS

RECOMMENDED RANGE

WINTER 2017 | VOLUME 36 NUMBER 1

TODDLER 1–2 YEARS

PRESCHOOL 3–5 YEARS

MAY BE APPOPRIATE

10

8–10

8–9

NEWBORN 0–3 MONTHS

10–11

SCHOOL AGE 6–13 YEARS

9 7–9

7–9

6

6

YOUNG ADULT 18–25 YEARS

ADULT 26–64 YEARS

7

TEENAGER 14–17 YEARS

NOT RECOMMENDED

7–8 5–6

OLDER ADULT 65+ YEARS

DATA: SLEEPFOUNDATION.ORG | SLEEP.ORG

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ALL IT TAKES IS A SPARK

For nearly 50 years, NKU professors have been providing students with a world-class education both in the classroom and beyond. Whether you’re an aspiring undergraduate or graduate student, we can prepare you to live — or discover — your dreams. And we’re proud to have been named one of the best values in Kentucky higher education. At NKU, you’ll come to learn, and you’ll learn to lead. All while experiencing a safe, vibrant campus just minutes from downtown Cincinnati.

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Register at www.nkychamber.com/events

Benefits of Attending the Workshop: • Identify action steps for your business which become your 2017 road map for success! • Protect the value of your business and its long-term success. • Avoid major business problems that would arise if you died or became disabled. • Get answers to your CPA and legal questions. Forward your questions to Bill prior to the workshop! • All attendees receive a one-hour complimentary follow-up consultation with Bill. 8:00 am Session 1: Tax Savings Strategies • Choice of Entity-Sole Proprietor, S or C Corporation • Maximize retirement plan deductions • Maximize your tax deductions • Avoid IRS audit problems

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HEALTH

Keep Your Mental Health in Check! By Kelly Rose Development Coordinator Welcome House, NKY

Staying healthy is so important. We all know this. Making sure we go to the dentist, our doctor for check-ups, or to the eye doctor for new contacts is always a top priority. But when was the last time you took a moment to take care of your mental well-being? You don’t necessarily have to see a doctor to make sure that you are taking breaks throughout your day, week, or year to clear your mind, relax, and do things you love. Currently, I work full-time and I am in the Leadership NKY 2017 class. It’s easy to become overwhelmed, but I try to make time to do the things I enjoy like being with friends, family, and my dog— Larry. In Leadership NKY, we are learning how to serve our community, but in order for me to be the best leader I can, I have to find balance. As a Leadership class, we have been tasked to contribute to community vibrancy by embarking on our own personal journey (outside of our normal classes) to visit some of our great local parks, breweries, small shops, and other locations and landmarks through the PAGE 20

Greater Cincinnati Area. Even though this project is a challenge for our class, it has proven to be a great way for all of us to decompress from the long hours we spend together planning our group project as well as the long hours we work at our daily jobs. Some of the amazing local sites we are asked to visit include the Cincinnati Art Museum, New Riff Distillery, Findlay Market, and The Carnegie. Most, if not all, of the adventures are family friendly and are a great way to get out of your house and break your routine. We would love to share our Passport to Community Vibrancy with our members in the hopes that it helps you relax and take stock of the wonderful area we live in — along with giving you a much needed mental health break from the everyday weekday rigors. NKY

— SOCIAL CHALLENGE!

SHARE A PHOTO TO FACEBOOK AND USE #NKYPASSPORT

NORTHERN KENTUCKY BUSINESS JOURNAL


Embark on your own personal journey, visiting some of the great parks, museums, gathering places and landmarks throughout Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. Here we’ve put together some suggested locations to visit — go explore our great region!

MUSEUMS

21C BEHRINGER-CRAWFORD MUSEUM THE CARNEGIE CINCINNATI ART MUSEUM CONTEMPORARY ART CENTER NATIONAL UNDERGROUND RAILROAD FREEDOM CENTER TAFT MUSEUM OF ART

PASSPORT TO COMMUNITY VIBRANCY

BREWERIES/ DISTILLERIES

ART WALKS/ CRAFT SHOWS

BRAXTON BREWERY DARKNESS BREWERY EIGHT BALL BREWERY HOFBRÄUHAUS NEW RIFF DISTILLERY RHINEGEIST BREWERY SECOND SIGHT SPIRITS TAFT ALE HOUSE

ART OFF PIKE ARTWORKS MURALS CITY FLEA COVINGTON RIVERFRONT MURALS DEVOU GRASS SECOND SUNDAY ON MAIN (OVER-THE-RHINE)

PLACES OF INTEREST

PERFORMING ARTS

CINCINNATI BELL CONNECTOR (STREETCAR) FAIRFIELD AVENUE (BELLEVUE) FINDLAY MARKET FOUNTAIN SQUARE MAINSTRASSE NEWPORT ON THE LEVEE VINE STREET/OVER-THE-RHINE

THE ARONOFF THE CARNEGIE ENSEMBLE THEATER KENTUCKY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA KNOW THEATRE PLAYHOUSE IN THE PARK STAINED GLASS THEATRE

Whenever you make it to any of these locations, make sure you share a photo on the NKY Chamber Facebook page! Also, use the hashtag #NKYPassport when sharing on social media!

WINTER 2017 | VOLUME 36 NUMBER 1

PAGE 21


AROUND THE CHAMBER

EMERGING 30

PAGE 22

NORTHERN KENTUCKY BUSINESS JOURNAL


PUBLIC AFFAIRS

DON’T MISS OUT! NKYCHAMBER.COM/EVENTS

WHERE WE STAND

WOMEN’S INITIATIVE, “ON THE ROAD”

DO YOU HAVE 60 MINUTES TO INVEST IN YOUR EMPLOYEES? To learn about “On the Road,” contact Gina Bath at (859) 578-6384 gbath@nkychamber.com

sponsored by:

WINTER 2017 | VOLUME 36 NUMBER 1

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HEALTH

It’s in the Bag! What if you could achieve your New Year’s resolutions to lose weight, eat better and save money with just a simple, reusable lunch bag? If you pack your lunch in the bag, then you may be able to do all three. By: Emily Gresham Wherle, CCPH Public Information Administrator Northern Kentucky Health Department

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NORTHERN KENTUCKY BUSINESS JOURNAL


“THE KEY TO PACKING A HEALTHY LUNCH IS PLANNING AHEAD,” said Monica Smith, Community Registered Dietitian with the Northern Kentucky Health Department. “Pack your lunch when you’re cleaning up from dinner the night before. The food is already out, and bringing last night’s leftovers makes planning ahead easier. In the morning, you can just grab your leftover container and go.” If you don’t have leftovers from dinner, frozen meals could be a healthy option. Smith recommends keeping entrees on hand like Lean Cuisine or Smart Ones, which tend to be lower in calories, fat and sodium. You can also keep a bag of frozen vegetables in the freezer, if space allows, to easily add to your frozen entrée. A healthy lunch should include a variety of foods — half should be fruits and vegetables, with servings of lean protein, whole grains and low-fat dairy. To get a variety of foods while watching portion sizes, use small containers — 1/2 to 1 cup in size.

“If you have space in the refrigerator at work, store some low-fat yogurt, 1 ounce cheese sticks, fruits and vegetables, salad dressing, hummus and a bag of lettuce there,” Smith said. “This gives you some options for healthy snacks or a light lunch on days when time is tight.” Healthy options that don’t require refrigeration include nuts or nut butters, dried or whole fruits, low-fat granola or protein bars and cans of low-fat or low-sodium soup.

“A lot of sugar or carbohydrates at lunch can make you tired,” said Smith. “It may be difficult to concentrate during your afternoon meetings. By the middle or late afternoon, your energy levels will plummet, and you might find yourself craving sugary snacks to balance things out. If this happens, have a healthy snack handy to gain some energy back or take a brief walk.” Bringing your lunch from home can save money also. A 2015 survey conducted by Visa found that American workers spend an average of $11 per meal to eat lunch out, compared to $6.30 per lunch brought from home. Switching from a meal out to a packed lunch just four days a week and eating out once could save you $977 over the course of the year.

Keep food at a safe temperature, too, by storing in your office refrigerator or freezer, or in insulted coolers with ice packs. Be sure to heat foods safely, making sure they reach 165 degrees Fahrenheit. Think about your drink, too. Choose tea, water or low-fat milk to round out the meal and avoid extra calories. The benefits of a nutritious lunch extend beyond your waistline. Healthy lunch choices can improve productivity.

“To improve your health in the longterm, start with small changes,” Smith said. “So whether your initial goal is to bring your lunch from home one day per week or swap out a sugary drink, think of each change as a step on a journey to a healthier lifestyle.” NKY

GOING OUT TO EAT? IF YOUR LUNCH PLANS INVOLVE A RESTAURANT MEAL, SMITH ALSO RECOMMENDS THE FOLLOWING TIPS FROM CHOOSEMYPLATE.GOV:

1.

2.

3.

WATCH YOUR PORTION SIZE —

AVOID THE BUFFET

FILL YOUR PLATE WITH FRUITS AND VEGGIES —

So you don’t overeat, take home leftovers for another meal or split a meal with a friend or order an appetizer or lunch portion instead.

Order a healthy option off the menu instead.

WINTER 2017 | VOLUME 36 NUMBER 1

Stir-fries, kabobs or vegetarian menu items usually have more vegetables. Select fruits as a side dish or dessert.

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HEALTH

Stand For It.

LUXOR MANUAL ADJUSTABLE HEIGHT DESK WORKWHILEWALKING.COM

By: Linda Poynter and Emily Gresham Wherle Northern Kentucky Health Department

Standing workstations can make employees healthier and more productive IF YOU KNOW YOU SPEND TOO MUCH TIME SITTING during your work day, please stand up. More and more American workers have jobs that involve sitting for long periods of time, either at a computer or in meetings. Research from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and others has demonstrated that prolonged sitting can have a negative impact on health, increasing the risk for cardiovascular disease, obesity and some cancers. One solution to the issue is the use of standing work stations, which allow employees to complete tasks like working on a computer in a standing, rather than seated, position. This summer and fall, employees at the Northern Kentucky Health Department have had the opportunity to try a Veridesk, which allows users to adjust their computer and monitor for either seated or standing use, for two months and then offer feedback. The experiences have been positive so far. “The standing desk is great, especially after lunch when I tend to be a bit tired,” said Tammy Foxworthy, Support Services Coordinator at the Health Department. “It’s also good to stand and march at my desk to get some circulation going. Footwear can be a bit tricky, though. Standing on casual Fridays in gym shoes is much easier than Monday-Thursday when I have to wear dress shoes.” A study by the CDC found that when workers are equipped with sit-stand workstations, prolonged PAGE 26

sitting is reduced, moods improve, energy is increased, and workers were 78% more likely to report a pain-free day. The CDC trends have been found to be true among Health Department staff who have used standing work stations, said Kelly Schwegman, Health Educator for Physical Activity and Nutrition, and coordinator of the pilot project. “Our staff with standing desks say they experienced less back pain when they were able to stand for bouts of time; they ended up getting more steps in their day because they were already up, so it made it easier to move around; and their energy levels improved,” Schwegman said. “Our program provides the standing desks for eight weeks at a time, and many staff have been sad to see their turn with it end.” Standing desks are just one component of the worksite wellness program at the Health Department. The agency has implemented a wellness policy for food at meetings and in break rooms, offers biometric screenings and flu vaccines, and holds regular wellness challenges for staff. Northern Kentucky companies who are interested in building a culture of wellness within their organization can participate in the LiveWell NKY worksite initiative, which offers companies a framework to implement health and wellness programs. For more information, contact Schwegman at Kelly.Schwegman@nkyhealth.org. NKY NORTHERN KENTUCKY BUSINESS JOURNAL


Women’s Initiative Sponsored by:

Annual Breakfast Wednesday, January 18, 2017 7:00am - 9:30am Northern Kentucky Convention Center This year’s keynote speaker is Laura Stack, President and CEO of The Productivity Pro, Inc. NKYChamber.com/events

Wednesday January 18, 2017 The Carnegie in Covington, KY

Title Sponsor

Proceeds Benefit RYL

Event Sponsor

NKYChamber.com/events

Workforce NKY

NKY Chamber Small Business Academy

Powered by:

Sponsored by:

Its Back! HR 100

Designed for NKY Businesses

Designed to focus on workforce development & talent acquisition.

Classes Begin January 2017!

Register today! • Jan. 17th, 2017 Creating Workforce • March 23rd, 2017 Pipeline Management To learn more contact Tiffany Osborne at tosborne@nkychamber.com or (859) 578-6396

Register at NKYChamber.com/events Or contact Debby Shipp at dshipp@nkychamber.com or (859) 578-6385


EMERGING 30

Emerging 30 Emerging 30 is comprised of local businesses making a significant economic impact on the community based on annual revenue growth. Winners receive public acknowledgment of their achievements and are encouraged to offer their guidance to help other small businesses grow during events tailored specifically to Emerging 30 designees.

CRU-CUTTERS have found their way on the Emerging 30 list for the last 5 years and are prepped for more growth to come. The company is a full service landscape design, construction, & maintenance firm serving the Northern Kentucky Region. Chris Cook attributes their growth and success to sticking to their “roots”. “We strive to provide an excellent quality product and a great, long-term relationship with all of our clients.” While 90% of their competitors subcontract lawn and plant care out, they feel that controlling this service in-house gives them a huge advantage in the industry. “Being a one stop shop allows our clients to rest easy knowing every aspect of their landscaping is being handled with care.” Growth has not been without its challenges. “One of our biggest challenges is finding the right people”, explains COO, Tanner Prince. “We believe the smartest business decision you can make is to hire qualified people.” “Managing a rapidly growing enterprise can be a very tough and stressful Job.” Tanner goes on to say there are three main things that have allowed them to keep up with their growth. First, making smart choices when it comes to buying equipment/materials. Second, hiring WINTER 2017 | VOLUME 36 NUMBER 1

the best people in the industry, giving their people the tools they need to be successful, and allowing them to manage their job without micro-managing them. Finally to not be afraid to take chances. Outside of doing a great job for their clients, Cru-Cutter’s attributes their growth to the uptick in the economy and the Emerging 30 Designation. They have seen that new building projects throughout Northern Kentucky have increased, which gives them an influx of opportunities for new work. Tanner believes, that their customers have become as proud of having the E30 designation award, as CruCutters is for the company to receive it. Cru-Cutters’ brand promise has fortunately remained the same since starting the company and it looks like we may be seeing them again on this list for a 6th time next year. SUBMITTED BY: CONRAD CULBERTSON ROEDING INSURANCE GROUP

WALT’S HITCHING POST, situated on Madison Ave in Fort Wright and has been a favorite family gathering space since 1942. Owners Bronson Trebbi and Donny Arnsperger undertook a complete

remodel/rebrand from 2012-2013. While preserving the names and legacies of Walt Ballanger and Billy Melton, Walt’s focused on capturing more of the business community. “Our business was built on years and years of relationships. Our service is sincere and we treat you like family at Walt’s. We not only want to be known as a social place for the family, but for the business community as well,” said Arnsperger. Under direction of Chef Neal Smith and GM David “Sanchez” Wilson, Walt’s is the Navy Seals of training when it comes to waiters and service assistants. Each week the entire staff fine-tunes their skills on the variety of dishes, wines and bourbons that are offered. “Our business continues to grow because our guests recognize the value of our service. And our service is all about the guest. Whatever they want, we try to do it for them.” Living up to its founder’s names and legacies, Walt’s pulls out all the stops with attentive service and traditional favorites such as finely curated steaks, open flamed ribs and an extensive seafood selection. Not to mention, their elaborate bourbon and wine selections. SUBMITTED BY: BOB WHALEN CK ASH AND ASSOCIATES

PAGE 29


WOMEN’S INITIATIVE PROFILE

How Effective Are You? An Interview with Laura Stack

By: Carla Landon Marketing & Communications Manager NKY Chamber of Commerce

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NORTHERN KENTUCKY BUSINESS JOURNAL


NOW THAT THE HOLIDAYS ARE OVER and our New Year’s resolutions are in full swing, what are you doing to be more effective? Effectiveness, according to Laura Stack, President and CEO of The Productivity Pro, Inc., is identifying and achieving the best objectives for your organization—doing the right things. But how can we become more motivated? Stack has identified several tools that she uses and shares with others on how to fight procrastination and remain productive. WI: HAS IT EVER BEEN HARD FOR YOU TO STAY MOTIVATED? LS: Yes. Sometimes it can be it can be supremely hard to get up off your “buts” and get moving—as we’ve all discovered at some point in our careers. We all have our low points, where it’s hard to believe we can ever regain old ground, much less rise to new peaks of productivity. I’ve been there myself—yes even as an author and noted authority in the productivity space—I’ve had days when my energy and mood have been at such a low ebb that it was hard not to crawl back into bed at 10:00 a.m.

But my responsibilities drove me to get moving, and once I was moving, it was easy to keep going. An object in motion tends to stay in motion—but you must invest a certain amount of energy to put it into motion in the first place.

WI: WHAT DO YOU DO TO FIGHT PROCRASTINATION? LS: One of the techniques that work for me when I’m in a state of inertia is to harness my impulses. When I think of something I should do, I can use that “impulse energy” to get started on a task immediately and use the resulting momentum to keep moving. If I don’t start doing something right away, even just opening a Word document or a tab online, I often lose the desire to do it. Conversely, sometimes when I get started, my energy picks up, and 5 minutes turns into 10 minutes, and all of a sudden, I’m working on a difficult project. WI: WHAT DO YOU FEEL THE ROLE OF IMPULSE IS IN PRODUCTIVITY? LS: In my experience, you have 30 seconds or less to react to an impulse, or it goes away. If you fail to take advantage of it, your body and brain allocate the energy meant to activate the impulse to something else. Sometimes that’s

a good thing; but more often it derails your productivity. If you use your impulse energy to get started within a few seconds, it’s easier to keep skating along on existing momentum and, therefore, maximize your productivity. WI: WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON TO-DO-LISTS? LS: I believe that reading a to-do-list is effective and helps with procrastination especially when you don’t have the energy to muster on something really difficult. When you look at a to-do list and have an impulse to work on a project you’ve been putting off, you’d better get moving before you talk yourself out of it. It’s always best to break down large products into smaller tasks. It starts you moving, encouraging you to build momentum toward other tasks, breaking you out of the self-defeating practice cycle of procrastination. WI: HOW DO YOU MAKE THE MOST OF IMPULSE TO STAY PRODUCTIVE? LS: I’ve practiced a specific impulse rule for years: “If you think it, ink it.” I learned it from my father, who always carried a small notebook and pen in his shirt pocket. Whenever he had an interesting idea, he immediately wrote it down. Partly that was due to the slippery-fish nature of most ideas; if you don’t hook them right away, most will escape you. Partly it was because if you keep reminding yourself about an idea constantly, just so you remember it, you distract yourself so much your productivity suffers. When I’m traveling and have my phone, I use the app “Touchdown for Mail” by Symantec (iPhone or Android) and Google Voice to dictate a task right into the app, which syncs with my Outlook, so the idea will be on my task list the next time I’m on my laptop. For more about Laura’s unique take on organization and time management, join us on Wednesday, January 18 for the Women’s Initiative Annual Breakfast. During the breakfast you will gain insight about managing productivity and improving workflow, organization and time management. Laura Stack, MBA, CSP, CPAE is President and CEO of The Productivity Pro, Inc. Laura’s presentation will focus on her most recent book, Doing the Right Things Right: How the Effective Executive Spends Time. NKY TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE BREAKFAST AND TO REGISTER GO TO NKYCHAMBER.COM/EVENTS.

THE BOOK Doing the Right Things Right details precisely how today’s leaders and managers can obtain profitable, productive results by managing the intersection of two critical values: effectiveness and efficiency. Effectiveness, Stack says, is identifying and achieving the best objectives for your organization — doing the right things. Efficiency is accomplishing them with the least amount of time, effort, and cost — doing things right. If you’re not clear on both, you’re wasting your time.

WINTER 2017 | VOLUME 36 NUMBER 1

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MEMBER MILESTONES

Member Milestones

ZIEGLER & SCHNEIDER, PSC is pleased to announce that attorney Justin A. Sanders has joined the firm. Justin spent the last 12 years practicing at his family’s law firm in Covington before moving to Ziegler & Schneider. Justin’s primary practice focus is civil litigation. His practice also includes business and corporate law, real estate, employment and labor law, and criminal defense. Justin is involved in a number of local community organizations, including the Northern Kentucky Chamber’s Business Advocacy Council. Justin is licensed in federal and state courts in Kentucky and Ohio. He can be reached by telephone at (859) 292-4281, or by email at jasanders@zslaw.com.

PAGE 32

ERIGO EMPLOYER SOLUTIONS is pleased to welcome Jennifer McDermott as their new Payroll Specialist. Jennifer comes to Erigo from Staffmark where she worked as a Senior Payroll Consultant. While at Staffmark, Jennifer was responsible for coordinating all payroll activities for the three largest national accounts, with total operations in ten states. Jennifer processed and reconciled payroll for as many as 1,000 employees per week. Jennifer brings over 16 years of payroll experience to Erigo’s payroll team.

THE NORTHERN KENTUCKY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE welcomes Gina Bath as Vice President of Women’s Initiative. As Vice President of Women’s Initiative, Bath will continue to grow this successful program of the Chamber that is committed to helping are employers meet the rising professional development goals for their employees. “The Women’s Initiative is one of the most successful parts of the Chamber. With Gina’s enthusiasm, talent and experience, I am confident that she and our outstanding volunteers will take the Women’s Initiative to an even higher level of success,” explains Trey Grayson, President/CEO NKY Chamber of Commerce. Bath earned a BA in Radio/TV from Northern Kentucky University and is a member of the NKU Alumni Association. She has experience working in outreach, fundraising and affinity programs at places including Northern Kentucky University and Mount St. Joseph University.

NORTHERN KENTUCKY BUSINESS JOURNAL


Mike Becker, a member of the NORTHERN KENTUCKY ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® (NKAR), was installed at the Convention as the 2017 president of the Kentucky Association of REALTORS®. Becker has been licensed in real estate for over 13 years and is an agent with RE/MAX Affiliates in Florence. He served as president and treasurer of NKAR and is currently serving as president of the NKAR Multiple Listing Service (MLS). In 2013, Becker was named REALTOR® of the Year for NKAR. He serves on the executive committee for both NKAR and the MLS and has given his time to many of the local committees such as governmental affairs, education and public relations. On the state level, he has served as treasurer, board member, delegate body member and on many committees such as economic development, legal affairs and strategic planning. He has also been a Trustee for the Kentucky Real Estate Education Foundation and the REALTORS® Political Action Committee. Becker has earned designations for the Certified Residential Specialist, Graduate, REALTOR® Institute and the Senior Real Estate Specialist. He was named a Five Star REALTOR® by the Cincinnati Magazine and is a member of the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce as well as the Southeast Indiana Board of REALTORS® and the Greater Cincinnati MLS. Becker received both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in business administration from Thomas More College.

ERIGO EMPLOYER SOLUTIONS is also proud to welcome their new Human Resources Assistant, Eunita Wilson. In May of 2013, Eunita decided to embark on a new career path after several years of experience in the healthcare field as a Radiation Therapist. After obtaining a Master of Science in Human Resources Management from Stony Brook University, Eunita gained valuable human resources experience with internships at 1-800 Flowers and Amneal Pharmaceuticals. A Chicago native and graduate of Howard University, Eunita brings an energetic and diligent work ethic to the Erigo human resources team and will be an extraordinary asset as Erigo continues to grow.

— SHARE YOUR GOOD NEWS!

All NKY Chamber members are invited to share announcements & personal achievements in the Milestones column. Send Milestones to clandon@nkychamber.com

WINTER 2017 | VOLUME 36 NUMBER 1

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RIBBON CUTTINGS

ABRA AUTO BODY & GLASS 5980 Merchants Street | Florence, KY 41042 | 859-721-2354 | abraauto.com

PICTURED: Amy McCabe, L&N Federal Credit Union- Sponsor; Becky McGrath, ABRA Auto Body & Glass; Trey Grayson, NKY Chamber President; Tim Flanagan, General Manager-ABRA Auto Body & Glass; Randy Trahan, Market VP-ABRA Auto Body & Glass; Chad Agoston, ABRA Auto Body & Glass; Dan Stafford, Enterprise; Jeff Rensing, Enterprise; Josh Hunt, City of Florence; Rick Kroner, Kroner Towing; JR Schneider, Allied Financial SolutionsNKY Chamber Ambassador.

ACTIVE DAY OF FORT THOMAS 90 Alexandria Pike, Suite 4-7 | Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 | 859-442-7000 | seniorcarectrs.com/center

PICTURED: Ellen Barnett, L&N Federal Credit Union-Sponsor; Active Day members & families; Tina Brooks, Center Director-Active Day; Tabatha Haag, Staff-Active Day; Judy Pogue, Comey & Shepherd Realtors-NKY Chamber Ambassador; Trey Grayson, NKY Chamber President.

ADVANCE AUTO PARTS 242 Mary Grubbs Highway | Walton, KY 41094 | 849-449-4051 | advanceautoparts.com

PICTURED: Kevin Garrett, United Community Bank-NKY Chamber Ambassador; Kevin Galbaugh, Advance Auto Parts; Trey Grayson, NKY Chamber President; Advance Auto Parts Employees; Joyce Bryan, City of Walton; Ellen Barnett, L&N Federal Credit Union-Sponsor; Kevin Richardson, Addiction Council Services-NKY Chamber Ambassador.

ALL-STAR ACADEMY GYMNASTICS 419 Licking Pike | Wilder, KY 41071 | 859-393-1686| all-staracademygymnastics.com

PICTURED: Jeff Loy, PEI–NKY Chamber Ambassador; Trey Grayson, NKY Chamber President; Ellen Williams, All-Star Academy Gymnastics; Maddie Williams, All-Star Academy Gymnastics; Mike Williams, All-Star Academy Gymnastics; Scott Stewart, Dwyer Insurance – NKY Chamber Ambassador; Ellen Barnett, L&N Federal Credit Union-Sponsor.

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NORTHERN KENTUCKY BUSINESS JOURNAL


RIBBON CUTTINGS

BEHRINGER-CRAWFORD MUSEUM 1600 Montague Rd | Covington, KY 41011 | 859-491-4003 | bcmuseum.org

PICTURED: JR Schneider, Allied Financial Solutions-NKY Chamber Ambassador; Gary Johnston, VP Behringer-Crawford Museum Board of Trustees; Jason French, Collections Care Volunteer and Brewing Exhibit Contractor, Behringer-Crawford Museum Maridith Yahl, Curator, Behringer-Crawford Museum; Mary Ann Courtoy, Trustee Behringer-Crawford Museum Board of Trustees; Laurie Risch, Executive Director, Behringer-Crawford Museum; Chuck Korzenborn, Kenton County Sheriff; Dan Hammons, Shared Wellness-NKY Chamber Ambassador.

BEHRINGER-CRAWFORD MUSEUM 25TH ANNIVERSARY OF HOLIDAY TOY TRAINS 1600 Montague Rd | Covington, KY 41011 859-491-4003 | bcmuseum.org

PICTURED: John Lange, Behringer-Crawford Museum volunteer; Richard Carr, Behringer-Crawford Museum volunteer; Mr. Red Legs, Cincinnati Reds; Tom Vogt, Behringer-Crawford Museum volunteer.

BURGER KING 3049 Dixie Highway | Edgewood, KY 41018 | gpshospitality.com

PICTURED: Bearcat, University of Cincinnati; Burger King Employees, Mario Nocero, GPS Hospitality; Ellen Barnett, L&N Federal Credit Union-Sponsor; Tyson Hermes, Erlanger Mayor; Ron Lovan, NKY Water District;

COMPASS SELF STORAGE 6307 Licking Pike | Cold Springs, KY 41076 859-572-0105 | compassselfstorage.com

Ribbon Cuttings Sponsored by:

— LET US HELP YOU PROMOTE!

PICTURED: Annette Oldiges, L&N Federal Credit Union–Sponsor; Marylou Greenlee, Compass Self Storage; Trey Grayson, NKY Chamber President; Mike Laubecher, Compass Self Storage; Mark Melson, Compass Self Storage; Keara Kuhlmann, Compass Self Storage; Dan Hammons, Shared WellnessNKY Chamber Ambassador.

WINTER 2017 | VOLUME 36 NUMBER 1

We want to help you promote and celebrate your ribbon cutting ceremony for your new facility, expansion, anniversary celebration or open house! We’ll bring our trademark giant blue scissors, a group of Chamber ambassadors, and a camera to capture the excitement of your special day. Call Lynn Abeln at (859) 578-6390 to schedule your FREE ribbon cutting today!

PAGE 351


RIBBON CUTTINGS

FORCHT BANK

TRANSITIONS, INC.

502 Madison Ave | Covington, KY 41011 859-334-9383 | forchtbank.com

1650 Russell Street | Covington, KY 41011 859-491-4435 | transitionsky.org

PICTURED: Larry Nitardy, ComAssist-NKY Chamber Ambassador; Kyle Newman, Forcht Bank; Annette Oldiges, L&N Federal Credit Union-Sponsor; Amanda King, Forcht Bank; Trey Grayson, NKY Chamber President; Kristin Reed, Forcht Bank; Chip Regenbogen, Forcht Bank; Steve Brunson, Forcht Bank; Kevin Richardson, Addiction Services Council-NKY Chamber Ambassador.

PICTURED: Betty Schumacher, FOPNA & Covington Resident; Judy Pogue, Comey & Shepherd Realtors–NKY Chamber Ambassador; Dr. Owen Nichols, NorthKey; Marie Schenkel, Transitions’ Advisory Board; Jim Beiting, Transitions CEO; Steve Brunson, Forcht Bank–NKY Chamber Ambassador; Trey Grayson, NKY Chamber President; Juanita Kylander, Transitions’ Board Member; Ellen Barnett, L&N Federal Credit Union–Sponsor.

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NORTHERN KENTUCKY BUSINESS JOURNAL


EVENTS

Events LOOKING FOR MORE EVENTS? NKYCHAMBER.COM/EVENTS

Northern Kentucky Business Journal is published quarterly by: Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, Inc. 300 Buttermilk Pike Suite 330 P.O. Box 17416 Ft. Mitchell, KY 41017 859-578-8800 nkychamber.com The Business Journal is a benefit of membership and included in membership fees. Annual subscription rate for nonmembers is $24. Periodicals Postage Paid USPS-548630 at Covington, KY. Postmaster: Please send address changes to the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, 300 Buttermilk Pike, Suite 330, P.O. Box 17416 , Ft. Mitchell, KY 41017-0416. Subscribers: Please send address changes by e-mail to info@nkychamber.com. © 2017, The Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, Inc. and by the individual authors. All rights reserved. CEO/Publisher Trey Grayson Vice President Public Affairs & Communication Scott Sedmak | ssedmak@nkychamber.com Marketing / Communications Manager Carla Landon | clandon@nkychamber.com Vice President Membership – Sponsorship Sales Lynn Abeln | labeln@nkychamber.com Director, Sponsor Investments Diana McGlade | dmcglade@nkychamber.com Chief Administrative Officer Ruth Eger | reger@nkychamber.com Chamber Communications Committee Rachel Folz, Meredith Fossett, Mindy Kershner, Amanda Nagelsisen, Bill Powell, Kelly Rose, Katie Scoville, Emily Gresham Wherle Designers Steve Fine | stevef@artboyanimation.com Chris Ritter | christopheraritter@gmail.com

WINTER 2017 | VOLUME 36 NUMBER 1

JANUARY: — 1/5

Health & Wellness: 2017 Wellness Kickoff

1/9

Wellness Challenge begins (1/9-2/17)

1/10

Eggs ‘N Issues: 2017 Preview of the General Assembly

1/17

Small Business Academy: Microsoft Excel Level 1 Class Starts

1/17

Small Business Academy: Active Listening Class Starts

1/17

HR 100: Creating Workforce for 2017

1/18

Talent & HR: Peer Exchange: Small Business Practices

1/18

Women’s Initiative Annual Breakfast

1/18

RYL Fundraiser: The Music Man

1/24

Sales Workshop: 5 Tips to Boost Sales Using Social Media

1/30

Women’s Initiative CONNECT Hour – Woodhouse Day Spa

FEBRUARY: — 2/2

The Ultimate Workshop for Business Owners: Taxes, Succession & Estate Planning

2/14

Eggs ‘N Issues: Economics of Wellness

2/15

Business Growth: Soft Skills Workshop

2/21

Sales Workshop: What’s the Difference Between Marketing, Advertising, Public Relations and Branding

2/21

Small Business Academy: Professional Communication

2/23

Getting the Most from Your Chamber Membership

2/27

Women’s Initiative CONNECT Hour – Hotel Covington

MARCH: — 3/1

Talent & HR Peer Exchange: TBD

3/6

Small Business Academy: Dynamic Presentations

3/10

Small Business Academy: Microsoft Excel Level II

3/14

Health & Wellness Wrap Party

3/21

Eggs ‘N Issues: FC Cincinnati Soccer

3/23

HR 100: Recruiting and Pipeline Management

3/27

Women’s Initiative CONNECT Hour – Dave & Buster’s

3/29

Business IMPACT Awards

3/29

Sales Workshop: TBD

PAGE 37


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NORTHERN KENTUCKY BUSINESS JOURNAL


DINING

What’s Old is New Again By: Rachel Folz Director of Digital Marketing Cerkl

A look at the cocktail scene in NKY What was old is new again. This idea is most apparent in the beautifully reutilized space of Hotel Covington’s Coppin’s Restaurant & Bar. If you care to imbibe, the bar offers a craft cocktail menu with old and new favorites alike, including the Coppin’s Old Fashioned. The drink is crafted with a blend of two Bourbons guaranteed to delight any palate. “We wanted to showcase what we think a great blended whiskey should taste like,” said Billy Grise, Food & Beverage Director for Hotel Covington. “We also use a type of bitters that are citrus and floral forward which really enlighten our old fashioned.” You could try to make it at home, or leave it to the pros at Hotel Covington. Coppin’s Restaurant & Bar is open 7 days a week. Cheers!

COPPIN’S OLD FASHIONED 1 oz Old Forester Bourbon 1 oz Woodford Reserve Bourbon 1/4 oz Demerara Syrup 2 dashes of Bittercube Trinity Bitters 3 dashes of Seltzer

WINTER 2017 | VOLUME 36 NUMBER 1

PAGE 39


“ I wasn’t going

anywhere but St. E

for my heart valve surgery.” — Joe Koester

Joe Koester lived with a heart defect for 40 years before his aortic valve needed to be replaced. He trusted the expert surgeons at the St. Elizabeth Heart & Vascular Institute to implant a ceramic valve that repaired his heart and restored his health.These days, Joe feels great and says he never once thought of going to Ohio for his care. St. Elizabeth: recognized for heart care excellence by U.S. News & World Report. Live better. Live longer. stelizabeth.com/heart | Extraordinary St. E

Profile for Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce

NKY Business Journal Winter 2017  

Official Magazine of the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce

NKY Business Journal Winter 2017  

Official Magazine of the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce

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