Bucks County Bar Association Fall 2022

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The Superior Court Comes to Bucks

Friends for Heroes A Conversation with Judge Clyde Waite, Jr.


contents FALL 2022

CONTACT INFO President Julie D. Goldstein Vice President/President Elect Lawrence R. Scheetz, Jr. Secretary R. Tyler Tomlinson

BCBA events

The Second Annual Red Mass By Jessica A. Pritchard, Esquire

This year’s Mass was to have again been officiated by Father Vincent Guest. Father Guest is a former attorney who worked is the offices of the former Governor Bob Casey. He was ordained as a priest in 2012 and now serves as a pastor of Sacred Heart Church in Camden, New Jersey. However, a COVID diagnosis the day prior

BCBA events

Summer of ’22:

Bluegrass at the TileWorks By Scott L. Feldman

Immediate Past President Sean M. Gresh Past Presidents’ Representative David J. Truelove Board of Directors Erin K. Aronson Brendan M. Callahan Susan E. Dardes Jeffrey G. DiAmico Kimberly Litzke Christopher S. Mahoney Bianca A. Roberto Francis J. Sullivan Tiffany Thomas-Smith Jason R. Weiss Megan Weiler Melanie J. Wender Writs Editor Melanie J. Wender Writs Photographer Dylan Gilheany Bar Association Office Greg Nardi, Executive Director 135 East State Street Doylestown, PA 18901 215.348.9413 • www.bucksbar.org email submissions to WritsEditor@BucksBar.org PUBLISHER Hoffmann Publishing Group, Inc. 2669 Shillington Road, #438 Sinking Spring, PA 19608 610.685.0914 x201 HoffPubs.com

Advertising Contact Tracy Hoffmann 610-685-0914 x201 • tracy@hoffpubs.com

For the second year, on October 4, 2022, members of the Bucks County legal community gathered at Our

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In the United States, the Red Mass tradition was inaugurated in 1928 at Saint Andrew’s Church located in New York City. Since then, the Red Mass has been celebrated increasingly in communities throughout the United States.

For the second year, on October 4, 2022, members of the Bucks County legal community gathered at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church in celebration of the “Red Mass.” A Red Mass is a Mass celebrated annually in the Roman Catholic Church for all members of the legal profession, regardless of religious affiliation: judges, lawyers, law school professors, law students, and government officials, marking the opening of the judicial year. The Red Mass originated in Rome, Paris and London centuries ago. The name exemplifies the scarlet robes worn by the royal judges who were then in attendance and now the red vestments worn by the celebrant priest.

Treasurer Jeremy D. Puglia

The Second Annual Red Mass

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Summertime done, come and gone, my, oh, my.

Bluegrass at the TileWorks For many of us, it was the first Summer since 2019 in which we could gather, travel, visit and be entertained

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there today much as they were by its founder, Henry Chapman Mercer, beginning in the early 1900’s. And

For many of us, it was the first Summer since 2019 in which we could gather, travel, visit and be entertained

now, the TileWorks is home to a unique and wonderful without worrying too much about the dreaded virus. The Superior Court totheBucks acoustic live music series. The weather wasComes mostly cooperative, and Jersey By Melanie J. Wender, Esquire

beaches and Pocono mountain lakes were welcoming.

On six summer Sunday afternoons, up to 500 music fans gathered on the sloping lawn outside the TileWorks and heard national touring bluegrass bands. All of the concerts were family friendly, with kids getting in for free. Attendees were welcome to bring their own food and beverages, along with their chairs and blankets. In addition, there was some food and drink for sale, and an ice cream truck! The series opened in June with renowned vocalist Danny Paisley and the Southern Grass. Additional shows followed, most featuring a headliner with an opening act. Perhaps the largest turnout of the season was in August for Dan Tyminski, a guitarist and

As summers tend to do, the summer of 2022 went by On September 20th and September all too quickly. 21st of this year, the Pennsylvania Superior Court made its way to Bucks County to Now, the days are shorter and the leaves have fallen. preside over oral argument in our much So, throw another log on the fire and lets look back at a beloved Justice Center. Courtroom 410 true highlight of the Summer of ’22. was suddenly very busy, with lawyers coming in and going out, all for the It is hard to imagine a more quintessential Bucks purpose of arguing in front of Justices County setting than the courtyard and backdrop towers Lazarus (presiding judge), Just Mary Murray, and Judge Daniel McCaffery.

of the Moravian Pottery and Tile Works in Doylestown. The TileWorks is a National Historic Landmark and

working History Museum. Tiles continue to be handmade The Justices presided over courtroom 410 for two days and they had a jam-packed schedule of oral arguments. I 14 was one of the attorneys who took time out of my day simply to go over to the courthouse to watch. It is interesting to see what questions the Justices ask and The Michener Museum provided a great backdrop for how the lawyers remain on their toes, this event, with its amazing outdoor space that resulted in quickly addressing each question. Additionally, it is also a spectacular cocktail hour. The dinner was, as expected, clear from the questions that the Justices ask that they exceptional, with not a bad option on the menu. Perhaps each took the time to read the briefs and transcripts for the most important part of this dinner was the people each case in front of them. I cannot imagine the time present. It was the opportunity to learn more about dedicated to those tasks, but it is what the job requires. the Superior Court and develop connections with these justices who we are so rarely in front of. It was also a With that said, the Superior Court originally intended great opportunity to spend time with our colleagues to come to Bucks County in 2020, but the pandemic had and continue to develop those relationships. In fact, as other ideas. As a result, it was not until 2022 that this soon as I was able, I was up and about, mingling with event could finally occur. As such, it had to be celebrated my colleagues. As a result, I had a fascinating converwith a dinner at the Michener Museum in Doylestown. In attendance, were several of our Common Pleas judges, sation with John Hart, Esquire where I learned about his including Judge Bateman, our president judge. Also career in the Navy. in attendance, were many of the leaders in our Bar Arlene Simolike, Esquire Association. Our current president, Julie Goldstein was The point of this dinnerBy was to celebrate the Superior there, as was our immediate past president, Sean Gresh. Court and the appellate process as it is part of the justice It was truly the Who’s Who of the legal community of system that we all work so tirelessly to uphold. I hope Bucks County. that the Superior Court returns to Bucks County soon to hold Court once again. All the Justices are more than welcome. 

The Superior Court Comes to Bucks On September 20th and September 21st of this year, the Pennsylvania Superior Court made its way to Bucks

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Friends for Heroes

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Friends for Heroes The Friends for Heroes Foundation is a non-profit group started by six friends in 2015, including our own

................................................................................................. Page 18 features Jeff says the idea for the group came from a meeting

The Friends for Heroes Foundation is a non-profit

at the Buck Hotel with his co-founders Brian Ruhling, group started by six friends in 2015, including our own Reflecting on acolleague, Distinquish Career: Dennis McDonald, Steve Bross, John Conzelman and bar association Jeff Liebmann, Esq. Part of

A Conversation with Judge Clyde Waite, Jr.

Chuck Hutt. They had run a charity golf outing for a the Foundation’s mission statement is “They will not be deceased serviceman’s family a few years prior. The forgotten…not ever”, which pertains to local military serviceman was known to Chuck Hutt, himself a combat veterans from all branches of the service, and their veteran and officer. At the Buck Hotel, they all decided families, which this group aims to help in many ways. they could, and should, help veterans on a regular basis The help rendered can range from buying groceries for via similar annual golf outings, donations and other a veteran to assisting in meeting a mortgage payment. By Susan Dardes, Esquire fund-raising efforts. The legal paper work was completed The group has even helped in the building and accomand filed. modative modeling of a homeWhat to make it easier discussion for a a fascinating I had recently withThe Friends for Heroes Foundation came into being 2015 as a 501(c) (3) non-profit group. Chuck seriously wounded veteran of the war in Afghanistan, toJr., reflecting the Honorable Clyde Waite, oninhis Hutt and Jeff navigate his living environmenttenure in comfort and in ease. This of Common as a Judge the Court Pleas in Liebmann serve as Co-Chairmen. veteran is a double amputee, who also partially BucksisCounty, and hisblind, retirement at years end. To achieve its mission Friends for Heroes needs funds. as a result of service in Logare Province in Afghanistan. I started out our nearly hour long discussion by Their principal fund-raising event is their annual golf asking him if he always wanted to beouting, a lawyerto usually held every August. Significant sums are

Reflecting on a Distinquished Career: A Conversation with Judge Clyde Waite, Jr.

which he swiftly and definitively said -“absolutely not!”. He admitted that he had little in the way of 18 ambitions during his teenage years.

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The Judge was born and raised in McKeesport, PA, in the far western and (then) very depressed area of Pennsylvania. He was one of nine children raised by a single parent as his father passed away when the Judge was only four years old.

BCBA events

His mother, who could neither read nor write, worked as a maid for the family of one of his McKeesport High classmates, while the Judge tended to their yard work. The Waites were very poor, fortunate to have food on the table. His high school guidance counselor told him that he was “not college material,” and steered him to commercial classes, which included typing and home economics, among other stereotypical courses for young girls. And, in fact, he was the only boy in most ofBy: hisElaine classes. T. Yandrisevits

Bench Bar Conference 2022: Reconnecting at the Sweetest Place on Earth

Chocolate World, or enjoy a beer at the Troegs brewery The 2022 Bench Bar Conference was one for The morning after his high school graduation, before reconnecting at the Hershey Gardens for dinner. the record books! Over one hundred and sixty BCBA in 1962, he took a train to Washington DC., Attendees were able to stroll around the rose gardens members, sponsors, and guests returned to the beautiful to interview for a typist’s job at the Library of and observe tropical butterflies in the Butterfly Atrium Hotel Hershey for networking, continuing education Congress. He had literally left his luggage at before enjoying homestyle dinner and desserts. The classes, good food, and relaxation over three spectacular Union Station, and was hired on the spot. By day’s chocolate peanut butter pie was a hit! late fall days. end, with about $40.00 in his pocket, he found a room in which to live. About a month into his new The Conference wrapped up on Saturday morning Upon check-in on Thursday, attendees were with Breakfast with the Bench. The Judges of the Bucks encouraged to “Get this Paw-ty Started!” by BCBA 20 County Bench provided a town hall discussion about mascot, The Bear, and 2022 Conference mascot, Riley, Court updates and procedures. The Judges also gave both outfitted in their finest Hershey’s attire. Presenadvice and insight by answering questions about their tations by USI Affinity and PNC Private Bank allowed backgrounds and experiences. attendees to earn CLE credits right away, and everyone got to team up with their friends and colleagues to The 2022 Bench Bar Conference would not have been showcase their competitive sides at Legal Quizzo such a success without the participation of the Bucks presented by the Young Lawyers Division. Attendees County Bench, CLE participants, conference sponsors, enjoyed catching up with each other and meeting new and BCBA members. Over one hundred and sixty people members during cocktail hour and dinner, followed by attended the Conference, which set a record for an fire pits, glow golf, and dessert at Harvest and the Blue offsite BCBA event. More than a dozen law clerks and Mountain Patio. It wouldn’t be a visit to Hershey without young lawyers received scholarships to attend thanks to making s’mores and eating chocolate! the Young Lawyers Division, Women Lawyers Division, Orphans’ Court Section, Business Law Section, Family Plenary session speaker, Alicia Rainwater from Law Section, Civil Litigation Section, and Bucks County The Center for Generational Kinetics, opened Friday Court Administration. In addition, the BCBA was able morning’s sessions with an energetic and fast-paced to put on such a great Conference thanks to the recorddiscussion of the challenges and concerns in inter-gensetting generosity of more than forty sponsors. erational workplaces. Alicia provided real-world tips for connecting and understanding colleagues across Finally, a special thanks to BCBA President, Julie generations, particularly with Gen Z entering the Goldstein; the Bench Bar Conference Committee; and workforce. Attendees then split up for additional CLE especially to Greg Nardi, Emily Norman, Barb Sauers, sessions on topics including cannabis law, emotional Kelly Myers, Kristen Norcross, and Dylan Gilheany of the intelligence, estate “horrorEsquire stories,” round table By Nicole O’Hara, BCBA for the many, many hours of work to make the discussions with the Bench, and a family law update Conference so sweet!  from the Bench. ThankPeople you toof the Criminal Law Section, various ages and Orphans’ Court Section, Women Lawyers Division professions flocked to fill the main and Diversity Committee, Business Law Civil meeting room at Section, the Bar Association See pictures from the Litigation Section, and on Family Law Section for20th all the Thursday, October to Bench Bar Conference work involved in planning anCounty interesting CLEand lineup. hearsuch Bucks native

Bench Bar Conference 2022: Reconnecting at the Sweetest Place on Earth

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BCBA events

A ‘Story of Triumph’ Recounted at Women Lawyers’ Division Distinguished Speaker Series with Investigative Journalist, Julie K. Brown

Temple alumna and professor, Everyone enjoyed free on Friday afternoon Julietime K. Brown, speak about her to golf, relax at the Hershey Spa, take Hershey’s life, career, and in 2021 work of nonfiction - Perversion of Justice; The Jeffrey Epstein Story.

on the next few pages.

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President Julie Goldstein extolled Brown’s accomplishments and accolades in her introductory remarks, including multiple George Polk Awards, the Sidney Award recognizing outstanding investigative journalism in the fields of social and economic injustices for Brown’s outstanding coverage of corruption and abuse in Florida state prisons, the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award, Hillman Prize for Journalism in the Common Good, and being named to Time Magazine’s 100 most influential people of 2020.

A ‘Story of Triumph’ Recounted at Women Lawyers’ Division Distinguished Speaker Series

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Over the course of the evening, Julie Brown described to a captive audience her decision to more thoroughly expose the misdeeds of Jeffrey Epstein and other individuals who had, until then, wielded their immense wealth and staggering privilege to protect themselves from any potential consequences of their actions from victims and the criminal justice system alike. The process involved pitching the difficult, polarizing, and risk-laden story to editors at the Miami Herald, pouring over mounds of heavily redacted court documents and investigatory information, and casting a wide net to find Epstien’s victims (most of whom were minors at the time of their assaults), before undertaking the Herculean task of convincing these women to share their stories with her.

Bucks County Curling Club

Moments of levity were welcomed by all, including a well-timed call to someone’s unsilenced cell and the author’s anecdotes about her non-journalism life, 28

Bucks County Curling Club Canada. Scotland. Warminster, Pennsylvania. The first three places that likely came to mind when you saw

................................................................................................. Page 30 members and income that it took over the rink. In doing so, the Zamboni was ejected from the building and Bucks County had a dedicated curling club. In the seven years since dedication, the club has undergone extensive renovations and now boasts one of the nicest warm rooms on the East Coast to go with its fantastic ice.

Canada. Scotland. Warminster, Pennsylvania. The first three places that likely came to mind when you saw this was an article about curling. Ok. Maybe you didn’t realize most of the curling granite on Earth comes from Scotland. Or perhaps you are one of the few who did not realize some of the best curling ice this side of Ontario is right in your backyard.

While a relatively young club, Bucks County curlers come with a good pedigree. Our members have curled across the United States, in Canada, Scotland, and the Czech Republic, to name just a few places. Three of our members were in Omaha, Nebraska earlier this year competing with one of the final six teams vying to represent the U.S. at the 2022 Olympics. They did not qualify, but there were good games and fun viewing back home.

For those unfamiliar with the sport, curling teams are made up of four players. Every end (inning) two teams alternate throwing eight rocks each. Every curler throws two rocks in a preassigned order. The rocks weigh about forty-two pounds and will travel approximately one hundred twenty feet towards the house which is twelve feet in diameter. After all sixteen rocks are thrown, the team closest to the middle of the house scores. Games are eight ends long and generally last about two hours.

Like most people I was introduced to curling through the Winter Olympics. With the rise of team John Shuster and four guys who looked more like beer league softball players than Olympic athletes, it certainly made the game

Formed in 2010, the Bucks County Curling Club began its life splitting ice time with hockey players and figure skaters. However, by 2015, the Club had enough 30

Also in This Issue: • President’s Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 • From the Editor… . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 • We Asked, You Answered . . . . . . . . . . . 6 • New Members & Highlights . . . . . . . . . . 8 • Pro Bono Honor Roll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

• Naturalization Ceremony . . . . . . . . . . . 32 • New Member Breakfast . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 • Happy Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

SEE PAST ISSUES AT bucksbar.org/attorney-resources/the-writs OR BW.HoffmannPublishing.com SPREAD THE WORD #BucksWrits & #BucksBar The written and visual contents of this magazine are protected by copyright. Reproduction of print or digital articles without written permission from Hoffmann Publishing Group, Inc., and/ or the Bucks County Bar Association is forbidden. The opinions expressed in this publication are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific legal or other advice or recommendations for any individuals. Additionally, the placement of editorial content, opinions and paid advertising does not imply endorsement by the Bucks County Bar Association.

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President’s Message to give us a better chance of good weather outside and we continued to be prepared for what would come. We have not looked back since. Thankfully, we have all remained agile and flexible and this year felt a little more normal with events. We have learned many things through the last couple of years and it has made us a stronger association. For example, Greg and the staff have been on top of technology and now we have the capability to run several hybrid meetings at once if necessary. As a result of technology and hybrid meetings, attendance at our business meetings has increased. I know that we will continue to remain flexible and grow as the time progresses. The Bar Association is in great hands with our next President, Larry Scheetz.

As the weather begins to change, and the year is coming to an end, I am amazed at how quickly the year has gone by. It may sound cliche, but time has flown by. There have been many wonderful events where our members have come Julie D. Goldstein together (and I know the Bucks County Bar year is not over yet). I was Association President especially happy and proud of the Bench Bar Conference this year in Hershey. It was a special of couple days, attended by the most participants at an off-site Bench Bar Conference. Through the generous support of our sponsors, we were able to provide excellent CLEs and networking to our members. A special thank you to Elaine Yandrisevits, the Bench Bar Conference Committee, and the staff for their hard work on pulling off another extraordinary conference. The bar is raised for next year!

I have thoroughly enjoyed my year as President and all the new people that I have met and friendships that have grown this year. Thank you for a great year!  — Julie D. Goldstein, Esquire Bucks County Bar Association President

In addition, we had the pleasure of hosting the Pennsylvania Superior Court here in Bucks County. It provided an opportunity for attorneys to argue their appellate cases right here in Doylestown, while we were also able to offer an informative CLE to our members.

Need a Lawyer? Welcome to the Bucks County Bar Association’s Lawyer Referral and Information Service (LRIS) serving all of Bucks County. The LRIS is a public service of the non-profit Bucks County Bar Association. Each year the LRIS responds to thousands of callers, referring them to attorneys with experience in the appropriate area of law or to area agencies able to provide assistance.

I am especially proud of the event where Julie K. Brown came to speak as part of our Distinguished Speaker Series sponsored by the Women Law Division Power Summit Committee. Ms. Brown was a very interesting speaker and provided her insight into the struggles she faced and the struggles faced by the many women she interviewed for her story.

Persons identified as needing legal representation and who do not claim inability to pay an attorney will be referred by LRIS to a participating attorney. LRIS participation is open to all Bucks County Bar Association members having their primary office in Bucks County. You can contact the LRIS at 215-348-9413. 

All in all, I have been very proud of all the hard work our members, committees, and sections have done this year to create the excellent programming. When the year started, we were not sure how things would be with COVID. There was a large surge in cases and it was not clear what the year would bring. We scheduled the Opening of the Assizes for a little later in the year 4


From the Editor… I cannot believe that fall has arrived, which is truthfully my favorite season. I love the slight crisp in the air, the leaves crinkling under my feet, the pumpkins on everyone’s porch and, especially the Halloween candy. It’s also a time to reflect upon the year as it starts to wind towards a close.

The Superior Court also visited Bucks County and held oral argument for two days in September. It was a great opportunity for the county to be recognized, as well as an opportunity for the Justices to spend time in our community. The Bar Association hosted a lovely dinner for the Justices, which was attended by many of our Common Pleas judges and several members of the bar association. In reflecting on 2022 at the Bucks County Bar Association, it has truly been one heck of a year. And one person should truly be recognized for the success of this year and that is our current president, Julie Goldstein, Esquire. Julie worked tirelessly to set the association up for success. I’m honestly not sure how she survived the year and how she found the time to take care of her family, including her three children. She truly seemed like Wonder Woman at times.

Melanie J. Wender Editor, Bucks Writs

As I reflect on the Bar Association’s 2022, I see a year full of success. That success is nowhere more evident than the success of this year’s Bench Bar Conference, which was held at the glamorous Hotel Hershey. This year’s conference saw record attendance, as well as record funds raised in sponsorships. A huge thank you goes to Elaine Yandrisevits, who served as the Bar Association’s 2022 chair of the Bench Bar Committee. For those of you who did not attend, yes, you did miss out!

Heading into 2023, I am excited to see what Larry Scheetz, Esquire, has planned. I have no doubt he will continue the success of the Bar Association and that there are only good things to come. With that said, please raise an imaginary glass to Julie Goldstein to thank her for her hard work and dedication and please, raise another imaginary glass to Larry Scheetz, to welcome him as the incoming president of the Bucks County Bar Association and to wish him all the success in the world. Cheers, everyone!  — Melanie J. Wender, Esquire

This is a lesson, do not miss Bench Bar. Next year, we are heading up north to Skytop and hopefully I will see everyone there. Additionally, this year saw further increases in membership, which is what we always strive for. Member Services chair Jennifer Ryan started what will now be a tradition of hosting a new member breakfast at the Bar Association. Two new member breakfasts were held this year and to great success.

We Welcome Your Feedback! Thanks for your interest in theWRITS. Please send all comments, questions, submissions to: WritsEditor@BucksBar.org.

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FALL 2022


WE ASKED, YOU ANSWERED: What are ways you fit wellness and self-care into your day? Get Inspired! Life in legal is often stressful, making it hard to carve out time for yourself. These members and business partners share how they take time for some self-care. We all know that it is important to take care of ourselves but making time for it isn’t always easy. Here are their tips – and some fun photos! Walking & Meditation: sometimes alone – sometimes with a partner A long walk every day with my spouse or other family member and without cellphones is good for the body and the soul. Steve Brush, Esq.

I live in an area where walking around our neighborhood includes about a mile long of hills and valleys. I walk in the evenings with other neighbors, all of whom are working moms. We have scheduled walks just before it gets dark and the kids are either with the other parent or in bed. All of us try to make it at least twice per week, if not more often. Although I am pretty free to walk at any time of the day, our neighborhood’s working moms prefer the later evening hours. María Judith Rodríguez-Martyak, Esq.

Walking every day at lunch or after dinner for at least a half hour. Jill M. V. Richter, Esq., Title IV-D Attorney, Bucks County Domestic Relations Section I try to get in a 5-mile walk every day. Susan Levy Eisenberg, Esquire A nice walk around the block after dinner. Julie D. Goldstein, Esq., BCBA President, Fox Rothschild LLP

Meditation I use a daily positive meditation reading, use the swimming pool and also go to Planet Fitness for the 30-minute exercise room as well as treadmill and bike. My wife and I attend together and it is something we look forward to and feel great afterwards. Greg B. Emmons, Esq., G Emmons Law, LLC Meditation Morris Kaplan, Esq.

Walking AND meditation, thinking, & mindfulness I meditate on the lamrim Carla V. Risoldi, Esq.

Any day that starts with a long, head-clearing walk usually turns out to be a good one. I wish I did it more. No excuses. Matthew D. Weintraub, Esq., Bucks County District Attorney For me, I have a transition period between work and “not work.” Whether I am working from the office or remotely (we are doing hybrid these days), I always go for a walk after the work day. It is just kind of built into my schedule, so my wife knows I am not available until after my walk. If the weather isn’t cooperative, I will use my treadmill, but I certainly get more joy from being in the outdoors. From both a mental and physical perspective, the walk is just something I need. Glenn Neiman, Esq., Brilliant & Neiman LLC 6


Just time alone to clear your mind with something you WANT to do

Bike / Peloton Riding the Peloton every morning Eric Marttila, Esq.

Fresh cup of coffee in the morning with a quick read of newspaper or book for 15 minutes or so. Arlene Simolike, Esq., Metka Law, LLC

Rowing

Sports

Rowing machine—every other day. Praying to God—every day. Brisk early morning walks in a local park with my wife— every few days. D. Keith Brown, Esq., Stuckert & Yates

Karate I have studied karate for more than twelve years and find that daily practice of the martial arts is a great way to clear my brain of work troubles that I would otherwise dwell upon. As with any meditation, I can leave the criminal defense facts and writer’s block outside of my mind. Bonnie Keagy, Esq., Keagy Law

Ping pong Playing sports with my family whenever possible. Frank Mazzeo, Esq., Ryder, Mazzeo, Konieczny, LLC

The gym I am an active member at the Fairless Hills branch of the YMCA. As far as eating and drinking go, I reform every Monday. :) Denis W. Lanctot, Esq., Jackson Cook Caracappa & Scott P.C. I go to the gym almost daily as part of my wellness and self-care. Gina H. Kiley, Esq., Curtin & Heefner LLP

Bill Cowan, Newtown Table Tennis Club President, from Nationals in Las Vegas William M Cowan, Jr., Esq., Cowan & Kelly

Cardio/Weight Loss I spend much more time on self-care these days. As a 6-factor candidate for Covid complications I’ve contrived to finally loose some weight by eating more carefully. I also get at least an hour of cardio each day. Of course I wish I had kept this routine in me 30s/40s but I was too anxious to be moving the work. One of my father’s favorite lines: “If I knew then what I know now...” Yours is a worthy campaign. William L. Antheil, Esq., Antheil Maslow MacMinn

I attend Orangetheory Fitness 3 times per week. On weekends I go hiking. In the winter I referee high school basketball. Hon. Mark Douple, Magisterial District Judge

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FALL 2022


New Member Highlights Jose Ramon, founder and owner of Roman Estate Law, LLC

Daniel P. Martin, law clerk to the Honorable Denise M. Bowman

• Practice Area: estate planning. • Education: B.S. in Crime, Law and Justice from Penn State University (2007); J.D. from Widener University Delaware Law School (2010) • Previous jobs: Manager of Retirement Benefits Administration at Conduent, Inc. Jose had the privilege of leading a team of 20 employees that Administered QDROs, QMCSOs and POAs for Fortune 500 clients. Jose was also an individual contributor on QDRO, QMCSO, POA team. • What he does for fun: Jose enjoys going to the Poconos to spend time with friends and family, reading a good book that is not law related, and going to sporting events. • Family: Mother Annette, Father Jose, Sister Vanessa, Dogs: Caesar a German Shepard and Riesling a Jack Russel mix. • Interesting fact: Jose originally went to Penn State for engineering as his dream was to be an aerospace engineer. After a few semesters, Jose was struggling with the engineering materials and decided to change majors. It was that change in majors that lead to Jose pursuing the law. After graduating law school in 2010, it took Jose 12 years to begin practicing law, but he is incredibly excited to be a lawyer and serve his community.

• Practice Area: interested in practicing commercial litigation and municipal law. • Education: BA in history from West Chester University and JD from Widener University Commonwealth Law School. • Previous jobs: Legal intern at the Lancaster County District Attorney’s office and legal intern at Grim, Biehn & Thatcher. • What he does for fun: Daniel enjoys golf, hiking, and travel. • Family: Daniel is the youngest of five, two brothers and two sisters. • Interesting fact: Daniel is a certified Guinness pourer.

Abigail E. Gascott, associate at Antheil, Maslow & MacMinn, LLP • Practice area: trusts and estate. • Education: Attended Dickinson College and received her JD from Villanova Charles Widger School of Law. • Previously jobs: Law clerk to the Honorable Gary B. Gilman of the Bucks County Court of Common Pleas. • What she does for fun: Abby enjoys spending time with family and friends, traveling, and trying new restaurants. • Family: Abby has one sister, who is an emergency room physician in Philadelphia. • Interesting fact: During her junior year of college, Abby studied abroad at the University of East Anglia in Norwich, England.

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At Legal Aid of Southeastern PA’s Bucks County Custody Clinic Oct. 13, LASP advocates and pro bono attorney Shari Williams helped four people prepare the first petition for custody, change a current order, or receive general advice in a Bucks County custody case. The clinic provided information on how to file the paperwork at court, and clients will be able to connect with LASP if they have follow-up questions. LASP thanks the Bucks County Bar Association for hosting the clinic, which started as a virtual event during the pandemic. To learn more about pro bono opportunities in Bucks County, please contact Megan Reinprecht, Community Engagement Staff Attorney & Bucks County Pro Bono Coordinator, at 484-206-8101 or mreinprecht@lasp.org; Jennifer Pierce, Pro Bono Director, at 610-756-7264 or jpierce@lasp.org; or visit lasp.org/pro-bono.

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• Judge, Court of Judicial Discipline • Former Chairman, Judicial Conduct Board of Pennsylvania • Former Chairman, Disciplinary Board of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania • Former Chairman, Continuing Legal Education Board of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania • Former Chairman, Supreme Court of Pennsylvania Interest on Lawyers Trust Account Board • Former Federal Prosecutor • Selected by his peers as one of the top 100 Super Lawyers in PA and the top 100 Super Lawyers in Philadelphia • Named by his peers as Best Lawyers in America 2022 and 2015 Philadelphia “Lawyer of the Year” Ethics and Professional Responsibility Law and Legal Malpractice Law 1500 Market Street, East Tower, Suite 1800 • Philadelphia, PA 19102 (215) 751-2863

ANTHEIL MASLOW

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Pro Bono Honor Roll

J

S

Stephen Jacobson

Russell P. Sacco Karen Salib William E. Scott Christopher Serpico Michael Shelton Stephanie Shortall Chris Little Simcox Arlene Simolike John Simolike Susan Smith Mindy Snyder Amir Stark

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2nd Quarter 2022

Barbara Kaner Robert Katzenstein Daniel Keane Kevin J. Kelley Barbara Kirk Mark S. Kruman

THANK YOU for volunteering your valuable time to provide high quality legal representation to Bucks County residents. Your efforts help to ensure that there is justice for all. You obtained final Protection from Abuse (PFA) orders for victims of domestic violence, prepared wills for senior citizens, obtained bankruptcies and expungements to provide someone a second chance, and so much more. Thank you, too, to all those who provide financial assistance through donations and arbitration allowances. Your support increases access to justice. Legal Aid of Southeastern PA (LASP) could not assist as many individuals without each of you.

L Denis W. Lanctot Larry Lefkowitz David Leslie-Hughes Kathryn Liebhaber Kimberly Litzke

— Megan Reinprecht, LASP Community Engagement Unit Staff Attorney & Bucks County Pro Bono Coordinator

M B Benjamin Barron Cynthia Bashore Begley, Carlin & Mandio Ronald R. Bolig John D. Blumenthal Denise Bowman Jason Bowman H. Jeffrey Brahin Christopher J. Brill D. Keith Brown Lauren Bucknser Abigail Bukowski Mardi Busanus C Brendan Callahan Roger P. Cameron Kathryn G. Carlson Dale Edward Caya Catherine Cavella Christopher Chandor Jahn Chesnov Adam Cohen William Cowan, Jr.

MacCorkle Family Michael Maguire Lauren Majewski Amanda Malamud Joseph Marinaro Tina Mazaheri Marybeth McCabe Barbara R. Merlie Kristine Michael Hillary Moonay William Moore Sandra W. Morris Robert B. Murray, Jr.

D Katie Daly Susan Dardes Julie A. Dees Jennifer Dickerson E Mark D. Eastburn Susan L. Eisenberg James J. Esposito F

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Bryan M. Ferris Elizabeth Wood Fritsch Georgeann R. Fusco

Katelyn Naso Stephen L. Needles Alexis Neifield Brooke Newborn

G Lauren Gallagher Martin Ghen Noah M. Gladstone

P Michael Peters Jessica Pritchard Hayley Purcell

H

R

Linay Haubert Judith Hayman James J. Hollawell Robin S. Holmes Michael Houghton

Joseph Ramagli Robert Repko Carla Risoldi

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T Stephanie Stecklair Tarantino Eric Tobin Elizabeth Tomlinson Jeffrey Toner Samuel J. Totaro, Jr. U Karen Ulmer V Henry E. Van Blunk Jessica VanderKam W Jason R. Weiss Donna J. Wengiel Keith Williams Shari Williams Donald Williford Clair E. Wischusen Paul D. Woosley Y Hon. Jordan Yeager


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BCBA events

The Second Annual Red Mass By Jessica A. Pritchard, Esquire

In the United States, the Red Mass tradition was inaugurated in 1928 at Saint Andrew’s Church located in New York City. Since then, the Red Mass has been celebrated increasingly in communities throughout the United States.

For the second year, on October 4, 2022, members of the Bucks County legal community gathered at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church in celebration of the “Red Mass.” A Red Mass is a Mass celebrated annually in the Roman Catholic Church for all members of the legal profession, regardless of religious affiliation: judges, lawyers, law school professors, law students, and government officials, marking the opening of the judicial year. The Red Mass originated in Rome, Paris and London centuries ago. The name exemplifies the scarlet robes worn by the royal judges who were then in attendance and now the red vestments worn by the celebrant priest.

This year’s Mass was to have again been officiated by Father Vincent Guest. Father Guest is a former attorney who worked in the offices of the former Governor Bob Casey. He was ordained as a priest in 2012 and now serves as a pastor of Sacred Heart Church in Camden, New Jersey. However, a COVID diagnosis the day

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The Bucks County Mediation and Arbitration Center (BCMAC) is owned and operated by Barbara N. Lyons, Esq. She is certified, skilled and experienced in neutral arbitration, mediation and case evaluation. Attorneys work closely with Barbara from initial contact to the conclusion of their case.

prior required Our Lady of Mount Carmel pastor Father Matthew Guckin to take up the preaching duties.

Father Guckin focused his homily on the great responsibility members of the legal community face each day.

BCMAC is a full-service ADR provider addressing issues involving, but not limited to:

Citing religious philosophers and political writers, Father noted that the separation of Church and State is a paramount principal and that the moral codes that all religions provide give guidance that shape the men and women in politics as well as their “flock.” He thanked the local legal community for their hard work and perseverance in difficult times and prayed for continued wisdom, compassion and knowledge for its members. 

BCMAC is a full-service ADR provider addressing issues involving: • Medical malpractice • Personal injury premises and • Equity matters product liability • Employer/employee disputes • Commercial and insurance • Underinsured and uninsured motorist cases matters • Business mergers and dissolutions Real estate •• Personal injuryand equity disputes • Contract and real estate disputes

• Municipal matters

BCMAC providescost-effective cost-effective BCMAC provides andand real-world real-world attorneys and their solutions to solutions attorneys, for consumers, business and industry professionals, employees, clients, business and industry professionals. employers and government agencies.

For more information call Bucks County Mediation and (215) 340-7655 Arbitration Center or visit www.bcmac.org. The Farm, 220 Farm Lane, Doylestown, PA 18901 Bucks County Mediation and For more information call (215) 340-7655 Arbitration Center visit www.bcmac.org. The Farm,or 220 Farm Lane, Doylestown, PA 18901 13

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BCBA events

: 2 2 ’ f o r e m m u S

Bluegrass at the TileWorks By Scott L. Feldman

Summertime done, come and gone, my, oh, my.

there today much as they were by its founder, Henry Chapman Mercer, beginning in the early 1900s. And now, the TileWorks is home to a unique and wonderful acoustic live music series.

For many of us, it was the first Summer since 2019 in which we could gather, travel, visit and be entertained without worrying too much about the dreaded virus. The weather was mostly cooperative, and the Jersey beaches and Pocono mountain lakes were welcoming. As summers tend to do, the summer of 2022 went by all too quickly.

On six summer Sunday afternoons, up to 500 music fans gathered on the sloping lawn outside the TileWorks and heard national touring bluegrass bands. All of the concerts were family friendly, with kids getting in for free. Attendees were welcome to bring their own food and beverages, along with their chairs and blankets. In addition, there was some food and drink for sale, and an ice cream truck! The series opened in June with renowned vocalist Danny Paisley and the Southern Grass. Additional shows followed, most featuring a headliner with an opening act. Perhaps the largest turnout of the season was in August for Dan Tyminski, a guitarist and

Now, the days are shorter and the leaves have fallen. So, throw another log on the fire and lets look back at a true highlight of the Summer of ’22. It is hard to imagine a more quintessential Bucks County setting than the courtyard and backdrop towers of the Moravian Pottery and Tile Works in Doylestown. The TileWorks is a National Historic Landmark and working History Museum. Tiles continue to be handmade

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longtime member of Alison Krauss’ Union Station band, who may be best known for being the singing voice of George Clooney in the 2000 film, O Brother, Where Art Thou. His version of “Man of Constant Sorrow” is still a highlight of his performances. In all, a heckuva show for Doylestown!

It is not easy to undertake a concert series such as this. Peter’s connections and persistence attracted the talent. Though the weather was generally accommodating, publicizing the event and competing with numerous other summer activities presented a challenge. The paid attendance was encouraging, although there was clearly room for more. The TileWorks had two goals: to increase visibility and focus attention on the museum and its offerings, and to break even financially. With so many out of county and even out of state attendees, it seems clear that the first goal was met.

On September 25, Jerry Douglas performed. He is the undisputed master of the resophonic guitar, also known as the dobro. Even though you may not recognize his name, and may not know a dobro from a dulcimer, you do know his playing. He has performed on over 1600 albums (not a typo!), including those by Garth Brooks, Eric Clapton, James Taylor, Ray Charles, Paul Simon, Elvis Costello and Mumford & Sons.

The TileWorks store was open during the concerts and Moravian tiles were sold. With one more concert scheduled for October 16, Mr. Wroblewski was unable to say whether the series broke even. He did offer that should the series return for the Summer of 2023, continued success may be dependent upon local family and corporate sponsorships. Here’s to hoping that the series continues into next Summer and beyond! Be sure to bring the family and open your ears to some truly great music. 

So how did Doylestown become home to bluegrass royalty? Most of the credit goes to local music aficionado Peter Wroblewski. His love of bluegrass and passion for sharing live music guided his efforts. He became the promoter, marketer, booking agent and cheerleader for the series. A one-off concert in the summer of 2021 featuring Josh Daniels and Friends was made possible through the approval and support of new TileWorks Executive Director (and bluegrass music lover) Katia McGuirk. The success of that event had the pair thinking bigger and better for the Summer of ’22.

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BCBA events

The Superior Court Comes to Bucks By Melanie J. Wender, Esquire

On September 20th and September 21st of this year, the Pennsylvania Superior Court made its way to Bucks County to preside over oral argument in our much beloved Justice Center. Courtroom 410 was suddenly very busy, with lawyers coming in and going out, all for the purpose of arguing in front of Justice Lazarus (presiding judge), Judge Mary Murray, and Judge Daniel McCaffery. The Justices presided over courtroom 410 for two days and they had a jam-packed schedule of oral arguments. I was one of the attorneys who took time out of my day simply to go over to the courthouse to watch. It is interesting to see what questions the Justices ask and how the lawyers remain on their toes, quickly addressing each question. Additionally, it is also clear from the questions that the Justices ask that they each took the time to read the briefs and transcripts for each case in front of them. I cannot imagine the time dedicated to those tasks, but it is what the job requires.

The Michener Museum provided a great backdrop for this event, with its amazing outdoor space that resulted in a spectacular cocktail hour. The dinner was, as expected, exceptional, with not a bad option on the menu. Perhaps the most important part of this dinner was the people present. It was the opportunity to learn more about the Superior Court and develop connections with these justices who we are so rarely in front of. It was also a great opportunity to spend time with our colleagues and continue to develop those relationships. In fact, as soon as I was able, I was up and about, mingling with my colleagues. As a result, I had a fascinating conversation with John Hart, Esquire, where I learned about his career in the Navy.

With that said, the Superior Court originally intended to come to Bucks County in 2020, but the pandemic had other ideas. As a result, it was not until 2022 that this event could finally occur. As such, it had to be celebrated with a dinner at the Michener Museum in Doylestown. In attendance, were several of our Common Pleas judges including Judge Bateman, our president judge. Also in attendance were many of the leaders in our Bar Association. Our current president, Julie Goldstein, was there, as was our immediate past president, Sean Gresh. It was truly the Who’s Who of the legal community of Bucks County.

The point of this dinner was to celebrate the Superior Court and the appellate process as it is part of the justice system that we all work so tirelessly to uphold. I hope that the Superior Court returns to Bucks County soon to hold Court once again. All the Justices are more than welcome. 

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features

Friends for Heroes By Arlene Simolike, Esquire

Jeff says the idea for the group came from a meeting at the Buck Hotel with his co-founders Brian Ruhling, Dennis McDonald, Steve Bross, John Conzelman and Chuck Hutt. They had run a charity golf outing for a deceased serviceman’s family a few years prior. The serviceman was known to Chuck Hutt, himself a combat veteran and officer. At the Buck Hotel, they all decided they could, and should, help veterans on a regular basis via similar annual golf outings, donations and other fund-raising efforts. The legal paper work was completed and filed. The Friends for Heroes Foundation came into being in 2015 as a 501(c) (3) non-profit group. Chuck Hutt and Jeff Liebmann serve as Co-Chairmen.

The Friends for Heroes Foundation is a non-profit group started by six friends in 2015, including our own bar association colleague, Jeff Liebmann, Esq. Part of the Foundation’s mission statement is “They will not be forgotten…not ever,” which pertains to local military veterans from all branches of the service, and their families, which this group aims to help in many ways. The help rendered can range from buying groceries for a veteran to assisting in meeting a mortgage payment. The group has even helped in the building and accommodative modeling of a home to make it easier for a seriously wounded veteran of the war in Afghanistan, to navigate his living environment in comfort and ease. This veteran is a double amputee, who is also partially blind, as a result of service in Logare Province in Afghanistan.

To achieve its mission Friends for Heroes needs funds. Their principal fund-raising event is their annual golf outing, usually held every August. Significant sums are 18


nature, physical challenges and opportunities to do community services for needy communities. The participants also get to form new friendships with fellow veterans who may also be healing from similar mental or physical trauma from military service. Friends for Heroes is happy to donate to this effort.

raised by the participation fees, sponsorships, and raffle ticket sales. Of course, donations throughout the year are always welcomed! Information about how and where to donate can be found at the website for the group at https://www.friendsforheroes.com or on their Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/theywillnotbeforgotten. With the money raised, Friends for Heroes has been able both to meet its own goals and to donate to other charitable groups focused on helping and empowering our veterans in multiple ways, upon their return to civilian life. With the funds, significant mental or physical trauma suffered by many veterans during service in combat areas can be treated. Improvement can be achieved with help from these groups Friends for Heroes has helped.

Another local and very worthy veteran-focused non-profit program helped by The Friends for Heroes Foundation is Shamrock Reins in Pipersville, PA. This center provides equine therapy for qualified veterans, active duty military and reservists too. The goal of veterans working with the horses is to help heal wounds of both body and mind suffered in military service. Building self-esteem and encouraging insight into the veteran’s own mindset by the veteran comes with the program pairing vets with horses. The Friends for Heroes Foundation has donated to Shamrock Reins and it hopes to continue to help this program. In closing, Jeff noted that The Friends for Heroes Foundation believes veterans are a most worthy group who both need and deserve the kind of help Friends for Heroes hopes to continue providing. 

For example, The Friends for Heroes Foundation has donated to the Travis Manion Foundation, formed in honor of local hero Travis Manion, who gave his life for his country early on during the lengthy Middle East conflict. The Travis Manion Foundation conducts a Leadership Expedition for Veterans where a seven-day expedition away from home puts them in touch with

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features

Reflecting on a Distinquish Career:

A Conversation with

Judge Clyde Waite, Jr. By Susan Dardes, Esquire

I started out our nearly hour long discussion by asking him if he always wanted to be a lawyer – to which he swiftly and definitively said – “absolutely not!”. He admitted that he had little in the way of ambitions during his teenage years.

His mother, who could neither read nor write, worked as a maid for the family of one of his McKeesport High classmates, while the Judge tended to their yard work. The Waites were very poor, fortunate to have food on the table. His high school guidance counselor told him that he was “not college material,” and steered him to commercial classes, which included typing and home economics, among other stereotypical courses for young girls. And, in fact, he was the only boy in most of his classes.

The Judge was born and raised in McKeesport, PA, in the far western and (then) very depressed area of Pennsylvania. He was one of nine children raised by a single parent as his father passed away when the Judge was only four years old.

The morning after his high school graduation, in 1962, he took a train to Washington, DC, to interview for a typist’s job at the Library of Congress. He had literally left his luggage at Union Station, and was hired on the spot. By day’s end, with about $40.00 in his

What a fascinating discussion I had recently with the Honorable Clyde Waite, Jr., reflecting on his tenure as a Judge in the Court of Common Pleas in Bucks County, and his retirement at year’s end.

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pocket, he found a room in which to live. About a month into his new town and new job, he was walking around the streets of Washington, DC looking for an apartment when he walked past a seven story building with the most “gorgeous girls” he had ever seen. As it turned out, it was the girl’s dorm at Howard University. Intrigued, and after he was informed that “The Girls Dorm” was not the name of the building but the residence for Howard University’s female students, he immediately submitted an application for admittance to Howard.

in the truck bed in a sleeping bag zipped up to the neck and the truck slid upside down a steep embankment into a shallow swamp area. No one was hurt badly, but the driver was arrested on a bogus charge, purportedly for “defacing the highways.” Judge Waite, in the truck bed, hid out until it was safe for him to dig his way out from under the truck. He was able to obtain the assistance of a nearby farmer to bring his tractor to the scene and upright the truck and pull it back up onto the highway surface. That was not the only brush with serious personal injury during his time in Selma.

But it was not to be – at least not straight away. Since the Judge had never taken college prep classes, he was unprepared for a college curriculum. To get up to speed, he took night classes, while still working at the library.

As one of the hundreds of thousands of people who had witnessed Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech, in 1963, he has framed posters in his study that he kept for all those years as reminders from that spirituous time.

By the time he applied to Howard for the third time, the Admission officer, impressed by his tenacity, told him that he’d be admitted on probation. They said, “We’ll give you the chance to fail.”

He described his life from the moment he arrived in Washington as tantamount to a cave dweller moving out of the darkness of his cave into the blinding bright sunlight.

And the judge took that chance, knowing all the while, that he was capable of success.

While at Howard, the Judge joined the ROTC, to serve his country in a military time of unrest, and also to help support his family back in Pennsylvania. He graduated from college in 1968 and went on to Yale Law School, to go into the JAG corps, rather than be drafted for the Vietnam infantry. Yale provided him contact with enlightened future politicians, such as Bill Clinton and Hillary Rodham, and the class of 1971 held the largest contingency of black law students – 12 in all – in its nearly 150-year history. White male students felt that they were more deserving of those seats, and derided the twelve by referring to them as the “dirty dozen,” and that time period as the “dark ages.” The late Judge Louis Pollak, a revered civil rights advocate, was the Dean of Yale Law at that time and pushed to have the African American students admitted.

He made the requisite “C” average his first semester, then brought his grades up to Bs and As by his second term. In 1960’s Washington, it was a time of great activism in the struggle for civil rights. The Judge became a member of SNCC, or the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, after having met Stokley Carmichael, its founder and key leader. As an SNCC member, he and several other African American students went to Selma, Alabama, for a black voter registration drive. The SNCC headquarters was just across the street from the Selma police, to purposefully monitor potential “subversive” behavior. SNCC members would leave Selma before the sun came up, and head to the farm lands of Lowndes County, to engage the 85% of Selma residents who were mostly poor black farmers. One early morning while on their way out of Selma to the outlying Lowndes County countryside, the Alabama State troopers chased the Judge and his fellow voter registration workers in their pickup truck, forcing it off the road, whereupon it flipped over with the Judge riding

When Judge Waite graduated in 1971, he applied to Legal Aid of Bucks County after hearing of its good work from a Yale classmate. As the first African American attorney in Bucks County history, he was at Legal Aid volunteering his time, and working part time at the Public 21

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features Defender’s office. Surprisingly to me, our present day PD’s office didn’t find its footing until late 1971, early 1972, when it was organized and funded with full time lawyers. During his tenure as an assistant PD, he also clerked with both Judge Edmund Ludwig and Judge Harriet Mims. After a couple of years in county jobs, an offer of private practice came from Leonard Sokolove, to join the Bristol firm, later known as Stief, Waite, Gross, Sagoskin and Gilman. (Yes, that is a trifecta of Common Pleas Judges there.) The early 2000s saw Judge Waite run for the Court of Common Pleas, winning the seat after three tries. He was sworn in as the first, and still only, African American Judge on our trial bench. Judge Pollak, then retired from Yale Law School, made the trip down for the induction, while Judge Ludwig administered the oath.

his life experiences to the courtroom, in the knowledge that dispensing justice requires one to be self-aware. He believes most parties want to get justice and if a party feels that he or she has been heard, really heard, they are in most cases willing to leave the courtroom not necessarily happy but at least reasonably satisfied.

A self- described “fighter,” Judge Waite told me that he believes if one isn’t given an opportunity, then he or she should – simply – take it. But he does that with quietness and reserve now, realizing it was a lot of hate and bad feelings which had driven him to a lot of successes. He’s done with that now, he told me. He keeps a low profile as a senior judge; he doesn’t push his politics or opinions on others. In the beginning of his first term, he was in Orphans Court, then moved to family court, and now he is finishing his career in juvenile court, which he enjoys immensely, and finally in criminal court. He stressed that there are legal principles in all practice areas that have an impact on all other areas of the law. That is, an understanding of contracts is as vital in a personal injury civil trial as it is in a corporate merger or in a divorce matter.

I asked him what he would do to occupy his time when he leaves the bench. He’ll play a lot of golf, and a bit of tennis, and he was just appointed to the Continuing Legal Education Board of Directors. His wife, Verna, to whom he’s been married for 8 years, after having reconnected with her since his college days, will continue her work as a Chaplain at Children’s Hospital in Philadelphia. And how does he want fellow judges and lawyers to remember him? He hopes that he leaves a legacy as a Judge who ensured that parties leave his courtroom feeling as if they had been heard and been given a chance. That they could better accept the results of a lawsuit or a criminal sentence if they had a fair hearing. Finally, he wants the voters in Bucks County to ensure that the character of someone occupying judge’s chambers is someone of integrity.

He says that he brings a unique perspective to his job. When he picks a jury, and prior to charging that jury, he reminds them that no one sees themselves as having bias, but we all do. After all, having a preference is nothing more than the starting point for being prejudiced. There are the extremes at both ends of the continuum with the addition of a pinch of malice and intent in the latter. Take away that pinch and you can end up with a prejudiced but self-aware juror who can deliver a just result despite his or her prejudice. He asks his juries to see the accused or the plaintiffs from that party’s own perspective, from their own eyes. Moreover, he applies

You can learn the mechanics of the job, Judge Waite opines, but you can’t learn character. And character counts. 

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BCBA events

Bench Bar Conference 2022: Reconnecting at the Sweetest Place on Earth By Elaine T. Yandrisevits, Esquire The 2022 Bench Bar Conference was one for the record books! Over one hundred and sixty BCBA members, sponsors, and guests returned to the beautiful Hotel Hershey for networking, continuing education classes, good food, and relaxation over three spectacular late fall days.

Chocolate World, or enjoy a beer at the Troegs brewery before reconnecting at the Hershey Gardens for dinner. Attendees were able to stroll around the rose gardens and observe tropical butterflies in the Butterfly Atrium before enjoying homestyle dinner and desserts. The chocolate peanut butter pie was a hit!

Upon check-in on Thursday, attendees were encouraged to “Get this Paw-ty Started!” by BCBA mascot, The Bear, and 2022 Conference mascot, Riley, both outfitted in their finest Hershey’s attire. Presentations by USI Affinity and PNC Private Bank allowed attendees to earn CLE credits right away, and everyone got to team up with their friends and colleagues to showcase their competitive sides at Legal Quizzo presented by the Young Lawyers Division. Attendees enjoyed catching up with each other and meeting new members during cocktail hour and dinner, followed by fire pits, glow golf, and dessert at Harvest and the Blue Mountain Patio. It wouldn’t be a visit to Hershey without making s’mores and eating chocolate!

The Conference wrapped up on Saturday morning with Breakfast with the Bench. The Judges of the Bucks County Bench provided a town hall discussion about Court updates and procedures. The Judges also gave advice and insight by answering questions about their backgrounds and experiences. The 2022 Bench Bar Conference would not have been such a success without the participation of the Bucks County Bench, CLE participants, conference sponsors, and BCBA members. Over one hundred and sixty people attended the Conference, which set a record for an offsite BCBA event. More than a dozen law clerks and young lawyers received scholarships to attend thanks to the Young Lawyers Division, Women Lawyers’ Division, Orphans’ Court Section, Business Law Section, Family Law Section, Civil Litigation Section, and Bucks County Court Administration. In addition, the BCBA was able to put on such a great Conference thanks to the recordsetting generosity of more than forty sponsors.

Plenary session speaker Alicia Rainwater, from The Center for Generational Kinetics, opened Friday morning’s sessions with an energetic and fast-paced discussion of the challenges and concerns in inter-generational workplaces. Alicia provided real-world tips for connecting and understanding colleagues across generations, particularly with Gen Z entering the workforce. Attendees then split up for additional CLE sessions on topics including cannabis law, emotional intelligence, estate “horror stories,” round table discussions with the Bench, and a family law update from the Bench. Thank you to the Criminal Law Section, Orphans’ Court Section, Women Lawyers Division and Diversity Committee, Business Law Section, Civil Litigation Section, and Family Law Section for all the work involved in planning such an interesting CLE lineup.

Finally, a special thanks to BCBA President Julie Goldstein; the Bench Bar Conference Committee; and especially to Greg Nardi, Emily Norman, Barb Sauers, Kelly Myers, Kristen Norcross, and Dylan Gilheany of the BCBA for the many, many hours of work to make the Conference so sweet! 

See pictures from the Bench Bar Conference on the next few pages.

Everyone enjoyed free time on Friday afternoon to golf, relax at the Hershey Spa, take in Hershey’s 24


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Bench Bar Conference 2022

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BCBA events

A ‘Story of Triumph’ Recounted at Women Lawyers’ Division Distinguished Speaker Series with Investigative Journalist Julie K. Brown By Nicole O’Hara, Esquire People of various ages and professions flocked to fill the main meeting room at the Bar Association on Thursday, October 20th to hear Bucks County native and Temple alumna and professor Julie K. Brown, speak about her life, career, and 2021 work of nonfiction – Perversion of Justice; The Jeffrey Epstein Story. President Julie Goldstein extolled Brown’s accomplishments and accolades in her introductory remarks, including multiple George Polk Awards, the Sidney Award recognizing outstanding investigative journalism in the fields of social and economic injustices for Brown’s outstanding coverage of corruption and abuse in Florida state prisons, the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award, Hillman Prize for Journalism in the Common Good, and being named to Time Magazine’s 100 most influential people of 2020. Over the course of the evening, Julie Brown described to a captive audience her decision to more thoroughly expose the misdeeds of Jeffrey Epstein and other individuals who had, until then, wielded their immense wealth and staggering privilege to protect themselves from any potential consequences of their actions from victims and the criminal justice system alike. The process involved pitching the difficult, polarizing, and risk-laden story to editors at the Miami Herald, pouring over mounds of heavily redacted court documents and investigatory information, and casting a wide net to find Epstein’s victims (most of whom were minors at the time of their assaults), before undertaking the Herculean task of convincing these women to share their stories with her. Moments of levity were welcomed by all, including a well-timed call to someone’s unsilenced cell and the author’s anecdotes about her non-journalism life, 28


including her love for the Eagles and Phillies (and Bruce Springsteen), and the many educational and personal accomplishments of her young adult children. While we were hardly able to scratch the surface of Brown’s incredibly interesting and somewhat lengthy book, a few copies of which were available for sale and signed by the author after her talk (along with many copies brought by attendees), we covered a good amount of ground, much of it rocky. Brown was called to investigate and publish the story, and then her book, due to serious errors, and, in some cases, willful mischaracterization of Epstein and his victims by the media (much of Brown’s investigative work happened before the #MeToo movement), as well as serious nefarious and negligent inaction on the part of the criminal justice system (including a very public role played by then-US Attorney, former Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta). The concluding message, however, was one of hope. Brown reiterated that everyone’s journey – hers as the investigative reporter and author, and ours as readers and audience members – should be looked upon with gratitude. Julie K. Brown found success and vindication, by telling the stories of the victims, facilitating their civil suits and other remedies, and exposing the wrongdoing of powerful people who would have otherwise remained in privilege and power. 

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features

Bucks County Curling Club By Christopher Mahoney, Esquire

members and income that it took over the rink. In doing so, the Zamboni was ejected from the building and Bucks County had a dedicated curling club. In the seven years since dedication, the club has undergone extensive renovations and now boasts one of the nicest warm rooms on the East Coast to go with its fantastic ice.

Canada. Scotland. Warminster, Pennsylvania. The first three places that likely came to mind when you saw this was an article about curling. Ok. Maybe you didn’t realize most of the curling granite on Earth comes from Scotland. Or perhaps you are one of the few who did not realize some of the best curling ice this side of Ontario is right in your backyard.

While a relatively young club, Bucks County curlers come with a good pedigree. Our members have curled across the United States, in Canada, Scotland, and the Czech Republic, to name just a few places. Three of our members were in Omaha, Nebraska earlier this year competing with one of the final six teams vying to represent the U.S. at the 2022 Olympics. They did not qualify, but there were good games and fun viewing back home.

For those unfamiliar with the sport, curling teams are made up of four players. Every end (inning) two teams alternate throwing eight rocks each. Every curler throws two rocks in a preassigned order. The rocks weigh about forty-two pounds and will travel approximately one hundred twenty feet towards the house which is twelve feet in diameter. After all sixteen rocks are thrown, the team closest to the middle of the house scores. Games are eight ends long and generally last about two hours.

Like most people I was introduced to curling through the Winter Olympics. With the rise of team John Shuster and four guys who looked more like beer league softball players than Olympic athletes, it certainly made the game

Formed in 2010, the Bucks County Curling Club began its life splitting ice time with hockey players and figure skaters. However, by 2015, the Club had enough 30


look easy. So, in 2015 when my wife and I relocated to Bucks County, we decided to seize the opportunity and find out just how easy it is. I learned very quickly that the sport is much harder than they make it look on TV. Every throw of the rock requires you to balance on one foot in the lunge position while sliding on ice. While sweeping a rock the length of the sheet one time is a decent aerobic workout, forty times a game can be downright punishing. It is all more than enough to work up a sizeable thirst every game. Which brings me to the final part of curling with which I was previously unfamiliar. The deeply ingrained social aspect.

Service Stability Strength

Unlike most other sports, curling prides itself on its collegiality. Every curler from the Average Joe to the Olympic gold medal winner will wish the opposing team “good curling” before every game and “good game” afterwards. Then, more importantly, both teams retreat to the warm room after the game where the winning team buys the first round at the bar. Teams spend the next hour or two getting to know their opponent, swapping stories, and buying rounds. Losses are forgotten and friends are made. You will never see the Eagles take the Cowboys out for a couple beers after a Sunday game.

SCHATZ ELECTRIC, INC. Jeff Schatz, Owner/President

“Tompkins will be with us in the future and help us grow even more,” Jeff says. Schatz Electric has been in business for 45 years. To keep the business growing, owner and president Jeff Schatz focuses on mastering new technologies and supporting customers 24/7—so he’s always on the go. That’s why he works with the team at Tompkins, who proactively offer products and services that increase efficiency, such as remote deposit.

Taking up curling was easily the best decision I made after moving out to Bucks County (other than joining the Bar Association of course). I would recommend it to anyone who enjoys a good mix of competition and camaraderie. Also, perhaps a beer or two. If you are interested, feel free to check us out – www.buckscountycurlingclub.org. Maybe I will see you at one of our learn to curl lessons. Fun pants optional. 

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BCBA events

Naturalization Ceremony

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New Member Breakfast

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BCBA events Women Lawyers’ Division Happy Hour

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Solo & Small Practice Section Happy Hour

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