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Archery Magazine 31407 Outer I-10 Redlands, CA 92373

PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID RAVENNA MI PERMIT NO. 320


&ARTICLES

FEATURES October/November 2007 BOWHUNTERS SHOWCASE by Valerie Collins .......................................4

HOW THE PROS DO IT Holding Steady Part I by Bernie Pellerite ...................................21

NFAA OUTDOOR NATIONALS Recap by Linda Parker and Tournament Results ............................7

NFAA MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS .............................................25

NFAA CALENDAR OF EVENTS ...............13

SECTIONAL NEWS ..................................27

FROM THE PRESIDENTS DESK by Bruce Cull ...........................................14

COPING WITH PRESSURE by Terry Wunderle ...................................30

WILDE’EST OF WEEKENDS Big Sky Open at Grand Junction by Tootie Brabec .....................................16

RAGSDALE’S STRAIGHT SHOTS Aiming and More Aiming by Robert Ragsdale .................................32

ON OUR COVER:

Vol. 27 • No. 5 © 2007 NFAA®

DWT PART IV by John Dudley .......................................38 NOSTALGIA CORNER The Indoor “Championship” Round by Paul Davison .......................................45 “ASAP” After School Archery Program and club application form ......................................47

AND MUCH MORE!

Bob Gentry and Randy Brabec shoot off for the Pro Male Freestyle Limited Championship at Darrington. Bob Gentry (L) takes home the Silver Bowl.

EDITORIAL POLICIES Archery is the official publication of National Field Archery Association and is published bi-monthly. Editorial deadlines are as follows: ISSUE Feb/March April/May June/July

DEADLINE December 15 February 15 April 15

All material should be sent by mail or e-mail. Mailed contributions should be submitted on diskette and typewritten. Microsoft Word is preferred. DO NOT include digital photos in your word document. No material will be returned. Submissions should be no more than 2,000 words. Previously published material will not be considered unless accompanied by a release or permission from the first publisher. Material appearing in this magazine does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the NFAA or its Board of Directors. The NFAA can not reimburse for cost incurred in the preparation of material submitted, nor compensate contributors for items which are published. All material will be published at the discretion of the editorial board. Photos of animals harvested should be in good taste. Only animals taken under

ISSUE Aug/Sep Oct/Nov Dec/Jan

DEADLINE June 15 August 15 October 15

the rules of fair chase will be considered. Correspondence concerning the NFAA’s policies and operations should be directed to the NFAA Headquarters, 31407 Outer I-10, Redlands, CA 92373. Contributions and correspondence pertaining to this magazine should be directed to: Marihelen Rogers, Editor, 31407 Outer I-10, Redlands, CA 92373 (909) 794-2133 • (909) 794-8512 FAX E-mail: nfaarchery@aol.com NFAA Section and State Association News should be directed to: Paul Davison, Section and State News Editor 2787 Winston Way, Duluth, GA 30096 Fax (770) 476-7488 E-mail (preferred): stringwalker@att.net

Archery is published bimonthly by the National Field Archery Association, 31407 Outer I-10, Redlands, CA 92373, 909/794-2133. Advertising rate cards available for display and classified advertising. All feature and editorial requests should be made in writing to NFAA® at the address above. Editorial contributions must be submitted with self-addressed envelopes with sufficient return postage. All materials considered, but the publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts. Deadline for copy is eight weeks prior to the month of publication. All statements are those of the writers and do not necessarily conform to the magazine’s editorial policies. Copyright 1984 by the National Field Archery Association®. All rights reserved. Change of address – allow eight weeks for change to become effective. Contact NFAA® headquarters. 2 Archery Magazine October/November 2007

Archery Magazine October/November 2007 3


by Valerie Collins

1

2

3 1 2 3

MICHAEL SPENCE of Dexter, Michigan took his South African Lion at 18 yards. The lion field dressed out at 260 pounds. TOM PUCCI of Park Rapid, Minnesota shown with whitetail deer taken in Hubbard Co. Minnesota field dressed out at 145 pounds. Tom is a 45 year member of the National Field Archery Association. RICK DOREY of Palm Springs, Florida took his mountain lion/cougar while stalking in Northern Nevada—Humbolt City. Just look at the size of this animal: length, 7 foot 11 inches.

4 Archery Magazine October/November 2007

4 4 5

6

5

MICHAEL ANGLIN of Yucaipa, California took his javelina at 20 yards while stalking in Duval County, Texas. MICHAEL SPENCE shown with his springbok, taken while hunting in the North West province of South Africa The springbok was shot at 12 yards.

8 6 7 8

SCOTT OSWALD of Sioux Falls, South Dakota is shown with his whitetail deer taken in Union County, South Dakota. MICHAEL SPENCE, a 22 year member of the NFAA, shown with his blesbok, taken while hunting in South Africa. TOM JENKINS of Roscommon, Michigan took his jake at 12 yards in Crawford County, Michigan.

9

7

10

TOM JENKINS took his black bear while hunting in Iron County, Michigan. The bear was taken at 7 yards in a tree stand. He used a 50# Assenheimer bow. The bear dressed out at 175 pounds. 10 DAVID WEBER shown with his Southwest Texas javelina, field dressed weight 35 pounds, taken at 12 yards. 9

Archery Magazine October/November 2007 5


ADVERTISERS INDEX Angus Brown Safaris. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Archery Focus Magazine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 BCY Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Brite Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Carter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

The voice of field archery, the NFAA®, Ted Nugent United Sportsmen, the IFAA and bowhunting.

Visit our Web site www.fieldarchery.com or call us toll-free at 1-800-811-2331

Eastman / Carbon Express. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Electronic Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Kwikee Kwiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Limbsaver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Maple Leaf Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Mathews, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Mental Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 New Archery Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Ragsdale & Associates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Shot Doctor, the . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12, 31 Specialty Archery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

EDITORIAL BOARD Bruce Cull Brian Sheffler Paul Davison Douglas Joyce EDITOR Marihelen Rogers NFAA Executive Secretary PUBLISHER Rogers Printing Inc. 3350 Main St. PO Box 215 Ravenna MI 49451-0215 LAYOUT P. A. Rogers SALES MANAGER Jim Stewart DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Scott Robbins

Stanislawski . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . outside back cover Stringwalker/Paul Davison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

ADVERTISING SALES

Sure-Loc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

Martin J. Rogers NFAA Headquarters 31407 Outer I-10, Redlands, CA 92373 (909) 794-2133 (909) 794-8512 FAX E-mail: nfaarchery@aol.com

TrueFlight Feathers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 US & International Archer Magazine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Walkers Game Ear. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

by Linda Parker

What a wonderful week! I can’t think of a better place to spend my vacation, a better bunch of people to share it with, or anything I’d rather do than combining camping with shooting field archery with my friends (old and new) in Darrington. Saturday was the day for getting settled in to the lodging and acquainted with the area, plus checking our equipment and limbering up our shooting form. In addition to the practice area, at least one range was open with Field, Hunter, and Animal targets posted. Saturday afternoon and Sunday morning were for check-in (and late registration) and picking up information packages at the NFAA desk in the clubhouse. Sunday afternoon Opening Ceremonies were held at the football stadium. Actually, I got drafted to be Range Captain for the Dylan range, so instead of shooting all the ranges I stayed on that one all week and got to meet and talk to most of the archers

as they passed through or when I was cruising the range to post fresh target faces. It was great to hear so many nice comments about the range, facilities, and town. Yes, the week started out wet, with unseasonable showers on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday carrying over into a drizzly Monday for the first Field Round. Some places on the courses were a little muddy and slippery, but it wasn’t really raining hard enough during shooting hours to need a jacket. Tuesday through Friday, the days just kept getting nicer. Cool over night for good sleeping and a fresh start in the morning, then warming up as the day went along. All the puddles dried up quickly. But at least we didn’t need to call out the water truck to keep the dust down. Every morning, there was a good, quick, and affordable breakfast available at the Community Center. And Monday and Wednesday Outdoor Nationals continued on page 8

6 Archery Magazine October/November 2007

Archery Magazine October/November 2007 7


Outdoor Nationals continued from page 7 evenings were capped off with a satisfying dinner also at the Community Center. The Darrington High School Cheerleaders had a refreshment stand on every range to sell beverages, snacks, and sandwiches, and they were backed up with more substantial offerings adjacent to the clubhouse to load up before going out on the ranges or to refill after turning in the day’s score. When everything was tallied after Friday’s

Animal Round, there were a couple ties to break: Pro Male Freestyle Limited - Randy Brabec and Bob Gentry; Pro Female Freestyle - Jamie Van Natta and Erika Anschutz. The shootoff was held on the practice butts, at 80 yards, so the assembled spectators could watch. Then we assembled at the stadium again for presentation of the awards and Closing Ceremonies. Results begin on page 10 and are posted on the NFAA website www.fieldarchery.com.

NFAA-Easton-Mathews Shooter of the Year I started shooting in 1992 when I was 15. I purchased a bow strictly for hunting. I was then introduced to 3-D and attended some local shoots for fun. After a year, I purchased a target bow and started shooting indoor, field, and 3-D competitively. In 1995 I won the IBO Triple Crown event in Erie and placed 3rd in the Overall Triple Crown. I also placed 2nd at the IBO Worlds that same year. In the fall of 1995 I started college at James Madison University. While at JMU I won the 1997 NAA Collegiate Indoor and 1996 Outdoor National Title and was a 4 year AllAmerican. In 1998 and 2000 I was on the USA Collegiate Archery Team and traveled to Touyan Taiwan and Madrid Spain for the World University Games. In Taiwan I set 3 individual WUG records and finished with the Silver. Our Men’s Compound Team also set the Team record and won the Team Gold. In Spain I won the individual Bronze Medal and our Men’s Compound Team won Gold. After a four year break I started shooting again in 2004. In January 2006 my daughter (Caroline) was born and I did not shoot much. Finally in 2007 I have been able to start traveling again. I would like to thank my sponsor, Lancaster Archery for their great support. —Randy Hinkleman My Equipment Bow: Martin Scepter 4 w/ Elite Limbs and Furious Cams (59 lbs. @ 30 5/8”) Sight: Copper John ANTS Evo 2 Scope: Original Brite Site Vegas Top Gun 6x Stabilizer: 34.5” Doinker Elite Suppression Rest: Original Brite Site Pro Tuner String Material: BCY 452X Release: Carter Just Cuz Arrows: Carbon Express Maxima 250’s Fletchings / Nocks: Bohning 2.25 Shield Cut Vanes and Bohning Double Lock Nocks Recent Accomplishments 11 Maryland St. Championships 2007 Accomplishments Mid Atlantic Indoor 1st WAF Vegas 3rd WAF Pittsburgh 7th NFAA National Indoor 5th NFAA National Outdoor 1st 2007 NFAA Shooter of the Year 2005 Accomplishments NFAA Mid Atlantic Indoor 2nd NFAA Mid Atlantic Outdoor 1st IFAA World Indoor 2nd NFAA National Indoor 3rd 2006 Accomplishments Mid Atlantic Outdoor 4th

8 Archery Magazine October/November 2007

Randy Hinkleman

NFAA Amatuer Shooter of the Year

TOP: Adult Male Freestyle Champion Randy Hinkleman, of New Market, MD with his trophy BOTTOM: Erica Anschutz and Jamie Van Natta shoot off for the Pro Female Freestyle Championship Archery Magazine October/November 2007 9


2007 NFAA Outdoor Nationals RESULTS 1st Field

1st Hunter

2nd Field

ADULT FEMALE BAREBOW CAY MCMANUS 483 472 486 CRYSTAL ROSARIO 437 419 434 ADULT FEMALE BOWHUNTER JAN SCIACCA 469 479 476 SANDY MC CAIN 461 463 444 ADULT FEMALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE JULENE HAKL 525 530 515 CHRISTINA DAVIS 522 522 505 MINDI ENGLISH 498 506 499 ANAISE FALGOUT 507 494 493 RHONDA WHITSON 506 486 479 GAIL WRIGHT 487 494 486 LORRIE STARKWEATHER 500 476 488 JULIE CLAWSON 463 445 471 ADA CREDEUR 454 462 464 GAIL CULVER 462 467 453 CATHY WINDOW 467 427 456 TONI ST.UPERY 399 414 0 ADULT FEMALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE LTD. LANA LYNDE 432 424 404 SANDY THATER 347 401 368 ADULT FEMALE FREESTYLE Flight 1 GEORGIANNA BRADEN 543 536 533 SAMANTHA NEAL 534 542 529 SHELLEY SAXWOLD 517 537 536 CORRINE MC KENZIE 534 532 526 HEIDI SNYDER 531 522 529 KATHY PINDELL 522 532 528 STACY PEARCE 514 534 525 SHAUNA MORGAN 522 534 523 Flight 2 GLENDA MERRILL 514 533 524 KAREN PALMER 507 529 530 SHEILAH BOMAR 506 521 519 JANE SOMMERS 514 521 515 JACKIE TAYLOR 511 508 510 DARLENE MARRIER 510 510 500 MICHELLE MAGELSEN 513 520 487 NIKKI STULL 483 512 508 DAWN MABREY 480 502 502 ADULT FEMALE FREESTYLE LIMITED VICKI LEIMBACH 483 491 478 SUSAN BLICKENSTAFF 422 448 440 ADULT FEMALE FREESTYLE LTD. RECURVE/LONGBOW LYNN WALTER 392 403 430 ADULT FEMALE TRADITIONAL CHRISTINE SKUBISH 171 183 206 RENAE SKUBISH 82 134 129 ADULT MALE BAREBOW RICK STARK 506 506 496 DAVID HUGHES 498 488 501 RICH ECKENBURG 485 479 491 WILLIAM (BILL) BOWEN 475 472 488 TOM DALEY 475 485 484 ADULT MALE BOWHUNTER RICHARD BROMLEY 492 504 511 CHUCK SCIACCA 482 482 486 GARY MC CAIN 486 488 479 PAUL TUCKER 469 452 477 BOB LINETT 472 479 467 RANDY LANZENDORFER 461 460 454 MARK HOULE 456 447 468 CLARENCE BANKS 401 432 421 JOE MCMANUS 397 399 419 ADULT MALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE Flight 1 MATTHEW SCHMITZ 549 548 544 JEFF HUMAN 546 545 543 BILL HAKL 547 545 543 TIM DAVIS 543 541 543 JASON FEVELLA 543 542 537 BEN ENGLISH 530 542 544 GARY CURL 537 536 539 JUDD WATHEN 544 532 535 MARKUS DOERRY 542 528 539 RICKY ST.UPERY 541 533 538 WALTER ERICKSON 531 534 533 SCOTT BRADFORD 534 535 532 GARY MARRIER 538 531 531 JASON URADOMO 529 536 535

2nd Hunter Animal

TOTAL

480 434

537 501

2458 2225

480 461

549 534

2453 2363

518 524 497 503 486 488 474 493 466 469 434 0

559 555 553 556 545 544 541 546 541 480 544 0

2647 2628 2553 2553 2502 2499 2479 2418 2387 2331 2328 813

438 419

515 488

2213 2023

540 545 547 535 540 532 528 526

575 569 575 570 564 570 571 566

2727 2719 2712 2697 2686 2684 2672 2671

531 531 530 516 508 513 513 507 0

568 568 567 565 566 565 563 559 0

2670 2665 2643 2631 2603 2598 2596 2569 1484

485 461

543 542

2480 2313

404

508

2137

177 142

254 253

991 740

491 510 493 491 487

553 544 545 543 530

2552 2541 2493 2469 2461

514 487 470 479 471 456 464 430 415

561 555 534 537 518 522 502 526 499

2582 2492 2457 2414 2407 2353 2337 2210 2129

546 549 542 540 540 542 548 543 537 531 537 534 531 536

574 572 574 572 568 571 566 564 570 573 568 567 571 560

2761 2755 2751 2739 2730 2729 2726 2718 2716 2716 2703 2702 2702 2696

10 Archery Magazine October/November 2007

1st Field

1st Hunter

2nd Field

Flight 2 JERROD VAUGHN 534 530 529 MICHAEL KINORES 532 515 508 NATHAN TAYLOR 521 529 518 KEVIN SR PERSINGER 515 509 510 FARREL SANDQUIST 507 511 509 NICK BELEZOS 496 504 506 MICHAEL EWING 510 497 491 RANDY SPANFELLNER 518 503 478 RONNIE FALGOUT 503 476 501 MICHAEL HEARN 502 502 489 RICHARD PARKER 477 493 481 HARRY BATES 532 529 525 ADULT MALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE LTD. BRUCE WILLIAMSON 500 511 508 JOHN LA PLANCHE 503 491 489 BRIAN DALLONS 484 495 481 DAVID ALLEN 465 451 450 ANTHONY COTE’ 435 437 438 ADULT MALE FREESTYLE Flight 1 RANDY HINKELMAN 549 558 551 MARK EAVES 550 551 543 MICHAEL PESTILLI 548 556 544 RUSSELL PAYNE 553 554 548 ANDY TURNQUIST 546 555 549 KEITH SWANSON 548 548 540 JEREMY RYSER 547 551 543 RICK MORGAN 553 548 545 JC BRADWAY 540 541 538 JODY PLETAN 542 546 544 JOHN MIKOLAY 541 547 534 MATT ANDERSON 545 532 534 TRACY NEAL 540 539 538 TERRY COLIN 541 537 532 Flight 2 WYATT JOHNSON 534 534 541 RYAN MAGELSEN 536 538 527 MIKE HINDMARSH 541 532 530 DUGIE DENTON 532 536 537 MIKE FLIER 528 526 532 GREG BENNER 536 522 529 MARTY SINGLETARY 535 541 530 ROBERT SEABURY 513 539 531 RICK CARDARELLI 522 529 533 ANDREW LUDWIG 528 513 527 RON RHOADS 521 529 523 ROB KITE 513 526 529 WILLIAM YOUNG 523 534 520 DENNIS JENKINS 527 516 529 TIMOTHY SAXWOLD 514 532 532 DON STARKWEATHER 519 520 526 Flight 3 DOUGLAS MOORE 516 519 530 NOEL OLIVER 514 516 515 WES CARBONELL 513 518 511 KEVIN HODGINS 518 501 519 RICK JASPER 508 521 518 HUNTER PRICE 508 502 507 WILLIAM O’BRYANT 470 493 505 JOHN ELZA 466 508 495 STEVE ROSS 486 482 498 OLIVER AUSTIN 425 427 431 DARRIN AUCKLAND 486 477 220 ADULT MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED DAVE HRYN 514 519 521 MATT TURNER 513 516 518 EARL BATEMAN 507 516 513 DEAN COTE’ 512 520 513 SCOTT WHITEFORD 503 514 499 KEN BUCK JR 503 505 507 RON BABCOCK 486 508 492 PAUL LEWKOWICZ 464 464 444 KEN BUCK 460 459 467 DAVID BLICKENSTAFF 445 453 441 BRAD KILLIP 388 430 425 ADULT MALE FREESTYLE LTD.RECURVE/LONGBOW TIMM HINES 490 492 488 STEVEN COLEMAN 456 446 479 JIM HARRIS 445 426 418 ADULT MALE TRADITIONAL DAVID EATMON 423 426 443

2nd Hunter Animal

TOTAL

538 527 513 513 512 519 501 496 498 489 479 522

567 570 567 556 561 565 552 547 559 545 538 0

2698 2652 2648 2603 2600 2590 2551 2542 2537 2527 2468 2108

510 490 491 459 462

548 554 547 507 530

2577 2527 2498 2332 2302

555 553 551 546 540 551 549 538 553 540 544 541 532 529

574 583 576 569 573 573 568 570 582 571 576 575 572 568

2787 2780 2775 2770 2763 2760 2758 2754 2754 2743 2742 2727 2721 2707

541 543 545 537 543 538 526 539 527 536 526 532 530 523 515 522

569 574 568 568 570 574 566 566 563 570 569 568 555 562 564 564

2719 2718 2716 2710 2699 2699 2698 2688 2674 2674 2668 2668 2662 2657 2657 2651

512 528 522 522 518 500 511 494 510 463 492

570 564 571 567 553 566 558 561 545 557 564

2647 2637 2635 2627 2618 2583 2537 2524 2521 2303 2239

516 516 517 508 515 504 502 489 481 462 438

563 564 565 557 563 554 561 540 525 532 517

2633 2627 2618 2610 2594 2573 2549 2401 2392 2333 2198

515 440 442

540 505 0

2525 2326 1731

442

498

2232

2007 NFAA Outdoor Nationals RESULTS 1st Field

1st Hunter

2nd Field

2nd Hunter Animal

DAN CROFT 417 416 DANIEL HICKMAN 438 421 JOEL TURNER 415 418 PETE MILES 415 400 ED RINGEL 361 370 DARREN COGAR 251 272 TERRY CREDEUR 270 277 CUB FEMALE BAREBOW TIANA PARKER 412 398 CUB FEMALE FREESTYLE KENNEDY ALMANZA 458 452 CUB FEMALE FREESTYLE LIMITED SCHUYLER COMBS 503 507 CUB MALE BAREBOW JACOB LEIMBACH 513 513 CODY SCIACCA 408 366 CUB MALE FREESTYLE HUNTER TUVESON 558 554 KADEN PEARCE 519 522 JUSTIN MOORE 531 522 GABE ROSS 490 498 ZACHARY OLIVER 434 438 CUB MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED AUSTIN LEIMBACH 514 509 CUB MALE FREESTYLE LTD.REC/LONGBOW DUGAN DENTON 475 478 MASTER SENIOR FEMALE BAREBOW REBECCA JACKSON 367 369 MASTER SENIOR FEMALE FREESTYLE ROSIE PRIDGEN 522 514 VICKI CLEM 519 521 LIANE HICKMAN 523 515 MASTER SENIOR MALE BAREBOW CHARLEY WASHBURN 451 434 FRED LONSBERY 454 441 WAYNE WOERDICH 409 415 MONTY HEISHMAN 455 428 RALPH ADAMS 370 416 ROBERT BROMLEY 379 408 JOHN PADDOCK 363 369 JERRY MILLER 385 388 JERRY BARR 328 307 PETE BUDDING 135 138 MASTER SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE Flight 1 DEAN PRIDGEN 545 545 JOSEPH STELLA 532 536 JOE BAUERFEIND 534 532 DON KOUNS 534 529 KARL NELSON 532 533 BILL RUCKER 526 526 DON KUDLACEK 526 523 SAM WEATHERFORD 514 516 LAYTON KITE 510 516 RED CHRISTIANSEN 517 509 RICHARD MCCLINTOCK 549 530 Flight 2 LEROY DUKES 527 487 PAUL WASHBURN 514 503 DON WILL 518 506 WAYNE DAVIDSON 506 513 DOUGLAS AUCKLAND 509 510 GEORGE JACOBS 492 509 JIM HAMILTON 480 499 JERRY BRABEC 485 483 TIMOTHY AUSTIN 489 495 ROBERT BAKER 461 456 JAN MATOUS 418 425 MASTER SR. FEMALE FREESTYLE LTD. KARMA CHRISTIANSEN 414 403 MASTER SR. MALE FREESTYLE LTD. JIM STANEK 524 509 DAVID E LEISEY 506 494 LARRY WORRILL 493 502 BOB STIVISON 496 488 DICK ECKENBURG 491 461 JERRY WENZEL 464 469 ANDREW PEDELAHORE 469 472 JOHN KNOX 432 417 LARRY RAMSEY 425 437 VICTOR MATTHEWS 396 398 DICK BLANKE 437 0

434 434 381 410 375 260 296

433 435 406 393 365 271 290

531 500 481 473 451 437 343

2231 2228 2101 2091 1922 1491 1476

396

408

528

2142

455

460

530

2355

503

491

553

2557

515 433

507 425

552 507

2600 2139

558 531 525 502 466

557 519 508 511 431

583 567 563 553 509

2810 2658 2649 2554 2278

495

500

546

2564

470

481

532

2436

402

389

492

2019

524 515 512

525 526 521

570 562 561

2655 2643 2632

468 425 440 400 396 403 368 362 295 127

479 454 462 417 405 385 394 399 301 169

536 479 520 486 473 424 501 458 399 212

2368 2253 2246 2186 2060 1999 1995 1992 1630 781

550 538 533 535 530 536 533 517 524 500 0

551 542 533 536 527 530 526 525 515 518 0

575 576 568 560 571 568 568 563 560 557 0

2766 2724 2700 2694 2693 2686 2676 2635 2625 2601 1079

519 513 518 503 508 512 493 484 457 476 440

528 523 512 521 516 512 500 497 485 471 446

562 570 562 566 563 560 540 549 553 553 520

2623 2623 2616 2609 2606 2585 2512 2498 2479 2417 2249

401

392

483

2093

517 498 499 487 469 455 458 442 408 440 0

514 502 498 496 475 474 466 451 413 439 0

562 553 554 570 526 550 546 527 503 476 0

2626 2553 2546 2537 2422 2412 2411 2269 2186 2149 437

TOTAL

1st Field

PRO FEMALE FREESTYLE JAMIE VAN NATTA 547 ERIKA ANSCHUTZ 550 GINGER MOREHEAD 533 DIANE WATSON 534 BECKY PEARSON 528 CRYSTAL PARKER 528 DEBRA SIELOFF 499 PRO MALE FREESTYLE JESSE BROADWATER 556 DAVE COUSINS 554 DIETMAR TRILLUS 557 SHANE WILLS 558 JIMMY BUTTS 557 CABE JOHNSON 552 ROB MORGAN 554 JOSH SCHAFF 553 CHRIS DESTON 552 TIM GILLINGHAM 551 ROD MENZER 555 RONALD BARNDT 552 SCOTT TURNER 546 MICHAEL BRADEN 548 ANDREW WILSON 547 JOE KAPP 550 JUSTIN NIELSEN 544 GREG POOLE 536 DAVE BARNSDALE 541 JESSE MOREHEAD 524 PRO MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED BOB GENTRY 538 RANDY BRABEC 535 RODNEY HUFFMAN 532 RANDALL WELLINGS 490 JEFF STEVENS 482 SENIOR FEMALE BAREBOW RHONDA WALL 407 LINDA ADAMS 405 SENIOR FEMALE BOWHUNTER KATHY BUDDING 231

1st Hunter

2nd Field

2nd Hunter Animal

TOTAL

553 554 549 539 535 521 508

555 550 540 539 530 537 516

552 556 543 539 538 532 521

577 574 565 570 571 561 560

2784 2784 2730 2721 2702 2679 2604

557 558 556 550 558 555 557 557 553 557 552 549 549 556 549 539 547 540 540 525

556 557 555 555 553 554 552 556 552 551 551 551 550 549 543 551 532 539 530 530

560 560 558 557 554 557 558 555 554 555 555 552 554 551 552 547 548 544 538 539

583 581 578 581 578 577 574 573 578 575 575 578 581 570 575 578 574 575 546 570

2812 2810 2804 2801 2800 2795 2795 2794 2789 2789 2788 2782 2780 2774 2766 2765 2745 2734 2695 2688

528 536 529 511 501

532 534 538 497 497

536 533 538 509 489

569 565 561 559 562

2703 2703 2698 2566 2531

427 410

436 425

447 430

518 520

2235 2190

236

250

233

251

1201

Archery Magazine October/November 2007 11


2007 NFAA Outdoor Nationals RESULTS 1st Field

1st Hunter

SENIOR FEMALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE VICKI MORGAN 496 502 SENIOR FEMALE FREESTYLE BEV KOUNS 534 535 MYRA DUDLEY 530 517 GWEN MCMURRAY 511 527 LAURA SMITH 514 512 VALERY GASPARD 513 493 RUTH AUCKLAND 507 504 SUZI PRICE 501 499 JUDY DOUB 484 487 GINNEY COLEMAN 460 464 MARY WENZEL 457 463 MARSHA WEATHERFORD 442 456 CONNIE MILLER 407 0 SENIOR FEMALE FREESTYLE LIMITED TEKO PHILLIPS 456 458 LINDA MUSSER 206 147 JOEY ECKENBURG 413 407 SENIOR FEMALE TRADITIONAL SHARON TUCKER 171 206 RHEA TUCKER 113 140 SENIOR MALE BAREBOW DAVID CLEM 477 472 EDDIE MCCRARY 461 463 LEE GREGORY 435 443 SENIOR MALE BOWHUNTER LOUIE RANGEL 476 470 JAMES DEMARIAS 450 468 BILL PARKER 452 467 CLINT AXFORD 425 444 PAUL FARINA 297 334 LARRY ROLUFS 303 317 SENIOR MALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE STEVE COLEMAN 536 536 NEIL NEWKIRK 522 526 GEORGE C. AVOURIS 513 525 DON DICKINSON 513 508 MICHAEL WEBSTER 506 520 AL HERSHEY 517 521 JOHN HUFFORD 502 508

2nd Field

2nd Hunter Animal

TOTAL

504

507

552

2561

539 516 516 513 505 504 511 503 462 432 420 0

530 517 509 514 520 508 489 484 462 443 446 404

564 563 561 563 566 566 556 555 516 526 74 491

2702 2643 2624 2616 2597 2589 2556 2513 2364 2321 1838 1302

434 198 0

430 241 0

495 329 0

2273 1121 820

207 136

218 159

296 225

1098 773

493 469 454

490 466 424

542 516 514

2474 2375 2270

476 472 434 408 344 321

477 446 451 411 334 320

531 502 518 516 411 393

2430 2338 2322 2204 1720 1654

537 520 517 530 527 505 510

535 528 528 530 514 507 515

564 562 564 564 564 545 559

2708 2658 2647 2645 2631 2595 2594

12 Archery Magazine October/November 2007

1st Field

1st Hunter

2nd Field

2nd Hunter Animal

DAVE MACK 503 514 510 507 JIM CLAWSON 509 508 487 514 GERALD WHITSON 484 517 509 504 ALLAN BAXTER 456 481 477 500 DENNIS LUNDINE 454 474 444 452 DAVID CULVER 458 444 437 412 SENIOR MALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE LTD. JIM HENDRICKS 486 496 511 486 MIKE WILLIS 470 487 472 475 BRIAN BOUCHER 476 411 0 0 SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE Flight 1 JIM THURLOW 536 544 541 547 DAVID TOWNSEND 536 539 538 543 KARL OKITA 524 533 541 532 THOMAS LUPO 531 533 537 530 KEN MILLER 530 531 533 537 SCOTT BOMAR 528 534 529 536 JOHN SMITH 533 533 529 530 LARRY THURMAN 519 537 531 535 STEVE TINCHER 524 532 523 518 TEX MUSSER 524 525 521 519 CARL CLAYCOMB 522 527 508 519 WAYNE KRESIN 533 528 515 530 Flight 2 JOHN DUDLEY 521 524 535 534 FRANK GASPARD 520 515 513 522 JEFF LANDIS 503 517 512 503 JOHN DOUB 501 516 507 509 JAY PRICE 513 507 499 502 JOHN MOORE 501 512 509 507 JAMES MENSE 509 487 493 508 PETER MANSUR 498 508 501 497 JOE BRITT 489 488 510 494 JERRY COLEMAN 487 481 468 495 BOB DESTON 471 497 479 478 TOM SAUNDERS 434 452 437 459 SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED RUSTY MILLS 511 528 516 513 KENT RUSSELL 509 505 503 515 VINCE HERSCHELL 488 505 505 519 DONALD PACK 477 484 477 489 JOHN BACHO 469 491 487 494 JIM GREAGER 473 488 463 498 ED FORSLOF 456 469 421 470 JERRY GIBSON 390 401 424 435 RICHARD MARSDEN 280 249 361 401 SENIOR MALE TRADITIONAL GERALD HICKMAN 393 408 408 373 FRANK TINLEY 356 361 367 380 MARVIN GIBSON 332 345 324 356 ROCKY CHISHOLM 0 396 404 423 DALE TUCKER 226 240 231 275 SENIOR PRO MALE FREESTYLE DENNIS NEELY 544 550 555 556 THOMAS CROWE 549 547 547 553 DEE WILDE 542 548 550 552 TOM COBLENTZ 543 553 546 549 BOB WEBB 543 548 536 544 ROGER WHEATON 540 547 545 540 BEN ROGERS 541 542 537 550 RON WEST 541 537 530 542 FRANK PEARSON 537 533 529 542 YOUNG ADULT FEMALE FREESTYLE LTD. REC/LONGBOW SHAELIE MCGRATH 447 431 416 438 AMANDA SISSEN 342 351 401 432 YOUNG ADULT MALE FREESTYLE SEAN ELZA 546 544 536 532 MICAH WEGGEL 539 535 535 532 YOUNG ADULT MALE FREESTYLE LTD. REC/LONGBOW JOSHUA RABY 422 394 454 395 YOUTH FEMALE FREESTYLE PAIGE PEARCE 538 526 539 534 YOUTH MALE FREESTYLE KRIS SCHAFF 547 549 544 546 KEVIN JR PERSINGER 534 528 522 536 TATE MORGAN 528 519 522 531 PATRICK O’BRYANT 521 514 518 513 ANTHONY OLIVER 489 519 513 525 JUSTUS LEIMBACH 511 500 503 510 BRYCE PARKER 503 518 487 501 YOUTH MALE FREESTYLE LTD. REC/LONGBOW CODY DENTON 335 370 395 364

TOTAL

NFAA® CALENDAR OF EVENTS

560 559 558 550 486 454

2594 2577 2572 2464 2310 2205

561 547 0

2540 2451 887

571 575 569 567 566 569 569 566 563 566 553 0

2739 2731 2699 2698 2697 2696 2694 2688 2660 2655 2629 2106

562 567 557 554 561 543 566 557 545 542 535 526

2676 2637 2592 2587 2582 2572 2563 2561 2526 2473 2460 2308

565 558 561 552 537 544 545 531 469

2633 2590 2578 2479 2478 2466 2361 2181 1760

436 450 461 506 350

2018 1914 1818 1729 1322

577 572 572 573 573 571 572 573 570

2782 2768 2764 2764 2744 2743 2742 2723 2711

488 534

2220 2060

570 572

2728 2713

Midwestern Outdoor Sectional ........................ June 21-22 ...... Blue Springs, MO & Coon Rapids, MN

442

2107

Mid-Atlantic Outdoor Sectional ....................... June 28-29 ............................... Watkins Glen, NY

572

2709

NFAA Unmarked 3-D Championship .................July 19-20 ........................................Yankton, SD

576 564 570 563 558 561 555

2762 2684 2670 2629 2604 2585 2564

NFAA National Outdoor....................................July 21-25 ........................................Yankton, SD

386

1850

TOURNAMENT ............................. DATES ............................... VENUE —2007— Big Sky Open .................................................. November 2-4 .................................... Mesquite, NV Everglades Open ..............................................December 8-9 .................................. Homestead, FL —2008—

Southwestern Indoor Sectional ......................January 19-27 ............................. Various Locations Midwest Indoor Sectional ...............................February 2-3 .... Kansas City, MO & Sioux Falls, SD Great Lakes Indoor Sectional ...........................February 2-3 .................................... Iron River, MI NFAA Board of Directors Meeting .................February 16-18 ................................. Las Vegas, NV World Archery Festival Vegas Shoot...............February 22-24 ................................. Las Vegas, NV Mid-Atlantic Indoor Sectional ...........................March 1-2 ............................... Various Locations Northwestern Indoor Sectional .........................March 8-9 ............................... Various Locations Southern Indoor Sectional ................................March 8-9 ............................... Various Locations Southeastern Indoor Sectional ..........................March 8-9 ..... Shepherdsville, KY; Sylva, NC; and ............................................................................................................................. Tallahassee, FL NFAA National Indoor.....................................March 15-16 ....................................Louisville, KY New England Indoor Sectional ........................March 28-30 ............................... Lunenburg, MA Southeastern 3-D Sectional .............................. April 12-13 ............................... Myrtle Beach, SC World Archery Festival Stanislawski Open ......... April 19-20 ...................................... Hartford, CT Great Lakes 3-D Sectional ................................ April 26-27 ........................................ Rockton, IL NFAA Marked 3-D Championship ...................... May 2-4 ........................................ Redding, CA Southwestern Outdoor Sectional ..................... May 17-18 ...................................... Carefree, AZ Big Sky Open ................................................... June 13-15 ........................... Grand Junction, CO Southern Outdoor Sectional ............................ June 14-15 .........................Shreveport, Louisiana Great Lakes Outdoor Sectional ......................... June 14-15 .................................... Eau Claire, WI Southeastern Outdoor Sectional ...................... June 21-22 ...................................... Clemson, SC Northwestern Outdoor Sectional ..................... June 21-22 ........................................ Casper, WY New England Outdoor Sectional ...................... June 21-22 ................................. Lunenburg, MA

Big Sky Open ................................................ November 1-3 ..................................Mesquite, NV IFAA NAFAC ................................................ December 13-14 ..............................Homestead, FL

Archery Magazine October/November 2007 13


NFAA® Council & Board of Directors NFAA® Council

NFAA® Board of Directors

Officers President—Bruce Cull 2305 E. Hwy. 50 Yankton, SD 57078 605/665-8340 archery@iw.net

GREAT LAKES Judy McCutcheon Director - IL 23358 Virden Rd. Virden, IL 62690 217/652-5836 jlynnmac@royell.org

Vice President—Brian Sheffler 7006 Beargrass Ct. Indianapolis, IN 46241 317/244-7585 lbs@indy.net

Greetings fellow archers: The After School Archery Program (ASAP) is up and running. The NFAA, USA Archery and the ASA with the expertise of NADA have coordinated all their combined efforts and given the stamp of approval to have NADA be the administrator/facilitator of the entire ASAP. The Easton Sports Development Foundation has been the main financial supporter of this Program, providing the equipment through NADA. I can’t thank them enough to be giving back to the Sport through such a perfect Program. I truly believe that this Program is finally what the sport of Archery has needed to bridge the gap between the great NASP and all forms of organized competitive archery. PLEASE learn all you can about this Program and get out and spread the word—be pro-active and help get a program started in your hometown. This Program will not be successful without each and every one of us doing our part to promote it. If you would like to have more information, please contact your Sectional Councilman, State Director or NADA directly at 352-4722388 or visit their webpage at www.afterschoolarchery.org. As you get your NFAA renewal information in the mail, I hope you pay close attention to the book of raffle tickets. The NFAA Hunts of a Lifetime Raffle is a great opportunity for you to support the NFAA and have reasonably good chance of winning a great hunt! This Raffle helps support the Bowhunter Programs as well as the general fund of the NFAA. All of the hunts are donated by great supporters of the NFAA; Angus Brown Safaris of Ellisras, RSA, Fred Eichler of Full Draw Outfitters in Colorado and Ted Nugent’s Sunrize Safaris. Please consider purchasing your enclosed tickets or call our Headquarters with a credit card. Please hurry as the Raffle ends on December 31st! We will be adding some new twists to the WAF 3-Star Tour this year. We have a planning meeting scheduled the first week in September and will be considering some new changes that I am confident will complement this great and successful Event! Please be sure to read the next issue of Archery for all the details. Also at this time I would like to thank all of our Sponsors. Without these great companies there is no way possible we could have a successful 3-Star Tour and be able to have the real “proving grounds” of Archery—the Vegas Shoot! The Vegas Shoot is without a doubt the greatest and largest Shoot in the World and we owe a great deal of this to our Sponsors! Please be sure to thank them any chance you have and even more, thank them through your patronage of their great products! A big thanks from me personally and the entire NFAA/WAF to: BCY, Gordon Composites, Mathews, Easton, Hoyt USA, PSE, Maple Leaf, Saunders, HSO, Gold Tip, Morrell, Beman, Reflex, Electronic Awards, Feather Visions, McKenzie/Delta, Stanislawski, Sure-Loc and Limbsavers!! Bruce Cull 14 Archery Magazine October/November 2007

NFAA® Office 31407 Outer I-10 Redlands, CA 92373 909/794-2133 800/811-2331 NFAArchery@aol.com Great Lakes Robert McCutcheon 23358 Virden Rd. Virden, IL 62690 217/965-5290 prairie1@royell.net Mid-Atlantic Mike LePera 34 Kentwood Road Succasunna, NJ 07876 973/584-0637 brtesite@optonline.net Midwest Ray Jones 704 West South Winterset, IA 50273 515/462-6788 IowaArchery@hotmail.com New England Kenneth Moore 730 Newman Avenue Seekonk, MA 02771 508/761-5415 kmoore15@comcast.net Northwest Dennis Lundine 19605 Pribilof Loop Eagle River, AK 99577 907/696-1910 lundine5@aol.com Southeast Tim Austin 1710 SW 76th Terrace Gainesville, FL 32607 352/332-1969 Flarchery@earthlink.net Southern Lee Gregory 112 Ridge Oak Drive Georgetown, TX 78628-7613 512/863-8296 lee@dlprint.com Southwest Becky Pearson P.O. Box 308 St. David, AZ 85630 520/720-9532 beckysayre@hughes.net

Rocky Kline Director - IN 1108 N. Korby St. Kokomo, IN 46901 765/457-7086 rlkline@insightbb.com Bill Jones Director - MI 2049 Lake St. National City, MI 48748 989/469-3939

Earl Foster Director - MO 8709 Booth Kansas City, MO 64138 816/763-2699 Ed Christman Director - NE 3818 34th St. Columbus, NE 69601 402/563-3504 eChristman@neb.rr.com Marc Tebelius Director - ND 5292 8th Ave. North Grand Forks, ND 58203 701/792-3582 (home) 218/230-3258 (cell) tebelius@gra.midco.net

Dave Thewlis Director - OH 16423 Chamberlain Rd Grafton, OH 44044 440/926-2464 DThew69613@aol.com

Ron Lewon Director - SD 11 Front St. Bronson, IA 51007 lewon@netins.net

Joe Barbieur Director - WI 5238 Valley View Dr. Janesville, WI 53546 608/756-1473 caal@charter.net

NEW ENGLAND Volker Pense Director - AAE Carl-Ulrich-Strasse 2B 64297 Darmstadt, Germany 0615-653085 nfaadirector@aae-archery.org

MID ATLANTIC Ron West Director - MD 802 Painter Pl. Capitol Hts., MD 20743 202/584-8015 WestArrowsWest@aol.com John Pawlowski Director - PA 360 Madison St. Coatesville, PA 19320 610/384-5483 bpjp@ccis.net Douglas Joyce Director - NJ 30 Willow Ave. Somerset, NJ 08873 732/247-3892 jdjarcher@aol.com Dave Hryn Director - NY PO Box 341 West Seneca, NY 14224 716/481-4699 Archery1@localnet.com Jim Quarles Director - VA 7911 Cherokee Rd Richmond, VA 23225 804/272-6512 jim.quarles@vfaa.org Ron Lauhon Director - WV P.O. Box 9331 Huntington, WV 25704 304/529-3509 rlauhon2@juno.com MIDWEST Dean Conrad Director - IA 200 Mulberry St. Sumner, IA 50674 563/578-8534 abe_archery@yahoo.com John Doub Director - KS 1125 E. 59th St. Wichita, KS 67216 316/524-0963 archnutz@cox.net Bill Hakl Director - MN 5656 317th St. Stacy, MN 55079 651/462-1916 wehjkh@frontier.net

Gary Marrier Director - VT 1525 Gibou Rd. Montgomery Ctr., VT 05471 802/326-4797 bowdoctor@pivot.net Tom Schaub Director - CT 35 Benson Rd. Ridgegfield, CT 06877 203/748-3771 Dave Cousins Director - ME 354 River Rd. Standish, ME 04084 207/642-4530 Alvie Carpenter Director - MA 7 Central Peterborough, NH 03458 603/924-3941 alviec@earthlink.net Michael Wright Director - NH PO box 237 Marlboro, NH 03455 603/876-4249 barebownh@aol.com Bruce Mulneix Director - RI 6101 Post Rd. Trlr 73, N. Kingstown, RI 02852 401-885-5684 NORTHWEST Hubert Sims Director - ID PO Box 1713 Orofino, ID 83544 208/476-5377 hmsarchery@email.com Doug Tate Director - MT 3499 Blacktail Loop Rd. Butte, MT 5970d1 406/494-4393 DOUG.TATE@northwestern.com Scott Roadarmel Director - AK 4106 Harrison St. Anchorage, AK 99503 907/727-0483 sroadarmel@gci.net

LeRoy Dukes Director - OR P.O. Box 422 Fairview, OR 97024 503/201-4961 T.C. Parker Director - WA P.O. Box 613 Hoquiam, WA 98550 360/533-4698 wa_nfaa@olynet.com Dan Kolb Director - WY 3571 Teton St. Casper, WY 82609 307/265-4418 bhfsldlk@hotmail.com SOUTHEAST Howard Beeson Director - AL 111 Eagle Circle Enterprise, AL 30824 334/347-4990 Oliver Austin Director - FL 1620 Yearling Trail Tallahassee, FL 32317 850/309-1918 oaustin@admin.fsu.edu Earl Watts Director - GA 3672 Larkin Road SE Dearing, GA 30808 706/556-6145 earlwatts1@aol.com Jerry Barr Director - KY 919 Manor Dr. Henderson, KY 42420 270/827-4570 barebow@henderson.net Mike Hindmarsh Director - NC 1687 Kildee Church Rd. Ramseur, NC 27316 919/742-5017 bowtie01@centernet.net S. Dale Smith Director - SC 149 Low Road Six Mile, SC 29682 864/868-9422 sdalesmith@yahoo.com Clinton A. Berry, III Director - TN 1802 Porter Road Nashville, TN 37206 615/227-4211 caberry3@earthlink.net SOUTHERN Wayne King Director - MS 107 Dana St. Brandon, MS 39042 601/825-9278 Dick Andrews Director - AR 11 Tuxford Circle Bellavista, AR 72714 479/855-6066 andr-ds@cox.net Scott Bradford Director - LA 40340 Old Hickory Ave. Gonzales, LA 70737-6756 225/622-0838 NFAALADirector@aol.com Robert Wood Director - OK 75377 S. 280 Rd Wagoner, OK 74467 918/485-6552 robertw@osaa.us Monty Heishmann Director - TX 10149 Heritage Pkwy. West, TX 76691 254-826-5788 barebow@att.net

SOUTHWEST Frank Pearson Director - AZ P.O. Box 308. St. David, AZ 85630 520/647-7847 frank@frankpearson.com Tom Daley Director - CA 11271 Lakeshore South Auburn, CA 95602 650/722-2713 nfaadir@cbhsaa@org

Committee Chairmen Pro Chairperson Diane Watson 11815 Lakewood Drive Hudson, FL 34669 (727) 856-6841 DianeN2Archery@aol.com Celebrity Chairman Ted Nugent Promotion Chairman Fred Eichler

Kenneth Buck Director - CO 1923 Shoshone Dr. Canon City, CO 81212 719/382-8919 KandSBuck@earthlink.net George Kong, Jr. Director - HI 1255 14th Ave. Honolulu, HI 96816-3838 808/734-5402 Robert Borges Director - NM 5332 River Ridge Ave NW Albuquerque, NM 87114 505/890-4665 Archermn@netscape.com John Thayer Director - NV 7215 W. Tara Ave. Las Vegas, NV 89117 702/222-9878 mdthayer@cox.net Judd Wathen Director - UT 309 E. 100 N Ephraim, UT 84627 435/283-3129 Wathen_1@msn.com

Professional Representatives Great Lakes Jeff Button 2889 Busston Rd. Cottage Grove, WI 53527 (608) 839-5137 Midwest Sharon Henneman 9 Aspen Belton, MO 64012 (816) 679-3250 Midatlantic Doug Williams 31 Gaylord St. Apt. A Auburn, NY 13021 (315) 258-9269 dwilliams@copperjohn.com Northwest Carolyn Elder 2319 Pe Ell McDonald Rd. Chehalis, WA 98532 (360) 245-3261 Southern Troy Wesley 2306 57th St. Lubbock, TX 79412 (806) 797-0546 Southeast Diane Watson 11815 Lakewood Drive Hudson, FL 34669 (727) 856-6841 DianeN2Archery@aol.com Southwest Jonathan Pemberton 1652 N. 2100 W. Provo, UT 85604 (801) 323-3704

THE NFAA® HAS 50 CHARTERED STATE ASSOCIATIONS AND OVER 1,000 AFFILIATED CLUBS IN THE UNITED STATES AND ABROAD. THE SPORT OF ARCHERY IS A HEALTHY AND EXCITING SPORT PROVIDING AN ACTIVITY IN WHICH THE ENTIRE FAMILY CAN PARTICIPATE.

WRITE US ON HOW TO OBTAIN INFORMATION ABOUT VARIOUS PROGRAMS OFFERED BY NFAA®. NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP TOURNAMENTS, SECTIONAL/STATE TOURNAMENTS, INDOOR/OUTDOOR LEAGUES, JUNIOR BOWHUNTER PROGRAMS, WHICH INCLUDE THE ART YOUNG SMALL / BIG GAME AWARDS, AND THE BOWFISHER PROGRAM.

Archery Magazine October/November 2007 15


by Tootie Brabec

The Annual Big Sky Open

A

s the small American flags fluttered over the colored targets, competing archers from 19 states focused on their target in hopes of scoring well and taking home prize money from the annual Big Sky

16 Archery Magazine October/November 2007

Open – Grand Junction tournament, June 8 , 9, 10. The fun was just beginning! Because the archers can clean the clay pigeons in the “GoForIt” Team Shoot, it was decided to “up the ante” by using the mini-clays

at Grand Junction for the championship entrants. So Friday evening at the start of the team event, binoculars were everywhere as they stared at the spot from 65 yards that looked like a fly had landed. That did it! No perfects were recorded by any of the

pro’s, but one open shooter came close with a 48 -- Kerry Baird from Idaho! On Saturday Benton Christiansen (also from Idaho) shot a perfect 50. Christiansen’s score was the only perfect shot during the three days of competi-

Archery Magazine October/November 2007 17


BIG SKY OPEN CONTINUED tion. Christiansen adds his name to the list of those who have shot a perfect on a clay pigeon round: Becky Pearson, David Cousins, Tony Clem, Logan Wilde, Mike Grell, Tyler Tenbrook, Tim Gillingham, Cotty Hayes... At the end of the first day of the individual competition on the colored targets, Erika Anschutz was ahead of Jamie VanNatta by five points. In the Seniors, Frank Pearson was ahead of Dee Wilde by a mere 3 points. But it was the “boys with the 80’s” (Gillingham, Reo Wilde, Jeremiah McConnell, Dave Cousins, Zak Kurtzhals, Charlie Owens and Logan Wilde, respectively) who were set on playing mind games to try and secure first place. Sunday was promising to be a very long day. Little things of interest keep happening at the Big Sky Open –Grand Junction. Bob and Karen Jacobsen spend their wedding anniversary with the archers at the Big Sky; Trina and Mitch Holmes, instrumental in helping work the tournament, rushed home from their honeymoon just to help out; Terry Ragsdale decided to pick up his bow again and entered the competition, although he injured himself in Yellowstone National Park on the way. Dave Cousins came back after three years absence to try and win top prize money. Big Sky Open had a shoot-off

KWIKEE KWIVER

You Can Pay More But You Can’t Buy BETTER!! KWIKEE KWIVER CO., INC. BOX 130 ACME, MI 49610

231-938-1690 18 Archery Magazine October/November 2007

which hasn’t occurred in years; and two Robin Hoods were shot by Lisa Tenbrook and 10 year old Dugan Denton! On Sunday, Tim Gillingham, was seen staring at the ground and shaking his head in disbelief that he failed to shoot the winning score he was capable of. Reo Wilde was beaming and wiping sweat from his brow when his score revealed he had won. Cousins managed to take third from McConnell and Logan Wilde went from 7th to 4th. Kurtzhals tied for 10th and Owens came in 15th. Dee Wilde, competing in the Seniors, picked up 20 points over Frank Pearson and won this division for the first time. All three 2006 Champions – Gillingham, Anschutz and Pearson – came in second place for 2007. Gillingham made the comment “that he used to be happy with second -- but not anymore In the Mens FreeStyle Limited division, Randy Brabec placed first with a strong lead over Clyde Whyte and Tim Driscoll. Jamie VanNatta broke Michelle Ragsdale’s old score from 2002 while Dee Wilde set a new record as well as Lana Lynde. Oh yes, the shoot-off! Ramie Haines, one of Wyoming’s finest archers and Kurt Geist of Colorado, tied in the Mens Champion BHFS division. After two ends of sudden-death, Kurt pulled through and was number one! Contingency money was paid by HOYT and MATHEW’S, INC. These two bow manufacturers have the finest line-up of Staff Pro Shooters in the country and both work hard to make sure their staff shooters are well taken care of. Thank you Hoyt and Mathew’s for rewarding your top archers at the Big Sky Open – Grand Junction. The Juniors and Cubs had their own range this year, something that has not been done since the 90’s and out of this competition, Dusty Weaver, UT and Tanner Clem, CO reigned as champions respectively. The Intermediates shot with the adults and Chris Brunstch, CO and Amber Pingle, CO claimed highest scores to win the Fuoco Motor Awards in their divisions. With the close of this tournament, we are looking forward to the Big Sky Open – Mesquite

BIG SKY OPEN CONTINUED scheduled for November 2, 3 and 4 in Mesquite, Nevada. For more information and registration, look for our website www.bigskyarcheryopen. com The Big Sky Open – Grand Junction is scheduled with the DoubleTree Hotel, June 13, 14, 15, 2008. Thank you to all our sponsors: SPORTSMANS WAREHOUSE, MATHEWS, INC, HOYT, MARTIN ARCHERY, ROCKY MOUNTAIN BOWSTRINGS, JAKE’S ARCHERY, SPECIALTY ARCHERY, GOLD TIP, INC. US ARCHER magazine, FUOCO MOTOR COMPANY; and the DOUBLETREE HOTEL. Thank you to all who gave door prizes and took Bale Ads. A great big thank you to Myron & Ann Peters, Linda & Jeff Cell, Mitch & Trina Holmes, and our Referees, Mike McDonald and Tommy Younger, for helping us put the Big Sky Open on. Everyone is so appreciated! TOURNAMENT RESULTS BEGIN ON PAGE 16 Photo page 12-13: Championship Winners: Kurt Geist, CO (BHFS); Randy Brabec, CO(FSL); Jamie VanNatta, OH (FS); Lynn Walter, CO, (Cls.FS); William Caires, CO (BHFSL). Below: Four top men of the 2007 Big Sky Open - Grand Junction, Tim Gillingham, UT; Jeremiah McConnell, CO; Reo Wilde, ID; and Dave Cousins, ME.

Archery Magazine October/November 2007 19


by Bernie Pellerite How the Pros Do It ©2007 HOLDING STEADY PART I

$20,000 BIG SKY OPEN RESULTS 2007 ** denotes new record

CHAMPIONSHIP MEN FSU 1 REO WILDE, ID-584/585=1169 $1700+ Gold coins/Chest, Goblet + $3000 HOYT Contingency Money 2 TIM GILLINGHAM, UT-587/580=1167 $850 $2000 MATHEWS, INC. Contingency money 3 DAVE COUSINS, ME-582/584=1166 $600+ $1000 HOYT Contingency Money 4 LOGAN WILDE, ID-580/585=1165 $500 5 ROGER HOYLE, UT-576/584=1160 $400 6 JEREMIAH MCCONNELL, CO-584/575=1159 $350 7 CHRIS DESTON, CT-576/581=1157 $300 8 JOSH SCHAFF, MT-579/571=1150 $250 9 KEVIN WILKEY, UT-573/583=1156 $200 CHAMPIONSHIP WOMEN’S CLASSIC LIMITED 1 LYNN WALTER, CO-371/406=777 $98+ Gold Coins/Chest, Goblet, Roses CHAMPIONSHIP MENS BHFSL 1 WILLIAM CAIRES, CO-469/483=952 Gold Coins/Chest

$95+

CHAMPIONSHIP WOMEN FSU 1 JAMIE VAN NATTA, OH-575/578 =**1153 $636 Gold Coins/Chest, Goblet, Roses + $2000 HOYT Contingency money 2 Ericka Anschutz, NE-580/572=1152 $1000 HOYT Contingency money 3 Becky Pearson, AZ-559/527=1086 $250 MATHEWS, INC. Contingency money CHAMPIONSHIP MEN FSL 1 RANDY BRABEC, CO-564/549= **1113 +Gold Coins/Chest 2 Clyde Whyte, CO-478/494=972 3 Tim Driscoll, CA-412/454=896

$576

MENS CHAMPIONSHIP FSU SENIOR DIVISION 1 DEE WILDE, ID - 566/578= **1144 $696 (MATHEWS STAFF SHOOTER) Gold Coins/Chest 2 FRANK PEARSON-569/551=1120 $417 3 DONALD SNIPES, NV-551/555=1106 $278 MENS CHAMPIONSHIP BHFS (SHOOT-OFF FOR FIRST) KURT GEIST, CO-561/557=1118 Gold Coins/Chest, Goblet 20 Archery Magazine October/November 2007

$700+

2 RAIME HAINES, WY-560/558=1118 3 Judd Wathen, UT-560/552=1112

$420 $300

WOMENS CHAMPIONSHIP BHFSL 1 LANA LYNDE, ND-366/354= **720 Gold Coins/Chest, Goblet

$98+

OPEN FLIGHTS – MEN #1 1 ANDY TURNQUIST, WY-579/567=1146 2 BENTON CHRISTENSEN, ID-568/570=1138 3 CASSIDY MILLER, MI-568/558=1126 4 BILL TIEFENTHALER, MT-568/553=1121

$273 $205 $137 $ 69

OPEN FLIGHTS – WOMEN #1 1 SHAUNA MORGAN, MT-543/547=**1090 $240 2 AMBER CHRISTENSEN, ID-527/537=1064 $144 3 LISA SPEAKMAN, CO-523/536=1059 $96 MALE YOUTH AMATEUR INTERMEDIATE 1 CHRIS BRUNTSCH, CO-562/554=1116 2 KEEGAN DE PRIEST, CO-545/551=1096 2 KYLE BARTLES, CO-558/538=1096 3 Jeffrey Crippen, CO-537/541=1078 4 Logan Weaver, UT-520/526=1046 5 Ethan Harvey, MT-519/525=1044 6 Dustin Phillips, CO-531/512=1043 FEMALE YOUTH AMATEUR INTERMEDIATE 1 AMBER PINGLE, CO-528/503=**1031 MALE YOUTH AMATEUR JUNIOR 1 DUSTY WEAVER, UT-579/597=1176 2 TATE MORGAN, MT-578/581=1159 3 SHELBY MOORE, CO-522/535=1057 4 Ostan Holmes, CO-500/522=1022 5 Cody Denton, MT-463/485=948 MALE YOUTH AMATEUR CADET 1 TANNER CLEM, CO-555/532=1087 2 DUGAN DENTON, MT-491/523=1014 3 KAYDEN SERIANI, CO-410/415=825

Fuoco Trophy Fuoco Trophy Fuoco Trophy

Trophy Fuoco Trophy Fuoco Trophy Fuoco Trophy

Fuoco Trophy Fuoco Trophy Fuoco Trophy

Complete results available at www.bigskyarcheryopen.com

M

ost advanced and pro shooters see a sight picture that is entirely different and is three to five times calmer than yours . . . they see a very slowly floating pin or dot that seldom leaves the aiming area (13⁄4” x-ring at 20 yards) or kill zone and, in some cases, nearly stops for two to three seconds. Ideally, most can hold it there for four to seven seconds without getting much worse, and in the best examples, it usually stays fairly steady day to day in practice or in tournaments. By now, you are probably asking yourself two questions . . . “What’s the secret, and how come we haven’t heard more about this?” The answer to the second question, I think, is threefold. First, as I have said before, most pros (with a few notable exceptions) are better shooters than teachers and the rest of them see no advantage in educating the competition. Second, good coaches and teaching pro shops are not easy to find. Third, most sports writers are usually much better writers than coaches or shooters and don’t know the answers themselves. To answer the first question, we need to look a little deeper into the cause of the problem. In my opinion, the primary reason that most people shake or can’t hold their sight still is they are using muscles to try and hold it steady. To me, the words “using muscles” and “holding steady” in the same sentence is a contradiction

in terms. Randy Ulmer points out “. . . any time we recruit muscle fiber, there is tension, and tension causes movement.” The more muscular involvement we have, the more movement we get. At this point, it is important to note that this muscular involvement, so prevalent in beginner through semi-advanced levels, can be traced to four primary problems not present at the top shooting levels: 1. Incorrect Draw Length 2. Bad Form 3. Too Much Draw Weight 4. Not Enough Bow Mass

Weight Because of the length of this subject matter, Draw Weight and Mass Weight will be covered in the next issue. INCORRECT DRAW LENGTH When we first tried to pull back a bow, most of us grabbed the bow handle, pushed it out as far as our shoulder would allow and pulled with the other hand as hard as we could. We held it back somewhere around the corner of our mouth or jaw, or, in some cases, our ear. In

A draw length that’s too long will cause your sight to shake. Archery Magazine October/November 2007 21


most cases the ability level and qualifications of whoever helped us pick out and fit our first bow determined what kind of chance we had of learning correctly. If you had an advanced or professional archer or qualified coach with you, then you were extremely lucky. (Most of us had a buddy named, “Bubba.”) If you were like me, you were fortunate enough to be advised by a burr-headed 17-year-old who resembled the kid who played “Dueling Banjos” in the movie, Deliverance. He was recently promoted from stock clerk to manager of the sporting goods department at the local K-Mart. Unfortunately, most bows at K-Mart, Wal-Mart, mail order catalogs, and some pro shops were (and sometimes still are) ordered in at 30 inches of draw. Maybe it’s because when you don’t know what you are doing, it is easier to sell too long of a draw length than too short. This is sort of like the “one size fits all” concept. For example, if you should shoot a 28” or 29” draw like most people between 5’10” and 6’ tall with normal proportions, and you are handed a 30” or 31” draw bow, there are several things you can do to make it “fit” . . . anchor farther back, use a high wrist grip, lean farther back or, easiest of all, extend the bow shoulder as far as you can. What does all of this do for us? It teaches us to extend or flex our muscles to pull and hold the bow and . . . you guessed it . . . causes our sight to shake! It also promotes punching the trigger or plucking the string, in a futile attempt to control the instant, and thereby the impact point of the shot of the arrow. Because we flex or recruit muscles in the shoulder and arm (and in

22 Archery Magazine October/November 2007

the case of high wrist grip, the back and front of the hand) when we draw a bow that’s too long, all of these muscles are in a state of tension. This is the biggest reason for movement. The obvious solution is “if you want to stop shaking . . . stop flexing!” If you don’t have your draw length close to being right yet, use the following draw length formula and get your bow adjusted. There’s not much else you can do until you get your draw length right.

95% of all archers. However, there are exceptions, such as people with shoulder or elbow problems, or abnormally long or short fingers or hands. When using my formula, the important thing you need to be aware of is, if the fingers or hands are not normal length, you will have to add or subtract a 1⁄2” or so on each hand to make up the difference. For example, for short stubby fingers, you might have to add 1⁄2” to each hand to get a correct draw length measurement. For extra long hands and fingers do the opposite. A mathematician came up with a simple variation of my formula: Subtract 15” from your wingspan and divide by 2. For example, 71” - 15 = 56 divided by 2 = 28”. You will get the same answer, regardless of which variation you use. Any one of these formulas should get you within 1⁄4” to 1⁄2” of your correct draw length. Most of the time though, no compensation for long or short fingers will have to be made. However, if you shoot with a high wrist grip, you will probably have to add up to 1” to the final AMO draw length.

THE DRAW LENGTH FORMULA This formula is not fool proof, but it works for most people. Also keep in mind, this is based on correct form. (See below.) The archer should stand with his or her back to a wall, with arms stretched out as far as possible at shoulder height with his palms facing out. We are measuring “wingspan.” Measure from tip of the middle finger of one hand to the tip of the middle finger of the other. (No long fingernails!) Here is a partial chart that you can use to determine correct draw length. I developed this system in 1996 and use it in the shooter’s school. Complete SHOOTING FORM your own chart based on the folTo improve your form, and lowing: therefore your chances to achieve predictable accuracy, 69 inches = 27 inches AMO draw shorten your draw until you have 70 inches = 271⁄2 inches AMO draw a relaxed bow hand, with the 71 inches = 28 inches AMO draw pressure on the heel of the hand 72 inches = 281⁄2 inches AMO draw or more precisely, at the base of 73 inches = 29 inches AMO draw the thumb directly in front of . . . and so on. the wrist bones. This eliminates any possible muscular involveFor every inch of “wingspan” over or ment from the elbow forward under 71” add or subtract a 1⁄2” from and puts the bow against bone. 28” of AMO draw, respectively. Continuing with this guideline, relax the bow shoulder and keep This formula works for about a straight, but relaxed, elbow

Fig. B

Front

Fig. C

Rear

Fig. A Imagine how steady your sight would be if you could replace your bow arm with a twoby-four!

joint. As for the shoulder itself, it needs to be in the “down, back and relaxed” position. The level or height of the bow shoulder should be about the same as the other shoulder; not rolled forward and not held higher than the other shoulder. It should be relaxed and seated (locked) in the shoulder socket with the bow weight held by the bones of the skeletal system, not with tendons and muscles. This boneto-bone form will eliminate most muscular involvement. Obviously, if the elbow is bent, not only do you have to recruit muscle to hold it in that position, but it is inconsistent also. Theoretically, if you could remove your arm at the shoulder joint and replace it with a 2” x 4” or solid wooden arm . . . now, how steady would your sight be? As steady as a rock with no bow hand torque (see Fig. A). If you have trouble finding the low-locked shoulder position, try opening your stance a little. Turn slightly toward the target, 15 to 20 degrees. The shoulder socket is not at the end of your shoulder. It faces slightly forward, otherwise you could swing your bow arm across your back, almost as far as you could across your chest. As you can see in Fig. B, the front of the skeletal shoulder is a ball joint and also notice the rear

view (Fig. C) shows the scapula (shoulder blade) and the angle that the shoulder socket sets on the skeleton. Therefore, when you open your stance, that will also cause your arm to point slightly forward (Fig. D), thus allowing the ball on the end of the humerus (upper arm bone) to relax down into the shoulder socket. Remember, your head should be centered over an erect but relaxed torso with your feet at shoulder width. Your aiming eye should be directly over your belt buckle. The tip of your draw elbow should be at least as high as your nose with the forearm above the line of the arrow (see photo E). If you are in doubt as to why you should adopt this shoulder position and an open stance as opposed to shooting with a closed stance (the feet on a line to the target and the shoulder and bow arm on the same line) look at Fig. F with the arms angled to align with and drop into the shoulder sockets. Then look at Fig. G with both arms straight out to the sides, which are not in the middle of the shoulder ball socket. You can feel for yourself which one is the most relaxed with the least muscular involvement. Start out by imitating Fig. F. Simply raise your arms (not your shoulders) parallel with the

ground to the position shown in Fig. F. Slowly rotate both arms out to your sides as in Fig. G. Notice that before you reach the position shown in Fig. G, you will feel a pulling sensation and tension in the top front of both shoulder muscles (deltoids) as

Fig. D With a slightly open stance, the arm joint lines up naturally with the shoulder socket and the string is clear of the bow arm.

Fig. E

To achieve correct form, relax the bow shoulder and keep a straight, but relaxed, elbow joint. The shoulder itself needs to be in the “down, back but relaxed” position. The level or height of the bow shoulder should be about the same as the other shoulder; not rolled forward and not higher than the other shoulder. Your head should be centered over a relaxed torso with your feet separated about shoulder width. Your aiming eye should be directly over your belt buckle. The tip of your draw elbow should be at least as high as your nose with the forearm above the line of the arrow. Archery Magazine October/November 2007 23


Fig. F

the arms swing out of, and away from, the natural shoulder socket. With this body position, the anchor is the only other factor that will vary. The anchor can be almost anywhere as long as it is solid, touches bone, involves multiple points of reference, and does not “float.” For example, the string hand should be touching and locked into, under or behind the jaw bone. Then, the eye centered in the peep sight and the string touching the nose (or the chin for recurve tournament archers who shoot long distances) can be two other points of reference. Some shooters add a kisser button to the string as a reference point (not necessary if you

use a peep sight). These should give you a good, solid anchor. With a straight, relaxed forearm, wrist, and elbow directly in line with the arrow, the only muscles we want to feel flexed are the rhomboids, between the shoulder blades, on the draw side only. This relaxed form with “passive physical aiming,” dictates that, “we move the trunk of the body up or down to change our point of aim,” instead of recruiting muscle fibers in the arms and shoulders. If your draw length is too long, you will never be able to relax and stop shaking in such a stretched-out position. This is because of all those muscles you used to pull and hold the bow at

Fig. G

full draw. Conversely, if the draw length is correct you won’t be able to stretch out, and you can relax at full draw. This only covers two of the four factors in holding steady. In the next issue, we will cover the remaining two; draw weight and bow mass weight. Editor’s note: The preceding article is an excerpt from Bernie’s book Idiot Proof Archery. This best selling hardcover book has over 300 pages and 350 photos and diagrams and is now available in paperback. It is one of the most comprehensive books ever written on archery and the most popular that’s available on the market today.

Congratulations to these featured recipients of the National Field Archery Association Memorial Scholarship Program for 2007!

Anthony will attend Western Technical College with a major in marketing. He has been an active volunteer in his community assisting in camp archery programs. He is a level 1 Certified Instructor and teaches archery safety lessons.

ANTHONY SCHMIDT • LA CROSSE, WI

The School of Advanced Archery & Instructor Certification UPDATE The School of Advanced Archery & Instructor Certification, a.k.a. “A Weekend at Bernie’s,” is well into its fourth year. So far, the ever-popular mobile Shooter’s School (formerly the NFAA Shooter’s School) has conducted 32 schools. 395 students have attended, with 369 becoming Certified Instructors. Interested shooters should go after your pro shop owners or club presidents and book a Shooter’s School near you! Remember, the host shop or club receives 10% and the contact person attends for free. The Shooter’s School has begun offering NFAA Certification. To date, there are 72 new NFAA members and 103 new NFAA Level III Instructors. For more information about attending or hosting a school, go to www.robinhoodvideos. com. ROBINHOOD VIDEOS • 1600 Reynoldsburg-New Albany Rd. • Blacklick, Ohio 43004 614-322-1038 / fax 614-322-1039 • E-mail: Bernie@robinhoodvideos.com • www.robinhoodvideos.com 24 Archery Magazine October/November 2007

Erika is attending the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, majoring in psychology. To her credit, she has attained over 150 national record scores in indoor and outdoor archery competitions. Eighteen of these are FITA world records.

ERIKA ANSCHUTZ • GRAND ISLAND, NE

Tiffany will be attending University of Montana, Helena. She is majoring in web mastery. Tiffany enjoys working with kids in 4-H programs. As a high school senior, she held a 4-H Archery KickOff shoot to encourage those new to the sport.

TIFFANY REEVES • HELENA, MT

Joseph will be attending Minnesota State Community and Technical College. He plans to major in Marine Engine Technology. Joe has been an archer since the age of five. He is very involved with his local archery club, helping promote archery with Cub Scout troops and school physical education programs.

JOSEPH DETERMAN • HENDERSON, MN

Scholarship applications for 2008 available at www.nfaarchery.com and must be received by December 31, 2007 Archery Magazine October/November 2007 25


SECTION & STATE ASSOCIATION NEWS Edited by Paul Davison • stringwalker@att.net GREAT LAKES SECTION Bob McCutcheon, Councilman prairie1@royell.net

2008 Great Lakes Sectional Schedule The Great Lakes Indoor Sectional will be held on February 2-3, 2008, at Iron River, MI. The Outdoor Sectional will be in Wisconsin on June 1415, 2008. More detailed information on these shoots will be in the next issue of Archery.

MID-ATLANTIC SECTION Mike LePera, Councilman brtesite@optonline.net

2008 Mid-Atlantic Sectional Schedule The Mid-Atlantic Indoor Sectional will be held at no less than fourteen widely-spaced venues on March 1-2, 2008. The Outdoor Sectional will be held June 28-29, 2008 at Watkins Glen, NY.

State News PENNSYLVANIA

Pennsylvania Outdoor State Championship Results 14 Field + 14 Hunter PL SHOOTER SCORE Master Senior Master Freestyle C Darrell Gehman 533 2 Ed Albright 532 3 Stan Lenhart 522 Richard Alexander 516 Dale Cain 505 Senior Male Freestyle C Ed Reichert 543 2 Michael Farren 532 3 Bruce Smith 526 Adult Male Freestyle C Robert Wertz 549 2 T. L. Williams 545 3 Greg Kulp 530 Greg Walker 529 Sylvan Glick 528 John Patcher 524 Scott Kearney 520 Steve Milcoff 517 Adult Male Freestyle Limited C Paul Donahoo 519 Kevin Kolak DNF Adult Bowhunter Freestyle C Greg McBride 532 2 John Eline 523 3 Tom Tober 514

SOUTHERN SECTION Lee Gregory, Councilman lee@dlprint.com

John Pawlowski, Director bpjp@ccis.net 2008 Southern Sectional Schedule Pennsylvania Field and Target Archers 2007 Outdoor Championship

The 2008 Southern Indoor Sectionals will be held on March 8th and 9th at multiple sites. The Outdoor Sectional will be in Louisiana on June 14th and 15th. More detailed information on these shoots will be in the next issue of Archery.

The Pennsylvania Field and Target Archers, the NFAA affiliate from Pennsylvania, held its annual Outdoor State Championship on Sunday July 29. The tournament was held at Mechanicsburg Archers, Mechanicsburg, PA. The round consisted of 14 Field and 14 Hunter targets. Twenty-one shooters participated this year compared to sixteen in 2006. It’s always good to have an increase of archer participation in a regularly held tournament. Competition was nip and tuck in the Master Senior Freestyle division where one point separated winner Darrell Gehman, 533, and Ed Albright, 532. Here are the complete results:

26 Archery Magazine October/November 2007

Archery Magazine October/November 2007 27


SOUTHEASTERN SECTION Tim Austin, Councilman flarchery@earthlink.net

2008 Southeastern Sectional Schedule For the first time, the Southeastern Indoor Sectional will be held at multiple sites on 8-9 March 2008: (1) Tri-State Archers, Tallahassee, FL, (2) Black Rock Archery, Sylva, NC, and (3) Chickasaw Archers, Shepherdsville, KY..The 3-D Sectional will be hosted by the Sandune Archers at Myrtle Beach, SC, on 12-13 April, and the Outdoor Sectional will be hosted by the Keowee Bowmen at Clemson, SC, on 21-22 June. 2007 Southeastern 3-D Sectional This tournament was held in conjunction with the Georgia State 3-D, and about thirty individuals actually shot both courses. The Fort Gordon club has two 25-target 3-D courses set up in beautiful woods and with realistic natural settings. The unmarked course was fairly evenly balanced between long shots on large targets, medium distance shots and closer shots at smaller animals. We had bright, clear weather, and 90° to 100° very humid heat. The hosts provided us with plenty of fluids, and we all tolerated the elements. The Adult Male Freestyle Bowhunter division required a tie-breaker for the championship. For the shoot-off, a Jake turkey was set out at an unknown (about 34 yards) distance, nose-on, and between two trees. Two very good shots, but one clear winner. The Fort Gordon hosts were gracious and helpful. It was a fun shoot at a beautiful site with a top quality course.

Southeastern 3-D Sectional Results August 4-5, 2007 - Ft. Gordon, GA 25 Unmarked + 25 Marked

Underlined score means award based on tie-breaker 25 PL SHOOTER ST UNMRKD Adult Male Freestyle C Mitchell Irvin GA 262 2 Bobby Flores SC 244 3 William McDonald GA 242 Stephen Edwards GA 243 Eric Helfritz FL 231 Senior Male Freestyle C Charlie Stone, Sr GA 228 Master Senior Male Freestyle C Ted Lynn SC 231 2 Don Melton SC 215 3 Tim Austin FL 206 Young Adult Male Freestyle C J D Long SC 214 2 Aaron Atkinson SC 208 Youth Male Freestyle C Gaylor Ronemus GA 180 Cub Male Freestyle C Raleigh Boots GA 198 Adult Male Bowhunter Freestyle C Charlie Stone, Jr. GA 229 2 Greg Ledger GA 235 3 Ricky Diederich GA 225 Tim Wehner GA 220 Adult Male Barebow C Phillip Baldowski GA 94 Senior Male Traditional C Bobby Barrow GA 132

25 MRK

TOTAL

278 272 274 256 258

540 516 516 499 489

252

480

242 239 217

473 454 423

238 224

452 432

179

359

211

409

256 250 246 212

485 485 471 432

145

239

144

276

SOUTHWESTERN SECTION Becky Pearson, Councilwoman beckysayre@hughes.net

2008 Southwestern Sectional Schedule Indoor Sectional The Southwestern Indoor Sectional will be a mail-in tournament. Shooting will take place from January 19 through Jan. 27, 2008. The locations will be set by the States, so contact your State Director for specific dates and locations. • The shoot will consist of one 450 round on the official Vegas face (threespot or single spot) following NFAA rules. • A time limit of 2-1/2 minutes for each three arrow end will be used. • Only NFAA members may compete in the tournament. Sign up at the shoot or bring your membership card for proof of membership. • Pros must have a current pro card and pay an additional $50.00 for the pro purse. • The trophies and pro purse will come from NFAA headquarters after all scores are tabulated and winners determined. Ties will be broken with “X” counts. If there is still a tie, the archer missing with first “X” will lose the tie. Awards will be based on NFAA flight system, determined by the number of participants in each class and division. Awards will be mailed to the host club or lanes. • Fees for the tournament are $77 for pros, including the pro purse. Individual fees are $27 ($9 to host club, plus $1 for targets, and $17 to NFAA for administration and awards). • Use registration form published in the Archery magazine, on the NFAA website www.fieldarchery.com, or from your State Association or host club. Outdoor Sectional The Outdoor Sectional will be held on May 17 and 18, 2008 at the Ben Avery Shooting facility near Carefree, AZ. It will be hosted by Black Canyon Archers.

28 Archery Magazine October/November 2007

Archery Magazine October/November 2007 29


capability. We all know that person is you. Your

form in practice. Put your focus in that direc-

thinking is constantly being bombarded with

tion, and then you will not be giving the results

distracting stimuli that can create pressure such

of the performance the inflated value.

as winning a tournament, shooting a high score,

by Terry Wunderle

Quite often you will shoot a shot that you

winning a trophy, impressing your friends, or

knew was a ten the instant that you released

living up to the expectations of others. Any one

it. It just felt like a perfect shot. The feeling of

of these things can and probably will destroy

that moment is what you want in your mind and

your performance if you give it more importance

muscles when you focus on perfect shot execu-

than taking care of the task that is in front of

tion. As you become more aware of this feeling,

you. You have one job to do. Shoot the best

try to perform it while blank bale shooting. By

shot that you are capable of shooting. Instead

practicing and duplicating this feeling, you are

of dwelling on the results of the shot or tourna-

polishing your form and raising your concentra-

ment, put your concentration and focus on your

tion level, so you can use it under pressure con-

performance. Handling the pressure shot is no

ditions. The next time you find yourself under

different than handling any other shot, as long

pressure, look at the target and picture yourself

as you don’t place a more significant value on

shooting the perfect shot. Feel the strong back-

it. The shot needs to be executed with the same

pressure, the explosion, and the follow-through.

consistent form as you do in practice.

Thinking these thoughts will give you a positive

A pressure shot becomes so because your

feeling and positive results.

thinking made it that way. Do not let this type of thinking dominate your focus. Instead concentrate and focus on executing a shot with perfect form. This should be done anytime your Two targets remained in the final round of a

was no doubt in my mind. The shots to fol-

3-D championship. Two archers were tied and

low would be the best that he had to offer. He

the tension in the air was strong enough to curl

cleaned the last two targets and won the cham-

the leaves on the trees. As I watched one of

pionship.

my students waiting for his turn at the stake, he turned toward the target and stood there motionless for several minutes. The target was a

After the final target, I congratulated him and asked, “Were you nervous?” He replied, “A little, but I kept it under con-

forty-six yard javelina and appeared to be a very

trol. My mental program helped me put my

challenging shot. When his turn to shoot ar-

concentration on making a perfect shot.”

rived, he set his sight, loaded his bow, and again stood motionless staring at the target. There 30 Archery Magazine October/November 2007

Only one person can put so much pressure on you that you cannot perform up to your

mind starts dwelling on the results of the tournament, even weeks before the tournament. Many archers get so engrossed in winning an upcoming event that they raise their anxiety to an unmanageable level before they even get to the first target. Concentrate and focus on what you can control, which is the execution of a perfect shot. When you prepare for the next tournament, promise yourself that you will focus on shooting each shot with your best form. That should be your main goal! I am sure most of you can shoot nearly every shot with consistent Archery Magazine October/November 2007 31


D

AIMING AND MORE AIMING There is More to Aiming Than Many Realize uring the great many fun years my entire family was on the tournament circuit I was

arrows over the last 3 days before the trip, with only about a 6 month lull before that.

often asked why all our sons shot so well. As

Getting ready, when I picked up my newer-fan-

and more in error. You know how we “mechanic”

a former military rifle competitor, about all I could

cier bow I remembered the sight was scattered in

types are, we first try to use it anyway thinking we

A peepsight can be a valuable asset but using

say was that I had explained to them how impor-

pieces and so was the arrowrest so there was no

can still be accurate by centering-up side to side,

one only well enough to get “into the ballpark” is

tant AIMING was.

time to get it ready. I found my “old-reliable” 46

regardless of how narrow the picture becomes.

not good enough if you want to become as accu-

My son Toby and I just came in from driving a

inch, round eccentric, wooden limb beauty I’ve

few hours to shoot an NFAA indoor event in one

shot with 1914 X7’s for 15 or 20 years and just

CENTERING UP YOUR SIGHT PICTURE.

of the 50 SYWAT indoor events (Shoot Your Way

like my scoped 1903 Springfield 30.06 coyote

For those of you who believe you can adequately

Across Texas, Nov-Feb indoor league) scheduled

rifle there in the cabinet, it still purrs like a kitten

center-up like that let me assure you it is NOT good

in 36 cities in Texas. With my age qualifying me

and is always ready to go at a moment’s notice.

poker. In my opinion, if you are not making maxi-

for Master Senior registration I don’t have to wor-

So smooth, so quiet, it is always a pleasure to use

mum use of your peep by centering the ENTIRE

ry about being embarrassed and only venture out

it.

scope housing in the peephole you are overlook-

to see old friends and stay more in touch with the

rate as possible. That is, when you get a peephole

ing an extremely valuable advantage. If you are NOTHING HAD CHANGED.

using a small peep-hole and attempting to center

I certainly have nothing to prove with my

However, it still had “operator problems” no dif-

up with that little bitty aiming spot on your scope

scores, in fact I never did worry much about my

ferent than most everyone else’s I suppose. Late

lens, you are treading on thin ice. That is, your eye

own score, only at having my setup ready in case

in the round I had already cataloged several rea-

and brain simply cannot be as accurate in making

I decided to get serious. I often joke that the few

sons why I had missed more X’s, and 5’s, than I

all 4 of the up-down-right-left spacings perfectly

times I did win a trophy or a purse position it was

had expected to. Besides standard excuses #14,

equal every time. Take a pencil and hold it in the

a surprise when I found out. I was perfectly con-

44 and 251, I was able to generate a new excuse

center of an 8 or 10 inch mixing bowl and then in

tent to take pride in having my gear set-up as well

#654 which is that my recent cataract surgeries

the center of a coffee cup. On which do you think

or better than anyone else and I always say that

had corrected my eyes so well that my formerly

you guessed more accurately? When you realize

the only reason I didn’t turn in a perfect score was

clear scope picture was nowhere near as clear as it

that for any one of the 4 that you guessed too

simply because I wasn’t willing to pay the price

was before! Number 44 of course is not centering

short, you will miss dead center in that direction.

of working hard enough to get it done. For this

up in my peep. As the day went on I was fight-

Plus, you can also be off in 2 directions at once!

last one, I can’t imagine why I wasn’t in better

ing my 43 inch strings gradual change in rotation

Then when you understand that the greater the

shape mentally and physically, I shot at least 60

that was causing my peep to slowly become more

distance to the target the greater the amount of

sport.

32 Archery Magazine October/November 2007

error, it really gets spooky.

of the right size to allow a little circle of light all continued on page 32

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Robert Ragsdale, A. E. See services listed on home page at: www.bowhunting.net/bobragsdale/ragsdale.html Archery Magazine October/November 2007 33


Figure 1. If the kisser is set to the lip at 20 yards and the peepsight is used it would look like this. But, shooters with a setup containing both a kisser button and a peepsight may be playing Russian roulette with their score and not helping accuracy whatsoever. Often these individuals think they are being “double safe” for distance settings and do not realize they are components of 2 different systems and actually are not compatible. Many experience consistent high and low impact problems and cannot understand why. SAFETY NOTICE: Note how well this peepsight is secured to avoid pop-out injuries.

Figure 2. Only when the shooter totally ignores the position of the kisser while enjoying only the security of feeling the kisser wherever it happens to end up can the confusion be avoided. Notice the head and the front sight are always in the same position looking directly at the target regardless of the distance. Now notice how this arrow now points uphill as the entire bow is raised higher for a greater distance. Here, at 60 yards for example, the peepsight is being used correctly so the kisser button has pivoted down and away since everything pivots on the peepsight hole, not on the kisser button. Here, if the kisser was placed on the lip as in Figure 1 the shooters view would be completely under the entire peepsight and use of the sight scale for the peepsight would cause a very, very low impact point.

around your scope housing it is half the battle. It’s

draw, is always in the correct up-down and right-

really easy center up on the entire scope housing

left position so the projectile will be directed to

when there is only a small circle of light around it

where the FRONT end of the barrel or arrow is be-

and then keeping it like that all you need to do is

ing aimed. So, first, we need to be sure where the

move your little bitty aiming dot over onto what

bowstring is resting, side to side. The only way to

you want to hit.

be certain is to actually see it and not depend on it merely being identically squished into your face

WHAT, NO PEEPSIGHT WANTED,

someplace. Which means it is out front enough

OR ALLOWED?

that your eye can pick it up, fuzzy as it may be.

Someone on my website asked me what the

Some line-up the fuzzy vertical blur somewhere

value of a peep was because he was considering

along the bow handle but there are other places. I

removing his. I said after you do it, try to shoot

remember adding a little white paint on a crossing

a tight group at 20 yards and you’ll figure it out.

cable and when it disappeared behind the fuzzy

Some sight shooters may not want to bother

string I figured I knew where it was. Now, what

with one while others, like FITA/Olympic com-

about up and down for accurate distances?

petitors, aren’t even allowed to use one. So what can they do to try and achieve the equivalent of

A KISSER BUTTON FOR ELEVATION

a “rear sight?”

REFERENCE.

Rear sights are necessary to MAKE CERTAIN the rear of the barrel, or the rear of the arrow at full 34 Archery Magazine October/November 2007

NOT use them both at the same time. Those who

if only I “wanted to work that hard” it is still a

do try it generally end up with continual high-low

great thrill to continually witness that when the

misses as they unwittingly use the peep on one

bow fired with the sight a tad high-right and find

shot and the kisser on the next. Only those who

that the hit was precisely at that very location! Get

need it as a security blanket and care-not where

the point, when you have progressed to the point

the kisser is touching them can use both.

where every arrow you shoot always impacts EX-

Any protrusion on the bowstring set to be felt

ACTLY where you pointed it you have done all

at a specific point on your face such as the lips

you can do mechanically and you can’t buy any-

as in Figure 1, is termed a “kisser.” Some use a

thing over the counter that will make your arrow

metal crimp-on nock-set, others a ball of thread.

impact where it was not aimed. That is, don’t

But keep in mind that it is intended as a reference

waste your time and effort continually tinkering

from your EYE, so it can even be that not having

with your setup expecting that one day it will all

your teeth clinched tight together will inject error.

suddenly come together and your score will jump

As mentioned earlier, even a thousandth of an inch

up to perfect.

error becomes an increasingly greater MISS as the

Or, you can get one of those bows that doesn’t

distance increases. Unless I’m mistaken, FITA and

shoot where it is aimed because it knows where

Olympic archers are permitted to use a kisser type

you want the arrow to hit and impacts over there

eye reference but are limited in size and cannot

instead! When you find it, I’ll take two.

protrude as much as the one in these photos. I HAVE TO GET ME ONE OF “THOSE” BOWS. After I got a little more serious and had my peep rotation squared away I realized I was back to where I had been in years past, I could not hold it perfectly still on dead center and then get the bow to shoot only when at that point. It makes you feel a little better when you realize that essentially NO ONE can hold their sight perfectly still on the target all the time and that even fewer can make their bow shoot only when they are steady on their target. Those who can hold their drifting to a very small range and then get it to shoot when still somewhere within that small drift area are the ones who can turn in the big scores, as long as they don’t make a blunder, which everyone does on occasion. Some of us blunder and make a bad shot more than others, which accounts for the succession of all the first-to-last place finishers.

Be certain this is perfectly clear; a kisser button

So when my goal was to feel that my setup was

works differently than a peep sight so you CAN-

as good as anyone’s and I could win this thing Archery Magazine October/November 2007 35


Bowhunting Conservation News

pennsylvania

GAME COMMISSION LOOKING INTO DEER DEATHS IN SOUTHWESTERN PENNSYLVANIA

Mathews Contingency Program for NFAA Pro Division Competition WORLD ARCHERY FESTIVAL-LAS VEGAS, NV Championship Compound Unlimited Male

Pennsylvania Game Commission Wildlife Conservation Officers are investigating the cause of death of more than 50 white-tailed deer in Greene and Washington counties. Game Commission biologists recently submitted samples for testing from four deer (three males and one female) to the Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study at the University of Georgia and Penn State University Animal Diagnostics Laboratory, and continue to gather information about other dead deer being found. Once the results are available, the Game Commission plans to release the findings to the public. “While we must wait for test results to confirm just what caused these deer to die, at this time, we are suspecting that the deer died of epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD), based on fields signs that we are seeing,” said Dr. Walter Cottrell, Game Commission wildlife veterinarian. In 2002, EHD was confirmed in the southwest corner of Pennsylvania. That same year, EHD was confirmed in Maryland, Ohio, Virginia and Wisconsin. EHD is one of the most common diseases among white-tailed deer in the United States, and is contracted by the bite of insects called “biting midges.” EHD usually kills the animal within five to 10 days, and is not spread from deer to deer. While EHD is not infectious to humans, deer displaying severe symptoms of EHD may not be suitable for consumption. Cottrell stressed that even though some EHD symptoms are similar to those of chronic wasting disease (CWD)—such as unconsciousness and a loss of fear of humans—there is no relationship between EHD and CWD. Cottrell also pointed out that EHD should be curtailed with the first hard frost, which will kill the insects that may be spreading the disease. He noted that EHD, unlike CWD, is a seasonal disease and the affected local deer herd can rebound quickly. 36 Archery Magazine October/November 2007

“The good news from this situation is that the public is reporting these sightings to the Game Commission,” Cottrell said. “Should the state’s deer herd be infected with more serious diseases, the Game Commission will need to rely on the continued vigilance of the public so that we can respond in a timely manner.” Game Commission Southwest Region Director Matt Hough urged residents to report unusual sightings by calling the Region Office at 724-238-9523. The Southwest Region serves Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, Cambria, Fayette, Greene, Indiana, Somerset, Washington and Westmoreland counties. Residents in other counties are encouraged to contact their respective regions. Created in 1895 as an independent state agency, the Game Commission is responsible for conserving and managing all wild birds and mammals in the Commonwealth, establishing hunting seasons and bag limits, enforcing hunting and trapping laws, and managing habitat on the 1.4 million acres of State Game Lands it has purchased over the years with hunting and furtaking license dollars to safeguard wildlife habitat. The agency also conducts numerous wildlife conservation programs for schools, civic organizations and sportsmen’s clubs. The Game Commission does not receive any general state taxpayer dollars for its annual operating budget. The agency is funded by license sales revenues; the state’s share of the federal Pittman-Robertson program, which is an excise tax collected through the sale of sporting arms and ammunition; and monies from the sale of oil, gas, coal, timber and minerals derived from State Game Lands. For information contact: Jerry Feaser, 717-705-6541 PGCNEWS@state.pa.us

Championship Compound Unlimited Women, Championship Freestyle Limited Compound and Championship Senior Compound Unlimited

Championship Bowhunter Freestyle

‘08 1st 2nd 3rd

$20,000 $4,000 $2,000

1st 2nd 3rd

$8,000 $3,000 $1,500

1st 2nd 3rd

$4,000 $1,000 $500

1st 2nd 3rd

$15,000 $4,000 $2,000

1st 2nd 3rd

$8,000 $3,000 $1,500

1st 2nd 3rd

$15,000 $4,000 $2,000

1st 2nd 3rd

$8,000 $3,000 $1,500

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$4,000 $1,500 $750

NATIONAL INDOOR CHAMPIONSHIP Pro Male Freestyle Pro Female Freestyle, Pro Senior Male Freestyle and Pro Male Freestyle Limited Class STANISLAWSKI OPEN Championship Compound Unlimited Men Championship Compound Unlimited Women, Championship Compound Senior Men and Championship Compound Freestyle Limited NATIONAL OUTDOOR CHAMPIONSHIP Redding Trail Shoot-Redding, CA* Pro Male Freestyle Pro Female Freestyle, Pro Senior Male Freestyle and Pro Male Freestyle Limited Class

* For the Redding Trail Event, Contingency will only be paid for the NFAA Pro Classes. Not the Money Events of the Redding Club. Archery Magazine October/November 2007 37


By John Dudley YOU KNOW SOME SAY THAT they’d rather be lucky than good. In my case I say the same thing. I was thinking that I was pretty lucky in my hunting year so far after dropping an antelope, whitetail and elk in the three weeks while I was out on my western tour. Well, that vacation came to a stop and I had to head back to Europe to do several more shooting seminars and training clinics. From October 5 to November 4, I was every where but someplace where I could hunt. I like Europe and enjoy time there, but I do really miss leaving work and being able to get in the woods for an afternoon hunt. The last week in Europe was especially hard because everyone was sending in photos of awesome bucks that were starting to make the mistakes of rut and show up during shooting time. The day to fly home finally came and I was especially excited to see the fall colors, as well as my house, after a long flight and long trip. My excitement slowed though as my garage door opened up. I was quickly reminded that all of my equipment from the western tour was still lying on the floor in the garage where I had left it. Not only did I have a month’s worth of travel stuff to sort out, I also had months of hunting gear to sort as

38 Archery Magazine October/November 2007

Archery Magazine October/November 2007 39


rage on the floor, and I gave Thomas about a five minute run-down of how to be a video man. I let him run the

when I looked behind me up in the corner of the food plot and noticed a big bodied deer. I stood up and turned

in shooting range. I hadn’t even hung my bow or taken my quiver off and it was “go” time! The buck moved into

Today was my day and I’d rather be LUCKY than good any day while hunting.

well. I really wanted to hunt my home state of Wisconsin but was limited on time and locations. For one, I had a very tight schedule in November with only a few weeks to be home and hunt Iowa, train for indoor season, make a trip to Utah to visit Hoyt and have Thanksgiving with family before heading back to Europe again. I had waited 2 long years for that tag in Iowa and was going to spend most of my time there. My plan was to hunt a day in Wisconsin and then go to Iowa for a full week if needed. I figured if I did get lucky and get there early enough 40 Archery Magazine October/November 2007

I could come back home to hunt Wisconsin again. The night I got back home I had a few friends come by that had been hunting in the area constantly since I left and had some good stands hung for me to hunt. I had wanted to hunt that first evening back but just couldn’t get everything organized in time (too much laundry and too much mail to go through). I had a brand new Hoyt Vectrix XL waiting for me on my door and I was really eager to use that bow for my hunts. I managed to put that bow together at about midnight and proceeded to sight

in my bow in the headlights of the truck in my driveway at about 1:30 A.M. I was totally wiped, as were my buddies. Thomas wanted to run the video camera for me and hunt a spot he had about 45 minutes from the house. That would mean we’d have to leave about 4:30 A.M. to make it there in enough time to get set up for the morning hunt. The alarm went off way too soon, as we have all felt many times. I think I hit snooze a few too many times, and before I knew it we were really late getting rolling. All my gear was still in the ga-

camera a little as I packed my backpack and put my gear on. Since we were so late going I thought that instead of ruining the hunting spot by going in too late we should elect to hunt at a closer location— closest stand I had is a stand I have set up about 100 yards from my house. Every year I plant a mixture of oats and clovers in about a 3-acre food plot that butts right up to my lawn. The deer use it frequently and during the summer months I had several nice velvety bucks passing through on occasion. During the winter months I usually get several bucks on camera as well. We went out through my garage and walked to the double ladder stand and got set up for the hunt. I gave Thomas about a one-minute intro to the tree arm and joystick that runs my camera. I had a gut feeling it wouldn’t be the best camera work, but I would take what I could get. It wasn’t but about two minutes at very first light

around so I could get my Nikons on the deer to see what it was. Well it was a no-ifs-ands-or-butts-aboutit SHOOTER buck. I was immediately jacked up and my heart started racing. I was trying to tell Thomas that he was coming and where he was coming from; all the while I was watching the buck quickly coming with-

about 20 yards, within seconds of tending a scrape that I later saw at about 25 yards away. I pulled back and nervously anchored in and made a few quick whispers to my camera guy that the shot was about to happen. Before I knew it, the release had gone off and the Wac Em’ Broadhead found the mark continued on page 42

Archery Magazine October/November 2007 41


on this big brute. The buck tipped over before making it out of my 3-acre plot and I was so pumped! I could see the heavy rack sticking up from the clover and I was trying to tell my camera guy to get focused on the buck laying there. Bless his heart but I think it was more than he could bear. What are the odds? I feel bad even telling this story because I know that so many people bust their butts day in and day out and that it just doesn’t seem to happen. However, I too have done that and several years

42 Archery Magazine October/November 2007

have not filled my tag in my home state. Today was my day, and like I said I’d rather be lucky than good any day while hunting. After a few quick words into the camera I got down from the tree stand and made my way over to what I believed to be my biggest whitetail, or for sure the most mature whitetail I had ever taken. Seconds after seeing this buck I realized it could have very well been one that I have hit poorly and never recovered about two years earlier. He was not quite as tall

but definitely more massive than before. Certain proportions of a rack you just don’t forget and don’t see often. This deer was one I hadn’t forgotten. Losing that buck years earlier made me sick for months, and to get another chance and capitalize on it was just all too bittersweet. I know that deer responded differently to pressure and I believe this buck had become comfortable this close to my house because I hadn’t been there to stink up the yard with my scent or my dog. I reviewed the video footage,

and let’s just say some rookie mistakes were made. However, I gave Thomas another 5-minute lesson on how to take good animal photos and this time he did well because my pictures turned out just fine. Well, part four of my DWT was now finished and the only business left unattended was the Iowa tag. It took me about four hours to process my deer and get the truck all packed. It’s another four-hour drive to my Iowa spot, and if all goes as planned, I could be hunting by morning. Stay tuned because part five is only a day away.

Archery Magazine October/November 2007 43


by Paul Davison

The Indoor “Championship” Round

B

44 Archery Magazine October/November 2007

ack in the old days,

The single spot target face

before compound

was the same then as it is

“standard”

bows and release

today:

a white center spot,

consists of 12 ends of five arrows

aids, glance-outs or damaged

8 cm in diameter, worth 5

each. As defined in 1977, the

arrows

significant

points, with four outer dark

problems when shooting at a

blue rings, 16, 24, 32 and 40

single-spot target.

By 1977,

cm in diameter, worth 4, 3, 2

however, the NFAA Directors

and 1 points, respectively. The

saw a need to provide a

4 cm X-ring in the dead center

different indoor target face

is for breaking ties only.

weren’t

for its top shooters ... namely,

The Championship target

the NFAA Pros. Consequently,

face created in 1977 had four

at the 1977 annual meeting

16 cm targets mounted on a

in New Orleans, the NFAA

40 cm light blue surface. Each

Indoor Championship Round

target had four scoring rings:

was created.

The shooting

a white 4 cm X-ring worth

rules were identical to the

5 points, a white 8 cm ring

standard Indoor Round — only

worth 4 points, and two dark

the target face, the scoring,

blue outer rings, 12 and 16

and the arrows-per-end were

cm in diameter, worth 3 and 2

different.

points, respectively.

Today,

the

single

Indoor

spot Round

continued on page 46

Visit

Paul Davison’s �������������������� Official adjunct to NFAA’s �������������������� � NFAA History and historyrelated articles published in ������� magazine � Recent NFAA/WAF tournament write-ups and photo galleries � Lists of all National Outdoor (from 1946) and National Indoor (from 1980) Champions � NFAA Barebow Fraternity news and membership roster � Field and 3-D Range Design Guidelines � Every ��������� ������ article published in ������� � Recently-published general interest articles by Paul Davison in �������

“NFAA and WAF news for all archers” Archery Magazine October/November 2007 45


Indoor Championship Round

Sometime in the mid-1980’s,

consisted of 15 ends of fours

the 5-spot indoor target face

arrows each. This meant that

was introduced.

you couldn’t mix the two rounds

the

in the same tournament. As far

that nearly all

as we know, the 4-spot target

freestyle

same

It’s

Indoor Championship Round, virtually obsolete. In fact, the Indoor Championship

target

Round was deleted from the NFAA rules this

face has never been used in

year

NFAA Indoor Championships.

... thirty shooters use today,

and

years is

its

nothing more than the 4-spot target with one

after

creation.

Although none are in the inventory and none

more 16 cm target placed in the

are being printed, the 4-spot

center. The scoring, however,

target is still in the NFAA rules

is different. Instead of 5-4-3-2

as an optional indoor target

from the center outward, the

face. It is expected that this

5-spot target scoring is “5” for

oversight will be corrected next

the 8 cm white spot, including

February at the 2008 annual

the 4 cm X-ring, and “4” for

meeting.

the combined, 12 cm and 16

If anyone out there has a

cm, blue rings. In other words,

vintage 1977, 4-spot target

the 5-spot target scores the

face, hang on to it, or give it to

same as a single-spot target

the NFAA Museum.

except that any shot outside the 16 cm ring is scored a “zero” rather than 3, 2 or 1.

ABOVE: The soon-forgotten, 4-spot, Indoor Championship target.

The 5-spot target made the 4-spot target, as well as the 46 Archery Magazine October/November 2007

Archery Magazine October/November 2007 47


48 Archery Magazine October/November 2007

Archery Magazine October/November 2007 49


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Archery Magazine October/November 2007 53


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Archery Magazine October/November 2007 55



Oct/ Nov 07