Page 1


f Favorite Quotes, Proverbs and Sayings f A Collection by Neil Michelsen

f


f Dedication To my family

2015


Neil Michelsen

2013


f


f Preface Definition: Proverbs, maxims, sayings, or whatever you might call them, are short pithy statements stating a general truth, piece of advice, facet of wisdom, rule of conduct or a bit of humor or wit. They say so much with so few words that their efficiency in delivering a message is both intellectually satisfying and inspirational. Why I Wrote This Book: I have always been enamored with proverbs and collected selected ones throughout my life with the idea that someday I’d compile them into a book such as this volume for my own enjoyment and for others who might also appreciate them. Suggestion about the Use of This Book: This book can be used for casual reading, for inspiration and or as a reference tool to help a reader make a succinct point or analogy by either using the saying “as is” or by modifying it a bit. Good sayings are like good jokes in that you can’t remember them. So my suggestion is to pick one out and work with it for some period of time − a week/month, or whatever, and it will stay with you. Equal and Opposite: While the proverbs and sayings appear to be universal “truths”, in reality there is always an equal and opposite one. For example “A stitch in time saves nine” may argue for acting quickly, but “Haste makes waste” might argue against it. It will all depend upon the point you are trying to make. Regardless, either way, it doesn’t diminish their intellectual and emotional appeal.


Key Words: While the sayings have been assigned key and amplifying words, other words could have been chosen. Favorites: I’ve read thousands and thousands of sayings over the years and this volume contains about 7,500 of my favorites. And within that population, I’ve identified a sub-set of favorites which I’ve indicated with an asterisk. But having said that, with every reading my favorites change. Readers of course, will have their own favorites. Research on the Authors: For each quote or saying that had a specific author attributed to it, I researched information about that author or source and included it at the end of this volume to the extent I could. Sources of Sayings and Editing: Some of the sayings may show two or more authors as that’s the way my source books (in the Bibliography) had shown them. Since this volume has not been professionally edited, I apologize for any deficiencies in form or style and for any grammatical, typographical or spelling errors. Closing: It is my hope that these sayings or aphorisms, along with my other personal works (i.e. my poetry, journals, books and other writings; music compositions; family movies and photo albums; paintings; and various other collections and memorabilia) will serve as one element of my legacy and mark in life and as a personal inheritance to my family. *****


f Table of Contents Description

Page

Preface Quotes, Proverbs and Sayings

1

Some Notes about the Authors

411

Bibliography

477

*****


f


Quotes, Proverbs and Sayings Collected by

Neil Michelsen


f


y Quotes, Proverbs and Sayings (Information on the sources and or authors follow) (An asterisk indicates a favorite of mine) Key Word

* Quote, Proverb or Saying

Ability

Ability is nothing without opportunity. They are able because they think they are able. * A little absence does much good. Absence makes the heart grow fonder. Away from the eyes, away from the heart. * He who is absent is always wrong. * Let no one speak ill of the absent.

Ability Absence Absence Absence Absence Absence Absence Absence Absent Absentminded Absentminded Absentminded Abstinence Abstinence

* Many a person liven up a party simply by staying away. Out of sight, out of mind. The absent are always to blame. * He that strives to touch the stars often stumbles on a straw. * In politics an absurdity is not a handicap. * There is nothing so absurd as knowledge spun too fine. Abstinence and fasting cure many a complaint. Abstinence is as easy to me as temperance would be difficult.

Author/ Nationality Napoleon Virgil French Sextus Propertius Spanish Unknown Sextus Propertius Unknown Unknown Hebrew Edmund Spencer Napoleon Benjamin Franklin Danish Samuel Johnson 1


Abstinence

Absurdity Abundance Abundance Abundance Abuse Abuse Accident Accident

Accident, marriage Accommodate Accomplish Accomplish Accomplish

Accord Account Account

2

* I went on a diet, swore off drinking and heavy eating and in fourteen days I lost two weeks. * Every absurdity has a champion to defend it. Abundance does not spread, famine does. Abundance of money is a trial for a man. * Abundance, like want, ruins many. Abuse is the result of seeing one another too often. * Don't ride a free horse to death. Accidents will happen. * Most accidents are caused by people, and most people are caused by accident. Accidents count for much in companionship as in marriage. If you accommodate others, you will be accommodating yourself. Achieving a purpose is better than achieving a profit. An accomplishment sticks to a person. He who boasts of his accomplishments will heap ridicule. There is no good accord where every man would be a lord. * Good accounting makes for good friends. * When accounts are examined, difficulties arise.

Joe E. Lewis

Oliver Goldsmith African Moroccan Unknown African Miguel de Cervantes English Unknown

Henry Brooks Adams Chinese African Japanese Philippine

English Greek Indian


Accountants Accountants

Accounting Accuracy Ache Ache Achievement Achievement Achievement

Achievement Acid Acknowledge Acquaintance

Act Action Action Action

Accountants are the witch doctors of the modern world. Deals aren’t usually blown by principals; they’re blown by lawyers and accountants trying to prove how valuable they are. * Creativity is great-but not in accounting. Hit the nail on the head. * The tongue ever turns to the aching tooth. * The worst ache is the present ache. No one is expected to achieve the impossible. * Nothing is ever accomplishment by a reasonable man. She didn’t know it couldn’t be done so he went ahead and did it. * You cannot get to the top by sitting on your bottom. * Sharp acids corrode their own containers. * Acknowledgment is half of the correction. One’s acquaintances may fill the empire but one’s real friends are but few. Act honestly and answer boldly. Action is the proper fruit of knowledge. * Actions speak louder than words, but not so often. * Better to do it than to wish that it be done.

J. Harman Robert Townsend

Charles Scott John Heywood Unknown Lebanese Unknown Bernard Shaw Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Unknown Albanian Russian Chinese

Danish English Unknown Unknown

3


Action Action Action Action, thought

Brave actions never need a trumpet. Never repent a good action. * Well done is better than well said. I have though too much to stoop to action.

Actions Actions

*

Activity Actor

*

Actor, critic

Actress

Adam

*

Add

*

Adjective

*

Admiration

*

Admiration

Admission Ado 4

English

Danish Unknown Philippe Auguste Villiers de L'Ilse-Adam Actions speak louder than words. Unknown The superior man is modest in his Confucius speech but exceeds in his actions. A rolling stone gathers no moss. Unknown To be an actor and get paid for it Unknown one way of turning conceit into profit. It is better to be making the news Sir Winston rather than taking it; to be an Churchill actor rather than a critic. Show me a great actor and I’ll W. C. Fields show you a lousy husband. Show me a great actress and you’ve seen the devil. We are all Adam’s children, but English silk makes the difference. The more you add the worse it Hebrew gets. Pick adjectives as you would a Stanley diamond or a mistress. Walker Few men have been admired by Michel their own households. Eyguem de Montaigne We always like those who admire Duc de La us but we don't always like those Rochewe admire. foucauld Admission by the defendant is Hebrew worth a hundred witnesses. Much ado about nothing. English


Adolescence

Adultery Adultery

Adultery

Advance

Advantage Advantage Advantage

Advantage Advantages

Adversity Advertising

Advice

* Adolescence is the period when people are too young to give advice and too old to take it. Adultery is like dung; one goes far away to do it. When a Roman was returning from a trip he used to send someone ahead to let wife know, so as not to surprise her in the act. You cannot tell your friend you’ve been cuckolded. Even if he doesn’t laugh at you he may put the information to good use. When a girl finds that she's not the only pebble on the beach, she becomes a little bolder. A single advantage is worth a thousand sorceries. Advantage is a better soldier than rashness. Next to knowing when to seize an opportunity the most important thing in life is to know when to forgo an advantage. There's one advantage to being a fool: you needn't be lonely. Adam and Eve had many advantages but the principal one was that they escaped teething. Adversity and loss make a man wise. * Doing business without advertising is like winking at a girl in the dark: You know what you are doing but nobody else does. * “Be yourself” is about the worst advice you can give to people.

Unknown

African Michel Eyguem de Montaigne

Michel Eyguem de Montaigne Unknown

Turkish Shakespeare Disraeli

Unknown Mark Twain

Welsh Ed Howe

Tom Mason

5


Advice Advice Advice Advice

Advice Advice Advice Advice Advice

Advice

Advice Advice

Advice Advice Advice Advice

Advice

6

* A friend advises in his interest, not yours. * A good scare is worth more to a man than good advice. Advice after the mischief is like medicine after death. Advice is seldom welcome; and those that want it most always like it least. * Advice that ain’t paid for ain’t no good. Advice to a fool goes in at one ear and out at the other. Advice to all, security for none. Ask advice from everyone but act with your own mind. * He who builds according to every man’s advice will have a crooked house. It is always a silly thing to give advice but to give good advice is fatal. * Many receive advice but few profit by it. * Nothing is given so profusely as advice. Take a woman’s first advice, not her second. The advice of the aged will not mislead you. * The best advice is found on the pillow. The woman who is clever enough to ask a man's advice is seldom foolish enough to follow it. * The worst men often give the best advice.

Turkish Ed Howe Danish Stanhope

American Danish English Yiddish Danish

Oscar Wilde

Publilius Syrus Duc de La Rochefoucauld French Welsh Unknown Unknown

Unknown


Advice Advice, coin Advice, help Advise Adviser

Advising Affairs Affairs Affect Affection Affliction Afraid Afraid

Afterthought

Age Age

Age Age Age

* When a man seeks your advice he generally wants your praise. Advice is the smallest current coin. * No distance is greater than that between advice and help. * No one is wise enough to advise himself. A man is often a bad adviser to himself and a good adviser to another. * Advising is easier than helping. * Man’s affairs are evaluated only after his coffin is closed. * No one is wise in his own affairs. Study what you most affect. * Strong affections give credit to weak arguments. After every affliction there is enjoyment. * Be afraid and you’ll be safe. * Be always a little afraid so that you never have need of being much afraid. The afterthought is good for naught except for catching blind horses. A man knows his age, a woman calculates hers. A man of sixty has spent twenty years in bed and over three years in eating. Age does not provide good sense, it only makes one go more slowly. * Every man desires to live long but no man wants to be old. * Forty is the old age of youth, fifty

Lord Chesterfield Ambrose Bierce Anonymous German Irish

German Korean Dutch Shakespeare English Moroccan Irish Finnish

English

Unknown Arnold Bennett Finnish Jonathan Swift Victor Hugo 7


Age

Age Age

*

Age Age

Age

*

Age Age

* *

Age Age Age Age Age

*

Age Age

Age Age Age

8

*

is the youth of old age. I refuse to admit that I am more than fifty-two even if that does make my sons illegitimate. If you want to avoid old age hang yourself in youth. In old age one again becomes a child. Man fools himself. He prays for a long life, and he fears an old age. Middle age is the time when a man is always thinking that in a week or two he will feel as good as ever. No man is so old as to think he cannot live one more year. No morning sun lasts a whole day. No one grows old by living only by losing interest in living. Old age does not announce itself. Old age is a hundred disorders. Old age will not come alone. Old men are twice children. The aged in council, the young in action. The best way to tell a woman's age is not to. The old believe everything, the middle age suspect everything, and the young know everything. With age comes wisdom. You and I are past our dining days. Young men's minds are always changeable, but when an old man is concerned in a matter he looks both before and after.

Lady Astor

Yiddish Japanese Chinese Don Marquis

Cicero American Unknown African Welsh Welsh Greek Danish Unknown Unknown

American Shakespeare Homer


Age, arteries Age, beauty Age, child Age, death

A man is as old as his arteries. Age before beauty. * They say an old man is twice a child. * Most people my age are dead.

Age, fool

There is no fool like an old fool.

Age, incongruity Age, seventy

I never knew so young a body with so old a head. Oh to be seventy again!

Age, youth Age, youth Age, youth Aging

Aging

Aging Aging

Aging

Aging

A young man is embarrassed to question an older one. * But though an old man, I am a young gardener. * Youth and old age will never agree. Another sign of age is when you begin to spend more time talking with your druggist than with your bartender. As a man grows older he either talks more and says less, or talks less and says more. As we grow older our bodies get shorted and our antidotes longer. As we grow older work seems a lot less fun, and fun seems a lot more work. Don't worry about your age: remember, every time you grow a year older, so do all your friends. You're getting old when of two evils, you choose the one that gets you home earlier.

Thomas Sydenham Unknown Shakespeare Casey Stengel John Heywood Shakespeare Oliver Wendell Holmes Homer Thomas Jefferson Unknown Unknown

Unknown

Robert Quillen Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

9


Agonies, change Agree Agree

*

Agreement

*

Agreement

*

Ague, sickness Ailment Aim

*

Aim

*

Aim Alcohol

*

Alcohol

*

Alcoholic

Alcoholic

*

Ale Alibi Alibi Alimony 10

*

Agonies are one of my changes of garments. Agree, for the law is costly. On one issue at least, men and women agree; they both distrust women. An ill agreement is better than a good judgment. When two men in business always agree, one of them is unnecessary. Agues come on horseback, but go away on foot. The ailment of the heart is known to only one. Many a man has an excellent aim in life, but no ammunition. The girl who seems to be throwing herself at a man is actually taking careful aim. You aimed for the palace and got drowned in the sewer. Alcohol is a good preservative for almost everything but secrets. I have taken more out of alcohol than alcohol has taken out of me. An alcoholic finds it hard to battle his way to the top, but easy to bottle his way to the bottom. Rich men are alcoholics, poor men are drunks. Ale in, wit out. A woman with a few children always has an alibi. An alibi is first cousin to an excuse, and bad relatives. Alimony is like buying oats for a

Walt Whitman English H. L. Mencken English William Wrigley Jr. English African C.C. Colton Unknown

Mark Twain Unknown Winston Churchill Unknown

Unknown English Kin Hubbard Unknown Arthur


Alimony Alimony Alimony Alimony

Alimony Alliance Alliances Alliances Alliances

Allies Alms Alms Alms

Alone Alone Alone Alternatives Amateur

dead horse. Alimony is the fee a woman charges for name dropping. * Alimony: A gambling debt. She cried, and the judge wiped her tears with my checkbook. * The girl who marries a man for his money, may have to divorce him to get it. You never realize how short a month is until you pay alimony. He that is not with me is against me. Do not aspire to an alliance with your betters. * Even a flounder takes sides. There are no compacts between lions and men, and wolves and lambs have no concord. If God be for us, who can be against us? Alms given openly will be rewarded in secret. Alms never make one poor. He who will not open the door to give alms will open it for the doctor. * Better alone than have a false friend for company. * Better be alone than in bad company. We’re all in this alone. There is more than one way to skin a cat. An amateur is a young man who, when flattering women, is afraid

"Bugs" Baer Unknown Unknown Tommy Manville Unknown

John Barrymore Bible T.C. Lai Stanislaw J. Lec, Polish Homer

Bible Chinese English Indian

English English Lily Tomlin Unknown Unknown

11


Amateur

*

Amateur

Amateur, professional

*

Amazing, grace

Ambassador

Ambiguity

Ambition

*

Ambition

*

Ambition

Ambition

Ambition

Ambition, nets 12

*

of doing it. It is by the quality of his mistakes that you recognize the amateur. The two most difficult careers are entrusted to amateurs-citizenship and parenthood. Any amateur can start a love affair, but only a professional knows how to break it off. Amazing grace! How sweet the sound That saved a wretch like me! I once was lost, but now I'm found, Was blind, but now I see. An ambassador is an honest man sent to lie aboard for the commonwealth. Those who write clearly have readers, those who write obscurity have commentators. Ambition can creep as well as soar. By working faithfully eight hours a day you may eventually get to be a boss and work twelve hours a day. He who sacrifices his conscience to ambition burns a picture to obtain the ashes. No persons stoop so low as those most eager to rise high in the world. There was a kid on the block who always wanted to be a pirate when he grew up. Today he is a doctor. He’s lucky. Not every man realizes the ambitions of his youth. Vain the ambition of kings; who

Dagobert D. Runes Unknown

Unknown

John Newton

Sir Henry Wotton Camus

Edmund Burke Robert Frost

Chinese

Unknown

Unknown

John


Ambush America

America, soul, face American American, Englishmen

Ancestry

Ancestry

Anchor Anchor Angel Angel Angel Angels, heaven, demons,

seek by trophy and dead things; to leave a living name behind; and weave but nets to catch the wind. You cannot avoid what lies in ambush. America is a large friendly dog in a small room. Every time it wags its tail it knocks over a chair. I'd rather see America save her soul than her face. An American will go to hell for a bag of coffee. * An Englishmen does things because they have been done before; an American does them because they haven't been done before. Birth, ancestry, and that which you yourself have not achieved, can hardly be called your own. None of us can boast about the morality of our ancestors. The records do not show that Adam and Eve were married. * Better to lose the anchor than the whole ship. * It is well to moor your bark with two anchors. Angels can fly because they take themselves lightly. Every man hath a good and a bad angel attending on him. Nowadays you must go to heaven to meet an angel. Neither the angels in Heaven above, Nor the demons down under the sea, Can ever dissever

Webster

African Arnold Toynbee Norman (Mattoon) Thomas American Mark Twain

Greek

Ed Howe

Dutch Publilius Syrus Chesterton Robert Burton Polish Edgar Allan Poe

13


Annabel Lee Angels, passion Anger Anger Anger

*

*

Anger Anger

Anger

*

Anger

*

Anger

*

Anger

*

Anger Anger

*

Anger

Anger Anger Anger

Anger

14

* *

my soul from the soul, Of the beautiful Annabel Lee. We are never like angels 'till our passions die. Anger has no eyes. Anger is short madness Anger is the only thing to put off till tomorrow. Anger punishes itself. Anger without a friend, rather than constant friendship with our enemy. Angry men make themselves a bed of nettles. Control yourself: remember that anger is only one letter short of danger. Don't fly into rage unless you are prepared for a rough landing. He who conquers his anger has conquered an enemy. Hell hath no fury like the lawyer of a woman scorned. If you are patient in a moment of anger, you will escape a hundred days of sorrow. If you are patient in one moment of anger, you will escape a hundred days of sorrow. Kill your anger while it is small. Never write a letter while you are angry. Speak when you're angry − and you'll make the speech you'll regret. When anger arises, think of the consequences.

Thomas Dekker Indian Horace Slovakian English Egyptian

Unknown Unknown

Unknown German Unknown Chinese

Chinese

Slovakian Chinese Unknown

Confucius


Anger Anger, swear Angry Animal

Animals

Answer Answer Answering

Ant Ant Ant Ant Anticipation Antique

Anvil Anvil Anvil Anvil

* When angry, shake your finger, not your fist. * When angry, count to four; when very angry, swear. * He that is angry is not at ease. * Animals have long tongues but can’t speak; men have short tongues and shouldn’t speak. * I distrust camels, and anyone else who can go a week without a drink. If one has nothing to answer, it is best to shut up. * No answer is also an answer. In answering an opponent, arrange your ideas but not your words. * An ant may well destroy a whole dam. * Even the ant has his bite. Go to the ant, thou sluggard; consider her ways and be wise. The little ant at its hole is full of courage. * A watched pot never boils. * An antique is anything that's too old for the poor, but not too old for the rich. * A good anvil is not afraid of the hammer. * The anvil lasts longer than the hammer. * When you are an anvil, bear; when you are a hammer, strike. When you are an anvil, hold you still; when you are a hammer, strike your fill.

Unknown Mark Twain English Yiddish

Joe E. Lewis

Yiddish Danish Charles Caleb Colton Chinese Turkish Solomon African Unknown Unknown

Greek Italian Spanish English

15


Anvil, hammer * When you are an anvil, lie still; When you are a hammer, strike your fill. Anxiety Anxiety breaks a man’s backbone. Anxiety The nature of twentieth-century man is anxiety. Anything * Anything for a quiet life. Ape Apes are never more beasts than when they wear men’s clothes. Apologize * It is much easier to apologize than to ask permission. Apology Apparel Appear Appearance

Appearance Appearance Appearance Appearance Appearance Appearances Appearances Appearances Appearances Appearances

16

* To apologize is to lay the foundation for a future offense. * Apparel makes the man. Appear always what you are and then a little less. * A man's appearance shows how much he is earning; a woman's appearance shows how much she is spending. * Appearances are deceitful. * Be careless in your dress if you must, but keep a tidy soul. How holy people look when they are sea-sick! * Pleasing ware is half sold. Under a tattered cloak you will generally find a good drinker. * Appearances often are deceiving. Devils are not so black as they are painted. * Judge not the horse by his saddle. * Never judge by appearances. * The cowl does not make the monk.

George Herbert Hebrew Norman Mailer English English Grace Murray Hopper Ambrose Bierce English Greek Unknown

English Mark Twain Samuel Butler English Spanish Aesop Thomas Lodge Chinese Unknown Anonymous


Appearances Appearances, cream Appearances, deceit

* Things are not always as they seem * Things are seldom as they seem. Skim milk often masquerades as cream. A goodly apple rotten at the core. O what goodly outside falsehood hath! * All that glitters is not gold.

Appearances, gold Appeasement * An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile hoping it will eat him last. Appeasement Appeasers believe that if you keep throwing steaks to a tiger, it will become a vegetarian. Appetite He who restrains his appetite avoids debt. Appetite * It is difficult to satisfy one’s appetite by painting pictures of cakes. Appetite, Good digestion waits on appetite, health and health on both! Applause Excesses of applause never satisfy the sensible. Applause * My advice to you concerning applause is this: enjoy it but never quite believe it. Apple Do not look for apples under a poplar tree. Apple Even in a good apple you sometimes find a worm. Apple One rotten apple spoils the others. Apples, * There’s small choice in rotten choices apples. Appreciation Thank you for nothing.

Phaedrus Sir W. S. Gilbert Shakespeare

John Dryden Winston Churchill Winston Churchill Chinese Chinese

Shakespeare Baltasar Gracian Robert Montgomery Slovakian Yiddish Yiddish Shakespeare Miguel de Cervantes 17


Appropriates

Archer Archer Architecture, music

* A whip for the horse, a bridle for the ass, and a rod for the fool's back. A good archer is not known by his arrows, but for his aim. * The archer that shoots badly has a lie ready. * I call architecture frozen music.

Argue, debate

Arguing

Arguing

Arguing, telling Argument

*

Argument Argument

*

Argument

*

Argument

*

Argument

Argument 18

*

Solomon

English Spanish Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Pierre De Beaumarchais Pierre Beaumarchais

It is not necessary to understand things in order to argue about them. It is not necessary to understand things in order to argue about them. When your argument has little or Cicero no substance, abuse your opponent. I’m not arguing with you – I’m James telling you. McNeill Whistler A long dispute means that both Voltaire parties are wrong. Behind every argument is Luis D. someone's ignorance. Brandies It takes two to make an Unknown argument, unless you have a wife. Some men learn quickly, while Unknown others still argue with a woman. The only thing that starts more Unknown arguments in a home than weak coffee is strong drink. The only thing wrong with being Unknown on the wrong side of an argument is being on the right side with no one listening. There are two sides to every Unknown


Argument

*

Argument

*

Argument

Argument, bed * Arm * Arms

*

Arms, weapons Army

*

Army

*

Army

*

*

Army Arrangement

Arrival

Arrival, departure Arrival, departure

*

argument, and they're usually married to each other. There is nothing so exasperating as arguing with someone who knows what he is talking about. There’s no argument like that of a stick. You raise your voice when you should rather reinforce your argument. Never go to bed on an argument. Keep a broken arm inside your sleeve. The moment you have a woman in your arms, you have her on your hands. Arms, women, and books should be looked at daily. An army of a thousand is easy to find, but, ah, how difficult it is to find a general. An army of sheep led by a lion would defeat an army of lions led by a sheep. In order to have good soldiers a nation must always be at war. None but an armed nation can dispense with a standing army. It is absurd to divide people into good and bad, as people are either charming or tedious. Nothing stops a family argument more quickly than the arrival of an unexpected guest. An average is struck in all things: cold welcome, warm farewell. At a cocktail party the guests have more friends when they arrive

Unknown

Spanish Samuel Johnson Unknown Chinese Unknown

Dutch Chinese

Arab

Napoleon Thomas Jefferson Oscar Wilde

Unknown

Unknown Unknown

19


than when they leave. Arrogance Do not be arrogant because of your knowledge. Arrow If you have no arrows in your quiver, go not with archers. Arrow, bow * Draw not your bow until the arrow is fixed. Art Art has no enemy but ignorance. Art * Bad artists always admire each other’s work. Art Good work rarely sells. I believe this of any art. Art, best, good In art the best is good enough. enough Art, ignorance Ashes

*

Ask Ask

*

Ask

*

Ask, knowledge Asking

*

Asking

*

Aspiration

Ass Ass 20

*

Art hath an enemy called Ignorance. Red-hot ashes are easily rekindled. Ask too much to get enough. Ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and ye shall find; knock and it shall be opened unto you. It is easier to beg forgiveness than to ask permission. Man, if you gotta ask, you'll never know. Many things are lost for want of asking. To know the road ahead, ask those who are coming back. If a man aspires to the highest place, it is no dishonor to halt at the second, or even at the third. A dull ass near home needs no spur. An ass is but an ass, though laden

Ptahhote German Unknown English Oscar Wilde Arthur Wing Pinero Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Ben Jonson Irish Spanish Bible

Unknown Elwyn Brooks White Unknown Chinese Cicero

English English


Ass Ass

*

Ass

*

Ass Ass

Ass Ass

*

Assassination

Assassination, * censorship Association

*

Association

Assume Assumption

* *

Astrology Atheist

*

Atheist, God

*

with gold. An ass is most pleasing to another of his kind. Asses carry the oats and horses eat them. Better an ass that carries me than a horse that throws me. Better strive with an ill ass than carry the wood yourself. In biblical days it was considered a miracle for an ass to speak. Now it would be a miracle if one kept quiet. Make yourself an ass, and every one will lay his sack on you. The ass and the driver never think alike. America is the place where you cannot kill your government by killing the men who conduct it. Assassination is the extreme form of censorship.

Slovakian Dutch Portuguese, English English Unknown

German Dutch Woodrow Wilson

George Bernard Shaw Tell me your company and tell Miguel de you what you are. Cervantes There is no fire where there is no John smoke. (Where there's smoke Heywood there's fire.) To assume is to be deceived. Yiddish Never look for birds this year in Miguel de the nests of last year. Cervantes Astrology is a disease, not a Maimonides science. Irreligious men are often better Hasidic suited for godly missions. At night an atheist half believes in Edward God. Young

21


Atheists Atrophy Attack, defense Attacked, unnoticed Attempt Attention Attraction Audience Audience, disturbance Authority, responsibility Authority, wisdom Autobiography Autobiography Autobiography

Autobiography

Automobile

Avarice

22

* There are no atheists in a foxhole. The hardest knife ill-used doth lose its edge. * Attack is the best form of defense. * I would rather be attacked than unnoticed. * A bold attempt is half success. * To get the maximum attention, you can't beat a big blunder. * Make happy those who are near and those who are far will come. * The play was a success but the audience was the failure. * To get an audience, create a disturbance. * Authority and responsibility are rarely balanced. Authority without wisdom is like a heavy axe without an edge, fitter to bruise than polish. * An autobiography is the story of how a man thinks he lived. * No man is bad enough to tell the truth about himself. Only when one has lost all curiosity about the future has one reached the age to write an autobiography. * There ain't nothing that breaks up homes and nations like somebody publishing their memoirs. A careful driver is one who honks his horn when he goes through a red light. If money be not thy servant, it will be thy master.

Unknown Shakespeare Unknown Samuel Johnson Danish Unknown Chinese William Collier Gaelic Joe Kelly Anne Bradstreet Herbert Samuel Bernard Shaw Evelyn Waugh

Will Rogers

Henry Morgan Francis Bacon


Awaiting Ax

Ax(e) Ax(e) Babies Baby

Baby Baby Bachelor

Bachelor Bachelor Bachelor Back Bad Bad news Bag Bag Bagel

* He who awaits much, receives little. If you'll spend more time sharpening the ax, you'll spend less time chopping wood. An axe for wax can’t cut a rock. The axe attacks the forest from whence its handle. * There are no premature babies, only delayed weddings. A baby is born with clenched fists but a man dies with his hands wide open. * Kissing the baby touches the mother. When a baby grows, the crying changes. * A bachelor is a man who gave up waiting for the right girl and is making the best of the wrong one. Bachelors are but half of a pair of scissors. * Call no man unhappy until he is married. Old bachelors and old maids are either too good or too bad. * Not all who turn their backs are fleeing. * Bad is never good until worse happens. Bad news travels fast. * Empty bags cannot stand upright. * The beggar’s bag is bottomless. If you eat your bagel, you’ll have nothing in your pocket but the hole.

Unknown Unknown

African Indian American Yiddish

Thai African Unknown

American Socrates Basque Swedish Danish Unknown English German Yiddish

23


Bait Bait, fish Bait, heart Baldness Banana Bang, whimper

Banishment Banker

Banking Banquet Baptism, slavery Barbarian Bargain Bargain Bargain

Bark

24

* The bait hides the hook. * It's a silly fish that's caught twice with the same bait. * If I keep a green bough in my heart, the singing bird will come. A hair in the head is worth two in the brush. One eats the banana and throws away the peel. Between the idea and the reality; Between the motion and the act falls the shadow. This is the way the world will end, not with a bank, but with a whimper. * Eating the bitter bread of banishment. The human species is composed of two distinct races: the men who borrow, and the men who lend. * Banking establishments are more dangerous than standing armies. He that banquets every day never makes a good meal. Baptism enslaved me. Control barbarians with barbarians. * Bargain like a gypsy and pay like a gentleman. * Go to a man who is in a difficulty and you’ll get a bargain. One of the difficult tasks in this world is to convince a woman that even a bargain costs money. * His (or her) bark is worse than his (or her) bite.

English Unknown Chinese Oliver Herford Vietnamese Thomas Sterns Eliot

Shakespeare Charles Lamb

Thomas Jefferson English Arthur Rimbaud Japanese SerboCroatian Irish Ed Howe

English


Bark, bite Barker Barking

* His bark is worse than his bite.

*

Barleycorn Barrel

*

Baseball

Bashful

*

Bastard

*

Bastard

Bath Bathroom

*

Bathroom

*

Battle Battle, blow Be Beach Bean Bear

*

Great barkers are no biters. One dog barks at something, the rest bark at him A barleycorn is better than a diamond to a cock. Empty barrels make the most noise. Baseball is the only place in life where a sacrifice is really appreciated. Bashfulness is of no use to the needy. People are not born bastards, they have to work at it. Poor people send their children to school to be bastards. Rich people teach that at home. At the baths all are equal. How long a few minutes are depends on if you are in the bathroom, or out. The father of the bride shouldn't think of it as losing a daughter, but as a gaining a bathroom. He who is well prepared has half won the battle. The first blow is half the battle.

George Herbert English Chinese English Danish Unknown

Dutch Frank Dane Gerald Barzan Yiddish Unknown

Unknown

Portuguese

Oliver Goldsmith That which shall be, shall be. English * Nowadays a woman wears less on Unknown the beach than she does in bed. Sow beans in the mud and they’ll English grow like wood. * The bear dances, but the gypsy Russian takes the money. 25


Bear Beard Beard Beard Bearskin Beat Beating

*

Beauty

Beauty

*

Beauty Beauty Beauty Beauty

26

*

*

Beauty Beauty

*

Beauty Beauty Beauty

*

Beauty Beauty Beauty

*

*

Two bears can’t live together in one den. If the beards everything goats might preach. It’s good to learn to barber on someone else’s beard. That ornamental excrement which growth beneath the chin. Never sell the bearskin till you have killed the bear. One may as well be well-beaten as badly-beaten. You may as well give a good beating as a bad one. A beautiful woman is paradise for the eyes, hell for the soul, and purgatory for the purse. A poor beauty finds more lovers than husbands. A woman is never as beautiful as she used to be. Beauty and folly are often companions. Beauty and pride go to the grave. Beauty and wisdom are rarely conjoined. Beauty draws more than oxen. Beauty is a very fine thing, but you can’t live on it. Beauty is but a blossom. Beauty is but skin deep. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Beauty is no inheritance. Beauty is only sin deep. Beauty is only skin deep.

Russian Danish Yiddish Thomas Fuller French French French Sebastien Chamfort English Unknown French African Gaius Petronius English American English English Unknown English Saki Unknown


Beauty Beauty Beauty Beauty Beauty Beauty Beauty Beauty Beauty Beauty Beauty Beauty Beauty

Beauty Beauty

Beauty Shop

Beauty, honesty Beauty, irony

* Beauty is potent, but money is omnipotent. Beauty is the subject of a blemish. * Beauty may have fair leaves, but bitter fruit. * Beauty never repays a debt. * Beauty provokes thieves sooner than gold. * Everything has beauty, but not everyone sees it. * He who marries a beauty marries trouble. * It is beauty's privilege to kill time, and time's privilege to kill beauty. It is not easy for a beautiful girl to believe that love is blind. It’s better to behold beauty but live with wisdom. * Let us leave pretty women to men who have no imagination. * No one can live on beauty, but one can die for it. The most beautiful things in the world are the most useless; peacocks and lilies, for instance. To the eyes of a lover pockmarks are dimples. * Women’s beauty, forest echoes, and pretty rainbows soon pass away. Most women leaving beauty parlors look as though they hadn't been waited on. * Beauty and honesty seldom agree. * It is the beautiful bird which gets caged.

English English English African English Confucius African Unknown Unknown Yiddish Proust Swedish John Ruskin

Japanese German

Will Rogers

Unknown Confucius

27


Beauty, thieves Because Bed Bed Bed

Bed Bed

Bed

Bed, health, wise, wealth Bee Bee Bee Been Beer Beg

Beg Beg Beggar Beggar 28

* Beauty provoketh thieves more than gold. Because is woman’s reason. * As you make your bed, so you must lie on it. * Better to go to bed supperless than to rise in debt. Early to bed and early to rise, makes a man healthy and wealthy and wise. No bed is big enough to hold three. No civilized person goes to bed the same day he gets up. * Though they rest on the same bed, they dream of different things. Early to bed, early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise. A dead bee will make no honey. * It is better to have one bee than a host of flies. * Where there are bees there is honey. What has been, may be again. When the beer goes in, the wits go out. Beggars should be abolished: it is irritating to give to them and it is irritating not to. Better beg than steal. Common people do not pray; they only beg. Beg from beggars and you’ll never be rich. Beggars breed and rich men feed.

Shakespeare Scottish English English English

German Richard Harding Davis Korean

Benjamin Franklin English Italian English English Danish Nietzsche

Dutch Bernard Shaw English English


Beggar

Better to die a beggar than live a beggar. Beggar He will soon be a beggar than cannot say no. Beggar * Put a beggar into your barn and he will make himself your heir. Beggar, death, * When beggars die there are no comets, comets seen; but the heavens princes blaze forth the death of princes. Beggars * Beggars can’t be choosers. Beggars Beggars Beggars Begin Begin Begin Beginning Beginning Beginning Beginning Beginning Beginning Beginning Beginning Beginning

* If wishes were horses, beggars would ride. * Mounted beggars run their horses to death. * Set a beggar on horseback and he will ride at full gallop. Better never to begin than to never make an end. Good to begin well but, better to end well. * To begin is to be half done. A bad beginning makes a bad ending. * A good beginning is half the work. * A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step. * Every beginning is difficult. Everything has a beginning. He who has begun, is half done. Dare to be wise and begin! * I start where the last man left off. If you know the beginning well, the end will not trouble you. * Look with favor on a bold beginning.

English Scottish Spanish Shakespeare

T.C. Lai, English Unknown Shakespeare Robert Burton English English Korean Euripides Irish Chinese English Unknown Horace Thomas A. Edison African Virgil

29


Beginning

* The best way to win an argument is to begin by being right. Beginning * The journey of a thousand miles starts with a single step. Beginning * Your day starts with what you say to yourself. Beginning, end My end is my beginning.

Beginning, end * There's nothing worse than a quitter, except the man who's afraid to begin. Beginning, From a good beginning comes a ending good end. Beginnings A hard beginning makes for a good ending. Beginnings All beginnings are difficult, with the first million being the hardest. Beginnings He has half the deed done, who has made a beginning. Begun * Begun is half done. Begun * Soonest begun, soonest over. Begun Well begun is half done. Behavior Behavior denotes birth. Behavior * Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example. Behavior He treats a flower girl as if she was a duchess and a duchess as if she was a flower girl. Behavior * What reveals a man is his behavior in time of hunger. Beheading I will make you shorter by the head. Belief All things work together for good to them that love God. Belief * Belief is easier than investigation. 30

Unknown Confucius Unknown Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots Unknown

John Heywood John Heywood Unknown Horace German English English Malaysian Mark Twain

Bernard Shaw African Elizabeth I Bible Serbo-


Belief Belief Belief

*

Belief

*

Believe

*

Believe Believe

*

Believe

*

Believe Believe Believe

*

Believe, deny, * mind Believing Believing Belittle Bell Bell Bell

*

*

Croatian I can believe anything provided it Oscar Wilde is incredible. It is believed because it is absurd. Tertullian Not everyone that saith unto me, Bible Lord, Lord shall enter into the kingdom of heaven, but only those who do the will of my Father. Nothing is so firmly believed, as Michel what is least known. Eyguem de Montaigne Believe not all you hear, tell not Indian all you believe. Believe not all you hear. English Man can believe the impossible, Oscar Wilde but can never believe the improbable. Men are most apt to believe what Montaigne they least understand. The eyes believe themselves, the Unknown ears believe other people. We soon believe what we desire. English Who is ready to believe, is easy to German deceive. It is always easier to believe than John to deny. Our minds are naturally Burroghs affirmative. Believe nothing of what you hear Unknown and only half of what you see. Seeing is believing. Unknown Don't belittle-be big. Unknown A fool’s bell is soon rung. English He who hears but one bell hears French but one sound. One does not ring a bell for the Welsh deaf. 31


Bell Belly Belly Belly Belly Belly Bend Bend Bending Benefit Benefits Best Best

Best Betray, knife

Better Beware, enterprises Bible

Bigamy

Bigamy

32

* While the great bells are ringing no one hears the little ones. * A belly is nearer than a brother. A hungry belly listens to no one. Full bellies make for empty skulls. My belly thinks my throat's been cut. * The belly overrules the head. * Best to bend while it is a twig. * Better to bend than to break. * A reed before the wind lives on, while the mighty oat falls. * He who feels the benefit should feel the burden. Benefits please best like flowers when they are fresh. * Better the best of the worst than the worst of the best. So long as you do your best in life, whatever happens will be for the best. The best things in life are free. To have a good enemy, chose a friend as he knows exactly where to stick the knife. Things can only get better. * Beware of all enterprises that require new clothes. When a politician swears on the Bible that a thing is so, and then immediately goes ahead and proves it, I know he’s lying. * A bigamist is a man who makes a second mistake before correcting the first. * Why a man would want a wife is a mystery to bachelors; why a man

Danish Turkish Spanish English English French English French Unknown American George Herbert Yiddish Unknown

Unknown Unknown

Unknown Henry David Thoreau Samuel Bonom

Unknown

Unknown


Biographies, geniuses Bird

* *

Bird Bird Bird Bird Bird

*

Bird

*

Bird Birds, feather Birth

*

Birth Birth Control

* *

Birth, death, funeral Bite

*

Bite

*

Biter Bitten Bitter

* *

would want to wife is a bigamystery. Great geniuses have the shortest biographies. A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. Birds are entangled by their feet, and men by their tongues. Birds of a feather flock together. Birds of prey do not flock together. However high a bird may soar, it seeks its food on earth. The bird once out of hand is hard to recover. To scare a bird is not the way to catch it. Where there are birds there is water. Birds of a feather will flock together. At birth we bring nothing, at death we take nothing. Birth is the remedy for death. It's a pity that birth control cannot be retroactive. Why is it we rejoice at a birth and grieve at a funeral? It is because we are not the person involved. Better a friend’s bite than an enemy’s caress. The bites of priests and wolves are hard to heal. The biter is often bit. Once bitten, twice shy. The bitterest words are those we are forced to eat.

Ralph Waldo Emerson English English English Portuguese Danish Danish French African Robert Burton Chinese African Unknown Mark Twain

Danish German French English Unknown

33


Blacken Blame

*

Blame

Blame, uneducated Blind

*

Blind

*

Blind

*

Blind

*

Blind Blind Blind

*

Blind Blindness Blood

* *

Blood Blood Blood Blood, water Blow Blow 34

*

Who blackens others, does not whiten himself. A bad workman always blames his tools. Blame yourself as you would blame others; excuse others as you would excuse yourself. If a son is uneducated, his dad is to blame. A good marriage would be between a blind wife and deaf husband. Blind guides, which strain at a gnat and swallow a camel. In the land of the blind, the oneeyed man is king. None are so blind as those who will not see. The blind eat many a fly. The blind leading the blind. There are none so blind as those who will not see. When the blind leads the blind, both fall into the ditch. Love is blind. Blood is thicker than water, and boils faster too. Let the blood be ever so thin, it is always thicker than water. There is no getting blood from a turnip. You can’t get blood out of a stone. Blood is thicker than water. A blow passes but, a spoken word lingers. Better a blow from a wise man

German Unknown Chinese

Chinese Michel De Montaigne Bible Niccolo Machiavelli Matthew Henry English Unknown Unknown English English Unknown Danish Italian English John Ray Yiddish Yiddish


Blow Blunder

* *

Boaster Boaster Boasting

* *

Boasting

Boasting

Boasting

Boasting

Boasting

*

Boat Boat

*

Boat

*

Boat

*

Body Body

* *

Body

than a kiss from a fool. Many small blows fell great trees. The blunders of physicians are covered by the earth. A boaster and a liar are near akin. Great boaster, little doer. Boast not thyself of tomorrow for thou knowest not what a day may bring forth. Like clouds with no rain, is a man who boasts of gifts he does not have. One of the hardest things for most of us to put up with is a braggart who makes good. Saying is one thing, doing is another. Some men are born great, some achieve greatness, and others just keep still. The talk of small boys among themselves consists almost entirely of boasting. Ill goes a boat without oars. We didn't all come over on the same boat but we're all in the same boat. When the boat reaches midstream, it is too late to stop the leak. You can’t load a small boat with a heavy cargo. A living body is a dying body. Better a sick body than an ignorant mind. Great bodies move slowly.

Norwegian Portuguese Scottish French Solomon

Unknown

Unknown

Michel Eyguem de Montaigne Kin Hubbard

Mencken

English Bernard Shaw Chinese

Chinese Japanese Greek English 35


Body Boil, degrees

To bow the body is easy; to bow the will is hard. * We boil at different degrees.

Boldness

*

Bolt

*

Bone Bone

Bone Book Book Book

* *

Book

*

Book

Book Book

Book

Book

36

*

Chinese

Ralph Waldo Emerson Boldness is royal power without a Hebrew crown. A small bolt to the house is better Danish than none at all. For the last to come the bones. French The difference between success Bernard and failure often depends on Shaw which you develop: backbone or wishbone. The nearer the bone, the sweeter English the flesh. A book gives knowledge, but it is Hebrew life that gives understanding. A book holds a house of gold. Chinese A book is like a garden carried in Chinese the pocket. A room without books is a body Cicero without a soul. Already by 1900 I could boast that Winston I had written as many books as Churchill Moses. Books do not exhaust words; and Chinese words do not exhaust thoughts. Good books usually make the G.C. fools more foolish, the wise more Lichtenberg wise, and leave the majority as they were. It is with books as with me: a very Voltaire small number play a very large part. My books are water; those of the Mark Twain great geniuses are wine-but everybody drinks water.


Book Book

Book Book

Book, judge Book, labor

*

Booted Bore

*

Bore

Bore

*

Born Born

*

Born

*

Born, alone Borrow

*

Borrow

*

The covers of this book are too far apart for me. The really cultured person reads the newest books in science, and the oldest in literature. Woe be to him that reads but one book. Writing a book is an adventure: it begins as an amusement, then it becomes a mistress, then a master, and finally a tyrant. Never judge a book by its cover. A bad book is as much labor to write as a good one. They that are booted are not always ready. Against boredom, even the Gods struggle in vain. Ennui is the feeling when you're tired of doing nothing and you're too lazy to do something. The secret of being a bore is not to leave anything out. Better unborn than untaught. He that is born to be hanged will never be drowned. We are born crying, live complaining, and die disappointed. No man is born unto himself alone. Always borrow from a pessimist as he doesn't expect to get paid back. If you want to teach your children the value of money, borrow from them.

Ambrose Bierce Unknown

George Herbert Winston Churchill

Unknown Aldous Huxley English Nietzsche Unknown

Unknown English English English

Francis Quarles Unknown

Unknown

37


Borrow Borrow Borrowing Borrowing

* *

Borrowing Boss

*

Boss

Bottle

*

Bottle Bottom

*

Bottom

*

Bough Bow Bow Bow Bow

*

Bow Bowing Bowing

38

* *

Neither borrow nor flatter. Never call a man a fool; borrow from him instead. Borrowed garments never fit. Neither a lender or a borrower be. The borrower is servant to the lender. By working faithfully eight hours a day you may eventually get to be a boss and work twelve hours a day. If you think your boss is stupid, remember: You wouldn’t have a job if he were any smarter. A full bottle won’t shake; but a half one will. With a bottle and a girl one does not count the hours. If you haven’t spanked a little bottom, don’t threaten a big one. Many a boss's son learns his father's business by starting at the bottom − for a few days. The boughs that bear most, hang lowest. A bow long bent grows weak. A bow over-bent will weaken. Better bow than break. Those who bow to the man above will always step on the man below. Unstringing the bow does not cure the wound. If you bow at all, bow low. The man who bows before the ruler, shows his behind to the

English Unknown Unknown Unknown Bible Robert Frost

Albert A. Grant, American Chinese Polish Greek Unknown

English English Scottish English Dagobert D. Runes French Chinese Stanislaw J. Lec


Bowl Bowl Bowl

* *

Box

*

Boy

*

Boy

*

Boy Boy

*

Bragger Bragging Bragging Brain

*

Brain

*

Brain Branch

*

Branch Branch

*

Branch Brave Bravery

*

Bravery

*

courtiers. Full bowls make for empty brains. It’s easy to bowl downhill. You can’t have more in the bowl than you have in the pot. An open box tempts even an honest man. A lazy boy and a warm bed are difficult to part. A smiling boy seldom proves a good servant. Boys will be boys. While the boy is small, you can see the man. Great braggers, little doers. If you’ve done it, it ain’t braggin’. They brag most that can do the least. A brain is worth little without a tongue. Idle brains are the devil’s workshop. Who has no brain needs brawn. A wet branch burns better than a dry stone. Better is the branch that bends, than the branch that breaks. The branch is seldom better than the stem. There is often a withered branch on a green tree. Seek the brave in prison and the stupid among the clergy. Bravery is the fruit of a thousand hardships. Even hares pull a lion by the beard when he is dead.

English Yiddish Yiddish Portuguese Danish English English Chinese English Dizzy Dean Unknown French English Hebrew Danish Danish Danish Norwegian Russian Philippine T.C. Lai

39


Bravery

Bravery Bravery

I count him braver who overcomes his desires than him who overcomes his enemies. It is easy to be brave when far away from danger. * Who will bell the cat?

Bravery, fashion

*

Brawling woman

*

Bread

*

Bread Bread

*

Bread Bread

*

Bread Bread Bread Bread, satisfaction Breakfast Breakfast

Breath

40

*

Aristotle

Aesop

William Langland Bravery never goes out of fashion. William Makepeace Thackeray It is better to dwell in the corner Solomon of the house, than with a brawling woman and in a wide house. Better bread with water than Russian cake with trouble. Bread on a journey is no burden. Russian Buttered bread always falls dry Hebrew side up. Eaten bread is forgotten. English He who doesn’t want to make Greek bread sifts the flour the whole day. His bread is buttered on both English sides. Oat bread today is better than Serbocake tomorrow. Croatian When you have bread, don’t look Polish for cake. A half a loaf is better than none. Unknown

* A good breakfast cannot take the place of the evening meal. My wife and I tried to breakfast together, but we had to stop as it would have wrecked our marriage. Eat no onions or garlic, if we are

Chinese Winston Churchill

Shakespeare


Breath

*

Breath Breath

*

Breed Breeding Breeding, quarrel

*

Brevity

Brevity

Brevity

*

Brew Bribe Bribe Bribes Bricks

*

Bride Bride

*

Bride

*

Brides

to utter sweet breath. He who has bad breath cannot smell it. Spare your breath to cool your porridge. The first breath is the beginning of death. Breed is stronger than pasture. One’s breeding is shown by one’s manners and speech. The test of a man or woman's breeding is how they behave in a quarrel. It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book. Since brevity is the soul of wit, and tediousness the limbs and outward flourishes, I will be brief. Whatever advice you give, be brief. As he brews, so shall he drink. A bribe blinds the clever, and how much more so the fool! He fishes well who uses a golden hook. Kickbacks must always exceed bribes. You cannot make bricks without straw. All brides are beautiful; all the dead are pious. Always a bridesmaid, never a bride. Choose a bride and piece goods in the daytime. Brides aren’t happy-they are

African The Seven Sages English English Philippine George Bernard Shaw Nietzsche

Shakespeare

Horace Ben Jonson Hebrew Latin John Peers Unknown Yiddish Unknown Japanese John 41


Bridge Bridge Bridge

*

Bridge

*

Broke

Broker Broker

*

Brood Brook

* *

Broom Broom Brother

*

Brother

*

Brother Brother

*

Brotherhood

*

Bucket

Building 42

triumphant. Build golden bridges for the flying foe. It is better to build bridges than walls. Make a bridge of silver for the fleeing enemy. Never cross a bridge till you come to it. No one ever went broke underestimating the taste of the American public. I do not regard a broker as a member of the human race. With an evening coat and a white tie, anybody, even a stock broker, can gain a reputation for being civilized. A bastard brood is always proud. Little brooks make for great rivers. A new broom sweeps clean. New brooms sweep clean. Even brothers keep careful accounts. If brothers disagree, the bystander takes advantage. The brother would rather see the sister rich than make her so. With your brother eat and drink, but have no business. It is easier to love humanity than to love one's neighbor. Don’t throw away the old bucket until you know whether the new one holds water. High buildings have a low

Barrymore German African Spanish English H. L. Mencken Honore De Balzac Oscar Wilde

English French Russian English Chinese Chinese English Albanian Eric Hoffer Swedish

English


Building Bull Bull

*

Bull

*

Bull Bullet, kill

*

Bullock

Burden Burden

*

Burden Burden

*

Burden

*

Burden Burden Burr Bus

Bush Bush

* *

foundation. No good building without a good foundation. A mad bull is not to be tied up with a packthread. It is easy to threaten a bull from a window. Two bulls cannot live in one stable. You may play with a bull till you get his horn in your eye. The bullet that will kill me is not yet cast. A good bullock requires but one blow, and a good woman only one word. A burden of one’s own choice is not felt. Another man’s burden is always light. Every man shall bear his own burden. None knows the weight of another burden. Nothing is so burdensome as a secret. Pray that you may not be a burden to your children. The heaviest burden is an empty pocket. I am a kind of burr and will stick. A bus runs twice as fast when you’re running after it as when you are riding on it. Bushes have ears, and walls have eyes. One beats the bush, another

English English Italian African English Napoleon Bonaparte Indian

English Danish Bible George Herbert French Yiddish Yiddish Shakespeare Unknown

Jamaican German 43


Bushel Bushel Business

*

Business Business Business Business Business Business Business

Business Business Business Business Business

*

Business

*

Business, pleasure Busy

44

*

catches the bird. A whole bushel of wheat is made up of single grains. In a bushel of winning is not a handful of cunning. A friendship founded on a business is better than a business founded on friendship. Business is business. Business? It’s quite simple-it’s using other people’s money. Do not leave to morning the business of evening. Drive your business, let not that drive you. Everybody’s business is nobody’s business. He who has reaped the profits has committed the crime. Let everyone mind his own business, and the cows will be well tended. Mind your own business. Much business, much pardon. Never do business with a relative. One business begets another. Where there is a sea there are pirates. You read a book from the beginning to the end. You run a business the opposite way − starting with the end, and then doing everything to reach it. Business before pleasure.

* If you want to get something done, ask a busy man to do it.

English English John D. Rockefeller English Alexandre Dumas Turkish American English Seneca French

Unknown English Turkish English Greek Harold Geneen

Unknown Unknown


Busy Butter Butter

*

Butterfly

*

Button Buy Buy

*

Buy

*

Buy

Buy

*

Buy Buyer Buyer Buyer

*

Buyer

*

Bygone Cabbage Cackle Caesar Caesar, Rome Cake

*

Some are very busy and yet do nothing. Butter is gold in the morning, silver at noon, and lead at night. Know which side you bread is buttered. The butterfly often forgets it was a caterpillar. For a big button, a big buttonhole. Better buy than borrow. He that buys dearly must sell dearly. He who buys what he doesn’t need steals from himself. I am the world's worst salesman; I therefore have to make it easy for people to buy. It is good to buy when another wants to sell. Who buys cheap pays twice as much. Buyer beware. Let the buyer beware. The buyer needs a hundred eyes, the seller only one. There are more foolish buyers than foolish sellers. Let bygones be bygones. Better cabbage and peace than dainties and fretting. You cackle often but never lay an egg. Render unto Caesar the things that are Caesar’s. Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more. One can get sick of cake, but

English English Unknown Swedish Philippine English English Swedish F.W. Woolworth Italian Slovakian English Unknown English French Unknown Greek English English Shakespeare Russian 45


Calamity Calamity

* *

Calamity, * touchstone Calendar Calf Calm * Calm, passion Camel * Camel Camel

* *

Camel Candle

*

Candle Candle Candle, deed

*

Cannot Canoe Cap Capital punishment

46

Captain

*

Captain

*

never of bread. Calamity is a guest teacher. One calamity is better than a thousand counsels. Calamity is man's true touchstone. No calendar is needed for dying. The gentle calf sucks all the cows. Always a calm before a storm. Calm of mind, all passion spent. A camel is a horse that was designed by a committee. A camel with bells is never lost. The camel does not see his own hump. You don’t water a camel with a spoon. A candle burned at both ends, will not last long. He needs a long candle who awaits the death of another. You can't burn a candle at both ends. How far that little candle throws his beams! So shines a good deed in a naughty world. Cannot has no craft. Paddle your own canoe. A cap sewn with pearls is not for a sore head. Does the death sentence deter crime? It always deterred those who suffered from it. A wise captain carries more ballast than sail. Too many captains will sink the

Estonian Turkish Beaumont and Fletcher Yiddish Portuguese English John Milton American Turkish Armenian Armenian Scottish Finnish Unknown Shakespeare

Scottish American Greek Hindu

Jamaican Libyan


Carabao

*

Care

*

Care

*

Care

*

Care Care Careful Careless Carpenter

* *

Carpenters

*

Cart Case

*

Cat Cat Cat Cat Cat Cat Cat, mice, gloves

* *

ship. Though you dress a carabao in silk, he will always return to the mud. A man cannot be too careful in the choice of his enemies. A man is usually more careful with his money than his principles. By the time a man gets enough experience to watch his step, he isn't going anywhere. Take care of the pence. Those who say they care least care the most. Carefulness can go everywhere. Carelessness is worse than theft. The worse the carpenter, the more the chips. The best carpenters make the fewest chips. Creaking carts last the longest. A good case is not difficult to state. A cat is a lion in a jungle of small bushes. A scalded cat is afraid even of cold water. One plays with the cat until one feels the claws. The cat likes fish but she doesn’t want to wet her paws. When the cat’s away the mice will play. Who shall bell the cat? The cat in gloves catches no mice.

Philippine

Oscar Wilde Ed Howe

Unknown

English American Chinese Gaelic Dutch German Dutch African Indian Philippine Norwegian Yiddish English Aesop Benjamin Franklin 47


Catching Caught, temptation Causation Cause Cause Cause Cause Cause, cup Caution Caution Caution Caution Caution Caution Caution Caution Caution

Caution Caution Caution 48

* Catching comes before hanging. * The fish will soon be caught that nibbles at every bait. No wind, no waves. Even the best cause requires a good pleader. * For a good cause, wrongdoing is virtuous. * Strive not with a man without cause. * The cause is hidden but the result is well known. * The last drop makes the cup run over. * A grain of caution is worth a pound of medicine. * Be on your guard against a silent dog and still water. Better caution at first than tears afterwards. Caution is born of unpleasant experiences. * Don't lift a stone only to drop on your own foot. * Govern a family as you would cook a small fish − very gently. Look before you leap. * Look out for the fellow who lets you do all the talking. One should be just as careful in choosing one's pleasures as in avoiding calamities. * Praise the sea, but remain on shore. Put all your eggs in one basket and watch that basket. * Take heed of reconciled enemies

American Unknown Chinese Dutch Publilius Syrus Solomon Ovid Unknown American Latin Yiddish Philippine Chinese Chinese Unknown Kin Hubbard Chinese

John Florio Mark Twain Unknown


Caution Caution Caution Caution

Caution Celibacy Centenarian

Certainty Certainty, death, taxes Chain Challenge Challenge, beginning Chance Chance Chance, risk Change Change Change Change

and of meat twice boiled. * The scars of others should teach us caution. There’s always free cheese in a mousetrap. Think before you speak. * When eating bamboo sprouts, remember the man who planted them. * When you want to test the depths of a stream, don't use both feet. Marriage has many pains, but celibacy has no pleasures. * I've never known a person to live to be 100 and be remarkable for anything else. * Convictions are more dangerous foes than lies. Nothing is certain except for death and taxes. * He is not escaped who drags his chain. Like ants eating a bone. * The man who removes a mountain begins by carrying away small stones. Chance is no robbery. Even a clock that is not going is right twice a day. Nothing ventured, nothing gained. * A change is as good as a rest A change of work is as good as a rest. * A new broom sweeps clean. Can the Ethiopian change his skin,

St. Jerome Unknown Miguel de Cervantes Chinese

Chinese Unknown Josh Billings

Nietzsche Unknown French Chinese Unknown

English Polish John Heywood Unknown Irish Unknown Bible 49


Change

*

Change Change Change Change, nature

Character

Character

*

Character

*

Character Character

*

Character Character

*

Character Character

*

Character Character

50

*

or the leopard his spots. It is a bad plan that admits of no modifications. It is best not to swap horses while crossing the river. To produce change; rub raw the sores of discontent. We must be the change we wish to see. Rivers and mountains are more easily changed, than a man’s nature. A sow, when washed, always returns to the muck. A man never discloses his own character so clearly as when he describes others. A rich man has no need of character. Adversity doesn't build character, it reveals it. Character does not change. Character is a line on stone, none can rub it out. Good character is what is remembered. In the arena of human life the honors and rewards fall to those who show their good qualities. No man can climb out beyond the limitations of his own character. Sometimes the character of the mistress can be inferred from the dress of her maids. The king can make a knight but not a gentleman. You can tell the character of a man by the way he receives

Publilius Syrus Abraham Lincoln Saul Alinsky Gandhi T.C. Lai

Jean Paul Richter Unknown Unknown Japanese African Unknown Aristotle

John Morley St. Jerome

Unknown Seneca


Charity Charity Charity Charity Charity Charity

* * *

Charity Charity, poverty Charity, sin

*

Charm

*

Charm * Charm, words * Cheap

*

Cheat

*

Cheating Cheating Cheer Cheer Cheerful Chess, equality Chest

*

*

praise. Charity and pride do both feed the poor. Charity begins at home. Charity covers a multitude of sins. Charity covers a multitude of sins. God loveth a cheerful giver. The charity that begins at home is usually a stranger elsewhere. Who depends upon another man’s table often dines late. Preempt charity by preventing poverty. Charity creates a multitude of sins. A little charm and you are not ordinary. Charm is better than beauty. Charm aches with air and agony with words. If you pay peanuts, you get monkeys. Two cheats make an even bargain. Cheaters never prosper. Cheating is more honorable than stealing. Small cheer and great welcome makes a merry feast. The best way to cheer yourself up is to cheer someone else up. Be cheerful while you are alive. After the game the pawn and the king go into the same box. Open chests tempt even the righteous.

English English Bible Unknown Bible Unknown Italian Maimonides Oscar Wilde Yiddish Yiddish Shakespeare Unknown American Unknown German English Mark Twain Ptahhote Unknown Indian

51


Child Child

*

Child

*

Child

Child Child

Child

*

Child

*

Child

*

Child Child Child

*

Child

*

Child Child

*

Child

*

Childhood, morning Childhood, web Children 52

*

A burnt child dreads the fire. A child does not know his father’s poverty. A child learns quicker to talk than to be silent. A child who does not fear his father and mother will not live long. A deformed child is the dearer to his parents. A fatherless child is half an orphan; a motherless child is a whole one. Better the child should cry than the father. Bring up your beloved child with a stick. Having an only child is like having one eye. He that loves his child chastises it. If you’re a child at twenty, you’re an ass at twenty-one. It is easier to bear a child once a year than to shave every day. There’s only one pretty child in the world, and every mother has it. To spoil a child is to kill it. When you show the moon to a child, it sees only your finger. With a child in the house, all corners are full. The childhood shows the man, as morning shows the day. We wove a web in childhood, a web of sunny air. Before I got married I had six

English African Norwegian African

Japanese Estonian

Yiddish Japanese Yiddish Dutch Yiddish Russian English

Chinese African Yiddish John Milton Charlotte Bronte Lord


Children Children

*

Children

*

Children

*

Children

*

Children Children

Children Children

*

*

Children Children

*

Children

*

Children

Children

*

Children Children

*

theories about bringing up children; now I have six children, and no theories. Better to have many children than many riches. Children and money make a nice world. Children are certain sorrow, but uncertain joy. Children are the riches of the poor. Children have wide ears and long tongues. Children should be seen and not heard. Children suck the mother when they are young and the father when they are old. Children will be children. From children you must expect childish acts. It is better not to live than to be dependent on children. It’s better children weep than old men. Love your children with your heart, but train them with your hands. Oh, what a tangled web we weave when first we practice to conceive. Small children don’t let you sleep; big children don’t let you rest. Small children eat porridge, big ones eat their parents’ hearts. Small children give you headache; big children, a heartache.

Rochester

Vietnamese Yiddish Danish Danish English English English

American Danish Yiddish English Russian

Don Herold

Yiddish Czech Russian

53


Children

Children

*

Children

*

Children

*

Children, fools * Children, training Children, ungratful

*

Chimney Chimney

*

Choice

*

Choice

*

Choices

*

Choices

*

Chooser Choosing

*

Chosen Christian, pagan 54

*

The best way to keep children at home is to make the home atmosphere pleasant, and let the air out of the tires. The neighbor's children are always ill-bred. There are no children at the bedside of long-sick parents. When children stand still, they’ve done something wrong. Children and fools want everything. Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it. How sharper than a serpent’s tooth it is to have a thankless child! A smoking chimney in a great house is a good sign. It is easier to build two chimneys, than to maintain one. Don’t be scared when you have no other choice. There is small choice in rotten apples. You cannot run with the hare and hunt with the hounds. You cannot sell the cow and sip the milk. Beggars and borrowers can't be choosey. Never choose bed linen or a wife by candlelight. Many are called, but few are chosen. Scratch the Christian and you will find the pagan.

Dorothy Parker

Unknown Chinese Unknown Maquess of Halifax Solomon

Shakespeare

English English Yiddish English Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Bible Israel Zangwill


Christian, repentance

Christianity

Christians, missionaries, China Church Church Church

*

Churches

*

Cigar

*

Circumstance Circumstance Civility Classics

*

Claw

*

Cleanliness Clergymen

*

Clerk

*

A Christian is a man who feels repentance on a Sunday for what he did on Saturday and what he’s going to do on Monday. Too many people have been inoculated with small doses of Christianity that it keeps them from catching the real thing. O kind missionary, O compassionate missionary, leave China! Come home and convert these Christians. Big churches, little saints. New churches and new taverns are seldom empty. The nearer to church, the farther from God. Most churches go on the theory that it's more desirable to have a dosing attendant than a wide awake absentee. You should treat a cigar like mistress: put it away before you get sick of it. Circumstances alter cases. Small circumstances produce great events. Civility costs nothing. Gladstone read Homer for fun, which I thought served him right. When one claw is caught, the whole bird perishes. Cleanliness is next to godliness. Avoid like the plague, a clergyman who is also a man of business. No one knows the parson better than the clerk.

Thomas Russell Ybarra Unknown

Mark Twain

German German Unknown Unknown

Disraeli

English American Unknown Winston Churchill Russian English St. Jerome Danish

55


Cleverness Climber Cloak Clock Clock Cloth Clothes Clothes Clothes Clothes Clothes Clothes, influence, nakedness Clothes, pitchfork Cloud Clouds, hope Clown

Clown, greed Clutter Coat

56

* Cleverness and stupidity go together. * Hasty climbers have sudden falls. * A borrowed cloak does not keep one warm. * Even the clock that does not work is right twice a day. If it were not for the hands the clock would be useless. * Measure your cloth seven times, as you can cut it but once. Borrowed clothes do not keep one warm. Clothes conceal the body but more often reveal the soul. * Clothes make the man. * Good clothes open all doors. With clothes the new are best; with friends the old are best. Clothes make the man; naked people have little or no influence in society. * She wears her clothes, as if they were thrown on her with a pitchfork. * A small cloud can hide both sun and moon. Every cloud has a silver lining. Clowns are best in their own company, but gentlemen are best everywhere. Give a clown your finger, and he will take your hand. If your desk isn’t cluttered, you probably aren’t doing your job. A fine coat hides an empty belly.

African English Egyptian Unknown Polish Russian Rumanian Unknown Dutch English Chinese Mark Twain

Jonathan Swift Danish Unknown English

English Harold Geneen SerboCroatian


Coat Coat

*

Coat, cloth Cobbler

Cobweb Coffee

Coffee break Cold, fever Cold, hard

*

Collaborate

*

Collaboration

*

Collaboration

*

Collaboration Come Come Come Come, go Comfort Commitment Commitment

A ragged coat finds little credit. A smart coat is a good letter of introduction. Cut your coat according to your cloth. The cobbler is always without boots. (Parallel: The shoemaker’s kids are always barefoot.) Where cobwebs are plenty, kisses are scarce. I like my coffee black as the devil, hot as hell, pure as an angel and sweet as love. Do the employees at a tea factory get a coffee break? Feed a cold, stave a fever. She looks like butter would not melt in her mouth. Only when all contribute their firewood can they build up a strong fire. A dwarf on a giant’s shoulder, sees further of the two. Many hands make light work. Two heads are better than one.

Late come, late served. Lightly come, lightly go. * Who, comes seldom is always welcome. Quickly come, quickly go. No one’s head aches when he is comforting another. * In for a penny, in for a pound. * Lady Godiva put everything she had on a horse.

Italian Dutch Unknown Russian

English Talleyrand

Unknown Unknown John Heywood Chinese

George Herbert John Heywood John Heywood American English Italian Unknown Indian Unknown William Claude Fields 57


Commitment Committee

Common sense Common sense Common sense Common sense Common sense Common sense

* When you strike at a king, you must kill him. “Committee” is a noun of multitude, signifying many, but not signifying much. * A little common sense would prevent many divorces, and even more marriages. Common sense could prevent most divorces, and most marriages. Common sense is not an issue in politics-it's an affliction. * Common sense is not so common.

Ralph Waldo Emerson Anonymous

Nothing astonishes men so much as common-sense and plain dealing. There are few things as uncommon as common sense.

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Communicate * Self-expression must pass into communication for its fulfillment. Communicate * The worse the news, the more effort should go into communication it. Communicate When communicating to a large or mass media audience; I imagine I’m talking to a single person. Communicator Managers who are skilled communicators may also be good at covering up real problems. Compact The lunatic, the lover, and the poet, are of imagination compact. Companion * Everybody’s companion is nobody’s friend. Company * A man is known by the company 58

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown Voltaire

Frank McKinney Hubbard Pearl S. Buck Andrew S. Grove Red Barber

Chris Argyris Harvad Shakespeare German Unknown


Company

*

Company Company

*

Company Company Comparison

*

Comparison Compensation

Competition

Compliment Compliment

Compliment Compliment

Compliment Composer

*

he keeps. Better to be alone than in bad company. Choose your company before you drink. Choose your company before you sit down. Tell me your company, and I’ll tell you who you are. The company makes the feast. It is only when the cold season comes that we know the pine and cypress to be evergreens. There is always someone worse off than you. There is compensation in everything: the man with a small mind usually has a big mouth. Sleep on it and then decide, unless you have a competitor who doesn’t need the sleep. I can live for two months on a good compliment. I have been complimented many times and they always embarrass me as I always feel they have not said enough. If you can't get a compliment any other way, pay yourself one. Never hesitate to flatter: the less truth there is in a compliment the more it will be believed. Some people pay a compliment as if they expected a receipt. Rossini would have been a great composer if his teacher had spanked him enough.

Unknown English Irish Irish Unknown Confucius

Unknown Unknown

Theodore Waller Mark Twain Mark Twain

Mark Twain Unknown

Kin Hubbard Beethoven

59


Compromise Compromise

Conceit

Conceit

Conceit Conclusion

Conclusion Conference Confession Confession Confession Confession Confession

Confession Confession Confidence

60

* A bad compromise is better than a good lawsuit. The man who says he's willing to meet you half way is usually a poor judge of distance. * Answer a fool according to his folly, lest he be wise in his own conceit. Conceit is a strange disease − it makes everyone sick except the person who has it. Self Conceit leads to self destruction. A person who jumps to conclusions usually scares the best ones away. * Jumping to conclusions seldom leads to happy landings. Conference: Hot air on a high level. * An honest is good for the soul but bad for the reputation. * Any time of the day is good for confession. * Confession by the defendant is as good as a hundred witnesses. * Confession is good for the soul. * Confession may be good for the soul but it is bad for the reputation. * Confession of our faults is the next thing to innocence * Nothing spoils a confession like repentance. * Confidence in an unfaithful man in time of trouble is like a broken tooth, and a foot out of joint.

French Unknown

Solomon

Unknown

Aesop Unknown

Unknown Gerald Barzan Unknown Hebrew Hebrew Unknown Thomas R. Dewar Publilius Syrus Anatole France Solomon


Confidence Confidence

Confidence

Confidence Confidence Conformity Conformity Conformity Conformity Conformity

Confusion Congress Congress

Congress Conqueror Conquest Conscience

* Confidence is a plant of slow growth. Confidence is keeping your chin up; overconfidence is sticking your neck out. * Confidence is the feeling you have before you understand the situation. * Confidence is the thing you had before you knew better. * I have great faith in fools-selfconfidence my friends call it. When in Rome do as the Romans do. * Don't try to reshape your foot to fit into a new shoe. It takes far more courage to violet custom than the law. * To rebel in season is not to rebel. We know what happens to people who stay in the middle of the road. They get run over. If you can’t beat ‘em, confuse ‘em. * Congress is really made up of children that never grow up. Congress is strange: a man gets up to speak and says nothing; nobody listens, and then everyone disagrees. * There is no distinctly native criminal class except Congress. * The conquerors are kings; the defeated are bandits. He conquers twice who conquers himself in victory. A clear conscience can bear any trouble.

Unknown Unknown

Unknown

Unknown Edgar Allan Poe French Chinese Unknown Greek Aneurin Bevan Harry S. Truman Will Rogers Unknown

Mark Twain Chinese Publilius Syrus English

61


Conscience Conscience Conscience Conscience Conscience Conscience Conscience Conscience

Conscience

Conscience

Conscience

Conscience

Conscience

Consent Conservatism

62

* A clear conscience laughs at false accusations. * A god conscience is the best divinity. * A guilty conscience has no accuser. * Clear conscience never fears midnight knocking. * Conscience is as good as a thousand witnesses. Conscience is the mother-in-law whose visit never ends. Conscience serves for a thousand witnesses. * He who sacrifices his conscience to ambition burns a picture to obtain the ashes. I have a New England conscience − I like to pay my bills on the second of the month. My conscience is more trouble and bother to me than anything else I started with. * Our conscience is a great ledger book wherein are written all our offences and grinds our souls with remembrances. * The one thing that doesn’t abide by the majority rule is a person’s conscience. There is no witness so dreadful, or accuser so terrible as the conscious that dwells in the heart of every man. * Silence gives consent. Conservatism offers no redress for the present, and makes no preparation for the future.

English Unknown Unknown Chinese Italian Mecken English Confucius

Sinclair Lewis

Mark Twain

Robert Burton

Dolly Parton

Polybius

English Disraeli


Conservative

Conspicuous

*

Conspicuous Constitution, military Consulting Contempt

*

Contentment Contentment

*

Contentment

Contest Contract Contract

*

Contradiction

*

Contrivance Convention Conversation

* *

Conversation

*

A conservative is a man with two perfectly good legs, who has never learned to walk. A camel standing amidst a flock of sheep. A crane standing amidst a flock of chickens. If there is one basic element in our Constitution it is civilian control of the military. Too much consulting confounds. When you are down and out something always turns up − usually the noses of your friends. Be content with what you have but not with who you are. The man who is too busy to worry by day is probably too sleepy to worry at night. When neither their property not their honor is touched, the majority of men live content. From trivial things great contests oft arise. An agreement that is binding only on the weaker party. The large print giveth and the small print taketh away. Contradiction should awaken attention, not passion. Contrivance is better than force. Convention is the ruler of all. A single conversation with a wise man is better than ten years of study. Conversation is but carving; give no more to every guest, than he's

Franklin D. Roosevelt Chinese Chinese Harry S. Truman English Orson Wells

Unknown Unknown

Machiavelli

Dutch Unknown Unknown Thomas Fuller French Pindar Chinese

Jonathan Swift 63


Cook

*

Cook, dinner

*

Cooking Cooking

*

Cooking, kissing Cooks Co-operation

*

Coordination

*

* *

Coordination

Corporations

Corpse Correct use Correction Correctness

Corruption Corruption 64

*

able to digest. There is one thing more exasperating than a wife who can cook and won’t and that’s a wife who can’t cook and will. He makes his cook his merit, and the world visits his dinner and not him. The only premarital thing girls don’t do these days is cooking. 'Tis an ill cook that cannot lick his own fingers. Kissing doesn’t last, but cooking does! Too many cooks spoil the broth. No member of the crew is praised for the rugged individuality of his rowing. One beats the bush and the other takes the bird. The hammers must be swung in cadence, when more than one is hammering the iron. Corporations have neither bodies to be punished or souls to be damned. A corpse and an uninvited guest stink after a couple of days. Play a harp before a cow. Little said is soon amended.

Robert Frost

Moliere

Omar Sharif Shakespeare George Meredith English Emerson

Unknown Giordano Bruno Unknown

Mexican Chinese Miguel de Cervantes Einstein

I think and think for months and years; 99 times the conclusion is false but the 100th time I’m right. The corruption of the best is the English worst. The more corrupt the state, the Tacitus


Corruption Cost Cost Cost

*

Cost

*

Cost Costumers

Cottage

*

Cough Council Counsel

*

Counsel Counsel

*

Counsel

*

Counseling

*

Counselors, clients Counting

*

Country

more numerous the laws. When it comes to corruption, nothing succeeds like money. All good things are cheap; and all bad things are very dear. It costs nothing to look. It's not what you pay a man that counts, but what he costs. What costs nothing is worth nothing. What you lose on the cost you will gain in the wear. We were so internally focused that we lost touch with costumers. It is better to live in a small cottage of one's own than in a palace with other people. A dry cough is the trumpeter of death. Every council brings forth war. Counsel in the heart of man is like deep water. Counsel must be followed, not praised. Friendly counsel cuts off many foes. Good counsel is lacking when most needed. He that won’t be counseled can’t be helped. Good counselors lack no clients.

American Thoreau Yiddish Will Rogers Dutch Malaysian Whitney McFarlin Maltese

English American Solomon English Shakespeare English Benjamin Franklin Shakespeare

* Don't count the days, make the Unknown days count. * A man’s country is where he does English well. 65


Country

Country Couple Courage Courage Courage Courage

Courage

Court Court Court

Courtesy Courtesy Courting Courtship Courtship

Cover

66

If you want to have a country ruined, pray that it may have many heads. * When you cross a boundary, ask about the customs. * Every couple is not a pair. Courage ought to have eyes as well as arms. Evading the enemy shows true courage. He was a bold man who first swallowed an oyster. One of our American wits said that it took only half as long to train an American army as any other, because you had only to train them to go one way. Though I may displease a thousand men by addressing one intelligent man, so shall it be. At court, every one for himself. Courts keep no almanacs. * The man who goes to court without a lawyer has probably decided to tell the truth. Courtesy on one side only lasts not long. Full of courtesy and full of craft. Faint heart never won a fair lady.

Lebanese

Chinese English English Philippine James I Woodrow Wilson

Maimonides

English English Unknown

English

English Miguel de Cervantes A fool and her money are soon Helen courted. Rowland I found the ideal girl. Her father is Joe E. Lewis a bookmaker and her brother owns a liquor store. According to your cover stretch Libyan your legs.


Covet Covet Covet Cow Cow Cow Cow Cow Cow Coward Coward

Coward Coward

Cows, sacred Crab Crab Crabgrass Cradle, rule Craft Craft

* Covetousness brings nothing home. Covetousness is always filling a bottomless vessel. When all sins grow old, covetousness is young. A cow never goes so far that her tail does not follow. * At night all cows are black. If you buy the cow, take the tail into the bargain. Many a good cow has but a bad calf. Milk the cow that stands still. The cow is milked by one who knows it. * A coward has no scars. * Cowards die many times before their deaths; the valiant never taste of death but once. Marriage doth make cowards of us all. The human race is a race of cowards; and I am not only marching in that procession but carrying a banner. Sacred cows make the tastiest hamburgers. * A crab does not give birth to a bird. * Confused crabs miss their holes. * Crabgrass grows overnight. * The hand that rocks the cradle is the hand that rules the world. * A craft is a kingdom! * Craft is common both to skill and deceit.

English English English Norwegian Yiddish English Manx English African African Shakespeare

Unknown Mark Twain

Abbie Hoffman African Japanese Yiddish William Ross Wallace Yiddish Winston

67


Craftsman Craving

Crease Credentials Credit

Credit Credit Credit

Credit Creditor Crime

Crime

Crime Crime Crime

Crime 68

* The bad craftsman quarrels with his tools. * It is not the man who has too little it's the man who craves more that is poor. * Better a crease in the shoe than a blister on the toe. * Credentials are not the same as accomplishments. A bank is a place where they lend you an umbrella in fair weather and ask for it back again when it begins to rain. * Better sell cheap than on credit. Give credit where credit is due. Some people use one half their ingenuity to get into debt and the other half to avoid paying it. The creditor hath a better memory than the debtor. Creditors have better memories than debtors. In France we leave unmolested those who set fire to the house and persecute those who sound the alarm. * It is easier for a cow to pass through the eye of a needle than to hide a crime. * It’s no crime to steal from a thief. * Many are cursed for the crime of one. * Save a thief from the gallows and he will be the first to cut your throat. * The act is not criminal unless the

Churchill African Seneca

Estonian Robert Half Robert Frost

African Unknown George D. Prentice James Howell English Sebastien Chamfort

Philippine

Yiddish African Italian

Anonymous


intent is criminal. Crime What greater crime than loss of time? Crime When a man commits the same crime twice, and is not punished, it seems to him permissible. Crime, blunder * It is worse than a crime, it is a blunder. Critic Critic

*

Critical Criticality

Criticism Criticism, nation

Criticism, praise Criticize

*

*

Crops, * watering, late Cross Cross Crow Crowd Crowd

A critic is a legless man who teaches running. To be a critic is easier than to be an author. For I am nothing if not critical. For want of a nail the shoe is lost, for want of a shoe the horse is lost, for want of a horse the rider is lost. The pot calls the kettle black. When abroad, I never criticize the government of my own country, but I make up for it when I get home. People ask you for criticism, but they only want praise. It is easier to pull down than to build up. It's but little good you'll do to water last year's crops.

Every one bears his cross. The cross on the breast, and the devil in the heart. * When the crows sing the nightingales fly away. A crowd is not company. He who does not mix with the

English The Talmud

Antoine Boulay de la Meurthe Channing Pollock Hebrew Shakespeare George Herbert

English Winston Churchill

W. Somerset Maugham Latin George Eliot (Marian Evans Cross) French English Greek Unknown Spanish 69


Crown

*

Crown Crown, fight

*

Cruelly Cruelty, death * Culture

Cunning Cunning Cunning

*

Cunning Cup

*

Cure

*

Cure

crowd knows nothing. A crown is no cure for the headache. My crown is in my heart, not on my head. It is the end that crowns us, not the fight. Cruelty is a tyrant that’s always attended with fear. Cruel as death, and hungry as the grave. Training is everything. The peach was once a bitter almond; cauliflower is nothing but cabbage with a college education. Cunning has little honor. Cunning is better than strength. Cunning is followed by foolishness. Too much cunning undoes. A full cup must be carried steadily. I treated him, God cured him.

* It's pity that the only thing that will cure a love affair is marriage. Cure Past cure, past care. Cure * There is no cure against a slanderer’s bite. Cure What can’t be cured must be endured. Cure, disease, * Cured of my disease yesterday, I physician died last night of my physician. Curse Better to hear curses than to be pitied. Curse The curse of the Lord is in the house of the wicked: but he 70

Dutch Shakespeare Robert Herrick English James Thomson Mark Twain

Danish Irish African English English Ambroise Pare Ed Howe Unknown Danish English Matthew Prior Yiddish Solomon


Curse Curses

*

Custom Cynic, price, value

*

Dagger

*

Daggers Daiquiris, lie

Dance

*

Dance Danger

*

Danger Danger

*

Danger

*

Danger

*

Danger

*

Danger

*

Danger

*

blesseth the habitation of the just. Work is the curse of the drinking class. Curses like chickens, always come home to roost. A bad custom is like a good cake, better broken than kept. What is a cynic? The man who knows the price of everything but the value of nothing. In a narrow lane watch out for a dagger. I will speak daggers to her but use none. Two daiquiris withdrew into a corner of the gorgeous room and one told the other a lie. If you dance you must pay the fiddler. It takes two to tango. A common danger produces unity. A danger foreseen is half avoided. Danger can never be overcome without taking risks. He who rides a tiger is afraid to dismount. It's a dangerous politician that believes everything he says. The man who rocks the boat is seldom at the oars. This country has come to feel the same as when Congress is in session as when a baby gets hold of a hammer. Those who play with cats must

Oscar Wilde Unknown English Oscar Wilde

Chinese Shakespeare John Berryman English American Slovakian English Unknown Confucius Unknown Unknown Will Rogers

Miguel de 71


Danger Danger, drive Darkness Darkness, empires Dart Daughter Daughter Dawn, darkness Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day, end Day, night Dead

72

expect to be scratched. * With the danger past, God is forgotten. Danger-the spur of great minds. * The darkness of night is surer than the light of day. To sit in darkness here hatching vain empires. * A golden dart kills where it pleases. * Daughters are easy to rear, but hard to marry. * When you marry off a daughter, a hump is off your back. * The darkest hour is just before dawn. By day they’re ready to divorce, by night they’re ready for bed. * Day has its eyes, night has its ears. Every day brings a new light. Every day has its night. * Every day is a fresh slate. One day teaches the other. One of these days is none of these days. * Praise not the day before night. * There is a day to be born and a day to die. * There is a day to cast your nets and a day to dry your nets. The longest day has an end. * The day is for honest men, the night for thieves. Do not speak ill of the dead.

Cervantes English George Chapman Russian John Milton English German Yiddish Unknown Yiddish Japanese English Italian Unknown Lithuanian Unknown English Chinese Chinese Unknown Euripides The Seven


Dead Dead Dead Deaf Dealing Death Death Death

Death Death Death Death Death Death Death Death

Death Death

Death

* The dead are soon forgotten. The dead, and only they, should do nothing. When one is dead, it’s for a long while. None so deaf as those you will not listen. * Plain dealing is praised more than practiced. A person who can break wind is not dead. After death one becomes important. * And nothing can we call our own but death and that small model of the barren earth which serves as paste and cover to our bones. As men we are all equal in the presence of death. * Death answers before it is asked. Death in time of youth, poverty in time of age, are hard. * Death is the final accounting. Death is the grand leveler. * Death is the last doctor. * Death keeps no calendar. * Don't worry about getting older, just worry about not getting older. He waits long that waits for another man’s death. * Homer is dead, Dante is dead, Shakespeare is dead, and I'm not feeling so well myself. How little room do we take up in death that, know no bounds.

Sages French English French Unknown English Jean-Jacques Rousseau Yiddish Shakespeare

Publilius Syrus Russian Turkish Anonymous English Swedish English Unknown

Dutch Artemus Ward James Shirley 73


Death Death

Death Death

I am paler than grass, and I feel that I am near to death. * I am ready to meet my maker, but whether my maker is prepared for the great ordeal of meeting me is another matter. * If your time ain’t come not even a doctor can kill you. In the jaws of death.

Death

Death Death

Death Death Death

*

Death

*

Death Death

*

Death Death

*

Death Death Death 74

*

Sappho Winston Churchill

American

Guillaume de Salluste In the long run we are all dead. John Maynard Keynes It is not death that alarms me, but Michel De dying. Montaigne Men have a much better time of H. L. it than women; for one thing they Mencken marry later; for another thing they die earlier. No death without a cause. Maltese One is certain only of death. Yiddish Sometimes a quick death is better Hungarian than a long life. The Dead! Why can't the dead Eugene die! O'Neill They loved beyond the world and William Penn therefore can’t be separated by it. Though boys throw stones at Bion frogs in sport, the frogs die in earnest (i.e. in reality). To have died once is enough. Virgil When death comes, the rich man Estonian has no money, the poor man no debt. Whom the gods favor die young. Plautus You are a long time dead. Unknown You cannot live without lawyers, Joseph


Death, cowards, valiant Death, dark

*

Death, darkness

*

Death, exaggeration Death, fear

*

Death, fool

*

Death, God Death, hope, fasting Death, luck

* *

*

*

Death, misery * Death, time

*

Debate Debt Debt Debt Debt Debt

*

and certainly you cannot die without them. Cowards die may times before their deaths, but the valiant never taste death but once. I am about to take my last voyage, a great leap in the dark. If I must die, I will encounter darkness as a bride, and hug it with my arms. The report of my death was an exaggeration. Men fear death as children fear the dark. It is better to be a fool than dead.

Hodges Choate Shakespeare

Thomas Hobbes Shakespeare

Mark Twain

Francis Bacon Robert Lewis Stevenson We owe God a death. Shakespeare He that lives upon hope will die Benjamin fasting. Franklin Them that die, be the lucky ones. Robert Lewis Stevenson Death is the kind umpire of men's Shakespeare miseries. We die only once, and for such a Moliere long time. Never argue with a fool, as people Anonymous might not know the difference. A little debt makes a debtor, but a English great one an enemy. A poor man’s debt makes a great English noise. Better be in debt than in shame. SerboCroatian Better go to bed without supper Czech than to live with debts. Debt is a bad companion. SerboCroatian

75


Debt Debt Debt Debts Debts Deceit Deceit Deceit Deceive Deceive

Deceive Deceive Deception

Deception Deception Deception, clever Deception, web Decision Decision, worry 76

* Debt is the worst kind of poverty. Forgetting a debt does not pay it. He who is without debt is without credit. To contract new debts is not the way to pay old ones. Words pay no debts. * Deceit is in the heart of them that imagine evil. * It is double pleasure to deceive the deceiver. * One deceit brings on another. He that once deceives is ever suspected. * If a man deceives me once, shame on him; but if he deceives me twice, shame on me. If you don’t deceive, you won’t sell it. * It is easier to deceive yourself than others. Beware of false prophets which come to you in sheep's clothing, but inwardly they are ravening wolves. Deceive not thy physician, confessor, nor lawyer Iron hand in a velvet glove. * The true way to be deceived is to think of oneself as more clever than others. What a tangled web we weave, when first we practice to deceive. * When a man decides to marry, it's usually his last decision. Once a decision was made, I did not worry about it afterward.

English Irish Italian George Washington Shakespeare Solomon Jean de La Fountaine French English English

Russian Unknown Bible

George Herbert Chares V Duc de La Rochefoucauld Unknown Oliver Goldsmith Harry S. Truman


Deed Deed Deed Deed Deed Deed Deed Deed, glory

A fair request should be followed by a deed in silence. A good deed is written on snow. * An evil deed, like smoke, cannot be hidden. Deeds are fruits, words are but leaves. Don’t take the will for the deed. Get the deed. * Good deeds travel far; bad ones farther. One deed is worth a thousand speeches. * The deed is everything, the glory is nothing.

Deed, honor Deeds

*

Deeds

*

Deeds

*

Deeds Deeds, attempt Deeds, word

* * *

Deem Deep water Deepness Defeat

*

A good deed does honor to a whole life. A man is judged by his deeds not his words. After all is said and done, there is more said than done. One's good deeds are only known at home, and the bad ones far away. Unsung, the noblest deed will die. It's the attempt and not the deed that confounds us. Ill deeds are doubled with an evil word. Deem the best till the truth be tried out. Smooth runs the water where the brook is deep. Still water runs deep. The worst thing about defeat is the sympathy that goes along

Dante Alighieri Estonian Philippine English American Russian American Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Petrarch Unknown Unknown Confucius

Pindar Shakespeare Shakespeare English Unknown Unknown Unknown

77


Defense

*

Defense

*

Definition

*

Delay Delay Delay Delay

*

Delay Delays Deliberate Delight

*

Democracy

Democracy Democracy

Democracy

Democracy

78

*

with it. My father never raised his hand to any one of his children, except in self defense. The best defense is a good offense. Define the problem before you pursue a solution. Delay is ever fatal to those who are prepared. Delay is the deadliest form of denial. Delay will lead to ruin. Talk about things of tomorrow and the mice inside the ceiling laugh. That is a wise delay which makes the road safe. Delays breed danger. Deliberating is not delaying. Delights dwell as well in the cottage as the palace. Democracy becomes a government of bullies tempered by editors. Democracy is the art of running the circus from the monkey cage. Democracy is the recurrent suspicion that more than half of the people are right more than half the time. I hold it to be the inalienable right of anybody to go to hell in his own way. The ship of Democracy, which has weathered all storms, may sink through the mutiny of those

Fred Allen

American John Williams Lucan John Peers Indian Unknown

Unknown John Lyly English American Ralph Waldo Emerson H. L. Mencken Elwyn Brooks White

Robert Frost

Grover Cleveland


Democrat

Democrat

Denial Departure Dependence Depravity

*

Desert Desertion Desertion

*

Deserving Desire

*

Desire Desire

* *

Desire Desire Desk Despair Despair

* *

Despair

*

aboard. Any well-established village could afford a town drunkard, a town atheist, and a few Democrats. I never said all Democrats were saloonkeepers; what I said was all saloonkeepers were Democrats. A civil denial is better than a rude grant. Every departure has an arrival. Dependence is a poor trade. No one becomes depraved in a moment. Desert and reward seldom keep company. Rats desert a sinking ship. When a building is about to fall down, all mice desert it. Not every question deserves an answer. A woman’s wholehearted desire will pierce even a rock. Desires are nourished by delays. If the desire to kill and the opportunity to kill came always together, who would escape hanging? If you have the desire, distance doesn’t matter. We desire nothing so much as what we ought not to have. A wastebasket with drawers. Despair and hope are sisters. Despair gives courage to a coward. There is no vulture like despair.

Denis W. Brogan Horace Greeley English Turkish English Juvenal English Unknown Plint the Elder Publilius Syrus Japanese English Mark Twain

Philippine Publilius Syrus Unknown Slovenian English T.C. Lai

79


Despair, hope. * I can endure my own despair, but not another's hope. Desperate Desperate diseases call for desperate remedies. Desperate * Even a hare will bite when it is cornered. Desperate, * Tempt not a desperate man. temptation Desperation The dog is turned to his own vomit. Destiny Destiny spoils plans. Destiny Many confuse bad management with destiny. Destiny Thoughts become words, words actions, actions habits, habits character, character, your destiny. Detail You cannot see the wood for the trees. Devil Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a raring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour. Devil Better keep the devil at the door than have to turn him out of the house. Devil Everyone has his own devil, and some have two. Devil * He who sups with the devil should have a long spoon. Devil * One sees more devils than vast hell can hold. Devil * Talk of the devil and he’ll appear. Devil The devil cannot go as far as a woman can. Devil The devil has no power over a drunkard.

80

William Walsh Unknown Chinese Shakespeare Bible Turkish Unknown Unknown

John Heywood Bible

English

Swedish Unknown Shakespeare English Polish English


Devil Devil Devil

*

Devil

*

Devil Devil

*

Devil Dew

*

Diamond

*

Diamond

*

Diamond, perfection

*

Diamonds Dice

*

Dice, world

*

Die

*

Die Die Die Diet

* *

The devil is a busy bishop in his own diocese. The devil sits behind the cross. The devil tempts some, but an idle man tempts the devil. The devil turns away from a closed door. The worst devil is the one who prays. Though the devil is up early, God is up before him. When the devil grows old he becomes a monk. In the ant’s house the dew is a flood. Better a diamond with a flaw than a pebble without one. Next to good judgment, diamonds and pearls are the rarest things in the world. A diamond with a flaw is preferable to a common stone with none. Diamonds cut diamonds. The best cast at dice is not to play. I shall never believe that God plays dice with the world. It is hard to die but it is harder to live. It’s never too late to die or get married. One has only to die to be praised. To die is easy, to live is hard. As a child my family’s menu consisted of two choices: take it, or leave it.

English Dutch English Spanish Polish American Greek Iranian Chinese Jean De La Bruyere Confucius

Unknown Spanish Albert Einstein Philippine Yiddish German Japanese Buddy Hackett

81


Difference

* It makes all the difference in the world whether you hear an insect in the bedroom or in the garden. Difference There is a big difference between what one hears and sees. Differences Different strokes for different folks. Different If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Difficult, * The difficult we do at once, the impossible impossible takes a little longer. Difficulty * Settle one difficulty, and you keep a hundred others away. Difficulty * There is no situation that cannot be made more difficult with a just a little bit of effort. Dignity Dignity consists not in possessing honors, but in the consciousness that we deserve them. Dignity * He who hurries cannot walk with dignity. Dignity, haste * He who hurries cannot walk with dignity. Diligence * Diligence is the mother of good fortune. Diligence * Diligence is the mother of good luck. Diligence The hand of the diligent shall bear rule: but the slothful shall be under tribute. Diligence, skill Few things are impossible to diligence and skill. Dinner * If you want your dinner, don’t offend the cook. Diplomacy * A diplomat is a man who thinks twice before he says nothing. 82

Robert Lynd

Japanese Unknown Henry David Thoreau

Unknown Chinese David Gerrold Aristotle

Chinese Chinese Miguel de Cervantes English Solomon

Samuel Johnson Chinese Unknown


Diplomacy

Diplomacy

*

Diplomacy

Diplomacy Diplomacy

Diplomacy

*

Diplomacy

*

Direct Direction Dirt Dirt Disappointed

Disaster Discipline Discount Discourse

*

A diplomat is a person who is appointed to avert situations that would never occur if there were no diplomats. A diplomat is someone who can tell you to go to hell in such a way that you look forward to the trip. A diplomatist is a man who always remembers a woman’s birthday, but never remembers her age. A man-of-war is the best ambassador. An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile hoping it will eat him last. Diplomacy is to do and say the nastiest thing in the nicest ways. To deceive a diplomat, speak the truth, for he has no experience with it. Better direct well than work hard. You can’t ride in all directions at one time. Dirt parts good company. He that flings dirt at another dirties himself most. Blessed be he who expects nothing, for he shall never to be disappointed. Serious disasters come from small causes. The parent who does not punish cannot persuade. Discount is good pay. Sweet discourse makes short days and nights.

Unknown

Unknown

Robert Frost

Oliver Cromwell Winston Churchill Isaac Goldberg Greek

English Yiddish Scottish English Jonathan Swift Japanese Unknown American English

83


Discretion Discretion Disease Disease Disease Disease Disease Disease Disease, cure Disease, nature Dish Dishonesty Dispatch, business Disposition

Dispute Dispute Distance Distance Distance Distance Distance 84

* An ounce of discretion is worth a pound of learning. * Discretion is the better part of valor. * A disease known is half cured. * Another man’s disease is not hard to endure. * Desperate diseases must have desperate cures. Disease will have its course. * If you know the disease, recovery is near. The doctor is to be feared more than the disease. * Cure the disease and kill the patient. Diseased nature oftentimes breaks forth in strange eruptions. All dishes need salt, but not all need spices. * Beware the man whose stomach doesn't moves when he laughs. * Dispatch is the soul of business.

English

They change their clime, but not their disposition, who run across the sea. No and yes cause long disputes. Out of yes and no comes all dispute. At a distance enjoy the fragrance of flowers. * Better is the neighbor that is near than a brother far off. * Distance enchants the view. Distance lends enchantment. Distance makes the heart grow

Horace

Shakespeare English Yiddish English English Japanese Latin Francis Bacon Shakespeare Hebrew Chinese Stanhope

Danish French Japanese Bible Unknown American Unknown


Distance Distance Distinction Distinction, difference Distress

fonder. * Distance preserves friendship. Distance promotes a close friendship. One who attains distinction is immediately changed. Distinction without a difference.

Diversity Divide Diving

* *

Division Division

*

Divorce

*

Divorce Divorce

Divorce

*

Divorce Do Do Do Do

*

When distress doesn’t show on the face, it lies on the heart. You cannot put the same shoe on every foot. Divide and rule. Drive like hell, and you'll get there. A house divided cannot stand. Something to everyone is good division. Do not lengthen the quarrel while there is an opportunity of escaping. Free of her lips, free of her hips. He that loseth his wife and a farthing, hath a great loss of a farthing. Marry for love and you divorce for money; marry for money and you divorce for love. The only sure way to stop divorce is to stop marriage. Do as I say, not as I do. Do good and care not to whom. Do it well that you may not have to do it twice. Do not all you can; spend not all you have; believe not all you hear; and tell not all you know.

Iranian Indian Polish Henry Fielding Yiddish Publilius Syrus Unknown Unknown Bible German Latin

English Italian

Unknown

Will Rogers Unknown Italian English English

85


Do Do Do Do Do Do Do Do Do Do Do

Do Doctor Doctor Doctor Doctor Doctor Doctor Doctor Doctor 86

* Do what you should and let the people talk. He that does most at once does least. He that does what he will does not what he ought. * If you can’t do as you wish, do as you can. * If you’re going to do something wrong, at least enjoy it! It is easier to know how to do a thing than to do it. Nobody does everything, nobody does nothing. None are so busy as those who do nothing. * Those who do little expect the most. * What we do willingly is easy. What you do when you’re drunk you must pay for when you’re dry. What you do yourself is well done. * A clever doctor never treats himself. * A physician who treats himself has a fool for a patient. A young doctor makes a humpy graveyard. Before a doctor can cure one he will kill ten. Better no doctor at all than three. Everyone is his own doctor. * God heals and the doctor takes the fee. * No one becomes a good doctor

German English English Yiddish Yiddish Chinese German French American English Scottish

Danish Chinese William Osler English Polish Unknown Greek Benjamin Franklin Swedish


Doctor

*

Doctor

*

Dog Dog Dog

* *

Dog Dog

*

Dog Dog

* *

Dog Dog Dog Dog

* * *

Dog Dog Dog Dog

*

Dog Dog Dog Dog Dog

* *

before he has filled a churchyard. The doctor demands his fees whether he has killed the illness or the patient. The doctor is often more to be feared than the disease. A barking dog bites little. A barking dog never bites. A dog has four feet but he can’t walk four different paths. A dog without teeth is just not a dog. A kitchen dog never was good for the chase. A lean dog shames his master. A mischievous dog must be tied short. A noisy dog is not fit for hunting. A still dog bites sore. An old dog bites sore. An old dog will learn no new tricks. Barking dogs don’t bite. Be on the watch when an old dog barks. Beware of a silent dog and a still water. Beware of the dog that does not bark. Dogs bark as they are bred. Dogs bark more from custom than fierceness. Dogs show no aversion to poor families. Every dog has his day. He that lies down with dogs will

Polish

French English Unknown Jamaican Yiddish Italian Chinese Italian Indian English English English Dutch SerboCroatian English Portuguese English English Chinese English Danish 87


Dog Dog

*

Dog

*

Dog Dog Dog

Dog Dog Dog Dog

*

Dog Dog Dog Dog Dog Dog

*

Dog

*

Dog 88

get up with fleas. He who pets dogs must be childless. If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a man and a dog. If you would wish the dog to follow you, feed him. It is better to irritate a dog than an old woman. It is easy robbing when the dog is quieted. Keep a dog for three days and he will not forget your kindness, but three years kindness shown to a cat is forgotten in three days. Let every dog carry his own tail. Many make themselves a dog for the sake of a bone. Not every dog that barks, bites. Satisfy a dog with a bone and a woman with a lie. The dog that barks much bites little. The dog that fetches will carry. The dog that has been beaten with a stick is afraid of its shadow. The dog will not get free by biting his chain. Timid dogs bark most. Trust not a dog’s limp or women’s tears. When the dog is awake, the shepherd may sleep. When the dog is drowning every

African Mark Twain

English Italian Italian Japanese

English Swedish Russian Basque Portuguese English Italian Danish German Mexican German French


Dog

*

Dog

*

Dog

*

Dog

Dog

*

Dog Dog, dreams, hunt Dog, friend Dog, water, crocodile

*

Dogs Dogs, cowards, bite

Dogs, fleas Doing Doing Doing Doing, done Dollar Dollar

one brings him water. When two dogs fight for a bone, the third runs away with it. Where there are no dogs the fox is a king. While the dog gnaws a bone, he loves no company. While the dogs are growling at each other the wolf devours the sheep. You can’t teach an old dog new tricks. Young dogs have sharp teeth. Like a dog, he hunts in dreams.

* If you need a friend, get a dog. * Leave a dog in the water as long as you like, but it will never become a crocodile. * Let sleeping dogs lie. * I loathe people who keep dogs. They are cowards who haven't got the guts to bite people themselves. * He that lies with dogs, riseth with fleas. Doing is better than saying. * The shortest answer is doing. * Whatever is worth doing is worth doing well. * So little done − so much to do. * A dollar saved is as good as a dollar earned. * Our problem is not what the dollar is worth at home or abroad it's how to get hold of it whatever it's worth.

Dutch Italian English French

Unknown Danish Alfred, Lord Tennyson Carl Icahn African

Unknown August Strindgberg

George Herbert English English English Cecil Rhodes American Will Rogers

89


Done Done Done Donkey

Donkey

*

Donkey Donkey

*

Donkey Donkey

Donkey

*

Donkey

Door Door Door Door Door Door Door Door Door 90

*

Could everything be done twice, everything would be done better. It isn’t done as easily as it’s said. What’s done can’t be undone. A donkey is asked to a wedding either to carry water or to bring wood. A donkey is still a donkey though it may carry the Sultan’s treasure. A starving donkey does not count the blows. Everybody beats the donkey that has no owner. Only a donkey is patient under a load. The donkey knows seven ways to swim but when he falls into the water he forgets them all. The small donkey is the one that everybody rides. You can recognize a donkey by his long ears, a fool by his long tongue. All doors open to courtesy. Every door has its own key.

German Yiddish English Greek

Lebanese Greek Turkish African (Hausa) Armenian

Libyan Yiddish

English African (Swahili) * In a quarrel, leave the door open Yiddish for reconciliation. Make not the door wider than the English house. Sweep before your own door. English * The back door robs the house. English The door of charity is hard to Chinese open and hard to shut. The door of success is marked Yiddish “push” and “pull.” * When one door shuts, another English


Door Door, annoyance Doorstep Doubt Doubt Doubt Doubt Doubt Doubt, certainty

opens. You may shut your doors against a thief, but not against a liar. * A creaking door hangs longest. * The doorstep of the palace is very slippery. * Doubt is the beginning of wisdom, not the end. * Doubt whom you will, but never yourself. * He that knows nothing doubts nothing. He who knows nothing doubts nothing. When in doubt, tell the truth. If a man begins with certainties he will end in doubts; if he begins with doubts he will end in certainties. * Our doubts are traitors.

Doubts, traitors Doubts. Truth * Doubts are more cruel than the worst of truths. Dowry * A great dowry is a bed full of brambles. Dragon, wrath * Come not between the dragon and his wrath. Dragons, killed Offering dragons quarter is not good, and should e be killed. Dream * Dream different dreams while on the same bed. Dream * If you want your dreams to come true, don’t sleep. Dream The dream of the cat is all about the mice. Dream, * I slept and dreamed that life was

Danish Unknown Polish Unknown Unknown Unknown Italian Mark Twain Francis Bacon

Shakespeare Moliere Unknown Shakespeare John Berryman Chinese Yiddish Egyptian Ellen Sturgis 91


beauty, duty Dream, plan Drink Drink Drink Drink Drink

Liquor talks mighty loud when it gets loose from the jug.

Drink

Of all vices, drinking is the most incompatible with greatness. The best audience is one that is intelligent, well-educated, and a little drunk. When the clergyman’s daughter drinks nothing but water she’s certain to finish on gin. Where the drink goes in, the wit goes out. ‘Tis not the drinking that is to blame, but the excess. * Drops of water eat up stones. Many drops make a great flood.

Drink

Drink

Drink, wit Drinking Drop Drop Drowning Duck Dull

Duration

92

beauty; I woke-and found that life was duty. * So I dream far ahead, but I don’t plan far ahead. A drink is shorter than a story. I always wake up at the crack of ice. I have taken more out of alcohol than alcohol has taken out of me. In wine there is truth.

Hooper Fred M. Gibbons Irish Joe E. Lewis Winston Churchill Pliny The Elder Joel Chandler Harris Sir Walter Scott Alben W. Barkley Rudyard Kipling George Herbert John Selden

Greek Indian (Tamil) * When a dog is drowning, George everyone offers him drink. Herbert * The duck knows where the lake is. Greek * It is the dull man who is always Henry Louis sure, and the sure man who is Mencken always dull. The only difference between love Unknown and insanity is the duration of the


Duty Duty Dwarf Dwarf, giant

Eagerness

Eagle Eagle Eagle Eagles Ear Ear Early bird Early bird, mouse Earn and Spend Earn, money Ears Earth Earth, cell

disease. * Do your duty and be afraid of none. I do perceive here a divided duty. A dwarf on a giant’s shoulder sees farther of the two. * A dwarf standing on the shoulders of a giant may see farther than the giant himself. It is equally wrong to speed a guest who does not want to go, and to keep one back who is eager. Eagles fly alone. The eagle does not catch flies. * The eagle does not war against frogs. Remember, eagles don’t flock. Better to play with the ears than with the tongue. Wide ears and a short tongue is best. The early bird catches the worm. * The early bird may get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese. Almost any man knows how to earn money, but one in a million knows how to spend it. Marrying for money is the hardest way to earn it. * Small pitchers have wide ears. * Six feet of earth make all men equal. What is earth most like? A single

American Shakespeare English Robert Burton Homer

English Desiderius Erasmus Italian Charles Scott English English Unknown Unknown

Thoreau

Unknown John Heywood English Lewis 93


Ease dropping * Ease dropping Easy Work

*

Eat Eat Eat, drink

*

Eat, drink Eater Eccentric

* *

Economics

*

Economist

*

Economist

*

Economist

*

Economy

*

Education

*

Education

*

Education Education

94

*

cell. There are always ears on the other side of the wall. There are always ears on the other side of the wall. Anyone can hold the helm when the sea is calm. Eat at pleasure drink by measure. Eat to live, not live to eat. Eat not to dullness; drink not to elevation. Let us eat and drink; for tomorrow we shall die. The quick eater does quick work. The man with a new idea is a crank until the idea succeeds. If you’re not confused you’re not paying attention. If all economists were laid end to end it wouldn’t be a bad idea. If all economists were laid end to end, they would not reach a conclusion. When an economist doesn't know the answer he changes the problem. The most comfortable way to economize is to travel with a good spender. A cauliflower is a cabbage with a college education. A Jade stone is useless before it is processed; a man is good-fornothing until he is educated. Better education than wealth. Education is hanging around until you've caught on.

Thomas Chinese Unknown Publius Syrus English English Benjamin Franklin Bible Japanese Mark Twain Wall Street Week Unknown George Bernard Shaw Unknown

Unknown

Mark Twain Chinese

Welsh Robert Frost


Education Education

Education

Education

*

Education

*

Education

*

Education Education

*

Education

Education

Education, old * age Eel

Eel Eel

*

Education is too important to be left to the educators. I was a modest, good-humored boy; it is Oxford that has made me insufferable. If a man empties his purse into his head, no one can take it away from him. If nobody dropped out at the eighth grade, who would hire the college graduates? In the first place God made idiots. This was for practice. Then He made school boards. It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Only the educated are free. The advantage of a good education is that it often enables you to hide your ignorance. The most widespread form of compulsory education is experience. There is now less flogging in our great schools than formerly, but then less is learned there; so that what the boys get at one end they lose at the other. Education is the best provision for old age. Taking an eel by its tail and a woman at her word leaves little in the hand. To squeeze an eel too hard is the way to lose it. Who takes an eel by the tail and a woman at her word may say he

Francis Keppel Max Beerbohm Benjamin Franklin Unknown

Mark Twain

Aristotle

Epictetus Unknown

Unknown

Samuel Johnson

Aristotle Swedish

French Italian

95


Eel Efficiency

* *

Efficiency Efficiency Effort

*

Egg

*

Egg

*

Egg Egg

*

Egg Ego

*

Ego

*

Ego

Ego Ego

Ego

*

Elbow-grease Elders 96

*

holds nothing. You cannot hide an eel in a sack. It's pretty hard to be efficient without being obnoxious. Kill two birds with one stone. Never leave that till tomorrow which you can do today. It takes little effort to watch a man carry a load. Don't put all your eggs in one basket. Eggs must not quarrel with stones. He who treads on eggs must tread lightly. One rotten egg spoils the whole pudding. To eat an egg, you must break the shell. He that falls in love with himself will have no rivals. I have lived long enough to satisfy both nature and glory. The cemeteries are filled with people who thought the world couldn’t get along without them. To love oneself is the beginning of a lifelong romance. What the world needs is more geniuses with humility, there are so few of us left. Oscar Levant When a man is wrapped up in himself he makes a pretty small package. Elbow-grease gives the best polish. Miss not the discourse of the

English Kin Hubbard Unknown Benjamin Franklin Confucius Dutch Chinese German German Jamaican Benjamin Franklin Julius Caesar American

Oscar Wilde Oscar Levant

John Ruskin

English Bible


Elections, sunup, sundown Elephant

Elephant

*

Eloquence Eloquence

*

Embarrass

*

Embarrassed Embarrassment Ember Ember Emulation End End End End End Ending Ending Ending, penny, beg

*

*

*

* *

elders. More men have been elected between sundown and sunup that ever were elected anytime else. No one who is following an elephant has to knock the dew off the grass. Where an elephant is being killed, none notices the death of a monkey. An idiot’s eloquence is silence. The finest eloquence is that which gets things done. Parents are embarrassed when their children tell lies, and even more embarrassed when they tell the truth. It is better to be embarrassed than heartbroken. To my embarrassment I was born in bed with a lady (woman). Blow not on dead embers. Burning embers are easily kindled. Emulation is good for mankind. Everything has an end. The end crowns all. The end justifies the means. The end makes all equal. The end of our good begins our evil. All good things must end. All's well that ends well. All the lovely things will have an ending; all lovely things will fade

Will Rogers

African (Ashanti) African (Ovambo) Japanese David Lloyd George Unknown

Yiddish Wilson Mizner Irish Irish Hesiod African English Unknown English English Unknown John Heywood Conrad Aiken

97


Endings Endurance

Endure Enemies

*

Enemies

*

Enemy

*

Enemy

Enemy

*

Enemy

*

Enemy

*

Enemy Enemy Enemy

Enemy Enemy Enemy

98

*

and die; and youth, that's now so bravely spending; will beg for a penny by and by. All's well that ends well. Endure my heart: you have endured something even more dreadful. That which was bitter to endure may be sweet to remember. A man cannot be too careful in the choice of his enemies. It is an unhappy and empty lot which finds no enemies. A friend is one who has the same enemies you have. A friend may become an enemy, but a relative is one from the start. An old enemy never becomes a friend. Better a good enemy than a bad friend. He that has no enemies has no friends. He who has three enemies must agree with two. He who is truthful may be the enemy of many. If we are bound to forgive an enemy, we are not bound to trust him. If you wish to have no enemy, do not lend. Love your enemies − it will drive them crazy. Nobody's enemy but his own.

Shakespeare Homer

English Oscar Wilde Publilius Syrus Abraham Lincoln Unknown

Greek Yiddish English German Indian (Tamil) English

Philippine Unknown Charles Dickens


Enemy Enemy Enemy Enemy Enemy

Repay your enemy with a favor. Speak well of your enemies, remember you made them. * The surest way to make enemies is to have too many friends. * There is no little enemy.

* There is no such thing as an insignificant enemy. Enemy There's absolutely no hope for a man who is too lazy to make enemies. Enemy To make an enemy, do someone a favor. Enemy We have met the enemy and they is us. Enemy, friend * Better a certain enemy than doubtful friend. Energy * They often make up in energy what they lack in clarity. Engagement * Better to break off an engagement than a marriage. England An Englishman thinks he is moral when he is only uncomfortable. England England

English, abolish English, common English, dogs

Japanese Unknown American Benjamin Franklin French Unknown

Unknown Pogo Aesop Heywood Hale Broun Yiddish

George Bernard Shaw If you want to eat well in England, Somerset eat three breakfasts. Maugham Teach the English how to talk and Oscar Wilde the Irish how to listen-then society will be quite civilized. The English never abolish Alfred North anything, the just put it in cold Whitehead storage. It was always yet the trick of the Shakespeare English nation, if they have a good thing, they make it too common. Only mad dogs and Englishmen go Unknown out in the midday sun. 99


Englishman

Englishman

Enjoyment Enjoyment Enjoyment

Enough Enough Enough Enterprise Enthusiasm Envy

Envy Envy Envy Envy

* *

Envy Envy

*

Envy

*

Envy 100

An Englishman is content to say nothing when he has nothing to say. The English are like their own beer: froth at the top; dregs at the bottom; and excellent in the middle. Enjoy yourself, it’s later than you think. Knowing is not as good as loving; loving is not as good as enjoying. My mother had a great deal of trouble with me, but I think she enjoyed it. Enough is enough. Just enough of a good thing is always too little. More than enough is too much. All things come to him who goes after it. Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm. A sound heart is the life of the flesh: but envy is the rottenness of the bones. An enemy’s envy is his own punishment. Better envy than pity. Better to be envied than pitied. Envy does not enter an empty house. Envy is the companion of glory. Envy is the sincerest form of flattery. Envy sees the sea but not the rocks. Envy slays itself with its own

Samuel Johnson Voltaire

Chinese Confucius Mark Twain

English George Savile English Unknown Ralph Waldo Emerson Solomon

Indian (Tamil) German English Danish Latin John Churton Collins Russian Greek


Envy Envy Envy Envy

Envy

Envy Envy, grass Epitaph

Epitaph

Epitaph

Equality Equality Equality

Err Eternity

arrows. Envy was never a good spokesman. He who envies, suffers. If envy were a disease everyone would be sick. It is in the character of very few men to honor without envy a friend who has prospered. * Oh, what a bitter thing it is to look into happiness through another man’s eyes. People often grudge others what they cannot enjoy themselves. The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence. I would have written of me on my stone: I had a lover's quarrel with the world. If men could see the epitaphs their friends write they would believe they had got into the wrong grave. Reading the epitaphs, our only salvation lies in resurrecting the dead and burying the living. * Crows everywhere are equally black. On the turf and under it, all men are equal. The only stable state is the one in which all men are equal before the law. To err is human, to forgive is divine. Live as long as you please, but it will strike nothing off the time

Danish German Unknown Aeschylus

Shakespeare

Aesop Unknown Robert Frost

American

Paul Eldridge

Chinese Unknown Aristotle

Dutch Michel Eyguem de

101


Eulogies Europe, Christianity, narcotics Event Everything, nothing, smothering Evidence

Evil

Evil Evil Evil Evil

Evil Evil Evil Evil Evil Evil

Evil

102

you will have to spend dead. * We owe eulogies to the living but pay them to the dead. Two great European narcotics: alcohol and Christianity. * Great events are brought about by small beginnings. * A smattering of everything and knowledge of nothing. Give me a few lines of a man’s handwriting and that will be sufficient for me to get him hanged. A prudent man forseeth the evil, and hideth himself: but the simple pass on, and are punished. Better to prevent an evil than attend it. * Between two evils, I always pick the one I never tried before. Do not seek evil gains, as they are equivalent to disaster. * Evil deeds do not prosper; the slow man catches up with the swift. Evil gotten, evil kept. Evil is easy and has infinite forms. Evil to him that evil seeks. Evil to him that evil thinks. * For great evils strong remedies. If you have never done anything evil, you shouldn’t worry about devils knocking at your door. It is bad to do evil, but worse to boast of it.

Montaigne Unknown Friedrich Wilelm Nietzsche American Charles Dickens Cardinal Richelieu

Solomon

American Mae West Hesiod Homer

English Blaise Pascal English English Dutch Chinese

English


Evil Evil Evil Evil

*

Evil

*

Evil

*

Evil Evil

* *

Evil Evil, choosing

*

Evil, poverty

Evil, religion

Evil, root, branches Evil, sinner Evolution

Exaggeration

Exaltation,

*

Money is the root of all evil. Of two evils choose the least. Of two evils chose the one you enjoy the most. Of two evils, it is always best to vote for the least hypocritical. Submit to the present evil, lest a greater one befall you. The evil that men do lives after them, the good is oft interred with their bones. The last evil smarts most. There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil, but barely a one striking at the root. We can endure neither our evils or their cures. When caught between two evils, I generally like to take the one I never tried. He that hasteth to be rich hath an evil eye, and considereth not that poverty shall come upon him. Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction. There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one striking at its root. Evil pursueth sinners. Some folks seem to have evolved from the chimpanzees much later than others. Gross exaggeration is 144 times worse than ordinary exaggeration. Whosoever shall exalt himself

Unknown English Unknown American Phaedrus Shakespeare

English Thoreau

Livy Mae West

Solomon

Blaise Pascal

Henry David Thoreau Solomon Kin Hubbard

Student answer on school exam Bible 103


humility Example Example

* *

Example Example Excellence

*

Excellence Exception, rule * Excess Excess Excess

*

Excess Excess Excess Exchange Exchange Excuse Excuse

Excuses Executive 104

* *

* *

shall be abased; and he that shall humble himself shall be exalted. Example is better than precept. Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example. Practice what you preach. Servants won’t be diligent when the master’s careless. All excellent things are as difficult as they are rare. Excellence is no distinction among the excellent. There is an exception to every rule. An overcrowded chicken farm produces fewer eggs. Can we ever have too much of a good thing? One monk shoulders water by himself; two can still share the labor among them; when it comes to three, they have to go thirsty. To go beyond is as wrong as to fall short. Too many cooks spoil the broth. You can have too much of a good thing. A fair exchange brings no quarrel. A fair exchange is no robbery. A bad excuse is better than none. If you don’t want to do something, one excuse is as good as another. He who excuses himself accuses himself. Blessed is he who talks in circles,

English Mark Twain

Unknown The Book of Barber Baruch Spinoza SerboCroatian Unknown Chinese Miguel de Cervantes Chinese

Confucius T.C. Lai Unknown Danish Unknown English Yiddish

Gabriel Meurier Frank Dane


Expectation

Expedience Expedience

*

Expedience

Expediency, humility

*

Expensive

*

Experience Experience

*

Experience

*

Experience Experience

*

Experience Experience Experience Experience Experience

* *

for he shall become a big wheel. You cannot prevent the birds of sorrow from flying over your head, but you can prevent them from building nests in your hair. All things are lawful for me, but all things are not expedient. Men resort to expedience when honor gets a little risky. When you have got an elephant by the hind leg and he is trying to run away, it’s best to let him run. To ride an ox while looking for a horse. To accept an unsatisfactory employment while looking for something better. Nothing seems expensive on credit. A fall into a ditch makes you wiser. A gem cannot be polished without friction, nor a man perfected without trials. A new broom sweeps clean, but the old broom knows all the corners. An old fox is not easily snared. Experience is a comb which nature gives to men when they are bald. Experience is a great servant. Experience is better bought than taught. Experience is better than knowledge. Experience is the best teacher. Experience is the name everyone

Chinese

Bible American Abraham Lincoln T.C. Lai

Unknown Chinese Chinese

Unknown

Unknown Chinese

Unknown Unknown Philippine German Oscar Wilde 105


Experience

Experience

Experience

*

Experience

*

Experience

*

Experience

Experience Experience Experience, age

Experience, fear Experience, information Experience, merry, fool

*

Experience, optimist Experience, school, fools

*

106

*

gives to his mistakes. Experience is what enables you to recognize a mistake when you make it again. Experience teaches us only one thing at a time − and hardly that in my case. I have never let my schooling interfere with my education. In the business world, everyone is paid in two coins: cash and experience. Take the experience first; the cash will come later. Second marriage: The triumph of hope over experience. The young man thinks the old man is stupid but the old man knows the young man is. There is no way to know before experiencing. We experience joy because we have known sadness. The trouble with experience is that by the time you have it you're too old to take advantage of it. He who has once burned his mouth always blows on his soup. Information’s pretty thin stuff, unless mixed with experience. I'd rather have a fool make me merry than experience make me sad. An optimist is a guy who has never had much experience. Experience is a dear school and fools will learn in no other.

Earl Wilson

Mark Twain

Mark Twain Harold Geneen

Samuel Johnson Unknown

Soupy Sales David Weatherford Unknown

Unknown Clarence Day Shakespeare

Don Marquis Benjamin Franklin


Expert

Expert

*

Explanation

Explanation

Exploitation

*

Exploitation Extra effort

Extreme Extremity Eye Eye Eye Eye Eye Eye Eye

* *

*

Eye Eye Eye

*

An expert is one who knows more and more about less and less (…until he knows everything about nothing). (See Specialist) Two experts are never on good terms. I may have said the same thing before, but my explanation, I am sure, will always be different. The first 40 years of life give us the text, the next 30, the commentary. Butcher the donkey only after it has finished its job at the mill. Dismantle the bridge only after crossing it. A horse cannot gain weight if not fed with extra fodder during the night; a man cannot become wealthy without earnings apart from his regular salary. Extremes meet. Every extremity is a fault. A lax eye spells a broken head. A stranger’s eye sees the clearest. An evil eye can see no good. Better eye out than always ache. Better to lose your eye than your good name. Eyes are the mirrors of your soul. His eyes are bigger than his stomach. If the eyes don’t see, the heart won’t break. Many see more with one eye than others with two. Not all who have their eyes shut

Nicholas Murray Butler African (Shona) Oscar Wilde

Schopenhauer Chinese Chinese Chinese

English English Malaysian English Danish English Armenian Unknown English Spanish German Italian 107


Eye Eye

*

Eye Eye

*

Eye

*

Eye Eye Eye Eyes Eyes

Eyes Eyes, ears Eyewitness Face Face Face Face Face

*

Face Face

* *

108

are asleep. Shut your eyes if you are among the blind. That which is far from the eye is far from the heart. The eyes deceive. The eyes speak as much as the mouth. What the eye does not see the heart does not grieve for. What the eye doesn’t see, the heart doesn’t feel. What the eyes see, the heart believes. You can see the eye of a needle but fail to see the eye of an axe. Eyes are more exact witnesses than ears. Men are born with two eyes, but with one tongue, in order that they should see twice as much as they say. The eyes are the windows of the soul. Eye hath not seen, nor ear heard. One eyewitness is better than ten earwitnesses. A fair face is half a portion. A fair face may be a foul bargain. A good face is a letter of recommendation. A good face needs no paint. A lovely face does not need adornment. A pretty face costs money. A pretty face doesn’t make for a good wife.

Hungarian Turkish Maltese Japanese Chinese Yiddish German Philippine Heraclitus Charles Caleb Colton

Unknown Bible English English English English English African (Swahili) Yiddish Yiddish


Face Face Face Face Face Face, eyes

Faces, sea Fact Fact Fact Fact Fact Facts

* A pretty face is half a dowry. * I never forget a face, but in your case I'll make an exception. One’s face is the mirror of one’s soul. * The face is the mirror of the heart. * The face tells the secret. The face is the mirror of the mind, and eyes-without speakingconfess the secrets of the heart. A sea of upturned faces.

* * * *

Failing Failure

*

Failure Failure

* *

Failure

*

Failure Fair Faith Faith Faith

*

Facts are facts. Facts are stranger than fiction. Facts are stubborn things. Facts speak for themselves. Facts speak louder than words. Get your facts straight first, then you can distort ‘em as you please. Press not a failing man too far. All problems present themselves to the mind as threats of failure. Failure is the source of success. Failure teaches you more than success. People learn from their failures. Seldom do they learn anything from success. You don’t die in the United States, you underachieve. Fair without false within. And whosoever liveth and believeth in me shall never die. Faith can move mountains. I respect faith, but doubt is what

Hebrew Groucho Marx Mexican Japanese Yiddish St. Jerome

Sir Walter Scott American American English American American Mark Twain Shakespeare J.J. Gordon Japanese Russian Harold Geneen Jerzy Kosinski Unknown Bible Russian Wilson 109


gets you an education. If there was no faith there would be no living in this world. We couldn’t even eat hash with any safety. Why are ye fearful, O ye of little faith. Have faith and pursue the unknown end.

Faith

Faith Faith, end

Faith, fashion

*

Faithfulness

Fall Fall

* *

Fall

*

Fall

*

Fall Fall, face, backward

*

false vows, wine Falsehood

* *

Falsehood Falsehood Fame Fame 110

*

Mizner Josh Millings

Bible

Oliver Wendell Holmes He wears his faith, but only as the Shakespeare fashion of his hat. A faithful man with abound with Solomon blessings; but he that haste to be rich shall not be innocent. Fall seven times, stand up eight. Unknown He falls low that cannot rise English again. Some people stand for nothing Unknown because they fall for everything. The bigger they are the harder American they fall. The harder you fall the higher you American bounce. You might as well fall flat on your James face as lean over too far Thurber backward. I am falser than vows made in Shakespeare wine. Falsehood never tires of going Danish round about. Falsehood often goes farther than Irish truth. One falsehood spoils a thousand African truths. (Ashanti) All fame is dangerous. English Fame is delightful, but as Elbert


Fame Fame

Fame

Fame, peace

Familiarity

Familiarity Familiarity Familiarity

Familiarity Family Family Family Family Family Family Family

collateral it does not rank high. Fame lasts longer than wealth. Martyrdom is the only way in which a man can become famous without ability. * The distance from obscurity to fame is much longer than from fame to obscurity. * If you can't give me sweet love and peace, then give me bitter fame. * Familiarity breeds contempt.

* Familiarity breeds contempt-and children. Familiarity little by little gets into the drawers of the cupboard. * The advantage of poverty is that your relatives gain nothing by your death. To take a light carriage on a familiar road. * A decaying family will not listen to advice. * A family divided against itself will perish together. * A family out of debt is out of danger. A large family gives beauty to a house. A small family is soon provided for. If a family has an old person in it possesses a jewel. It’s a poor family which has neither a whore nor a thief in it.

Hubbard Welsh Bernard Shaw Unknown

Anna Akhmatova Aesop/ Publilius Syrus Mark Twain Maltese Hebrew

T.C. Lai Indian (Tamil) Indian (Tamil) Indian (Tamil) Indian (Tamil) English Chinese English

111


Family

* One family builds a wall, two families enjoy it. Family * Vicious as a tigress may be, she never eats her own cubs. Family * When the whole family is together, the soul is in place. Family, Happy families are all alike; every happiness, unhappy family is unhappy in its unhappiness own way. Famine, After a famine in the stall comes a contagious famine in the hall. Famine, death * They that die by famine, die by inches. Fan There are no fans in hell. Fanatic * A fanatic is one who can’t change his mind and won’t change the subject. Fanatic * The worst vice of a fanatic is his sincerity. Fanaticism Fanaticism consists of redoubling your effort when you have forgotten your aim. Fancy * Fancy flees before the wind. Fancy Fancy is a fool. Fancy Fancy surpasses beauty. Fancy * Little of what you fancy does you good. Farmer * If are farmer fails many will starve. Farmer * The farmer hopes for rain, the traveler for fine weather. Farming Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil and you’re a thousand miles from a cornfield. Fashion A girl with cotton stockings never sees a mouse. Fashion Change in fashion is the tax which 112

Chinese Chinese Russian Leo Tolsoi

Unknown Matthew Henry Egyptian Winston Churchill Oscar Wilde George Santayana Scottish English English Unknown American Chinese Dwight David Eisenhower American Sebastien


Fashion Fashion Fashion

*

Fashion Fashion

*

Fasten Fasting Fasting

*

Fat, lean Fate Fate Fate

Fate Fate Fate, probabilities

*

the industry of the poor levies on the vanity of the rich. Everyone after his fashion. Judge not a man by his clothes, but by his wife’s clothes. Tailors and writers must mind the fashion. The plain fashion is best. What’s in fashion will be out of fashion. I will fasten him as a nail in a sure place. Fasting is easy with a chicken leg and a half-bottle of wine. When the stomach is full it is easy to talk of fasting. A man must take the fat with the lean. A good bone does not always come to a good dog. Fate leads the willing but drives the stubborn. Granting our wish is one of Fate’s saddest jokes.

On the tip of the tongue lies the fate of the entire world. * One man’s fate is another man’s lesson. Fate laughs at probabilities.

Fate, relatives, * Fate chooses our relatives, we friends choose our friends. Fate, slave, Thou are a slave to fate, chance, chance, kings kings and desperate men.

Chamfort English Thomas R. Dewar Unknown English Japanese Bible Yiddish St. Jerome Charles Dickens French Unknown James Russell Lowell Yiddish African (Swahili) Edward George BulwerLytton Jacques Delille John Donne

113


Father Father

*

Father Father

Father Father Father, son

*

Father, son

Father, son Fatherland

Fatigue

*

Fault

*

Fault

*

Fault Fault

*

Fault Fault Fault

114

A miserly father makes a prodigal son. He who teaches me for one day is my father for life. It is a wise father that knows his own child. One father can support ten children; but it is difficult for ten children to support one father. One father is more than a hundred schoolmasters. The father earns and the son spends. A man never knows how to be a son until he has become a father. For rarely are sons similar to their fathers: most are worse, and a few are better than their fathers. Like father like son. It is a fine thing to die for one’s fatherland, but a still finer to live for it. Fatigue is better than a bed of down. A fault is sooner found than mended. A fault once excused is twice committed. Denying a fault doubles it. Don’t find fault with what you don’t understand. Everyone finds fault with his own trade. Everyone puts his fault on the times. Everyone’s faults are not written in their foreheads.

French Chinese English Yiddish

English Japanese Unknown Homer

Unknown Hungarian

American English English English French Italian English English


Fault Fault Faults

Faults Favor Favor Favor Fear Fear

* * * *

Fear

Fear

*

Fear

Fear Fear

Fear Fear Fear

Fear

* *

Fault-searchers are those who have the most faults. He that commits a fault thinks everyone speaks of it. If we had no faults of our own, we would not take such pleasure in noticing those of others. No one sees his own faults. A king’s favor is no inheritance. For the smallest favor you become a debtor. One good turn deserves another. A scaled cat fears cold water. Always do what you’re afraid to do. Be not afraid of sudden fear, or of the desolation of the wicked when it cometh, for the Lord shall be thy confidence. Don’t be afraid when you have no other choice. Fear is sharp-sighted and can see things underground, and much more in the skies. Foolish fear doubles danger. Fools are more to be feared than the wicked.

Philippine English Duc de La Rochefoucauld German English Yiddish English Unknown Ralph Waldo Emerson Solomon

Yiddish Miguel de Cervantes

English Christina, Queen of Sweden He that will not sail till all dangers Thomas are over must never put to sea. Fuller * Once bitten by a snake, one is Chinese frightened by a rope. One cannot refuse to eat just Chinese because there is a chance of being choked. The only thing we have to fear is Franklin fear itself. Delano 115


Fear

*

Fear

*

Fear Fear of falling Fear, death Fear, nobility Fear, obedience

* *

Fear, right * Fear, wisdom, understanding

Feathers Fed Feelings

Feelings

Fellow Female Fence Fence

*

Fences, home * 116

Roosevelt To fear the worst often cures the Shakespeare worse. To fear the worst, often cures the Shakespeare worst. You must keep people scared Peter Grace every day. He that is down needs fear no fall. John Bunyan The fear of death is more to be Publilius dreaded than death itself. Syrus True nobility is exempt from fear. Shakespeare The fear of some divine and Robert supreme powers keep men in Burton obedience. Do right and fear no man. Unknown The fear of the Lord is the Solomon beginning of wisdom: and knowledge of the holy is understanding. It's not only fine feathers that Aesop make fine birds. Better unfed than untaught. English Feelings are not supposed to be David logical. Dangerous is the man who Borenstein has rationalized his emotions. They may forget what you said, Carl W. but they will never forget how Buechner you made them feel. The fellow who has ten faults Korean sneers at other for having one. The female of the species is more Unknown deadly than the male. A hedge between keeps Unknown friendship green. There's no fence against ill English fortune. I have come home to look after John


Fences, neighbors Feud

*

Fickleness

*

*

Fidelity Fidelity Fight Fight

*

Fight, fair, stranger Fighting Figure Figure

*

Filth

*

Finders Fire Fire Fire Fire

*

*

my fences. Good fences make for good neighbors. A family feud is not to be interfered with. Some praise at morning what they blame at night, and always think the last opinion right. Fidelity bought with money can be overcome by money. The worst revenge of a woman is to remain faithful to a man. It is not possible to fight beyond your strength even if you strive. You may fight to the death for something in which you truly believe, but keep such commitments to a bare minimum. Never fight fair with a stranger, boy. You'll never get out of the jungle that way. Of all the thirty-six alternatives, running away is best. Figures don't lie, but liars figure. I have everything I had twenty years ago, only it's all a little bit lower now. The more you stir filth, the worse it stinks. Finders keepers, losers weepers. A large fire often comes from a small spark. A small spark can make a great fire. Fight fire with fire. Fire is a good slave, but a bad master.

Sherman Robert Frost African (Zulu) Alexander Pope Seneca Jacques Bossuet Homer Albert A. Grant

Arthur Miller

Chinese Unknown Gypsy Rose Lee Danish Unknown Danish Unknown Unknown Albanian

117


Fire Fire

He who plays with fire gets burned. * Put out the fire while it’s small.

Fire, cat Fired

First First First, last Fish Fish

*

Fish Fish Fish Fish

*

*

Fish Fish Fish, bait Fish, death Fish, men, aging Fit

* *

Fit

*

Flatterer

118

*

To pull chestnuts out of the fire with the cat's paw. If you aren’t fired with enthusiasm, you’ll be fired with enthusiasm First come, first serve. First things first. Many that are first shall be last; and the last shall be first. Big fish eat little fist. Little fishes slip through nets, but great fishes are taken. Of all the fish in the sea, herring is the king. The best fish swim near the bottom. The fish is caught from the head. The fish sees the bait, not the hook. The fish that escaped is the big one. You catch fish in troubled waters. Fish not with a medallion as bait. Fish die by their mouth. Old fish and young flesh feed men best. Donkey's lips do not fit onto a horse's mouth. If the only tool you have is a hammer, you treat everything like a nail. When flatterers meet, the devil goes to dinner.

Philippine African (Hausa) Moliere Unknown

Unknown Unknown Bible English English English Unknown Turkish Chinese Chinese Russian Shakespeare Japanese Unknown Chinese Abraham Maslow English


Flattery

* When fortune flatters, she does it to betray. Flattery, friend Every one that flatters thee is no friend in misery. Flattery, * Imitation is the sincerest form of imitation flattery. Flea, harm * The flea, though he kill none, he does all the harm he can. Flee * The best day, is the first to flee. Flesh, spirit The spirit is willing but the flesh weak. Flexibility * Better to bow than break. Flexibility Fly Fly

* * *

Fly

*

Fly Fly

*

Fly

*

Focus

*

Folk Following

*

Following

*

Folly Folly Food

*

Publilius Syrus Shakespeare Unknown John Donne Virgil Unknown

John Heywood It is better to bend than to break. Aesop A fly can drive away horses. Greek A fly does not mind dying in African coconut cream. (Swahili) Flies and priests can enter any Russian house. Flies are easier caught with honey French than with vinegar. The busy fly is in every man’s Spanish dish. The fly does not kill, but it does Hebrew spoil. The shortest way to do many Samuel things is to do one thing at a time. Smiles Threatened folks live long. English Follow me, and I shall make you Bible fishers of men. Follow me; and let the dead bury Bible their dead. By their own follies they perish, Homer the fools. Folly is never long pleased with English itself. Abstain from beans. Plutarch 119


Food

Food Food

Food

*

Food Fool

*

Fool

*

Fool Fool

Fool Fool Fool Fool Fool Fool

* * *

Fool

*

Fool Fool

*

120

Fishes live in the sea as men do aland; the big ones eat the little ones. He that eats till he is sick must fast till he is well. I would like to find a stew that will give me heartburn immediately, instead of at three o’clock in the morning. The most dangerous food a man can eat is wedding cake. To eat is human, to digest, divine. A fool and his goods are soon parted; a wise man and his poverty always remain united. A fool and his money are soon parted. A fool at forty is a fool indeed. A fool finds no pleasure in understanding, but does so in airing his own opinions. A fool hopes to get honey, even from wasps. A fool must now and then be right, by chance. A fool thereto all that's in his mind. A half fool is a very wise man. A quiet fool is half a sage. Answer a fool according to his folly. Better to remain silent and appear a fool, than to open your mouth and remove all doubt. Fools come in all sizes. For fools rush in where angels fear to tread.

Pericles

Hebrew John Barrymore

American Mark Twain Russian

English English Unknown

Russian Unknown Bible Yiddish Yiddish English Unknown

English Alexander Pope


Fool

Fool Fool

* *

Fool

*

Fool Fool

*

Fool

*

Fool

Fool Fool Fool

Fool

Fool Fool Fool Fool Fool Fool Fool

* *

Fortune, seeing that she could not make fools wise, has made them lucky. From a fool you have trouble. He who asks is a fool for five minutes, but he who does not ask remains a fool forever. He who is born a fool is never cured. It's foolish to deal with a fool. Learned fools are the greatest fools. Let a fool hold his tongue and he may be taken for a sage. Let us be thankful for fools. But for them the rest of us could not succeed. Never challenge a fool to do wrong. One fool praises another. One never needs their humor as much as when they argue with a fool. The best way to convince a fool that he is wrong is to let him have his way. The fool plucks at a wasp’s nest. The more riches a fool has, the greater fool he is. Two fools in a house are too many. When you send a fool to the market, the merchants rejoice. Who is born a fool is never cured. You can educate a fool, but you cannot make him think. You don’t show a fool a job half

Michel De Montaigne Yiddish Chinese

English Unknown German Publilius Syrus Mark Twain

French German Chinese

Josh Billings

Philippine English Unknown Yiddish Italian The Talmud Hebrew 121


done. Fool You must not take offense at anything a fool does. Fool, haste The haste of a fool is the slowest thing in the world. Fool, saint This age thinks better of the gilded fool than of a thread bear saint in wisdom's school. Fool, wise man The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows he is a fool. Fool, wrath A stone is heavy, sand the sand is weighty; but a fool's wrath is heavier than them both. Foolery, * How just a little foolery does governing govern the world. Foolish The least foolish is wise. Foolish, well It is a foolish thing well done. done Foolishness * Foolishness grows by itself, no need to sow it. Foolishness * Those who wish to appear wise among fools, appear foolish among the wise. Foolishness When foolishness sometimes succeeds, it is still foolishness. Fools * Fools seldom differ. Fools * Unskilled fools quarrel with their tools. Foot * Better a crooked foot than a crooked mind. Force * Force without wisdom falls on its own weight. Force The force of his own merit makes his way. Force What force cannot do, ingenuity may. Forcefulness Speak softly and carry a big stick. 122

Yiddish Sir Isaac Newton Thomas Dekker Shakespeare Solomon

John Selden English Samuel Johnson Czech Quintilian

Yiddish Unknown Chinese Yiddish Horace Shakespeare Spanish Theodore


Foresight

* Thatch your roof before it rains; dig your well before you thirst. Forest * The forest has ears, and the field has eyes. Foretelling * Coming events cast their shadows before. Forethought * Forethought is easy, but regret is difficult. Forgetful, Blessed are the forgetful, for they blunders get the better end of the blunders. Forgive Always forgive your enemiesnothing annoys them so much. Forgive The secret of forgiving everything is to understand nothing. Forgive, forget Forgive and forget. Forgiveness * The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is the attribute of the strong. Forgiveness Turn the other cheek. Forgotten * Seldom seen, soon forgotten. Fortune A good fortune may forebode a bad luck, which may in turn disguise good fortune. Fortune * An ounce of good fortune is worth a pound of discretion. Fortune Don’t trust in fortune until you are in heaven. Fortune Easy come, easy go. Fortune * Fortune and glass break soon. Fortune * Fortune and love don’t always favor the most deserving. Fortune Fortune favors the bold but abandons the timid. Fortune * Fortune only brings in some boats that are not steered.

Roosevelt Confucius Danish Thomas Campbell Chinese Friedrich Wilelm Nietzsche Oscar Wilde Bernard Shaw Unknown Gandhi Indian Unknown Unknown Chinese

English Philippine Unknown Dutch English Latin Shakespeare

123


Fortune Fortune, bravery Forward, slowly

* If fortune calls, offer him a seat. * Fortune favors the brave.

Yiddish Unknown

* Ever forward but slowly.

Foundation

* No good house is built without a good foundation. * There is no sure foundation that's set on blood. A fox should not be of the jury at a goose’s trial. An old fox need learn no craft. At length the fox is brought to the furrier. Foxes are caught with foxes. The fox may lose his hair, but not his cunning. The fox preys furthest from his hole. The fox produces his tail as a witness. * When the fox starts preaching, look after your hens. Fortune is like glass-the brighter the glitter, the more easily broken. France is a place where the money falls apart in your hands but you can’t tear the toilet paper. He was a Frenchman, and that makes him a little dirty to begin with. (On Andre Gide) If it were not for the government, we should have nothing to laugh at in France.

Gebhard Leberecht von Blucher Unknown

Foundation, blood Fox Fox Fox Fox Fox Fox Fox Fox Fragility

France

France

France

124

Shakespeare English English English Finnish Dutch English Iranian Basque Publilius Syrus Billy Wilder

Shelley Berman Sebastien Chamfort


Frankness

* There is no wisdom like frankness. Benjamin Disraeli Free There is no such thing as a free Unknown lunch. Freedom American freedom consists Ed Howe largely in talking nonsense. Freedom Freedom rings where opinions Adlai clash. Stevenson Freedom The fool in the old story who Thomas resolved not to go into the water Babington until he has learned to swim. Macaulay Freeloader * A freeloader is a confirmed guest Damon and the man who is always willing Runyon to come to dinner. French soldier, * Every French soldier carries a Napoleon baton marshal's baton in his knapsack. Bonaparte Friar * Where friars abound keep your Spanish eyes open. Friday The only one who got anything John Peers done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe. Friend A best friend is like a four leaf Unknown clover: hard to find and lucky to have. Friend A fair-weather friend changes Spanish with the wind. Friend A faithful friend is medicine for Unknown life. Friend A faithful friend is the medicine of Bible life. Friend A friend at one’s back is a safe Dutch bridge. Friend * A friend in court is better than a English penny in the purse. Friend A friend in need is a friend English, Latin indeed. proverb Friend * A friend in power is a friend lost. Henry Brooks 125


Friend

*

Friend

*

Friend

*

Friend Friend

*

Friend Friend

*

Friend Friend Friend Friend

*

Friend

*

Friend

*

Friend Friend

*

Friend Friend Friend

126

*

Adams A friend is a gift you give yourself. Robert Louis Stevenson A friend is not so easy to find as Jamaican to lose. A friend is not so soon gotten as Unknown lost. A friend is recognized only in Russian misfortune. A friend remains a friend up to his Yiddish pocket. A friend to all is a friend to none. English A good friend is my nearest English relation. A reconciled friend is a double English enemy. Among friends all things are English common. Better my friend think me strange Scottish than troublesome. Beware of your friends, not your Yiddish enemies. Correct your friend secretly and Czech praise him publicly. Eat and drink with a friend, but Turkish have no business transaction with him. Friends share all things. Pythagoras Go often to the house of thy J.C. and A.W. friend; for weeds soon choke up Hare the unused path. Have but few friends though English much acquaintance. He who judges between two French friends loses one of them. I get by with a little help from my John Lennon friends.


Friend

Friend

*

Friend

Friend

*

Friend

*

Friend

Friend

Friend Friend Friend Friend

*

Friend Friend Friend Friend

Friend

* *

If I had to choose between betraying my country and betraying my friend, I hope I should have the guts to betray my country. In time of prosperity friends will be plenty. It is easier to fathom the depths of the sea than to find a true and sincere friend. It is easier to visit friends than to live with them. It is good to have friends but bad to need them. It is not so much our friends' help that helps us as the confident knowledge that they will help us. Many a friend was lost through a joke, but none has ever been gained by one. Many a man is a good friend but a bad neighbor. Old friends and old wine are best. One friend watches for another. Only your real friends tell you when your face is dirty. The best time to make friends is before you need them. The friend that faints is a foe. There is no physician like a true friend. True friendship is like sound health; the value of it is seldom known until it be lost. When a friend is in trouble, don't annoy him by asking if there is anything you can do, just think up

E. M. Forster

English Philippine

Chinese English Epicurus

Czech

Danish English English Sicilian Unknown English Unknown Charles Caleb Colton Edgar Watson Howe 127


something appropriate and do it. Friend, enemy * Better an open enemy than a false friend. Friend, enemy May God defend me from my friends; I can defend myself from my enemies. Friend, feet Old friends are best, like old shoes are best for your feet. Friend, mirror * The best mirror is an old friend Friend, misfortune Friend, serenity Friend, wall

* * *

Friend, wine Friends

*

Friends

*

Friends

*

Friends Friends

*

Friends, enemies

Friends, enemies Friends, enemies

128

* *

Unknown Voltaire

John Selden

George Herbert Misfortune shows those who are Aristotle not really friends. True friendship is never serene. Marquise de Sevigne Friends should have a high wall Chinese between them. Old friends and wine are best. Unknown Friends are made by many acts Unknown and lost by one. It is good to have some friends George both in heaven and hell. Herbert Prosperity makes friends, Publilius adversity tries them. Syrus The shifts of fortune test the Cicero reliability of friends. There are three faithful friends: Benjamin an old wife, an old dog, and ready Franklin money. He who has a thousand friends Ali ibn-Abihas not one friend to spare; and Talib he who has one enemy will meet him everywhere. Keep your friends close, but keep Sicilian your enemies closer. Old friends become bitter Robert enemies on a sudden over toys Burton and small offences.


Friends, strangers Friendship Friendship Friendship Friendship

Friendship

Friendship Friendship Friendship

Friendship Friendship Friendship Friendship Friendship Friendship, money Frost Frugality Frugality

* Strangers are just friends you have not met yet. A little for you and a little for me − this is friendship. A true friend is one who likes you despite your achievements. * Ascend a step to choose a friend, descend a step to choose a wife. * Before borrowing money from a friend decide which you need most. Friendship is always a sweet responsibility, never an opportunity. * Friendship is friendship, but money has to be counted. * In the division of inheritance, friendship stands still. Never speak ill of yourself. Your friends will always say enough on that subject. The friendship of officials is as thin as paper. * The friendship of two depends on the forbearance of one. There is no friendship in trade. * To preserve friendship one must build walls. Treat your friend as if he might become your enemy. * Friendship is easier made than kept. * The frost doesn’t hurt weeds. Frugality is a form of income. * Take care of the pennies and the pounds will take care of themselves.

Unknown Indian (Kashmiri) Unknown The Talmud American

Kahlil Gibren

Russian Dutch Charles Maurice De Talleyrand Chinese Indian (Tamil) American Italian Publilius Syrus Unknown English English Unknown

129


Fruit Fruit Fruit Fruit Fruit, ready Fruits

* * *

Frustrate Fugitive Funeral

*

Funny

*

Futility

Futility

Future

*

Future Future Future

130

*

A good tree brings forth good fruit. Forbidden fruit is sweet. The fruit falls not far from the stem. The tree is known by its fruit. The ripest fruit falls first. Your descendants will gather your fruits A frog in a well shaft seeing the sky. A fugitive never stops to pick the thorns from his foot. I did not attend his funeral, but I wrote a nice letter saying I approved it. Everything is funny, so long as it happens to someone else. It will be a long wait for a rabbit to hit upon a tree and be killed in order for you to catch it. What difference does it make to the dead, the orphans, and the homeless, whether the mad destruction is wrought under the name of totalitarianism or the holy name of liberty and democracy? I like men who have a future and women who have a past. I never think of the future. It comes soon enough. Learn the future by looking at things past. My interest is in the future because I am going to spend the rest of my life there.

Unknown English Dutch Bible Shakespeare Virgil Chinese African (Yoruba) Mark Twain

Will Rogers Chinese

Gandhi

Oscar Wilde Albert Einstein Indian (Tamil) Unknown


Future Future

Gain Gain Gain Gain, risk Gains Gambler Gambler Gambling Gambling Gambling Gambling Gambling

Game Game

Game Game

* The future comes one day at a time. * Your future lies before you like a field of driven snow-so be careful how you tread for every step will show. * Do not rejoice over the first gain. * Lightly gained, quickly lost. No gain without pain. * Nothing ventured, nothing gained. * Ill-gotten gains never prosper. * Gamblers know neither fathers nor sons. * If a gambler can reform, then there is a cure for leprosy. * A Smith & Wesson beats four aces. Gambling and boasting end in sorrow. If you believe in gambling, in the end you will sell your house. * Never do card tricks for the boys you play poker with. * There are two times in a man’s life when he should not speculate: when he can’t afford it, and when he can. If one piece is moved wrongly, the whole game is lost. It doesn’t matter whether you win or lose, but how you play the game. * It is a bad game where nobody wins. * The best game of dice is the one

Dean Acheson Unknown

Russian English Benjamin Franklin Unknown Unknown Chinese Chinese American Indian (Tamil) Chinese American Mark Twain

Chinese Grantland Rice Italian Hebrew 131


Garden Gardner Garment Gate Gate

Geese, swans General

not played at all. A garden is like a baby; it does not grow fast. * As is the gardener, so is the garden. Rich garments weep on unworthy shoulders. * A gate once widened stays wide. * He who has been shut out at the main gate must knock at the side entrance. All our geese are swans.

The general of a defeated army should not talk of tactics. General * Under a brave general there are no cowardly soldiers. Generalization * No generalization is wholly true, not even this one. Generation

Generation

Generosity Generosity Generosity Generous Geniality, grammar Genius 132

African (Bemba) Unknown French Hebrew Polish

Robert Burton Japanese Japanese Oliver Wendell Holmes Chinese

* One generation opens the road upon which another generation travels. * One generation plants the trees Chinese under whose cool shade another generation takes its ease. Generosity is wealth. African (Annang) The best generosity is that which Egyptian is quick. * The saving man becomes the free Chinese man. * Be just before being generous. English * I prefer geniality to good Francis grammar. George Fowler Genius borrows nobly. Ralph Waldo


Genius

*

Genius

*

Genius Genius Genius

*

Genius

*

Genius, * madness Genius, talent *

Gentleman

German, French, wine, dislike Germany

*

Get Get Ghost Ghost

*

Giant Giant Gift

Emerson Genius is 1% inspiration and 99% Thomas A. perspiration. Edison Genius is initiative on fire. Holbrook Jackson Hats off gentlemen − a genius. Robert Schumann I do not think America is a good Samuel place in which to be a genius. Butler The is no great genius without Seneca some touch of madness, There is no great genius without Publilius some touch of madness. Syrus No genius is without some Unknown madness. Genius does what it must, and Earl of Lytton talent does what it can. (Owen Meredith) A gentleman may love like a Francois De lunatic but not like a beast. La Rochefoucauld A true German can't stand the Johann French, yet is willing to drink their Wolfgang wine. von Goethe We may never produce another Oswald Goethe but we may produce Spengler another Caesar. Ill gotten, ill spent. English Soon gotten, soon spent. English Nobody wars with ghosts. African (Ga) To be a thousand days a ghost is Chinese not equal to being one day a man. Some think they are giants when Russian they sit on the hump of a camel. The giant loves the dwarf. English God gives nuts to those who have American no teeth. 133


Gift

Gift Gift

*

Gift Gift Gift Horse

*

Gift Horse

*

Gifts Girls

*

Girls

*

Girls Give

*

Give Give Giver

*

Giving

*

Glass Glass houses, stones

*

Glory

*

134

He that parts with his property before his death prepares himself for much suffering. Rich gifts wax poor when givers prove unkind. The gift is not as precious as the thought. To get a gift means to return one. What is bought is cheaper than a gift. Don’t count the teeth of a gift horse. Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth. Beware of Greeks bearing gifts. Homely girls let themselves be seduced. It is easier to watch over one hundred fleas than one young girl. That which a girl does not know adorns her. He who gives quickly gives doubly. It is better to give than to receive. To give tardily is to refuse. Let the giver be silent and the receiver speak. He doubly benefits the needy who gives quickly. A broken glass can’t be hurt. Whose house is made of glass, must not throw stones at another. Glory is like a circle in the water which never ceases to enlarge itself, till by broad spreading it disperses to naught.

French

Shakespeare Yiddish Hebrew Portuguese Iranian English Unknown Yiddish Polish Russian German English French Portuguese Publilius Syrus English George Herbert Shakespeare


Go Go Go God God God God God God God God God God God

God God God

God God, man, ruins God, self-

* He goes far that never turns. If you can’t go over, go under. It is better to turn back than go astray. Fear God, and next to God, him that has no fear of God. * Fear God, but be wary of men. * God cures, but the doctor gets the money. God did not join brains with beauty. * God does not pay weekly, but pays at the end. * God help the poor, for the rich can help themselves. God is always on the side of the heaviest battalions. God takes care of fools, and drunken men. God will forgive me. That’s His business. * I cannot believe a God who wants to be praised all the time. I’ll keep myself from my enemies but God defend me from my friends. If God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent him. Praise God and love men. * When I turned myself over to God, I took my life out of the hands of an idiot. With one hand God punishes and with the other he blesses. Man is God in ruins. Self-reliance, the height and

English Yiddish German Polish Yiddish Dutch Polish Dutch Scottish Voltaire Scottish Heinrich Heine Nietzsche English

Voltaire Russian Unknown

Yiddish Ralph Waldo Emerson Ralph Waldo 135


reliance God, subtle, malicious Gods Gods

Gods Gods Gods

* *

Gods Gold Gold Gold Gold

*

Gold

*

Gold Gold

*

Gold

*

Golf, walk Good Good

*

Good

*

136

perfection of man, is reliance on God. The Lord God is subtle, but malicious he is not. All men have need of the Gods. God is usually on the side of the big squadrons and against the small ones. Gods and immortals sometimes lose their swords. Gods have their own rules. It is not possible with the mortal mind to search out the purpose of the gods. Surely these things lie on the knees of the gods. All that glitters is not gold. Better whole than patched with gold. Gold dust blinds all eyes. Pure gold does not fear the furnace. The gold being gone, let us look to the silver. When gold speaks every tongue is silent. When we have gold we are in fear, when we have none we are in danger. Yellow gold is plentiful in the world; but old white-haired friends are few. Golf is a good walk spoiled. Do good and then do it again. Good and evil are chiefly in the imagination. Good and quickly seldom meet.

Emerson Albert Einstein Homer Roger de BussyRabutin Chinese Ovid Pindar

Homer English Danish English Chinese Turkish Italian English

Chinese

Mark Twain English English English


Good Good

* Good finds good. He who is no good to himself is no good to another. Good No good comes out of hurrying. Good None so good that’s good for all. Good Set good against evil. Good The good ones pay, the bad ones demand. Good What is good is not necessarily beautiful. Good Where there’s no good within, no good comes out. Good deed Who has done an atom's weight of good shall see it, and who has done an atom's weight of evil, will see it also. Good deeds * Better do a good deed near at home than go far away to burn incense. Good material * Rotten wood can’t be carved. Good men There are not three good men unhinged in England. Good news * He that brings good news knocks hard. Good turn One good turn deserves another. Good turn Good wife

Good, bad, thinking Good, evil

Good, lonesome

English Yiddish Yiddish English English Yiddish Japanese Dutch The Koran

Chinese

Confucius Shakespeare Unknown

Gaius Petronius One good turn deserves another. Unknown Her children arise up, and call her Solomon blessed; her husband also, and he praiseth her. * There is nothing good or bad, only Shakespeare thinking makes it so. There is only one good, Socrates knowledge, and one evil, ignorance. * Be good and you will be Mark Twain lonesome. 137


Good, way

* It is not enough to do good one must do it in the right way. Goodness * Goodness is not tied to greatness. Goodness, Goodness sold itself and badness badness flaunted itself about. Goods * Better to cry over your goods than after them. Goods * Forbidden goods find many buyers. Goose Don't kill the goose that lays the golden egg. Goose (see * It is a silly goose that comes to a geese) fox’s sermon. Gossip A gossiping mouth is the devil's postbag. Gossip * Gossip needs no carriage. Gossip * It is easier for a woman to defend her virtue against men than her reputation against women. Gossip It is easier to stop a river than to stop gossip. Gossip Love and scandal are the best sweeteners of tea. Gossip * Without wood a fire goes out; without gossip a quarrel dies down. Gossiping Gossiping and lying go together. Gossiping * The hearing ear is always found close to the speaking tongue. Gout, disease Gout unlike any other disease kills more rich men than poor, more wise men than simple. Govern He who governs must know how to be strong. Govern, noise * They that govern most, make the least noise. Governing The art of governing consists in 138

John Morley English African English Russian Unknown English Unknown Russian French

Philippine Henry Fielding Unknown

English Ralph Waldo Emerson Thomas Sydenham Maltese John Selden Napoleon


Government

*

Government

Government

Government spending Government, deserves Grace Grace

*

Grace Grace, luck Grain Grammar

*

Grammar Grandchild

*

Grasp

*

not allowing men to grow old in their jobs. Government is best which governs least. He who exercises government by means of his virtue may be compared to the polar star which keeps its place and all stars turn towards it. It may be long before the law of love will be recognized in international affairs. The machineries of government stand between and hide the hearts of one people from those of another. It’s a billion here and a billion there; and before you know it, it adds up to a lot of money. Every nation has the government it deserves. Grace grows after governance. There is no grace in giving that which sticks to the fingers. Where sin abounded, grace did much more abound. There but for the grace of God go I. He who sows his grain in the field puts his trust in Heaven. Even kings must obey the laws of grammar. I am the King of Rome and above grammar. The first grandchild is more beloved than one’s own child. He that grasps at too much holds nothing fast.

Bonaparte American Confucius

Gandhi

Everett Dirksen Joseph de Maistre, English American Bible Unknown Chinese Somerset Maugham Sigismund Japanese English

139


Grasp Grasp Grasp, slip

*

Grass Grass Grass

*

Grass Grass Grass Grass

*

Grass, stars

*

Gratefulness

Gratitude

*

Gratitude

*

Gratitude

*

Gratitude

*

Gratitude Grave 140

*

He who grasps all loses all. He who grasps at all holds nothing in the end. To the person who seizes two things, one always slips from his grasp. Grass does not grow on stones. Grass grows not upon the highway. In a storm grass fares better than trees. Soft grass follows the wind. Soon grass, soon hay. The wild grass fears the frost, and the frost fears the sun. There are no two spears of grass alike. I believe a leaf of grass is no less than the journey-work of the stars. A man should always consider how much he has more than he wants; secondly, how much more unhappy he could be than he really is. Forget injuries, but never forget kindnesses. Gratitude is a useless word. You will find it in a dictionary but not in life. He that has satisfied his thirst turns his back on the well. Hope has a good memory, gratitude a bad one. Next to ingratitude, the most painful thing is gratitude. Graves are of all sizes.

Spanish German African

Greek Dutch Russian Chinese Dutch Chinese American Walt Whitman Joseph Addison

Chinese Francois De La Rochefoucauld Baltasar Gracian Baltasar Gracian Henry Ward Beecher English


Grave Grave, kingdom Gravity, love

Grazing, France Great Great Great Great Great, Nixon

Greatness Greatness Greatness

Greatness Greatness Greatness Greed Greed Greed

* We shall lie all alike in our graves. * I'll give my kingdom for a little grave − a little obscure grave. * Gravity cannot be held responsible for people falling in love. Tilling and grazing are the two breasts that feed France. A great man is always willing to be little. * Great and good are seldom the same man. The great and the little have need of one another. * There would be no great ones if there were no little. Richard Nixon would have been a great, great man if someone had loved him. * Greatness knows itself. * It's a rough road that leads to the heights of greatness. Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon them. The price of greatness is responsibility. The really great man is the man who makes every man feel great. Where there is greatness, it shows itself. I gave you an inch and you took a mile. The more you get the more you want. Would you eat your cake and have it too?

English Shakespeare Albert Einstein Duc de Sully Emerson English English English Henry Kissinger Shakespeare Seneca Shakespeare

Unknown Yves Saint Laurent African (Bemba) John Heywood Unknown John Heywood 141


Greek

* In Greece wise men speak and fools decide. Greeks, tug of When Greeks join Greek, then war begins the tug of war. Grief * A new grief awakens the old. Grief * Great griefs are mute. Grief * Grief destroys even a hero. Grief * On the wings of time grief flies away. Grief One grief drives out another. Grief * The most recent grief is the heaviest to bear. Grief There is no grief greater than that of a mother. Grief There is no grief so great as that for a dead heart. Grief, shadows * Each substance of a grief hath 20 shadows. Grief, weeping To weep is to make less the depth of grief. Griefs, fool, Beware the easy griefs that fool fuel and fuel nothing. Grocer The grocer does not open his shop for the sake of one customer. Ground He who lies on the ground must expect to be trodden on. Group I don’t like to work in a group. I don’t get along well with other people. Groups The more the merrier. Growing Be not afraid of growing slowly, be afraid only of standing still. Grown The older one grows, the more one learns. Growth * Without bending, there is no growth. 142

Solon Nathaniel Lee English Italian Hebrew Jean de La Fountaine English Irish Maltese Chinese Shakespeare Shakespeare Gwendolyn Brooks Turkish

German Jimmy Breslin Unknown Chinese Dutch Japanese


Guards Guess Guest Guest Guest Guest Guest Guest Guest Guest Guest

Guile Guilt Guilt Guilt, innocence Guilty Guilty Gullibility Gut

* But who is to guard the guard themselves? He who guesses well prophesies well. * A constant guest is never welcome. * A daily guest is a great thief in the kitchen. A frequent guest becomes a burden. A guest and a fish after three days are poison. A guest eats much when he sees his hosts doing likewise. * A guest is like rain: when it lingers it becomes a nuisance. * A guest, like a fish, stinks the third day. * It’s an ill guest that never drinks to his host. One guest loves not another guest; the master of the house dislikes both. * Guile excels strength.

Juvenal Italian Unknown Dutch Yiddish French African (Shona) Yiddish Dutch English Turkish

African (Hausa) Guilt is always jealous. English * Who feels guilty, feel responsible. Unknown It is better to risk saving a guilty Voltaire person than to condemn an innocent one. He who is guilty is the one who African has much to say. (Ashanti) * Strike the innocent that the guilty Egyptian may confess. * A man who is always ready to Gaius believe will never do well. Petronius A full gut supports moral Burmese 143


Gutter, stars

*

Habit

*

Habit Habit Habit Habit Habit Habits

* * * *

Habits Hades Hail Hair Hair Hair Hair

* *

Hair Hair

*

Hair Hammer

Hand

*

Hand

*

144

precepts. We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. A habit acquired in youth is carried on in old age. Habit becomes one’s nature. Habit is a shirt of iron. Habit is stronger than resolution. Nothing is stronger than habit. We are what we repeatedly do. Ill habits gather by unseen degrees-as brooks make rivers, rivers run to seas. Old habits die hard. Hades is relentless and unyielding. In time of drought even hail is welcome. A hair of the dog that bit you. Curly hair, curly thoughts. Gray hairs are death’s blossoms. One finds many gray hairs but few wise men. One hair at a time and the man is bald at last. One hair of a woman draws more than a team of oxen. Take a hair of the dog that bit you. Before the big hammer strikes one, the little hammer strikes two. A hand in the water feels no pity for a hand in the fire. A single hand makes no sound of handclapping.

Oscar Wilde Philippine Japanese Slovenian Welsh Ovid Aristotle John Dryden

Unknown Homer Greek English Russian English Swedish German English Unknown Indian (Tamil) Maltese Korean


Hand Hand Hand Hand Hand Hand Hand Hand Hand Hand Hand Hand

All is not at hand that helps. Cold hand, a warm heart. Empty hands don’t go to the mouth. Hand washes hand and stone polishes stone. If the hands are empty the mouth is empty. * If you applaud with one hand it will not be heard. Kiss the hand you cannot bite. * Many hands make light work. Many kiss hands they would fain see chopped off. * Many kiss the hand they wish cut off. No one dares to slap the hand that gives. One hand cannot clap.

Hand Hand Hand

*

Hand Hand Hand

* *

Hand

*

Hand

*

Hand Hand

One hand full of money is stronger than two full of truth. One hand washes the other, and both the face. Scatter with one hand, gather with two. Skilled hands eat trout. The hand that gives gathers. The rough hand is the way to wealth. Though the left hand conquers the right, no advantage is gained. Under a glove the ugliest hand is hidden. When your hand is in the dog’s mouth withdraw it gently. Without fingers the hand would

English German Indian (Hindustani) Icelandic Japanese African (Ovambo) Rumanian English Spanish English Philippine Indian (Hindustani) Swedish English English Spanish English Philippine Chinese Rumanian Irish African 145


Handful Handsaw Hang

*

Hanged

*

Hanging

*

Hanging Hanging, * stealing, horses Hannibal, fear Happiness Happiness * Happiness

Happiness Happiness Happiness

*

Happiness Happiness Happiness

*

Happiness

*

146

be a spoon. Handfuls make up a load. A handsaw is a good thing, but not to shave with. Better be half hanged than ill wed. You might as well be hanged for a sheep as for a lamb. Hanging was the worst use a man could be put to. There is no hanging a man for his thoughts. Men are not hanged for stealing horses, but that horses may not be stolen. Hannibal is at the gates! All happiness is in the mind. Happiness begins where ambition ends. Happiness grows at our own firesides and is not to be picked in strangers' gardens. Happiness is a perpetual possession of being well deceived. Happiness is guarded by bold warriors. He that talks much of his happiness summons grief. If ignorance is bliss, why isn't the world happier? Most folks are about as happy as they make up their minds to be. No man is happy who does not think himself so. There is an hour wherein a man might be happy all his life, could he find it.

(Wolof) Irish English English Unknown Sir Henry Wotton American Maquess of Halifax Anonymous English Hungarian Douglas Jerrold Jonathan Swift Indian (Hindi) English Unknown Abraham Lincoln Publilius Syrus George Herbert


Happiness

Happiness

*

Happiness, adversity

Happiness, duty Happy Hard work

*

Hard work Hardness Hardship

Hardship Hare

*

Hare

Hare

*

Hare

*

Harm Harm

*

There is nothing which has yet been contrived by man, by which so much happiness is produced as by a good tavern. Very little is needed to make a happy life. Happiness is like a sunbeam, which the least shadow intercepts, while adversity is often as the rain of spring. There is no duty we so much underrate as the duty of being happy. Better to be happy than wise. Hard work never killed anybody, but why take the chance? Hold their noses to the grindstone. Your heart is always harder than a stone. There is no hardship without an end, and no game without a parting. When the hardship is at its height, relief is near. Even hares pull a lion by the beard when he is dead. Hares are caught with hounds, fools with praise, and women with gold. It is hard to catch hares with unwilling hounds. The hare does not eat the grass around his burrow. Better the harm I know than that I know not. Once harm has been done, even a fool understands it.

Samuel Johnson

Marcus Aurelius Chinese

Robert Lewis Stevenson English Charlie McCarthy John Heywood Homer African (Ovambo) Philippine Dutch German

Dutch Chinese English Homer

147


Harmony Harpoon Harvard, people

Haste

Haste Haste Haste Haste Haste Haste Haste

Haste Haste Haste, debt

Haste, leisure Haste, marriage Hatchet Hate Hate Hate

148

Harmony in discord. A small harpoon can kill a whale. * My father used to say, "Superior people never make long visits, have to be shown Longfellow's grave, or the glass flowers at Harvard." Do nothing in great haste, except catching fleas and running from a mad dog. * Haste in every business brings failure. Haste makes waste. Haste, haste, has no bleeding. In haste there is error. * Marry in haste and repent at leisure. More haste, less speed (progress). Nothing great is created suddenly, any more than a bunch of grapes or a fig. Rome was not built in a day.

Horace Philippine Marianne Moore

Old Farmer’s Almanac Euripides English African Chinese Dutch Unknown Epictetus

John Heywood Unknown

What flares up fast, is soon extinguished. * Too great haste is paying an Duc de La obligation, is a kind of ingratitude. Rochefoucauld * Marry in haste, repent at leisure. English * Married in haste, we may repent William at leisure. Congreve A small hatchet fells a great oak. Portuguese * Great hate follows great love. Irish * Hate has no medicine. African (Ga) * The greatest hate springs from English the greatest love.


Hate

* You lose a lot of time hating people. Hate, war Oh what a war of looks was between them. Hatred Hatred of the bourgeoisie is the beginning of wisdom. Hatred * Hatred renewed is worse than the first. Hatred, heart, Hatred comes from the heart; head, contempt from the head; and contempt neither feeling is quite within our control. Haughty The haughty in prosperity are meanest in adversity. Have Better have it than hear of it. Have * Many have too much, but none have enough. Hazard Better hazard once than be always in fear. Head A camel’s head does not pass through the eye of a needle. Head A wise head keeps a shut mouth. Head A wise head makes a closed mouth. Head A wise head makes a still tongue. Head * An idle head is a box for the wind. Head Better be the head of a lizard than the tail of a lion. Head Don’t lie a healthy head down in a sick bed. Head * The greatest undeveloped territory in the world usually lies under your hat. Head The head never begins to swell until the mind stops growing. Head of the Wherever MacDonald sits is the table head of the table.

Marian Anderson Shakespeare Gustave Flaubert Italian Arthur Schopenhauer American English Danish English Turkish Irish Irish English English English Yiddish Unknown

Unknown Ralph Waldo Emerson 149


Headache Heal Healing

Health Health Health Health Health Health

Health Health Health Healthy Hear Hear Hear Heart Heart Heart Heart Heart

150

* Neither hat nor crown help against a headache. One is not so soon healed as hurt. Healing is a matter of time, but sometimes also a matter of opportunity. Eat well, stay fit, die anyway. Good health is the sister of beauty. Health and money go far. Health comes before making a livelihood. * Health is better than wealth. * The art of medicine consists of amusing the patient while nature cures the disease. * The healthy die first. There is no riches above a sound body. * Your health comes first − you can always hang yourself later. He who would be healthy, let him be cheerful. “I heard” is not as good as “I saw.” Hear first and speak afterwards. * Hear twice before you speak once. A fool’s heart is in his tongue. A gentle heart is tied to an easy thread. A gentle heart is tied with an easy thread. A good heart is better than all the heads in the world. * A heavy heart talks a lot.

Swedish English Hippocrates

Unknown Maltese English Yiddish English Voltaire

Italian Bible Yiddish Welsh Chinese Spanish English English Unknown English Paul Boese Yiddish


Heart Heart

*

Heart Heart Heart

*

Heart

*

Heart Heart Heart Heart Heart

* *

Heart Heart Heart Heart Heart

*

Heart

*

Heart Heart Heart

Heart

*

A kind heart is better than a crafty head. A lord’s heart and a beggar’s purse never agree. A loving heart is more precious than gold. A maiden’s heart is a dark forest. A man's heart deviseth his way: but the Lord directeth his steps. A proud heart and a beggar’s purse agree not well together. A small heart has small desires. After a good cry the heart is lighter. Every heart has secrets. Faint heart never won fair lady. Have a mouth as sharp as a dagger but a heart as soft as tofu. Hearts communicate with each other. Hearts may agree though heads differ. Hearts will never be practical until they are made unbreakable. Home is where the heart is. Men’s hearts are as different as their faces. The heart and the eye are the two agents of sin. The heart does not grieve over what the eyes have not seen. The heart is something of a prophet. To know one’s self is to know others, for heart can understand heart. What comes from the heart, goes

Manx English Philippine Russian Solomon English English Yiddish Yiddish English Chinese Russian English Wizard of OZ Unknown Japanese Hebrew Slovakian Yiddish Chinese

German 151


Heart Heart Heart, courtship Heart, hands Heart, head

to the heart. * When the ear will not listen, the heart escapes sorrow. * Wherever you go, go with all your heart. * Faint heart never won a fair maiden. Cold hands/feet, warm heart His heart runs away with his head.

Heart, head Heart, heaviness Heart, kindness Heart, thoughts

* *

Heart, woman *

Heat, pressure Heaven Heaven Heaven

*

Heaven Heaven Heaven

* * *

152

Confucius Confucius Unknown

Unknown George Colman the Younger To handle yourself use your head; Unknown to handle others use your heart. Heaviness in the heart of man Solomon maketh it stoop: but a good word maketh it glad. A woman would run through fire Shakespeare and water for such a kind heart. Great thoughts come from the Marquis de heart. Vauvenargues Once a woman has given you her Sir John heart, you can never get rid of the Vanbrugh rest of her. If you can’t stand the heat, stay Harry S. out of the kitchen. Truman Better once in heaven than ten Dutch times at the gate. Good Americans, when they die, Thomas G. go to Paris. Appleton Heaven goes by favor; if it went Mark Twain by merit, you would stay out and your dog would go in. Heaven protects the good man. Chinese Heaven's net misses nothing. Lao-tzu It is easier for a camel to go Bible through the eye of a needle, than


Heaven Heaven

Heaven

*

Heaven

*

Heaven, die

*

Heaven, fury

*

Heaven, hell

*

Heaven, hell

*

Hedge Heed Heir

*

Heir

Heir

*

Hell Hell Hell

* *

Hell

Hell

for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God. The bottom line is Heaven. The Way of Heaven has no favorites, it is always with the good man. What a man misses most in heaven is company. What Heaven has ordained man cannot oppose. Everybody wants to go to heaven but nobody wants to die. Heaven has no rage like love to hatred turned, nor hell a fury like a woman scorned. Better to reign in hell, than serve in heaven. If I cannot bend Heaven, I shall move Hell. A low hedge is easily scaled. Much heed does no harm. He who is anxious for the death of another has a long rope to pull. It’s going to be fun to watch and see how long the meek can keep the earth after they inherit it. Never say you know a man until you have divided an inheritance with him. All hell shall stir for this. Each if us bears his own hell. He who would not go to hell, must not go to court. Hell and destruction are never full; and so are the eyes of man never satisfied. Hell is full of good intentions.

Edwin Land Lao-tzu

Mark Twain Chinese Unknown William Congreve John Milton Virgil English English French Kin Hubbard

Johann Caspar Lavater Shakespeare Virgil Danish Solomon

Italian 153


Hell Hell

Hell Hell Hell, light Helm Helm Help Help Help Help Help Help

Help Help Help, god Heredity

Heredity

154

* How do you know that this life isn't another world's hell? I never did give anybody hell. I just told the truth and they thought it was hell. * The road to hell is paved with good intentions. * There is no hell like a troubled conscience. Long is the way and hard, that out of hell leads up to light. * It is easy to sit at the helm in fine weather. When the helm is gone the ship will soon be wrecked. * A man is at his tallest when he stoops to help a child. Give me the ready hand rather than the ready tongue. God’s help is nearer than the door. * He who helps everybody, helps nobody. If you do not ask their help, all man are good-natured. * If you ever need a helping hand you’ll find one at the end of your arm. * Slow help is no help. * There’s always plenty of help when it’s not wanted. God helps those who help themselves. * Heredity is the transmission of unpleasant characteristics from the other side of the family. Heredity runs in our family.

Unknown Harry Truman Karl Marx (not sure) English John Milton Danish Danish Unknown Garibaldi Irish Spanish Unknown Yiddish

English American Unknown Unknown

Don Marquis


Hermit

Hero

*

Hero

Hero Hero

* *

Hero Hero, bore

*

Heroes

Herring Hesitation Hesitation Hidden, universe Hill Hill

*

Hills Hinge

*

Hint History

*

History

*

A hermit is simply a person whom civilization has failed to adjust itself to. A hero is no braver than the ordinary man, but he is brave five minutes longer. In war the heroes always outnumber the soldiers ten to one. No man is a hero to his valet. The hero appears only when the tiger is dead. There is no hero in the eyes of his servant. Every hero becomes a bore at last. Heroes are created by popular demand, sometimes out of the scariest materials or none at all. Set a herring to catch a whale. He who hesitates is last. He who hesitates is lost. Something deeply hidden had to be behind things. Every hill has its valley. It is easier to run down a hill than up one. Blue are the hills that are far away The hinge of a door is never crowded with insects. A hint hits harder than the truth. After you have heard two eye witness accounts of an accident you begin to wonder about history. History belongs to the winner.

Will Rogers

G. K. Chesterton H. L. Mencken Unknown Burmese Japanese Ralph Waldo Emerson Gerlad White Johnson English Mae West Unknown Albert Einstein Italian Chinese Unknown Chinese Yiddish Unknown

Unknown

155


History

History History History

*

History

*

History

*

History, write

*

Hit, aim, man

*

Holiday

Hollywood Home Home

*

Home Home Home

*

Home

*

Home, hat Honesty Honesty

156

*

History is always written wrong, and so always needs to be rewritten. History is nothing but a pack of tricks that we play upon the dead. History repeats itself. History would be a wonderful thing if it were only true. The causes of events are ever more interesting than the events themselves. We learn from history that we learn nothing from history. Anybody can make history, but only great man can write it. In the long run men only hit what they aim for. A perpetual holiday is a good working definition of hell.

Sanayana

Voltaire Unknown Tolstoi Cicero

Bernard Shaw Oscar Wilde

Henry David Thoreau George Bernard Shaw Hollywood Drink: Marriage on the American rocks. A house is not a home. Unknown Better at home than a mile away Chinese from it. East or west, home is best. Dutch Home is where the heart is. American One’s home is both paradise and Rumanian hell. There’s no place like home, after Unknown the other places close. Home is where you hang your Unknown hat. All I mean is that there shall be no Theodore crookedness in the dealing. Roosevelt An honest man is one who’s American never been caught.


Honesty

Honesty

* An honest politician is one who, when he is bought, stays bought. Honesty is not the best policyonly the safest. * Honesty is praised but starves. * Honesty is the best policy. Honesty is the best policy-for poor people. Honesty pays-and dishonesty gets paid. Honesty's the best policy.

Honesty

*

Honesty Honesty Honesty Honesty Honesty

Honesty

Honesty, face Honey Honor

*

Honor

*

Honor

*

Honor Honor Honor Honor Honor Honor

Simon Cameron Unknown Juvenal English Unknown Unknown

Miguel de Cervantes Take note, take note, O world, to William be direct and honest is not safe. Shakespeare The company of just and honest Euripides men is better than wealth and a rich estate. Honest labor bears a lovely face. Thomas Dekker Cover yourself with honey and English the flies will eat you. Better die in honor than live in Vietnamese disgrace. Better poor with honor than rich Dutch with shame. Better to die with honor than live Unknown with shame. Great honors are great burdens. English Honor and ease are seldom English bedfellows. Honor cannot be bought. Philippine Honor is much dearer than Yiddish money. Honor will come at the end. Hebrew I too shall lie in the dust when I Homer am dead, but now let me win noble renown. 157


Honor Honor Honor Honor, soul Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope

158

* If you can’t give me your word of honor, give me your promise. The bad and good alike in honor share. * The ore he talked of his honor, the more we counted our spoons. If it is a sin to covet honor, then I am the most offending soul alive. * A long hope is sweeter than a short surprise. All hope abandon, ye who enter here. Good hope is better than a bad intention. He that lives in hope dances without a fiddle. He that lives upon hope will die fasting. * He that waits for a dead man’s shoes may long go barefoot. Hope and expectation are a fool’s income. * Hope is a good breakfast but a bad supper. * Hope is a good breakfast, but a bad supper. Hope is a waking dream. Hope is the dream of a waking man. Hope springs eternal. Hope to the end. However long the night, the dawn will break. Most of the important things in the world have been accomplished by people who have kept on trying when there

Sam Goldwyn Homer Ralph Waldo Emerson Shakespeare Hungarian Dante Alighieri Irish English R.W. Emerson French Danish English Francis Bacon Aristotle Aristotle Unknown Bible African Dale Carnegie


Hope

*

Hope Hope

*

Hope

Hope, experience Horse

*

Horse

*

*

Horse Horse

*

Horse Horse

* *

Horse Horse Horse Horse

*

Horse

*

Horse

*

Horse

*

Horse

*

seemed to be no hope at all. The miserable have no other medicine than hope. Too much hope deceives. You can only go halfway into the darkest forest; after that, you are coming out the other side. You think you lost your horse? Who knows, he may bring a whole herd back to you someday. The horses of hope gallop, but the asses of experience go slow. A horse and a cow face the wind differently. A horse knows its rider.

Shakespeare English Chinese

Chinese

Unknown Chinese

African (Hausa) Don’t drive the horse with a whip, Russian but with oats. Don't look a gift horse in the English mouth. Ill-matched horses draw badly. Dutch Lend not horse, nor wife, nor English sword. Like beating a dead horse. Unknown Never spur a willing horse. Italian Praise a horse after a month and Czech a woman after a year. Put no more on an old horse than English he can bear. The biggest horses are not the English best travelers. The horse that draws most is French most whipped. The willing horse is always most English ridden. When two ride on one horse, one English must sit behind. 159


Horse

* You may lead a horse to the water but you can’t make him drink. Horse, gifts * Never look a gift horse in the mouth. Horses, If wishes were horses, beggars beggars might ride. Hospitality To pass the night in the cold is better than the hospitality of a monkey. Host A merry host makes merry guests. Hot * Soon hot soon cold. Hotel, born, * Born in a god damn hotel room hotel and dying in a one! Hound The foremost hound catches the hare. Hound, hare * To hold with the hare and run with the hound. Hour An hour lost is often a year lost. Hour Happy hours are very short. Hour Hours were made for slaves. Hour Pleasant hours fly fast. Hour * The darkest hour is before the dawn. House * A house with two mistresses will be deep in dust. House * A house with two owners will soon be neglected. House Burn not your house to fright away the mice. House * Lawyers’ houses are built on the heads of fools. House No house without a mouse, no barn without corn, no rose without a thorn. House One’s house, one’s castle. House, divided * A house divided cannot stand.

160

English Unknown John Ray Moroccan

Dutch English Eugene O'Neill Scottish John Heywood Swedish Vietnamese American English English Iranian Philippine English English German

English Abraham Lincoln


House, field, wife, tilled

A little house well filled, a little field well tilled, and a little wife well willed, are great riches. Hubris When you’re on the top of the heap, you really don’t think about some of the things that you used to. I think the Greeks call it the sin of hubris. Human nature Human nature consists of 90% of giving advice and 10% lending a helping hand. Human nature It is human nature to think wisely but act foolishly. Human nature The man who has a good opinion of himself is probably a poor judge of human nature. Humility He that makes himself a sheep shall be eaten by a wolf. Humility * Humility is a virtue all preach, none practice and yet everyone is content to hear. Humility * Let me be dressed as fine as I will, but flies, worms and flowers exceed me still. Humility Three humble shoemakers brainstorming will make a great statesman. Humor Fear not a jest. If one throws salt at thee thou wilt receive no harm unless thou hast sore places. Humor Humor is the only test of gravity, and gravity of humor; for a subject which will not bear raillery is suspicious, and a jest which will not bear serious examination is false wit. Humor * We must laugh at man to avoid crying for him.

Benjamin Franklin John R. Torell III

Unknown

Anatole France Unknown

Italian John Selden

Isaac Watts

Chinese

Latin

Aristotle

Napoleon

161


Hunger Hunger Hunger Hunger Hunger Hunger Hunger Hunger Hunger Hunger Hunger Hunger Hunger, stomach Hunter, hill, lonely Hurt Hurt Hurt Husband Husband Husband 162

’Tis a hard winter when one wolf eats another. * A hungry dog will eat dirty pudding. Hunger drives the wolf out of the woods. * Hunger is a good cook. * Hunger is the best sauce. * Hunger sweetens beans. Hunger transmutes beans into almonds. If the people have no bread, let them eat cake. * It is a hard matter to argue with the stomach, for it has no ears. It is better to die in battle than to die of hunger. * No man can be wise on an empty stomach. * There's no such sauce in the world like hunger. * A hungry stomach cannot hear. * My heart is a lonely hunter on a lonely hill. * A small hurt in the eye is a great one. He that hurts another hurts himself. It is easier to hurt than to heal. * A husband without faults is a dangerous observer. Do married men make the best husbands? It’s a sad house where the hen

The Barber Book Latin English African (Ovambo) Unknown T.C. Lai Italian Marie Antoinette Marus Porcius Cato Philippine George Eliot Miguel de Cervantes Jean de La Fountaine William Sharp (Fiona Macleod) English English German Sir George Savile James Huneker Scottish


Husband Husband

*

Husband

*

Husband

*

Husband

*

Husband, wife * Hyena Hymn, Jesuit

*

Hypocrisy

Hypocrisy

*

Hypocrisy

Hypocrite Ice Idea Idea Idea Idea

* *

crows louder than the cock. The best husbands aren't caught they're made. The calmest husbands make the stormiest wives. The husband is master of the home if the wife is out-of-doors. The husband is the head, but the wife is the neck and turns it whichever way she wants. There is no such thing as a good husband or a sweet onion. A light wife doth make a heavy husband. The hyena is the cure for the biting dog. Bland as a Jesuit, sober as a hymn. As hateful to me as the gates of Hades, is a man who hides one thing in his heart and speaks another. Hypocrisy is the parents' first duty. The wicked work harder to preach hell than the righteous do to get to heaven. A hypocrite is worse than a demon. Trust not in one night’s ice. A swollen idea can bring ruin. All of our ideas come from natural world: trees equal umbrellas. Ideas are like children, there are none so wonderful as yours. In a war of ideas, it is the people who get killed.

Unknown English Hebrew Russian

Rumanian Shakespeare African (Hausa) William Ernest Henly Homer

Bernard Shaw American

Indian (Tamil) English Burmese Wallace Stevens Unknown Stanislaw J. Lec 163


Idea Idea

*

Idea

Idealism

*

Ideas

*

Ideas

Ideas Idle Idle

* *

Idle Idle

Idleness Idleness Idleness Idleness

* *

Idleness Idleness

*

Idleness

*

164

Never judge an idea by the words it wears No army can withstand the strength of an idea whose time has come. There are well-dressed foolish ideas, just as there are welldressed fools. Idealism increases in direct proportion to one’s distance from the problem. A good idea has a thousand fathers, but a bad one is an orphan. I am long on ideas, but short on time. I expect to live to be only about a hundred. The best way to have a good idea is to have a lot of ideas. Better to be idle than ill occupied. Killing time is not murder − it's suicide. The man who does nothing usually does something. The man with nothing to do always gives it his personal attention. Idle people lack no excuses. Idleness is the devil’s workshop. Idleness is the mother of all evil. Idleness is the refuge of weak minds. Idleness is the root of all evil. The Devil tempts all, but the idle man tempts the devil. The Devil will find work for idle hands.

Unknown Victor Hugo

Sebastien Chamfort John Galsworthy Unknown

Thomas Alva Edison Linus Pauling English Unknown Unknown Unknown

Unknown German Greek Stanhope English Unknown Unknown


Idleness Idleness

*

Idol

*

Idols Ignorance Ignorance

Ignorance Ignorance Ignorance Ignorance Ignorance

Ignorance Ignorance Ignorance

*

Ignorance, science

Ignorance, sin * Ill Ill deeds

The hardest work is to go idle. The man who has nothing to do is always the busiest. The maker of idols does not worship them. We shouldn't maltreat our idols; the guilt comes off on our hands. Admiration is the daughter of ignorance. I would rather have my own ignorance than another man's knowledge because I have so much more of it. Ignorance does not commit sins. Ignorance is bliss Ignorance is the mother of devotion. Ignorance of a thing is darker than darkness. Ignorance of the law must not prevent the losing lawyer from collecting his fee. It is better to be ignorant than to be mistaken. It is only the ignorant who despise education. Where ignorance is bliss it is folly to be wise. So long as the mother, Ignorance, lives, it is not safe for Science, the offspring to divulge the hidden causes of things. Ignorance is not innocence but sin. He that does ill hates the light. I have done a thousand dreadful things as willingly as one would

Yiddish French Russian Gustave Flaubert Unknown Marc Twain

Russian Unknown Robert Burton African (Fulani) Legal Maxim

Japanese Publilius Syrus African (Fulani) Johannes Kepler

Robert Browning English Shakespeare

165


Illegible

*

Illness

*

Illness Illness

*

Illness

*

Illness

Illness

*

Illness

Illness Ills

*

Illusion

*

Illusion

Image-maker Imagination

166

kill a fly. I could always find plenty of women to sleep with, but the woman really hard for me to find, is a typist who can read my writing. An imaginary illness is worse than a real one. I’ve just learned about his illness. Let’s hope it’s nothing trivial. Illness comes by many roads but always uninvited. Illness comes in a coach and goes away through the eye of a needle. People who take cold baths never have rheumatism, but they have cold baths. She was dangerously ill, now she’s dangerously well. The illness of the rich is known to all, but not even the death of the poor to anyone. Those who suffer from the same illness pity each other. Desperate ills require desperate remedies. The one person who has more illusions than the dreamer is the man of action. There are three species of creatures who when they seem coming, are going, and when they seem going, they are coming: Diplomats, women and crabs. An image-maker never worships the Buddha. You cannot depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of

Thomas Wolfe

Yiddish Irvin S. Coss Czech Rumanian American

Unkonown Finnish

Korean French Oscar Wilde

John Hay

Chinese Mark Twain


Imagination, knowledge Imitation Imitation, sincerity Imitation, opposite

focus. * Imagination is more important than knowledge. Try to be like an ancient Greek in words and a Roman in deeds. Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. * To do just the opposite is also a form of imitation.

Immortality Immortality Immortality

Immortality

Immunization * Impartial

*

Impartiality

*

Importance

*

Impossible Impossible

Impracticality Impression

*

*

Every day we are dying, yet we fancy ourselves as eternal. Immortality is when a man is but his words alive. Millions long for immortality who barely know how to scratch themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. Without the hope of an after-life, this life is not even worth the effort of getting dressed in the morning. What does not kill you makes you stronger. The man who can see both sides doesn't have a chance in an argument. No one should be judge in his own case. If you make your job important, it will probably return the favor. It is impossible to overdo luxury. The difficult we do immediately, the impossible takes a little longer. Paper can't wrap up a fire. It's a grand and impressive thing

Albert Einstein Unknown English George Christoph Lichtenberg St. Jerome Unknown American

Bismarck

Unknown Unknown

Publilius Syrus Unknown French World War II Military Slogan Chinese Galen 167


Impression Impressions

Impressions Impromptu speech Improper Improper

Improper Impunity Inaccuracy Inadequacy Inch Inch Inch Income

Income

Indecision

168

to do, to mistrust the obvious, and to pin one's faith on things which cannot be seen. * Slight impressions soon fade. Early impressions are hard to eradicate; once the wool has been dyed purple, it is hard to restore it to white. The first impression is the lasting impression. * It usually takes me more than three weeks to prepare a good impromptu speech. Impropriety is the soul of wit. * The man whose behavior leaves his wife speechless has hit upon something priceless. Truth is stranger than fiction − and more decent. No one provokes with impunity. * A little inaccuracy sometimes saves tons of explanation. Don't fight a wolf with a flex stalk. A lost inch of gold may be found; a lost inch of time, never. * An inch in an hour is a foot a day. * Give him an inch and he’ll take a mile. A miser is a person who lives within his income. He is also called a magician. * There is nothing more demoralizing than a small but adequate income. Don’t stand shivering upon the bank; plunge in at once, and have

English St. Jerome

Unknown Mark Twain

Somerset Maugham Unknown

Unknown Anonymous Saki Chinese Chinese English Dutch Unknown

Edmund Wilson Sam Slick


Independence

Indigestion Industry Industry Inequality Inferior

*

Inferior

*

Infidelity

*

Inflation

Influence

*

Ingratitude Ingratitude Ingratitude

*

Inherency Inherent

Inheritance

*

it over. When I was a boy I used to do what my father wanted. Now I have to do what my boy wants. Unquiet meals make ill digestions. Industry in youth will support one in old age. Industry pays debts, while despair increases them. You can’t have all chiefs; you gotta have Indians too. Remember, no one can make you feel inferior without your consent. The trouble with an inferiority complex is that people who ought to have it, never do. To cast away honesty upon a foul slut, were to put meat into an unclean dish. How is the human race going to survive now that the cost of living has gone up two dollars a quart? Women make us poets, children make us philosophers. Ingratitude is the daughter of pride. Ingratitude is worse than witchcraft. Those who have free seats at a play hiss first. Regular feet can't be affected by irregular shoes. Every man carries the whole stamp of the human condition. If you want to really know what

Sam Levenson Shakespeare Indian (Tamil) American American Eleanor Roosevelt Unknown

Shakespeare

W. C. Fields

Malcolm de Chazal English English Chinese Chinese Michel Eyguem de Montaigne Gregory

169


Inheritance, know Iniquity, vanity Injuries

*

Injury, saint Injustice Injustice In-laws

*

Inn Inn

*

Inn

*

Innkeeper Innocence Innocence

*

Insanity

*

Insanity Insanity Insanity 170

your friends and family think of you die broke, and then see who shows up for the funeral. Say not you know a person entirely, until you have divided an inheritance with him. He that soweth iniquity shall reap vanity. We are more mindful of injuries than benefits. Such an injury would vex even a saint. Better suffer injustice than commit it. Equity follows the law, but seldom overtakes it. Don’t provoke your in-laws before sleeping with your wife-to-be. Find your inn before nightfall. He who puts up at the first inn he comes across very often passes a bad night. The nearer the inn, the longer the road. An innkeeper never worries if your appetite is big. Innocence is no protection. Innocence itself sometimes has need of a mask. Insanity − grounds for divorce in some states, and grounds for marriage in all. Insanity is hereditary − you get it from your kids. One half of the nation is mad − and the other half not very sound. When we remember we are all

Nunn

Johann Kaspar Lavater Solomon The Barber Book Shakespeare SerboCroatian Unknown African (Bemba) Chinese Filippo Baldinucci German Chinese English English Unknown

Sam Levenson Tobias Smollett Marc Twain


Insight Inspiration, perspiration Instinct

*

Instinct Instruction

*

Instruction

*

Insufficiency

Insult

*

Insult

*

Insult Insult

* *

Insult

Insult Insult, injury, forgiveness Insurance Integers Intellect

* *

mad, the mysteries disappear and life stands explained. What you see in yourself you see in the world. Genius is 1% inspiration and 99% perspiration. Hereditary instinct is stronger than upbringing. Woman’s instinct is often truer than man’s reasoning. Instruction in old age is like engraving in dung. Instruction in youth is like engraving in stones. How can you put out a fire set on a cart-load of firewood with only a cup of water? A man must insult himself before others will. Insults are more painful than lashes. Least said soonest mended. Run away from an insult, but don’t chase after honor. Sticks and stones may break my bones but names will never harm me. To add insult to injury. An injury is much sooner forgotten than an insult. Religion: Insurance in this world against fire in the next. God made integers, all else is the work of man. A second-class intellect, but a first-class temperament.

Unknown Thomas A. Edison Irish English Moroccan Moroccan Chinese

Confucius Philippine Unknown Yiddish Unknown

Phaedrus Stanhope Unknown Leopold Kronecker Oliver Wendell Holmes 171


Intelligence Intelligence

Intelligence Intelligence Intelligence

Intelligence

Intention Intention Intentions Interest

Interest Interest Interesting, important Interfere

Interpreter Intoxication

172

* A fat paunch never breeds fine thoughts. At a certain age some people’s minds close up. They live on their intellectual fat. Intelligence consists in recognizing opportunity. She was short on intellect but long on shape. There is nothing so irritating as somebody with less intelligence and more sense than we have. You cannot gauge the intelligence of an American by talking with him. * The camel’s intention is one thing, the camel driver’s is another. * The worst work is always done with the best intentions. * The road to hell is paved with good intentions. * I don't believe in principle, but I do in interest. Interest rules the world. Nothing is interesting if you are not interested. * It doesn't have to be important, but it has to be interesting. * If you interfere between man and wife, remember this: they will be friends again but you won't. Every man is the best interpreter of his own words. If he's rich, they call him a playboy; if he's poor, they call him a drunk.

St. Jerome William Lyon Phelps Chinese George Ade Don Herold

Eric Hoffer

Lebanese Oscar Wilde English James Russell Lowell American Unknown Agatha Christie Unknown

German Unknown


Intoxication Intrigue Introduction

Invention Invention

Invention

Invention Invention Investment

Investment

Ireland

Irish

Irish

* The intoxication of youth surpasses that of wine. Women’s intrigues surpass those of men. It is a foolish thing to be long on the prologue, and short on the story itself. A man in love always acts as if he invented it. Edison did not invent the first talking machine. He invented the first one that could be turned off. If a man can write a better book, or preach a better sermon, or build a better mousetrap than his neighbor, though he builds his house in the woods, the world will make a beaten path to his door. If you build a better mousetrap, you will catch better mice. Necessity is the mother of invention. Hard work is the soundest investment. It provides a neat security for your widow’s next husband. Your investments provide a neat security for your widow's next husband. Had you English not persecuted the Catholics in Ireland, the greatest number of them would have become Protestants. * Ireland is a country in which the probable never happens and the impossible always does. * The Irish are a fair people as they

Rumanian Lebanese Bible

Unknown Unknown

Ralph Waldo Emerson

George Gobel Latin Unknown

Unknown

Napoleon

John P. Mahaffey Samuel 173


Iron Iron Iron Iron, sharpen

Irony Irony

Irreplaceable

Island Israel Israel Itch Itch Itch Ivy Jargon Jealousy Jealousy Jealousy

Jest

174

never speak well of one another. Johnson Do not strike when the iron is Lebanese cold. Iron is cut by iron. Indian (Kashmiri) * Strike while the iron is hot. English Iron sharpen iron; so a man Solomon sharpeneth the countenance of his friend. * The finest edge is made with the John Lyly blunt whetstone. Who's worst shod that the John shoemaker's wife? (The Heywood shoemaker's kids are always barefoot.) Don’t be irreplaceable. If you Anonymous can’t be replaced, you can’t be promoted. No man is an island. Unknown In Israel in order to be a realist David Benyou must believe in miracles. Gurion The only thing chicken about Bob Hope Israel is their soup. * An itch is worse than a smart. English He that will not bear the itch must English endure the smart. Itch and ease can no man please. English The ivy destroys the oak. American Incomprehensible jargon is the Kingman hallmark of a profession. Brewster Jealousy is the life of love. Japanese No jealousy, no love. German The venom clamors of a jealous Shakespeare woman-poison more deadly than a mad dog's tooth. A jest breaks no bones. English


Jest Jest Jest, word Jesting Jesting Jew

* * *

Jewel Jilt

Job Joining Joke

Joke

*

Joke Joke Joke

* *

Journalism Journalism

*

Journey

*

Journey

*

Journey

A true jest is no jest. Said in jest, meant in earnest. Many a true word is spoken in jest. It is ill jesting with edged tools. Long jesting was never good. We Jews have a secret weapon in our struggle with the Arabs; we have no place to go. None can guess the jewel by the casket. It's comparatively easy to leave a woman, but it's very hard to be left by one. Never send a boy to do a man’s job, send a lady. If you can’t beat them, join them. I don’t know jokes; I just watch the government and report the facts. It is a good deed to forget a poor joke. Jesters do oft prove prophets. The gods too are fond of a joke. There is no worse joke than a true one. Journalism is unreadable and literature is unread. Journalism largely consists of saying “Lord Jones is dead” to people who never knew he was alive. A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step. A journey of a thousand miles must begin with a single step. I am going on a journey; they

English German Unknown English English Golda Meir

English Thackeray

John F. Kennedy American Will Rogers

Brendan Beham Shakespeare Aristotle Spanish Oscar Wilde G. K. Chesterton

Unknown Lao-tzu Sir Samuel 175


Journey Journey

Journey

have greased my boots already. (After receiving extreme unction.) * Journeys end in lovers’ meeting, ever wise man’s son doth know. Nothing is lost on a journey by stopping to pray or to feed your horse. * The longest part of the journey is said to be passing the gate.

Joy Joy

*

Joy Joy

* *

Joy Joy Judge

*

Judge Judge Judge Judge

*

Judge Judge Judge Judge, fortune

176

*

After joy comes sorrow. Joy and sorrow are next-door neighbors. Joy is always guarded by sorrow. Sudden joy kills sooner than excessive grief. The drunken man’s joy is often the sober man’s sorrow. The joy of the heart makes the face merry. A foolish judge passes brief sentence. A good judge conceives quickly, judges slowly. Judge not that you be judged. Judges should have two ears, both alike. Never judge someone until you have travelled a mile in his shoes. No one is a good judge in his own cause. Sit as crookedly as you like, but judge justly. The judge is condemned when the criminal is absolved. Most people judge men only by their success or their good

Garth Shakespeare Spanish

Marcus Terentius Varro English German Philippine English Danish English French English Unknown German Unknown Portuguese Russian Publilius Syrus Duc de La Roche-


Judging

*

Judging Judgment

*

Judgment

*

Judgment Judgment Judgment Judgment Jury

*

Jury

Jury

fortune. Enquire often, but Judge rarely, and thou wilt not often be mistaken. Wherein thou judgest another, thou condemnest thyself. Everyone complains of his memories, but no one about his judgment. For good judgment ask an old person. He has a good judgment that relies not wholly on his own. Never judge before you've heard the other side. The day of the Lord, so cometh like a thief in the night. There is judgment in all things. A jury consists of twelve persons chosen to decide who has the better lawyer. A jury consists of twelve persons chosen to decide who has the better lawyer. Despite the arguments of his attorney, we the jury find the defendant not guilty. Be just before being generous. Be just to all, but trust not all. Justice is better than worship.

foucauld William Penn

Bible Duc de La Rochefoucauld Japanese English Euripides Bible American Robert Frost

Robert Frost

Decision in a Missouri Murder Trial Unknown English Indian (Kashmiri) Russian

Just Just Just

*

Just

Justice, like oil, will come to the surface, however deeply you have sunk it. * No one likes justice brought home Italian to his own door. * An eye for an eye and a tooth for Unknown

Just Justice

177


Justice Justice Justice Justice Justice Justice

*

Justice

Justice, blind

*

Kennel

*

Kernel Kettle Key Key

*

Key

*

Key Kick Kin Kindness Kindness

178

*

*

a tooth. Be swift to hear and slow to speak Bible and to wrath. Give the Devil his due. Miguel de Cervantes He who spares the bad injures the Pubilius good. Syrus There is no such thing as justice − Clarence in or out of court. Darrow They that sow in tears shall reap Psalms in joy. Thieves for their robbery have Shakespeare authority when judges steal themselves. We leave unmolested those who Sebastien set the fire to the house, and Chamfort persecute those who sound the alarm. Get out of the way of justice for Stanislaw she is blind. Jerzy Lee The dog’s kennel is not the place Danish to keep a sausage. If you wish for the kernel you Slovenian must break the shell. Little kettles soon boil over. Estonian A gold key opens every door. Italian A golden key opens every door Danish except the door of heaven. A used key is always bright. Benjamin Franklin Not all keys hang from one girdle. Norwegian Every kick is a boost. American Everyone is kin to the rich man. English A forced kindness deserves no English thanks. Drinking kindness is drunken English friendship.


Kindness

Kindness Kindness

*

Kindness Kindness Kindness Kindness Kindness

*

Kindness

Kindness

Kindness, love * King

*

King King King

*

King

*

King King

He was so benevolent, so merciful a man that, in his mistaken passion, he would have held an umbrella over a duck in a shower of rain. I have found men more kind than I expected, and less just. Kindness and evil are not forgotten. Kindness begets kindness. Kindness is better than piety. Kindness is greater than law. No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. She openeth her mouth with wisdom; and in her tongue is the law of kindness. Too much kindness to a man is not profitable, for he becomes ungrateful. You can get more with a kind word and a gun than you can get with a kind word alone. Kindness is women, not their looks, shall win my love. A cork will do for a king, if you need him that badly. A good king is better than an old law. All flatter a king. Every one is a king in his own house. In the kingdom of the blind, a one-eyed person is king. No king was ever a traitor, or pope excommunicated. The King reigns, but does not

Douglas Jerrold

Samuel Johnson African (Hausa) Greek Yiddish Chinese Aesop Solomon

Turkish

Johnny Carson Shakespeare Yiddish Danish Hebrew Portuguese English Spanish Jan Zamoyski 179


King

*

King

*

King King

Kingdom

*

Kings

*

Kinsfolk Kiss

Kiss Kiss

*

Kiss

*

Kiss Kiss

Kiss Kiss Kiss

180

*

govern. When a king makes a mistake, all the people suffer. Who serves two kings deceives one of them. Woe to the kingdom whose king is a child. You are a king by your own fireside, as much as any monarch on his throne. It is easier to govern a kingdom than to rule one’s family. Idleness and pride tax with heavier hand than kings and parliaments. If we get rid of the former, we can bear the latter. Many kinsfolk and a few friends. Few men know how to kiss well; fortunately I've always had time to teach them. Frequent kisses end in a baby. He who kisses ugly Philaenis sins against nature. I am in favor of preserving the French habit of kissing-after all, we must start somewhere. If you kiss enough asses you’ll get kicked in the teeth. Marriage is the miracle that transforms a kiss from a pleasure into a duty. We have kissed away kingdoms and provinces. What lies lurk in kisses. When women kiss it always reminds me of prize fighters

Chinese Hebrew English Miguel de Cervantes Chinese Benjamin Franklin

English Mae West

Hungarian Unknown Sacha Guitry

Gerald Barzan Helen Rowland Shakespeare Heinrich Heine H. L. Mencken


Kitchen

*

Knave Knife

*

Knot

*

Knot

*

Know Know Know

*

Know

*

Know Know Know

*

Know Know

*

Know

*

Know Know Know Know

*

Knowing

*

Know-it-All

shaking hands. All that is said in the kitchen should not be heard in the parlor. Knaves and fools divide the world. The same knife cuts both bread and fingers. A knot in the tree spoils the axe; and famine spoils a friendship. A tight knot cannot be formed in a thick rope. All that is known is not told. Better known than trusted. He that knows little often repeats it. He who knows but little quickly tells it. He who knows little forgets little. He who knows little soon tells it. Know thyself.

Scottish English English African (Efik) Indian (Tamil) Egyptian English English Italian

Norwegian Spanish The Seven Sages/Greek Know yourself and your neighbors English will not mistake you. The more you know the less will Russian you sleep. They that know one another; English salute afar off. To know everything is to know Italian nothing. Who knows most believes least. Italian Who knows most says least. French You never know what you can do English till you try. Knowing is not enough, we must Unknown do. A know-it-all is a man whose wide Unknown range of information is always on

181


Knowledge

*

Knowledge Knowledge Knowledge

*

Knowledge

*

Knowledge Knowledge

*

Knowledge

Knowledge Knowledge Knowledge Knowledge Knowledge Knowledge

*

*

Knowledge Knowledge Knowledge

Knowledge Knowledge 182

*

a narrow acquaintance with facts. A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way. All men by nature desire knowledge. All we know is still less than what remains unknown. Better to be ignorant of a matter than to half know it. Grasp the subject and the words will follow. I would far rather be ignorant than knowledgeable of evils. It is better to know some of the questions than all of the answers. It is better, of course, to know useless things than to know nothing. It's better of course to useless things than to know nothing at all. Knowledge is a treasure. Knowledge is better than riches. Knowledge is no burden. Knowledge is power. Lack of knowledge is darker than the night. Mistakes are their own instructors. Not to know is bad; not to want to know is worse. The fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge, but fools despise wisdom and instruction. The more one knows the less one believes. The world is full of ignorant

Mark Twain

Aristotle Willian Harvey Publilius Syrus Marus Porcius Cato Aeschylus James Thurber Publilius Syrus Seneca English African (Efik) English English African (Hausa) Horace Unknown Solomon

Unknown Unknown


Knowledge Knowledge Knowledge Knowledge, accidents Knowledge, love Knowledge, power Knowledge, showing off

Knowledge, truth Lack of direction Ladder

Lady

Lady Lafayette Lamb Landlord Landlord

people who don't know what you have just found out. * Too much knowledge is a curse. * When knowledge is least the will is strongest. Without knowledge, without sin. * The chapter of knowledge is very short, but the chapter of accidents, very long. It's good to be knowledgeable but better to be loveable. Knowledge is power. * Wear your learning like your watch, in a private pocket: and do not pull it out and strike it, merely to show that you have it. It is better to know nothing than to know what ain't so. * If you don’t know where you’re going, any path will take you there. Many men get to the top of the ladder only to find it has been leaning against the wrong wall. It is easier to make a lady of a peasant girl than a peasant girl of a lady. * When an old lady wants to feel happy, she recalls her dowry. Lafayette, we are here.

Chuang-Tzu Norwegian German Stanhope

Unknown Francis Bacon Stanhope

Josh Billings Sioux

Unknown

Dutch

Hebrew

Charles E. Stanton * A lamb in the house, a lion in the English field. Give a landlord an inch and he’ll American build an apartment house. He who has the property in the Latin

183


Lane Language

Language Larceny, sparkle Latch

soil has the same up in the sky. * It's a long lane that has no turning. If the Romans had been obliged to learn Latin they would never have found time to conquer the world. It was Greek to me. * You sparkle with larceny. *

Late Late Late Late

* *

Late, goals

*

Lateness Laugh Laugh

*

Laugh, cry

*

Laughter

*

Laughter

Laughter

*

Laughter Laughter

*

184

Unknown Heinrich Heine

Shakespeare Wilson Mizner A broken latch lasts longer than a English good one. A little too late is much too late. German Better late than never. English Never too late to learn. English Too late to close the gate after Unknown the horses have escaped. It's never too late to be what you Unknown might have been. Don't mend the pen only after the Chinese sheep are gone. He who laughs last, laughs best. Russian Laugh and the world laughs with American you, weep and you weep alone. Laugh and the whole world Unknown laughs; cry and you cry alone. Against the assault of laughter, Mark Twain nothing can stand. Laugh a little more at your own Unknown troubles and a little less at your neighbors'. Laughter is heard farther than Yiddish weeping. Laughter is the best medicine. Unknown Laughter is the closest distance Unknown between two people.


Law Law

* Agree for the law is costly. * Agree, for the law is costly.

Law

* Better no law than law not enforced. Fear not the law, but the judge. He who goes to law for a sheep loses his cow. * In law, nothing is certain but the expense. * It will not injure you to know enough of law to keep out of it. Law are sand, customs are rock. Laws can be evaded and punishment escaped, but an openly transgressed custom brings sure punishment. Law stands mute in the midst of arms. * Laws catch flies, but let the hornets go free. Laws go where crusades please. * Laws have wax noses. * Much law but little justice. * Privileges of a few do not make common law. The brain may devise laws for the blood, but a hot temper leaps over a cold decree. * The English laws punish vice; the Chinese laws do more, they reward virtue. * The law catches the small fish. The law is good, if a man use it lawfully. * The law is like a telephone pole: you can’t jump over it, but you

Law Law Law Law Law

Law Law Law Law Law Law Law

Law

Law Law Law

Unknown Thomas Fuller Danish Russian Spanish Samuel Butler Old Farmer’s Almanac Mark Twain

Cicero English Portuguese French English St. Jerome Shakespeare

Oliver Goldsmith Maltese Bible Russian

185


Law Law Law Law Law Lawsuit Lawsuit

Lawsuit

Lawsuit

Lawsuit Lawyer Lawyer Lawyer Lawyer Lawyer

Lawyer Lawyer

186

can get around it. * The law is not the same at morning and at night. The law itself follows gold. * The law turns on golden wheels. The trouble with law is lawyers. * Where there is now law, there is no transgression. * Fond of lawsuits, little wealth; fond of doctors, little health. I can’t do no literary work for the rest of this year because I’m meditating another lawsuit and looking around for a defendant. I was never ruined but twice, once when I lost a lawsuit and once when I won one. * Lawsuit: A machine you go into as a pig, and come out of as a sausage. * Win your lawsuit, lose your money. * A good lawyer is a bad neighbor. * A good lawyer must be a great liar. A lawyer is a man who profits by your experience. * A man who is his own lawyer has a fool for his client. God works wonders now and then; behold a lawyer, an honest man. He is no lawyer who cannot take two sides. Ignorance of the law excuses no man from practicing it.

English Propertius Rumanian Clarence Darrow Bible Hebrew Mark Twain

Voltaire

Ambrose Bierce Spanish, Chinese French English Unknown Anonymous Benjamin Franklin Charles Lamb Addison Mizner


Lawyer Lawyer Lawyer

Lawyer

Lawyer

Lawyer

Lawyers

Lawyers Lawyers Laziness

Leader Leader

Leader, hope Leaders Leadership

Ignorance of the law excuses no man. Let’s kill all the lawyers. * The lawyers eat the kernel and the contending parties the shell of the nut. * There are two kinds of lawyers: those who know the law, and those who know the judge. Where there’s a rift in the lute, the business of the lawyer is to widen the rift and gather the loot. Young lawyers attend the courts, not because they have business there but because they have no business anywhere else. A countryman between two lawyers is like a fish between two cats. * Lawyers are like beavers: They get in the main-stream and dam it up. The first thing we do, let’s kill all the lawyers. Lazy people are always looking for something to do. Before a leader must lead he must first belong. * To be a leader of men, one must turn one’s back on men. A leader is a dealer in hope. * Good followers do not become good leaders. * A leader must have the courage to act against an expert’s advice.

John Selden Shakespeare Rumanian

Unknown

Arthur Garfield Hays Washington Irving

B. Franklin

John Naisbitt Shakespeare Marquis de Vauvenargues Bruce Henderson Henry Havelock Ellis Napoleon Bonaparte Laurence J. Peter James Callaghan

187


Leadership Leadership Leadership Leadership

Leadership Leadership

Leadership

Leadership

* Anyone can hold the helm when the sea is calm. Anyone can steer the ship when the sea is calm. Bad herdsman ruin flocks. It's not the cry, but the flight of the wild duck, that leads the flock to fly and follow. * Lead, follow or get out of the way! The emperor sent his troops to the field with immense enthusiasm; and promised to lead them in person, when they return. The shepherd always tries to persuade the sheep that their interests and his own are the same. * The view only changes for the lead dog.

Leadership

Leadership

*

Leak Learn

* *

Learn Learn Learn Learn Learn Learned, knowledge 188

* *

There is nothing more difficult, perilous or uncertain than introducing a new order of things. To lead the people, walk behind them. A little leak will sink a great ship. I am always ready to learn, but I don’t always like being taught. Live and learn. Never too late to learn. No one is too old to learn. One learns by failing. Soon learned, soon forgotten. The things we know best are those that we have not learned.

Publilius Syrus Publilius Syrus Homer Confucius

Anonymous Mark Twain

Stendhal

Sergeant Preston of the Yukon Machiavelli

Lao-tzu English Winston Churchill Unknown Scottish German French English Marquis de Vauven-


Learning Learning

Learning

Learning Learning Learning

Learning, experience Learning, ungrateful

Legacy Leisure

Lemonade Lend Leopard

I grow old ever learning many things. I profess to learn and to teach anatomy, not from books, but from dissections; likewise not from the positions of philosophers, but from the fabric of nature. Japan is a country committed to learning. The United States isn’tand it shows. * Learning is a treasure that will follow its owner everywhere. Never too late or old to learn. The man who does not learn what is in the dark, is like one walking in the night. You don’t learn anything the second time you’re kicked by a mule. I have learned silence from the talkative, tolerance form the intolerant, and kindness from the unkind, and am ungrateful to those teachers. If you come for the legacy, you often have to pay for the funeral. We give up leisure in order that we may have leisure just as we go to war in order that we may have peace. * If life deals you lemons make lemonade. * Lend never that thing you need most. When the leopard dies, he leaves his skin; a man, his reputation.

argues Solon Willian Harvey

Thomas P. Rohlen Chinese Unknown Chinese

American (Texas) Kahlil Gibran

Yiddish Aristotle

Unknown English Chinese

189


Leopards, fear * After dark all cats are leopards. Lesson An evil lesson is soon learned. Letter * Christmas is the season when a smart child writes a letter to Santa Claus, but a smarter child writes one to Grandma. Leverage * A dwarf on a giant’s shoulder, sees further of the two. Liar * A liar can go round the world but he can’t come back. Liar A liar is not believed when he speaks the truth. Liar * Don't believe a liar even if you know he's telling the truth. Liar Liars must have good memories. Liar * No one is such a liar as an indignant man. Liar Liar

*

Liar

*

Liar, thief

*

Libel Liberal

Liberal

Liberal

190

*

Once a liar, always a liar. Show me a liar, and I’ll show you a thief. The liar is sooner caught than the cripple. Show me a liar and I'll show thee a thief. A libel hurts worse than a spear thrust. A liberal is a man who is right most of the time, but he’s right too soon. A man who has both feet planted firmly in the air can be safely called a liberal. A man who has both feet planted firmly in the air can be safely called a liberal; as opposed to the conservative, who has both feet

Unknown English Unknown

George Herbert Polish English Unknown English Friedrich Wilelm Nietzsche American English Spanish George Herbert African (Hausa) Gregory Nunn American

Gerald Barzan


firmly planted in his mouth. Liberal * I can remember way back when a liberal was one who was generous with his own money. Liberal Though I believe in liberalism, I find it difficult to believe liberals. Liberty The price of liberty is eternal vigilance. liberty, corpse We have buried the putrid corpse of liberty. Liberty, nose. Liberty plucks justice by the nose. Liberty, * Lean liberty is better than fat slavery slavery. Liberty, soul, Liberty of thought is the life of the life soul. Library Your library is your Paradise. Lick He who can lick can bite. Lid Don’t lift off the lid too soon. Lie A lie begets a lie. Lie A lie comes back sooner or later. Lie Lie Lie

Lie Lie Lie

Lie

A lie is plump in private but lean in public. * A lie stands on one leg and truth on two. If lies were as heavy as stones to carry many would prefer the truth. One lie draws ten after it. One lie makes many. * There are a terrible lot of lies going about the world, and the worst of it is that half of them are true. There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics.

Will Rogers

Chesterton Unknown Benito Mussolini Shakespeare Unknown Voltaire Erasmus French Chinese English African (Bemba) Malagasy English Swedish

Italian English Winston Churchill

Benjamin Disraeli

191


Lie Lie, ending Lie, masses

Lies

Lies Lies, ask Lies, silence, cruel Life Life Life Life

Life

Life

Life

Life

Life Life 192

* With lies you will go far, but not back again. * A lie has seven endings * The great masses of people will more fall victims to a big lie than to a small one. It takes a wise man to handle a lie; a fool had better remain honest. * There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics. Ask me no questions and I'll tell you no lies. * The cruelest lies are often told in silence. A good life will have a good end. * A precipice in front of you, and wolves behind you: that’s life. * All of life is a struggle. But men must know that this theater of man's life is reserved for God and angels to be on lookers. He who teaches men how to die, teach them how to live. * I’ve read the last page of the Bible. It’s going to turn out all right. In life as in a football game, the principle to follow is: Hit the line hard. In small portions we just beauties see; And in short measures life may perfect be. It's a dog's life. Life can only be understood

Yiddish African Adolf Hitler

Norman Douglas Benjamin Disraeli Oliver Goldsmith Robert Lewis Stevenson English Latin Yiddish Francis Bacon

Michel Eyguem de Montaigne Billy Graham

Theodore Roosevelt Ben Jonson

Unknown Soren


Life Life Life

* *

Life

*

Life

*

Life

*

Life Life

*

Life Life Life

*

Life

*

Life Life Life

* *

Life

*

Life

Life

backwards, but it must be lived forwards. Life has its ups and downs. Life is a dead-end street. Life is a journey, not a destination. Life is a mystery to be lived, not a problem to be solved. Life is half spent before we even know what it is. Life is like a good book: the more you get into it the more it makes sense. Life is one long process of getting tired. Life is one long struggle in the dark. Life's brief span forbids us to enter on far-reaching hopes. Man’s life is like morning dew. Men don’t care how nobly they live but rather just how long. Most men make use of the first part of their life to render the last part miserable. Not to be born is best. Showing up is 80 percent of life. The first hundred years are always the hardest. The tragedy of life is not that it ends so soon, but that we wait so long to begin it. The trouble with life is that there are so many beautiful women, and so little time. The world itself is but a large prison, out of which some are

Kierkegaard American Mencken Rita Mae Brown Unknown George Herbert Unknown

Samuel Butler Lucretius Horace Korean Seneca Jean de La Bruyere Sophocles Woody Allen Wilson Mizner W.M. Lewis

John Barrymore Sir Walter Raleigh 193


Life Life

Life Life Life

Life, betting Life, conclusions Life, death Life, death Life, death

Life, death

Life, disease Life, fiction

Life, garment

194

daily let to execution. There is more to life than simply increasing its speed. There is nothing better in life than refraining from hurting others, and comforting those who are sad. We must not look for a golden life in an iron age. While there’s life there’s hope. * Why are we so fond of that life which begins with a cry and ends with a groan? Long ago I came to the conclusion that life is 6 to 5 against. Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises. Every man dies, but not every man has lived. Life is a dream walking; death is a going home. Since death is at the end of life, we are all moving in the wrong direction. * There is nothing terrible in life for the man who realizes that there is nothing terrible in death. * Life is an incurable disease.

Gandhi Olive Schreiner

English English Mary, Countess of Warwick Damon Runyon Samuel Butler Unknown Chinese Unknown

Epicurus

Abraham Cowley * Life is fiction in disguise. James Ingram Merrill * Life is a garment we continually Herman alter but which never seems to fit. Jacob MankiewiczOrson Wells


Life, glory, name Life, man

Life, prolonged Life, servants

*

Life, today

*

Life, toughest

*

Life, vexing

*

*

Light Light Light

*

Light Light and Dark Light, candle, dark Lightning

* *

Lightning Lightning,

*

One crowded hour of glorious life Thomas is worth an age without a name. Osbert Mordaunt Mark how fleeting and paltry is Marcus the estate of man-yesterday an Aurelius embryo, tomorrow a mummy or ashes. Prolong human life only when you Stanislaw can shorten its miseries. Jerzy Lee Living? We'll leave that to the Philippe servants. Auguste Villiers de L'Ilse-Adam Today is the first day of the rest of Anonymous your life. Life's a tough proposition, and the Wilson first hundred years are always the Mizner hardest. Life is as tedious as a twice-told Shakespeare tale, vexing the dull ear of a drossy man. Lead me from darkness to light! The Upanishads There is always light behind the American clouds. There is more light than can be Russian seen through the window. When the lights go out, the mice Yiddish begin to dance. Dark secrets are the ones that Unknown soonest come to light. It's better to light a candle than to Unknown curse the darkness. He who is struck by the lightning Hungarian doesn’t hear the thunder. Lightning never strikes in the Unknown same place twice. Thunder is good and impressive, Mark Twain 195


thunder Likeness Likeness Likeness, unlikeness Limit

Limitation

but it is lightning that does the work. It's a wise child that resembles its rich relatives. * Likeness causes liking. By nature, men are nearly alike; by practice, they get to be wide apart. * The chief difference between intelligence and stupidity is that intelligence has its limits. * I will follow a good cause right to the fire, but not into it.

Limits

No limits but the sky.

Line

In order to keep a man in line a girl has to have a good line. Making a living is only part of life. A chain is only as strong as its weakest link. A lion doesn’t catch mice. Wake not a sleeping lion. When the lion roars the hyena is quiet. When the lion fawns upon the calf, the calf will never cease to follow him. Sweet-melon lips, bitter-melon heart. Lips, however rosy, must be fed. Good liquor will make a cat speak. Pour in liquor and draw out the secret. A good listener is usually thinking of something else. Look out for the fellow who lets

Lining Link Lion Lion Lion

* *

Lion, devotion *

Lip Lips Liquor Liquor

*

Listen

*

Listen

*

196

Unknown English Confucius

Unknown

Michel Eyguem de Montaigne Miguel de Cervantes Unknown Cecil Andrus Unknown Russian Turkish African (Ovambo) Shakespeare

Chinese Scottish English Indian (Tamil) Kin Hubbard Kin Hubbard


Listen

*

Listener Listening

*

Listening

*

Literature Literature Literature

Literature

Little Live

*

Live Live Live Live Live Live, effort Livelihood Liver Living

*

you do all the talking. None so deaf as he that won’t listen. Listeners hear no good of themselves. It is the disease of not listening, the malady of not marking, that I am troubled withal. Listen to all: pluck a feather from every passing goose, but, follow no one absolutely. Literature does not lead men astray. Literature is the art of writing something that will be read twice. Only the more rugged mortals should attempt to keep up with current literature. Only those things are beautiful which are inspired by madness and written by reason. By the little is known the much. As you have lived, so shall you die. Better to live well than long. He lives long that lives well. He that lives long suffers much. Live and let live. We shall live till we die. You get out of life what you put into it. A good livelihood is a cure for all ills. Chopped liver is better than miserable troubles. Every day should pass as if it were our last.

French English Shakespeare

Chinese

Chinese Cyril Connolly George Ade

Gide

English Philippine English English English Anonymous English Unknown Yiddish Yiddish Publilius Syrus 197


Living Living Living Living Living Lizard Lizard Load Load, sink Loaf Loan Lock Locusts, spiders

Log Log Logic Logic

Logic, sermons, 198

* He that lives well lives long. Living by yourself is better than living with a bad woman. Living in peace is better than living as a king. Living well is the best revenge. We never live, we are always going to live. * A lizard suns itself within reach of its hiding place. If the lizard were good to eat, it would not be so common. * It is easier to throw the load off the cart than to put it on. It's a load that would sink a navy. Better half a loaf than none at all. It is better to give than to lend, and it costs about the same. * A lock is good only for an honest man. There be two things which are little upon the earth, but which are exceeding wise: The locusts have no king, yet go they forth all of them by bands; the spider taketh hold of their hands, and is in king's palaces. * Crooked logs make straight fires. One log does not burn long by itself. Against logic there is no armor like ignorance. * If this were a logical world, men, not women, would ride sidesaddle. * Logic and sermons never convince, rather the damp of the

Unknown African (Hausa) African (Hausa) English Voltaire African (Shona) Haitian Czech Shakespeare Danish Philip Gibbs Yiddish Solomon

English German Unknown Christine Bovie Walt Whitman


night, soul Loneliness loneliness, distrust Long Longevity

*

Longing Look Look Look Look Look

* *

*

Look Look Looker-on Looks Lord

*

Lord Lose Lose Lose

*

*

Lose Loser Loser

*

night drives deeper into my soul. Be good and you will be lonely. What loneliness is more lonely than distrust? Long is not forever. It's not true that married men live longer than unmarried men-it just seems longer. Better go away longing than loathing. An honest good look covers many faults. Look before you leap. Look not too high lest a chip fall in your eye. Looks are nothing-behavior is all. One look ahead is better than two behind. Proud looks lose hearts, but courteous words win them. The cure for love at first sight is to take a second look. Lookers-on see most of the game. Look good, feel good. Great lords and dogs do not close the door behind them. Lords and fools speak freely. All is not lost that is delayed. Better lost than found. Lose an hour in the morning, and you will spend all day looking for it. You can't lose what you never had. Second place is first loser. There are two tragedies in life.

Mark Twain George Eliot German Unknown

English English English English American Irish English Unknown English Unknown SerboCroatian Danish French English Richard Whately Unknown Unknown George 199


Loser Loss Loss Loss Loss Loss, gain Love Love

Love Love Love Love

Love

Love Love Love Love

200

One is to lose your heart’s desire, the other is to gain it. * You're never a loser till you quit trying. * A loss not felt is no loss at all. Better a loss at sea than a bad debt at land. Losses teach men wisdom. * Reckon loss before reckoning gain. * One man's loss is another man's gain. * A mother’s love is always renewed. A young man in love is a fool; an old man in love is the greatest fool of all. * An ocean of emotions surrounded entirely by expenses. * An old love burns strong. Better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all. Do you love me because I am beautiful, or am I beautiful because you love me? First love is a little foolishness and a lot of curiosity.

Bernard Shaw Unknown Publilius Syrus English SerboCroatian Lebanese Unknown French Unknown

Thomas R. Dewar American Unknown Cinderella

George Bernard Shaw Yiddish

* For a little love you pay all your life. He loves me for little that hates Scottish me for naught. * He who marries for love has good French nights and bad days. If love is a sickness, patience is African


Love

*

Love

Love

*

Love

*

Love Love

Love Love Love Love Love Love Love Love Love Love

Love Love

*

*

the remedy. If you judge people, you have no time to love them. If you love something, set it free; if it comes back it's yours, if it doesn't, it never was. In love and war no time should be lost. It is easier to mend neglect than to quicken love. It's better to have loved and lost, than to have never loved at all. Like the measles, love is most dangerous when it comes late in life. Little love, little trust. Love and a cough cannot be hidden. Love and foolishness differ from each other only in name. Love and poverty are hard to conceal. Love and war are the same thing. Love asks faith, and faith asks firmness. Love blinds.

(Fulani) Mother Teresa Richard Bach

American St. Jerome Alfred Lord Tennyson Lord Byron

English English Hungarian Danish Miguel De Cervantes English

African (Swahili) Love can do much, money can do German all. Love conquers all. Unknown Love does not consist in gazing at Benjamin each other but in looking together Franklin in the same direction. Love drives out fear. Czech Love is a fire. But whether it is Joan going to warm your heart or burn Crawford 201


Love

Love Love Love Love Love Love Love Love Love

Love Love Love Love Love Love Love Love Love Love Love 202

down your house, you can never tell. Love is blind, and lovers cannot see the pretty follies that they themselves commit. Love is blind. Love is full of busy fear. Love is like butter, it’s good with bread. * Love is like pi − natural, irrational, but very important. Love is never without jealousy. Love is no impartial judge. Love is not found in the market. Love is sweet, but it’s nice to have bread with it. Love is the delightful interval between meeting a beautiful girl and discovering that she looks like a haddock. * Love is the triumph of imagination over intelligence. * Love knows no order. Love lasts as long as the money endures. Love levels all inequalities. Love lives in cottages as well as in courts. Love lives in palaces as well as in thatched cottages. Love makes men orators. Love many, trust few, and always paddle your own canoe. Love me little, love me long. Love me, love my dog. Love sought is good, but given

Shakespeare

Unknown English Yiddish Lisa Hoffman Scottish Irish English Yiddish John Barrymore

H. L. Mencken St. Jerome English Italian English Japanese English Unknown English English Shakespeare


Love Love Love Love

*

Love Love

*

*

Love Love

*

Love Love Love Love Love Love

Love Love Love Love

*

Love Love

Love

*

unsought is better. Love teaches asses to dance. Love well, whip well. Love will find a way. Love without return is like a question without an answer. Love: A grave mental illness. Love: The irresistible desire to be irresistibly desired. Love: Two minds without a single thought. Never change when love has found its home. New loves drive out the old. No love is foul nor prison fair. One always returns to one’s first love. One cannot love and be wise. One is never too old to yearn. One should always be in love. That is the reason one should never marry. Open rebuke is better than a secret love. Subdue your passion or it will subdue you. The best way to a man’s heart is through his stomach. The course of true love never runs smooth. The loves of some people are but the result of good suppers. The most important thing a father can do for his children is to love their mother. The people’s love is the king’s

French American English German Plato Mark Twain Philip Barry Sextus Propertius Spanish English French English Italian Oscar Wilde

Bible Horace Traditional Unknown Sebastien Chamfort Theodore M. Hesburgh English 203


Love Love

Love Love

* *

Love

*

Love Love Love

Love Love Love Love

*

Love letter Love letter

lifeguard. There is no living with thee, nor without thee. There is no such fiery love that would not be cooled down by marriage. There’s love in a budget. Those who love others are always loved in return. Three things cannot be hidden: love, coughing and poverty. To be in love is merely to be in a perpetual state of anesthesia. To understand your parents’ love you must raise children yourself. When a scholar goes to seek out a bride he should take along an ignoramus as an expert. When passionately in love, one becomes stupid. You can't buy love. You can't hurry love. Your daughter and the Moor are now making the beast with two backs. A lover is a man who tries to be more amiable than is his nature. A lover teaches a wife all her husband kept hidden from her. Love and a cough cannot be hidden. Self love is the greatest of all flatterers.

Love, cough

*

Love, flattery

*

Love, force

* No chord or cable can so forcibly draw or hold so fast as love can do with just a small twined

204

Martial Russian

English T.C. Lai Yiddish H. L. Mencken Chinese The Talmud

Japanese Unknown Unknown Shakespeare

Sebastien Chamfort Honore de Balzac George Herbert Duc de La Rochefoucauld Robert Burton


Love, ghosts

*

Love, hedge

*

Love, luck * Love, marriage Love, marriage * love, New England, pie Love, pardon Love, pity Love, sun, power

*

Lovers Lovers Lovers, performance Loving

*

Loyalty

Luck Luck Luck Luck

*

thread. True love is like ghosts, which everybody talks about but few have seen. Love your neighbor, but don’t pull not down your hedge. Lucky at cards, unlucky at love. Love is an ideal; marriage is the real thing. Love is blind, but marriage is an eye opener. I love you as New Englanders love pie. Love that comes too late, like a remorseful pardon slowly carried. Of all the paths to a woman's love, pity's the straightest. To illustrate this power and effect of love is to set a candle in the sun. Lovers think others are blind. Young lovers wish, and married men regret. All lovers swear more performance than they are able. Loving one who loves another is a bellyful of trouble. A dog won't forsake his master because of his poverty; a son never deserts his mother for her homely appearance. A little bit of luck is better than a ton of gold. A lucky man needs no advice. Even for bad luck one needs luck. If I didn’t have bad luck, I’d have no luck at all.

Duc de La Rochefoucauld George Herbert Unknown Unknown Unknown Don Marquis Shakespeare John Fletcher Robert Burton Italian Indian (Hindustani) Shakespeare African (Hausa) Chinese

Yiddish Unknown Yiddish Unknown

205


Luck Luck Luck

*

Luck Luck

*

Luck Lunatics, asylum Lure

*

Luxury

Lying

*

Lying

*

Lying Lying Lying Lying Lying Lying

206

It's the mark of an inexperienced man not to believe in luck. The Devil’s children have the Devil’s luck. The harder you work, the luckier you get. The less luck a man has, the more he believes in it. When ill luck falls asleep, let nobody wake her. Without luck nothing will succeed. The lunatics have taken charge of the asylum. He is easy to lure who is ready to follow. Give us the luxuries of life and we’ll dispense with the necessaries. A liar should have a good memory. A wise man does not waste so good a commodity as lying for naught. Children and fools cannot lie.

* Even when they speak the truth, liars are not believed. Lord, Lord, how this world is given to lying. Lying is the first step to the gallows. Lying lips are abomination to the Lord. The best liar is he who makes the smallest amount of lying go the longest way.

Joseph Conrad English Gary Player Unknown English Yiddish Richard Rowland Danish American

Quintilian Mark Twain

John Heywood Aristotle Shakespeare German Solomon Samuel Butler


Machiavelli, virtue, riches Mad Mad, even Madness Magic, face Magistrate

Maid Maid Maid Maid Maid Maid

Maiden

Maiden Maiden Maiden Maids, men

Mail

* Machiavelli says virtue and riches seldom settle on one man. * Those whom God wishes to destroy, he first makes mad. * Don't get mad, get even. There is always some reason in madness. The magic of a face. An honest magistrate has lean clerks; a powerful god has fat priests. A maid that laughs is half taken. All are good maids, but whence come the bad wives? An old maid becomes a faithful wife. Every maid is undone. Maids should be seen and not heard. * While the tall maid is stooping, the little one has swept the house. A maiden marries to please her parents, a widow to please herself. A maiden with many wooers often chooses the worst. A neat maiden makes a dirty wife. The most to be pitied is a poor maiden in childbirth. Men are April when they woo, December when they wed; Maids are May when they are maids, but the sky changes when they are wives. I have received no more than one

Robert Burton Euripides Joe Kennedy Unknown Thomas Carew Chinese

English English Yiddish English English English

Chinese

Scottish Scottish Yiddish Shakespeare

Henry David 207


Majority

Majority

Malice Malice Malice Malice Man Man

*

*

Man Man Man Man Man

* *

Man Man Man Man

Man

208

*

or two letters in my life that were worth the postage. Sometimes the majority only means all the fools are on the same side. We go by the major vote, and if the majority are insane, the sane must go to the hospital. Malice has a sharp sight and strong memory. Malice hurts itself most. Malice seldom wants a mark to shoot at. There is no rampart that will hold out against malice. A dead man does not make war. A drowning man will even clutch at a straw. A generous man has never gone to hell. A good man is no more to be feared than a sheep. A great man does not seize small things. A great man has not a great son. A little man may cast a great shadow. A lucky man fares better than a brave man. A man assaulted is half taken. A man at sixteen will prove a child at sixty. A man believes that he has been born he does not believe that he will die. A man can hang himself from his own tree as well as from his

Thoreau Unknown

Horace Mann English English English Moliere Italian Russian Irish English Japanese American English Greek English English Turkish

Russian


Man

*

Man Man

Man Man Man Man Man

*

Man Man Man Man Man

Man Man

*

Man Man

*

Man

*

Man

*

Man

neighbor’s. A man cannot be hanged for his thinking. A man cannot change his face but he can change his habits. A man does not look behind the door unless he has stood there himself. A man has many enemies when his back is to the wall. A man has often more trouble to digest meet than to get it. A man is a man, even a ruined one. A man is as old as he feels. A man is attractive when he is not your husband. A man is known by his acts. A man is known by the company he keeps. A man is not lean without cause. A man may come soon enough to an ill bargain. A man must keep his mouth open a long while before a roast pigeon flies into it. A man surprised is half beaten. A man travels as far in a day as a snail in a hundred years. A man warned is half saved. A man who does one bad action will stoop to another. A man who has but one eye must take good care of it. A man who knows too many crafts cannot feed his family. A man who puts his hand into the

American Philippine Danish

English English Finnish English African (Shona) Philippine English African (Ga) English Danish

English French German African (Fulani) French Chinese African 209


Man

Man Man Man Man Man Man Man Man Man Man Man Man Man Man Man Man Man Man 210

bee’s hive gets stung by the bees. A man whose heart is not content is like a snake which tries to swallow an elephant. A man will rather hurt his body than displease his palate. A man with a cough cannot conceal himself. A man without a smiling face should not open a shop. A man without determination is but an untempered sword. * A man without enemies is like a river without stones. A man without money is a bow without an arrow. * A man without money is like a ship without sails. A man without money is no man at all. A man without reason is a beast in season. A poor man buys what he can afford; a rich man what he wants. A poor man has few acquaintances. A poor man has no friend. * A proud man has many crosses. A resolute man cares nothing about difficulties. A rich man is never ugly in the eyes of a girl. A satisfied man does not know what a hungry man feels. A sick man sleeps, but not a debtor. A stingy man is always poor.

(Annang) Chinese

English African (Yoruba) Chinese Chinese Rumanian English Dutch English English Greek Danish African (Oji) English Indian (Tamil) French African (Fulani) Spanish French


Man Man Man Man Man

*

Man Man Man

*

Man

*

Man Man Man Man

Man Man Man

Man Man Man

*

A stubborn man brings in a snake for a hairdo. A talking man is no better than a barking dog. A timid man has little chance. A true man and a thief think differently. A weeping man and a smiling woman are not to be trusted. A well-fed man does not give thanks. A wicked man is his own hell. A wise man carries his cloak in fair weather and a fool wants his when it rains. A wise man hears one word and understands two. A wise man knows his own. A wise man knows what he says, a fool says what he knows. A wise man never wants a weapon. A wise man who has seen everything is not the equal of one who has done one thing with his hands. A wise man will make more opportunities than he finds. A wise man will make tools of what comes to hand. A wise man won’t call a fool a fool, but a fool will always call a wise man a fool. An angry man is a brother of the madman. An angry man knows no reason. An envious man is a squint-eyed

African (Ovambo) American Danish English Indian (Tamil) African (Ovambo) English Scottish

Yiddish English Yiddish English Chinese

English English Russian

Lebanese Philippine English 211


Man

*

Man

Man Man Man

*

Man

*

Man Man Man Man Man Man Man Man Man Man Man Man Man Man 212

*

fool. An old man in the home is a curse, an old woman a blessing. An old man in the house is a snare in the house; an old woman in the house is a treasure in the house. An old man is a child for a long time. As a man lives, so shall he die; as a tree falls so shall it lie. As long as a man is not dead, his chance of becoming wealthy is not over yet. Better be the happy man than the happy man’s son. Better to lose with a wise man than to win with a fool. Beware of the man of two faces. Even a poor man wants to live. Every man before he dies shall see the devil. Every man for himself. Every man has a name.

Every man has his faults. Every man is blind in his own cause. Every man is blind to his own faults. Every man is bold until he is at a public assembly. Every man is king in his own house. * Every man is master at home. Every man must carry his own sack to the mill. Every man must row with the oars

Hebrew Hebrew

Icelandic English Lebanese

Scottish Yiddish Dutch Yiddish English English African (Ovambo) English Scottish Yiddish Irish Iranian Icelandic Danish English


Man Man Man Man Man

*

Man Man Man Man Man

Man Man Man Man

*

Man

*

Man Man Man Man

*

Man

*

he has. Every man thinks he may live another year. Every man to his business. Every man to his taste. Every man to his trade. Get the coffin ready and the man won’t die. He is a clever man who can drive away hunger by working his jaw. He is a man who acts like a man. How great in number are the little minded men. If a man wants a hare for his breakfast he must hunt overnight. If the young man would, and the old man could, there would be nothing undone. If you can’t overcome a man, you would best call him your friend. In sleep man doesn’t sin, but his dreams do. In the land of promise a man may die of hunger. It’s better to be with a wise man in hell than with a fool in paradise. Man builds the house, but woman makes the home. Man cannot be always fortunate; flowers do not last forever. Man is a walking corpse. Man is born to die. Man is the head, but woman turns it. Man is the only animal that blushes. Or needs to.

English English French English Chinese Jamaican Danish Plautus English English

Jamaican Yiddish Dutch Yiddish

Jamaican Chinese Russian Yiddish English Mark Twain

213


Man Man Man Man

Man Man Man Man Man

*

Man Man Man Man Man

*

Man Man

*

Man

*

Man Man Man Man 214

*

Man is what he is, but not what he used to be. Man knows where he came from but not where he is going. Man loves but once. Man perfected by society is the best of all animals; he is the most terrible of all when he lives without law and without justice. Man plans many things; God alters his plans. Man sees the gain and not the danger. Man that is born of a woman is of few days, and full of trouble. No man can do two things at once. No man can live longer in peace than his neighbor pleases. No man can please all. No man can serve two masters. No man is a hero in the eyes of his valet. No man tells lies at death’s door. Not every man can speak with the king. Once a man, twice a child. One man knocks in the nail, and another hangs his hat on it. One man laughs at another and the devil at all. One man tells a falsehood, a hundred repeat it as true. Praise no man till he is dead. The good looking man is king, if there is no rich man near. The great man makes the great

Yiddish African (Ovambo) German Aristotle

Greek Chinese The Bible English Scottish English English French Hebrew English English German Rumanian Chinese English African (Hausa) American


Man Man

* *

Man Man

*

Man Man Man Man Man Man

*

Man Man

*

Man

*

Man

Man

*

Man

*

Man

thing. The happy man cannot be ruined. The man on horseback knows nothing of the toil of the traveler on foot. The man thinks he knows, but the woman knows better. The man who lives in a glass house does not throw stones at his neighbors. The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation. The more honest the man, the worse luck he has. The more I see of men, the more I like dogs. The patient man cooks a stone till he drinks broth from it. The poor man has his crop destroyed by hail every year. The poor man has only one sickness, the rich man a hundred. The rich man displays his wealth and the poor his children. The rich man has his brains in his billfold. The rich man plans for the future, but the poor man for the present. The wise man cannot recover the stone which the fool threw down the well. The wise man does at first what the fool does at last. The wise man has long ears and a short tongue. Though I’ve belted you and flayed you, by the livin’ Gawd (God) that

Scottish Chinese

Indian (Hindustani) Greek

Henry David Thoreau English Mme. De Stael African (Hausa) Spanish Czech Greek Yiddish Chinese SerboCroatian Indian (Hindi) German Rudyard Kipling 215


Man

*

Man Man Man Man

*

Man Man

*

Man, alone, strength Man, beast

made you, you’re a better man than I am, Gunga Din! To a hungry man it is always noon. Today a man, tomorrow none. What a sober man thinks, a drunkard speaks. When a man is disliked he is blamed for all kinds of things. When a man is going down, everybody lends him a kick. When a man is poor he remembers old debts due him. When a wise man talks to a fool, two fools are talking. The strongest man in the world is he who stands most alone. When he is best, he is a little worse than a man, and when he is worst, he is little better than a beast. Man is the only animal that blushes-or needs to. Man cannot live on bread alone. When a man dies he kicks the dust. Man proposes but God disposes.

Man, blush, animal Man, bread Man, death, dust, kicks Man, god

*

Man, woman

A man gets what he wants by acting smart, and a woman, by playing dumb. * A man likes to feel he's loved, a woman likes to be told. Every man has his price, and every woman her figure. * Those who try to paint a management picture “by the

Man, woman Man, woman Management

216

*

Russian English Yiddish African (Ashanti) American Chinese Yiddish Henrik Ibsen Shakespeare

Mark Twain Unknown Henry David Thoreau Thomas a' Kempis Unknown

Unknown Unknown James L. Hayes


Manager

Manner Manner Manners

Manners Manners Manners Manners Manners, knowledge Manners, portrait, mirror Mantis

Manure, fertilizer

March Mare Mare

numbers� will always be amateurs. Your job as a supervisor or manager is not to criticize your employees but to critique their work. Manners make often fortunes. * Manners make the man. Good manners are like good digestion: if you don't notice them, they are all right. Good manners are made up of petty sacrifices. Manners maketh the man.

Andrew S. Grove

English English Unknown

Emerson William of Wykeham Unknown French

* Manners market the man. * Naught must disturb a man of worth during his dinner. * Manners must adorn knowledge Stanhope and smooth the way through the world. A man's manners are a mirror in Johann which he shows his portrait. Wolfgang von Goethe * The mantis seizes the locust but Chinese does not see the yellow bird behind him. * Money is like manure: if you Unknown spread it around, it does a world of good; but if you pile it up, it stinks to high heaven. March comes in like a lion and Unknown goes out like a lamb. * A white mare needs washing; a Latvian pretty wife, watching. Once you have sold the mare you Russian may burn the saddle. 217


Mark Market

*

Marriage

*

Marriage

Marriage

Marriage

*

Marriage Marriage

Marriage

*

Marriage Marriage Marriage

Marriage

*

Marriage Marriage Marriage

*

218

*

Great marks are soonest hit. One doesn’t go to market with his own price. A community consisting of a master, a mistress, and two slaves, making in all two. A husband and wife who have separate bedrooms have either drifted apart or found happiness. A husband should tell his wife everything that he is sure she will find out. By all means marry. If you get a good wife you will become happy − and if you get a bad one you will become a philosopher. Concubinage has been corrupted by marriage. Don’t marry for money. You can borrow it cheaper. A young man married is a man that’s marred. He who marries for money earns it. It is too hard a knot for me to untie. Keep thy eyes wide open before marriage, and half shut afterward. Let us be very strange and wellbred: let us be as strange as if we had been married a great while; and as well-bred as if we were not married at all. Marriage and cooking call for forethought. Marriage is a desperate thing. Marriage is a lottery. Marriage is a noose.

English Russian Ambrose Bierce Honore De Balzac Thomas R. Dewar Socrates

Friedrick Nietzsche Shakespeare

Hebrew Shakespeare Thomas Fuller William Congreve

Greek John Selden English Miguel de


Marriage Marriage

Marriage Marriage Marriage

Marriage Marriage Marriage Marriage Marriage Marriage Marriage Marriage

Marriage Marriage

Marriage Marriage

* Marriage is a romance in which the hero dies in the first chapter. Marriage is for women only-a man should have nothing to do with it. Marriage is the process whereby love ripens into vengeance. Marriage is the sunset of love. Marriage, if one will face the truth, is an evil, but a necessary evil. Marriages are made in Heaven and consumed on Earth. Marriages are made in heaven. * Marriages are not as they are made, but as they turn out. Married couples tell each other a thousand things without talking. * Marry in haste, repent at leisure. * Marry your son when you will; your daughter when you can. More belongs to marriage than four bare legs in a bed. My notion of a wife at forty is that a man should be able to change her, like a bank note, for two twenties. Never say that marriage has more joy than pain. One was never married, and that was his hell; the other was, and that was his plague. Second Marriage: The triumph of hope over experience. The deed involves sacrifice and risk.

Cervantes Unknown Unknown

Unknown French Menander

John Lyly English Italian Chinese Unknown George Herbert English Douglas Jerrold

Euripides Robert Burton Samuel Johnson Martin Buber

219


Marriage

Marriage

*

Marriage

Marriage

*

Marriage, eyes *

Marriage, rights, duties

*

The greatest secret of a successful marriage is to treat all disasters as incidents, and none of the incidents as disasters. The trouble with matrimony is not so much with the institution, as with the personnel. Though marriage makes man and wife one flesh, it leaves 'em two fools. Wedding is destiny, and hanging likewise. Keep your eyes wide open before marriage, and half shut afterwards. To marry is to half your rights and double your duties.

Marriage, ring * How many torments lie in the small circle of a wedding ring. Marry He that marries late marries ill. Marry He who marries does well, but who remains single does better. Marry If you marry in Lent you will live to repent. Marry It’s good to marry late or never. Marry * Marry first and love will follow. Marry * Marry in haste and be sorry at your leisure. Marry Marry your son when you will; your daughter when you can. Martyr A thing is not necessarily true, just because a man dies for it. Martyr It's not dying for a faith that's hard-it's living up to it. Martyr Let others wear the martyr's crown for I'm not worthy of that 220

Harold Nicolson

Unknown

William Congreve John Heywood Benjamin Franklin (See Fuller) Arthur Schopenhauer Colley Cibber English German English English English Irish English Oscar Wilde Thackeray Erasmus


Martyrdom

*

Mass, energy, light, speed

Masses Master

*

Master Master Master

*

Master Master

*

Master Master Master Master, servant Match Matchmaker Matchmaker Matchmaking

*

honor. Martyrdom is the only way in which a man can become famous without ability. E=mc2-Enery equals mass times the speed of light squared. The original statement is: If a body gives off energy L in the form of radiation, its mass diminishes by L/c2. The masses are asses. A bad master quarrels even with his broom. Everyone is a master and servant. He that is master of himself will soon be master of others. He that is the master of himself will soon be master of others. He who pays well is master of other men’s purses. If the master says the crow is white, the servant must not say it is black. Master easy, servant slack. Masters should be sometimes blind, and sometimes deaf. We cannot all be masters. It thou art be a master, be sometimes blind; if a servant, sometimes deaf. Marry above your match, and you get a master. Nine out of ten matchmakers are liars. The unwed matchmaker looks for himself. When I lost my wife every family

George Bernard Shaw Albert Einstein

Yiddish Greek English English Unknown Italian English

Chinese English Shakespeare Thomas Fuller Scottish Chinese Greek French 221


Materials Maturity Maxim Mayors, scholars Meadow Meal Meal Mean Meaning

*

* *

*

Means Measles

*

Measure Measure Measure Measurement Meat Meat Meat Meat 222

*

in town offered me another; but when I lost my horse no one offered me a another horse. Of a pigs tail you can never make a good shaft. A man never grows up until his mother stops worrying about him. A good maxim is never out of season. We can make mayors every year, but not scholars. A thin meadow is soon mowed. A forbidden meal is quickly eaten. A meal for the priest, a mouthful for the deacon. Live according to your means. The meaning is best known to the speaker. Take care of the means and the end will take care of itself. Like the measles, love is most dangerous when it comes late in life. Better twice measured than once wrong. Measure for measure. Measure seven times, but cut only once. If you can’t measure output, then measure input. All meats to be eaten, all maids to be wed. I am a great eater of beef, and I believe that does harm to my wit. If you miss the meat, take the soup. Meat twice cooked and a friend

George Herbert Unknown English Robert Burton English Swedish Greek Danish French Gandhi Unknown

Danish English Russian American English Shakespeare Lebanese Czech


Meat

*

Meddle Meddling Meddling Medicine

*

Medicine

*

Medicine Medicine

*

Medicine

Medicine Medicine Mediocrity

Meek, hero, friend Meet Meeting Melancholy, weasel Melon

* *

twice reconciled are hardly ever good. One man’s meat is another man’s poison. Meddle not in what you don’t understand. Of little meddling, comes great rest. Of much meddling, comes no sound sleeping. Even medicine when exceeded becomes poison. I am dying from the treatment of too many physicians. Medicine can only cure curable diseases, and then not always. No medicine can cure a vulgar man. The best medicine I know for rheumatism is to thank the Lord it ain’t the gout. There is no medicine to apply to a food. There is no such thing as tasty medicine. Mediocre minds usually dismiss anything which reaches beyond their own understanding. The meek is known in anger, a hero in war, and a friend in time of need. Lifelong friends seldom meet. Never the twain shall meet. I can suck melancholy out of a song as a weasel sucks eggs. A melon and a woman are hard to know.

English Portuguese English English Japanese Alexander The Great Chinese Chinese Josh Billings

Japanese Hebrew Duc de La Rochefoucauld Solomon ibn Gabirol Unknown Unknown Shakespeare Spanish

223


Melon Melon

*

Melon seller Membership Memorandum *

Memory

*

Memory

*

Memory

*

Memory

*

Memory

Memory

Memory Memory

*

Memory

*

Memory

*

Memory

*

224

Even a melon seed may come between husband and wife. When the melon is ripe, it will drop by itself. The melon seller shouts that his melons are sweet. I won’t belong to any organization that would have me as a member. A memorandum is written not to inform the reader but to protect the writer. Everyone complains of his memory, but no one about his judgment. He is an ill companion that has a good memory. If you tell the truth you don’t have to remember anything. It may be said that his wit shines at the expense of his memory. Many a man fails to become a thinker only because his memory is too good. Memory does not forget the promised kiss, but the remembrance of the kiss received is soon lost. Memory is the treasure of the mind. No man has a good enough memory to make a successful liar. The best memory is that which forgets nothing but injuries. Write kindness in marble and write injuries in the dust. The faintest ink is more powerful than the strongest memory. The palest ink is better than the

Iranian Chinese Chinese Groucho Marx Dean Acheson Duc de La Rochefoucauld Unknown Mark Twain Alain Rene Lesage Nietzsche

Finnish

English Abraham Lincoln Persian

Unknown Chinese


Memory Memory Memory, age youth

Memory, * companion Memory, liars * Men Men Men Men

*

Men Men Men

*

Men Men Men

Men Men Men Men Men Men

best memory. There are three kinds of memory, good, bad, and convenient. Writing things down is the best secret of a good memory. When I was younger I could remember anything, whether it happened or not; but I am getting old, and soon I shall remember only the latter. He is an ill companion that has a good memory. Liars ought to have good memories. All men are equal underground. All men can’t be first. All men can’t be masters. Angry men make themselves beds of nettles. Bad men hurt a good cause. Better men, better times. Blind men are not afraid of snakes. Dead men tell no tales. Evil men, evil times. Follow good men and you will learn to be good; follow beggars and you will sleep outside the temple gates. Good men are scarce. Great men have great faults. Great men may jest with saints. Great men must be obliged. Hungry men think the cook lazy. Idle men are dead all their life long.

Unknown Unknown Mark Twain

English Algernon Sidney Hebrew English English English American American Japanese English American Chinese

English English German American English English

225


Men Men

Men Men Men

*

Men

*

Men

*

Men

*

Men

*

Men Men Men Men

*

Men

*

Men

Men Men Men Men 226

If all men pulled in one direction, the world would topple over. If two men feed a horse, it will be thin; if two men mend a boat, it will leak. If you do not ask their help, all men are good-natured. In soft regions men are born soft. It is not these well-fed long-haired men that I fear, but the pale and hungry looking. Many men are wise but few are good friends. Men all make mistakes; all horses stumble. Men always meet but mountains, never. Men are as old as they feel, and women as they look. Men are best loved furthest off. Men are crushed to death under the tongue. Men are everywhere the same. Men are not to be measured by inches. Men don’t trip on mountains, but stumble on stones. Men fear a slip of their writing brush; women, a slip of their virtue. Men fear the gallows more than God himself. Men in a hurry from dawn until sunset do not live long. Men must sail while the wind serves. Men of a certain height must

Yiddish Chinese

Chinese Euripides Julius Caesar

Greek Chinese Rumanian Italian English Chinese American English Indian (Hindustani) Chinese

Yiddish Chinese Dutch Chinese


Men Men Men Men Men Men Men Men Men Men Men Men Men

Men Men Men Men Men Men Men

wear clothes of a certain length. Men of principle have courage. Men who are too cautious will never gain wisdom. Men willingly believe what they wish. Men, not walls, make a city. Old men and travelers may lie by authority. Old men are children for the second time. * Old men are twice children. * Old men for consultation, young men for quarrels. Old men go to death; death comes to young men. * Old men will die and children soon forget. Poor men do penance for rich men’s sins. The best of men are but men at best. There are only two good men; one is dead, and the other is not born. Two blind men cannot guide each other. Two great men cannot stand side by side. Two men may meet, but never two mountains. We are usually the best men when in the worst health. Weak men need be witty. When men are really friends, then even water is sweet. Wise men are silent, fools talk.

Chinese Chinese Julius Caesar Chinese English Greek English Japanese English English Italian Unknown English

African (Shona) Japanese French English English Chinese English 227


Men Men Men Men Men Men

Merchant Merchant Merchants Merciful, cruel

Merit Merriment

Merriment Merry Merry Message Messenger Mice

228

Wise men go on foot and fools ride. Wise men make proverbs and fools repeat them. * Wise men propose and fools determine. Without ordinary men, there would be no great men. Young men may die, old men must. Young men think old men fools, but old men know the young men are. Every merchant praises his own merchandise. Merchant today, beggar tomorrow. * Merchants have no country. The merciful man doeth good to his own soul: but he that is cruel troubleth his own soul. * Merit and renown are but gulls floating on the water. I had rather have a fool make me merry, than experience make me sad. * Merry nights make for sorry days. All are not merry that dance. The more the merrier.

Yiddish English English Japanese English English

Russian German Thomas Jefferson Solomon

Chinese Shakespeare

Unknown English John Heywood Danish

He knocks a boldly at the door who brings a welcome message. When the messenger of death Chinese comes, all affairs cease. As there are mice in the house, so Korean are there thieves in the country.


Mice Mice Middle Middle age

Middle class, England, safety Midwife Might Mile, winter

It takes a good many mice to kill a cat. Mice care not to play with kittens. * You will be safest in the middle. * Middle age is when the broadness of the mind and the narrowness of the waistline exchange places. It is to the middle class we must look for the safety of England.

*

Milk Mill, water, mill Millionaire

*

Millionaire

*

*

Mind Mind

*

Mind

Mind

Mind

*

Danish English Ovid Unknown

Wilian Makepeace Thackeray Too many midwives kill the baby. Hebrew Might is right. Unknown Every mile is two in winter. George Herbert After getting burnt on milk, you’ll Russian start to blow even on water. The mill cannot grind with the George water that's past. Herbert A millionaire is a man with the Unknown most relatives. The only thing better than Unknown marrying a millionaire with a good heart, is marrying one with a weak heart. A closed mind is like a closed Chinese book; just a block of wood A good mind possesses a Seneca kingdom. A mind enlightened is like the Chinese halls of Heaven; a mind in darkness is like the realm of Hell. A vacant mind is open to all Confucius suggestions as a hollow building echoes all sounds. I have a prodigious quantity of Mark Twain mind; it takes me as much as a week sometimes to make it up. 229


Mind Mind Mind Mind Mind Mind Mind Mind Mind over matter Mind, waste Minds Minds Minds Mine Minnow Minute

Miracle Miracle Mirrors, reflection, images Mirth

230

Nothing is difficult to a willing mind. The best kind of mind is that which minds its own business. The mind is hindered by too little education − and by too much. * The mind of a workman is in his stomach. * The open mind never acts. * The resolved mind has no cares. What’s on his mind is on his tongue. When the mind of a scatterbrain wanders, it never goes far. Reject your sense of injury and the injury itself disappears. A mind is a terrible thing to waste. * Great minds think alike. * Little things affect little minds. Little things please little minds. Mine is better than ours. One must lose a minnow to catch a salmon. * Take care of the minutes, and the hours will take care of themselves. * Don’t depend on miracles. In Israel, in order to be a realist, you must believe in miracles. Mirrors should reflect a little before throwing back their images. A pennyworth of mirth is worth a pound of sorrow.

Italian Unknown Pascal Moroccan Bernard Shaw English Yiddish Unknown Marcus Aurelius Anonymous Unknown Unknown Unknown American French American

Yiddish David BenGurion Jean Cocteau

English


Misanthrope

Miscalculation

Mischief Mischief

*

Mischief Mischief

Mischief

Miser

*

Miser

Miser Miser

*

Miser

*

Miser Miser, lair Miserly Misery Misery

The misanthrope thinks the world is all right for a visit but hates to live there. It does not do well to leave a live dragon out of your calculations, especially if you live near him. Mischief all comes from much opening of the mouth. Mischief comes by the pound and goes away by the ounce. Mischief has swift wings. O mischief! Thou art swift to enter in the thoughts of desperate men! Wherever there is mischief, there is sure to be a priest and a woman in it. A miser and a liar come to terms quickly. A miser begins by saving up for a rainy day, and ends up by saving up for a rainy days of his heirs. He bewails the loss of the water when he washes himself. Misers amass wealth for those who wish them dead. Misers aren’t fun to live with, but they make wonderful ancestors. The miser will not prosper.

Unknown

J. R. R. Tolkein Chinese English English Shakespeare

German

Greek Unknown

Plautus Polish

David Brenner Indian (Tamil) * A miser and a liar bargain quickly. Greek To be miserly is worse than to Yiddish steal. * He bears misery best that hides it English most. * It is a consolation to the wretched Publilius to have companions in misery. Syrus

231


Misery Misery Misery Misery

*

Misfortune

*

Misfortune Misfortune Misfortune

Misfortune

*

Misfortune

*

Misfortune

Misfortune

*

Misfortune

*

Misfortune Misfortune Misfortune

232

*

It is misery enough to have once been happy. Misery loves company, but can't bear the competition. Misery loves company. There is no greater sorrow that to think of happy times in misery. A misfortune is better than the fear of it. Another’s misfortune does not cure my pain. Another’s misfortune is only a dream. Don’t laugh at someone else’s misfortune, yours is on the horizon. Fortune knocks but once at any man's door, but misfortune has much more patience. He who helps another in his misfortune becomes his master. If all our misfortunes were lumped together, with everyone forced to take an equal share, people would be glad to take back their own. If it weren't for the misfortune of others, life would be absolutely unbearable. Misfortune does not come with a bell on its neck. Misfortune seldom comes alone to the house. Misfortunes find their way even on the darkest nights. Never find your delight in another's misfortune.

English Josh Billings John Ray Dante Alighieri Welsh Portuguese French Russian

Unknown

Indian (Tamil) Socrates

Unknown

Estonian Danish Czech Publilius Syrus


Misfortune

* We all have enough strength to bear the misfortunes of others.

Misinformation Miss Missing

*

Mistake

*

Mistake Mistake Mistake Mistake

*

Mistake Mistake

Mistake Mistake Mistake

*

The surest way to convey misinformation is often to tell the strict truth. A miss is as good as a mile. The sound of her silk skirt has stopped. On the marble pavement dust grows. Her empty room is cold and still. Fallen leaves are piled against the doors. Longing to that lovely lady − how can I bring my aching heart to rest? A mistake is simply another way of doing things. It is a mistake to go to a Buddhist monastery to borrow a comb. One mistake does not warrant the divorce of one’s wife. One mistake naturally leads to another. The man who has never made a mistake will never make anything else. The mistakes of the doctor are covered by earth. The worst mistake we make as parents is teaching children that money isn’t everything. There's many a mistake made on purpose. To err is human, but anybody can make a mistake. When a fellow needs a friend he often makes a mistake and takes a wife.

Francois De La Rochefoucauld Mark Twain

English Han Wu-ti

Katherine Graham Chinese African (Swahili) American Bernard Shaw Polish Joseph Mankiewicz Thomas C. Haliburton Unknown Unknown

233


Mistakes

* He who makes no mistakes makes nothing. Mistakes The greatest general is he who makes that fewest mistakes. Mistakes The mistakes of others can be good teachers. Mistress * All is well when the mistress smiles. Mistress The mistress makes the morning, but the Lord makes the afternoon. Mistress, wife * What’s the worst portion in this mortal life? A pensive mistress, and a yelping wife. Mistresses, * Others go to bed with their ideas mistresses, I with my ideas. MisThe man who thinks marriage is a understand 50-50 proposition understands neither women or fractions. MisMisunderstandings are best understanding prevented by pen and ink. Mis* To be great is to be understood misunderstood. Mob It is an easy and a vulgar thing to please the mob, and no very arduous task to astonish them. Mob It is the proof of a bad cause when it is applauded by the mob. Mob The mob does not deserve to be enlightened. Mob The mob has many heads, but no brains. Mob The nose of a mob is its imagination. By this, at any time, it can be quietly led. Model Model first, teach second. Moderation 234

* At the beginning of a cask and at

Unknown Napoleon Bonaparte German English American

Theodore Roethke Jose Marti Unknown

English Ralph Waldo Emerson C. C. Colton

Seneca Frederick II English Edgar Allan Poe Dennis C. Kinslaw Hesiod


Moderation Moderation Moderation Moderation

Moderation

Modern

Modesty

Modesty Modesty Modesty

Modesty

Modesty

Modesty Molehill

the end take your fill; in the middle be sparing. * Be moderate in everything, including moderation. Enough is as good as a feast.

Horace Porter John Heywood * I can abstain; but can’t be Samuel moderate. Johnson Moderation in temper is always a Thomas virtue; but moderation in Paine principle is always a vice. Temperate temperance is best; Mark Twain intemperate temperance however injures the cause of temperance. Modern art is like a woman: you'll Unknown never enjoy it if you try to understand it. Great artists are modest almost H. L. as seldom as they are faithful to Mencken their wives. Modesty dies when clothes were Mark Twain born. Modesty is the ornaments of a Indian woman. (Tamil) The English instinctively admire James Agate any man who has no talent, and is modest about it. * The man who is ostentatious of Mark Twain his modesty is twin to the statue that wears a fig-leaf. The man who is ostentatious of Mark Twain his modesty is twin to the statue that wears a fig leaf. * Too much modesty is half conceit. Yiddish Don't make a mountain out of a Unknown molehill.

235


Monarchy Monday

Kings have long hands. Monday is a bad way to spend one-seventh of your life.

Money

A fool and his money are soon parted. A great fortune is a great slavery. A happy heart is better than a full purse. A man making money is like a bee making honey − he can make it but they won't let him keep it. All complain of their lack of money, none of their want of brains. All heiresses are beautiful. All things are obedient to money. Always try to rub against money as some of it may rub off on you. Even between parents and children money matters make strangers. Every crowd has a silver lining. Finance, like time, devours its own children. He catches the best fish who angles with a golden hook. He who has plenty of pepper can afford to season his cabbage well. I have enough money to last me the rest of my life, unless I buy something. I’ve never been poor, but I’ve been broke. If a little money doesn’t go out, great money won’t come in. If money be not thy servant, it will

Money Money

*

Money

Money

Money Money Money

*

Money

*

Money Money

*

Money

*

Money Money

*

Money

*

Money Money 236

Ovid Thomas “Wayne” Brazell Unknown Seneca Unknown Unknown

Rumanian

John Dryden English Damon Runyon Japanese

P. T. Barnum Honore De Balzac Latin Latin Jackie Mason

Mike Todd Chinese Francis


Money

Money Money

*

Money Money

*

Money

*

Money Money Money Money

*

Money

*

Money Money Money

*

Money

Money Money Money Money

*

be thy master. If you have money, you are wise and good looking and can sing well too. If you have money, your opinion is accepted. If you want to know what God thinks of money, look at some of the people he gives it to. It has been said that the love of money is the root of all evil. It is better to have a permanent income than to be fascinating. It’s easier to earn money than to keep it. Lend money to a bad debtor and he will hate you. Little money, little law. Make money honestly if you can, but make money. Marry for money, my little sonny, a rich man’s jokes are always funny. Money alone sets the world in motion. Money begets money. Money can do everything. Money can't buy everything − poverty for example. Money comes like earth scooped up with a needle; it goes like sand washed away by water. Money doesn't go very far these days, or come very near. Money goes where money is. Money governs the world. Money hides a thousand

Bacon Yiddish

Hebrew Unknown

Samuel Butler Oscar Wilde Yiddish Chinese English American Hebrew

Publilius Syrus Italian Yiddish Unknown Chinese

Unknown Russian English Chinese 237


Money

*

Money

Money

*

Money

*

Money Money Money

*

Money

Money Money Money Money Money

*

*

Money Money Money Money Money

Money 238

*

deformities. Money is a good servant but a bad master. Money is a good thing, but you have to waste a lot of good time making it. Money is like manure – it’s no good unless it is spread around. Money is like promises-easier made than kept. Money is more eloquent than a dozen members of parliament. Money is the route of all evil. Money isn't everything, but it's way ahead of whatever's in second place. Money isn't everything, but subtract it form some people and there's nothing left. Money lost, nothing lost; courage lost, everything lost. Money loves to be counted. Money makes even a bastard legal. Money makes the man. Money saved is as good as money gained. Money talks but it doesn't always talk sense. Money talks, but not when it's a small amount. Money talks. No money, no mistress. Put not your trust in money, but put your money in trust. Ready money is Aladdin’s lamp.

English Unknown

Francis Bacon Josh Billings Danish Unknown Unknown

Unknown

Yiddish Russian Hebrew English Danish Unknown Unknown English English Oliver Wendell Holmes Lord Byron


Money Money

*

Money Money

Money

*

Money

*

Money

*

Money

*

Money

Money

Money Money Money

Money

*

Rich or poor, it's nice to have money. Take care of the pence, and the pounds will take care of themselves. The money perish with thee. The more flesh, the more worms. The more prosperous, the more money. The only absolutely safe way to double your money is to fold it once and put it in your pocket. The reason some people are stingy is also the reason they are rich. There is nothing so comfortable as a small bankroll; a big one is always in danger. There’s only one thing money won’t buy, and that’s poverty. What this country needs is not more money, but more people who have some of it. When a man says that money can do anything that settles it − he hasn't any. When gold speaks every tongue is silent. When money speaks the truth keeps silent. Where I was brought up we never talked about money because there was never enough to furnish a topic of conversation. With respect to money, there are two types of people: those who cannot make it, and those who cannot keep it.

Unknown Philip Dormer Stanhope Bible Hillel

Frank McKinney Hubbard American

Wilson Mizner Joe E. Lewis Unknown

Ed Howe

Italian Russian Mark Twain

Unknown

239


Money, glory

Money, joy

Monk Monk

*

Monkey, God, * man Monkey, tail

*

Monogamy

Monogamy

*

Monument Moon Moon Moon, futility Moon, madness

Moon, man, dark, hidden Moose

240

* *

It is not good to eat much honey: so for men to search their own glory is not glory. How sad to see a father with money and no joy. The man studied economics, but never happiness. A monk in his cloister, a fish in the water, a thief on the gallows. A runaway monk never speaks well of his convent. I believe that our Heavenly Father invented man, as he was disappointed in the monkey. The higher the monkey climbs, the more he shows his tail. I'm not a real movie star as I still have the same wife I started out with nearly 28 years ago. Most men believe in monogamy because they believe enough is enough. Monuments are reminders of those who have been forgotten. Once in a blue moon. You can’t outrun the moon. The moon does not heed the barking of dogs It is the error of the moon; she comes more near the earth than she awls wont, and makes men mad. Everyone has a mood and a dark side which he never shows to anyone. I am as strong as a bull moose and you can use me to the limit.

Solomon

Jim Rohn

German Dutch Mark Twain

Unknown Will Rogers

Unknown

American Unknown Yiddish Unknown Shakespeare

Mark Twain

Theodore Roosevelt


Moralist

Morality

Morality Morality

Morality

Morality, luxury

* A moralist is a person who never runs out of ideas on what other people ought to do. As soon as we lose the moral basis, we cease to be religious. Religion can never over-ride morality. Man cannot be untruthful, cruel or incontinent and claim to have God on his side. Don’t be too moral as you may cheat yourself out of much of life. * Morality is a private and costly luxury. Whenever you find that you are on the side of the majority, it is time to reform. * Morality is a private and costly luxury.

More Mornings Mornings

*

Mortgage

*

Mortgage Mosquito

*

Mosquito Mosquito

Moth

*

Unknown

Gandhi, Indian

Henry David Thoreau Henry Brooks Adams Mark Twain

Henry Brooks Adams The more the merrier. English A foul morning may turn to a fair English day. To get up early for three mornings Chinese is equal to one day of time. A small house is better than a Unknown large mortgage. Some men are known by their Unknown deeds, others by their mortgages. A mosquito is like a child: when it Unknown stops making noise you know it’s getting into something. If we walk in the woods, we must Emerson feed the mosquitoes. Take a lesson from the mosquito: Unknown he never waits for an opening − he makes one. He dreads a moth who has been Albanian 241


Mother

*

Mother

Mother Mother Mother Mother

*

Mother Mother

*

Mother

*

Mother Mother

Mother Mother

Mother, father *

Mother, milk, gin

242

stung by a wasp. A busy mother makes a lazy daughter. A mother that has lost many children by death, hates the idea of her child taking a nap. An indulgent mother makes a sluttish daughter. As is the mother such is the child, as is the yarn such is the cloth. Every mother thinks her child is beautiful. God could not be everywhere, so therefore he made mothers. It takes two to make a marriage: a young girl and an anxious mother. Look at the mother before you take her daughter in marriage. Mother always said that honesty was the best policy, and money isn’t everything. She was wrong about other things too. Mother knows best. One kisses the child for the mother’s sake, and the mother for the child’s sake. Some of the dirtiest dogs, past and present, had mothers. When I was born my mother was terribly disappointed. Not that she wanted a girl − she wanted a divorce. Hear the instruction of thy father, but forsake not the law of thy mother. Gin was mother's milk to me.

Irish African (Annang) Dutch Indian (Tamil) Yiddish The Talmud Unknown Indian (Tamil) Gerald Barzan

Unknown German

Gregory Nunn Woody Allen

Solomon

George Bernard


Mother, tears Motherhood Mother-inlaw Mother-in-Law Mother-in-law Mother-in-law

Motion Motion

Motivation

*

Mountain

*

Mountain, frighten Mouse

*

Mouse Mouse, rat, studying Mouth

* *

Shaw I cannot bear a mother's tears. Virgil The hand that rocks the cradle Peter De rules the world. Vries There is but one good mother-in- English law and she is dead. A mother-in-law dies only when Rabelais another devil is needed in hell. Behind every successful man Hubert stands a surprised mother-in-law. Humphrey The chain of wedlock is so heavy Alexander that it takes two to carry it − and Dumas sometimes three. A good example of slow motion is Unknown a woman entering her thirties. Why does an oak grow taller and Bernard live longer than a man? Because Shaw he does not waste its energy moving from one spot to the other. Motivation is what gets you Unknown started and habit is what keeps you going. If the mountain won't come to Unknown Mohamed, the Mohamed must go to the mountain. The mountain cannot frighten Johann one who was born on it. Friedrich von Schiller A mouse never entrusts his life to Plautus only one hole. Don’t show the mouse the door Moroccan of the house. You are a mouse studying to be a Wilson rat. Mizner A closed mouth and open eyes German never did anyone harm.

243


Mouth Mouth Mouth

Mouth

Mouth

*

Mouth Mouth Mouth

*

Mouth

Mouth Mouth

* *

Mouth

*

Mouth Mouth Movement Movies

Mule Mule 244

A closed mouth catches no flies. A closed mouth makes a wise head. A good time to keep your mouth shut is when you are in deep water. He who would close another man’s mouth should first tie up his own. If you keep your mouth shut, you'll never put your foot in it. In the morning the mouth smells, but there are good words in it. It is the mouth that cuts the throat. Keep your mouth shut and your eyes open. Many things are opened by mistake, but none so often as the mouth. Mouth and heart are wide apart. Once your word leaves your mouth, you cannot chase it back. The mouth of a strange woman is a deep pit. The mouth of the slanderer is as fire exposed to the wind. The mouth that forbids is the mouth that allows. A rolling stone gathers no moss. Over in Hollywood they almost made a great picture, but they caught it just in time. A mule and a woman do what is expected of them. A mule laden with gold is

English English Unknown

Danish

Unknown African (Oji) African (Hausa) English Unknown

German Unknown Solomon Indian (Tamil) Hebrew Publilius Syrus Wilson Mizner Spanish Armenian


Murder Murder, suicide Murderer, friend Muscle Music

*

*

Music Music

Music Music Music

Music

*

Music, bread, desolate, dead

Must Mutiny

Myth

*

welcome at every castle. Never murder a man who is about to commit suicide. Never murder someone who' is committing suicide. Every murderer is probably somebody's old friend. Muscles come and go; flab lasts. I don't know anything about music really, but I know what I like. Like music to my ears. Making music is like making love: the act is always the same, but each time it is different. Music hath charms to soothe the savage beast. My music is best understood by children and animals. Nothing soothes me more after a long and maddening course of pianoforte recitals than to sit and have my teeth drilled. Wagner’s music is better than it sounds. Music I heard with you was more than music; And bread I broke with you was more than bread; Now that I am without you, all is desolate; All that was once so beautiful is dead. When one must, one can. Mutiny and riot were not the best ways of conveying a soldier’s aspirations to his sovereign. Myth is nothing more than gossip.

German Unknown Agatha Christie Bill Vaughan Sir Max Beerbohm Unknown Arthur Rubinstein James Bramston Igor Stravinsky George Bernard Shaw Mark Twain Conrad Aiken

Yiddish Tacitus, Roman Stanislaw J. Lec 245


Nag Nail Nail Nail NaĂŻve

Naked Name Name Name Name

Name Name

Nation Nation Nations, war, power Nature Nature

Nature

246

* Every nag imagines himself to be a fancy trotter. Do not hang all on one nail. Drive not a second nail till the first be clinched. Drive the nail that will go. The people who fall for everything probably stand for nothing. The naked don’t fear robbery. A good name is a rich inheritance. A good name is better than a girdle of gold. A good name keeps its luster in the dark. Every man's first name is more important than his last, until he becomes famous. One has the name and another the worth. * Who steals my purse steals trash; But he that filches from me my good name and makes me poor indeed. A nation is born stoic, but dies Epicurean Nationalism is an infantile disease − it is the measles of mankind. As long as there are sovereign nations possessing great power, war is inevitable. Ill natures never want a tutor. Let us give Nature a chance; she knows her business better than we do. Nature is an infinite sphere whose center is everywhere, and whose

Russian German English English Unknown

Russian German French English Camus

Greek Shakespeare

Will Durant Einstein Albert Einstein English Michel Eyguem de Montaigne Pascal


circumference is nowhere. Nature * The donkey loaded with gold still eats thistles. Nature There is nature in all things. Nature, sharp * In nature there are few sharp lines lines. Navigator, wind, waves Neat Necessary

* The winds and waves are always on the side of the ablest navigators. * Be carless in your dress, if you must, but keep a tidy soul. * Make yourself necessary to someone.

Necessities

Necessity Necessity Necessity

*

Necessity

*

Necessity

*

Necessity Necessity Necessity

*

Necessity Necessity Necessity, bargain Needle

* *

If the journey is long, take only the necessities. This leaves room to acquire luxuries along the way. Kill one to warn a hundred. Necessity alters the law. Necessity is the mother of all invention. Necessity is the mother of invention. Necessity knows no law except to prevail. Necessity makes the best soldiers. Necessity must speak. Necessity teachers even the lame to dance. Not even the gods fight against necessity. Without rice, even the cleverest housewife cannot cook. Necessity never made a good bargain. A needle is sharp only at one end.

Unknown American Archie Randolph Ammons Edward Gibbon Mark Twain Ralph Waldo Emerson American Anonymous

Chinese Russian Unknown English Publilius Syrus Josephus American German The Seven Sages Chinese Benjamin Franklin Confucius 247


Needle Needle Needle Needs

*

Negative Neglect Negotiation, jaw, war Neighbor

*

*

Neighbor Neighbor

*

Neighbor

*

Neighbor Neighbor

*

Nervous

Net, fish

*

Nettle Nettle Neurotic

248

*

A needle with a small eye should be threaded slowly. It takes a needle to get a thorn from one’s foot. No needle has two sharp points. Needs must when the devil drives. Two negatives make an affirmative. A little neglect may breed great mischief. To jaw-jaw is always better than to war-war. A good neighbor is better than a brother far off. Choose your neighbor before you buy you house. Love is blind, but the neighbors are not. Love your neighbor as yourself; but don’t take down the fence. Love your neighbor, but don’t pull down the fence. Your own safety is at stake when your neighbor’s house is in flames. A man gets a reputation for being energetic when he's merely nervous. It's vain to cast your net where there are no fish. Better to be stung by a nettle than pricked by a rose. He that handles a nettle tenderly is soonest stung. A neurotic builds castles in the air, the psychotic lives in them and

Thai Iranian Chinese Unknown English English Sir Winston Churchill Danish African (Hausa) Unknown Carl Sandburg German Horace

Unknown

Unknown English English Unknown


Neurotic

Neurotic

Neutrality

Neutrality

*

New

News News News

* *

News News News

* *

News News News News

*

the psychiatrist collects the rent. A neurotic doesn't answer the Unknown phone when it rings, while a psychotic answers it when it doesn’t ring. Neurotics worry about things that Unknown didn't happen in the past instead of worrying like normal people about things that won't happen in the future. They are neutral against us. World War II servicemen's Description of the Spanish and Portuguese When in doubt who will win, be Swiss neutral. We must beware of needles Winston innovations, especially when Churchill guided by logic. Bad news is soon told. American Believe no news until it is old. Welsh He that brings good news, knocks English boldly. He that tells his wife news, is English newly married. Ill news travels fast. Italian No news is good news. Ludovic Halevy No news is good news. Unknown No one knows what news is of Nietzsche importance until a century later. None loves the messenger who Sophocles brings bad news. The dull period in the life of an Thomas event is when it ceases to be Hardy 249


news and not yet begun to be history. News What the good Lord lets happen, I am not ashamed to print in my paper. News, Lake That's the news from Lake Wobegon, Wobegon, where all the women men, women, are strong, the men are goodchildren looking, and all the children are above average. Newspaper Not all the news that’s fit to print is fit to read. Newspaper Nothing can be believed which is seen in a newspaper. Nice, * It's nice to be important but it's importance more important to be nice. Niceness You can catch more flies with honey than with vinegar. Night A blustering night, a fair day. Night * A sleepless night is the worst punishment. Night * Night hath a thousand eyes. Night Night hides many things from us. Night

* No night is so long that day will not follow it. Night, counsel * Night is the mother of counsel. Nightingale Even in a golden cage, the nightingale is homesick. Nobility It is a sign of nobility to patronize. Nod A nod for a lord is a breakfast for a fool. Nod * A nod of an honest man is enough. Noise As with narrow-necked bottles: the less in them, the more noise they make in pouring it out. 250

Charles A Dana Garrison Kiellor

Unknown Thomas Jefferson Unknown Unknown English Yiddish John Lyly Dante Alighieri Finnish Unknown Armenian Irish English English Jonathan Swift


Nonconformity Nose

*

Nose Nose

Nose Nothing Nothing

*

Nothing Nothing, lose Notice

*

Nude

*

Nudity

Nudity

Numbers

Non-conformity is often a form of conformity in reverse. A big nose never spoiled a handsome face. He that has a great nose thinks everybody is speaking of it. Notice that the nose was formed to wear spectacles: thus we wear spectacles. The lip can slip, the eye can lie, but the nose knows. By doing nothing we learn to do ill. If you can do nothing with yourself, others are not likely to do better. Nothing is perfect. Having nothing, there is nothing he can lose. There's a difference between beauty and charm: a beautiful woman is one I notice, and a charming woman is one who notices me. Clothes make the man and impression; naked people have very little or no influence in society. Having spent my entire vacation in a nudist colony, I was somewhat taken back when a lady shook my hand and said: “Good-by, Mr. Nunn, I hope to see more of you.� I have seen three emperors in their nakedness and the sight was not inspiring. The drudgery of the numbers will

Unknown French English Voltaire

Unknown English Dagobert Runes Yiddish Shakespeare John Erskine

Mark Twain

Gregory Nunn

Otto Von Bismarck Harold 251


Numbers Nut Oak Oak

* *

Oak

*

Oaks, strokes

*

Oar

*

Oath

*

Oath Oats, England, Scotland Objection

*

Objection

Observation

Obsolescence

Obstacle Obvious

252

*

make you free. The numbers tell you how your business is going, not why. Give someone nuts and he will throw the shells at you. An oak is not felled at one stroke. Great oaks from little acorns grow. Oaks may fall when reeds stand the storm. Little strokes fell great oaks.

Geneen Jonathan P. Siegel Hebrew English English English

Benjamin Franklin Everyone must row with the oars Dutch he has. A liar freely gives his oath. Pierre Corneille An unlawful oath is better broken English than kept. Oats is a grain which England is Samuel generally given to horses, but in Johnson Scotland it supports the people. No man objects to his wife calling Unknown him a fool; what he objects to is her taking an hour to do so. Nothing will ever be attempted if Samuel all possible objections must first Johnson be overcome. A man's faults all conform to his Confucius type of mind. Observe one's faults and you will know his virtues. When a subject becomes totally Peter F. obsolete, we make it a required Drucker course. Every obstacle is for the best. Greek A city that is set on a hill can’t be Bible hid.


Obvious Obvious Obvious Obvious Obvious Obviousness Occasion Occupant Ocean Odds Odds Odor Odor, goodness, taint Offender Offense Offense Offer Offer Officer Old Old Age

* From his claw one can tell a lion. * If you walk on snow you cannot hide your footprints. Looking for the ass on its very back. Pick up a sesame seed but lose sight of a watermelon. * To search for the very animal one is riding. For this thing was done in a corner. An occasion lost cannot be redeemed. * It is the occupant who knows where the house leaks. * To a fool the ocean is knee deep. Odds will beat anybody. There are odds in all things. * Fish and guests begin to smell after three days. There is no odor so bad that which arises from goodness tainted. The offender never pardons. If thy right hand offend thee, cut it off. Keep your offense in your bosom and you may meet as before. Fair offer is no cause of enmity. Never refuse a good offer. Good officers will make good soldiers. * When old, one finds it difficult to follow the world. * An old man is a man who is 10 years older than you are.

Anonymous Confucius Chinese Chinese T.C. Lai Bible English African (Hausa) Russian English English Benjamin Franklin Henry David Thoreau English Bible Chinese Scottish Italian American Japanese Unknown

253


Old Age

Old Age Old age

Old Age

Old Age

Old Age Old woman, new Omen Omen Omen

Once One One Onion Open

Open

254

* Another objection to old age is Unknown that there's not much of a future in it. Calling a man a sexagenarian Unknown sounds like flattery. Few people know how to be old. Duc de La Rochefoucauld Old age is like everything else: to Unknown make a success of it, you have to start when you're young. The sign of old age is to extol the Sydney past at the expense of the Smith present. To the old, no folks are old. Unknown It's well to be off the Old Woman George before you're on to the New. Bernard Shaw * The leaves fall before the tree French dies. Tis ill taking of halters in the Miguel de house of a man that was hung. Cervantes When a man’s dog turns against Mark Twain him it is time for a wife to pack her trunk and go home to mama. You only live once. Unknown One is no number. English Where one is wise, two are English happy. Cooking an onion takes all the John conceit out of it. Burroughs * It's good to have an open mind, Unknown but be sure it is not open at both ends Keep an open mind, but don't Unknown keep it too open or it will invite people to throw a lot of rubbish in


Open Opera

Opera

Opera

Operation

Operation

Operation

*

Operation

*

Opinion Opinion

*

Opinion

Opinion

*

Opinion

*

it. Minds are like parachutes as they function only when open. One can't judge Wagner's opera Lohengrin after a first hearing, and I certainly don't intend hearing it a second time. Opera in English is, in the main, just about as sensible as baseball in Italian. The trouble with opera in the United States is that it's like trying to sell caviar to a hamburger eating country. An operation often enables the patient to live, but more often enables the surgeon to live. If an operation is performed right, you walk; if performed wrong, you ride. No one really gets over his operation till he stops talking about it. To the surgeon who collects the bill in advance every operation is a success. How do I know what I think until I hear what I say. If one man says to thee, “Thou art a donkey,� pay no heed. If two speak thus, purchase a saddle. Inconsistencies of opinion, arising from changes of circumstances, are often justifiable. It is differences of opinions that make horse races. Maternity is a matter of fact, paternity is a matter of opinion.

Unknown Rossini

H. L. Mencken Helen Traubel

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown The Talmud

Daniel Webster Mark Twain American

255


Opinion Opinion

* Opinion rules the world. * Private opinion is weak, but public opinion is almost omnipotent. Opinion * The man who never changes his opinions never corrects his mistakes. Opinion, * The opinion of the strongest is strongest always the best. Opponent He who knows himself as well as his opponent will be invincible. Opportunist Opportunity knocks only once, but not opportunists. Opportunities * Opportunities always look bigger going than coming. Opportunity A wise man will make more opportunities than he finds. Opportunity * Once lost, Jupiter himself cannot bring back opportunity Opportunity * Opportunism are like eggs: they come one at a time. Opportunity * Opportunity knocks only once. Opportunity * Opportunity often makes a thief. Opportunity * Opportunity seldom knocks twice. Opportunity Strike while the iron is hot. Opportunity * The first half of life consists of the capacity to enjoy without the chance; the last half consists of the chance without the capacity. Opportunity The secret of success is making hay with the grass that grows under other peoples feet. Opportunity * There is a tide in the affairs of men, which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune; omitted, all the voyage of their life is bound in shallows and in miseries. Opportunity We consume our tomorrows 256

English Henry Ward Beecher Unknown

Jean de La Fountaine Korean Unknown Unknown Montaigne Phaedrus Unknown English Unknown Unknown Unknown Mark Twain

Unknown

Shakespeare

Persius


Opportunity

*

Opposite Opposition

Opposition

Optimism Optimism

*

Optimism

*

Optimism, pessimism

*

Optimism, pessimism Optimism, pessimism

Optimism, pessimism

Optimism, pessimism

Optimism, pessimism

fretting about our yesterdays. While we stop to think we often miss our opportunity. Doing just the opposite is another form of flattery. Opposition breeds success: you cannot light a match on a bar of soap. Treating your adversary with respect is giving him an advantage to which he is not entitled. An intellectual disorder yielding to no treatment but death. An optimist is a man who has never had much experience. An optimist is a man who spends his last dollar to buy a new billfold. A pessimist asks you if there is milk in the pitcher; an optimist asks you to pass the cream. An optimist is a man who looks forward to marriage, and a pessimist is a married optimist. If a man is a pessimist before forty, he knows too much; if he is an optimist after forty, he knows too little. In time of trouble, the pessimist gets more pleasure out of his pessimism than the optimist out of his optimism. Life is la telescope with the optimist looking through one end, and the pessimist looking through the other. The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible

Publilius Syrus G.C. Lichtenberg Unknown

Samuel Johnson Ambrose Bierce Don Marquis Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

J.B. Cabell

257


Optimism, pessimism Optimism, pessimism

*

Optimism, pessimism

Optimism, pessimism Optimism, pessimism

*

Optimist Orange

*

Orange

*

Orator, words, * reason

worlds, and the pessimist fears this is true. The optimist sees a glass as half full; whereas the pessimist sees it as half empty. The optimist sees an opportunity in every calamity; whereas the pessimist sees a calamity in every opportunity. The pessimist feels he is creating the weight of the world on his shoulders, the optimist feels he's sitting on top of it. The pessimist is more often right; the optimist is more often happy. There is no sadder sight than a young pessimist, except for an old optimist. A man who calls bullshit fertilizer. A divided orange tastes just as good. A stolen orange is better tasting than your own. Here comes the orator with his flood of words and his drop of reason. The object of oratory is not truth alone, but persuasion.

Oratory

*

Orchestra

If you can't face the music, you'll never lead the band. * Order is Heaven’s first law.

Order Order Order

258

* Order is heaven's first law, but earth's last achievement. Set the cart before the horse.

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown Mark Twain

Frank Dane Chinese African (Bemba) Benjamin Franklin Thomas Babington Macaulay Unknown Alexander Pope Unknown John Heywood


Order

Though last, not least.

Origins

Tall oaks emanate from little acorns Beware of the fundamentalist who thinks it necessary to make a hell of this world so that we may enjoy heaven in the next. Be not too hasty to outbid another. The outer garment conceals the inner torment. An old oven is easier to heat than a new one. Have one's ears pierced only before the wedding ceremony. If you refuse to accept anything but the best, you very often get it. The daughter of a crab does not give birth to a bird. You can't expect both ends of a sugar cane to be equally sweet. Your fingers can't all be of the same length. Horses and poets should be fed, but not overfed. Do not remove a fly from your friend's head with a hatchet. Each year it grows harder to make ends meet-the ends of my hands and feet. The man who says he owes everything to his wife seldom pays her back. Although the owl has large eyes, he can’t see as well as a mouse. An owl is the king of the night.

Orthodoxy

Outbid

*

Outer garment Oven Over anticipation Over expectation Over expectation Over expectation Over expectation Over feeding

*

*

Overkill Overweight

Overweight

Owl Owl

*

Edmund Spencer Anonymous Unknown

English Yiddish French Chinese W. Somerset Maugham Confucius Chinese Chinese Charles IX Confucius Richard Armour Unknown

Japanese English

259


Own Owner Ox Ox Ox

*

Ox Ox

*

Ox

*

Ox Ox

* *

Ox

*

Oyster

*

Packages

*

Padlock Pain

*

Pain Pain

*

Pain

*

Pain

*

Pain

*

260

Own is own. Only the owner of a house knows about its leaking. After an ox is lost one repairs its stable. An old ox makes a straight furrow. If an ox won’t drink, you can’t make him bow his head. It is in vain to lead the ox to the water if he is not thirsty. The fierce ox becomes tame on strange ground. The ox is not aware of its own strength. The tired ox plants his foot firmly. When the ox falls, everyone sharpens their knives. You may force an ox to the water, but you cannot make him drink. He was a bold man who ate the first oyster. The best things come in small packages. A bad padlock invites a picklock. It is much easier to stand pain than an itch. No pains, no gains. One’s pain is lessened by another’s anguish. Pain is the price that God puts upon all things. The least pain in our little finger gives us more concern than the destruction of millions of our fellow beings. The pain of the little finger is felt by the whole body.

English African (Kpelle) Korean English Chinese French Spanish Yiddish Spanish Yiddish Danish Jonathan Swift Unknown English Unknown Scottish Shakespeare English William Hazlitt

Philippine


Pain Pain Pain, happiness

Time heals old pain, while it creates new ones. * When in pain it’s best to be alone. The two foes of human happiness are pain and boredom.

Pain, idea

*

Pain, joy, eternal

*

Pain, pleasure * Pain, victory * Painful

*

Painting

Painting

Pairs Panic, survival Pants Paper

*

Papers, knowledge Parade

*

Hebrew

Japanese Arthur Schopenhauer One of the greatest pains to Walter human nature is the pain of a new Bagehot idea. Pain is short and joy is eternal. Johann Friedrich von Schiller Pain is so close to pleasure. Unknown Pain is temporary, victory is Unknown forever. It is more painful to do nothing English than something. Good painting is like good Vlaminck cooking, it tastes good, but can’t be explained. Some painters transform the sun Picasso into a yellow spot, others transform a yellow spot into a sun. God always pairs off like with the Homer like. Each man for himself. Chaucer I never made any money until I Sally Rand took off my pants. Paper and brush may kill a man; Chinese you don’t need a knife. All I know is what I read in the Will Rogers papers. If they really want to honor the Will Rogers soldiers, why don't they let them sit in the stands and have the people march by? 261


Paradox Paradox

Pardon Pardon

* *

Parent Parent

Parent

Parent

Parent, Children Parent, Children Parent, Children

*

Parent, Children Parent, Children Parents Parents Parents

262

*

I prefer to be a man of paradox than a man of prejudice. Success is paradoxical: most men get to the top by going to the bottom of things. Pardon all but thyself. Pardon one offence and you encourage others. My parents were neither very poor nor conspicuously honest. Parents were invented to make children happy by giving them something to ignore. The first half of our lives is ruined by our parents and the second half by our children. You are the bows from which your children, as living arrows, are sent forth. Children bring their parents closer together-usually for self-defense. Every child keeps hoping his parents will run out of advice. I don't know who are the best people to educate the young but I do know that parents are the worst. Parents are the last people on earth who should have children. The best way for a father to bring up his children is to love their mother. Good parents, happy marriages; good children, fine funerals. It's very hard for rich parents not to be poor parents. Many problem children go by the name of parents.

Rousseau Unknown

Unknown Publilius Syrus Mark Twain Ogden Nash

Clarence Darrow Kahlil Gibran

Unknown Unknown William Morris

Unknown Unknown

Chinese Unknown Unknown


Parents Parents

*

Parents Parents Parish Participation Partner

Partnership Partnership

Party Passion Passions, candle, wind, fire

*

Past Past Past

Past

*

Past

*

Most parents begin by giving in and end up giving up. To understand your parents' love you must raise children yourself. We got our parent when they are too old for us to change them. What the parents are, so will the children be. A mad parish must have a mad priest. You have to be in it to win it. When two partners in business always agree, one of them is unnecessary. Forty for you, sixty for me and equal partners we will be. In business partnerships and marriage partnerships, oh, the cheating that goes on. A fool and his money are soon partying. Hot passion cools easily. Absence diminishes mediocre passions and increases great ones, as the wind blows out candles, and fans fire. Consider the past and you will know the future. Half the pleasure of recalling the past lies in the editing. It used to be a good hotel, but that proves nothing − I used to be a good boy. Living in the past has only one thing in its favor − it’s cheaper. No man is rich enough to buy back his past.

Unknown Chinese Unknown Philippine English Unknown Unknown

Gerald Barzan American

Unknown Japanese Duc de La Rochefoucauld Chinese Unknown Mark Twain

Unknown Oscar Wilde

263


Past Past Past Past Past Past Past, future

Past, future

Past, future Path Patience Patience Patience Patience Patience Patience Patience Patience Patience

264

The past always looks better than it was because it isn’t here. The past is as clear as a mirror, the future as dark as lacquer. The past, at least, is secure. * The thing most women dread about their past is its length. * What’s past is prologue. * When you live in the past it costs you the present. I like the dreams of the future better than the history of the past. May the happiest days of your past be the saddest days of your future. The girl who wants a future will avoid a man with a past. The middle path is the safe path. A handful of patience is worth a bushel of brains. * A patient mind is the best remedy for trouble. All things come to he who waits. An ounce of practice is worth a pound of precept. Every dog hath his day. Everything comes to he who waits. Everything comes to him who hustles while he waits. Nature thrives on patience: man on impatience. Patience is a necessary ingredient of genius.

Finley Peter Dunne Chinese Daniel Webster Unknown Shakespeare Unknown Jefferson

Unknown

Unknown German Unknown Plautus Unknown Unknown John Heywood Unknown Thomas A. Edison Unknown Benjamin Disraeli


Patience Patience

Patience is safety, haste is blame. Turkish * Patience is the greatest prayer. Indian (Hindi) Patience * Patience: a minor form of despair, Bierce disguised as a virtue. Patience * The longer the night lasts, the Chinese more our dreams will be. Patience * The secret of patience is doing Unknown something else in the meantime. Patience The time when patience is most Unknown needed is when it is exhausted. Patience With time and patience the Chinese mulberry leaf becomes a silk gown. Patience * You won't help shoots grow by Chinese pulling them up higher. Patience, hope Patience is the art of hoping. Marquis de Vauvenargues Patience, poor * How poor are they that have no Shakespeare patience. Patience, Patience is a virtue. Unknown virtue Patient, nurse * Man who wants pretty nurse, Unknown must be patient. Patriotism But in spite of all temptations to W. S. Gilbert belong to other nations, he remains an Englishman. Patriotism Patriotism is not the last refuge of Unknown a scoundrel − it's the first. Patriotism Though I love my country, I do not Lord Byron love my countrymen. Patriotism, * Patriotism is the last refuge of a Samuel scoundrel scoundrel. Johnson Patronizing, * A patronizing disposition always George Eliot disposition has its meaner side. (Marian Evans Cross)

265


Pauper Pay

Pay Payback Paying

*

Pea Peace

*

Peace

Peace

Peace Peace

Peace

Peace

Peace

*

Peace

*

Peace of mind * 266

A proud pauper and a rich miser are contemptible beings. Beware of places you don't have to pay to get it, as you will probably have to pay to get out. Pay what you owe, and be cured of your complaint. Recompense to no man evil for evil. They that dance must pay the fiddler. Eat peas with the king and cherries with the beggar. A bad peace is better than a good war. A crust eaten in peace is better than a banquet partaken in anxiety. First keep the peace within yourself then you can bring peace to others. If a man would live in peace he should be blind, deaf, and dumb. If they want peace, nations should avoid the pin-pricks that precede cannon-shots. In his steadfast pursuit of world peace, man has always sticks to his guns. Peace is a morbid condition where there is a surplus of civilians which a war will nicely correct. We are going to have peace even if we have to fight for it. What a mess we are in now-peace has been declared. The quiet mind is richer than a

Italian Unknown

Spanish Bible Unknown English Russian Aesop

Thomas a' Kempis Turkish Proverb Napoleon

Unknown

Unknown

Dwight D. Eisenhower Napoleon Robert


Peace, infidels Peace, soul, opinion Peace, war, victories Pear

*

Pearls

*

Peasant Pedigree Pen, sword Penalty

*

Penalty

Pence

Penny Penny Penny Penny Penny Penny

*

crown. Peace shall go sleep with Turks and infidels. Nothing contributes more to peace of soul than having no opinion at all. Peace has her victories, no less renown than these in war. The pear (apple) falls not far from its tree. He who would search for pearls must dive below. For the sake of a proverb a peasant walked to Moscow. Do well and you will have no need of ancestors. The pen is mightier than the sword. The penalty for getting the woman you want is that you must keep her. When a man pays all the taxes he owes, he feels he is being fined for his honesty. Take care of the pence (pennies) and the pounds (dollars) will take care of themselves. A bad penny always turns up. A hard-earned penny lives a lifetime. A penny at hand is worth a dollar at a distance. A penny earned is better than shilling given. A penny for your thoughts. A penny in pocket is a good companion.

Green Shakespeare George Christoph Lichtenberg John Milton Turkish John Dryden Russian Voltaire Unknown Lionel Strachey Unknown

English

Unknown Russian Yiddish English English English

267


Penny Penny Penny Penny Penny Penny Penny wise People

People

People

People People People People People People People People People

268

A penny in the purse is better than a friend at Court. * A penny saved is a penny earned. A penny saved is twice earned. No penny, no pardon. Penny wise, pound foolish. * There’s no companion like the penny. Penny wise, pound foolish. Avoid offending three classes of people − officials, customers and widows. Eat and drink with your own people, but do no business with them. I have found little that is good about human beings. In my experience most of them, on the whole, are trash. * If you wish to succeed, consult three old people. It’s more important to please people than to please God. * Let people talk and dogs bark. Many people see things but few understand them. * More people are drowned in the glass than in the sea. * Not all people can be driven by the same stick. * Old people have always new pains. Old people see best in the distance. Only that is good which other people praise.

English English German English Robert Burton English Unknown Chinese

SerboCroatian Sigmund Freud

Chinese Yiddish German Yiddish Latvian Lebanese Swedish German Russian


People People

*

People People People People

People

*

People, success, failure Pepper

*

Perception

*

*

Perception Perfection Performance

Performance Perfume Permanent

*

People are to be taken in small doses. Two people fit easier into one grave than under one roof. We are all schlemiels. Wealthy people have many worries. When people talk about something, it is probably true. You may fool all the people some of the time, you can even fool some of the people all of the time; but you can’t fool all of the people all the time. Young people and dogs take many useless steps in an hour. Be nice to people on your way up, ‘cause you're going to meet them on the way down. Pepper has a beautiful face with an ugly temper. Those who play the game do not see as much as those who watch it. To the jaundiced eye all things look yellow. Perfection is imperfect. Achieving good performance is a journey, not a destination.

Ralph Waldo Emerson Slovakian Yiddish Japanese Yiddish Abraham Lincoln

Czech Wilson Mizner African (Annang) Unknown

Unknown Unknown Kenneth H. Blanchard and Robert Lorber Shakespeare

* All lovers swear more performance than they are able. * Old women should not seek to be Hesiod perfumed. * There's nothing so permanent as Unknown a temporary tax.

269


Permission, forgiveness Perpetuity Perseverance Perseverance

Perseverance

Perseverance

Perseverance Perseverance Perseverance

Perseverance Persians

Persistence Persistence Persistence Persistence Person

270

* It's easier to ask for forgiveness than to ask for permission. Shun those works, where the work dies with the worker. Big shots are only little shots who keep shooting. * Don't stop trying: remember it is always the last key that opens the lock. * Enough shovels of earth – a mountain. Enough pails of water − a river. * Never give up: remember the mighty oak was just a little nut that stood his ground. No man drowns if he perseveres in praying to God, and can swim. * Opportunity knocks but once, trouble is more persistent. When I was young I observed that nine out of every tenth thing I did were failures, so I did ten times more work. When the going gets tough, the tough get going. The Persians are accustomed to deliberate about the most important things when they are drunk. * Constant dripping wears away the stone. * Do not turn back when you are just at the goal. Little strokes fell great oaks. Look for a thing till you find it and you'll not lose your labor. A bad person is better than an empty house.

Unknown Da Vinci Christopher Morley Unknown

Chinese

Unknown

Russian Unknown Bernard Shaw

Unknown Euripides

Unknown Publilius Syrus Unknown Confucius African (Ga)


Person

Person Person

*

Person Person Person Person Person Person

*

Person

*

Person Persuade

Pessimist

Pessimist

Pessimist

Pessimist

*

A good person doesn’t need a letter of recommendation; for a bad one, it would do no good. He who does not know a famous person surely will hear of him. Let each person drive away his own wasps. Persons of imperfect learning have no reputation. Persons of little learning are always talkative. Seven persons don’t wait for one. Talented persons are short lived. The guilty person flees from his own shadow. The one-eyed person is a beauty in the country of the blind. The person going home is not stopped by the dusk. The person with least knowledge talks most. A man in the wrong may be more easily convinced than a man who is half right. A pessimist is a man who doesn't choose the lesser of two evils, but both. A pessimist is a man who enjoys having something to worry about because if he didn't, he'd be even more worried. A pessimist is a man who looks both ways before crossing a oneway street. A pessimist is a man who, faced with the choice of two evils, chooses both.

Yiddish

African (Hausa) Japanese Indian (Tamil) Indian (Tamil) Russian Japanese Philippine Egyptian African (Bemba) Irish Emerson

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

271


Pessimist Pessimist

Pessimist

*

Pessimist

Pessimist

Pessimist, optimist Pest

* *

Pest

Pestilence

*

Pets

Petticoat Petting

*

Petting

*

Philadelphia

*

Philanderer

*

272

A pessimist is seldom as tired of the world as the world is of him. A pessimist not only expects the worst, but makes the worst of it when it happens. Always borrow from a pessimist as he never expects to get it back. Even when a pessimist gets the best of it, he makes the worst of it. The pessimist is a man who can't enjoy his health today because he feels he may be sick tomorrow. A positive pessimist is better than a negative optimist. I am 42 around the chest, 42 around the waist, 96 around the golf course, and a nuisance around the house. Of all the unbearable nuisances, the ignoramus who has travelled is the worst. There is no worse pestilence than a familiar enemy. When I play with my cat, who knows if I am a pastime to her more than she is to me? Near is my petticoat, but nearer is my smock. When a girl holds a man's hands in the dark it's either for love-or necessity. Whoever named it necking was a poor judge of anatomy. I once spent a year in Philadelphia. I think it was on a Sunday. A philanderer likes to have his

Unknown Unknown

Unknown Unknown

Unknown

Unknown Groucho Marx

Kin Hubbard

English Michel Eyguem de Montaigne English Unknown

Groucho Marx W. C. Fields

Unknown


Philanderer

Philanthropy

*

Philanthropy Philanthropy Philosopher

Philosopher

Philosopher

Philosopher

*

Philosopher

*

Philosopher

*

Philosophy

Philosophy

Philosophy

*

hands on a girl, but not a girl on his hands. A philanderer not only makes a study of women, but takes up post graduate work. Money talks but it rarely gives itself away. Steal the hog and give the feet away as alms. To enjoy a good reputations give publicly, and steal privately. A philosopher can always see both sides of a question, but no answer. If he really thinks there is no distinction between vice and virtue, when he leaves our houses let us count our spoons. If you wish to understand a philosopher, do not ask what he says, but find out what he wants. Many talk like philosophers and live like fools. Not all philosophers are married men, but all married men become philosophers. There was never any philosopher who could endure a toothache. I fear he will prove to be the weeping philosopher when he grows old, being so full of unmannerly sadness in his youth. I have gained this by philosophy: that I do without being commanded what others do only from fear of the law. I would rather be wrong with Plato than right with the followers

Unknown

Unknown George Herbert Josh Billings Unknown

Samuel Johnson

Nietzsche

English Unknown

Shakespeare Shakespeare

Aristotle

Cicero

273


Philosophy

Philosophy

Philosophy Philosophy

of Pythagoras. It is more important that a philosophy be truly reasonable than that it be reasonably true. Philosophy is a route of many roads leading from nowhere to nothing. Philosophy is for the few.

Philosophy may teach us to bear with equanimity the misfortunes of our neighbors. Philosophy * Philosophy: A route of many roads leading from nowhere to nothing. Philosophy The business of philosophy is to show us that we are not fools for doing what we do. Philosophy To ridicule philosophy is to philosophy. Physician Few physicians live well. Physician Physicians’ faults are covered with earth. Physician Though a physician to others, yet himself full of sores. physician, * Observe the physician with the disease same diligence as he does to the disease. Physician, fee, * Kill the physician and the fee disease bestow upon the foul disease. Physician, Physician, heal thyself. healing Physician, Go not for every grief to the lawyer, grief physician, not every quarrel to the lawyer, not for every thirst to the pot. Physics, Physics is experience arranged in

274

Unknown

Bierce

William Gilbert Oscar Wilde

Ambrose Bierce Justice O.W. Holmes Blaise Pascal English English Latin Proverb John Donne

Shakespeare Bible George Herbert

Ernst Mach


experience Picasso

Picasso

Picasso

Picture Picture Picture Piece Piety Piety Piety

economical order. A picture is worth a thousand words, especially if the picture is by Picasso. I don't own any of my own paintings because a Picasso original costs several thousand dollars, which is a luxury I can't afford. * The world today doesn't make sense, so why should I paint pictures that do? * A picture is worth a thousand words. * Every picture tells a story. The picture of a rice cake does not satisfy hunger. Someone else’s piece is always sweeter. Filial piety moves heaven and earth. Let them learn first piety at home. Those who had loved God most have loved man least.

Pig

A clean pig makes lean bacon.

Pig

* A pig bought on credit grunts all the year. Give a pig a chair, he’ll want to get on the table. Give a pig when it grunts and a child when it cries, and you will have a find pig and a bad child. Give the trough and the pigs will appear. Let every pig dig for itself.

Pig Pig

Pig Pig

Picasso

Picasso

Picasso

English Unknown Japanese Russian Chinese Bible Robert Green Ingersoll SerboCroatian Spanish Yiddish Danish

Russian Manx 275


Pig Pigeon Pilgrim

Pilot Pilot Pilot, sea Pining

Pioneers Piper

*

*

Pitcher Pity Pity Pity Pity Pity, envy Place Place Place Place

Place Place, Time

276

* *

One pig knows another. A blind pigeon may sometimes find a grain of wheat. The Pilgrim Fathers landed on the shores of America and fell on their knees; then they fell upon the aborigines. The pilot cannot mitigate the billows or calm the winds. Too many pilots wreck the ship. In a calm sea every man is a pilot. For all sad words of tongue and pen, the saddest are these, 'It might have been.' The pioneers get all the arrows. They that danced should pay the piper. Little pitchers have wide ears. Pity cures envy. Pity has pure intentions. Pity is a poor plaster. Pity is akin to love, but a mighty poor relation. Better to be envied than pitied. A place for everything and everything in its place. A woman’s place is in her home. Any place in the yellow earth will do to bury a man. Don’t sleep in a troubled place, and you won’t dream a troubled dream. East, West, there is no place that surpasses home. There is a time and place for everything.

Irish Danish American

Plutarch Chinese John Ray John Greenleaf Whittier Burt Lance American English English Yiddish English Unknown Unknown Unknown American Chinese Iranian

Japanese Unknown


Plagiarism

Plagiarism Plan Plan

Plan, future, past Plank Planning Planting Play Play Play Players, spectators Playing Plea Plea Please Please

Please Please Please

* If you steal from one author it’s plagiarism. If you steal from many, it’s research. * Nothing is said which has not been said before. Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans. * The best laid schemes of mice and men gang aft a-gley. (often go awry) You can never plan the future by the past. Tread not on a rotten plank. A sly rabbit will have three openings to its den. * He that plants a tree plants for posterity. Better play for nothing than work for nothing. Fair play is good play. No play without a fool in it. Though the most be players, some be spectators. Playing and joking lead to quarrelling. * A plea is always better than a threat. An ill plea should be well pleaded. If you want to please everybody, you’ll die before your time. If you wish people to think well of you, don't speak too well of yourself. It is hard to please all. * Please the eye and plague the heart. The person who always does

Wilson Mizner Terence Unknown Robert Burns

Edmund Burke Turkish Chinese Unknown Scottish English English Ben Jonson Maltese Slovakian English Yiddish Pascal

English English Unknown 277


Pleasing Pleasure

Pleasure Pleasure Pleasure

*

Pleasure

*

Pleasure

*

Pleasure

*

Pleasure

Pleasure Pleasure, love, deeds

*

what he pleases seldom pleases all. It is a hard undertaking to try to please everyone. He that loveth pleasure shall be a poor man: he that loveth wine and oil shall be rich. Momentary pleasure is inferior pleasure. No man is a hypocrite in his pleasure. No profit grows where there is no pleasure taken. Short pleasure often brings long repentance. Stolen pleasures are the sweetest. That man is richest whose pleasures are the cheapest. The greatest pleasure in life is doing what people say you cannot do. When pleasure interferes with business, give up business. Pleasure and love are the pinions of great deeds.

Pleasure, pain * Pleasure is nothing but the intermission of pain. Plenty, * He that tilleth his land shall have poverty plenty of bread: but he that followeth after vain persons shall have poverty enough. Plot * The friendship of two women is always a plot against a third. Plough A much-used plough shines; stagnant waters stink. Plough Better have one plough going 278

Publilius Syrus Solomon

Indian (Tamil) Samuel Johnson Shakespeare Danish English Thoreau Charles F. Kettering American Johann Wolfgang von Goethe John Selden Solomon

Unknown Estonian English


Ploughman Ploughman

* *

Plum Pocket

*

Pocket

*

Poet

Poet

*

Poet Poet

*

Poet

*

Poetry

*

Poetry

*

Poetry

*

Poetry

*

Poetry

*

Poetry

than two cradles. A bad ploughman beats the boy. The ploughman has no time for mischief. The higher the tree the sweeter the plum. A priest’s pocket is not easily filled. Put no more in the pocket than it will hold. A mighty good sausage stuffer was spoiled when he became a poet. He was a poet and hated the approximate. Poets are prophets whose prophesying never comes true. The worst tragedy for a poet is to be admired through being misunderstood. War talk by men who have been in a war is always interesting; whereas moon talk by a poet who has not been in the moon is likely to be dull. All bad poetry springs from genuine feeling. Genuine poetry can communicate before it is understood. I would as soon write free verse as play tennis with the net down. Poetry is a gift; maybe that's why you can't sell it. Poetry is a way of taking life by the throat. Poetry is an impish attempt to paint that color of the wind.

English Russian Unknown Danish English Eugene Field

Rainer Maria Rilke Ed Howe Jean Cocteau

Mark Twain

Oscar Wilde Thomas Sterns Eliot Robert Frost Unknown Robert Frost Maxwell Bodenheim

279


Poetry

Poets Poets

*

Point Point of View Poison Poison

*

Poison Poison

Poker Poker

Pole Policy Policy Polite

*

Polite

Polite Politeness 280

*

There's no money in poetry, but then there's no poetry in money either. Poets tell many lies. We can say nothing but what hath been said-our poets steal from Homer. He spoke without a note and almost without a point. Your point of view is everything: the pond is an ocean to a tadpole. Control poison with poison. One man's meat is another man's poison. One poison drives out another. There's one thing in favor of drinking poison: it never becomes a habit. In poker, the best way to conceal your hand is with your face. Poker is a matter of good judgment when you win, and luck, when you lose. The longest pole gets the persimmon. Policy goes beyond strength. When policy fails try thinking. A girl spends 3 years in finishing school learning how to behave in polite society and the rest of her of her life trying to find it. No one loses anything by being polite but there are a lot people who are afraid to take the risk. The less a man knows about you, the politer he is. Excessive politeness assuredly

Unknown

Solon Robert Burton Winston Churchill Unknown Japanese Unknown English Unknown

Unknown Unknown

American English American Unknown

Unknown

Unknown Chinese


Politeness Political party

Political party

Politician

Politician Politician

*

Politician

Politician

*

Politician Politician

*

Politician

*

Politician

Politician

conceals conceit. Great politeness usually means “I want something.” I am not a member of any organized party − I am a Democrat. The more you observe politics, the more you're got to admit that each party is worse than the other. A politician spends half his time making promises and the other half making excuses. An honest politician is one who when he’s bought stays bought. Fleas can be taught nearly anything that a Congressman can. Politicians are the same all over. They promise to build a bridge where there is no river. Since a politician never believes what he says, he is always astonished when others do. The cheaper the politician, the more it costs the country. The worst thing about political jokes is that some of them get elected. There are two sides to every question and a good politician takes both. There's nothing as shortsighted as a politician, unless it's a delegation of them. Too bad ninety percent of the politicians give the other ten percent a bad reputation.

Chinese Will Rogers

Will Rogers

Unknown

Simon Cameron Mark Twain Nikita S. Khrushchev De Gaulle

Unknown Unknown

Unknown

Will Rogers

Henry Kissinger

281


Politician

Politician, statesmen Politics Politics Politics Politics

Politics

Politics Politics Politics

Politics Politics

Politics, facts

Politics, forces, men

282

You sometimes meet a politician who is nice to you even if you can't do anything for him. If he shears the sheep, he's a statesman; if he skins them he's a politician. In politics nothing is contemptible. * In politics stupidity is not a handicap. In politics the choice is constantly between two evils. * Politics is the art of postponing decisions until they are no longer relevant. Politics is the diversion of trivial men who, when they succeed at it, become important in the eyes of more trivial men. Politics is too serious a matter to be left to politicians. Politics makes strange bedfellows. When a leader is in the Democratic Party he’s a boss, and when he’s in the Republican Party he’s a leader. You can fool too many people too much of the time. You don’t have to fool all the people all of the time; you just have to fool enough to get elected. * Practical politics consists of ignoring facts. Modern politics is a struggle not of men but of forces.

Unknown

Unknown

Benjamin Disraeli Napoleon John Morley Henri Wueville George Jean Nathan

De Gaulle American Harry S. Truman

James Thurber Gerald Barzan

Henry Brooks Adams Henry Brooks Adams


Pool Poor

Poor

Standing pools gather filth. I'm one of the undeserving poor.

*

Poor, content * Poor, proud Poor, rich, god * Poorer Pope Poppies, crosses, Flanders Portrait Portrait, satisfaction

*

Position Possession

*

Possession Possible Post Pot Pot Pot, hot Pot, Kettle

* *

English George Bernard Shaw It’s no disgrace to be poor, but it’s Yiddish no great honor either. Poor and content is rich enough. Shakespeare How apt are the poor to be Shakespeare proud? God help the poor, for the rich Unknown can look out for themselves. The poorer, the more generous. Russian Death spares neither Pope nor Portuguese beggar. In Flanders fields the poppies John McCrae blow, Between the crosses, row on row. Every time I paint a portrait, I love John S. a friend. Sarent One is never satisfied with a Johann portrait of a person that one Wolfgang knows. von Goethe Thus in the highest position there Sallust is the least freedom of action. Possession is nine points of the English law. To have is to hold and to hold is Unknown to have. I am not an optimist, I am a Julian Huxley possibilist. Little posts cannot support heavy Chinese weights. A pot does not boil when not African looked after. (Zulu) A watched pot never boils. English A little pot will be soon hot. Shakespeare The pot calls the kettle black. Unknown 283


Pottage Pottery Pound Poverty Poverty Poverty Poverty

Poverty Poverty Poverty Poverty Poverty

Poverty Poverty Poverty Poverty Poverty Poverty

Poverty

284

Blow your own pottage and not mine. Pottery and fine porcelain must not quarrel. A thousand pounds and a bottle of hay is all one at Doomsday. Do not look for poverty; it will find you. * It’s no disgrace to be poor, but it might as well be. Living hand to mouth. * No man can worship God or love his neighbor on an empty stomach. * Poverty brings nagging. Poverty generates resourcefulness. Poverty is a crime of which the rich are never guilty. Poverty is a sort of leprosy. Poverty is a wonderful thing. It sticks to a man after all his friends have forsaken him. * Poverty is no crime, but it is more certain in its punishment. Poverty is no crime, but that's all that can be said in its favor. Poverty is no crime. Poverty is no sin.

English Chinese English Polish Kin Hubbard Guillaume de Salluste Woodrow Wilson Greek Russian Unknown French Hebrew

Unknown Unknown

Russian George Herbert Poverty is not a vice. French * The only advantage of being poor Unknown is that it doesn't take much to improve your situation. There are only two families in the Miguel de world − The Haves and the Have- Cervantes


Poverty

*

Poverty

*

Poverty, love

*

Power Power Practicality

*

Practice Practice Practice

*

Practice Practice

*

Praise Praise Praise

* *

Praise

*

Praise Praise

Nots There is no poverty like poverty of spirit. When you have only two pennies left in the world, buy a loaf of bread with one, and a lily with the other. When poverty comes in the door, love flies out the window. The power of a man has grown in every sphere, except over himself. Use power to curb power. Never do anything standing that you can do sitting, or anything sitting that you can do lying down. Let your practice keep step with your knowledge. Practice comes halfway to meet every effort. Practice is the best of all instructors. Practice makes perfect. Practice yourself in little things; and thence proceed to greater. Avoid those who always praise you. Faint praise is akin to abuse. Get someone else to blow your horn and the sound will carry twice as far. He that praises publicly, will slander privately. He who praises everybody praises nobody. He who praises everybody, praises nobody.

T.C. Lai Chinese

Unknown Winston Churchill Chinese Chinese

Chinese Welsh Publilius Syrus Unknown Epictetus African (Swahili) Danish Will Rogers

English Samuel Johnson Samuel Johnson 285


Praise

Praise Praise

Praise Praise

Praise

It is salutary to train oneself to be no more affected by censure than by praise. It’s better to praise yourself than to disparage others. Let another man praise thee, and not thine own mouth; a stranger, and not thine own lips. * Praise, like gold and diamonds, owes its value only to its scarcity. The best way to knock the chip off your neighbor's shoulder is to pat him on the back. * Usually we praise only to be praised.

Praise, * Many know how to flatter; few flattery understand how to give praise. Praising, * Praising what is lost makes the remembrance remembrance dear. Pray Better to pray for yourself than to curse another. Pray He that would learn to pray, let him go to sea. Pray * He who goes to bed and does not pray, maketh two nights to every day. Pray, work, * Work as if you were to live a death hundred years, pray as if you were to die tomorrow. Prayer * A short prayer reaches heaven. Prayer * Before going to war say one prayer, before going to sea, two before getting married, three. Prayer It is better to offer your prayers to the spirits than to man. Prayer Prayer is heard best at night.

286

W. Somerset Maugham, English Yiddish Solomon

Samuel Johnson Unknown

Duc de La Rochefoucauld Greek Shakespeare Yiddish English George Herbert Benjamin Franklin English Polish

Chinese Yiddish


Prayer

Prayer, hawk, chicken Preach Preach Preaching

* * * *

Preaching, * church, silence

Try praying as nothing pleases God more than to hear a strange voice. The prayer of the chicken hawk does not get him the chicken. He preaches well that lives well. Practice what you preach. The worst scoundrels make the best preachers. I like the silent church before the service begins, better than any preaching. Look before you leap.

Precaution

*

Precept

Precepts may lead but examples draw. Silence is golden. Some prefer carrot while others like cabbage. * If my theory of relativity is proven successful, Germany will claim me as a German and France will declare that I am a citizen of the world. Should my theory prove untrue, France will say I am a German and Germany will declare that I am a Jew. Prejudice: A vagrant opinion without visible means of support. It is never too late to give up our prejudices. Small presents keep friendship warm. Yesterday is ashes; sorrow wood for only today does the fire burn brightly. If I knew as much now as I

Precious Preference Prejudice

Prejudice, vagrant Prejudices Present Present

President

Unknown

African English English German Ralph Waldo Emerson John Heywood English English Chinese Albert Einstein

Ambrose Bierce Henry David Thoreau Slovenian Unknown

Warren G. 287


President

*

President

*

President

*

President

Pretend Pretense

*

Pretense

Prettiness Pretty Prevention Prey

*

Price Pricks

*

Pride Pride Pride

Pride 288

*

thought I knew at 19, I'd be the greatest President this country ever had. Some men would rather be right than President, while others are not so particular. The White House is the finest prison in the world. When I became President, what surprised me most was that things were just as bad as I'd been saying they were. When I was a boy I was told that anyone could be President. I’m beginning to believe it. To pretend to know when you do not is a disease. Half of who make love could be arrested for counterfeiting. When some men take a position on high moral grounds it is always a bluff. Prettiness dies first. Pretty is as pretty does. Prevention is better than cure. When its time has arrived, the prey comes to the hunter. Every man has his price. It is hard for thee to kick against the pricks. A little pride is good even in a wild horse. He that is proud eats up himself. I might have gone to West Point but I was too proud to speak to a congressman. If pride were an art, how many

Harding

Unknown

Harry S. Truman John F. Kennedy

Clarence Darrow Lao-tzu Ed Howe Unknown

English American English Iranian Unknown Bible English Unknown Will Rogers

Italian


Pride Pride Pride Pride Pride Pride Pride Pride Pride Pride Pride, envy, avarice Priest Priest Prince Prince Prince, darkness Principle

Principles

doctors we should have. * Pride and grace dwell never in one place. Pride and poverty are ill met, yet often seen together. * Pride comes before the fall. Pride goeth before a fall, but it goeth a lot quicker after one. Pride swells with flattery.

English English Shakespeare Unknown

SerboCroatian * Pride that dines on vanity sups on American contempt. * Pride went out on horseback and Italian returned on foot. Pride will always have a fall. English Pride will spit in pride’s face. English * You can’t hold your head high Yiddish with your hand out. Pride, Envy and Avarice are the Dante three sparks that have set these Alighieri hearts on fire. Priests also smile pleasantly on German your women. Priests and women never forget. German If the prince wants an apple, his German servants take the tree. Never joke in the presence of a Chinese prince. The prince of darkness is a Shakespeare gentleman. When a fellow says it ain’t the Kin Hubbard money but the principle of the thing, it’s the money. Aspire to the principle, behave Confucius with virtue, abide by benevolence, and immerse yourself in the arts. 289


Priorities Prison

Privacy

*

Privacy Probability Problem

*

Procession Procrastinate

Procrastinate

*

Procrastinate

*

Procrastinate Procrastinate

*

Procrastinate

Procrastinate Procrastinate

*

Procrastinate yesterday

*

290

Better to be deprived of food for Chinese three days, than tea for one. The most anxious man in a prison George is the warden. Bernard Shaw Family disgrace must not be T.C. Lai spread abroad. Do not wash your dirty linen in public. That which is everybody's Izaak Walton business is nobody's business. A thousand probabilities do not English make one truth. A problem is a chance for you to Unknown do your best. It is an ill procession where the English devil holds the candle. Definition of a manager: A man Anonymous who never puts off till tomorrow that which he can get someone else to do today. I’m going to stop putting off Sam things starting tomorrow. Levenson If it weren’t for the last minute, Unknown nothing would get done. Never put off till tomorrow what Unknown you can do today. One of these days is none of Unknown these days. Procrastination is the thief of Antoine de time. SaintExupery Procrastination is the thief of English time. Thank God for the last minute. Anonymous Otherwise nothing would ever get done. Procrastination is the art of Don Marquis keeping up with yesterday.


Produces Profession

Professor

Profit Profit

Profit Profit

* Money begets money. Lawyers, preachers and tomtit's eggs, there are more of them hatched than come to perfection. College professors are people who get what’s left over after the football coach is paid off. If the profits are great, the risks are great. * It is a socialist idea that making profits is a vice; I consider that the real vice is making losses. Profit is better than fame. Profit surpasses pride.

English Benjamin Franklin Unknown

Chinese Winston Churchill

Danish African (Swahili) Profit * Profits don’t live without losses. Russian Profit, penury In all labor there is profit: but the Solomon talk of the lips tendeth only to penury. Projection Do not count your chickens Aesop before they're hatched. Promiscuity Some men have no ambition or Ed Howe ability, except about women. Promise A fair promise binds a fool. French Promise A promise is a debt. Irish Promise * A promise made at an inn never Latvian leaves it. Promise Easily promised, quickly Japanese forgotten. Promise Easy to promise, hard to fulfill. Yiddish Promise Old promises are left behind. Australian (Maori) Promise Promise is debt. English Promise * Promises and piecrust are made Jonathan to be broken. Swift Promise There are no greater promisers Dutch than they who have nothing to 291


Promises Promises Promises

*

Promises

*

Promising Proof Proof

Proof

*

Proof

*

Property Property Prophecy

Prophecy

Prophet

*

Prophet, historian Prosperity

*

292

give. Never promise more than you can perform. Promise is most given when the least is said. Promises are like babies: easy to make, hard to deliver. The fruits will outdo what the flowers have promised. Promising and performing are two things. An ounce of proof is worth a ton of assertions. If a man could say nothing against a character but what he could prove, history could not be written. Shed no tears until seeing the coffin. The proof of the pudding is in the eating. Property has its duties as well as its rights. Touch my property touch my life. A country is sometimes not without honor save for its own prophet. I always avoid prophesying beforehand because it is much better to prophesy after the event has already taken place. The prophet knows no more than ordinary man but he knows it earlier. A historian is a prophet in reverse.

* Few of us can stand prosperity −

Publilius Syrus George Chapman Unknown Francois de Malherbe French American Samuel Johnson

Chinese English Thomas Drummond American Samuel Butler Winston Churchill

Dagobert D. Runes Friedrich von Schlegel Mark Twain


Prosperity

Prosperity

*

Prosperity Prosperity

* *

Prosperity, deceit, appearances Prostitution

Prostitution

Prove

*

Proverb Proverb Proverb Proverb Proverbs

*

another man’s, I mean. If you want 1 year of prosperity, grow grain. If you want 10 years of prosperity, grow trees. If you want 100 years of prosperity, grow people. Prosperity has ruined many a many but, if a man has to be ruined, that is the most pleasant way. Prosperity lets go the bridle. When you ascend the hill of prosperity may you not meet a friend. Prosperity doth bewitch men, seemingly clear; but seas do laugh, snow white, when rocks are near. It has been said that politics is the second oldest profession. I have learned that it bears a striking resemblance to the first. Prostitutes are a necessity: without them, men would assault respectable women in the streets. That which proves too much proves nothing. A country can be judged by the quality of its proverbs. A proverb is a short sentence based on long experience. Proverbs are butterflies, some are caught, others escape. Proverbs are the coins of the people. A maxim is a saying of maximum repetition and minimum value.

Chinese

Unknown

English Mark Twain

John Webster

Ronald Reagan

Napoleon

English German Proverb Miguel De Cervantes Russian Russian Unknown

293


Proverbs

Proverbs Proverbs, griefs Proverbs, wisdom, nation Proximity

Proximity Proximity Prudence Prudence Prudence

Prudence Prudence Prudence Prudence Prudence

Prudery, avarice 294

Another thing that everyone Unknown preaches and no one practices is a proverb. * Some proverbs are half-truths, Unknown but most are semi-falsehoods. * Patch griefs with proverbs. Shakespeare Proverbs contradict each other. This is the wisdom of the nation.

Stanislaw Jerzy Lee

* A slap on the back is only a few inches away from a kick in the butt * Distant water won't help to put out a fire close at hand. Distant water won't quench your immediate thirst. * A grain of prudence is worth a pound of craft. * An ounce of prudence is worth a pound of gold. Be valiant, but not too venturous; Let thy attire be comely, but not too costly. Don't put all your eggs in one basket. Prudence does no harm. * Prudence looks ahead as well as behind. To know the road ahead, ask those coming back. When planning for a year, plant corn. When planning for a decade, plant trees. When planning for life, train and educate people. * Prudery is a kind of avarice, the worst of all.

Unknown

Chinese Chinese English English John Lyly

Miguel de Cervantes German American Unknown Chinese

Stendal (Henri Beyle)


Psalm Psychiatrists

Psychiatrists Psychiatrists Psychiatrists Psychiatrists

Psychoanalysis *

Psychoanalysis * Psychological, speaking Public Public

*

Public Speaking Public Speaking

*

Public Speaking Public, damned Public,

*

He that can’t sing psalms, let him pray. A normal person is one who has not yet been examined by a psychiatrist. A psychiatrist is secure only as long as his parents aren't. Psychiatrists never seem to find anything good about anybody. Psychiatry covers a multitude of sins. Psychiatry is a branch of medicine that enables a person to suggest a wrong course of treatment with complete confidence. Daughters go into analysis hating their fathers, and come out hating their mothers. They never come out hating themselves. Psychoanalysis is the disease it claims to cure. He knew the precise psychological moment when to say nothing. He who serves the public has a sorry master. Who serves the public, serves no one. God gave eloquence to some, brains to others. The first rule of public speaking is to speak up, the second is to sit down. The three "Bs" of public speaking are: be brief, be interesting, be gone. The public be damned.

* The public seldom forgive twice.

American Unknown

Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Laurie Jo Wojcik

Karl Kraus Oscar Wilde Italian Italian Unknown Unknown

Unknown

William Vanderbuilt Johann 295


forgiveness Publicity

Publicity

*

Publish, damn Pudding

*

Pudding Pudding Pull down

*

Punctuality

*

Punctuality Punctuality, politeness Punctuation

*

*

Punishment

Punishment Punishment

*

Punishment

*

Punishment Punishment

*

296

Kaspar Lavater Many a man would give to charity Unknown anonymously, but only if it were well publicized. What kills a skunk is the publicity Abraham it gives itself. Lincoln Publish and be damned. Duke of Wellington Better some of a pudding than English none of a pie. Pudding before praise. English Too much pudding will choke a English dog. It is easier to pull down than to English build up. Better three hours too soon than William a minute too late. Shakespeare Punctuality is the soul of business. English Punctuality is the politeness of Louis XVIII kings. All morning I worked on the proof Oscar Wilde of one of my poems, and I took out a comma; in the afternoon, I put it back. A man in jail has more room, Samuel better food, and often better Johnson company. For great wrongdoing there are Euripides great punishments from the gods. He that spareth his rod hateth his Solomon son: but he that loveth him chasteneth him often times. Let the punishment match the Cicero offence. Spare the rod and spoil the child. Unknown The best way to avoid Chinese


Punishment

Pupil Purchase Purse Purse Purse Purse Purse Purse Push Put Quality Quality Quality Quanta

Quarrel

Quarrel Quarrel Quarrel

punishment is to fear it. The rod and reproof give wisdom: but a child left to himself bringeth his mother shame. Every pupil is, as he is taught. No purchase like a gift. * A light purse is a heavy curse. A light purse makes a heavy heart. An empty purse fills the face with wrinkles. Near is my purse, but nearer is my soul. The longest purse will prevail. You can’t make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear. * You can only go as far as you push. If you put something in, you can take something out. It is quality rather than quantity that matters. It's quality rather than quantity that matters. Quality is often used as an excuse for lack of quantity. The more one chases after quanta, the better they hide themselves. Every married couple has a lot to contend with-they have each other. It takes two to quarrel. One cannot quarrel without an opponent. People generally quarrel because they cannot argue.

Solomon

Irish French English English English English American English Unknown Yiddish Publilius Syrus Seneca Unknown Albert Einstein Unknown

Unknown Unknown Chesterton

297


Quarrels

Question

Question Question

Question

Question, answer

Question, answer Question, answer Quiet Quip Quip Quotation Quotation

Rabbi

298

Quarrels would not last if the fault were only one side. * A man soon learns how little he knows when a child begins to ask questions. Ask a silly question and you'll get a silly answer. I had six honest serving men who taught me all they knew; their names were Where and What and When, and Why and How and Who. When you ask a chatterbox a question, it's like pulling your finger out of a dike. Four and sixteen are the most provocative ages: at four, you know all the questions: at sixteen, you know all the answers. * Judge a man by his questions rather than his answers. Many a short question is evaded by a long answer. Give me my scallop of quiet. A proverb is practical wisdom; a quip, impractical wit. You're got to snap the quip to make Pegasus prance. A quotation at the right moment is like bread to the famished. You could compile the worst book in the world entirely out of selected passages from the best writers in the world. * If you’re at odds with your rabbi, make peace with your bartender.

Duc de La Rochefoucauld Unknown

Unknown Kipling

Unknown

Unknown

Voltaire Unknown Sir Walter Raleigh Unknown Robert Frost The Talmud Chesterton

Yiddish


Rabbi Rabbit Rabbit Rabbit

*

Rabble Race

Race Radical

Radical

Rage Rags

*

*

Raillery Rain Rain Rain Rain Rain Rain Rain

*

Whether a rabbi or a bath-house keeper, all have enemies. Even the nibbling rabbit can gorge itself to death. It is easier to watch a flock of rabbits than a woman. When the rabbit has escaped, comes the advice. Govern the rabble by opposing them. Know ye not that they which run a race run all, but only one receives the prize. The race is got by running. I never dared be radical when young for fear it would me conservative when old. The trouble with radicals is that they're always trying to make the world much better instead of just a little better. Rage vials less than courage. You may deal in rags and dress in velvet. No raillery is worse than that which is true. A heavy rain is good for the fields and bad for the roads. A little rain stills a great wind. Drop by drop rain fills a pot.

It never rains but it pours. It's best to read the weather forecast before praying for rain. More rain, more rest. * Rain before seven, fine before eleven.

Yiddish Tibetan Rumanian Spanish Egyptian Bible

English Robert Frost

Unknown

French Yiddish English Yiddish English African (Annang) English Mark Twain English Unknown

299


Rain

Rain Rain Rain Rain Rainbow Rainbow

Raindrop Rancor Rank Rascal, skunk

Rashness Rat Rat Rat Rat Rat Rat Rat Raven Raven

300

Rain chases you into the house and a quarrelsome wife chases you out. * Rainy days come to those who save up for them. Small rain lays a great dust. * To see it rains is better than to be in it. Who has been almost drowned fears not the rain. Go to the end of the rainbow and you’ll find a crock of gold. The way I see it, if you want the rainbow, you gotta put up with the rain. Raindrops will hollow a stone. Rancor sticks long by the ribs. Rank does not make the man. Make yourself a good man, then you can be sure there is at least one less skunk in the world. Rashness is not valor. A cornered rat will bite a cat. A squirrel is a rat with good PR. An old rat easily finds a hole. As one rat brings another, so lawyer brings lawyer. Rats know the way of rats. The rat that knows but one hole is soon caught by the cat. The rats may safely play when the cat’s away. Bring up a raven and he will peck out your eyes. Foster a raven and it will peck out

Yiddish

Unknown English English Albanian English Dr. Robert Anthony Korean English Greek 19th Century Western American Prayer English Japanese Unknown Dutch American Chinese Spanish English French Spanish


Read Reading

*

Reading Reading, writing Reading, writing

*

Reading, writing Reading, writing Reading, writing Reading, writing Reality

Reap Reap

*

Rear attack

*

Reason Reason

*

your eyes. Read not before you learn to spell. After three days without reading, talk becomes flavorless. Reading is to the mind what exercise is to the body. Foolish writers and reader are created for each other. I never desire to converse with a man who has written more than he has read. The book that can be read without any trouble was probably written without any trouble also. The hand of the writer should never be concerned with the eye of the reader. We read often with as much talent as we write. What is written without effort is read without pleasure. By convention there is color, by convention, sweetness, by convention bitterness, but in reality there are only atoms and space. As you sow, so shall you reap. What you reap, that you will thresh. It is easy to dodge a spear that comes in front of you but hard to keep harms away from an arrow shot from behind. A woman’s reason: because‌ Better to die than turn your back on reason.

English Chinese Edward Young Horace Walpole Samuel Johnson Oscar Wilde

Jules Renard

Emerson Samuel Johnson Democritus

Unknown Russian Chinese

English Chinese

301


Reason

Reason Reason Reason Reason

*

Reason Reason

*

Reason

*

Reason Reason Reason, good, * real Rebuke Reciprocity Reckoning Reckoning Reckoning Recollection Recommend

302

*

He who becomes angry for no reason becomes friendly again for no reason. Hearken to reason or it will be heard. If you will not hear reason, it will surely rap your knuckles. Man is a reasoning rather than a reasonable animal. Nothing is ever accomplished by a reasonable man. Poor men’s reasons are not heard. Reason does not come before years. Reason lies between the spur and the bridle. Reason rules all things. Reasons are not like garments, the worse for the wearing. A man always has two reasons for doing something − a good reason and the real reason. Open rebuke is better than secret love. One good turn asketh another.

Even reckoning makes long friends. Old reckonings breed new disputes. Old reckonings make new quarrels. * Take notes on the spot, a note is worth a cart-load of recollections. A fair exterior is a silent recommendation.

Yiddish

English English Alexander Hamilton American English German English English English J.P. Morgan

Solomon John Heywood English French English Ralph Waldo Emerson Publilius Syrus


Reconciliation, * Strange to see how a good dinner dinner and feasting reconciles everybody. Rectify Until you have rectified yourself, you cannot rectify others. Redemption There is no redemption from hell. Reflection Study without reflection is a waste of time; reflection without study is dangerous. Reform Every reform was once a private opinion Reform I admit that I never did warm to a reformer or the reformed. Reform I regret that before people can be reformed they have to be sinners. Reform If a man has a pain in his bowels, he forthwith sets about reforming the world. Reformers, * All reformers are bachelors − all bachelors. extreme reformers have been bachelors. Reforming, * Nothing so needs reforming as habits other peoples habits. Refusal * A refusal is better than a broken promise. Refusal When someone says, "I'll think it over and let you know", you already know. Refuse I shall never ask, never refuse, nor ever resign an office. Refuse Only refuse is to be gotten free. Regret A thousand regrets do not pay one debt. Regret It's better to have something to remember than noting to regret. Regret Looking back, I have this to regret, that too often when I loved, I did

Samuel Pepys Chinese English Confucius

Emerson Robert Frost Ogden Nash Thoreau

George Moore Mark Twain Welsh Unknown

Benjamin Franklin Yiddish Turkish Unknown David Grayson

303


Regret Regret

*

Reinforcement Relation * Relative

*

Relative

*

Relative

Relative Relativity

*

Relief, cause, theory, fact, result Religion

*

Religion

*

Religion Religion

304

*

not say so. Nobody has a monopoly on regret. Regret for the things we did can be tempered by time; it is regret for the things we did not do that is inconsolable. Reinforcement beats the foe. Love your relations, but don’t live near them. Do not disregard a poor relative nor a slight wound. Eat and drink with your relatives; do business with strangers. On the day your horse dies and your gold vanishes, your relatives are like strangers met on the road. Relatives are friends from necessity. Sit with a pretty girl for an hour and it seems like a minute; sit on a hot stove for a minutes and it seems like an hour − that's relativity. I pass with relief from the tossing sea of Cause and Theory to the firm ground of Result and Fact. All religions must be tolerated, for every man must get to heaven in his own way. Every man goes to Hell in his own way. I don’t believe in God because I don’t believe in Mother Goose. Irreligious men are often better suited for godly missions.

Yiddish Sydney J. Harris

African (Oji) English Finnish Greek Chinese

Russian Einstein

Sir Winston Churchill Frederick the Great Unknown Clarence Darrow Hasidic Saying


Religion

Religion

It is a reproach to religion and government to suffer so much poverty and excess. It is the test of a good religion whether you can joke about it. Man is the only animal who's got the true religion − several of them. Many have quarreled about religion that never practiced it. Men are swayed more by fear than by reverence. One religion is as true as another.

Religion

*

Religion

*

Religion

*

Religion

*

Religion

* Religion has two children, love and hatred. * Religion is the best armor in the world, but the worst cloak. * Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich. * Religion stands on tip toe in our land. The man who is always worrying whether or not his soul would be damned generally has a soul that isn’t worth a damn. * The nearer to church, the further from God. * There is only one religion, but there are a hundred versions of it.

Religion Religion Religion Religion

Religion

William Penn

Chesterton Mark Twain

Benjamin Franklin Aristotle Robert Burton Russian English Napoleon George Herbert Oliver Wendell Holmes

John Heywood Religion George Bernard Shaw Religion * There would never have been an Jefferson infidel if there had never been a priest. Religion * You can change your faith without Stanislaw J. changing gods, and vice versa. Lec Religion, cross, On her white breast a sparkling Alexander infidels, Jews cross she wore, Which Jew might Pope 305


Religion, minds Religion, opium Religion, philosophy Religion, science

Religion, volcanoes Reluctance

Remarks, quote Remedies Remedies, illness Remedy

*

*

* *

Remedy Remedy

*

Remedy

*

Remedy Remedy

*

Remedy Remedy

306

*

kiss and infidels adore. Superstition is the religion of feeble minds. Religion is the opiate of the masses. All good moral philosophy is but a hand maiden to religion. Religious feeling is as much a verity as any other part of human consciousness; and against it, on the subjective side, the waves of science beat in vain. Old religious factions are volcanoes burnt out. There is nothing so easy but that becomes difficult when you do it reluctantly. Famous remarks are very seldom quoted correctly. There are some remedies worse than the disease. Nearly all men die of their remedies than their illnesses. A remedy without pain is not to be hoped for. Adapt the remedy to the disease. For compassion and for cowardice there is no remedy. Galloping in water is the remedy for a vicious horse. No remedy but patience. Sometimes the remedy is worse than the disease. The remedy against bad times is to have patience with them. The remedy is worse than the disease.

Edmund Burke Karl Marx Francis Bacon John Tyndall

Edmund Burke Terence

Simeon Strunsky Publilius Syrus Moliere Turkish Chinese Yiddish African (Hausa) English Yiddish Egyptian English


Remedy Remedy

*

Remedy Remedy remedy, cure

*

Remember Remember

Remember Remember Remember, forget

*

Remembered Remembered Remembering

Remembrance *

Remission Remorse Reorganize

There is a remedy for all things but death. There is a remedy for everything; it is called death. Tomorrow’s remedy will not ward off the evil of today. When there’s a remedy for an ailment, it’s only half an ailment. The remedy is worse than the disease. Better twice remembered than once forgotten. It isn't so astonishing, the number of things I can remember, as the number of things I can remember that aren't so. Remember the poor as it costs nothing. The best way to be remembered by people is to owe them money. A happy marriage is one where a man knows what to remember and a woman what to forget. Once seen never forgotten. The last benefit is the one remembered. Better by far you should forget and smile than that you should remember and cry. The remembrance of a former misfortune proves a new one to me. Without shedding of blood there is no remission. Never mind the remorse; don’t commit the sin. Never reorganize except for a

English Portuguese Spanish Yiddish Francis Bacon Dutch Mark Twain

Unknown Unknown Unknown

Unknown The Barber Book Christina Georgina Rossetti Miguel de Cervantes Bible Yiddish John Akers

307


Repair Repartee Repartee

Repeat

Repentance Repentance Repentance Repentance Repentance Repentance repetition

Replacement Report

Report

Reproach Reproof

308

good business reason. But if you haven’t reorganized in a while, that’s a good business reason. Better to repair than to build anew. A good retort always puts the other person in a bad humor. * Repartee is the art of saying what you think − and getting out of range before it is understood. If you repeat often enough that you’re right, you will discover you’re wrong. Late repentance is seldom worth much. Repentance always comes behind. Repentance comes too late. Repentance costs very dear. Repentance for silence is better than repentance for speaking. Repentance is imagining heaven but feeling pain. * A man who has committed a mistake and doesn't correct it is committing another mistake. One heat drives out another, and one passion expels still another. * This report, by its very length, defends itself against the risk of being read. When some men discharge an obligation you can hear the report for miles around. You reproach yourself ten times when you reproach others once. Public reproof hardens shame.

African (Hausa) Unknown Unknown

Yiddish

Danish English English French Moroccan Unknown Confucius

George Chapman Winston Churchill Mark Twain

Vietnamese English


Republican

Republican

Republican

*

Reputation

*

Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation

Reputation

Request Research Resistance

Resolution Respect Respect

* *

If you shoot a Republican out of season, the fine will be ten dollars and costs. Republicans are men who made their money under the Democrats and wish to see that nobody else is faced with the same dastardly sin on their consciences. Republicans will do anything for the poor except get off their backs. A good name is better than a good face. A man is known by the company he shakes. A reputation is seldom cured. The reputation of a man is the shadow of a tree. Their bodies are buried in peace; but their name liveth for evermore. When a person loses his reputation, the last place he looks for it is where he lost it. Great men’s requests are commands. Research is a crock!

19th Century Mississippi Saying Billy Boy Franklin

American

Unknown Unknown English Indian (Hindustani) Bible

Unknown

Danish

Michael Eisner There's no striving against the Miguel de stream, and the weakest still goes Cervantes to the wall. The best way to keep a New Unknown Year's resolution is to yourself. He that respects nothing is not English respected. * I get no respect. The way my luck Rodney is running, if I was a politician I’d Dangerfield be honest. 309


Respect Respect

Respect is mutual. *

Responsibility

Responsibility

Rest Rest Rest Rest Result Resume

*

Retreat Retreat

*

Retreat

*

Retribution

Retribution

Retribution Return Return Revenge

310

African (Zulu) Respect the man and he will do The Barber the more. Book Some men always recognize their Unknown duty in sufficient time to side-step it. You are not in charge of the Arnold universal: you are in charge of Bennett yourself. A short rest is always good. Danish Even rest will make the lazy tired. Hungarian There is no rest for the poor man. African (Hausa) Who troubles others has no rest Italian himself. Results are what you expect, and Unknown consequences are what you get. A resume is a balance sheet Robert Half without any liabilities. A brave retreat is a brave exploit. English A good retreat is better than a Irish poor defense. He who fights and runs away, Unknown lives to fight another day. In this world a man gets all that Unknown he can − in the next world, all that he deserves. The man who asks a woman what Alec Waugh she wants deserves all that's coming to him. What goes around comes around. Unknown The man who lets himself go Unknown should remember to come back. What goes up must come down. Unknown Jimmy Carter is the South’s Ronald revenge for Sherman’s march Reagan


Revenge

*

Revenge

*

Revenge Revenge Revenge Revenge, woman Reviling

*

*

Revolution

Revolution Revolution

Revolution, silk, gloves Reward

Reward, punishment Reward, timing Rhyme Rhyme Rice Rice

*

*

through Georgia. Revenge converts a little right into a great wrong. Revenge is a dish best served cold. Revenge is new wrong. Revenge is sweet. The revenge that is postponed is not forgotten. A woman always has a revenge ready. In reviling, it is not necessary to prepare a preliminary draft. Never wear your best trousers when you go out to fight for freedom and truth. Revolutions are not made with rosewater. So they united, and the Communist revolution took the chain from their legs and wound it around their necks. You can't make a revolution with silk gloves. There's often a reward for finding something, but never for finding fault. Service without reward is punishment. Reward workers while the sweat’s still on their brow. A little before my sixtieth year I first committed the sin of rhyme. It may rhyme, but it accords not. Rice and fish are as inseparable as mother and child. Rice obtained by crookedness will

German Unknown German English Icelandic Moliere Chinese Henrik Ibsen

English Samuel Bonom

Joseph Stalin Unknown

George Herbert H. Ross Perot Robert Frost English Vietnamese Chinese 311


Rice

*

Rich

*

Rich

Rich

Rich

Rich

*

Rich

Rich

*

Rich Rich Rich Rich, death

*

Rich, money

Rich, poor Rich, poor

312

*

not boil up into good food. Without rice even the cleverest housewife cannot cook. Get what you can and keep what you have. That’s the way to get rich. If a fool and his money are soon parted, why are there so many rich fools? It is an easy matter for a stingy man to get rich − but what’s the use? It is the wretchedness of being rich that you have to live with rich people. Some people are so rich they have no neighbors. The greatest luxury of riches is that they enable you to escape too much good advice. The only thing I like about rich people is their money. The rich and pigs are appreciated after their death. Today rich, tomorrow a beggar. When one is rich, one begins to save. It is better to live rich, than to die rich. There are people who have money and there are people who are rich. I’ve been rich and I’ve been poor. Rich is better. The best condition in life is not to be rich as to be envied, nor so poor as to be damned.

Unknown Scottish

Unknown

American

Logan Pearsall Smith Unknown Arthur Helps

Lady Astor Russian American German Samuel Johnson Coco (Gabrielle) Chanel Sophie Tucker John Billings


Rich, poor

The poor have more children, but the rich have more relatives. Rich, poor * The rich have money; the poor children. Riches Riches bring oft harm and ever fear. Riches Riches serve a wise man but command a fool. Riches The miser’s riches fall into the spendthrift’s hands. Right * Right is a stubborn thing. Right The greatest lesson in life is to know that even fools are right sometimes. Right There is no mistake so great as that of being always right. Right, gratify, * Always do right. This will gratify astonish some people and astonish others. Right, wrong A man may be intellectually right though being morally wrong. Right, wrong When you're right, no one remembers: when you're wrong, no one forgets. Righteous Behold, the righteous shall be remompensated in the earth: much more than the wicked and the sinner. Righteousness Better is a little with righteousness than great revenues without right. Righteousness I lead in the way of righteousness, in the midst of the paths of judgment. Righteousness The fruit of the righteous is a tree of life; and he that winneth souls is wise. Righteousness, It is an abomination to kings to wickedness commit wickedness: for the

Unknown Estonian English English Greek American Winston Churchill Samuel Butler Mark Twain Chesterton Unknown

Solomon

Solomon

Solomon

Solomon

Solomon

313


Rights, defend, death Rigidity Ring Ring

*

Ring

Ring

*

Ripe Ripe Ripe Risk

* *

Risk Risk Risk

*

*

*

Risk Rivals

*

River

*

River River 314

throne is established by righteousness. I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it. The bow too tensely strung is easily broken. A man sits as many risks as he runs. Don't be afraid to take a big step if one is indicated; you can't cross a chasm in two small jumps. Nothing is ever gained without risk: you can't steal second base and still keep one foot on first. There are lots of ways to become a failure, but never taking a chance is the most successful. Fast to ripe, fast to rotten. Soon to ripe, soon to rot. What ripens fast doesn’t last. Behold the turtle: He only makes progress when he sticks his neck out. He who dares wins. Nothing risked, nothing gained. Unless you enter the tiger’s den, you cannot get her cubs. You can't catch a cub without going into the tiger's den. Of all the plagues a lover bears, sure rivals are the worst. One can fill up a river or a well, but never a foul mouth. Ten thousand rivers flow into the sea, but the sea is never full. Trust the river but not the brook.

Voltaire

Publilius Syrus Thoreau Lloyd George

Unknown

Unknown

Japanese English German James Bryant Conant Unknown American Japanese Chinese William Walsh Vietnamese Chinese Russian


Road Road Road Road Road

Road Road Road Road Road Roads Robber Robbery Rock Rock, ages

Rod, training

Rome Rome Rome

* A long road tests a horse; long drawn-out affairs test a friend. * Even the longest road has an end. Every road has two directions. Every road leads somewhere. If you wish to know the road ahead, inquire of those who have traveled it. Make haste before the road gets slippery. * One road leads to heaven but many lead to hell. The road that is preferred leads to destruction. The road to ruin is paved with good intentions. To a friend’s house the road is never long. All roads lead to Rome. * Even a robber fastens his door. Rob Peter to pay Paul.

Chinese American Russian Philippine Chinese

African (Bemba) Hungarian Japanese German Danish English Japanese John Heywood Homer

* A small rock holds back a great wave. Rock of ages, cleft for me, Let me Audustus hide myself in thee. Montague Tolady * Thou shalt beat him with a rod, Solomon and shalt deliver his soul from hell. He who wishes to live at Rome French must not quarrel with the Pope. I found Rome a city of bricks and Augustus left it a city of marble. Caesar Rome has more churches and less Will Rogers preaching in them than any other city in the world. 315


Rome Roof Roof Room Room

Room Room Rope

*

Rope

*

Rope Rope, end Rose Roses Rubbish

*

*

Rudder Rule Rule

*

Rule Rule, exception 316

*

When in Rome do as the Romans do, unless your wife is with you. He who has a glass roof should not throw stones at his neighbors. When the roof is leaky, it rains that night. Room can always be found for a delicacy. The biggest room in the house in the house is always the room for self-improvement. There is always room at the bottom. When there is room in the heart, there is room in the house. Give him rope enough and he’ll hang himself. He pulls with a long rope that waits for another’s death. Pull gently at a weak rope. The longest rope has an end. A single rose does not mean spring. Under the thorn grows the roses. He who sits among the rubbish must not be surprised if pigs devour him. He who will not be ruled by the rudder must be ruled by the rock. Better rule than be ruled by the rout. It is a poor rule that won’t work both ways. There is no rule without an exception. No rule is so general, which admits not some exception.

Unknown Italian Chinese Hebrew Unknown

Unknown Danish English English Dutch Unknown Iranian Unknown SerboCroatian English English American English Robert Burton


Rulers Rules

Ruling Rumor Rumor Run

Rushing Russia

Rut Sack Sack Sack Sacrifice Saddle Sadness, English Safety Safety Safety Safety

A multitude of rulers is not a good Homer thing. * If you must play, decide on three Chinese things at the start: the rules of the game, the stakes, and the quitting time. * Rule will show the man. The Seven Sages One rumor breeds another. Slovakian Rumor is a pipe. Shakespeare Honesty may be the best policy in Unknown the long run, but most of us are only sprinters. No man who is in a hurry is quite Will Durant civilized. The trees in Siberia are miles Bob Hope apart and that’s why the dogs are so fast there. He that stays in the valley will Unknown never get over the hill. A broken sack holds no corn. English A short sack has a wide mouth. English * An old sack asks much patching. English * Better one house spoiled than Unknown two. Better lose the saddle than the Italian horse. The English take their pleasures Duc de Sully sadly, after the fashion of their country. * Any port is good in a storm. Unknown Better safe than sorry. Unknown * I would give my all for a pot of Shakespeare ale, and safety. * Keep your broken arm inside your Chinese sleeve.

317


Safety

Safety Sage Said Said Sail Sail Sailing Sailing Sailing

*

Sailor Sailor

*

Sailor

*

Saint

*

Saint Saint Saint

Saint Salesmen

Salt 318

*

There is no less likely way of winning a war than to adhere pedantically to the maxim of “safety first.� There is safety in numbers. The Way of the age is to act but not to compete. Least said soonest mended. Sooner said than done. All sails do not suit every ship. You must shift your said with the wind. It is good sailing with wind and tide. It is ill sailing against wind and tide. It is the safest sailing within reach of the shore. A sailor has a sweetheart in every port. Even good sailors are tried in a storm. Too many sailors drive the boat up the mountain. All are not saints that go to church. Everyone praises his own saint. Small saints too work miracles. There's no one so uncomfortable as the bishop who has a saint in his diocese. Young saint, old devil. Most salesmen try to take the horse to water and make him drink. Your job is to make the horse thirsty. Salt spilled is never all gathered.

Winston Churchill

Unknown Lao-tzu English English Icelandic Italian Dutch Dutch Dutch American American Japanese English Italian German Unknown

English Gabriel M. Siegel

Spanish


Salt Salvation Salve Sampling Sand Sap Sardine Satan Satisfaction Satisfaction Satisfaction

* You mustn’t pour salt on a wound. Work out your own salvation with fear and trembling. * There’s a salve for every sore. By a small sample we may judge the whole piece. What is written on sand is washed out by the tide. Sap runs best after a sharp frost. * Better a sardine on the dish than a flounder in the sea. Get thee behind me, Satan. Better half a loaf than no bread at all. He is well paid that is well satisfied. I am easily satisfied with the best.

Yiddish Bible English Miguel De Cervantes Philippine American Hebrew Bible John Heywood Unknown

Winston Churchill Satisfaction Revenge is sweet. Unknown Satisfaction * Those who know when they have Confucius enough are truly rich. Sausage Better a sausage in hand than a Polish ham at the butcher’s. Sausages, man Many men are like unto sausages: Alexei Tolstoi whatever you stuff them with, that they will bear in them. Savage, yoke * In time even the savage bull doth Shakespeare wear the yoke. Saving * A little saving is no sin. English Saving Take care of your pennies and American your dollars will take care of your widow’s next husband. Savvy I know on which side my bread is John buttered. Heywood Say Easy to say is hard to do. French Say If you cannot say something good, Greek 319


Say Say Say Say Saying Saying, doing

*

Saying, doing

*

Saying, doing Sayings Scale Scale Scale

*

Scandal, sin, privacy

*

Scar

*

Scare

*

Scent

*

Scholar

*

Scholar 320

don’t say something bad. Say as men say, but think to yourself. Say but little, and say it well. Say little and listen much. Say well or be still. Saying is one thing, doing another. Between saying and doing there is a great distance. Between saying and doing there is a long road. Saying is one thing; doing another. An old man’s sayings are seldom untrue. Good scales bring good customers. Just scales and full measure injure no man. The scale can't distinguish gold from lead. To create a public scandal is what's wicked; to sin in private is not a sin. Though the wound be healed, a scar remains. A good scare is usually worth more to a person than good advice. The scent of these arm pits aroma − finer than prayer; This head – more than churches, bibles, and all the creeds. Great scholars are not the shrewdest men. He that robs a scholar robs

English Irish Greek English Italian Danish Spanish Unknown Danish Greek Chinese English Moliere

Unknown Unknown

Walt Whitman

French English


Scholar

Scholar School

*

Science, religion Science, religion

*

Science, sociology

*

*

Score Scorecard

*

Scotchman

*

Scotty, life, intelligence Scrap Scratch Sea

*

Sea Sea

*

Sea

Sea

Sea

* *

twenty men. Scholars are a country’s treasure; the learned are the delicacies of the feast. When scholars vie, wisdom mounts. I have never let my schooling interfere with my education. Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind. There is more religion in men's science, than there is science in their religion. Sociology is the science with the greatest number of methods and the least results. Score twice before you cut once. There’s no column on the scorecard headed “remarks.” Much can be made of a Scotchman if he is caught young. Beam me up Scotty, there's no intelligent life down here. A scrap will not satisfy the lion. Scratch me and I’ll scratch thee. A calm sea does not make a good sailor. In a calm sea every man is a pilot. It is hard to sail over the sea in an eggshell. It is the sea only which knows the bottom of the ship, as God only knows the time of death. Never trust her at any time when the calm sea shows her false alluring smile. Praise the sea but keep on land.

Chinese

Hebrew Mark Twain Einstein Thoreau

Jukes Henri Poincare English Sidney Lansburgh Samuel Johnson Anonymous Hebrew English Unknown English English African (Efik) Lucretius

English 321


Sea Sea Sea Sea Sea, tide, sky

Searching

Searching Searching, repose Seas, sailor Secrecy Secrecy

Secrecy

Secret

Secret Secret Secret Secret, death 322

The sea always ebbs after high tide. The sea has fish for every man. The sea refuses no river. To a drunken man the sea is only knee deep. I must down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky; I must down to the seas again, for the call of the running tide. A man travels the world over in search of what he needs and returns home to find it. * What we see depends mainly on what we are looking for. * A man needs to go outside of himself in order to find repose and reveal himself. Smooth seas do not make skillful sailors. * I shall be as secret as the grave.

Philippine English English Russian John Mansfield

George Moore Unknown Jose Marti

Unknown

Miguel de Cervantes If you do not want others to know Chinese what you have done, better not do it at all. Whoever wishes to keep a secret Joseph must hide the fact that he Addison possesses one. * If you tell your secret to your Scottish servant, you have made him your master. It is easier to hear a secret than to Yiddish keep it. The secret of a lot of happy Unknown marriages is a lot of secrets. Wine in, secret out. Hebrew * Three may keep a secret if two of Benjamin


Security Security Seducer See Seed Seed Seed Seeing Seeing Self Self

Self Self

Self Self Help Self-esteem

Selfimportance

them are dead. Franklin * Flies never visit an egg that has no Chinese crack. * He that's secure is not safe. Benjamin Franklin A seducer is worse than a witch. African (Ovambo) See all, say nothing, and hold English yourself content. As the seed is, so is the fruit. Russian * Even good seeds can give a poor Russian harvest. Some seeds will grow, others will African die. (Zulu) Seeing is believing, but feeling is English the truth. Seeing is believing. English Keep counsel of thyself first. English * No matter that we may mount on Michel stilts, we must still walk on our Eyguem de own legs. Montaigne Provide for the worst; the best Barber The will save itself. Book * The easiest person to deceive is Edward one’s own self. George BulwerLytton You stand in your own light. John Heywood * Better to light a candle than to Chinese curse the darkness * We do not deal much in the facts Mark Twain when we are contemplating ourselves. If you don't think too much of Goethe yourself, you are much more than you think. 323


Self-made man Sell Sell Sell, markets

* *

Selling, timing

Seneca, adversary Serious, frivolous

Serpent Serpent

*

Serpent

*

Serpent Servant Servant Servant Servant Servant Serve Service 324

*

The self-made man who boasts about it has not finished his job. Better sold than bought. He who sells cheap, sells quickly. Sell when you can for you are not for all markets. While the dust is still on your feet, sell what you have brought to the market. Seneca thinks the gods are wellpleased when they see great men contending with adversary. One who is serious all day will never have a good time, while one who is frivolous will never establish a household. He who has been stung by a serpent is afraid of a lizard. How sharper than a serpent's tooth it is to have an ungrateful child. It looks like an innocent flower, but be the serpent underneath it. What! Woulds't thou have a serpent sting thee twice? Bad servants do the thing first and then seek counsel. Many humble servants, but not one true friend. One servant cannot serve two masters. So many servants, so many foes. The more servants, the worse service. If you wish to be well served, serve yourself. The best way to find yourself is to

Unknown English Turkish Shakespeare Babylonian Talmud, Pesahim Robert Burton Ptahhote

Italian Shakespeare

Shakespeare Shakespeare Hebrew English Hebrew English Dutch Spanish Gandhi


Sex, time

*

Shadow

*

Shadow, institution Shadows

Shadows * Shadows, * aging Shakespeare, Milton, Shelley, Burns, graves, watch Shallowness * Shallowness Shame

*

Shame Shame, candle * Shameless Share Sharing

*

Shark Sharp tools

Sheep

*

lose yourself in the service of others. Sex takes up the least amount of time but causes the most amount of trouble. Nobody can rest in his own shadow. An institution is the lengthened shadow of one man. Beware lest you lose the substance by grasping by grasping at the shadow. We are but dust and shadows. Like our shadows, our wishes lengthen as our sun declines. Shakespeare was of us, Milton was for us, Burns, Shelley, were with us − they all now watch from their graves. Empty heads love long titles. The empty vessel makes the most noise. Fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice, shame on me. Shame sometimes can kill a man. Must I hold a candle to my shames? He that is shameless is graceless. Share and share alike. A problem shared is a problem halved. All kinds of fish eat man but only sharks get the blame. There is no jesting with edged tools. (Do not play with sharp tools.) A sheep was never known to

Unknown

Hungarian Ralph Waldo Emerson Aesop

Horace Edward Young Robert Browning

German Shakespeare Confucius Philippine Shakespeare English English Unknown Jamaican John Fletcher

Chinese 325


Sheep Sheep Sheep Sheep Sheep

*

Sheep Sheep Sheep Sheep, proximity Shelter

*

Shepherd Shepherd Shepherd Shield Ship Ship Ship

* *

Ship

*

Ship Ship 326

*

climb a tree. After losing the sheep, one repairs the pen. All the sheep are not for the wolf. It is a foolish sheep that makes the wolf his confessor. One bad sheep can easily lead others astray. One foolish sheep will lead the flock. One sheep follows another. The lamb began to follow the wolf in sheep's clothing. The lone sheep is in danger of the wolf. When one sheers the sheep, the ram trembles. It is good to have a shelter against every storm. A lazy shepherd is the wolf’s friend. He who has daughters is always a shepherd. To be a good shepherd is to shear the flock, not skin it! A golden shield is of great defense. A dear ship stays long in the harbor. A great ship asks for deep waters. A ship and a woman are ever repairing. A ship close to harbor has been often lost. Anchor a ship with reference to the wind. In calm water every ship has a

Korean Italian English Philippine Unknown English Aesop English Unknown English Welsh French Tiberius English Scottish English English Irish Indian (Tamil) Swedish


Ship Ship

good captain. * Ships fear fire more than water. The ship goes, the port remains.

Shoe

*

Shoe Shoe Shoe Shoe Shoe Shoe Shoe, experience Shoes, complaint

*

* *

Shop Shopping Shot

*

Shot

*

Shout, shoot Shrewdness Shrimp Shut Sickness

*

English Indian (Tamil) Better cut the shoe than pinch the English foot. Better to wear out shoes than English sheets. Between saying and doing many a Italian pair of shoes is worn out. Everyone knows where his shoe Yiddish pinches. If the shoe fits, wear it. English No one knows where another’s Dutch shoe pinches. One shoe will not fit all feet. English None but the wearer knows Unknown where the shoe pinches. I complained because I had no Unknown shoes, then I met a man who had no feet. To open a shop is easy; the Chinese difficult thing is keeping it open. Shopping is golden. Unknown Every shot does not bring down a Dutch bird. The first shot is worth a dozen American afterward. I want to see you shoot the way Theodore you shout. Roosevelt While two dogs fight for a bone, Unknown the third one runs away with it. Shrimps get broken backs in a Korean whale fight. The man who has a closed mind Unknown ought to keep his mouth shut too. Sickness comes in haste, and goes Danish 327


Sickness Side Sides Sight Sign Sign, customers Silence Silence Silence Silence Silence Silence Silence Silence Silence Silence Silence Silence Silence Silence, majority Silence, wisdom Silent Silent things: 328

at leisure. Sickness is every man’s master. The mother’s side is the surest. There are two sides to every question. * Out of sight, out of mind. What’s signed, is signed; and what’s to be, will be. * The sign brings customers. Dignified silence is better than dignified speech. I have never been hurt by anything I didn't say. * I have often regretted my speech, but never my silence. * Silence answers much. Silence catches a mouse. Silence comes from admission. * Silence gives consent. Silence is a fine jewel for a woman, but it’s little worn. * Silence is a sign of consent. Silence is an admission. Silence is golden. Silence is good for the wise, how much more so for the foolish. Silence surpasses speech. The great silent majority. * Silence is the fence around wisdom. * Sometimes you have to be silent to be heard. * These be three silent things: The

Danish English Unknown English American Jean de La Fountaine Yiddish Calvin Coolidge Publilius Syrus Dutch Scottish Turkish Oliver Goldsmith English Russian Welsh Unknown Hebrew Japanese Richard Nixon Unknown Stanislaw J. Lec, Polish Adelaide


Snow, dawn, death Similarity Similarity Simple

Simple, complex Simple, complex Simplicity

falling snow; the hour before the dawn; and the mouth of one just dead. Birds of a feather flock together. It takes one to know one. Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler. * Everything is simple than you think, and more complex than you imagine. Psychoanalysis was a wonderful discovery; it makes quite simple people feel they are complex. * I want death to find me planting my cabbages.

Simplicity

Simplicity

*

Sin

*

Sin Sin

*

Sin Sin

*

Sin Sin

*

Oh thrice and four times happy are those that simply plat cabbages. The greatest truths are the simplest, and so are the greatest men. A little sin is big when a big man commits it. A sin confessed is half forgiven. A woman who writes commits two sins: she increases the number of books, and decreases the number of women. An old sin makes for a new shame. Commit the oldest sins the newest kind of ways. Each sin has its own excuse. He who prays often has many sins.

Crapsey

Unknown Unknown Einstein

Johann von Goethe S.N. Behrman Michel Eyguem de Montaigne Francois Rabelius Edward BulwerLytton Abraham Lincoln Italian Alphonse Karr

English Shakespeare Czech Philippine

329


Sin Sin

Sin Sin Sin Sin Sin Sin Sin Sin

*

Sin , kill Sin, virtue

* *

Sing Sing Sinner Sins Sins Sip Size, collapse

Skeletons Skepticism

330

*

If there were no sin there would be no hell. If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. It is a sin to believe the devil. It is no sin to cheat the devil. Men are not punished for their sins, but by them. Old sins breed new shame. Sin cries out for retribution. Sin has no master. Sin is the root of the sorrow. Who swims on sin shall sink in sorrow. It is no sin to kill a killer. Some rise by sin, and some fall by virtue. He that sings worst let him begin first. People who have heard me sing say I don't. A dead sinner revised and edited.

Slovakian Bible

English English Elbert Hubbard Scottish Philippine Russian Chinese English Hindu Shakespeare English Mark Twain

Ambrose Bierce * Old sins cast the longest shadows. Unknown * The gods visit the sins of the Euripides father upon his children. The first sip of broth is always the Irish hottest. Stately towers tumble down with Horace a heavier crash than more lowly buildings. Every family has skeletons in the Unknown closet. Give a skeptic an inch, and he'll Unknown measure it.


Skill Skill Skill Skill

Force has no place where there is a need for skill. Skill and confidence are an unconquered army. * Skill wins over noble birth. There is great skill in knowing how to conceal ones skill.

Skin

* A thick skin is a gift from God.

Skirt

* Long skirts carry dust, but short skirts carry away souls. He’s a slave that cannot command himself. * One hour of sleep before midnight is worth three after. * Sleep is a thief. Sleep is better than medicine. * Let sleeping dogs lie. * A slip of the foot may be soon recovered, but that of the tongue perhaps never. * Better slip with the foot rather than the tongue. * Every slip is not a fall. Slow and sure. It takes five years to develop a new car in this country. Heck, we won World War II in four years. Riches will not profit if one is sluggish. It's the little things that bother us: we can dodge an elephant easier than a fly. Life is too short to be small. There be two things which are little upon the earth, but which

Slave Sleep Sleep Sleep Sleeping dog Slip

Slip Slip Slow Slowness

Sluggish Small

Small Small things

Euripides English Greek Duc de La Rochefoucauld Konrad Adenauer Maltese English George Herbert Yiddish Unknown English English

Benjamin Franklin English English H. Ross Perot

Ptahhote Unknown

Disraeli Solomon

331


Small town

*

Smile Smile

*

Smile

*

Smiles Smiling

*

Smiling Smoke Smoke Smoke Smoking

*

Snake Snake Snake Snake Snake

332

* *

are exceeding wise: The ants are a people not strong, yet they prepare their meat in the summer: the cronies are but feeble folk, yet make their houses in the rocks In a village a rich man is respected, a great man suspected. Better is the last smile than the first laughter. The smile on a hungry man’s face is a lie. You are not fully dressed until you wear a smile. Smiling through tears. A man without a smiling face ought not to open a shop. A smile will gain you ten more years of life. No smoke without fire, and no rumor without foundation. There is no smoke without fire. Where there’s smoke, there’s fire. To stop smoking is the easiest thing I ever did. I ought to know because I’ve done it a thousand times. Add legs to the snake after you have finished drawing it. Big snakes do not live in the same hole. Don’t trouble a quiet snake. Fear surrounds the place where a snake disappeared in the bush. He who has been bitten by a snake fears a decayed rope.

Bernard Shaw English Polish Unknown Homer Chinese Chinese Lebanese English Yiddish Mark Twain

Chinese African (Ovambo) Greek African (Jabo) Japanese


Snake

He who has been bitten by a snake fears a piece of string. Snake He who is bitten once by a snake will not walk a second time in the grass. Snake One does not follow a snake into its hole. Snake One year bitten by a snake, for three years afraid of a grass rope. Snake The snake that wishes to live does not travel on the highway. Snake Warm up a frozen snake and she will bite you first. Snake Who has been bitten by a snake dreads even earthworms. Snake, lurking A snake lurks in the grass. Snakes, The distinction of big and little size does not apply to snakes. Sneer, refute * Who can refute a sneer? Snob Snob

Snob Snow Snowflake, responsibility Soap Socking, silk, mud

Iranian Chinese

African (Zulu) Chinese Haitian Armenian Russian Virgil Indian

William Paley * A highbrow is a person educated Brander beyond his intelligence. Matthews God is satisfied with one “d” but George the “Todd”s need two. (Abraham Bernard Lincoln, when asked the spelling Shaw of his wife’s maiden name inferring the English are snobs.) Whoever is rich is my brother. Russian Proverb * Each snowflake in an avalanche Stanislaw J. pleads not guilty. Lec No snowflake in an avalanche Stanislaw ever feels responsible. Jerzy Lee When the soap comes to an end, Moroccan the washerwoman rejoices. A silk stocking filled with mud. Napoleon Bonaparte

333


Soft Softness

*

Soldier

*

Soldier Solitude

*

Solution

*

Somewhat Son Son

Soft and fair goes far. A soft answer turneth away wrath. It is better to be a soldier than a priest. Soldiers in peace are like chimneys in summer. Solitary trees, if they grow at all, grow strong. The man who knows how to solve the world's problems (un)fortunately lacks the authority to do so. Somewhat is better than nothing. A son is the bone of hard times.

Brainless sons boast of their ancestors. Son Teach your son in the hall, your wife on the pillow. Son The son disgraces his father by bad conduct. Son The son of an old man is an orphan, and his wife is a widow. Son, crying * Chasten thy son while there is hope and let not thy soul spare for his crying. Song The song of the stomach is hard to hear. Songs, despair, The most despairing songs are the tears loveliest of all I know immortal ones composed only of tears. Soon Better too soon, than too late. Sore A small sore wants not a great plaster. Sore Different sores must have different salves. 334

English Unknown Greek English Winston Churchill Unknown

English African (Ovambo) Chinese Chinese African (Efik) Lebanese Solomon

African (Wolof) Allred de Musset American English English


Sore Sorrow Sorrow

*

Sorrow Sorrow

*

Sorrow

*

Sorrow

*

Sorrows

*

Sort Soul

Soul, silence

*

Soul, animals

*

Soul, duty

Soup Soup Soup

*

Old sores are hardly cured. A child’s sorrow is short lived. A day of sorrow is longer than a month of joy. Merry nights make for sorry days. Sorrow and an evil life makes soon an old wife. There are many cures for grief, but careful nursing is not one of them. Without sorrows none become Buddhas. When sorrows come, they come not as single spies, but in battalions. It takes all sorts to make a world. For what is a man profited, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul. Whoso keepeth his mouth and his tongue, shall keepeth his soul from troubles. To hold opinion with Pythagoras, that the souls of animals infuse themselves into the trunks of men. Every subject's duty is the king's; but every subject's soul is his own. Between the hand and the mouth the soup is lost. Only the pure in heart can make a good soup. There is only one thing harder than looking for a dewdrop in the dew, and that is fishing for a clam in the clam chowder.

English Danish Unknown English English Unknown

Chinese Shakespeare

English Bible

Solomon

Shakespeare

Shakespeare

Spanish Ludwig van Beethoven New England Proverb

335


Sour grapes

Source Source

*

Sourness Sow Spare Spare Sparing Spark Spark Spark Sparrow

* *

Sparrow Speak Speak Speak Speak Speak Speak

* *

Speak Speak Speak, silver, gold Speaking 336

*

The fathers have eaten a sour grape, and the children's teeth are set on edge. How can you expect to find ivory in a dog's mouth? You should go to a pair tree for pares, not an elm. I'm sure the grapes are sour. As you sow, so will you reap. Spare well and spend well. Spare when you are young and spend when you are old. Sparing is the first gaining. A little spark kindles a great fire. A little spark shines in the dark. A small spark makes a great fire. A sparrow in hand is worth a pheasant that flies by. Two sparrows on one ear of corn never agree. He that speaks without care shall remember with sorrow. Speak only when you are spoken to. Speak well of the dead. Speak what you will, an ill man will turn it ill. Speak when you are spoken to. That is well spoken that is well taken. Think before you speak. Who speaks of the wolf sees his tail. Speak silver, repay gold.

Bible

Never speak ill of the dead.

Unknown

Chinese Publilius Syrus Aesop English English English English Spanish French English English Spanish English Unknown English English English English Unknown English African


Speaking Spear Spear

Specialist Specialist

Speck Speck Spectator Speech Speech Speech

Speech

Speech Speech

Speech Speech Speech Speech Speech

* When all men speak, no man hears. Do not go between a spear and a bull. * It is easy to dodge a spear in the daylight, but it is difficult to avoid an arrow in the dark. Jack of all trades, master at none. Someone who learns more and more, about less and less, until he knows everything about nothing. A speck will produce a storm. One speck of rat’s dung spoils a whole pot of rice. The spectator is a great hero. A closed mouth catches no flies.

The Barber Book African (Ovambo) Chinese

Unknown Unknown, but cited by my father American Chinese

Pashto French Proverb * A fool’s speech is a bubble of air. English * A word too much always defeats Arthur its purpose. Schopenhauer Adlai Stevenson has a genius for Joe E. Lewis saying the right thing, at the right time, but to the wrong people. Honeyed speech often conceals Danish poison and gall. It usually takes me more than Mark Twain three weeks to prepare a good impromptu speech. Oratory is the art of making a loud Unknown noise seem like a deep thought. Speak softly, and be slow to begin Chinese your speech. Speech is difficult, but silence is Yiddish impossible. * Speech is the image of actions. Solon They speech betrayeth thee. Bible 337


Speech Speed Speed Speed

* *

Spelling

*

Spender Spending

*

Spider Spindle Spinster

*

Spinster

Spinster

*

Spirit Spirit Spirit

*

Spirit, body

*

Spirit, control

Spit

*

Spit Spite 338

*

Woman’s word is never done. All the speed is in the spurs. Speed and accuracy do not agree. Speed is only good for catching flies. The man who is busy with public matters cannot be bothered with spelling. Great spenders are bad lenders. I can get no remedy against this consumption of the purse. You cannot destroy the cobweb without killing the spider. By one and one spindles are made. An old spinster is not worth more than an unposted letter. It isn't dying a spinster that worries women, it's living that way. When there is an old maid in the house a watchdog is unnecessary. A broken spirit is hard to heal. A poor spirit is poorer than a poor purse. You may hide a thing from men but not from the spirits The spirit is willing but the body is weak. He that hath no rule over his own spirit is like a city that is broken down, and without walls. Spit against the wind and you spit in your own face. Who spits against heaven, spit falls in his face. There is no spite like that of a

American English Irish Yiddish Napoleon

English Shakespeare Maltese English Hungarian Unknown

Honore De Balzac Yiddish English Chinese T.C. Lai Solomon

Armenian English French


Spoil Spoil Spoiling Spoon Spoon Sport Sport Spot Spot

*

Spring Spring

Stain Stair

* *

Stairs, ghost, imagination

*

Star Star, faith Starling Stars Stars, heads

*

proud beggar. It only takes one bad apple to spoil the barrel. Too little and too much spoils everything. Too many cooks spoil the broth. A dry spoon irritates the mouth. A spoon is most valuable at dinnertime. Sport is sweetest when no spectators. What is sport to the cat is death to the mouse. A spot shows most on the finest cloth. By seeing one spot you know the entire leopard. Spring is as changeable as a stepmother’s face. That which does blossom in the spring will bring forth fruit in the autumn. Stains are not seen at night. Too many stairs and back doors make thieves and whores. As I was going up the stairs; I met a man who wasn't there; He wasn't there again today; I wish, I wish, that he'd just stay away. Stars are not seen by sunshine. If thou follow thy star, thou const not fail a glorious haven. Starlings are lean because they go in flocks. I pointed out the stars and you only saw the tip of my finger At whose sight all the stars hide

Unknown Danish Unknown Russian Russian English German Spanish Japanese Chinese English

Hebrew English Hughes Mearns

English Dante Alighieri Italian Unknown John Milton 339


Stars, night, sleep, gift Start Statement

* *

Statesman Statesman

*

Statistics

Statistics

*

Statistics

*

Statistics

*

Statistics

*

Status

*

Status

*

Status

Status

Stay Steadiness Steal, purse, 340

* *

their diminished heads. Night with her train of stars and her great gift of sleep. A good start wins the race. A statement once let loose cannot be caught by four horses. A statesman is a politician who’s been dead ten or fifteen years. In statesmanship get the formalities right, never mind about the moralities. A new study reveals that sexually transmitted diseases are leading cause of statistics. A single death is a tragedy, a million deaths is a statistic. He uses statistics as a drunken man uses lampposts − for support rather than for illumination. Statistics: A group of numbers looking for an argument. There are two kinds of statistics, the kind you look up and the kind you make up. At a round table there is no dispute about place. Cauliflower is nothing but cabbage with a college education. I would rather sit on a pumpkin, and have it all to myself, than be crowded on a velvet cushion. My folks didn’t come over on the Mayflower but they were here to meet the boat. He that can stay obtains. Slow and steady wins the race. Who steals my purse steals trash;

William Ernest Henly American Japanese Harry S. Truman Mark Twain

Anonymous

Joseph Stalin Andrew Lang

Unknown Rex Stout

Italian Mark Twain Henry David Thoreau Will Rogers

English Aesop Shakespeare


name

Steal, sweets Steal, thief

* *

Stealing

*

Stealing

*

Stealing Stealing, gentleman

*

Stealing, thief

Steam

*

Step Step Step

*

Step

*

Step Step Step Step

but he that flinches my good name robs me of that which not enriches him, but makes me poor indeed. Stolen sweets are best. The robbed that smiles, steals something from the thief. Stolen waters are sweet, and bread eaten in secret is pleasant. Vegetables of one's own raising are not relished but those from other's gardens are the best. Who steals a calf, steals a cow. If you steal something small you are a petty thief, but if you steal millions you are a gentleman of society. If you steal something small you are a petty thief, but if you steal millions you are a gentleman of society. It is hard to swim against the stream. Between the word and the deed there’s a long step. Every step leads to death. If you take one step in the wrong direction, a hundred steps in the right direction will not atone for it. If you tell every step, you will make a long journey of it. The best step, the first step. The first man’s steps become a bridge for the second one. The first step is all the difficulty. The first step is the only difficulty.

Colley Cibber Shakespeare Solomon Confucius

German Greek

Greek

Dutch French Philippine Chinese

English Welsh Greek French English 341


Step Step Stick Stick

*

Stingy Stitch Stock market

* *

Stock market

Stock market

*

Stocking Stomach Stomach Stomach

Stomach

*

Stomach

*

Stomach Stomach Stomach Stomach 342

*

The steps at court are slippery. Whoever falls and gets up gains a step. A straight stick is crooked in the water. It is easy to find a stick to beat a dog. Stinginess is merely practicing economy before you have to. A stitch in time saves nine. I made a fortune getting out too soon. My family wasn’t affected by the crash of ’29. They went broke in ’28. The stock market has spoiled more appetites than bad cooking. It’s hard to get a stocking off a bare leg. An empty stomach cannot tolerate anything. Better a light stomach than a heavy conscience. If you go to sleep with an empty stomach, you will count the beams on the ceiling. It is the stomach which rules the man. The full stomach does not understand the empty one. The stomach is the workshop of the body. The stomach keeps a secret better than the heart. Though your stomach is full, carry provisions. When the stomach is empty, so is

Danish Hebrew English Dutch, English Unknown English J. P. Morgan Gerald Barzan Will Rogers English Yiddish Greek Yiddish

African Irish Swedish Yiddish Chinese Yiddish


Stone Stone Stone Stone Stone

Stone

*

Stone Stone

*

Stone Stone

Stone

*

Stone, blood Stool Stop

Stopping

*

Store

Storm

*

the brain. A rolling stone gathers no moss. A rugged stone grows smooth from hand to hand. A single stone is enough for a house of glass. A stone in a well is not lost. A stone thrown at the right time is better than gold given at the wrong time. It is easier to roll stones up a mountain than to talk to a fool. Not all stones are building stones. Stones are cheap; the problem is weight. Stones or bread, one must have something in hand for the dogs. Though stone were changed to gold, the heart of man would not be satisfied. When a big stone rolls it carries many with it. You can't get blood from a stone. It isn’t easy to sit on a borrowed stool. If you know where to stop and stop there, you will never be disgraced. We are not so much concerned if you are slow as when you come to a halt. A store of food is the best equipment for war: when war is proclaimed, every man takes up his wallet. A storm destroys the field, bad manners destroy the country.

English English Iranian English Iranian

SerboCroatian Lebanese African (Annang) Italian Chinese

Norwegian Unknown Norwegian Chinese

Chinese

African (Yoruba)

African (Ovambo) 343


Storm Storm Storm Storm Storms, fires

Story

* After a storm comes a calm. * After the storm comes the calm. * The sharper the storm, the sooner it’s over. The storm blows over but the driftwood remains. * Violent fires quickly burn themselves out and sudden storms are short. * A false story has seven endings.

Story

Story

*

Story, gossip

*

Strange

*

Stranger Stranger Stratagems Strategy

*

Straw

*

Straw

*

Street

*

Strength Strength Strength 344

English Unknown English Yiddish Shakespeare

African (Swahili) If you don’t hear the story clearly, Thai don’t carry it off with you under your arm. The story is only half told when Icelandic one side tells it. He who comes with a story to you Unknown will bring two away from you. Truth is stranger than fiction − to Mark Twain some people. The stranger eats with care. African (Jabo) You may boast to strangers, but Serbotell the truth to your own people. Croatian All stratagems are fair in war. American Of all the stratagems, to know Chinese when to quit is the best. It's the last straw that breaks the English camel’s back. Straws show which way the wind English blows. When the streets are muddy, the Yiddish cobblers rejoice. Strength is defeated by strategy. Philippine The strength of a fish is in the African water. (Shona) When your strength is not Burmese


sufficient, humble yourself. Strength, * We all have strength enough to Duc de La endurance endure the misfortune of others. Rochefoucauld Stretching Stretching and yawning leads to English bed. String A little string will tie up a little English bird. String * If the string is long, the kite flies Chinese high. String * One string is good enough to a Mexican good musician. Stroke * Different strokes for different American folks. Stroke Little strokes fell great oaks. English Struggle The harder the struggle, the more Philippine glorious the triumph. Stubbornness Stubbornness gets a black eye. Greek Student If the student is successful, the Yiddish teacher gets the praise. Student, * When the student is ready, the Unknown teacher master (teacher) will appear. Study If you neglect study when you are Chinese young, what of your old age? Study Study well, play well. Japanese Studying If you do not study hard when Chinese young you'll end up bewailing your failures as you grow up. Stumble * A stumble may prevent a fall. English Stump * A small stump upsets a big cart. Latvian Stump * A stump is left where the tree was African felled. (Ovambo) Stupid * Better a little stupid than too Finnish wise. Stupid The more stupid, the happier. Chinese Stupidity * Artificial intelligence is no Unknown substitute for natural stupidity. 345


Stupidity

Stupidity Stupidity Stupidity

* Genius may have its limitations but stupidity is not so handicapped. * Steal a bell with one's ears covered. Stupidity is a force unto itself. Stupidity often saves a man from going mad.

Style Subject

Substance

*

Substance

*

Subtlety Success

*

Success Success Success

Success

*

Success

*

Success Success

*

346

Elbert Hubbard Chinese

Latin Oliver Wendell Holmes Fashions fade, but style is eternal. Thomas Fuller Subjects and wives, when they English revolt from their lawful sovereigns, seldom choose for a better. An empty bag cannot stand Benjamin upright. Franklin Catch not the shadow and miss Unknown the substance. Subtlety is better than force. English All you need in this life is Mark Twain ignorance and confidence and then success is assured. Behind every successful man is a Unknown woman with nothing to wear. If it’s worth fighting for, it’s worth American fighting dirty for. It is possible to fail in many ways, Aristotle while to succeed is possible only in one way. It takes twenty years to become Eddie Cantor an overnight success. Let us be thankful for fools. But Mark Twain for them the rest of us could not succeed. Nothing succeeds like success. Unknown Success always has been a big liar. Nietzsche


Success Success Success Success Success Success Success Success, failure Success, failure Suffer Suffer Sufferance Suffering

Suffering

Suffering Suffering, joy

Suicide

Suicide

* Success has many fathers, while failure is an orphan. Success is full of promise till a man gets it. * Success is its own reward. Success is never blamed. Success makes a fool seem wise. * The dog that trots about finds a bone. * The road to success is always under construction. * A minute's success pays for the failure of years. It is hard to admire a man who has made a success out of what you gave up as a failure. Better suffer ill than do ill. * Better to suffer than to die: that is mankind's motto. Sufferance is the badge of our tribe. Although the world is full of suffering, it is also full of the overcoming of it. The young suffer less from their own mistakes than from the wisdom of the old. * When elephants fight, it is the grass that suffers. Suffering cheerfully endured, ceases to be suffering and is transmuted into an ineffable joy. An alcoholic spends his life committing suicide on the installment plan. Killing time is not murder − it's suicide.

Unknown Unknown American English English Gypsy Unknown Robert Browning Unknown

English Jean de La Fountaine Shakespeare Helen Keller

Marquis de Vauvenargues African Gandhi

Unknown

Unknown

347


Suicide Suit

*

Suitor

*

Suitor Summer Summer Sun

*

Sun Sun

*

Sun Sun

*

Sun

*

Sun Sun Sun Sun Sun

*

Sunlight

*

Sunlight Sup Superfluous 348

The man who hangs himself dies of his own free will and accord. Nothing last so long as a suit you don't like. It’s the last suitor that wins the maid. The last suitor wins the maid. Do what you can, but summer will have its flies. Play in summer, starve in winter. In every country the sun rises in the morning. One does not look at the moon when the sun is up. The sun at home warms better than the sun abroad. The sun sees and hears all things. The sun shines brighter after a shower. The sun shines even into a little room. The sun shines nowhere as it shines at home. There’s nothing new under the sun. When the sun is highest it casts the least shadow. When the sun shines, it shines on everyone. Yesterday the sun went away, yet here it is again, today. Sunlight penetrates even the thinnest crack. You can’t cut off the sunlight with one hand. Who sups well sleeps well. The superfluous, a very necessary

Unknown Unknown Irish English Emerson English English Norwegian Albanian Homer Yiddish Swedish Slovenian German English Philippine John Donne Unknown Chinese English Voltaire


Superior

*

Superstition

*

Superstition

*

Superstition, religion

Supper Supper Support Surety Surgeon, shoes Survival Suspense

*

Suspense, torture Suspicion

*

Suspicion Suspicion

Suspicion

thing. Always obey your superiors − if you have any. Superstition is to religion what astrology is to astronomy: the mad daughter of a wise mother. The man who frees you from your superstition, usually makes you adopt his own. Superstition may be defined as constructive religion which has grown incongruous with intelligence. If you eat it up at supper, you cannot have it at breakfast. Light suppers make clean sheets. Behind an able man there are always other able men. He who is surety is never sure. A cobbler is a surgeon to old shoes. Every man for himself and God for us all. Suspense is worse than the ordeal itself. Suspense in news is torture.

A slight suspicion may destroy a good repute. An evil suspicion has a worse condition. * If you suspect a man, don't employ him, and if you employ him, don't suspect him. If you suspect a woman, don't marry her; if you marry her, don't suspect her.

Mark Twain Voltaire

Unknown

John Tyndall

Spanish English Chinese English Shakespeare John Heywood Yiddish John Milton Danish English Chinese

Unknown

349


Suspicion Suspicion Suspicion Suspicion

Suspicion, thief Suspicion, treason Swallow Swallow Swan Swan Swear Swearing

Swearing Swearing

Swearing Sweat Sweat Sweet 350

* Suspicion generates dark devils. * Suspicion has double eyes. Suspicion may be no fault; showing it is a great one. The moment there is suspicion about a person's motives, everything he does becomes tainted. * Suspicion always haunts the guilty mind; the thief doth fear each bush an officer. Suspicion all our lives shall be stuck full of eyes; for treason is but trussed like the fox. Do not swallow before you chew. * One swallow does not make a summer. * The swan sings before its death. When you are among the swans you become a swan. He that will swear will lie. * In certain trying circumstances, urgent circumstances, desperate circumstances, profanity furnishes a relief denied even to prayer. Swearing never catches fish. * Swearing was invented as a compromise between running away and fighting. * There ought to be a room in every house to swear in. Perspiration is the only liquid you can't drown in. Sweat makes good mortar. A black plum is as sweet as a

Japanese English The Barber Book Gandhi

Shakespeare

Shakespeare

African (Shona) English English Thai English Mark Twain

English Finley Peter Dunne Mark Twain Unknown German Unknown


Sweet Sweet

*

Sweetheart Swift Swim

Sword Sword

Sword Sword Sword Sword Sword

*

Sword, sheath * Sword, violence Swordsman Sympathy

Sympathy

*

white. Nothing sweet without sweat. The meat is sweeter near the bone. Nobody’s sweetheart is ugly. Their ships are swift as a bird or a thought. He needs to learn how to swim who has needs to be held up by the chin. Against reason no sword will prevail. Even the sword won’t hack off the head of one who confessed his crimes. He who is hungry embraces the sword. He who lives by the sword shall die by the sword. It is ill putting a naked sword in a madman’s hand. One sword keeps another in the sheath. There is no sword that can oppose kindness. One sword keeps another in the sheath. All that take the sword shall perish with the sword. A good swordsman is never quarrelsome. If there was less sympathy in the world there would be less trouble in the world. Sympathy is such a precious thing, that it's a crime to waste it on others.

English Unknown Dutch Homer English

Japanese Russian

Turkish Unknown English English Japanese George Herbert Bible French Oscar Wilde

Unknown

351


Sympathy Table Table Table Tail Tail Tail Tail Tailor Take Take Take Talent

Talent Talent

Talk Talk Talk Talk Talk Talk

352

* Sympathy without relief is like mustard without beef. * A poor man’s table is soon spread. He who lies under the table gets kicked. The table robs more than a thief. A dog’s tail can never be straightened. * A short tail won’t keep off flies. Do not measure the wolf’s tail until he’s dead. If the tail is too long, it will be trampled on. The tailor makes the man. * He who likes to take does not like to give. * Many a good tale is spoiled in the telling. Tell no tales out of school. A talent is formed in stillness, character, in the world's torrent. Blessed are those who have no talent! Premature development of the powers of both mind and body leads to an early grave. Daring talk is not strength. Least talk, most work. One must talk little and listen much. * Talk does not cook rice. Talk is but talk. Talk is cheap.

Unknown English Polish English Indian (Bihar) Italian SerboCroatian Korean English Yiddish Scottish German Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Ralph Waldo Emerson Unknown

African (Jabo) English African (Wolof) Confucius English Unknown


Talk, do Talker Talker Talker Talker Talking

Talking Talking Talking Talmud

Tango Tardiness Task Taste

Taste Tax Tax Taxes Taxes Taxes

Teach

* Talkers are no not doers. * A good talker does not equal a good listener. Great talkers are commonly liars. Great talkers are great liars. Great talkers are not great doers. If you keep on talking, you will end up saying what you didn’t intend to say. Talking is not like doing. Talking is silver, silence is gold. Talking pays no toll. * To learn the whole Talmud is a great accomplishment; to learn one good virtue is even greater. It takes two to tango. * I’ve been on a calendar, but never on time. None ever got ahead of me except the man of one task. * Good taste has always been the excuse I've given for leading such a bad life. There is no accounting for taste. There’s no tax on talk. * Those who are prospering do not argue about taxes. No matter how bad a child is, he is still good for a tax deduction. Taxation with representation ain’t so hot either. The way to crush the bourgeoisie is to grind them between millstones of taxation and inflation. * Better untaught than ill taught.

Shakespeare Chinese German English French Yiddish

Lebanese German English Yiddish

Unknown Marilyn Monroe Azariah Rossi Oscar Wilde

Unknown Irish Chinese American Gerald Barzan V. I. Lenin

English 353


Teacher

Teacher Teacher Teacher

Teachers Teaching Teaching Teaching Teaching Teaching Teaching Teams Tear Tear

* A teacher will not criticize a teacher, nor will a doctor criticize a doctor. * He who is his own teacher has a fool for his pupil. Reviewing the old and deducing the new makes a good teacher. Your teacher can lead you to the door; the acquiring of learning rests with each person. * Teachers open the door, but you must enter by yourself. * Good teachers cost a lot, poor teachers a lot more. I’ll learn him or kill him. Nothing that is worth knowing can be taught. The teaching of others teacheth the teacher. * To teach is to learn twice.

* *

Tear Tear Tears

*

Teasing Teeth 354

*

You're teaching a fish to swim? Great people don’t equal great teams. A child’s tears reach the heavens. A tear in place is better than a smile out of place. The tears of the adulteress are ever ready. The tears of the poor are as sharp swords. There's only one woman who sheds more than a grieving wife, and that's a cunning one. Teasing eventually turns to a quarrel. All do not bite that show their

Chinese

German Confucius Chinese

Unknown Unknown Mark Twain Unknown Unknown Joseph Joubert Anonymous Unknown Yiddish Iranian Egyptian Indian (Tamil) Unknown

Burmese Dutch


Teeth Teleconferencing Television

*

*

Telling Temper Temper Temperance

Temple

*

Tempt, upper, * lower class, demitasse Temptation *

Temptation

*

Temptation

*

Temptation

*

Temptation Temptation Temptation

teeth. Be true to your teeth and they won’t be false to you. Teleconferencing is so rational it will never succeed. A poor joke must invent its own laughter. There are two tellings to every story. A quick temper does not bring success. Temper never shows itself in a man until it's lost. Pitted against hard drinking Christians the abstemious Mahometans go down like grass before the scythe. Those near the temple make fun of the gods. You may tempt the upper classes with your demitasses, but Heaven will protect the working girl. Anyone who has to be lead into temptation doesn't deserve to enjoy it. Do not employ handsome servants. I can resist everything but temptation. Of two evils, choose the prettier.

Unknown John Naisbitt Latin Proverb Irish Japanese Unknown Ambrose Bierce

Chinese Edgar Smith

Unknown

Chinese Oscar Wilde

Carolyn Wells * Temptation arrives unannounced. Armenian * Temptation in a maiden is asleep; Yiddish in a wife it’s always awake. * The only trouble with resisting Unknown temptation is you may not get another chance.

355


Temptation Temptation

Temptation Tenant Testimony

Texas

* The only way to get rid of temptation is to yield to it. * There are several good arguments against temptation, but the surest one is cowardice. * There’s always free cheese in a mousetrap. Better a rich tenant than a poor landlord. The testimony of the heart is stronger than a hundred witnesses. If I owned Hell and Texas I’d rent out Texas and live in Hell.

Thank Thanks Theater

*

Theft

*

Theory

Theory Theory, fact

*

Theory, fact

Thief Thief

356

*

Oscar Wilde Mark Twain

International Yiddish Turkish

General Philip H. Sheridan Who does not thank for little will Estonian not thank for much. Old thanks are not for new gifts. Italian The theater is a great equalizer: Will Rogers it's the only place where the poor can look down on the rich. Never thrust your sickle into Publilius another man's corn. Syrus Socrates thought and so do I is Montaigne that the wisest theory about the gods is no theory at all. The quickest way to kill a good Unknown theory is to put it into practice. A young man is a theory, an old Ed Howe man is a fact. Science is organized common Thomas H. sense where many a beautiful Huxley theory is killed by an ugly fact. A lazy thief is better than a lazy Swedish servant. A thief knows a thief, as a wolf English knows a wolf.


Thief Thief Thief Thief

*

Thief

*

Thief

Thief Thief Thief

*

Thief Thief

*

Thief Thieves Thieves Thieves

* *

Thieves

*

Thieves Thieves Thing Thing Thing

*

Call one a thief and he will steal. Catch the thief before he catches you. Every man's apparel fits the thief. Hang the young thief, and the old one will not steal. He who holds the ladder is as bad as the thief. Men do not despise a thief, if he steal to satisfy his soul when he is hungry. One thief robs another. Set a thief to catch a thief. The thief is no danger to the beggar. The thief thinks that all men are like himself. We hang the petty thieves and appoint the great ones to public office. Who steals from a thief goes unpunished. All are not thieves that dogs bark at. Big thieves hang little ones. Petty thieves are hanged; big thieves are pardoned. The great thieves punish the little ones. Thieves never trust one another. We hang little thieves and take off our hats to great ones. A bad thing never dies. A good thing sells itself. All things are easy that are done willingly.

English Rumanian Shakespeare Danish German Solomon

English English Irish Spanish Aesop

Hebrew English Czech Yiddish The Barber Book American German English African (Hausa) English

357


Thing Thing Thing Thing Thing Thing Thing Thing

*

Thing

Thing Thing Thing Thing Thing Thing

*

*

*

Thing Think Think

*

Think

*

Think Think Think Think 358

All things are not to be granted at all times. All things have a beginning. All things have an end. Everything forbidden is sweet. Everything has an end. Everything has its time. Everything is for the best. He who knows one thing does not know all things. If you are not patient in small things you will bring great plans to naught. It doesn’t take long to get used to good things. It is a rare thing to do good. Judge not things by their names. Little things are great to little men. Little things please little minds. Many things are lost for want of asking. Things done cannot be undone. First think, then speak. He thinks not well that thinks not again. Life always gives you plenty to think about, but seldom enough to think with. Never be afraid to sit a while and think. One always thinks that others are happy. One may think that dares not speak. Some think they have done when

English English English Egyptian English English American Indian (Tamil) Chinese

Yiddish English American English English English English Turkish English Unknown

Unknown Yiddish English French


Think

Think

*

Think

*

Think

*

Think, speak

Think, speak

*

Thinking Thirst

*

Thirst, irony Thorns, sloth, righteousness Thorns, snares

Thoroughness

Thought Thought Thought

*

Thought

*

Thought

they are only beginning. There is no expedient to which a man will not go to avoid the labor of thinking. Think before you speak, and look before you leap. Think much, speak little and write less. Where all men think alike, no man thinks very much. If we are not ashamed to think it, we should not be ashamed to say it. Too many people mistake connected words for connected thought. Think twice and say nothing. Who has no thirst has no business at the fountain. I am dying of thirst by the side of a fountain. The way of the slothful man is as a hedge of thorns: but the way of the righteous is made plain. Thorns and snares are in the way of the forward: he that doth keep his soul shall be far from them. A dish of carrots hastily cooked may still have soil in the vegetable. Dark thoughts lead to dark deeds. Fool’s thoughts often fail. One sincere thought can move both Heaven and earth. Second thoughts are often the best thoughts. The deeper the thought, the

Thomas A. Edison Irish Unknown Walter Lippmann Cicero

Unknown

Chinese Dutch Charles d'Orleans Solomon

Solomon

Chinese

American English Chinese English Unknown 359


Thread Thread

*

Threatener Three

*

Three Thrift

*

Thrift

Thrift Thrift Throw

*

Thunder Thunder

*

Thunder, lightning Tidbit

*

Tide Tide Tide Tide

360

higher you must climb to grasp it. A thread breaks where it is weakest. Cut the thread in the middle to find an end. The threatener sometimes gets a beating. Three may accord, but two never can. Three may keep a secret, if two of them are dead. Take care of the pennies and the dollars will take care of themselves. Take care of your pennies and your pounds will take care of your heirs and barristers. The thrifty prepare today for wants of tomorrow. Thrift is good revenue. Don’t throw away the soiled until you have the clean. If thunder doesn’t sound, the peasant doesn’t cross himself. Thunder will bring to a peaceful end a quarrel between husband and wife. Thunder is impressive, but lightning does all the work. Another man’s tidbits smell sweet. Every tide will have an ebb. He's going out with the tide.

English Greek French American English Scottish Proverb English Proverb Aesop English Yiddish Russian Japanese

Mark Twain Yiddish

English Charles Dickens Nae man can tether time or tide. Robert Burns The highest tides produce lowest American ebbs.


Tide Tide

*

Tidings Tidings Tiger

*

Tiger Tiger Tiger

*

Tile Timber Time Time

Time Time

*

Time Time Time Time Time Time Time

* *

The tide may turn. The tide tarries (waits for) no man. Bad tidings always come too soon. Ill tidings come soon enough. He who rides the tiger finds it difficult to dismount. If you do not enter the tiger’s den, how can you get her cub? The tiger crouches before he leaps. There are times when even the tiger sleeps. Throw a tile over the wall and you cannot know how it lands. As crazy as hauling timber into the woods. All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in the rain. An inch of time is an inch of gold but you can't buy that inch of time with an inch of gold. Any time is no time. Everything in time comes to him who knows how to wait. Everything is good but all in its time. He that gains time gains all things. He that has most time has none to lose. He who turns to look a second time will lose nothing. It is later than you think. Lost time is never found again. No time like the present.

American English German Dutch Chinese Chinese American Chinese Chinese Horace Roy Batty Chinese

American French Yiddish English English Chinese Chinese English English

361


Time Time Time Time Time Time Time

Time Time Time Time Time

*

* *

Time Time Time Time

*

Time Time Time Time Time Time

362

*

*

Only time will tell. Sadness flies away on the wings of time. Suit yourself to the times. Take your time and time will take you. The good time comes but once. The time of death is no time to take a breath. The time spent on any matter is usually inversely proportional to its importance. There is a time for all things. There is a time to speak and a time to be silent. There is always a first time. There is no time like the present. There needs a long time to know the world’s pulse. They who make the best use of their time have none to spare. Those who are happy do not observe how time goes by. Those who kill time eventually mourn the corpse. Time and chance happen to all men. Time and chance reveal all secrets. Time and patience bring roses. Time and patience will wear out even stone posts. Time and tide wait for no man. Time and tide wait for no man. Time bears away all things, even

Unlnown Jean de La Fontaine German Unknown Italian Russian C. Northcote Parkinson English English American Unknown English English Chinese Unknown English English Slovakian English English Geoffrey Chaucer Virgil


Time Time Time Time Time Time Time Time Time Time Time Time Time Time Time Time Time Time Time, essence Time, forgot

*

*

* *

our minds. Time brings everything to those who can wait for it. Time brings wounds and heals them. Time cures all things. Time flies. Time goes, death comes. Time is a great healer. Time is the best counselor. Time is the best doctor. Time is the best physician. Time makes friendship stronger, but love weaker. Time passes like the wind. Time reveals all things. Time tries truth. Time undermines us. Time waits for no man. Time will show (tell). Times waits for no one. You cannot kill time without injuring eternity. Time is of the essence. A little town that time forgot, and that decades can't improve. As if you could kill time without injuring eternity. Lost time is never found again.

German Yiddish English Roman Poet Dutch Unknown German Russian Yiddish La Bruyere Portuguese English English English Danish American Unknown Thoreau

Anonymous Garrison Kiellor Time, kill, Henry David eternity, injury Thoreau Time, lost, * Benjamin found Franklin Time, money Remember that time is money. Benjamin Franklin Time, tide Time and tide wait for no man. Unknown Timeliness Better late than never. Unknown Timeliness * Better three hours too soon than Shakespeare 363


Timeliness Timeliness

Timid Timidity

Timing Timing

Timing Title

a minute too late. * Meet the disease at its first stage. When your horse is on the brink of a precipice it is too late to pull the reins. * Let the meek inherit the earththey have it coming to them. If the trumpet give an uncertain sound, who shall prepare himself for battle. Know the right moment. Observe due measure, for right timing is in all things the most important factor. * You should hammer your iron when it is glowing. * Little men are fond of big titles.

Tobacco Today Today

*

Toe

*

Togetherness

*

Tomorrow

*

Tomorrow

*

Tomorrow Tomorrow Tomorrow Tone 364

*

We dine together, but each one smokes his own tobacco. If today will not, tomorrow may. One today is worth two tomorrows. Better to stumble with the toe than with the tongue. We must all hang together or we will hang separately. Do it tomorrow. You’ve made enough mistakes for one day. Never put off till tomorrow what you can do today. Tomorrow is a new day. Tomorrow is two days late for yesterday's job. Tomorrow never comes. It is the tone that makes the

Persius Confucius

James Thurber Bible

The Seven Sages Hesiod

Publilius Syrus German Proverb Russian English English African (Swahili) Benjamin Franklin Bumper Sticker English English Unknown Unknown French


music. A double tongue will slip.

Tongue Tongue Tongue Tongue

*

Tongue Tongue Tongue Tongue

*

Tongue

*

Tongue Tongue Tongue Tongue Tongue Tongue

*

*

Tongue Tongue Tongue Tooth Toothache Top heavy

*

A false tongue will hardly speak truth. A good tongue is a good weapon. A quiet tongue makes a wise head. A sweet tongue hides a bad heart. A wicked tongue is worse than an evil hand. A wise head keeps a still tongue. A woman’s tongue can break bones. Below the tongue, there is an ax hidden. Foolish tongues talk by the dozen. For evil tongues, scissors. He that knows not how to hold his tongue knows not how to talk. My tongue swore; but my mind was unconvinced. The lame tongue gets nothing. The tongue goes where the tooth aches. The tongue is mightier than the sword. The tongue of idle persons is never idle. The tongue speaks, the conduct shows. The tongue is ever turning to the aching tooth. When a toothache comes, you forget your headache. Too many chiefs and not enough

Indian (Tamil) English Unknown English Jamaican Yiddish Unknown Maltese Korean English Spanish English Euripides English Spanish Japanese English Welsh English Yiddish Unknown

365


Tortoise Torture Tower

Town Track Trade Trade Trade Trade Tragedy Tragedy

Tragedy

Train Training

Traitor Translation Translation Translation

366

Indians. The tortoise is not overburdened by its shell. Torture the data long enough and they will confess to anything. Towers are measured by their shadows, great men by those who speak evil of them. * Every town has its fool. ’Tis a wise saying: Drive on your own track. * A trade is better than service. All is fair in trade. Each trade has its own ways. He that changes his trade makes soup in a basket. * A single death is a tragedy, a million is a statistic. There are two tragedies in live: one is to lose your heart's desire, and the other is to gain it. What the American public wants in the theater is a tragedy with a happy ending. The train waits for no one. Training is everything. The peach was once a bitter almond; cauliflower is nothing but a cabbage with a college education. Once a traitor, always a traitor. It is as impossible to translate poetry as it is to translate music. Poetry is what is lost in translation. Reading a translation is like looking at a tapestry on the wrong side.

African (Shona) Anonymous Chinese

Yiddish Plutarch English American Chinese English Joseph Stalin Bernard Shaw William Dean Howells Japanese Mark Twain

Mexican St. Jerome Robert Frost Cervantes


Travel Travel Travel Travel, arrival Traveler Traveler Travels

Treason Tree Tree Tree Tree Tree Tree Tree Tree Tree Tree Tree Tree Tree Tree

* He that travels alone travels fastest. * Money − you can't take it with but just try to travel without it. Travel ripens a man. * It's sometimes better to travel hopefully than to arrive. A lazy traveler makes a long journey. A traveler may lie by authority. * A man travels the world over in search of what he needs and returns home to find it. I love treason but hate the traitor. * A creaky tree stands a long time. A fallen tree provides plenty of kindling. A good tree can lodge ten thousand birds. A great tree has a great fall. * A rotting tree leans long before it falls. A single tree does not make a forest. A threatened tree stands long. * Aged trees cannot be bent. * Bend the tree only while it is young. Don’t climb a tree to look for fish. Don’t cut down the tree to get the fruit. * If a tree dies, plant another in its place. It is the fruitful tree that is pelted with stones. Large trees give more shade than

Unknown Unknown Iranian Unknown American English George Moore Julius Caesar Russian Armenian Burmese English Finnish Chinese Scottish Japanese Russian Chinese Philippine Henry Fielding Indian (Hindi) English

367


Tree Tree Tree Tree Tree

*

Tree Tree Tree Trial Trials

* *

Trick * Trick Tricks, woman

Trifles Trifles Trifles, life

*

Trot Trouble

* *

Trouble

*

Trouble

*

368

fruit. Straight trees are felled first; sweet wells are drained first. Straight trees have crooked roots. Tall trees catch much wind. The great tree attracts the wind. The one tree receiving all the wind breaks. Trees which bear flowers do not always bear fruit. When the tree is fallen all go with their hatchet. Whichever way the tree is bending, it will fall. There are no trials till marriage. The gem cannot be polished without friction, nor man perfected without trials. A trick is clever only once. Trick against trick. Women are like tricks by the sleight of hand which to admire we should not understand. Dispense with trifles. Revolutions are not about trifles, but spring from trifles. Trifles make the sum of life.

Chinese English Dutch Chinese African (Oji) African (Kpelle) English Russian Irish Confucius

Yiddish German William Congreve Shakespeare Aristotle

Charles Dickens Troy was not taken in a day. English All the trouble in the world is due Blaise Pascal to the fact that man cannot sit still in a room. Better pour out your troubles to a Yiddish stone, but don’t carry them within yourself. He that seeks trouble never English


Trouble

Trouble

*

Trouble

*

Trouble Trouble Trouble Troubles

*

Trout

*

Trout Troy True Trust

*

Trust Trust

Trust

*

Trust

*

Trust

*

misses. He that troubleth his own house shall inherit the wind: and the fool shall be servant to the wise of heart. I am an old man and have known a great many troubles, but most of them never happened. Never trouble trouble, till trouble troubles you. Nobody ever grew despondent looking for trouble. None sigh deeper than those who have no troubles. Trouble creates a capacity to handle it. Your troubles seem larger the longer you look at them. There’s no catching trout with dry breeches. Trout's are not caught with dry breeches. Now there are fields of corn where mighty Troy once existed. To thine own self be true. A faithful husband is any man who is married to a trusting wife. He that trusteth in his own heart is a fool He who loves the world as his body may be entrusted with the empire. In God we trust − all others pay cash. Put your trust in God but keep you powder dry. The most disappointing period in

Solomon

Mark Twain

Unknown Kin Hubbard Norwegian Justice O.W. Holmes Unknown Portuguese Spanish Ovid Unknown Unknown Bible Lao-tzu

American Oliver Cromwell Unknown 369


Trust Trust Trust Trust Trust Trust

*

Trust

Trust, love Trust, papers

* *

Truth Truth

*

Truth Truth Truth

Truth

Truth Truth

370

*

a man's life is when his wife begins to trust him. Trust everybody, but cut the cards. Trust everybody, but thyself most. Trust is dead, ill payment killed it. Trust is the mother of deceit. Trust none better than yourself. Trust none, for oaths are straws, men's faith are wafer cakes and hold fast is the only dog. Trust the man who hesitates in his speech and is quick and steady in action, but beware of long arguments and long beards. Love all, but trust few. Trust not him with your secrets, who, when left alone in your room, turns over your papers. A half truth is a whole lie. A truth spoken before its time is dangerous. Always tell the truth if you want to make trouble. Always tell the truth in the form of a joke. As a general rule, if you want to get at the truth-hear both sides and believe neither. As scarce as truth is, the supply has always been in excess of the demand. Between truth and the search for truth, I choose the second. Beware of a half-truth for you may have gotten hold of the wrong half.

Finley Peter Dunne Danish English English English Shakespeare

George Santayana

Shakespeare Johann Kaspar Lavater Yiddish Greek Proverb Unknown Armenian Josh Billings

Josh Billings

Bernard Berenson Unknown


Truth

Truth Truth

*

Truth Truth Truth Truth Truth

*

Truth

Truth

Truth

Truth Truth Truth

*

Truth Truth Truth

*

Do not veil the truth with falsehood, nor conceal the truth knowingly. Half the truth is often a whole lie. He that follows truth too near the heels shall have dust thrown in his face. I never give ‘em hell. I just tell the truth and they think it’s hell. In too much dispute truth is lost. In truth we know nothing, for truth lies in the depth. Many a truth is best concealed. Never tell the truth to a pimp, a whore or a corporate vicepresident. No mask like open truth to cover lies, as to naked is the best disguise. No real gentleman will tell the naked truth in the presence of ladies. One of the nicest things about telling the truth is that you don't have to remember what you said. Refuse profane and old wives’ tales Sooner or later the truth comes to light. Speak the truth and shame the Devil Speak the truth, but have one foot in the stirrup. The pure and simple truth is rarely pure and simple. The truth doesn’t die but it lives like a poor man.

The Koran

English English

Harry S. Truman English Democritus Welsh Frank Dane

William Congreve Mark Twain

Unknown

Bible Dutch Francois Rabelius Armenian Oscar Wilde Yiddish

371


Truth Truth

* The truth has many faces. The truth is more important than the facts. Truth The truth surfaces like oil on water. Truth Though I can always make my extravaganzas appear credible, I cannot make the truth appear so. Truth To know the truth is easy; but, ah, how difficult to follow it! Truth Truth and folly dwell in the wine cask. Truth * Truth does not blush. Truth Truth has a good face but bad clothes. Truth * Truth is a fruit which should not be picked before it is ripe. Truth Truth is a slowpoke. Truth Truth is the safest lie. Truth Truth lies at the bottom of a well. Truth Truth lies on the surface of things. Truth Truth never grows old. Truth Truth often comes out of a joke. Truth Truth ought to be spoken. Truth Truth seldom finds lodging. Truth * Truth shames the devil. Truth Truth shines in the dark. Truth Truth will prevail. Truth When the truth is told, everyone takes it ill. Truth When you want to fool the world, tell the truth. Truth, slander * Truth is generally the best vindication against slander. Truth, * All great truths begin as blasphemies blasphemies. 372

Yiddish Frank Lloyd Wright Yiddish Bernard Shaw Chinese Danish Tertullian English Voltaire Yiddish Yiddish English English English Japanese American Flemish English Welsh English Indian (Tamil) Bismarck Abraham Lincoln George Bernard


Truth, cunning

Truth, defenders

*

Truth, devil

*

Truth, doubt Truth, economize Truth, error

* *

Truth, error, damage

*

Truth, fiction Truth, fiction Truth, libel Truth, lies

Truth, lies

*

Truth, lies Truth, lies Truth, quiet Truths

* *

Shaw The seeming truth which cunning Shakespeare times put on to entrap the wildest. Truth often suffers more by the William Penn heat of its defenders than by the arguments of its opposers. There are no whole truths; all Alfred North truths are half-truths. It is trying Whitehead to treat them as whole truths that plays with the devil. When in doubt tell the truth. Mark Twain Truth is the most valuable thing Mark Twain we have. Let us economize it. Love truth, but pardon error Voltaire (mistakes). Nothing is more damaging to a Johann new truth than an old error. Wolfgang von Goethe Truth has only to pass through a Unknown few persons to become fiction. Truth is stranger than fiction, but Unknown seldom as convincing. The worst libel is the truth. Yiddish I never could tell a lie that Mark Twain anybody would doubt, nor a truth that anybody would believe. It is twice as hard to crush a half Austin truth as a whole lie. O'Malley Nothing can be falser than a Unknown truism. The safest of all lies is sometimes Unknown the truth. Truth has a quiet breast. Shakespeare Irrationally held truths may be Thomas more harmful than reasoned Henry Huxley errors. 373


Try Trying

*

Trying Tsar Tsar

*

Tub Tune Tune, piper

*

Turn Turn Two Tyrant Tyrant

*

Tyrant

*

Tyrant, flatterer Tyrants Ugliness Ugly Ulcers Umbrella Un374

*

Try before you trust. No one knows what he can do until he tries. You never know what you can do until you try. If the Tsar makes you a present of an egg he takes from you a hen. The Tsar has three hands but only one ear. Every tub must stand on its own bottom. There’s many a good tune played on an old fiddle. He who pays the piper calls the tune. A turn well done is twice done. An ill turn is soon done. Where two fall out, the third wins. Any excuse will serve a tyrant. It is time to fear when tyrants seem to kiss. The only tyrant I accept in this world is the still voice within. Of all the wild beasts preserve me from the tyrant; and of all the tame, from a flatterer. All men would be tyrants if they could. Her face was her chaperone.

English Publilius Syrus Unknown Russian Russian English English Unknown Scottish English German Aesop English Gandhi Ben Jonson

Daniel Defoe Rupert Hughes Unknown

* Beauty is only skin deep, but ugliness goes to the bone. * I don’t have ulcers; I give them. Harry Cohen We remember the umbrella only Philippine when it rains. * Those who have free seats at the Chinese


appreciative Uncertainty

play hiss first. Continued uncertainty leads to war. Uncertainty, * His is no wise man who will quit certainty for uncertainty. Underling Underlings are worse than masters. Understand It's strange how much easier it is for a man to understanding a woman when he's not married to her. Understand Some people understand nothing better than anything else. Understand There is a great difference between knowing and understanding: you can know a lot about something and not really understand it. Understanding Forsake the foolish, and live; and go in the way of understanding. Understanding Good understanding giveth favor: but the way of transgressors is hard. Understanding * I have suffered from being misunderstood, but I would have suffered a hell of a lot more if I had been understood. Understanding I know all except myself.

Indian (Tamil) Samuel Johnson Yiddish Unknown

Unknown Charles F. Kettering

Solomon Solomon

Clarence Darrow

Francois Villon Pierre De Beaumarchais Graham Greene

Understanding * It is not necessary to understand things in order to argue about them. Understanding No human being can really understand another, and no one can arrange another's happiness. Understanding The man that wandereth out of Solomon the way of understanding shall remain in the congregation of the

375


dead. Understanding With great doubts comes great understanding; with small doubts comes little understanding. Understanding * You have to understand that some things you will never understand. Undo, O God! O God! That if it were yesterday possible to undo things done − to call back yesterday. Undress Every time a woman leaves off something she looks better, but every time a man leaves off something he looks worse. Unhappy * Call no man unhappy until he is married. Unhappy There's enough misery and un happiness in the movies without having it in real life. Unicorn Never plat leapfrog with a unicorn. Union Union is strength. United United we stand, divided we fall. United The United Nations was set up Nations not to get us to heaven, but only to save us from Hell. United States America is a great country, but you can't live in it for nothing. United States America is a land where most citizens vote for Democrats, but hope to live like Republicans. United States The United States is the only land where the poor have parking problems. United States There are no institutions in America, only fashions. Unity Unity is strength, separation 376

Chinese

Unknown

Thomas Heywood Will Rogers

Socrates Unknown

Unknown Dutch Unknown Winston Churchill Will Rogers Unknown

Unknown

Will Rogers African


Universe Universe

Universe, knowledge Unlooked Unpleasant

Unreliable Upbringing Uprightness

Use Use

Use Useless

Useless Useless

Useless

Uselessness Uselessness

weakness. There is in the universe neither enter or circumference. Though I have looked everywhere I can find nothing lowly in the universe. He knows the universe, but himself he does not know. Unlooked for often comes. Something unpleasant is coming when men are anxious to tell the truth. * You can’t depend on anyone to be wrong all the time. Better than birth is upbringing. Who would leave the paths of unrighteousness, to walk in the way of darkness? Constant use will wear away anything especially friends. Flowing water never goes bad; our door hubs never gather termites. Use it or lose it. He is useless on top of the ground: he ought to be under it, nourishing the cabbages. Music is essentially useless, as life is. The punishment of criminals should serve a purpose: when a man is hanged he is useless. We have too much knowledge of useless things, and too much ignorance of useful things. A flea on a bald head. * A nod is as good as a wink to a

(Annang) Giordano Bruno Archie Randolph Ammons Jean de La Fountaine English Disraeli

American Japanese Solomon

Unknown Chinese

Unknown Mark Twain

Santayana Voltaire

Vauvenargues Chinese Unknown 377


Uselessness, death Vagrant Valkyries Value Value

Value Value Value Value

blind man. * A useless life is an early death.

A vagrant is a nobody on his way from nowhere to nothing. Ride of the Valkyries. * Kill a chicken before a monkey. * Never tell a woman you are unworthy of her as she already she knows it. * Pleasing ware is half sold. * The real issue is value, not price. There’s little value in the single cow. Value has been defined as the ability to command the price.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Unknown Richard Wagner Chinese Unknown

Italian Robert T. Lindgren Irish

Louis Dembitz Brandeis Vanity How many valiant me have Michel survived their own reputations? Eyguem de Montaigne Vanity Vanity is what makes the man in a Unknown rut think he's in the groove. Variety Variety is the spice of life. Unknown Variety With me a change of trouble is a Lloyd George good as a vacation. Varnishing * Varnishing hides a crack. English Vengeance A woman’s vengeance knows no German bounds. Venture Never venture out of your depth English till you can swim. Verse * I always make the first verse well, Moliere but have trouble making the others. Verse, poetry, * I've given offence by saying I'd as Robert Frost 378


net

soon as write free verse as play tennis with the net down. Vice Be good and you will be lonely. Vice Every man should have enough vices to keep him from being a menace to society. Vice No vice goes alone. Vice Vice makes virtue shine. Vice Vices are learned without a master. Vice Where vice is, vengeance follows. Vice President * Once there were two brothers: one ran away to sea, the other was elected Vice President-and nothing was ever heard from either of them again. Vice, virtue He who hesitates is probably torn between vice and virtue. Vice, virtue * I prefer an accommodating vice to an obstinate virtue. Vice, virtue Men do not vary much in virtue; their vices only are different. Vice, virtue When virtue hides her face it is called modesty; when vice does so, it is called shame. Vices, minds, The greatest minds are capable of virtues the greatest vices as well as the greatest virtues. Viciousness There is a generation, whose teeth are as swords, and their jaw teeth as knives, to devour the poor from off the earth, and the needy from among men. Victim In the world the low are the victims of the high. Victor The victor feels no fatigue. Victor * The victor is always justified.

Mark Twain Unknown

English English English English Thomas R. Marshall

Unknown Moliere Elbert Hubbard Unknown

Rene Descartes Solomon

Indian (Tamil) Slovenian T.C. Lai 379


Victor, spoils Victory

Viper

To the victor belongs the spoils. Death is swallowed up in victory. Oh death, where is thy sting? Oh grave, where is thy victory. Hannibal knew how to gain a victory but not how to use it. In war there is no substitute for victory. On the day of victory, no one is tired. Victory does not stand in the number of soldiers. Which if not victory is yet revenge. It is the north wind that made the Vikings. Every village has its inn. So many villages, so many customs. The village that is in sight needs no guide. Who calls me villain? Breaks my pate across, plucks off my beard and blows it in my face? One murder makes a villain, millions, a hero. Baring that natural expression of villainy which we all have, the man looked honest enough. She considereth a field, and buyeth it: with the fruit of her hands she planteth a vineyard. If violence comes by the door, law goes out by the chimney. The viper allows no insolence.

Viper

Vipers breed vipers.

Victory Victory

*

Victory

*

Victory Victory, revenge Vikings

*

Village Village Village

*

Villain

Villain, murder * Villainy, honesty Vineyard

Violence

380

Unknown Bible

Plutarch Douglas MacArthur Arab Armenian John Milton Scandinavian Polish SerboCroatian Turkish Shakespeare

Beilby Porteus Mark Twain

Solomon

Turkish African (Yoruba) Danish


Virginity Virtue Virtue Virtue Virtue

* Eternal vigilance is the price of virginity. * And virtue, though in rags, will keep me warm. Be virtuous and you will be eccentric. I am as pure as the driven slush.

Virtue

I have never seen a man as fond of virtue, as of women. She is like a merchant ship that bringeth food from afar. The virtue of a coward is suspicion. To walk in the path of virtue for ten years is not enough; to do evil for a single day is too much. * Virtue (beauty) is but skin deep. Virtue and beauty are a blessed association. Virtue cannot live in solitude; neighbors are sure to grow up around it. Virtue debases itself in justifying itself. * Virtue is its own punishment. * Virtue is its own reward. Virtue is not an orphan, it will always have neighbors. Virtue is not knowing but doing. Virtue is not left to stand alone. He who practice it will have neighbors. Virtue is superior to rank.

Virtue Virtue

* Virtue praised increases. When you can't have anything

Virtue Virtue Virtue

Virtue Virtue Virtue

Virtue Virtue Virtue Virtue Virtue Virtue

Unknown John Dryden Mark Twain Tallulah Bankhead Confucius Solomon English Chinese

American Slovakian Confucius

Voltaire Unknown Unknown Japanese Japanese Confucius

Indian (Tamil) English Don Marquis 381


Virtue

*

Virtue

*

Virtue, capitalism, socialism

Virtue, vice

Virtue, vice

*

Virtue, vice, abstinence

*

Virtues, fortune

*

Vision

*

Vision

*

Visit

*

Visit Volunteer

* *

Vote Voting

Voting

382

*

else, you can have virtue. Who can find a virtuous woman, for her price is far above rubies. Woman’s virtue is man’s greatest invention. The inherent virtue of capitalism is the unequal sharing of blessings; the inherent virtue of socialism is the equal sharing of miseries. There is no vice so simple assumes some mark of virtue on his outward parts. Virtues all agree but vice fight one another. Virtue consists not abstaining from vice, but in not desiring it.

Solomon Cornelia Otis Skinner Sir Winston Churchill

Shakespeare

Unknown

George Bernard Shaw We need greater virtues to Duc de La sustain good fortune than bad. Rochefoucauld The father backward you can Winston look, the farther forward you are Churchill likely to see. Vision is the art of seeing things Jonathan invisible. Swift Friends are lost by calling too Unknown often or too seldom. Short visits make for long friends. English A volunteer is worth 20 men Unknown pressed. We’d all like to vote for the best Kin Hubbard man, but he’s never a candidate. Those who cast the votes decide Unknown nothing; those who count the votes decide everything. Vote for the man who promises Bernard


Voting

Wagon

*

Wait Wait

*

Waiting

Walk Walk Walk, run Walker Walking

* *

least as he'll be the least disappointing. When a fellow tell me he's bipartisan, I know he's going to vote against me. Empty wagons (barrels) make the most noise. He who can wait obtains what he wishes. The woman who says she won't be a minute is usually right. Although my neighbors are all barbarians, and you are a thousand miles away, there are always two cups on my table. If you walk straight, you will not stumble. We must walk before we run. Walk before you run. Even a slow walker will arrive.

I am a slow walker, but I never walk backwards. Wall Even walls have ears. Wall It is bad to lean against a falling wall. Wall Walls have ears, wine bottles have mouths. Wall Walls have ears. Wall, building Before I built a wall I'd ask to know, "What I was walling in, or walling out?" Walls The walls we build around us to keep out the sadness also keep out the joy. Want * For want of a nail the shoe is lost; for want of a shoe the horse is

Baruch Harry S. Truman Danish Italian Unknown Chinese

Yiddish English Unknown African (Ovambo) Lincoln Russian Danish Japanese English Robert Frost

Jim Rohn

English

383


Want War War

War War War

War War

War

War

War

War

War War War, peace

384

lost; for want of a horse the rider is lost. * Waste not, want not. Advantage is a better soldier than rashness. * Diplomats are just as essential in starting a war as soldiers are in finishing it. Fiercer the war, sooner the peace. * He that makes a good war makes a good peace. How good bad music and bad reasons sound when we march against an enemy! I make war on the living, not the dead. Many return from the war who cannot give an account of the battle. There have been few wars which did not originate through priests or women. War does not always decide who is right but it always decides who is left! War is little more than a catalogue of mistakes and misfortune. War is not as onerous as servitude.

English Shakespeare Will Rogers

American English Nietzsche

Chares V Italian

Czech

Unknown

Winston Churchill

Marquis de Vauvenargues * What millions died, so that Caesar Thomas might be great! Campbell When war begins Hell opens. English * I don't know whether war is an Clemenceau interlude during peace or peace an interlude during war.


War, peace

* There never was a good war or a bad peace. War, plan, * All wars are planned by old men council rooms in council rooms apart. War, runner * In war there is no second prize for up, prize the runner up. Warn * Half warned is half armed. Warning Forewarned is forearmed. Warriors, The strongest of all warriors are time, patience Time and Patience. Was, peace * There was never a good war or a bad peace. Wash It will all come out in the wash. Washington * Washington is a city of southern efficiency and northern charm. Waste * A tiger never returns to the prey he did not finish off. Waste * Controlling waste is like bailing a boat − you have to keep at it. Waste Water Water

*

Water

*

Water Water

* *

Water Water Wave Wave

*

Waste not, want not. Deep waters flow slowly. Drink waters out of thine own cistern, and running waters out of thy own well. Shallow waters make a great noise. Still waters run deep. Trust not still water, or a silent man. Water can support a ship, and water can upset it. Water that has been begged for does not quench the thirst. Don’t let high waves scare you to lose the oars. One wave thrusts out another.

Benjamin Franklin Grantland Rice Omar Bradley English Unknown Leo Tolsoi Benjamin Franklin Unknown John F. Kennedy Chinese Lyndon Baines Johnson Unknown Chinese Solomon

Irish English Danish Chinese Unknown Vietnamese American 385


Wave Way Way Way

*

Way

*

Way Ways

Wealth Wealth Wealth

*

Wealth Wealth Wealth Wealth

*

Wealth Wealth Wealth

Wealth

386

*

The waves do not rise but when the winds blow. It is a great way to the bottom of the sea. The shortest way is the best way. The way to be safe is never to be secure. The way to heaven is full of obstacles and brambles. The way to heaven is not strewn with roses. There be three things which are too wonderful for me, yea, four which I know not the way of the eagle in the air; the way of a ship in the midst of the sea; and the way of the man with a maid. A man’s wealth is his enemy. A pauper in the midst of wealth. A penny is a lot of money if you haven’t got a penny. After a rich man gets rich, his next ambition is to get richer. He that maketh haste to be rich shall not be innocent. Much wealth will not come if a little does not go. Riches enlarge, rather than satisfy appetites. The wealth which enslaves the owner is not wealth. Wealth maketh many friends. Wealth maketh many friends; but the poor is separated from his neighbor. When there is wealth, there is power.

American English American English Philippine Philippine Solomon

English Horace Yiddish American Bible Confucius Harpee Lee African (Swahili) Bible Solomon

Indian (Tamil)


Wealth

Wealth

Weapon

Weapon

*

Weapon

*

Wear

*

Wearied

*

Weasel Weather

*

Weather

*

Weather

*

Weather

Weather, talk

Web

*

When you are poor, neighbors close by will not come; but once you become rich, you'll be surprised by visits from relatives who'll come from long distances. Where wealth is established it is difficult for friendship to find a place. A weapon in the workroom will not help you when you are to be mauled. The best armor is to keep out of gunshot. The best weapon against an enemy is another enemy. Better to wear out than to rust out. If you have run with footmen and they have wearied you, then how can you contend with horses? A weasel will always come to say Happy New Year to the chickens. Cursing the weather is bad farming. Everybody talks about the weather but nobody does anything about it. Look at the weather when you step out; look at men’s faces when you step in. Red sky at night, shepherds delight, red sky in the morning, shepherds warning. Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it. The spider’s web lets the rat escape and catches the fly.

Chinese

Russian

African (Ovambo) Francis Bacon Nietzsche English Old Testament Chinese English Mark Twain

Chinese

Unknown

Mark Twain

Spanish

387


Wedge Weed Weed Weeding Weeds Weeds, plant Weigh Weight Weight

Welcome Welcome Well Well Well Well Well, water Well-bred, error, fault Wench West 388

A blunt wedge will do it, where sometimes a sharp axe will not. * A weed is a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered. The evil weed produces the largest number of seeds. * One year's seeding means seven years weeding. * Ill weeds grow fast. * Any plant growing in the wrong place is a weed. * Weigh not what you give, but what is given you. Great weights hang on small wires. It were better for him that a millstone were hung about his neck, and he cast into the sea. * Do not wear out your welcome. * Fish and guests smell in three days. All is well that ends well. Don’t spit in the well, you may have to drink the water. He who sits in a well to look at the sky can see but little. * You never miss the water till the well has run dry. * When the well's dry, we know the worth of water. None but the well-bred knows how to confess a fault, or acknowledge himself in error. Young wenches make old wenches. Go West, young man, and grow

English Emerson Maltese Unknown John Heywood Old Farmer’s Almanac English English Bible

Unknown Unknown English Russian Chinese Irish Benjamin Franklin Benjamin Franklin English Horace


Wet, martini Whale Wheel Wheel Wheel

Wheel Wheel, squeaks, grease Whip Whip Whiskey

Whiskey Whisper Whisper Whore Whoredom Wicked

Wicked

up with the country. Why don't you get out of that wet coat and into a dry martini. In a fight between whales, the backs of shrimps are burst. A turning wheel does not get rusty. He who greases his wheels, helps his oxen. The squeaky wheel doesn’t always get greased; it often gets replaced. The worst wheel of a cart creaks most. The wheel that squeaks the loudest is the one that gets the grease. A whip for a fool and a rod for a school are always in good season. It is enough to show a whip to a beaten dog. * Too much of anything is bad, but too much of good whiskey is barely enough. * What whiskey will not cure, has no cure. * A whisper is louder than a shout. Some people will believe anything, if you whisper it. A young whore, an old saint. Whoredom and thieving are never long concealed. Enter not into the path of the wicked, and go in the way of evil men. The way of the wicked is as darkness: they know not at what

Greeley Robert Benchley Korean Greek English John Peers

English Josh Billings

English Czech Mark Twain

Irish Philippine Unknown English Spanish Solomon

Solomon

389


Wickedness, degrees Widow

Widow

Widow Widow

Widow Widow Wife Wife Wife Wife Wife Wife Wife Wife

Wife Wife 390

they stumble. * There is a method in man's wickedness − it grows by degrees. He that marries a widow and two daughters has three back doors to his house. He who marries a widow with three children marries four thieves. It is as easy to marry a widow as to put a halter on a dead horse. The tragedy of Mormonism is that a single death makes a dozen widows. Who marries a widow and two daughters marries three thieves. Widows are always rich. A bad wife takes advice from everyone but her own husband. A man's best possession is a sympathetic wife. A nice wife and a back door will soon make a rich man poor. * A quarrelsome wife is like a constant drip. * A second wife is like a wooden leg. A wife brings but two good daysher wedding day and death day. A wife isn’t a mitten − you can’t take her off your hand. A wife should not hold converse with her husband’s younger brother. A wife, a razor, and a horse are things not to be lent. Beating your wife with a paddle

Beaumont and Fletcher Scottish

Danish

English American Saying George Herbert English Irish Euripides Scottish Unknown Yiddish English Russian Chinese

Polish Yiddish


Wife

*

Wife Wife

*

Wife Wife Wife Wife Wife

*

Wife

*

Wife Wife Wife

*

Will

*

Will

*

Will Willingness Willow Willow Willow

* *

doesn’t make the linen white. Do not praise your wife before seven years. He who has a good wife can bear any evil. If you take a wife from hell, she will bring you back. It is easy to take a wife, but hard to get rid of her. Love your wife like your soul, but shake her like a pear tree. Take a good wife even if you have to sell your pots and kettles. The blind man’s wife needs no painting. The cunning wife makes her husband her apron. The second wife is hateful to the children of the first; a viper is not more hateful. The wife should be blind and the husband deaf. When the wife wears the pants, the husband washes the floor. When you have a pretty wife, you are a bad friend. Great souls have wills; feeble ones have only wishes. Where there’s a will there’s a way. With will one can do anything. All lay their loads on a willing horse. Bend the willow while it is young. Willows are never broken by snow. Willows are weak, yet serve to

Russian Spanish American SerboCroatian Russian Japanese English English Euripides

English Yiddish Yiddish Chinese English English Unknown Danish Japanese Italian 391


Willow Win Win, lose Wind Wind

* *

Wind Wind

Wind Wind Wind Wind Wind Wine

*

Wine Wine Wine Wine Wine, age

* *

Wine, reflection Wine, truth Wine, wit 392

* *

bind bigger wood. Willows are weak, yet they bind other wood. Win at first and lose at last. You win some, and lose some. Every wind is ill to a broken ship. If the wind will not serve then take to the oars. It’s an ill wind that blows nowhere. Suddenly there came a sound from heaven as a rushing mighty wind. The fresh wind was singing over the wine-dark sea. The wind that comes in through a crack is cold. The wind will fell an oak, but cannot destroy the reed. There is something in the wind. You can’t catch the wind in a net. Fine or not, it is my country’s wine. Good wine makes good blood. Wine and late rising are short cuts to poverty. Wine and wealth change wise men’s manners. Wine is a peep-hole on a man. The best wine comes out of an old vessel. If you see in your wine the reflection of a person not in your range of vision, don't drink it. Wine is truth. When the wine goes in, wit goes

English English Unknown English Unknown American Bible

Homer Japanese Hungarian Shakespeare English Chinese Italian Japanese English Solon Unknown Chinese

Anonymous Dutch


Wine, wit Winners, losers Winning

*

Winning Winter Wisdom

*

Wisdom Wisdom Wisdom Wisdom

Wisdom Wisdom

*

Wisdom

*

Wisdom Wisdom

*

Wisdom

Wisdom

*

out. When the wine is in the man, the wit is in the can. If there were no losers, there would be no winners. Winning isn’t everything, but wanting to win is. Winning isn't everything, it's the only thing. Now is the winter of our discontent. A single conversation with a wise man is better than ten years of study. Be swift to hear, slow to speak, and slow to wrath. Everything I know I learned after I was thirty. Give instruction to a wise man, and he will be even wiser. Happy is the man that findeth wisdom, and the man that getteth understanding. He is a hard man who is only just, and a sad one who is only wise. Incline thine ear unto wisdom, and apply thine heart to understanding. It is always good when man has two irons in the fire. No man is wise at all times. Speak to him, for there is none born wise. The law of the wise is a fountain of life, to depart from the snares of death. The superior man does not permit

Dutch Unknown Vince Lombardi Anonymous Shakespeare Chinese

New Testament Georges Clemenceau Solomon Solomon

Voltaire Solomon

Beaumont and Fletcher Unknown Ptahhote Solomon

I Ching: Book 393


Wisdom

*

Wisdom Wisdom Wisdom

*

Wisdom

*

Wisdom, cunning Wisdom, * desperation Wisdom, philosophy Wisdom, pride *

Wise

*

Wise Wise

*

Wise

*

Wise Wise Wise

394

his thoughts to go beyond his situation. Wisdom cannot be comprehended by the narrowminded. Wisdom is not bought. Wisdom travels by oxen. Wise men do not quarrel with each other. Wise men profit more from fools than fools from wise men. Nothing doth more hurt in a state than cunning men pass for wise. It is a characteristic of wisdom not to do desperate things. Vain wisdom all, and false philosophy. When pride cometh, then cometh shame: but with the lowly is wisdom. A wise man leans more from his enemies than a fool from his friends. Be not over wise in doing thy business. It’s a wise man who lives with money in the bank but it’s a fool who dies that way. So wise so young, they say, do never live long. Some are wise and some are otherwise. The foolish sayings of a rich man pass for wise ones. The more laws and order are made prominent, the more thieves and robbers there will be.

of Changes T.C. Lai

African Yiddish Danish Marcus Porcius Cato Francis Bacon Henry David Thoreau John Milton Solomon

Baltasar Gracian Bible French

Shakespeare Unknown Spanish Lao-tzu


Wise

Wise

Wise Wise

*

Wise choices

*

Wise man

Wise man

*

Wise man

*

Wise men

Wise men

Wiseman

*

Wiseman

*

Wish

Wish Wish

*

The wise shall inherit glory: and shame shall be the promotion of fools. Wise is the young man who is always thinking of taking a wife, but never takes one. Wise men learn more from fools than fools from wise men. You can learn more from a wise man when he is wrong than from a fool when he is right. It is better to give away the wool than the sheep. A wise man feareth and departeth from evil: but the fool rageth and is confident. A wise man sometimes changes his mind, but a fool never. When a wise man errs, he errs badly. He that walketh with wise men shall be wise: but a companion of fools shall be destroyed. Logical consequences are the scarecrows of fools and the beacons of wise men. There is no difference between a wise man and a fall when they fall in love. When a fool is silent, he too is counted among the wise. Do not wish to be anything but what you are, and try to be that perfectly. Even the wishes of an ant reach heaven. If a man could have half his wishes, he would double his

Solomon

Pietro Aretino Unknown Unknown

Italian Solomon

Arabic Yiddish Solomon

Thomas Henry Huxley English Unknown

Unknown Walter Bagehot Japanese Unknown

395


Wish

*

Wish

Wish

*

Wit Wit Wit Wit Wit

*

*

Wit Wit Wit Wit, melancholy Witch Witness Witness Witness

* *

Witness Wives

*

Wives

*

Wives Woe

396

*

trouble. If wishes were true, shepherds would be kings. If you want money, go to strangers: of you want advice, go to friends; if you want nothing, go to relatives. Our necessities are few but our wants are endless. Better wit than wealth. Bought wit is dear. Brevity is the soul of wit. Great wits have short memories. The monuments of wit survive the monuments of power. The more wit, the less courage. Wit and will strive for the victory. Wit bought is better than taught. Aristotle says that melancholy men of all others are most witty. A harry man is a happy man; a hairy wife is a witch. A single witness is no witness. No witness can become the judge. One witness, one liar; more witnesses, all liars. There is no such witness as a good measure of wine. Ugly wives and stupid servant girls are treasures above price. Wives and shoes are better when old. Wives, razors and horses should never be lent. The stone fell on the pitcher; woe to the pitcher. The pitcher fell on

French Unknown

Bernard Shaw English English Shakespeare English Francis Bacon English English English Robert Burton Unknown Anonymous Hebrew Greek Spanish Chinese Japanese Russian The Talmud


Wolf Wolf Wolf Wolf Wolf

*

Wolf Wolf

*

Wolf Wolf Wolf Wolf

*

Wolf Wolf

Wolf

*

Wolf Wolfman

Wolves

*

the stone; woe to the pitcher. A wolf changes his coat but never his nature. A wolf is happy during a storm. An old wolf does not lose his way. An old wolf is used to being shouted at. Feed a wolf in the winter and he will devour you in the summer. It needs but slight provocation to make the wolf devour the lamb. No matter how much you feed a wolf, he keeps on looking into the forest. Talk of the wolf and you see his tail. The wolf bemoans the sheep, and then eats it. The wolf eats counted sheep. The wolf is not afraid of the dog, but he hates his bark. The wolf knows what the ill beast thinks. The wolf laments what he left behind, the shepherd what he took away. The wolf may lose his teeth, but not his inclinations. Though the wolf be lean, he can contend with a goat. Even a man who's pure in heart; And says his prayers at night; May become a wolf when the wolf bane blooms And the Autumn moon is bright. Wolves are often hidden in sheep’s clothing.

SerboCroatian Greek Turkish Dutch Greek Danish Russian

French Italian English Yiddish English Armenian

Spanish African (Wolof) Curt Siodmak

Danish

397


Woman Woman Woman Woman Woman Woman Woman

Woman Woman Woman

Woman Woman Woman

Woman Woman Woman Woman

398

A bad woman is as hard as a harsh winter’s day. A beautiful woman is beautiful trouble. A drunken woman is lost to shame. * A pregnant woman wants toasted snow. A small woman can also have a big mouth. A woman and a glass are ever in danger. A woman goes mad twice − when she loves and when she begins to go gray. A woman has long hair and short sense. A woman is attractive when she is somebody else’s wife. * A woman is like a teabag. You don’t know her strength until she’s in hot water. A woman laughs when she can, and weeps when she pleases. A woman takes off her claim to respect along with her garments. A woman that loves to be at the window is like a bunch of grapes on the highway. A woman without jealousy is like a ball without bounce. A woman’s mind is cleaner than a man’s; she changes it more often. Beat a woman with a hammer and you’ll have gold. Beware of a bad woman and put no trust in a good one.

Hebrew Jamaican Irish Hebrew Yiddish English Polish

Yiddish African (Shona) Nancy Reagan French Euripides English

English Oliver Herford Irish Spanish


Woman

Woman

*

Woman

*

Woman

*

Woman

Woman Woman

*

Woman

Woman

Woman Woman

*

Woman

Woman Woman

*

Beware of a strange woman with honeycomb lips as her end may be as bitter as wormwood, sharp as a two-edged sword, and her feet go down to death and her steps take hold of hell. Choose not a woman nor linen by candlelight. Do not insult a woman before she has undressed. If you don’t think women are explosive, drop one. Most virtuous women are like hidden treasures, safe only because they are not sought after. No woman is ugly when she is dressed. No woman marries an old man for God’s sake. Nothing upsets a woman like somebody getting married she didn’t even know had a beau. The homely woman is precious in the home, but at a feast the beautiful one is preferred. The pretty woman in the house is the enemy of all the ugly ones. There are two ways to handle a woman, and nobody knows either of them. Women are attractive at 20, attentive at 30, and adhesive at 40. Women are made to be loved, not understood. Women are never stronger than when they arm themselves with

Solomon

English African (Bemba) Unknown Francois De La Rochefoucauld Spanish German Kin Hubbard

Chinese

Chinese Kin Hubbard

Unknown

Oscar Wilde Marquise Du Deffand 399


Woman, age

their weaknesses. * Old age is woman's hell.

Woman, anger

Women

*

Women

*

Women Women

*

Women

*

Women Women Women Women Women Women Women, happiest Women, life

Wonders Wood

400

*

It is better to dwell in the wilderness than with a contentious and angry woman. Beware of women with beards and men without them. It is easier to make a hundred watches agree than ten women. Lazy and silly women marry well. Put the light out and all women are alike. There are only two good women in the world − one is lost and the other can’t be found. When evening falls all women become equal. Women and cats are both ungrateful animals. Women are necessary evils. Women have their fears. Women in mischief are wiser than men. Women, asses, and nuts require strong hands. The happiest women, like the happiest nations, have no history.

Ninon de L'Enclos Solomon

Basque Polish Greek German Polish

Lebanese Mexican English American English Italian

George Eliot (Marian Evans Cross) * From birth to age 18 a girl needs Sophie good parents. From 10 to 35, she Tucker needs good looks. From 35 to 55, she needs a good personality. From 55 on, she needs good cash. Will wonders ever cease? Unknown * Chop your own wood and it will Unknown warm you twice.


Wood

* Crooked wood burns just as well as straight. Wood * Wood half burnt is easily kindled. Wood Woods have ears and fields have eyes. Woods, deeds * Fine words dress ill deeds. Word

*

Word Word

*

Word Word Word

*

Word Word Word

* *

Word

*

Word

*

Word Word Word Word Word Word Word

*

German English Dutch

George Herbert A harsh word is more painful than Indian a blow. (Tamil) A kind word is better than alms. Yiddish A silent man’s words are not Danish brought into court. A straightforward word is bitter. Turkish A true word needs no oath. Turkish A word before is worth two English behind. A word is often better than a gift. Bible A word to the wise is enough. English An honest man’s word is as good English as his bond. Better one word in time than two English afterwards. Big words seldom go with good Danish deeds. Deliver your words not by number English but by weight. Good words cost no more than English bad. Good words cost nothing. English It is bitter fare to eat one’s own Danish words. Kind words don’t wear out the Danish tongue. Many a true word is spoken in English jest. Not every word requires an Italian answer. 401


Word

Word

Old people’s words are weighed with scales. One cross word brings on a quarrel. * One ill word asks for another. Pleasant words will draw a snake from its hole. * Polite words open iron gates.

Word Word

*

Word

*

Word Word Word

Word Word Word Word Word Word Word

*

Word Word Word Word Word Word

402

*

Greek Yiddish

English African (Swahili) SerboCroatian Sweet words please fools. Japanese The difference between the right Mark Twain word and the almost right word is the difference between lightning and the lightning bug. The word of slander rings like a Rumanian bell. The word of the destitute does Indian not reach the assembly. (Tamil) The word of the Tsar is a proverb. Russian The word that lies nearest the Norwegian heart comes first in the mouth. There is many a true word spoken Scottish in jest. Wait is a hard word to the hungry. German What words won’t do, gold will. English When the word is out, it belongs German to another. Wise words and great words English seldom agree. Words and feathers are tossed by English the wind. Words are but words. English Words cut more than swords. English Words have long tails. English Words must be weighed and not Yiddish counted.


Word Word, wise Words Words Words Words

Words Words Words

Words Words

Words Words Words Words Words Words Words Words

Words won’t feed cats. A word to the wise is enough, and many words won't fill a bushel. Fine words butter no parsnips. * Good words are like a string of pearls. Good words are worth much and cost little. He has a genius for compressing a minimum of ideas into a maximum of words. Heaven and earth shall pass away, but my words shall not pass away. If you wish to know the mind of a man, listen to his words. It is not the quantity, but the pertinence of your words that does the business. * Men of few words are the best of men. The outcome of the war is in our hands; the outcome of words is in the council. Thou art snared with the words of thy mouth. * True words are not fine; fine words are not true. * Use soft words and hard arguments. * Who is a lion in his words, is oft' times a hare in his deeds. * Words are braver than all fighting. Words are like winter snowflakes. Words are the voice of the heart. Words are wise men's counters, they do but reckon with them,

Italian Benjamin Franklin Sir Walter Scott Confucius George Herbert Winston Churchill Bible Chinese Seneca, Roman Shakespeare Homer

Solomon Lao-tzu Unknown Carlo Goldoni Unknown Homer Confucius Thomas Hobbes 403


Words Words

*

Words

*

Words, corruption

*

Words, deeds Words, * heaven Words, picture Words, short Words, style

*

Work Work Work Work

Work Work

* *

Work

*

Work

*

Work

404

but they are the money of fools. Words have a longer life than deeds. Words once spoke can never be recalled. Words should be weighed and not counted. How many honest words have suffered corruption, since the days of Chaucer! Words are women; deeds are men. Words without thought never go to heaven. A picture is worth a thousand words. Short words are best and the old words when short are best of all. Proper words in proper places, make the true definition of style. A woman’s work is never done. Another day another dollar. Fine work is its own flattery. Going to work for a large company is like getting on a train. Are you going sixty miles an hour, or is the train going sixty miles an hour and you’re just sitting still? Hard work never killed anyone. He does a good day’s work who rids himself of a fool. He who is busy with work cares little for news. He who looks for light work goes very tired to bed. Hurry men at their work, not at their meals.

Pindar Horace Yiddish Thomas Middleton George Herbert Shakespeare Anonymous Sir Winston Churchill Jonathan Swift English Unknown Slovakian Jean Paul Getty

Hebrew French Czech Yiddish Chinese


Work Work

Work Work Work

Work Work Work

I do not like work even when someone else does it. I found I could add nearly two hours to my working day by going to bed for an hour after lunch. If you want fish, go home and make a net. * Ill work done must be twice done. Isn’t it nice that no one cares which twenty-three hours of the day I work? It is harder work getting to hell than to heaven. Keep thy shop and thy shop will keep you. Light gains make heavy purses.

Work

Work Work

* *

Work

Work

Work

*

Work Work Work Work

*

Man who waits for roast duck to fly into his mouth must wait a very, very long time. Many hands make light work. No labor, however humble, is dishonoring. Parkinson’s Law: Work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion. She looketh well to the ways of her household; and eateth not the bread of idleness. Sow much, reap much; sow little, reap little. The future of work consists of learning a living. The hardest work is to do nothing. The moment you stop working, you are dead. There is no more fatal blunderer

Mark Twain Winston Churchill Confucius English Thurgood Marshall German George Chapman George Chapman Chinese

Unknown The Talmud C. Nortcote Parkinson Solomon

Chinese Marshall McLuhan American Rita LeviMontalcini Henry David 405


Work Work

*

Work Work Work Work Work, fools Work, wear, rust Worker Worker Workman Workman World World World World World World World World

406

*

* * *

than he who consumes the greater part of his life getting his living. Weighty work must be done with few words. Work expands to fill the time available. Work half done is no work at all. Work is the curse of the drinking class. Work is the curse of the drinking class. Work smarter, not harder. Only fools and horses work. It's better to wear out than rust out. The hard worker and good health are always friends. The hard worker toiled and the lazy man rejoiced. A bad workman blames his tools.

* An ill workman quarrels with his tools. All the world goes by fair speech. * Better be out of the world than out of the fashion. Half the world knows how the other half lives. Let the world pass. The world hates the informer and the moralist. The world is a cheat. The world is a stage, but the play is badly cast. The world is big, its troubles still bigger.

Thoreau

Danish Unknown Slovakian Oscar Wilde Unknown Anonymous Unknown Unknown Estonian Greek African (Swahili) English English English George Herbert English Yiddish American Oscar Wilde Yiddish


World

* The world is too narrow for two fools a-quarrelling. World, oyster The world's my oyster and I shall open it with my sword. World, parish I look upon the world as my parish. Worm * A little worm will lie under a great stone. Worm * Silent worms dig holes in any wall. Worm * The early bird catches the worm, so the wise worm gets up late. Worm * Tread on a worm and it will turn. Worm Worms that live on mahogany do not know that dates are sweet. Worry * As a cure for worrying, work is better than whiskey. Worry * Worries about children continue until death. Worry Worries are easier to bear with soup than without it. Worth * The worth of a thing is known by its want. Worth The worth of a thing is what it will bring. Worth, Whatever is worth doing is worth correctness doing right. Worth, seeing * Worth seeing, yes-but not worth going to see. Would A wound never heals so well that the scar cannot be seen. Wrath Wrath is cruel, and anger is outrageous; but who is able to stand before envy? Wreck, rise * Out of the wreck I rise. Wretched

It is hard to be wretched, but worse to be known so.

English Shakespeare John Wesley English Japanese Unknown English African (Fulani) Thomas Alva Edison Lebanese Yiddish English English Stanhope Samuel Johnson Danish Solomon

Robert Browning English

407


Wrinkle Writer

Writing

Writing Writing

An old wrinkle never wears out. * Most writers regard truth as their most valuable possession, and therefore are most economical in its use. How vain it is to sit down to write when you have not stood up to live! I write fast because I have not the brains to write slow. Let giving and receiving all be in writing.

Writing Writing

Writing

*

Writing, sweat * Writings Written Wrong

*

Wrong

*

Wrong Wrong Wrong

*

Wrong-doer Wrongs, right 408

*

People start writing with a clean piece of paper and a dirty mind. Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man. The great art in writing well is to know when to stop. He who casts to write a living line, must sweat. Words fly, writings remain. Written reports stifle creativity. If anything can go wrong it will. (Murphy's Law) The best way to convince a fool he is wrong is to let him have his way. Truly it is much better to suffer wrong than to do wrong! Two wrongs do not make a right. What is wrong today won’t be right tomorrow. The wrong-doer never lacks excuses. Two wrongs don't make a right,

English Mark Twain

Thoreau

George Simenon Apocrypha, Wisdom of Ben Sira Patrick Dennis Francis Bacon Josh Billings Ben Jonson Latin H. Ross Perot Unknown Josh Billings

American English Dutch Italian Unknown


Yacht, cost

Yawn

*

Year

*

Year

*

Yes, no

*

Young, old Young, old

Youth

but three rights make a left. Any man who has to ask about the annual upkeep of a yacht can't afford one. Love is a fever that ends with a yawn. Better die ten years earlier than live those years in poverty. Lost years are worse than lost dollars. Yes and no are the oldest and simplest words, but they require the most thought. A man is never too old to learn, but he is sometimes too young. No matter how old you are, you're younger than you'll ever be. A growing youth has a wolf in his belly. A rose is sweeter in the bud, than in full-bloom. A youth with his first cigar makes himself sick; a youth with his first girl makes everybody sick. I am not young enough to know everything.

Youth

*

Youth

*

Youth

*

Youth

What youth learns, age does not forget. * Youth and age will not agree. * Youth and white paper take any impression. Youth and wine are like a whip to a galloping horse. * Youth goes in a flock, manhood in pairs, and old age alone.

Youth Youth Youth Youth

J.P. Morgan

Edgar Saltus Chinese Yiddish Pythagoras

Unknown Unknown

Unknown John Lyly Mary Little

James Matthew Barrie Danish English English Japanese Swedish

409


Youth

Youth Youth Youth , age

Youth, age, wisdom Youth, senile, elders Zeal

Zeal

* Youth is a wonderful thing. What George a crime to waste it on children. Bernard Shaw Youth is the best time to be rich; Euripides and the best time to be poor. * Youth is wasted on the young. Unknown * Wives are young men's Francis mistresses, companions for Bacon middle age and old men's nurses. Young men think old men are George fools, but old men know young Chapman men are fools. Young men have a passion for Henry regarding their elders as senile. Brooks Adams A certain nervous disorder Ambrose afflicting the young and Bierce inexperienced. Blind zeal only does harm. German *****

410


y Information on the Sources and or Authors Author Acheson Adam Adams Addison Ade Adenauer

Aeschylus

Aesop

Agate Aiken

Akers Akhmatova

Information Dean Acheson 1893-1971 U.S. Secretary of State Philippe Auguste Villiers de L'Ilse-Adam 18381889 a French symbolist writer Henry Brooks Adams 1838-1918 American writer and historian Joseph Addison 1672-1719 English essayist, poet, playwright and politician George Ade 1866-1944 American writer, newspaper columnist and playwright Konrad Adenauer a German statesman and the first post-war WW II Chancellor of Germany from 1949 to 1963 Aeschylus b. 525 BC an ancient Greek tragedian whose plays still survive along with those of Sophocles and Euripides Aesop c. 620-c. 560 B.C. an ancient Greek fabulist or story teller credited with a number of fables now collectively known as Aesop's Fables. Born in Turkey, died in Greece James Agate 1877-1947 a British diarist and critic Conrad Aiken 1889-1973 an American writer whose work includes poetry, short stories, novels, a play and an autobiography John Akers, CEO IBM in 1980s and 1990s Anna Akhmatova 1889-1996, better known by the pen name Anna Akhmatova, was a Russian modernist poet and one of the most acclaimed writers in the Russian canon 411


Alexander The Great

Alighieri

Alinsky

Allen

Allen

Ammons

Anderson Antoinette

Appleton

Aretino

412

Alexander The Great Alexander III c. 356 BC was a King of the Ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon and member of the Argead dynasty. Also a great military strategist who conquered Persia and other empires Dante Alighieri Durante 1265-1321, simply called Dante, was a major Italian poet of the late Middle Ages who wrote “The Divine Comedy” Saul David Alinsky 1909-1972 a community organizer and writer generally considered to be the founder of modern community organizing Fred Allen1894-1956 an American comedian whose absurdist, topically pointed radio show made him one of the most popular and forward-looking humorists in the Golden Age of American radio Woody Allen b. 1935 in the Bronx as Heywood "Woody” Allen was an American actor, writer, director, comedian and playwright Archie Randolph Ammons 1926-2001 an American poet who won the annual National Book Award for Poetry in 1973 and 1993. He wrote about humanity's relationship to nature in alternately comic and solemn tones Marian Anderson 1897-1993 African American contralto opera singer Marie Antoinette 1755-1793) born an Archduchess of Austria, was Dauphine and Queen of France, and executed during the French revolution Thomas Gold Appleton 1812-1884 an American writer, artist, and patron of the fine arts. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was his brother-in-law Pietro Aretino 1492-1556 an Italian author, playwright, poet, satirist, and blackmailer who wielded immense influence on contemporary


Aristotle

Armour

Astor

Aurelius

Bach

Bacon

Baer

Bagehot

Baldinucci Barber

art and politics and invented modern literate pornography Aristotle 384-322 BC a Greek philosopher, scientist, and student of Plato born in Macedonia. He taught Alexander the Great which gave him many opportunities Richard Willard Armour 1906-1989 an American poet and author of more than 65 books Lady Astor 1879-1964, Nancy Witcher Langhorne Astor, Viscountess Astor, an American-born English socialite whose second marriage was to Waldorf Astor in England Marcus Aurelius 121-180 AD a Roman Emperor who ruled with Lucius Verus as co-emperor from 161 until Verus' death in 169. He was the last of the Five Good Emperors and also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers who believed truth and wisdom should rise above the distractions of worldly worries and pain Richard David Bach b 1936 an American writer widely known as the author of the hugely popular 1970s best-sellers Jonathan Livingston Seagull and Illusions Francis Bacon 1561-1624 Lord Chancellor of England and English philosopher, statesman, scientist, jurist, orator, essayist and author Arthur "Bugs" Baer 1886-1969 an American sports journalist, humorist and cartoonist in New York City Walter Bagehot 1826-1877 a British journalist, businessman and essayist who wrote extensively about government, economics, and literature Filippo Baldinucci 1634-1696 Florentine (Italian) art historian and biographer Red Barber, 1908-1992 a major league baseball 413


Barber

Barkley

Barnum

Barrie

Barry

Barrymore

Baruch

Barzan 414

sportscaster and commentator named Walter Lanier "Red" Barber nicknamed "The Ol' Redhead" John Warner Barber of The Barber Book of 1000 Proverbs in 1876 was an American engraver whose books of state, national and local history featured his vivid illustrations, said to have caught the flavor and appearance of city, town, and countryside scenes in his day Alben W. Barkley a lawyer and politician from Kentucky who served in both houses of Congress and as the 35th Vice President of the United States from 1949 to 1953 Phineas Taylor Barnum (P.T. Barnum) 18101891 an American circus owner and showman born in Bethel CT who promoted celebrated hoaxes and founded the Barnum & Bailey Circus Sir James Matthew Barrie 1860-1930 a Scottish author and dramatist, the child of a family of small-town weavers and best remembered as the creator of Peter Pan Philip James Quinn Barry 1896-1949 an American dramatist best known for his plays Holiday and The Philadelphia Story, which were both made into films starring Katharine Hepburn and Cary Grant John Barrymore 1892-1942 an American actor on stage, screen and radio. A member of the Drew and Barrymore theatrical dynasties Bernard Mannes Baruch 1870-1965 an American financier, stock investor, philanthropist, statesman, political consultant and philanthropist. After his success in business, he devoted his time to advising U.S. Presidents Woodrow Wilson and Franklin D. Roosevelt on economic matters Gerald Barzan a aphorist and author in the 20th


Beaumont and Fletcher Beecher

Beerbohm

Beham

Behrman

Ben Sira

Ben-Gurion

Bennett

Berenson

century, as best as I could determine Beaumont and Fletcher owners and makers of the fine English handmade furniture Henry Ward Beecher 1813-1887 an American Congregationalist clergyman, social reformer and speaker known for his support of the abolition of slavery, his emphasis on God's love and his 1875 adultery trial Sir Maximilian "Max" Beerbohm 1872-1956 an English essayist, parodist, and caricaturist best known for his 1911 novel “Zuleika Dobson� Brendan Beham (Francis Aidan Behan) 19231964 an Irish playwright, poet, short story writer, novelist and playwright who wrote in both English and Irish. He was also an Irish republican and volunteer in the Irish Republican Army Samuel Nathaniel Behrman (S.N. Behrman) 1893-1973 an American playwright, screenwriter, biographer, and longtime writer for The New Yorker Apocrypha, Wisdom of Ben Sira 42:7 denotes the collection of ancient books found in some editions of the Bible in a separate section between the Old and New Testaments or as an appendix after the New Testament. David Ben-Gurion 1886-1973 the primary founder and the first Prime Minister of Israel, a passionate Zionist and the executive head of the World Zionist Organization in 1946 Enoch Arnold Bennett 1867-1931an English writer best known as a novelist who also worked in other fields such as journalism, propaganda and film Bernard Berenson 1865-1959 an American art historian specializing in the Renaissance and a major figure in pioneering art attribution and establishing a market for paintings by the "Old 415


Berman

Berryman

Bevan Bierce

Billings Bion

Blanchard and Lorber Bodenheim

Bonom Borenstein

Bossuet

Bovie Bradley 416

Masters" Shelly Berman b 1925 Sheldon "Shelley" Berman an American comedian, actor, writer, teacher, lecturer, philanthropist and poet. John Allyn Berryman 1914-1972 an American poet and scholar born in McAlester, Oklahoma and a major figure in American poetry Aneurin “Nye” Bevan 1897-1960 a Welsh Labor Party politician Ambrose Gwinnett Bierce 1842-1914 an American editorialist, journalist, short story writer, fabulist and satirist Josh Billings (Henry Wheeler Shaw) 1818-1885 an American writer and auctioneer Wilfred Ruprecht Bion 1897-1979 an influential British psychoanalyst who became president of the British Psychoanalytical Society from 1962 to 1965 Kenneth H. Blanchard Kenneth and Robert Lorber were book publishers and trainers Maxwell Bodenheim 1892-1964 an American poet, novelist and literary figure in Chicago who later went to New York where he became known as the King of the Greenwich Village Bohemians Samuel Bonom 1912-1962 an American lawyer and politician from New York David Borenstein (I believe) a journalist and author who specialized in writing about social innovation, a style called solutions journalism Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet 1627-1704 a French bishop and theologian, renowned for his sermons and other addresses and considered by many to be one of the most brilliant orators of all time and a masterly French stylist Christine Bovie – no verifiable information available Omar “Brad” Nelson Bradley 1893-1981 a


Bradstreet

Bramston

Brandeis

Brazell Breslin

Brewster

Brogan

Brooks

United States Army field commander and General in North Africa and Europe during World War II Anne Bradstreet 1612-1672 the most prominent of early English poets of North America and first female writer in the British North American colonies to be published. She was also a prominent Puritan figure in America James Bramston 1694-1744 a satirist, educated at Westminster School and Oxford, took religious orders and later became Vicar of Harting. His poems are “The Art of Politics, In Imitation of Horace”; and “The Man of Taste, In Imitation of Alexander Pope” Louis Dembitz Brandeis 1856-1941an American lawyer and associate justice on the Supreme Court of the United States from 1916 to 1939. Born in Louisville, Kentucky, to Jewish immigrant parents from Bohemia, who raised him in a secular home Thomas “Wayne” Brazell (believed to be a security expert and writer but not verified) Jimmy Breslin b.1930 a Pulitzer Prize-winning American journalist and author who wrote a column for the New York Daily News' Sunday edition Kingman Brewster, Jr. 1919-1988 an educator, president of Yale University from 1963-1988 and American diplomat Sir Denis William Brogan 1900-1974 a Scottish author and historian who studied in Glasgow, Oxford and Harvard. From 1939 to 1968, he was a fellow of Peterhouse and professor of political science at Cambridge Gwendolyn Brooks, Gwendolyn Elizabeth Brooks, 1917-2000 an American poet and teacher. She was the first black person to win a Pulitzer prize for Poetry in 1950 417


Broun Brown

Bruno

Buber

Buck

Buechner

Bulwer-Lytton

Bunyan

Burke Burns 418

Heywood Hale Broun 1918-2001 an American author, sportswriter, commentator and actor Rita Mae Brown b. 1944 an American writer and feminist best known for her first novel “Rubyfruit Jungle” published in 1973 dealing with lesbian themes in an explicit manner unusual for the time Giordano Bruno c. 1548-1600 born Filippo Bruno an Italian Dominican friar, philosopher, mathematician, poet and astrologer and celebrated for his cosmological theories, for which he was burned at the stake as a heretic Martin Buber 1878-1965 an Austrian-born Israeli Jewish philosopher best known for his philosophy of dialogue, a form of existentialism centered on the distinction between the I–Thou and the I–It relationship Pearl S. Buck 1892-1973 a Pulitzer Prize author and Nobel laureate in literature. Pearl Sydenstricker Buck was also known by her Chinese name Sai Zhenzhu. Daughter of missionaries she spent most of her life in China prior to 1934 Carl W. Buechner b. 1926 an American writer, theologian and ordained Presbyterian minister and the author of more than thirty published books Edward George Earl Bulwer-Lytton, 1st Baron Lytton, 1803-1873 an English novelist, poet, playwright and politician John Bunyan 1628-1688 an English writer and preacher best remembered as the author of the religious allegory “The Pilgrim's Progress” and who also wrote 60 titles, many of which were expanded sermons Edmund Burke 1729-1797 an English statesman, orator and writer Robert Burns 1759-1796 a Scottish poet and


Burroughs

Burton

Butler, Nicolas

Butler, Samuel

Byron

Cabell

Caesar

Callahan

lyricist widely regarded as the national poet of Scotland John Burroughs 1837-1921 an American naturalist and nature essayist, active in the U.S. conservation movement. The first of his essay collections was “Wake-Robin” in 1871 Robert Burton 1577-1640 an English scholar at Oxford University, best known for the classic “The Anatomy of Melancholy” Nicholas Murray Butler 1862-1947 an American philosopher, diplomat, and educator. Butler was president of Columbia University, president of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and a recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize Samuel Butler 1835-1902 novelist and translator was an iconoclastic Victorian-era English author who published a variety of works two of which were the Utopian satire “Erewhon” and a semi-autobiographical novel published posthumously, “The Way of All Flesh” Lord Byron (George Gordon Byron) 1788-1824 an English poet and a leading figure in the Romantic movement J.B. Cabell 1879-1958 an American author of fantasy fiction and belles letters who was well regarded by his contemporaries, including H. L. Mencken, Edmund Wilson, and Sinclair Lewis Julius Caesar Gaius (Julius Augustus Caesar) 63 BC-14 AD a Roman statesman, general and notable author of Latin prose and who played a critical role in the events that led to the demise of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire James Callaghan English Prime Minister and Baron of Cardiff was the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom 1976 to 1979 and Leader of 419


Cameron Campbell

Camus

Cantor Carew Carnegie

Carson

Cato

Chamfort

Chanel

Chapman

420

the Labor Party 1976 to 1980 Simon Cameron 1799-1889 an American financier and politician Thomas Campbell 1777-1844 a Scottish poet chiefly remembered for his sentimental poetry dealing with human affairs Albert Camus 1913-1960 a French Nobel Prize winning author, journalist and philosopher whose views contributed to the rise of the philosophy known as absurdism Eddie Cantor 1892-1964 an American comedian and writer Thomas Carew 1595-1640 an English poet, among the 'Cavalier' group of Caroline poets Dale Harbison Carnegie 1988-1965 an American writer, lecturer and the developer of famous courses in self-improvement, salesmanship, corporate training, public speaking and interpersonal skills John William "Johnny" Carson 1925-2005 an American television host, comedian, writer, producer, actor, and musician known for his thirty years as host of The Tonight Show on TV Marus Porcius Cato 234-149 BC the name of several ancient Roman men of the Porcia family, including Cato the Elder SĂŠbastien-Roch Nicolas 1741-1794 also known as Chamfort was a French writer best known for his witty epigrams and aphorisms. Was also secretary to Louis XVI's sister and of the Jacobin club Coco (Gabrielle Bonheur) Chanel 1883-1971 a French fashion designer and founder of the Chanel brand of perfume George Chapman 1559-1634 an English dramatist, translator and poet and classical scholar whose work shows the influence of Stoicism


Charles IX

Chaucer

Chesterton

Choate Christina, Queen of Sweden

Chuang-Tzu

Churchill

Cibber

Cicero

Charles IX 1550-1574 a monarch of the House of Valois who ruled as King of France from 1560 until his death ascending the throne upon the death of his brother Francis II Geoffrey Chaucer 1343-1400 known as the Father of English literature is widely considered the greatest English poet of the Middle Ages and was the first poet to be buried in Poets' Corner of Westminster Abbey Gilbert Keith Chesterton 1874-1936 better known as G. K. Chesterton, was an English writer, lay theologian, poet, philosopher, dramatist, journalist, orator, literary and art critic, biographer and Christian apologist Joseph Hodges Choate 1832-1917an American lawyer and diplomat Christina Queen of Sweden Christina was queen regnant of Sweden from 1632 to 1654, with the titles of Queen of the Swedes, Goths and Wends; Grand Princess of Finland, and Duchess of Estonia, Livonia and Karelia and Bremen-Verden Chuang-Tzu Zhuang Zhou, 370-287 BC, often known as Zhuangzi, was an influential Chinese philosopher who lived during the period of the Warring States which period also corresponded to the summit of Chinese philosophy and the “Hundred Schools of Thought” Winston Churchill 1874-1965 an English Prime Minister, writer, and soldier who lead England through WW II Colley Cibber 1671-1757 an English actormanager, playwright and Poet Laureate whose colorful memoir “Apology” for the Life of Colley Cibber describes his life in a personal, anecdotal and even rambling style Cicero 106-43 B.C. a Roman philosopher, politician, lawyer, orator, political theorist, 421


Clemenceau

Cocteau

Cohen

Collier Collins Colman

Colton

Conant

Confucius

Congreve Connolly 422

consul and constitutionalist Georges Benjamin Clemenceau 1841-1929 a French statesman who led the nation during the First World War. As leader of the Radical Party he played a central role in politics during the Third Republic Jean Cocteau 1889-1963 a playwright, artist and filmmaker best known for his novel “Les Enfants Terribles”, and the films “Blood of a Poet”, ”Les Parents Terribles”, ”Beauty and the Beast” and “Orpheus” Harry Cohen, 1891-1958 an American president and production director of Columbia Pictures Corporation William Collier – no verifiable information obtainable John Churton Collins 1848-1908 a British literary critic George Colman the Younger 1762-1836 an English dramatist, miscellaneous writer and son of George Colman "the Elder" whose name is often misspelled as "Coleman" Charles Caleb Colton 1780-1832 an English cleric, writer, sportsman, wine merchant and collector well known for his eccentricities James Bryant Conant 1893-1978 a vigorous and prolific organic chemist, devoted to interpreting chemical reactions on a physical level and applying such knowledge to the structures of important natural products, especially chlorophyll Confucius Chinese (full name Kong Qiu ) 551479 BC a teacher, editor, politician and philosopher of the Spring and Autumn period of Chinese history William Congreve 1670-1729 an English playwright and poet Cyril Vernon Connolly 1903-1974 a literary


Coolidge

Corneille

Coss Cowley Crawford Cromwell

da Vinci

Dana

Dane Dangerfield Darrow

Davis

critic and writer John Calvin Coolidge1872-1933 the 30th President of the United States. A Republican lawyer from Vermont who worked his way up the ladder of Massachusetts state politics eventually becoming governor of that state Pierre Corneille 1606-1684 a French tragedian and one of the three great seventeenth-century French dramatists, along with Molière and Racine Irvin S. Coss − no information available Abraham Cowley 1618-1667 a leading English poet in the 17th century Joan Crawford 1905-1977 a dancer and stage chorine (chorus girl) Oliver Cromwell 1599-1658 an English military and political leader and later Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland and Ireland Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci 1452-1519, more commonly Leonardo da Vinci, was an Italian polymath: a painter, sculptor, architect, scientist, musician, mathematician, engineer, inventor and anatomist, among others Charles A Dana 1881-1975 a philanthropist who founded the Dana Corporation and the Dana Foundation Frank Dane Frank Dane a British actor of the silent era who died in 1950 Rodney Dangerfield (Jacob Cohen) 1921-2004 an American comedian and actor Clarence Seward Darrow 1857-1938 an American lawyer and leading member of the American Civil Liberties Union best known for defending teenage thrill killers Leopold and Loeb in their trial for murdering 14-year-old Robert "Bobby" Franks Richard Harding Davis1864-1916 known 423


Day de Balzac

de Beaumarchais

de BussyRabutin

de Cervantes

de Chazal

de Gaulle

de La Bruyere de La Fountaine de la Meurthe de La 424

foremost as the first American war correspondent to cover the Spanish-American War, Second Boer War, and First World War Clarence Day 1874-1935 an American essayist and humorist Honore de Balzac 1799-1850 a French novelist and playwright whose magnum opus was a sequence of short stories and novels collectively entitled “La Comédie Humaine”, that presented a panorama of French life Pierre-Augustin Caron de Beaumarchais 17321799 a French playwright, watchmaker, inventor, musician, diplomat, fugitive, spy, publisher, horticulturalist, arms dealer, satirist, financier and revolutionary Roger de Bussy-Rabutin 1618-1693, commonly known as Bussy-Rabutin, was a French memoirist. He was also the cousin and frequent correspondent of Madame de Sévigné Miguel de Cervantes 1547-1616 a Spanish novelist, poet, and playwright and author of “Don Quixote” Malcolm de Chazal 1902-1981known especially for his “Sens-Plastique”, a work consisting of several thousand aphorisms and pensées Charles André Joseph Marie de Gaulle 18901970 a French general, resistant, writer, statesman and the leader of Free France and the head of the Provisional Government of the French Republic Jean de La Bruyere 1645-1696 a French philosopher and moralist Jean de La Fontaine 1621-1695 was the most famous French fabulist and one of the most widely read French poets of the 17th century Antoine Boulay de la Meurthe 1761-1840 a French politician and magistrate Duc de La Rochefoucauld 1613-1680 (the Duke


Rochefoucauld

de L'Ilse-Adam de Maistre,

de Montaigne

de Musset

de SaintExupery de Salluste

de Sevigne

de Staël

de La Rochefoucauld) a French peerage of one of the most famous families of French nobility whose origins go back to Lord Rochefoucauld in Charente in the 10th and 11th centuries and a noted French author of maxims and memoirs Philippe Auguste Villiers de L'Ilse-Adam 18381889 was a French symbolist writer Joseph-Marie de Maistre 1753-1821 a Savoyard philosopher, writer, lawyer and diplomat who defended hierarchical societies and a monarchical State in the period immediately following the French Revolution Michel Eyquem de Montaigne 1533-1592 one of the philosophers of the French Renaissance known for popularizing the essay as a literary genre Allred de Musset 1810-1857 poet and novelist known for writing “La Confession d'un enfant du siècle” Antoine de Saint-Exupery 1900-1944 a French aristocrat, writer, poet and pioneering aviator Guillaume de Salluste 1544-1590 a Gascon Huguenot courtier and poet who was trained as a doctor of law and served in the court of Henri de Navarre most of his career Marquise de Sevigne1626-1696 (Marie de Rabutin-Chantal, marquise de Sévigné) was a French aristocrat remembered for her letterwriting which celebrated her wit and vividness most of which were addressed to her daughter Anne Louise Germaine de Staël-Holstein17661817 commonly known as Madame de Staël was a French woman of letters of Swiss origin whose lifetime overlapped the events of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic era. She was one of Napoleon's principal opponents. Celebrated for her conversational eloquence, she participated actively in the political and 425


de Sully

de TalleyrandPérigord De Vries

Dean

Dekker

Delille Democritus

Dennis

Descartes

426

intellectual life of her times. Her works both critical and fictional made their mark on the history of European Romanticism Duc de Sully 1560-1641, first Duke of Sully was a doughty soldier, French minister, staunch Huguenot and faithful right-hand man to King Henry IV of France Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Périgord 17541838 a French bishop, politician and diplomat Peter De Vries 1910-1993 an American editor and novelist known for his satiric wit described by the philosopher Daniel Dennett as "probably the funniest writer on religion ever" Dizzy Dean (Jay Hanna "Dizzy" Dean also known as Jerome Herman Dean) 1910-1974 was a major league baseball player who pitched for the St. Louis Cardinals, Chicago Cubs and the St. Louis Browns Thomas Dekker 1572-1632 (I believe) was an English Elizabethan dramatist, pamphleteer and a versatile and prolific writer whose career spanned several decades that brought him into contact with many of the period's most famous dramatists Jacques Delille 1732-1813 a French poet, freemason and translator Democritus 460-370 BC an influential Ancient Greek pre-Socratic philosopher primarily remembered today for his formulation of an atomic theory of the universe Patrick Dennis 1921-1976 an American author of his novel “Auntie Mame: An Irreverent Escapade” which was one of the bestselling American books of the 20th century René Descartes 1596-1650 a French philosopher, mathematician, and scientist and key figure in the scientific revolution who spent most of his life in the Dutch Republic. Was


Dewar Dickens

Dirksen

Disraeli

Donne

d'Orleans

dubbed the father of modern Western philosophy and of analytical geometry. He developed the Cartesian coordinate system in mathematics which created the bridge between algebra and geometry by allowing reference to a point in space as a set of numbers and that also allowed algebraic equations to be expressed as geometric shapes in a two-dimensional coordinate system that was crucial to the discovery of infinitesimal calculus and analysis. He was a true genius. Thomas R. Dewar 1864–1930 author and aphorist Charles John Huffam Dickens 1812-1870 was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world's best-known fictional characters and is regarded as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era. He authored “The Pickwick Papers”, “Oliver Twist”, “A Christmas Carol”, David Copperfield”, “Great Expectations” and “A Tale of Two Cities.” Everett McKinley Dirksen 1896-1969 an American politician of the Republican Party representing Illinois in the U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate Benjamin Disraeli 1804-1881 a Jewish English Prime Minister and novelist, who later became Anglican. Was leader of the Tory, conservative party and adversary of the liberal, William Ewart Gladstone around the time of the decaying Ottoman Empire. He maintained a friendship with Queen Victoria John Donne 1572-1631 an English poet and a cleric in the Church of England who was considered the pre-eminent representative of the metaphysical poets Charles d'Orleans 1394-1465 became Duke of Orléans following the murder of his father, 427


Drummond Dryden Duke of Wellington

Dumas

Dunne

Durant Earl of Lytton (Owen Meredith)

Edison Einstein

Eisenhower

Eisner 428

Louis I, Duke of Orléans, on the orders of John the Fearless, Duke of Burgundy Thomas Drummond 1797-1840 an English engineer and administrator John Dryden 1631-1700 an English dramatist Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, 1769-1852 was a British soldier and statesman born in Dublin, Ireland belonging to the Protestant Ascendancy Alexandre Dumas 1824-1895 a French playwright and novelist who wrote “The Three Musketeers” and “The Count of Monte Cristo” Finley Peter Dunne 1867-1936 an American humorist and writer from Chicago who published “Mr. Dooley in Peace and War”, a collection of his nationally syndicated Mr. Dooley sketches in 1898 Will Durant 1885-1981an American writer, historian and philosopher Earl of Lytton (Owen Meredith) 1831-1891a pseudonym adopted by Edward Robert, first Earl of Lytton, son of the novelist BulwerLytton, the author of “Lucile” who took his pseudonym from the names of two of his ancestors Thomas Alva Edison 1847-1931 a prolific American inventor and entrepreneur Albert Einstein 1879-1955 a German-born physicist who developed the theory of relativity and considered the most influential physicist of the 20th century Dwight David Eisenhower 1890-1969 (nicknamed "Ike") was the 34th President of the United States from 1953 to 1961. He was a five-star general in the United States Army during World War II and served as Supreme Allied Commander Michael Dammann Eisner b 1942 an American


Elder

Eldridge Eliot, George

Eliot, T.S.

Ellis

Emerson Erasmus

Erskine

businessman who was CEO of The Walt Disney Company from 1984 until 2005 Plint the Elder Gaius Plinius Secundus, 23-79 AD, better known as Pliny the Elder, was a Roman author, naturalist, and natural philosopher as well as a naval and army commander of the early Roman Empire and personal friend of the emperor Vespasian Paul Eldridge 1888-1982 an American poet, novelist, short story writer and teacher George Eliot, 1819-1880, was a pen name for Marian Evans Cross an English novelist, journalist, translator and one of the leading writers of the Victorian era. She is the author of seven novels, including “Adam Bede”, “The Mill on the Floss “, “Silas Marner”, “Middlemarch” and “Daniel Deronda” most of which were set in provincial England and known for their realism and psychological insight Thomas Sterns Eliot 1888-1965 usually known as T. S. Eliot was an essayist, publisher, playwright, literary and social critic and "one of the twentieth century's major poets" Henry Havelock Ellis 1859-1939 known as Havelock Ellis was an English physician, writer, Progressive intellectual and social reformer who studied human sexuality Ralph Waldo Emerson 1803-1882 an American essayist and poet Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus 1466-1536 known as Erasmus of Rotterdam, or simply Erasmus, was a Dutch Renaissance humanist, Catholic priest, social critic, teacher and theologian. He was a classical scholar who wrote in a pure Latin style John Erskine 1879-1951 an American educator and author, pianist and composer who was an English professor at Amherst College and 429


Euripides

Field

Fielding

Fields

Flaubert

Fletcher

Florio

Forster

430

Columbia University Euripides 480-406 BC a tragedian of classical Athens and one of the three playwrights whose plays survived with the other two being Aeschylus and Sophocles Eugene Field, Sr. 1850-1895 an American writer, best known for his children's poetry and humorous essays Henry Fielding 1701-1754 an English novelist and dramatist known for his rich earthy humor and satirical prowess and as the author of the novel “Tom Jones” William Claude Fields (William Claude Dukenfield and better known as W. C. Fields) 1880-1946 was an American comedian, actor, juggler and writer. Fields’ comic persona was that of a misanthropic and harddrinking egotist who remained a sympathetic character despite his snarling contempt for dogs and children Gustave Flaubert 1821-1880 an influential French writer who was perhaps the leading exponent of literary realism of his country John Fletcher 1579-1625 a Jacobean playwright. Following William Shakespeare as house playwright for the “King's Men” he was among the most prolific and influential dramatists of his day John Florio 1553-1625 known in Italian as Giovanni Florio, was a linguist, lexicographer, a royal language tutor at the Court of James I and a possible friend and influence on William Shakespeare Edward Morgan Forster 1879-1970 an English novelist, short story writer, essayist and librettist. He is known best for his ironic and well-plotted novels examining class difference and hypocrisy in the early 20th century


Fowler

France Franklin

Franklin Frederick III

Frost Fuller Gabiroli

Galen

Galsworthy

Gandhi

Francis George Fowler 1871-1918 familiarly known as F.G. Fowler was an English writer on English language, grammar and usage Anatole France 1844-1924 was a French poet, journalist and successful novelist Benjamin Franklin 1706-1790 an American printer, statesman and scientist. Spending many years in France , he was instrumental in getting France to assist the cause of the American Revolution Billy Boy Franklin a aphorist (I believe) Frederick III 1712-1784 the King of Prussia whose achievements included military victories, reorganization of Prussian armies, patronage of the Arts and the Enlightenment in Prussia and success against great odds in the Seven Years' War. He became known as Frederick the Great. (Not sure if this information relates to Frederick II or III.) Robert Frost 1874-1963 an American poet Thomas Fuller 1608-1661was chaplain extraordinary to Charles II Solomon ibn Gabirol 1021-1069 also known as Solomon ben Judah and traditionally known by his Latinized name Avicebron. Was an Andalusian poet and Jewish philosopher with a Neo-platonic bent Galen Aelius Galenus, 130-200 AD, or Claudius Galenus, better known as Galen of Pergamon was a prominent Greek physician, surgeon and philosopher in the Roman empire John Galsworthy 1867-1933 an English novelist and playwright whose notable works include “The Forsyte Saga” and its sequels, “A Modern Comedy” and “End of the Chapter.” He won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1932 Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi 1869-1948 was the preeminent leader of Indian independence 431


Garibaldi Garth Geneen George Georgina Rossetti

Gerrold

Getty Gibbon

Gibbons

Gibbs

Gibran

Gide

432

movement in British-ruled India and who was assassinated Giuseppe Garibaldi 1807-1882 an Italian general and politician who unified Italy Sir Samuel Garth 1661-1719 was an English physician and poet Harold Geneen ,CEO of the IT & T Company David Lloyd George 1863-1945 was Prime Minister of England Christina Georgina Rossetti 1830-1894 an English poet who wrote a variety of romantic, devotional and children's poems including the poems “Goblin Market” and “Remember” David Gerrold b. 1944 a Jewish American science fiction screenwriter and novelist known for his Star Trek scripts Jean Paul Getty 1892-1976 Chairman of the Getty Oil Co. and philanthropist Edward Gibbon 1737-1994 an English historian and Member of Parliament with his most important work, “The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire” published in six volumes between 1776 and 1788 Fred M. Gibbons (I believe) was a Partner at Concept Stage Venture Management in 1999 and a Strategic Advisor at Startup Capital Ventures and who he founded the Software Publishing Corporation in 1981 Sir Philip Armand Hamilton Gibbs 1877-1962 an English journalist and prolific author of books who served as one of five official British reporters during the First World War Khalil Gibran 1883-1931 a Lebanese-American artist, poet, and writer for the New York Pen League. He was born in the former Ottoman Empire André Paul Guillaume Gide 1869-1951 a French author and winner of the Nobel Prize in


Gilbert

Gobel

Goldoni Goldsmith Goldwyn Gordon

Grace

Gracian

Graham

Graham

Literature in 1947 for his comprehensive and artistically significant writings on human problems and conditions Sir William Schwenck Gilbert 1836-1911an English dramatist, librettist, poet and illustrator best known for the fourteen comic operas produced in collaboration with the composer Sir Arthur Sullivan of Gilbert & Sullivan George Leslie Gobel 1919-1991was an American comedian and actor best known as the star of his own weekly NBC TV show, The George Gobel Show, which ran from 1954-1960 Carlo Goldoni 1707-1792 an Italian dramatist Oliver Goldsmith 1728-1774 an English poet and playwright Samuel Goldwyn 1882-1974 an American movie mogul William J. J. Gordon (I believe) 1919-2003 was an inventor and psychologist and recognized as the creator of a problem solving approach called synectics which he developed while working in the Invention Design Group of Arthur D. Little Joseph Peter Grace 1913-1995 a multimillionaire American industrialist and conglomerateur of Irish Catholic heritage. He was president of the diversified chemical company W.R. Grace for 48 years, making him the longest serving CEO of a public company Baltasar Graciรกn y Morales 1601-1658 formerly Anglicized as Baltazar Gracian was a Spanish Jesuit and baroque prose writer and philosopher William Franklin "Billy" Graham Jr. b. 1918 an American Christian evangelist ordained as a Southern Baptist minister who rose to celebrity status Katharine Meyer Graham 1917-2001 was an 433


Grant Greeley

Green

Grove Guitry

Hackett Halevy

Half Haliburton

Hardy

Hare 434

American publisher who led her family's newspaper, The Washington Post Albert A. Grant – no information found on him, only on an Albert W. Grant Horace Greeley 1811-1872 editor of the NewYork Tribune, among the great newspapers of its time. He was active in politics and served briefly as a congressman from New York Robert Green (I believe) b. 1959 is an American author and speaker known for his books on strategy, power and seduction who wrote five international bestsellers: “The 48 Laws of Power”, “The Art of Seduction”, “The 33 Strategies of War”, “The 50th Law” and “Mastery” among others Andrew S. Grove, CEO of Intel Corp. Alexandre-Pierre Georges "Sacha" Guitry 18851957 a French stage and film actor, director, screenwriter and playwright of the Boulevard Theatre Buddy Hackett 1924-2003 a Brooklyn born American comedian and actor Ludovic Halévy 1834-1908 a French author and playwright whose father, Léon Halévy had converted from Judaism to Christianity prior to his marriage to Alexandrine Lebas, daughter of a Christian architect Robert Half, President of the Robert Half International a career search company Thomas Chandler Haliburton 1796-1865 was a politician, judge and author who lived in the British Colony of Nova Scotia Thomas Hardy 1840-1928 an English novelist, poet and a Victorian realist in the tradition of George Eliot who was influenced both in his novels and in his poetry by Romanticism and especially by William Wordsworth J.C. and A.W. Hare c. 1792 English clergymen


Harman Harris

Harvad

Harvey

Hay

Hayes

Hays

Hazlitt

Heine

Helps

and writers J. Harman 1894-1970 an English jurist Joel Chandler Harris 1848-1908 an American journalist, fiction writer and folklorist best known for his collection of “Uncle Remus� stories Chris Argyris Harvad 1923-2013 an American business theorist, Professor Emeritus at Harvard Business School and a Thought Leader at the Monitor Group William Harvey 1578-1657 an English physician and first known to describe completely and in detail the systemic circulation and properties of blood being pumped to the brain and body by the heart John Milton Hay 1838-1905 an American statesman and official whose career in government stretched over almost half a century James L. Hayes an American educator and former president of the American Management Association Arthur Garfield Hays 1881-1954 an American lawyer who became prominent in civil liberties issues and was a co-founder of the American Civil Liberties Union William Hazlitt 1778-1830 an English writer remembered for his humanistic essays and literary criticism, as the greatest art critic of his age, and as a drama critic, social commentator, philosopher and painter Christian Johann Heinrich Heine 1797-1856 a German poet, journalist, essayist and literary critic best known outside Germany for his early lyric poetry which was set to music Sir Arthur Helps 1813-1875 an English writer and dean of the Privy Council and a Cambridge Apostle 435


Henderson Henly

Henry Heraclitus

Herbert Herford

Herold

436

Bruce Henderson, CEO Boston Consulting Group, Inc. William Ernest Henley 1849-1903 an influential poet, critic and editor in the late-Victorian era in England that is spoken of as having as central a role in his time as Samuel Johnson had in the eighteenth century. (I’m assuming the spelling should be “Henley” as information on “Henly” couldn’t be located) Matthew Henry 1662-1714 a Welsh or British non-conformist minister and author Heraclitus c.535-475 BC ( Heraclitus of Ephesus) a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher in Ephesus, Ionia on the coast of Asia Minor. He regarded himself as self-taught and a pioneer of wisdom. From the lonely life he led, and still more from the riddling and allegedly paradoxical nature of his philosophy and his stress upon the needless unconsciousness of humankind, he was called "The Obscure" and the "Weeping Philosopher." Heraclitus was famous for his insistence on an ever-present change in the universe, as stated in the famous saying, "No man ever steps in the same river twice." This position was complemented by his stark commitment to a unity of opposites in the world, stating that "the path up and down are one and the same." Through these doctrines Heraclitus characterized all existing entities by pairs of contrary properties whereby no entity may ever occupy a single state at a single time George Herbert 1593-1633 English clergyman and poet Oliver Herford 1863-1935 an American writer, artist and illustrator who has been called "The American Oscar Wilde" Don Herold 1889-1966 an American humorist, writer, illustrator, and cartoonist who wrote


Herrick

Hesburgh

Hesiod

Heywood

Hillel

Hippocrates

and illustrated many books and was a contributor to national magazines Robert Herrick 1591-1674 a 17th-century English lyric poet and cleric best known for his book of poems, “Hesperides.” This includes the carpe diem poem “To the Virgins, To Make Much of Time”, the first line of which is “Gather ye rosebuds while ye may” The Rev. Theodore Martin Hesburgh 1917-2015 a Jesuit priest of the Congregation of the Holy Cross and president of the University of Notre Dame for 35 years Hesiod c.750-650 BC was a Greek poet around the same time as Homer who created the first European poetry in which the poet regards himself as a topic and an individual with a distinctive role to play. Ancient authors credited Hesiod and Homer with establishing Greek religious customs. Modern scholars refer to him as a major source on Greek mythology, farming techniques on early economic thought and who is sometimes identified as the first economist and developer of archaic Greek astronomy and ancient timekeeping John Heywood 1497-1580 an English writer known for his plays, poems and collection of proverbs and best known as a playwright but also was active as a musician and composer, though no works survive Hillel 110 BC-10 AD (I believe) was a famous Jewish religious leader and one of the most important figures in Jewish history and associated with the development of the Mishnah and the Talmud Hippocrates 460-370 BC a Greek physician of the Age of Pericles and considered one of the most outstanding figures in the history of 437


Hitler

Hobbes

Hoffer

Hoffman, Lisa

Hoffman, Abbie

Holmes Homer

Hooper, Ellen

Hooper, Grace Hope

438

medicine Adolf Hitler Adolf Hitler 1889-1945 an Austrianborn German politician who was the leader of the Nazi Party. He was Chancellor of Germany from 1933 to 1945 and Führer of Nazi Germany from 1934 to 1945 Thomas Hobbes of Malmesbury 1588-1679 an English philosopher best known today for his work on political philosophy Eric Hoffer 1898-1983 an American moral and social philosopher and author of ten books and awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in February 1983 Lisa Jo Hoffman b. 1954 (I believe) was an American businesswoman and American founder and president of Lisa Hoffman Beauty. (Her husband is actor Dustin Hoffman) Abbot Howard "Abbie" Hoffman 1936-1989 an American political and social activist and anarchist who co-founded the Youth International Party Oliver Wendell Holmes 1809-1894 a physician, poet, professor, lecturer and popular writer Homer c. 700 B.C. (born in Turkey) best known as the author of the “Iliad” and the “Odyssey” and believed by the ancient Greeks to have been the first and greatest of the epic poets Ellen Sturgis Hooper 1812-1848 an American poet, a member of the Transcendental Club, and widely regarded as one of the most gifted poets among the New England Transcendentalists. Grace Murray Hopper, Admiral, U.S. Navy (retired) Bob Hope Leslie Townes ("Bob" Hope) 19032003 English-born American comedian, vaudevillian, actor, singer, dancer, athlete and author


Hopper

Horace

Howe

Howell

Hubbard, Frank Hubbard, Elbert Hugo

Humphrey

Huneker

Grace Murray Hopper 1906-1992 an American computer scientist and United States Navy rear admiral. She was one of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark I computer in 1944 and invented the first compiler Horace (Quintus Horatius Flaccus) 65-8 BC Roman poet and satirist known in the Englishspeaking world as Horace. Was the leading Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus (also known as Octavian). He was known to some as independent and a “ master of the graceful sidestep") and to others, in John Dryden's phrase, "a well-mannered court slave" Edgar Watson Howe 1853-1937 an American novelist and newspaper and magazine editor in the late 19th and early 20th centuries best known for his magazine the E.W. Howe's Monthly James Howell 1594-1666 a 17th-century AngloWelsh historian, writer and representative figure of his age Frank McKinney Hubbard 1868-1930 a caricaturist, humorist and journalist known by his pen name "Kin" Hubbard Elbert Hubbard 1856-1915 an American writer, publisher, artist and philosopher Victor Marie Hugo 1802-1885 a French poet, novelist and dramatist of the Romantic movement and considered one of the greatest and best known French writers who wrote “Les Misérables” and “The Hunchback of NotreDame” Hubert Horatio Humphrey Jr. 1911-1978 an American politician who served as the 38th Vice President of the United States under President Lyndon B. Johnson from 1965 to 1969 James Gibbons Huneker 1857-1921 an American art, book, music and theater critic 439


Huxley, Aldous Huxley, Julian

Huxley, Thomas

I Ching

Ibsen

Icahn Ingersoll

Jackson

James I

Jefferson

440

Aldous Leonard Huxley 1894-1963 an English writer, philosopher and prominent member of the Huxley family Sir Julian Sorell Huxley 1887-1975 a British evolutionary biologist, eugenicist, and internationalist and proponent of natural selection and a leading figure in the midtwentieth century evolutionary synthesis Thomas Henry Huxley 1825-1895 an English biologist, known as "Darwin's Bulldog" for his advocacy of Charles Darwin's theory of evolution “I Ching: Book of Changes� is an ancient divination text and the oldest of the Chinese classics in the 2nd century BC Henrik Johan Ibsen 1828-1906 a major 19thcentury Norwegian playwright, theatre director and poet often referred to as "the father of realism" and one of the founders of Modernism in theatre Carl Icahn , CEO of Icahn & Co. Robert Green "Bob" Ingersoll 1833-1899 a lawyer, a Civil War veteran, political leader and orator of United States during the Golden Age of Free Thought and noted for his broad range of culture and his defense of agnosticism George Holbrook Jackson 1874-1948 an English writer, editor and publisher recognized as one of the leading bibliophiles of his time and as a Fabian socialist who was influenced by Nietzsche James VI and I 1566-1625 was King of Scotland as James VI and King of England and Ireland as James I Thomas Jefferson 1743-1826 the Third President of the U.S. and principal author of the Declaration of Independence. He acquired the vast Louisiana Territory from France (1803) and


Jerrold Johnson, Gerald Johnson, Lyndon Johnson, Samuel Jonson

Joubert

Juvenal

Karr

Keller

Kelly Kempis

sent out the Lewis and Clark Expedition (1804– 1806) to explore the new west. Jefferson doubled the size of the United States during his presidency Douglas William Jerrold 1803-1857 an English dramatist and writer Gerald White Johnson 1890-1980 a journalist, editor, essayist, historian, biographer and novelist Lyndon Baines Johnson 1908-1973 the 36th President of the United States after Kennedy was assassinated Samuel Johnson 1709-1784 an English lexicographer and poet Ben Jonson 1572-1637 an English playwright, poet and literary critic of the seventeenth century, whose artistry exerted a lasting impact upon English poetry and stage comedy. He popularized the comedy of humors Joseph Joubert 1754-1824 a French moralist and essayist, remembered largely for his “Pensées” (“Thoughts”), which was published posthumously Decimus Iunius Iuvenalis, known in English as Juvenal, was a Roman poet active in the late 1st and early 2nd century AD who was critical of Roman paganism and authored the “Satires” Alphonse Karr Jean-Baptiste (Alphonse Karr) 1808-1890 a French critic, journalist and novelist Helen Adams Keller 1880-1968 an American author, political activist and lecturer and the first deaf-blind person to earn a bachelor of arts degree Joe Kelly, Concordia management professor at Concordia University Thomas à Kempis 1380-1471was a canon regular of the late medieval period and the 441


Kennedy

Keppel

Kettering

Keynes

Khrushchev

Kiellor

Kierkegaard

Kinslaw 442

most probable author of “The Imitation of Christ”, which is one of the best known Christian books on devotion John F. Kennedy 1917-1963 the 35th President of the U.S. Most famous for his handling of the Cuban Missile Crisis and sponsoring the first manned expedition and walk on the moon. He was assassinated in 1963 Francis Keppel (I believe) was an American educator and who was instrumental in developing the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 and in overseeing enforcement of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 in the schools Charles Franklin Kettering 1876-1958 an American inventor, engineer, businessman and holder of 186 patents. He was a founder of Delco and was head of research at General Motors from 1920 to 1947 John Maynard Keynes 1883-1946 was a British economist whose ideas fundamentally affected the theory and practice of modern macroeconomics and the economic policies of governments Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev 1894-1971 a Russian politician and former First Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet who led the Soviet Union during part of the Cold War Gary Edward "Garrison" Keillor b. 1942 an American author, storyteller, humorist and radio personality who hosted the Minnesota Public Radio show “A Prairie Home Companion” Søren Aabye Kierkegaard 1813-1855 a Danish philosopher, theologian, poet, social critic and religious author who is widely considered to be the first existentialist philosopher Dennis C. Kinslaw – no information found


Kissinger

Kosinski Kronecker

La Bruyere Lai

Lamb

Lance

Land

Lang

Lansburgh Lao-Tzu

Henry Alfred Kissinger b. 1923 an American diplomat and political scientist who served as National Security Advisor and later concurrently as Secretary of State in the administrations of President Richard Nixon Jerzy Kosioski, born Józef Lewinkopf 1933-1991, was an award-winning Polish-American novelist Leopold Kronecker 1823-1891 a German mathematician who worked on number theory and algebra and was a critic of Cantor's work on set theory Jean de La Bruyère 1645-1696 a French philosopher and moralist T.C. Lai b. 1921 ( I believe) is the author of various books on Chinese arts, e.g. music, painting, etc. Charles Lamb 1775-1834 an English writer and essayist best known for his “Essays of Elia” and for the children's book “Tales from Shakespeare” which he produced with his sister, Mary Thomas Bertram "Bert" Lance, an American businessman who served as Director of the Office of Management and Budget under President Jimmy Carter in 1977 Edwin Herbert Land 1909-1991 an American scientist and inventor best known as the cofounder of the Polaroid Corporation Andrew Lang 1844-1912 a Scot poet, novelist, literary critic and contributor to the field of anthropology and best known as a collector of folk and fairy tales Sidney Lansburgh − no verifiable information found Lao-Tzu 604-531 B.C. Chinese philosopher and founder of Taoism that emphasized living in harmony with the Tao, meaning the “path” , the “principles” or the “way” which was 443


Lavater

Lec Lee, Gypsy

Lee, Jerzy

Lee, Nathaniel

Lee, Nelle

Lenin

Lennon

444

romanticized as Dao that advocated piety. He was associated with the anti-authoritarian movement. He was thought to be a contemporary of Confucius but some historians contend that he actually lived during the Warring States period of the 5th or 4th century BC Johann Kaspar Lavater 1741-1801 a Swiss poet, writer, philosopher, physiognomist and theologian Stanislaw J. Lec 1909-1966 a Polish writer and aphorist Gypsy Rose Lee 1911-1970 an American burlesque entertainer famous for her striptease act. Was also an actress, author and playwright whose 1957 memoir was made into the stage musical and film Gypsy. Stanislaw Jerzy Lee 1909-1966 a Polish poet and aphorist often mentioned among the greatest writers of post-war Poland and one of the more influential aphorists Nathaniel Lee 1653-1962 an English dramatis and son of Dr Richard Lee, a Presbyterian clergyman Nelle Harper Lee b.1926 an American novelist widely known for her 1960 Pulitzer Prizewinning “To Kill a Mockingbird� which dealt with the racism she observed as a child in her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov 1870-1924 alias Lenin a Russian communist revolutionary, politician and political theorist John Winston Lennon 1940-1980 an English singer and songwriter who rose to worldwide fame as a co-founder of the band the Beatles, the most commercially successful band in the history of popular music. He married Yoko Ono and was assassinated in New York


Lesage

Levenson

Levi-Montalcini

Lewis

Lewis, Joe Lewis, Sinclair

Lichtenberg

Lincoln

Lindgren Little Livy

Lodge

Alain-René Lesage 1668-1747 a French novelist and playwright best known for his comic novel “The Devil upon Two Sticks” his comedy “Turcaret” and his picaresque novel “Gil Blas” Sam Levenson 1911-1980 an American humorist, writer, teacher, television host and journalist Rita Levi-Montalcini 1909-2012 an Italian Nobel Laureate honored for her work in neurobiology and nerve growth Joseph Louis Barrow 1914-1981better known as Joe Louis, nicknamed the Brown Bomber, was an American professional boxer and the World Heavyweight Champion from 1937 to 1949. He is considered to be one of the greatest heavyweights of all time Joe E. Lewis 1902-1971 a comedian and singer Harry Sinclair Lewis 1885-1951 an American novelist, short-story writer and playwright who in 1930 became the first writer from the United States to receive the Nobel Prize in Literature. Was a critic of capitalism and materialism. Georg Christoph Lichtenberg 1742-1799 was a German scientist, satirist and Anglophile. As a scientist, he was the first to hold a professorship explicitly dedicated to experimental physics in Germany Abraham Lincoln 1809-1865 the 16th President of the United States leading the US through its Civil War after which he was assassinated Robert T. Lindgren − no definitive information was found for this author Mary Little – no information found Livy Titus Livius Patavinus 59 BC-17 AD known as Livy was a Roman historian who wrote a monumental history of Rome and the Roman people Thomas Lodge 1558-1625 an English physician 445


Lombardi Louis XVIII

Lowell

Lucan

Lucretius

Lyly

Lynd

446

and author during the Elizabethan and Jacobean periods Vince Lombardi 1913-1970 legendary coach of the Green Bay Packers during the 1960s Louis XVIII 1755-1824 known as "the Desired" was a monarch of the House of Bourbon who ruled as King of France from 1814 to 1824 except for a period in 1815 known as the Hundred Days James Russell Lowell 1819-1891 an American Romantic poet, critic, editor and diplomat associated with the Fireside Poets a group of New England writers who were among the first American poets Marcus Annaeus Lucanus 39 AD-65 AD better known in English as Lucan was a Roman poet. Despite his short life he is regarded as one of the outstanding figures of the Imperial Latin period. His youth and speed of composition set him apart from other poets. Titus Lucretius Carus 99-55 BC a Roman poet and philosopher with his only known work being the epic philosophical poem “De rerum natura” about the tenets and philosophy of Epicureanism and which is usually translated into English as “On the Nature of Things”. Epicurus was an atomic materialist, following in the steps of Democritus. His materialism led him to a general attack on superstition and divine intervention John Lyly 1533-1606 an English writer, poet, dramatist, playwright and politician, best known for his books “Euphues: The Anatomy of Wit” and “Euphues and his “England”. Lyly's mannered literary style, originating in his first books, is known as euphuism Robert Wilson Lynd 1897-1949 an Irish writer, editor of poetry, urbane literary essayist and


MacArthur

Macaulay Mach

Machiavelli

Mahaffey Mailer

Maimonides

strong Irish nationalist Douglas MacArthur 1880-1964 an American five-star general and Field Marshal of the Philippine Army and Chief of Staff of the United States Army during the 1930s playing a prominent role in the Pacific theater during World War II Thomas Babington Macaulay 1800-1859 an English historian and author Ernst Waldfried Josef Wenzel Mach 1838-1916 an Austrian physicist and philosopher noted for his contributions to physics such as the Mach number and the study of shock waves Niccolo Machiavelli 1469-1527 Niccolò di Bernardo dei Machiavelli was an Italian historian, politician, diplomat, philosopher, humanist and writer based in Florence during the Renaissance and reputed to be one of the founders of modern political science and more specifically political ethics whose most renowned work was “The Prince (Il Principe”). "Machiavellianism" is a widely-used negative term to characterize unscrupulous politicians of the sort Machiavelli described in “The Prince” John P. Mahaffey − no information found Norman Kingsley Mailer 1923-2007 an American novelist, journalist, essayist, playwright, film-maker, actor and political activist. His novel “The Naked and the Dead” was published in 1948 Maimonides 1138-1204 (Moshe ben Maimon) ("Our Rabbi/Teacher Moses Son of Maimon"), Latinized Moses Maimonides was a preeminent medieval Sephardic Jewish philosopher and astronomer who became one of the most prolific and influential Torah scholars and physicians of the Middle Ages. He was born in Córdoba, present-day Spain 447


Mankiewicz MankiewiczWells

Mann Mansfield

Manville

Maquess of Halifax Marquis

Marshall

Marti

Marx, Groucho

448

Joseph Mankiewicz − no information found Herman Jacob Mankiewicz 1909-1993 a film director, screenwriter and producer who won awards for “A Letter to Three Wives” and “All about Eve.” Also co- authored “Citizen Kane” with Orson Wells (see Orson Wells) Horace Mann 1796-1859 an American politician and educational reformer John Edward Masefield 1878-1967 an English poet, writer, and Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom remembered as the author of the classic children's novels e.g. The “Midnight Folk” and “The Box of Delights” and poems, including "The Everlasting Mercy" and "SeaFever" Thomas Franklyn Manville, Jr. 1894-1967 universally known as Tommy Manville was a Manhattan socialite and heir to the JohnsManville asbestos fortune The title Marquess of Halifax was created in the Peerage of England in 1682 for the 1st Earl of Halifax Donald Robert Perry Marquis 1878-1937 a humorist, journalist and author. He was variously a novelist, poet, newspaper columnist and playwright Thomas Riley Marshall 1854-1925 an American Democratic politician who served as the 28th Vice President of the United States under Woodrow Wilson Jose Marti (José Julián Martí Pérez) 1853-1895 a Cuban national hero and an important figure in Latin American literature Groucho Marx (Julius Henry "Groucho" Marx) 1890-1977 an American comedian and film and television star known for his quick wit and widely considered one of the best comedians of the modern era


Marx, Karl

Mary, Countess of Warwick

Maslow

Mason, Jackie Mason, Tom Maugham McCarthy

McCrae

McFarlin McKinney McLuhan

Mearns

Karl Marx 1818-1883 a philosopher, economist, sociologist, journalist and revolutionary socialist. Born in Germany, he later became stateless and spent much of his life in London Mary, Countess of Warwick Mary Rich 16251678 was the seventh daughter of Richard Boyle, 1st Earl of Cork, and his second wife, Catherine Fenton Abraham Maslow 1908-1970 (Abraham Harold Maslow) an American psychologist best known for creating Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, a theory of psychological health predicated on fulfilling innate human needs in priority culminating in self-actualization Jackie Mason b. 1931 an American stand-up comedian and film and television actor Tom Mason-no information found W. Somerset Maugham 1874-1965 English novelist and playwright Edgar John Bergen 1903-1978 an American actor, comedian and radio performer best known for his proficiency in ventriloquism and his characters Charlie McCarthy and Mortimer Snerd. He is also the father of actress Candice Bergen. Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, MD 18721918 a Canadian poet, physician, author, artist and soldier during World War I and a surgeon during the Second Battle of Ypres, in Belgium Whitney McFarlin, President ofthe Everest & Jennings International Frank McKinney Hubbard 1868-1930 an American caricaturist and humorist Herbert Marshall McLuhan 1911-1980 a Canadian philosopher of communication theory and a public intellectual William Hughes Mearns 1875-1965 better known as Hughes Mearns an American 449


Meir

Menander

Mencken

Merrill

Meurier Miller

Millings Milton

Mizner, Wilson

Mizner, Addison

450

educator, poet and a graduate of Harvard University Golda Meir Golda Meir 1898-1978 an Israeli teacher, kibbutznik, politician and the fourth Prime Minister of Israel Menander Menander 342-291 BC a Greek dramatist and the best-known representative of Athenian New Comedy Henry Louis Mencken 1880-1956 an American journalist, satirist, cultural critic and scholar of American English James Ingram Merrill 1926-1995 was an American poet whose awards include the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry for his “Divine Comedies” Gabriel Meurier, Spanish author c. 1530 Arthur Asher Miller 1915-2005 a prolific American playwright, essayist and prominent figure in twentieth-century American theatre. Among his most popular plays are “All My Sons”, “Death of a Salesman” and “The Crucible” Josh Millings-no information found John Milton 1608-1674 an English poet, polemicist, man of letters and a civil servant for the Commonwealth of England under Oliver Cromwell. He wrote at a time of religious flux and political upheaval and is best known for his epic poem “Paradise Lost” written in blank verse Wilson Mizner 1876-1933 an American playwright, raconteur, and entrepreneur. His best-known plays are “The Deep Purple” and “The Greyhound” Addison Cairns Mizner 1812-1933 an American resort architect whose Mediterranean Revival and Spanish Colonial Revival style interpretations left an indelible stamp on South


Moliere

Monroe Montgomery

Moore

Mordaunt

Morgan Morley, John Morley, Christpher Morris

Naisbitt Napoleon

Florida where it continues to inspire architects and land developers Moliere Jean-Baptiste Poquelin 1622-1673 known by his stage name Molière, was a French playwright and actor who is considered to be one of the greatest masters of comedy in Western literature Marilyn Monroe 1926-1962 an American movie actress and sex symbol Robert Montgomery 1904-1981 an American film and television actor, director and producer and the father of actress Elizabeth Montgomery George Augustus Moore 1852-1933 an Irish novelist, short-story writer, poet, art critic, memoirist and dramatist. Moore came from a Roman Catholic landed family who lived at Moore Hall in Carra, County Mayo Thomas Osbert Mordaunt 1730–1809 a British officer and poet best remembered for his oftquoted poem "The Call", written during the Seven Years' War of 1756-1763 Henry Morgan 1915-1994 born Henry Lerner Van Ost was an American humorist John Morley, 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, 1838-1923 a radical British liberal statesman, writer, journalist and newspaper editor Christopher Morley 1890-1957 an American journalist, novelist, essayist and poet who also produced stage productions for some years William Morris 1834-1896 an English textile designer, poet, novelist, translator and socialist activist John Naisbitt Chairman of the Naisbitt Group Napoleon Bonaparte 1769-1821 a French military and political leader who rose to prominence during the French Revolution. Led France against a series of coalitions in the 451


Nash Newton, Isaac

Newton, John

Nicolson Nietzsche

452

Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. He won most of these wars and the vast majority of his battles, rapidly gaining control of continental Europe before his ultimate defeat in 1815 at Waterloo. One of the greatest commanders in history, his campaigns are studied at military schools worldwide and he remains one of the most celebrated and controversial political figures in Western history. In civil affairs, Napoleon implemented fundamental liberal reforms in France and across Europe. He established a system of public education, abolished the vestiges of feudalism, emancipated Jews and other religious minorities, enacted legal protections for an emerging middle class and centralized state power at the expense of religious authorities. His lasting legal achievement, the Napoleonic Code, has been adopted in various forms by a quarter of the world's legal systems. He was Emperor of France from 1804 until 1814 and again in 1815 after his comeback Frederic Ogden Nash 1902-1971 an American poet well known for his light humorous verse Sir Isaac Newton 1643-1727 an English physicist and mathematician widely recognized as one of the most influential scientists of all time and a key figure in the scientific revolution John Newton 1725-1807 an English sailor in the Royal Navy for a period of time and later a captain of slave ships Sir Harold George Nicolson 1886-1968 an English diplomat, author, diarist and politician Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche 1844-1900 a German philosopher, cultural critic, poet, composer and Latin and Greek scholar. One of the key tenets of his philosophy is "lifeaffirmation" which embraces the idea of


Nunn Nye

O’Neill

O'Malley Oscar Levant Ovid

Paine

Pare

Parker

Parkinson

dealing with the realities of this world rather than looking to the world beyond and renowned for his, “God is dead” phrase Gregory Nunn-no information found William Sanford "Bill" Nye b. 1955 popularly known as Bill Nye the Science Guy, an American science educator, comedian, television host, actor, writer, scientist and former mechanical engineer Eugene Gladstone O'Neill 1888-1953 an American playwright and Nobel laureate in Literature. His poetically titled plays were among the first to introduce the techniques of realism into American drama Austin O'Malley 1858-1932 a famous American physicist, physician and humorist Oscar Levant 1906-1972 an American pianist, composer, author, comedian and actor Ovid Publius Ovidius Naso b. 43 BC known as Ovid in the English-speaking world, was a Roman poet living during the reign of Augustus and a contemporary of Virgil and Horace Thomas Paine 1737-1809 an English-American political activist, philosopher, political theorist and revolutionary. He was a Founding Father of America and authored the pamphlet “Common Sense”. He also wrote “The Rights of Man” which defended the French revolution and “The Age of Reason” which advocated deism and argued against institutional religion Ambroise Paré 1510-1590 a French barber surgeon who served in that role for kings Henry II, Francis II, Charles IX and Henry III Dorothy Parker 1893-1967an American poet, short story writer, critic and satirist best known for her wit, wisecracks and eye for 20th-century urban foibles Cyril Northcote Parkinson 1909-1993 a British 453


Parton

Pascal

Pauling

Peers Penn

Pepys

Pericles

Perot Persius

454

naval historian and author of some 60 books the most famous of which was his management best-seller “Parkinson's Law� which says that work expands to fill the time available Dolly Rebecca Parton b. 1946 an American singer-songwriter, instrumentalist, actress, author, business woman and philanthropist known primarily for her work in country music Blaise Pascal 1623-1662 a French mathematician, physicist, inventor, writer, Christian philosopher and child prodigy educated by his father, a tax collector in Rouen Linus Carl Pauling 1901-1994 an American biochemist, peace activist, author, and educator who published more than 1200 papers and books, of which about 850 dealt with scientific topics John Peers, President of the Logical Machine Corp. William Penn 1644-1718 a real estate entrepreneur, philosopher, early Quaker and founder of the Province of Pennsylvania, the English North American colony and the future Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Samuel Pepys 1633-1703 an English naval administrator and Member of Parliament who is now most famous for the diary he kept for a decade while still a relatively young man Pericles 495-429 BC was arguably the most prominent and influential Greek statesman, orator and general of Athens during the Golden Age specifically the time between the Persian and Peloponnesian wars. H. Ross Perot founder of the Electronic Data Systems Persius 34-62 AD, full name Aulus Persius Flaccus, was a Roman poet and satirist of Etruscan origin (period of 9th and 2nd centuries


Pesahim

Peter

Petronius

Phaedrus

Phelps

Picasso

Pindar Pinero

BC). In his works, poems and satires he shows a stoic wisdom and strongly criticizes the abuses of his contemporaries Babylonian Talmud, Pesahim is the third tractate of Seder Moed ("Order of Festivals") of the Mishnah and of the Talmud. It is concerned mainly with the laws of the Jewish holiday Passover as well as the Passover lamb offering Laurence Johnston Peter 1919-1990 was a Canadian educator and "hierarchiologist" best known to the general public for the formulation of the Peter Principle which states: "In a hierarchy every employee tends to rise to his level of incompetence” meaning that after one is promoted he or she become lax and inefficient Gaius Petronius Arbiter 27-66 AD a Roman courtier during the reign of Nero generally believed to be the author of the “Satyricon”, a satirical novel believed to have been written during that era “The Phaedrus” written by Plato is a dialogue between Plato's main protagonist Socrates and Phaedrus and an interlocutor in several dialogues. The Phaedrus was presumably composed around 370 BC William Lyon Phelps 1865-1943 an American author, critic and scholar who taught the first American university course on the modern novel Pablo Ruiz y Picasso 1881-1973 also known as Pablo Picasso was a Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, stage designer, poet and playwright who spent most of his adult life in France Pindar c. 522-443 BC an Ancient Greek lyric poet Sir Arthur Wing Pinero 1855-1934 known 455


Plato

Plautus

Player Pliny The Elder

Plutarch

Poe

Poincare

Pollock

456

mononymously as Pinero was an English actor and later an important dramatist and stage director Plato 423-347 BC a philosopher, as well as mathematician, in Classical Greece. Considered an essential figure in the development of philosophy, especially the Western tradition and founded the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world. Along with his teacher Socrates and his most famous student, Aristotle, Plato laid the foundations of Western philosophy and science Titus Maccius Plautus 254-184 B.C. known as "Plautus" was a Roman playwright of the Old Latin period Gary Player, a professional golfer from South Africa Gaius Plinius Secundus 23-79 AD better known as Pliny the Elder, a Roman author, naturalist, and natural philosopher, as well as a naval and army commander of the early Roman Empire and personal friend of the emperor Vespasian Plutarch 46-120 AD a biographer, essayist and philosopher later named , upon becoming a Roman citizen, Lucius Mestrius Plutarchus and known primarily for his “Parallel Lives and Moralia” Edgar Allan Poe 1809-1849 an American author, poet, editor and literary critic and considered part of the American Romantic Movement Jules Henri Poincaré 1854-1912 a French mathematician, theoretical physicist, engineer and philosopher of science Channing Pollock 1880-1946 an American playwright, critic and writer of film scenarios, including “The Evil Thereof”


Polybius

Pope

Prentice

Prior

Propertius

Proust

Ptahhote

Publilius Syrus

Polybius 200-118 BC a Greek historian of the Hellenistic Period noted for his work, “The Histories”, which covered the period of 264146 BC in detail. The work describes the rise of the Roman Republic to the status of dominance in the ancient Mediterranean world. Polybius is also renowned for his ideas concerning the separation of powers in government, later used in Montesquieu's “The Spirit of the Laws” and in the drafting of the United States Constitution Alexander Pope 1688-1744 an 18th-century English poet best known for his satirical verse, as well as for his translation of Homer George Dennison Prentice 1802-1870 an editor of the Louisville Journal, which he built into a major newspaper in Louisville, Kentucky. He attracted readers by satire as well as exaggerated reporting and support of the Know-Nothing Party in the 1850s Matthew Prior 1664-1721 an English poet and diplomat who is also known as a contributor to The Examiner Propertius Sextus c. 50-15 BC a Latin elegiac poet of the Augustan age in Assisium. Propertius' surviving work comprises four books of Elegies Valentin Louis Georges Eugène Marcel Proust 1871-1922 a French novelist, critic and essayist best known for his monumental novel “À la recherche du temps perdu” (“In Search of Lost Time”) Ptahhotep, sometimes known as Plathotpe or Ptah-Hotep, was an ancient Egyptian official during the late 25th century BC and early 24th century BC Publilius Syrus, 46–29 BC often referred to as Publius was a Latin writer of sententiae. He was 457


Pythagoras

Quarles

Quillen

Quintilian

Rabelius

Raleigh

Rand

Ray

458

a Syrian who was brought as a slave to Italy, but by his wit and talent he won the favor of his master who freed and educated him Pythagoras of Samos 571-495 BC an Ionian Greek philosopher and mathematician who’s been credited as the founder of the movement called Pythagoreanism Francis Quarles 1592-1644 an English poet most famous for his Emblem book aptly entitled “Emblems” Verni Robert Quillen 1887-1948 an American journalist and humorist who for more than a quarter century was "one of the leading purveyors of village nostalgia" from his home in Fountain Inn, South Carolina Marcus Fabius Quintilianus 35-100 AD a Roman rhetorician from Hispania widely referred to in medieval schools of rhetoric and in Renaissance writing François Rabelais 1494-1553 a major French Renaissance writer, doctor, Renaissance humanist, monk and Greek scholar who historically is regarded as a writer of fantasy, satire, the grotesque, bawdy jokes and songs Sir Walter Raleigh c.1554-1618 an English landed gentleman, writer, poet, soldier, politician, courtier, spy, and explorer. He was Instrumental in the English colonization of North America and well known for popularizing tobacco in England Sally Rand 1904-1979 a burlesque dancer and actress most noted for her ostrich feather fan and balloon bubble dance. She also performed under the name Billie Beck John Ray 1627-1705 an English naturalist widely regarded as one of the earliest of the English parson-naturalists. Until 1670, he wrote his name as John Wray


Renard

Rhodes

Rice

Richelieu

Rilke

Rimbaud

Rochefoucauld

Rochester

Rogers

Pierre-Jules Renard or Jules Renard 1864-1910 a French author and member of the Académie Goncourt, most famous for the works “Poil de carotte”, “Les Histoires Naturelles”and “Le Plaisir de rompre” Cecil John Rhodes 1853-1902 a British businessman, mining magnate, and politician in South Africa. An ardent believer in British colonialism, Rhodes was the founder of the southern African territory of Rhodesia, which was named after him in 1895 Henry Grantland Rice 1880-1954 an early 20thcentury American sportswriter known for his elegant prose Cardinal Richelieu Armand Jean du Plessis, 1585-1642, a French clergyman, noble and statesman René Karl Wilhelm Johann Josef Maria Rilke 1875-1926 better known as Rainer Maria Rilke was a Bohemian-Austrian poet and novelist Jean Nicolas Arthur Rimbaud 1854-1891 a French poet who influenced modern literature and arts and inspired various musicians and prefigured surrealism Duc de La Rochefoucauld (the title of Duke de La Rochefoucauld) a French peerage and one of the most famous families of French nobility whose origins go back to the 10th and 11th centuries Lord Rochester John Wilmot 1647-1680 2nd Earl of Rochester was an English poet and courtier of King Charles II's Restoration court which Restoration reacted against the "spiritual authoritarianism" of the Puritan era Will Rogers 1879-1935 (William Penn Adair Rogers) a Cherokee cowboy, vaudeville performer, humorist, newspaper columnist, social commentator and stage and motion 459


Rohlen Rohn

Roosevelt

Rossi

Rousseau

Rowland

Rowland Roy Batty Rubinstein

460

picture actor. He became one of the most famous American media stars during the 1920s and 1930s Thomas P. Rohlen, author, b 1940 Emanuel James "Jim" Rohn 1930-2009 an American entrepreneur, author and motivational speaker. His rags to riches story played a large part in his work which influenced others in the personal development industry Theodore Roosevelt 1858-1919 26th President of the United States and American statesman, author, explorer, soldier, naturalist, reformer and a leading force of the Progressive Era Azariah Rossi 1513-1578 an Italian-Jewish physician, religious writer and scholar. He was descended from an old Jewish family which, according to a tradition, was brought by Titus from Jerusalem. (Titus was left in charge of ending the Jewish rebellion and in 70 AD he besieged and captured Jerusalem and destroyed the city and the Second Temple) Jean-Jacques Rousseau 1712-1778 a Genevan philosopher, writer and composer whose political philosophy influenced the Enlightenment in France and across Europe Helen Rowland 1875-1950 an American journalist and humorist who wrote a column in the New York World newspaper called “Reflections of a Bachelor Girl” Richard Rowland − no definitive information found Roy Batty, Blade Runner − no information found Arthur Rubinstein 1887-1982 a Polish-born American classical pianist who received international acclaim for his performances of the music written by a variety of composers and many regarded him as the greatest Chopin


Runes

Runyon

Ruskin

Saki

Sales

Saltus

Samuel

Sanayana Sandburg

interpreter of his time Dagobert D. Runes Editor 1902-1982 a publisher, philosopher and author. Born in Bukovina, Austro-Hungary (now in the Ukraine) emigrated to the United States in 1926 (Alfred) Damon Runyon 1880-1946 an American newspaperman and author best known for his short stories celebrating the world of Broadway in New York City that grew out of the Prohibition era John Ruskin 1819-1900 the leading English art critic of the Victorian era and an art patron, draughtsman, watercolorist, prominent social thinker and philanthropist Hector Hugh Munro 1870-1916 a Scottish writer better known by the pen name Saki, and also frequently as H. H. Munro, whose witty, mischievous and sometimes macabre stories satirized Edwardian society and culture. He is considered a master of the short story Soupy Sales 1926-2009 an American comedian, actor, radio-TV personality and host and jazz aficionado best known for his local and network children's television show series, “Lunch with Soupy Sales” Edgar Evertson Saltus 1855-1921 an American writer known for his highly refined prose style. His works paralleled those by European decadent authors such as Huysmans and Oscar Wilde Herbert Louis Samuel 1870-1963 1st Viscount Samuel a British Liberal politician who was the party leader from 1931-1935 Sanayana − no information available Carl August Sandburg 1878-1967 an American poet, writer, and editor who won three Pulitzer Prizes, two for his poetry and one for his biography of Abraham Lincoln 461


Santayana

Sappho

Sarent

Savile

Schreiner

Schumann

Scott, Charles Scott, Walter

Selden

Seneca

462

George Santayana 1863-1952 (Jorge Agustín Nicolás Ruiz de Santayana y Borrás) a philosopher, essayist, poet, and novelist. Spanish-born, Santayana was raised and educated in the United States and identified himself as an American Sappho c. 630-1925 a Greek female poet who the Alexandrians included in their list of nine great lyric poets John Singer Sargent 1856-1925 an American artist considered the "leading portrait painter of his generation" for his evocations of Edwardian era luxury George Savile 1633-1695 1st Marquess of Halifax was an English statesman, writer and politician Olive Schreiner 1855-1920 a South African author, anti-war campaigner and intellectual. She is best remembered for her novel “The Story of an African Farm” Robert Schumann 1810-1856 a German composer and influential music critic who was regarded as one of the greatest composers of the Romantic era Charles Scott (I believe) is CEO of the Intermark Company Sir Walter Scott 1771-1832 1st Baronet a Scottish was a historical novelist, playwright and poet John Selden 1584-1854 an English jurist and a scholar of England's ancient laws and constitution and a scholar of Jewish law Seneca (Lucius Annaeus Seneca) 4-65 AD a Roman writer, rhetorician, Roman Stoic philosopher, statesman, dramatist and humorist in the Silver Age of Latin literature. He was also a tutor and later advisor to Emperor Nero


Sergeant Preston of the Yukon Seven Sages

Shakespeare

Sharif

Shaw

Sheridan Sherman

Shirley

Sidney

Sergeant Preston of the Yukon. TV series 19551958 The Seven Sages (of Greece) or Seven Wise Men c. 620-550 BC was the title given by ancient Greeks to the seven early 6th-century BC philosophers, statesmen and law-givers who were renowned for their wisdom William Shakespeare 1564-1616 an English writer, dramatist, actor and poet widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist. He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon" Omar Sharif 1932-2015 an Egyptian actor born Michel Demitri Chalhoub but used the assumed surname Sharif which means "noble" in Arabic. His films include” Lawrence of Arabia”, “Doctor Zhivago” and “Funny Girl” George Bernard Shaw 1856-1950 a Nobel laureate in literature was an Irish playwright, essayist and short story writer whose work addressed prevailing social problems with a vein of comedy. Was also a co-founder of the London School of Economics. His main talent was for drama and wrote more than 60 plays General Philip H. Sheridan, 1831-1888 Civil War General and associate of Sherman and Grant John Sherman 1823-1900 an American Republican representative and senator from Ohio during the Civil War and into the late nineteenth century James Shirley 1596-1666 an English dramatist who belonged to the great period of English dramatic literature Algernon Sidney 1622-1683 an English statesman, republican statesman and writer on 463


Siegel, Gabriel Siegel, Jonathan Sigismund

Simenon

Siodmak

Slick

Smiles

Smith

Smith

Smollett

464

government matters Gabriel M. Siegel ,President of the MediCab of New York, Inc. Jonathan P. Siegel − no information available Sigismund Sigismund of Luxemburg 1368-1437 was at various times the Prince-elector of Brandenburg; the King of Hungary and Croatia; the King of Germany and the King of Bohemia Georges Joseph Christian Simenon 1903-1989 a Belgian writer and prolific author who published nearly 200 novels and numerous short works and who was best known as the creator of the fictional detective Jules Maigret Curt Siodmak 1902-2000 a novelist and screenwriter who made a name for himself in Hollywood with horror and science fiction films, most notably “The Wolf Man” and “Donovan's Brain” Sam Slick was a character created by Thomas Chandler Haliburton, a Nova Scotia judge and author Samuel Smiles 1812-1904 a Scottish author and movement reformer who campaigned on a Chartist i.e. a working man’s reform platform Logan Pearsall Smith 1865-1946 an Americanborn British essayist and critic. Harvard and Oxford educated he was known for his aphorisms and epigrams and as being an expert on 17th Century divines (theology) Edgar Smith an American convicted murderer, who was once on Death Row for the 1957 murder of fifteen-year-old honor student and cheer leader Victoria Ann Zielinski. (Not sure this information is for the author of the quote) Tobias George Smollett 1721-1771 a Scottish poet and author best known for his picaresque novels, such as “The Adventures of Roderick


Socrates

Solomon

Solon

Sophocles

Random” and “The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle” Socrates c. 469-399 BC was a classical Greek (Athenian) philosopher credited as one of the founders of Western philosophy. He is an enigmatic figure known chiefly through the accounts of classical writers, especially the writings of his students Plato and Xenophon and the plays of his contemporary, Aristophanes. Plato's dialogues are among the most comprehensive accounts of Socrates to survive from antiquity though it is unclear the degree to which Socrates himself is "hidden behind his 'best disciple', Plato" Solomon also called Jedidiah was, according to the Bible (Book of Kings), a king of Israel and the son of David. The conventional dates of Solomon's reign are circa 970 to 931 BC. He is described as the third king of the United Monarchy, which would later broke apart into the northern Kingdom of Israel and the southern Kingdom of Judah shortly after his death. Following the split, his patrineal descendants ruled over Judah alone. According to the Talmud, Solomon is one of the 48 prophets. In the Qur'an he is considered a major prophet and Muslims generally refer to him by the Arabic variant Sulayman, son of David. The Hebrew Bible credits Solomon as the builder of the First Temple in Jerusalem Solon Solon c. 638- 558 BC was an Athenian statesman, lawmaker and poet remembered for his efforts to legislate against political, economic and moral decline in archaic Athens. His reforms failed in the short term, yet he is often credited with having laid the foundations for Athenian democracy Sophocles c. 497-406 BC is one of three ancient

465


Spencer

Spengler

Spinoza

St. Jerome

Stalin

Stanhope

466

Greek tragedians whose plays have survived. His first plays were written later than those of Aeschylus, and earlier than, or contemporary with, those of Euripides. According to the Suda, a 10th-century encyclopedia, Sophocles wrote 123 plays during the course of his life, but only seven have survived in a complete form Edmund Spenser 1552-1599 an English poet best known for “The Faerie Queene�, an epic poem and fantastical allegory celebrating the Tudor dynasty and Elizabeth I Oswald Arnold Gottfried Spengler 1880-1936 a German historian and philosopher of history whose interests included mathematics, science and art Benedict (or Baruch) Spinoza 1631-1677 a Dutch philosopher of Sephardi of Portuguese origin. The breadth and importance of Spinoza's work was not fully realized until many years after his death Saint Jerome 347-420 AD an Illyrian Latin Christian priest, confessor, theologian and historian who also became a Doctor of the Church Joseph Stalin 1879-1953 the leader of the Soviet Union from the mid-1920s until his death in 1953. Stalin was one of the seven members of the first Politburo, founded in 1917, in order to manage the Bolshevik Revolution, alongside Lenin, Zinoviev, Kamenev, Trotsky, Sokolnikov and Bubnov. Stalin was appointed General Secretary of the party's Central Committee in 1922 after which he consolidated his power following the death of Vladimir Lenin in 1924 Philip Dormer Stanhope 1694-1773 the Secretary of State and the 4th Earl of Chesterfield a British statesman and man of


Stanton

Stendal

Stengel

Stevenson, Adlai

Stevenson, Robert

Stout

Strachey Stravinsky

Strindgberg

letters and wit Charles E. Stanton was a Colonel in the United States Army during World War I and chief disbursing officer and aide to General John J. Pershing. Stanton was the nephew of Abraham Lincoln's Secretary of War, Edwin M. Stanton Stendal (Henri Beyle) 1783-1842 better known by his pen name Stendhal was a 19th-century French writer Charles Dillon "Casey" Stengel 1890-1975 nicknamed "The Old Professor" was an American Major League Baseball outfielder and manager of the New York Yankees. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1966 Adlai Ewing Stevenson 1900-1965 an American politician and diplomat, noted for his intellectual demeanor, eloquent public speaking and promotion of liberal causes in the Democratic Party Robert Lewis Stevenson 1850-1894 a Scottish novelist, poet, essayist and travel writer. His most famous works are “Treasure Island”, “Kidnapped”, and “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” Rex Todhunter Stout 1886-1975 an American writer noted for his detective fiction particularly the 33 novels and approximately 40 novellas that featured the detective Nero Wolfe and his assistant Archie Goodwin between 1934 and 1975 Lionel Strachey c. 1864-1927 was a British writer, translator and humorist Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky 1882-1971a Russian, and later, a naturalized French and American composer, pianist and conductor. He is widely considered one of the most important and influential composers of the 20th century Johan August Strindberg 1849-1912 a Swedish 467


Strunsky

Stuart (Queen of Scots) Swift Sydenham

Tacitus

Talmud Tennyson

Teresa

468

playwright, novelist, poet, essayist and painter. A prolific writer who often drew directly on his personal experience Simeon Strunsky 1879-1948 a Russian-born Jewish American essayist and prominent editorialist for the New York Times Mary, Queen of Scots, 1542-1587, also known as Mary Stuart or Mary I of Scotland was Queen of Scotland from 1542 to 1567 and Queen consort of France from 1559 to 1560 Jonathan Swift 1667-1775 an English cleric and satirist Thomas Sydenham 1624-1689 an English physician and author of “Observationes Medicae” which became a standard textbook of medicine for two centuries and therefore became known as 'The English Hippocrates’ Tacitus, c. 55-117, Publius (or Gaius) Cornelius, was a Roman orator, politician, senator and historian of the Roman Empire. The surviving portions of his two major works, the “Annals” and the “Histories”, examine the reigns of the Roman Emperors Tiberius, Claudius, Nero and those who reigned in the Year of the Four Emperors (AD 69). These two works span the history of the Roman Empire from the death of Augustus in AD 14 to the years of the First Jewish-Roman War in AD 70. The Talmud meaning instruction or learning Alfred, Lord Tennyson 1809-1892 1st Baron Tennyson was a Poet Laureate of Great Britain and Ireland during much of Queen Victoria's reign and remains one of the most popular British poets Mother Teresa, Blessed Teresa of Calcutta 1910-1997, commonly known as Mother Teresa, was a Roman Catholic religious sister and missionary who was from Macedonia but


Tertullian

Thackeray

Thomas

Thomson

Thoreau

Thurber

Tiberius

Tolady

lived most of her life in India helping the poor Tertullian Quintus 160-229 AD (Septimius Florens Tertullianus, anglicized as Tertullian) was a prolific early Christian author from Carthage in the Roman province of Africa. He is the first Christian author to produce an extensive corpus of Latin Christian literature William Makepeace Thackeray 1811-1863 an English novelist of the 19th century famous for his satirical works, particularly Vanity Fair, a panoramic portrait of English society Norman (Mattoon) Thomas 1884-1968 an American Presbyterian minister who achieved fame as a socialist, pacifist and six-time presidential candidate for the Socialist Party of America James Thomson 1700-1748 a Scottish poet and playwright known for his masterpiece “The Seasons� and the lyrics of "Rule, Britannia!" Henry David Thoreau 1817-1862 an American author, poet, philosopher, abolitionist, naturalist, tax resister, development critic, surveyor and historian James Grover Thurber 1894-1961 an American cartoonist, author, journalist, playwright, and celebrated wit best known for his cartoons and short stories, published mainly in The New Yorker magazine and collected in his numerous books Tiberius, 42 BC-37 AD was Roman Emperor from 14-37 AD. Born Tiberius Claudius Nero, a Claudian, Tiberius was the son of Tiberius Claudius Nero and Livia Drusilla. His mother divorced Nero and married Augustus in 39 BC, making him a step-son of Octavian Audustus Montague Tolady 1740-1778 an Anglican cleric and hymn writer and major Calvinist opponent of John Wesley. He is best 469


Tolkein

Tolsoi

Tomlin

Torell

Townsend Toynbee

Traubel

Truman

Tucker

Twain

470

remembered as the author of the hymn "Rock of Ages" J. R. R. Tolkein an English professor and popular novelist who authored “The Hobbit”, “The Lord of the Rings”, and “The Silmarillion” Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoi 1828-1910 usually referred to in English as Leo Tolstoy was a Russian novelist regarded as one of the greatest of all time. He is best known for his “War and Peace” and “Anna Karenina” Mary Jean "Lily" Tomlin b. 1939 an American actress, comedian, writer and producer and a major force in American comedy since the late 1960s when she began a career as a stand-up comedienne John R. Torell III, President of the Manufacturers Hanover Trust (I knew him personally) Robert Townsend, former CEO of Avis Arnold Joseph Toynbee 1889-1975 a British historian, philosopher of history, research professor of international history at the London School of Economics and the University of London and author of numerous books Helen Francesca Traubel 1899-1972 an American opera and concert soprano best known for her Wagnerian roles, especially those of Brünnhilde and Isolde Harry S. Truman 1884-1972 as Vice President became the 33rd President of the United States (1945–1953) after Franklin D. Roosevelt died in office in 1944 Sophie Tucker 1887-1966 a Ukrainian-born American singer, comedian, actress and radio personality known for her stentorian delivery of comical and risqué songs Mark Twain (Sam Langhorne Clemens) 18351910 riverboat captain, humorist and author of


Tyndall

Upanishads

Van Beethoven

Vanderbuilt

Varro

Vaughan

Vauvenargues

Virgil

Vlaminck

“The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” John Tyndall 1820-1893 a prominent 19th century physicist. His initial scientific fame arose in the 1850s from his study of diamagnetism. Later he made discoveries in the realms of infrared radiation and the physical properties of air The Upanishads are a collection of texts of religious and philosophical nature written in India probably between c. 800-500 BC during a time when Indian society started to question the traditional Vedic religious order Ludwig van Beethoven 1770-1827 born in Austria, was a German composer and pianist and crucial figure in the transition between the Classical and Romantic eras William Henry "Billy" Vanderbilt 1821-1885 an American businessman and philanthropist and the eldest son of Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt and a prominent member of the Vanderbilt family Varro Marcus Terentius Varro 116-27 BC an ancient Roman scholar and writer sometimes called Varro Reatinus to distinguish him from his younger contemporary Varro Atacinus William E. Vaughan 1915-1977 an American columnist and author who wrote a syndicated column for the Kansas City Star Marquis de Vauvenargues 1715-1747 (Luc de Clapiers, marquis de Vauvenargues) a minor French writer and moralist Virgil Publius Vergilius Maro 70-19 BC usually called Virgil or Vergil in English, was an ancient Roman poet of the Augustan period known for such major works of Latin literature as the “Eclogues” and the “Georgics” Vlaminck Maurice de Vlaminck 1876-1958 a French painter, along with André Derain and 471


Voltaire

von Bismarck

von Blucher

von Goethe

von Schiller

Wagner

Walker, Stanley

472

Henri Matisse, is considered one of the principal figures in the Fauve movement, a group of modern artists who from 1904 to 1908 were united in their use of intense color Voltaire François-Marie Arouet 1694-1778 known by his nom de plume (pen name) Voltaire, was a French Enlightenment writer, historian and philosopher famous for his wit and his attacks on the established Catholic Church Otto Eduard Leopold 1815-1898 Prince of Bismarck, Duke of Lauenburg, known as Otto von Bismarck, was a conservative Prussian statesman who dominated German and European affairs from the 1860s until 1890 Gebhard Leberecht von Blucher (Fßrst von Wahlstatt) 1742-1819 most notably led his army against Napoleon I at the Battle of the Nations at Leipzig in 1813 and the Battle of Waterloo in 1815 in alliance with the Duke of Wellington Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1749-1832 a German writer and statesman whose body of works includes epic and lyric poetry written in a variety of meters and styles, prose and verse dramas, memoirs and an autobiography Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller 17591805 a German poet, philosopher, historian and playwright Wilhelm Richard Wagner 1813-1883 a German composer, theatre director, polemicist, and conductor primarily known for his operas. Unlike most opera composers, Wagner wrote both the libretto and the music for each of his stage works Stanley Walker 1898-1962 an editor of the New York Herald Tribune in the first half of the 20th century


Walker, Theodore Walpole

Walsh

Walton

Ward

Watts

Waugh, Arthur

Waugh, Alexander

Weatherford Webster, John

Theodore Waller – no information found Horatio Walpole 1717-1797, 4th Earl of Orford, also known as Horace Walpole, was an English art historian, man of letters, antiquarian and Whig politician William Walsh 1662-1708 an English poet , critic and son of Joseph Walsh of Abberley Hall, Worcestershire Izaak Walton 1593-1683 an English writer best known as the author of “The Compleat Angler”. He also wrote a number of short biographies that have been collected under the title of “Walton's Lives” Artemus Ward 1727-1800 was an American major general in the American Revolutionary War and a Congressman from Massachusetts Isaac Watts 1674-1748 an English Christian hymnwriter, theologian, logician and evangelist. He was recognized as the "Father of English Hymnody" and credited with some 750 hymns Arthur Evelyn St. John Waugh 1903-1966 known by his pen name Evelyn Waugh, was an English writer of novels, biographies, and travel books and a prolific journalist and reviewer of books Alexander Raban "Alec" Waugh 1898-1981 a British novelist and the elder brother of the better-known Evelyn Waugh and son of Arthur Waugh, author, literary critic and publisher David Weatherford (I believe) was a writer and aphorist John Webster 1580-1634 an English Jacobean dramatist best known for his tragedies “The White Devil” and “The Duchess of Malfi”, which are often regarded as masterpieces of the early 17th-century English stage 473


Webster, Daniel

Wells, Carolyn Wells, Orson

Wesley

West

Whistler

White

Whitehead

Whittier

474

Daniel Webster 1782-1852 a leading American senator and statesman during the era of the Second Party System. He was the outstanding spokesman for American nationalism with powerful oratory that made him a key Whig leader Carolyn Wells 1862-1942 an American author and poet George Orson Welles (Orson Wells) 1915-1985 an American actor, director, writer and producer who worked in theatre, radio, and film. Two of his famous works were “Citizen Kane” and “The War of the Worlds” John Wesley 1701-1791 an Anglican divine and theologian who, with his brother Charles Wesley and fellow cleric George Whitefield, is credited with the foundation of the evangelical movement known as Methodism Mae West (Mary Jane "Mae" West) 1893-1980 an American actress, singer, playwright, screenwriter, and sex symbol whose entertainment career spanned seven decades James Abbott McNeill Whistler 1834-1903 an American-born, British-based artist active during the American Gilded Age Elwyn Brooks White 1899-1985 an American writer who contributed to The New Yorker magazine and was a co-author of the English language style guide “The Elements of Style”, which is commonly known as "Strunk & White" Alfred North Whitehead1861-1947 an English mathematician and philosopher best known as the defining figure of the philosophical school known as process philosophy John Greenleaf Whittier 1807-1892 an American Quaker poet and advocate of the abolition of slavery in the United States.


Wilde

Wilder

William of Wykeham

Williams

Wilson, Harvey

Wilson, Edmund Wilson, Woodrow

Witman

Wojcik Wolfe

Frequently listed as one of the Fireside Poets, Whittier was influenced by the Scottish poet Robert Burns Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde 1854-1900 better known as Oscar Wilde was an Irish poet, wit, and dramatist Billy Wilder 1906-2002 an Austrian-born American filmmaker, screenwriter, producer, artist and journalist whose career spanned more than 50 years and 60 films William of Wykeham 1320-1404 was Bishop of Winchester and Chancellor of England who founded the New College Oxford and New College School in 1379 and the Winchester College in 1382. He was also the clerk of works when much of Windsor Castle was built John Towner Williams (I believe) b. 1932 was an American composer, conductor, and pianist who composed some of the most popular and recognizable film scores in cinema Harvey Earl Wilson 1907-1987 was an American syndicated columnist, journalist, gossip columnist and author perhaps best known for his nationally syndicated newspaper column Edmund Wilson 1895-1972 an American writer, literary and social critic and man of letters Thomas Woodrow Wilson 1856-1924 was the 28th President of the United States from 1913 to 1921 and leader of the Progressive Movement Walter "Walt" Whitman 1819-1892 an American poet, essayist, journalist and humanist. He was a part of the transition between transcendentalism and realism incorporating both views in his works Laurie Jo Wojcik – no information available Thomas Clayton Wolfe 1900-1938 a major American novelist of the early twentieth 475


Wotton

Wright

Wrigley Wueville Wu-ti

Ybarra

Young Zamoyski Zangwill

century who wrote four lengthy novels, plus many short stories, dramatic works and novellas. (Might also be the Thomas Kennerly "Tom" Wolfe, Jr. b. 1931 who wrote “The Right Stuff”, “The Bonfire of the Vanities”, “The Last American Hero” and “Almost Heroes”) Sir Henry Wotton 1568-1639 an English author, diplomat and politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1614 and 1625. Frank Lloyd Wright 1867-1959 an American architect, interior designer, writer, and educator who designed more than 1,000 structures, 532 of which were completed William Wrigley, Jr. 1861-1932 a U.S. chewing gum industrialist Henri Wueville 1884-1970 (I believe) the one time premier of France Han Wu-ti 156-87 BC a Chinese Emperor and one of the greatest Han dynasty emperors. (His name means 'martial emperor'). Under Wu-ti the civil service was reorganized using Confucian principles which were modified to include elements from other schools and became the state religion Thomas Russell Ybarra 1880-1971 a Venezuelan-born American journalist and traveler Edward Young 1683-1765 an English poet best remembered for “Night-Thoughts” Jan Zamoyski or Zamojski 1542-1605 a Polish nobleman and magnate Israel Zangwill 1864-1926 a British humorist and writer

****

476


y Bibliography (The following represents some of the sources) Reference Author/Publisher Prentice-Hall Encyclopedia of World Proverbs 3,500 Quotes for Speakers

The Manager’s Book of Quotations

Selected Chinese Sayings

Repertoire of Chinese Proverbs Select Chinese Proverbs Choicest Chinese Proverbs Top 10 Chinese proverbs List of 1,000 Proverbs Proverbs of Solomon Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations (17th edition)

by Wolfgang Mieder; MJF Books, New York-1986 by Gerald F. Lieberman; Doubleday & Company, NY1983 by Lewis D Eiger and Jonathan P. Siegel; American Management Association; The Quotation Corp, Rockville, MD1944-1989 By T.C. Lai; University Book Store at the University of Hong Kong; Wing Tai Cheung Co. Ltd., Hong Kong-1983 www.quotations.about.com/od /chineseproverbs (and other sites) www.saidwhat.co.uk/proverb/ viewall.php www.letgodbetrue.com/prover bs/index.htm By John Bartlett; Little, Brown and Company; Hachette Book Group USA; 1271 Avenue of the America, NY 10020 477


25 Sayings From various sources 20,000 Quips and Quotes

Various Various By Evan Esar; Barnes & Noble Books 1995

*****

478


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