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Beyond Daisy: Future Prospects for the former Wilhelmsburg Dishware Factory



Beyond Daisy: Future Prospects for the former Wilhelmsburg Dishware Factory



Content 6

About this publication

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Introduction Perspectives:

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Stefan Moritsch: Ceramic Identities Rainald Franz: Ohnsorg and “Beyond Daisy.” Thoughts of an art historian and ceramics curator on tradition and innovation in Austrian ceramics of the twentieth century and today

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Manfred Schönleitner: Vision becomes reality. Dishware Museum Wilhelmsburg – Competence Centre for Ceramics

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Thomas Rösler: Set up wicked small companies!

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Course of the project

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Prospects and projects

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Imprint


About this publication This publication unites practical and theoretical scenarios for the future of ceramic production in general and the former Wilhelmsburger dishware factory in particular and should be understood as an invitation to continue the discourse on the development of the site and ceramic production. The first section of the publication is composed of texts that shed light on the different dimensions of ceramic production from four perspectives. Manfred Schönleitner, managing director and director of the Wilhelmsburg dishware museum Daisyworld, exposes the potential of the former dishware factory and considers the future use of the grounds. In his capacity as art historian and curator of ceramics at the Museum of Applied Arts Vienna (MAK), Rainald Franz shares his thoughts on tradition and innovation in Austrian ceramics of the twentieth century and today. Stefan Moritsch, University Professor at NDU and program director of the “Manual & Material Culture” program, takes up the closings of ceramic production sites in Wilhelmsburg and describes how “ceramic identities” as producing designers can counteract this development. In conclusion, Thomas Rösler, founder and captain of the Vorarlberg tile manufactory KARAK, provides a best practice example of a producing designer and describes why he runs his company like a pirate ship.

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Introduction Andrea Moya Hoke In reference to the current EU Interreg CerDee project, the focus of summer semester 2020 was on contemporary ceramic production. The former dishware factory in Wilhelmsburg in Lower Austria served as the imaginary and real testing ground. Questions such as the following were asked: If the factory came to life again, what could be produced there today? And to what extent can design—also in the broader meaning of the term—contribute to the success of the (re)building of a company and what role can design and craftsmanship take on in this process? The project comprised analyses of objects developed in Wilhelmsburg over the course of time and their cultural and economic context. The further examination of techniques and infrastructure used in the production of ceramic products was limited due to the COVID-19 measures. This situation provided students as well as instructors with new challenges that were met with creativity and improvisation. At the same time, this circumstance makes the advantages of ceramic production clearer—to unite and implement the quality, design, and production in a minimal framework of infrastructure and capacities. Thoughts on techniques to the original craft of ceramics and the conditions of the Wilhelmsburg factory, for example the use of a ceramic 3D printer and experimental approaches to production, are apparent in the results of this unusual semester and are found in the second part of this publication. Andrea Moya Hoke is Assistant Professor BA “Manual & Material Culture” at the New Design University in St. Pölten, Austria

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Ceramic Identities1 Stefan Moritsch The closings of the “Lilien-Porzellan” (Lily Porcelain) Factory 23 years ago and of industrial manufacturing facilities such as Laufen Austria AG in Wilhelmsburg a few months ago immediately raise the question of the future of ceramic production in Austria. At first glance, it seems inappropriate to make a comparison between Laufen Austria AG, in whose halls relatively few employees produced ceramic sanitary products on an industrial scale using automated manufacturing processes and impressive robotic systems, and a ceramic artist’s studio, in which there is a potter’s wheel, a kiln and possibly a 3D ceramic printer. But is it really? Or: What exactly is the difference? While industrial production is increasingly moving away from Austria and all of Europe due to pressure on costs from global competition, it has been observed that producing designers are sustainably carving out new niches in the field of ceramics/porcelain. Designers and entrepreneurs—such as the people behind feinedinge2, KARAK3 and others—are creating new forms of self-employment and employment that are being sought out by more and more people for whom the meaning of work is not simply to earn money. The traditional industrial division of labor into creative designers, skilled manual workers and good sellers has merged into the comprehensive competency profile of a producing designer. Creativity is required not just to answer formal, aesthetic questions; it unfurls its innovative power when it is used to develop courageous economic and technical designs alongside creative ones. While large ceramic production facilities can only be created from the ground up at great expense, many ceramic goods are just the right thing for starting up small productions without large investments. Or as expressed by the ceramic artists interviewed by our students during a research project4: “A kiln and a wheel—that’s it. You can hit the ground running as a ceramic artist with 10,000 Euro.” One of the risks for beginning creative

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Perspectives


entrepreneurs who first need to find a niche between creative identity and economic independence—namely “taking out loans”—can be more easily avoided than in other trades. It is possible to experiment on a small scale. For example, set up a kiln in the attic of a rental house without official permission and take the first small steps toward the production of your own work. Or officially register the manufacture and marketing of exclusive ceramic goods without a specific trade license as a “treasure hunt.” Creativity in our sense of the word is therefore a universal tool available in all disciplines with which obstacles that stand in the way of your own wish to create can be overcome. While those responsible for design and production can seldom look forward to profits from a corporation, and even “star designers” are only occasionally able to make a good living from royalties, producing designers directly benefit from sales of what they have produced themselves. Nevertheless, it is important to understand that you can only survive as a designer and producer if you are interested in and even derive pleasure from dealing with economic issues. For a producing designer, success does not mean first and foremost recognition from colleagues and juries but first of all the satisfaction of generating income sustainably through one’s own design work, the working out of a standard of living that is no longer the precariousness of the artist that must be justified by the idea that art requires a sacrifice. Only time will tell whether in the near future, the building of the dishware and ceramic factories in Wilhelmsburg will accommodate new ceramic identities in its spaces after workshops, manufactories, factories, museums and apprentice training workshops. The possibility exists! 1 This contribution arose following the recent publication “Kreative Identitäten – Eine Milieustudie zu Handwerks- und Kreativberufen,” Velbrück Wissenschaft, 2020 | 2 feinedinge.at | 3 karak.at | 4 Practice-based Research – Manual & Material Culture 1&2, 2015–17; Funding: WissenschaftForschung department of the province of Lower Austria

Stefan Moritsch is Designer and Program Director BA “Manual & Material Culture” at the New Design University in St. Pölten, Austria

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Ohnsorg and “Beyond Daisy.” Thoughts of an art historian and ceramics curator on tradition and innovation in Austrian ceramics of the twentieth century and today Rainald Franz In 1961, Kurt Ohnsorg (1927–1970), the most influential postwar Austrian ceramic artist, began to set up a studio for ceramics in the Wilhelmsburg factory as a consultant for ÖSPAG. Following the example of Scandinavian ceramics companies, he was supposed to develop designs that could be transferred from ceramics to industrial production. The result was unique pieces and limited edition ceramic series. Ohnsorg was also integrated into the design of the ceramics being produced at that time: He modified the “Daisy” service that had been in production since 1959. The pastel “Lilien-Porzellan” (Lily Porcelain) still remains the most famous today. Prototypes for an Ohnsorg coffee pot were developed but not produced. Kurt Ohnsorg described his attitude toward industrial production of ceramics as such: “The workshop as a site of production has altogether lost its meaning in the industrial age. Small production with mistakes that do not prevent the objects from being used and that are valued and promoted as ‘quirks of craftsmanship’ is anachronistic. The job description for a ceramic artist has changed. He has to create empirical values to which large-scale production can orient itself.” If the position of Ohnsorg, who comes from the great tradition of modern ceramic arts in Austria founded as a result of the teachings of the Vienna School of Applied Arts (Wiener Kunstgewerbeschule), is compared to the present position of ceramics in Austria, one comes to another conclusion. While Ohnsorg‘s work was recently appreciated as ceramic arts at the large monographic exhibition in St. Pölten in 2018, ceramics as a material has once again become important in applied arts, design, and art.

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Perspectives


In the course of the development of the craftsmanship and manufacture of production and during the Industrial Revolution of the nineteenth century, ceramics also became a substrate for technical innovation. The manual working of clay became the catalyst. The term “art” for good craftsmanship remained in use into the second half of the nineteenth century. The terms “craft” or “arts and crafts” referring to artistically designed products from a trade arose as a result of technical innovation in production and in response to the new methods of production supported by industry, machinery, and science—and in the clay industry as well. Art as an idea split from being linked to a material during the modern period. In recent years, however, this process has reversed itself and a move back to the material and to craftsmanship in art has been observed. Contemporary Austrian ceramics has also benefited from this situation, for it satisfies the need to create with a material in the digital era. In addition to the positions represented by ceramics masters who have practiced for decades such as Franz Josef Altenburg, Gundi Dietz, and Kurt Spurey, new works have arisen such as those consistently created by Matthias Kaiser, Petra Lindenbauer, Gottfried Palatin, or Marie Janssen. Ohnsorg speaks of works in ceramics that are organized against mass production: ceramics for everyday use that has also been tried and tested in the restaurant industry and thus does not negate the mass-produced. And it is here that the arts and crafts position that stresses what has been turned on the wheel becomes important again. The empirical values that can be drawn from clay and ceramics are so enticing again today that even successful contemporary artists such as Erwin Wurm are consciously choosing the path of handworked clay forms. New technologies such as 3D printing, which can be applied particularly well in ceramics, are pushing forward into ceramics for everyday use without endangering the primacy of ceramics if new technologies are accepted as an innovation in the trade. Mastery of a craft and constant enhancement of material work from the extraction of clay to processing to shaping and firing provide the basis for new applications of ceramics in arts and crafts as well as in the applied and autonomous arts.

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Once before, the production of ceramics in Wilhelmsburg—with Kurt Ohnsorg—was the site of the combination of art, craft, and design in the industrial ceramic production by Richard Lester. The search for the connection between a modern shape and dishes with broad appeal can succeed if the production site is open to input from the ceramic arts by designers and craftspeople interested in ceramics. The vintage image of the “Daisy” service can provide a new point of departure and an answer to the question of all remaining ceramics manufacturers: how good the ceramics should look that are sold outside of those from IKEA and the masses of imported goods from China. This is an experiment with a capital E. Kurt Ohnsorg‘s credo: Real artistry can only develop out of mastery—mastery of one‘s own personality and of the material. Yet the personality as well as the artistry of someone who does not go to great lengths to master a material can only be viewed as questionable. For Ohnsorg, ceramics is an expression of “the cultural level of a country.” Thus we should all take an interest in Austrian ceramic arts. Dr. Rainald Franz is curator of the glass and ceramics collections at the MAK – Museum of Applied Arts, Vienna, Austria

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Perspectives


Vision becomes reality: Dishware Museum Wilhelmsburg – Competence Centre for Ceramics Manfred Schönleitner Today I look back on the “golden age” of the Wilhelmsburg stoneware and porcelain factory with nostalgia. When I was just ten years old, my first school field trip brought me to the heart of the Austrian porcelain industry. Nearly 1,000 people were employed and working in our small city. They did a great job. Our “Lilien-Porzellan” was world famous. Today, nearly 45 years later, there is nothing left of it. After over 200 years of continuous production, our traditional business disappeared. Reflecting on the changes that occurred from my first encounter with the factory until its closure gave me an opportunity to take a hard look at the domestic porcelain industry. Ten years after the company closed, I channeled my passion and dedication into founding the Wilhelmsburg Dishware Museum. Preserving the cultural heritage of “Lilien Porzellan” and Wilhelmsburg Stoneware including the history of the company has been the main focus. The factory closure in 1997 affected 400 jobs that were mainly held by women. I remember this time. People were unbelievably disappointed by this development. This could also be felt when the museum first opened. Many wouldn’t even enter the museum because the situation was so emotional. That is why I attempted to integrate former employees into the life of the museum, which succeeded in part through the development of the “Friends of Wilhelmsburg Ceramics” association. The additional purchase of the old stoneware factory in 2013 provided the opportunity—on the actual site —to open up the grounds to a variety of projects whose implementation is progressing step by step. An excellent partnership with the New Design University has existed for several years. Students can work with the material of ceramics on site. The programs are highly popular. This revitalization of the old factory is in turn a motivation and confirmation for me to continue

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above: factory floor, Wilhelmsburg earthenware factory, ca. 1905 below: exterior view and factory entrance, WinkelmĂźhle on the left, bell tower with fire department lookout in the background, ca. 1905

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to enhance the project. One of my goals is to create jobs in the area of ceramics. The infrastructure that is required still exists. It was clear that at the age of 53, I had to return to the classroom and start the “Collection Studies and Management” program at Danube University Krems. For me, lifelong learning is the most natural thing in the world. It is also great fun. Currently I am developing a plan to set up a demonstration workshop including a shop. The guests should experience ceramic production up close and personal. That is how to create an appreciation of this craft that will serve as the basis for producing ceramics in Europe. Design will play a major role in the planning of the workspaces. In the 1950s, Dr. Conrad Henry Lester, the former company owner and my intellectual mentor, realized in California that workers were the most relaxed when they produced porcelain in studios where the walls had been painted pale celadon green. I will implement this concept in Wilhelmsburg as well. The mill stream that flows through the factory premises also has great potential. The hydropower plant is important for economic production in the future. At the same time, the flowing water is an attraction and the place where people take a break and relax at the site—simply wonderful. My life goal is to demonstrate in the ceramics industry how livable Europe can be in terms of ecology, economics, science, culture, and mentality—and everyone is invited to join in! Manfred Schönleitner is Manager and Director of the Dishware Museum Wilhelmsburg, Lower Austria. daisyworld.at

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Set up wicked small companies! Thomas Rösler What are we to do? The answer to that question is—in the words of German songwriter Fanny Van Dannen: “Set up wicked small companies!” Maybe it is not THE solution, but it is an answer. Perhaps that is also a reason why Sebastian and I decided to run our company like a pirate ship. You might say: “But that isn’t suitable for a tile manufactory from Vorarlberg.” We don’t care—it suits us. That doesn’t mean that we exploit others but that we have emancipated ourselves from the large galleys to self-determined slaves. Enslaved only by the harsh dictatorship of reality. We are all in the same boat! The attitude of self-determination is pure personal responsibility. What comparison is better suited to a company that wants to be personally responsible for its handcrafted tiles, designs, and glazes, its marketing, and its own material than a pirate ship? Perhaps that we are really and officially commercial treasure hunters. Our treasures are our employees, our workplace, and the work we put into creating our tiles. Our tiles are “just” our ship. As beautiful as the ship may be, it does not sail by itself. Our craft should not be seen as one-dimensional. Our ship itself is the manifestation of all our thoughts, of how we want to see our work. And much more: how we want to see our life, of which our work is a part—gern macha, guat macha, Geld macha (like what you do, do it well, make money). What small ships have lost over time is the certainty that even a small ship can sail across the ocean. A glance at the large galleys of the world may prove intimidating. In truth, they are giants that are difficult to move and often stay afloat only by losing their own integrity.

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So it seems that on the large galleys, a specific person has been trained to carry out every conceivable task, the knot tier, the anchor puller, people who are exclusively concerned with drawing the map. But we want to create the entire adventure together, the ship as well as the treasure we are seeking. Where the large galleys had to appeal to many people so they would sign up for the ship in the first place, a small ship only has to appeal to the few who are really prepared to embark on an adventure and become a part of it. Clearly we use the treasure hunt and the pirate ship only as a symbol for the craft, work, and product. But isn’t it the personal story that is worth telling in life as well as the personal, holistic consideration of the things and spaces in which they manifest themselves? Isn’t the home of a self-determined craftsman/craftswoman the place where he/she discovers this treasure, where a job becomes a vocation? If creating is regarded not just as an elite tool for designers to use that is only related to the product and its target group, then it is understandable that—when an environment is created—the product produces itself. The craftsman/craftswoman unites material, design, and production in one person. As soon as the craftsman/craftswoman understands again that he/she cannot regard the industry as a whole but recognizes that it is just one job divided among a thousand specialists, he/she can recognize that he/ she is not just a knot tier in his/her craft, in his/her niche, but the captain of his/her own ship. Maybe it helps us to recognize in our own history that satisfaction does not necessarily lie in being a small part of something big but a big part of something small. What are we to do? Set up wicked small companies! Thomas Rösler is Captain and treasure hunter of KARAK Tiles in Bludenz, Vorarlberg, Austria. karak.at

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Course of the project The semester started with two field trips. Manfred Schönleitner, director of the Wilhelmsburg dishware museum, told the story of the Wilhelmsburg dishware factory at the actual site and guided the group through the abandoned factory. Unfortunately, the group was not able to tour the factory of the Laufen AG company located directly next to the former dishware factory since it closed at the start of 2020. The second field trip took place in Vienna before the COVID lockdown. Rainald Franz, art historian and curator of ceramics, guided the group through the ceramics collection of the Museum of Applied Arts Vienna (MAK). The tour was followed by a visit to the co-making space RAMI in the second district. Finally, the group visited the Porcelain Manufactory Augarten, which provided the students additional insight into the historical dimension of ceramic production. Luckily the one-week workshop on ceramic mold making that was planned with ceramic artist, modeler, and mold making specialist Hermann Seiser was also able to take place in the former factory before the lockdown. The regular discussions with the students took place during video conferences to which experts such as Thomas Rösler, Hermann Seiser, and Kristin Weissenberger were invited to expand the students’ design horizons with examples from their own practice. Due to the COVID restrictions, the final implementation was moved to the summer and into Hermann Seiser’s ceramics studio. The finalization of the projects as well as the semester presentation of them took place over the course of another one-week workshop in the former dishware factory in Wilhelmsburg.

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Prospects and projects


Shaped Wallware Lisa Berger and Alina Miklau This project develops wall decorations that make use of the different decorative ornaments on Wilhelmsburg stoneware dishes, paying homage to the products in the “Daisy� service. The wall decorations can also be taken down from the wall and used as decorative platters or dishes for special occations or as ordinary dishes. The individual pieces can be ordered according to the suggested plan or to suit one’s own taste.

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Prospects and projects



Ash_Tray Jasmin Bermadinger Ashes are a raw material with valuable minerals that can be used to make ceramics. On top of that, the smoking of cigarettes is increasingly receding into the background. “Ash_Tray� is a series of cylindrical containers whose forms mimic that of an ashtray. They employ a traditional technique to make a glaze that includes cigarette ashes.

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Prospects and projects



sculla Teresa Egger This project examines the location of porcelain products between a decorative collector’s item and a functional furnishing. This is rendered in a series of porcelain lightbulb sculptures that can be used both as lightbulbs for standard light sockets and as decorative table lamps.

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Prospects and projects



Metamorphosis Isabella FĂźrst Standard geometric shapes are juxtaposed against unique floral structures. These structures are modeled by hand on shapes that have been cast in serial production, making a unique specimen from a recurring shape. They enhance the function of the object, transforming it into a sculpture.

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Prospects and projects



Connecting Ceramics Walter Grundböck This project illustrates the mechanical resilience of porcelain using 3D printing technology. The goal of this project is to produce stable porcelain furniture connectors using as little material as possible. The product is a café table for the restaurant industry that is assembled with connectors alone—no tools required.

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Prospects and projects



LeMo – Vase with Insert Irene Haider-Pachtrog Following the motto “less is more,” the “LeMo” Vase makes the beauty of individual blossoms and leaves more easily perceptible. A removable insert narrows the neck of the vase, allowing flowers and other parts of plants to be arranged at different heights.

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Prospects and projects



Interplay Brayden Dalton The making of high-quality handmade objects often seems incomprehensible or even inexplicable to lay people. True mastery is required to create such formal spectacles. However, today’s technologies allow even inexperienced apprentices to produce complex objects and even quicker than their mentors. “Interplay” is a 3D printed ceramic sculpture with two layers that visualizes the interplay between handmade and computer supported design.

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Prospects and projects



36Zero° Nikolaus Kettenbach “36Zero°” provides a new opportunity for connecting a traditional photo album to recent times. It requires a 360° camera that is placed on the porcelain object. The pure porcelain has perfect qualities for stylishly holding the camera, functioning as a hidden tripod and guaranteeing the observer a novel yet familiar visual experience.

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Prospects and projects



Lagrima – a light of hope Martin Koberwein A lamp of translucent ceramics in the shape of a teardrop. The shape should be seen as a symbol reflecting the loss of the dishware factory in Wilhelmsburg. Special attention is paid to finding the shape since it does not arise through hand modeling but through experimenting.

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Prospects and projects



Daisy Goes Wild Katharina Steiner “Daisy Goes Wild” is an attempt to open up a new area for porcelain as a material that is well-established in dish production: porcelain cocktail glasses inspired by the “Daisy” service and the zeitgeist of the 1950s and 1960s. The focus has returned to taste without abandoning aesthetics.

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Prospects and projects



Stacked Yvonne Rausch A series of espresso cups with saucers whose geometric shapes merge into a sculptural structure. When stacked, the play of the shapes and handles invites users to think before they realize what they actually have in their hands: espresso cups.

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Prospects and projects



Comme Scène Nino Lerchner The goal of this project is to develop a special fine dining experience from the interplay between dishes and the individual courses of a meal. The dishes serve as the “stage” for the individual ingredients of the dishes, which are the “actors.” The waiter presents the different courses as “acts” of a culinary performance.

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Prospects and projects



Daisy Brush Anna Fassl A toothbrush is used every day and discarded after it has worn out and replaced by a new one. The project is dedicated to this problem. Its reusable porcelain handle ensures that less trash is produced. The handle also makes it easier to brush one’s teeth. “Daisy Brush”—eye candy in the bathroom.

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Prospects and projects



The Coffee Sphere Rafael Jägersberger “The Coffee Sphere” stands for the conscious experience of the (coffee) break. Its round shape cannot be placed anywhere without it falling over—it must be kept in your hand. The break is consciously perceived as such and for a moment, the stress of everyday life is forgotten.

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Prospects and projects



128 – The thrill of collecting Katharina Partik The goal of this project is to encourage the thrill of collecting by taking an unconventional approach to making a mold. Based on the conical shape of the famous “Daisy” service, the four basic shapes of plaster moulds can be stacked on top of each other in 128 variations to cast new and unique pieces.

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Prospects and projects



Fusion Anja Lindner This formal study started with the merging of different traditional Chinese and Japanese teapot shapes with the typical shape of the Wilhelmsburg “Daisy” service in order to create a completely new teapot design. One of the results is the “Fusion” teapot.

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Prospects and projects



Kiln – Ceramic Furniture System Maria Scharl Ceramics are known for their hardness, compressive strength, and nearly infinite malleability. There are few limitations, but of these the size of the kiln is probably the most important. The shapes and technical development of “Kiln� are inspired by exactly this limitation. The system consists of individual parts that are connected to one another to make up a shelf.

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Prospects and projects



All abstract Evelyn Pana The project represents an abstract synopsis of the ceramics collected in the Wilhelmsburg Dishware Museum. The shapes of the objects for this series are inspired by early spray decorations and their abstract and surreal line compositions. The objects reflect the carefully curated content of the museum and find their functions in the present as new collector’s items.

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Prospects and projects



Daisy Table Benjamin Rößler The “Daisy Table” is a small porcelain side table. The product was developed in order to create a new product for the “Daisy” series. Removed from dishware typologies, it still makes formal reference to the “Daisy” products, extending them by a small piece of furniture and thus indicating the variety of ways in which ceramic materials may be applied.

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Prospects and projects



Synthetic Vine Fabian Wohlfarth The project developed out of the examination and translation of the two-dimensional illustrated shape of a lily into a three-dimensional object. Because of the many possibilities that underlie such an approach as well as my interest in the diversity of ceramics as a material, the final shape does not adhere to specifications and limits but results in a constantly growing and changeable object. From these considerations, a ceramic sculpture arises whose appeal comes from the interplay of modular elements and their connection to the base of the object.

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Prospects and projects



Contra – A controversial mixture Magdalena Manigatter Many people are of the opinion that it doesn’t work. It shouldn’t be. They are not made for each other. “Contra” is a product made of stoneware and porcelain. Two materials that couldn’t be more different. Based on the story of the Wilhelmsburg dishware factory, “Contra” dares to examine the connection between stoneware and porcelain.

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Prospects and projects



Lilia – Tiles Jonas Tarmann The use of tiles for walls and floors has a long tradition. The first tiles come from the ancient Egyptians, who were already decorating walls with ceramic slabs in 2600 BCE. The “Lilia tile” project is more than just two-dimensional wall design; the three-dimensionality of the “Lilia tiles” ensures an exciting interplay between light and shadow.

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Imprint Responsible for the content: New Design University Privatuniversität GesmbH, Mariazeller Straße 97a, 3100 St. Pölten, Austria www.ndu.ac.at ISBN 978-3-9503515-8-3 Graphic Design: L A Studio, Pillersdorfgasse 8/1/3, 1020 Vienna, lenaappl.com Photos (Projects): Nikolaus Korab, Taborstraße 18/111, 1020 Vienna, nikolauskorab.com Reproduction / Photography of historical photographs: Wilhelmsburger Geschirr-Museum GmbH, Christa Stangl Proofreading and Translation: Büro für Übersetzungen und Sprachdienstleistungen Mag. Andrea Kraus, M.A., Peterstalstraße 16e, 8042 Graz, kraus-translation.at Editing, Production: Andrea Moya Hoke, Petra Wieser Print: Gugler GmbH, Melk/Donau, Austria

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This publication unites practical and theoretical scenarios for the future of ceramic production in general and the former Wilhelmsburger dishware factory in particular and should be understood as an invitation to continue the discourse on the development of the site and ceramic production.