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thursday oct. 15, lOll vol XXIII issue 43 • humboldt county, calif. FREE

Why is the county paying employees hundreds of thousands of dollars to stay home? By Ryan Burns

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5 Exploding mailbox 9 Code of silence in Humboldt courts 25 Is there a holiday coming up or anything? 28 Teddy bear with a Glock 29 What a king!


2 North Coast Journal • Thursday, oct. 25, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


table of 5 7

Mailbox Poem

25 Calendar 28 Filmland

Shadows and Fog

9

News

you call that scary?

29 Field Notes

Two Deaths, MANY Questions

11 Blog Jammin’ 12 On The Cover ‘Don’t Bother Coming In’

14 Home & Garden Service Directory

19 Get Out! Stand Up and Paddle

20 The Hum raising the dead

22 Music & More!

King Arthur, Part 1: The Matter of Britain

30 32 32 34 38 39

Workshops Sudoku Crossword Marketplace Body, Mind & Spirit Real Estate This Week

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 25, 2012

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4 North Coast Journal • Thursday, OCT. 25, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


Censorious Editor: Over decades I’ve been associated with several periodicals that have published a (free?) cover story each year from Project Censored (“Project Censored,” Oct. 18), but this time my annual irritation requires expression. Though the topics summarized in these stories may be “underreported” (which is all the project now claims in the small print) by standards of journalism or a political point of view, calling them “censored” is nothing but cynically sensationalistic marketing which I find offensive and destructive. Back in the day when I was a columnist, I once wrote about cigarette advertising campaigns targeting young people, for a newspaper that was taking that advertising money from tobacco companies. The piece was killed, I lost my column, the newspaper mounted a campaign to discredit me, and my writing career in that city was pretty much over. That’s censorship. Knowing what it really is — and saying what it really is — I believe is too important to risk losing the meaning of the term for the sake of easy

but misapplied imagery or a self-serving brand name. William S. Kowinski, Arcata   Editor: Thanks for the article on Project Censored. I have been buying and reading from cover to cover the Censored books since 1994. I met Carl Jenson, founder of Project Censored and Peter Phillips, successor to Carl Jenson as editor of the Censored books, at  the California Faculty Association meetings in Los Angeles. During one of these meetings Peter asked if I would like to be a faculty evaluator for Project Censored. I did it for a couple of years around 2005 until my traveling made it impossible to continue. All of the material in Censored is researched by higher education students supervised by faculty members. The top 25 censored news stories are submitted to a panel of about 30 judges from the United States and three or four other countries. This panel ranks the censored news stories, and they are published in Censored. All participants in this endeavor are listed in the Censored books. The sources for all the censored news stories are listed, and articles in the Censored are well-footnoted. As well as important news that did

not receive a lot of attention in our media, there is a section called junk food news which identifies several extensively covered news stories which have no significant effect on our lives. For each junk food news story there is an account of events which could have affected our lives that occurred at the time the junk food news occurred but were not covered by the media. That section makes for interesting reading. One of the most significant sections in the 2011 edition of Censored deals with what the authors called State Crimes Against Democracy (SCAD), pages 231 to 291. If you are concerned about what is happening in our country today, I highly recommend these sections. Jack Munsee, McKinleyville

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Editor: Something that was mentioned in “Project Censored” stopped me dead in my tracks because I knew it could not be true. It was the reference to Palestinian women being forced to give birth in shackles. So I “Googled” the term as you had it in the story. I then followed the story progression. Page after page had the same story continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, OCT. 25, 2012

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Oct. 25, 2012 Volume XXIII No. 43

North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2012

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg carrie@northcoastjournal.com art director Holly Harvey production manager Carolyn Fernandez staff writer/a&e editor Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/copy editor Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Ryan Burns ryan@northcoastjournal.com calendar editor Andrew Goff calendar@northcoastjournal.com editorial intern Scottie Lee Meyers contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Mark Shikuma, Amy Stewart graphic design/production Lynn Jones, Alana Chenevert, Drew Hyland production intern Kimberly Hodges sales manager Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com advertising Colleen Hole colleen@northcoastjournal.com advertising Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com advertising Karen Sack karen@northcoastjournal.com office manager Carmen England classified assistant Sophia Dennler mail/office:

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 PHONE: 707 442-1400 FAX:  707 442-1401

press releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e calendar@northcoastjournal.com music thehum@northcoastjournal.com production ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com sales ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

continued from previous page repeated on web site after web site — and all the sites were those with a political agenda and oozing polemics. Finally we come to the NCJ source, “Project Censored,” which acquired the story through Electronic Intifada. So, was the statement in the NCJ true? I cannot prove it was false, but my understanding of Israeli society, its government and its policies tells me it is not likely to be true. The source of the story is one Palestinian prisoner and a representative of a U.N. agency whose comments were taken out of context. But the important point is that you presented it as if it were true. Just because the mainstream media does not report something and alternative media does, does not mean that what the alternative media is presenting is factually correct. The first rule of good journalism: Check your sources. Nan Abrams, Eureka

Dispiriting Law Editor: Synchronicity? On Sunday Oct. 14, John Tutuska died (Blog Jammin’, Oct. 18). On sunny days, Tutuska could often be seen sitting and meditating on the sidewalk next to the Clarke Museum in Old Town. According to your obituary: “Shop owners and workers in Old Town remembered Tutuska fondly on Monday, telling stories of his thoughtfulness and spirit.” However, on Tuesday, Oct. 16, the Eureka City Council voted unanimously to make it illegal to sit or lie in public in the city’s business districts between the hours of 6 a.m. and 11 p.m. Parke Bostrom, Eureka

sumption. Dwelling endlessly on plastic bags is a distraction from seeking that more hopeful, useful goal.        Sonia Baur, MD, Garberville

Editor: Thanks to Mitch Trachtenberg for nudging us toward taking our own bags to the market. Unless you bake your own bread or buy high-end baked goods, it’s hard to avoid acquiring a lot of plastic bread bags. But those bags are really strong, so why not shake out the crumbs and re-use them for our groceries? They will last for several years of shopping. They’re perfect containers for loose pieces of fruit or vegetables, wet lettuce and bulk goods like grains or beans, holding like items together for convenience and speed at the checkout counter. I use them until they are completely worn out and then recycle them in the store’s bin. Just be sure to blot out the old bar code completely with a solid black rectangle: Drawing a line through it is not enough, because the laser can pick up any visible code and you may find you’ve been charged for something you didn’t purchase. (Also, shop by bicycle if you can. Putting fresh produce and bulk goods into light, flexible bread bags avoids wasteful packaging, and you can then put the smaller bags together in a big reusable bag and fit that into your backpack or bike basket.) Orr Marshall, Eureka Editor: Thank you for your article on reusable vs. “single use” plastic and paper bags at the grocery store. It is more than time for people to stop throwing away “single-use” bags.

Bagging It Editor: I just loved Mitch Trachtenberg’s article about the big bag “tadoo” (“Bag by Bag,” Oct. 11). Of course we all want to do the right and good thing, and he has ferreted out the information we need to make an intelligent decision, but at 0.3 percent of the “waste-stream,” plastic bags are a minuscule part of the problem. Monopoly capitalism gallops on consuming the earth’s resources, and capitalism is a growth-model economy. Its prosperity depends on growth, which requires ever-greater consumption (and attendant waste creation) of the earth’s resources. Maybe someday we can be clever enough to devise a prosperous life which is not based on maximizing con-

6 North Coast Journal • Thursday, OCT. 25, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Cartoon by joel mielke

We’d like to add: First, plastic bags and paper sacks are far from being “single use.” The plastic ones can be used over and over for months before they wear out. When they won’t carry groceries, they become litter bags. Eventually we recycle them. Paper bags also last a long time, if they don’t get wet. There is no excuse to throw bags away after only one use. People in the past probably would have paid well for such useful containers. Second, it’s not a “terrifying task” to carry groceries home in a reusable bag. People have brought their own containers to market for centuries. We have been doing it almost since we moved here in 1966. Third, you don’t have to buy a cloth bag. Cardboard boxes work very well to carry groceries, especially heavy, tippy items like milk cartons. Even if the environmental cost of making one plastic bag is less than that for one cloth bag, the serious costs of plastic bags come after they’re thrown away, especially when they end up in the ocean. The cost of making the cloth bag is amortized over many years. Using a cloth bag “173 times” would take only about a year and a half (at twice a week). Any of these containers can be reused for more than just groceries. Take them to Kmart, drugstores, etc. If we all did, we’d save a lot of wear and tear on the environment and landfills. And bread bags work well for fruits and vegetables. It’s not “plastic vs. paper.”  It’s reuse vs. throw away. Virginia and Jim Waters, Trinidad


Shadows and Fog You were a strange boy in the presence of men who wanted not much more than to understand who suffered the blindness of the shadows and fog and came out on the other side another kind of gypsy country another strange and feral wood the call of the North shore was aching in his dreams until the moment he stepped bare foot upon his promise land — Marley Goldman

Green Mistake Editor: I’m writing in response to Kathy Berry’s and Dana Silvernale’s letters (“Jolly Greens,” Oct. 11) urging people to vote for Jill Stein, the Green Party candidate for president. I believe in Stein’s platform and if we had ranked choice voting, she would be my first choice. The Green Party is circulating a petition to adopt this voting format because, as its website states, it can “eliminate the ‘spoiler effect’ in which candidates with similar views split their vote, thus electing someone who doesn’t represent any of their views.” I eagerly signed the petition. But we don’t operate under that system yet. Thus my concern that progressives in this country will help elect Romney/Ryan by voting for a thirdparty candidate or sitting out the election entirely. Two venerable progressives share my concern. Daniel Ellsberg, although profoundly disappointed in Obama (as I am) warns that a Romney/Ryan administration “would be much worse, even catastrophically worse” on crucial issues like “attacking Iran, Supreme Court appointments, the economy, women’s reproductive rights, health coverage, safety net, climate change, green energy, the environment.” It’s a facile and dangerous oversimplification to say there’s no real difference between Romney and Obama or Republicans and Democrats. Ellsberg calls this thinking “absurd.” He quotes Noam Chomsky: “The Republican organization today is extremely dangerous, not just to this country, but the world.” Both men have told interviewers that if they lived in a swing state, they’d vote against Romney/ Ryan, “which means voting for Obama.”

We’ve been down this road before. In 2000, Ralph Nader was “the spoiler.” Green Party members then were saying there was no difference between Bush and Gore. After the Iraq war was well under way, a Green Party member asked me if I could guarantee that Gore would not have invaded Iraq. My answer was yes. Margy Emerson, Arcata

Editor: Thanks for the coverage of Prop. 37 (“The $38 Million Label,” Oct. 11). It’s an extremely important subject that gets too little attention from the press. Unfortunately, the coverage genetic engineering does get in the media is often riddled with factual errors and misinterpretations of the science. It’s not unique in this. Most press reports on scientific subjects are pretty bad, because it’s hard to convey real science in the simple language and few words that a newspaper article or TV news report require. I thought your article was pretty good overall. There’s a deeper and much more insidious problem with the body of scientific research on GE products. Even if all studies involving GE seeds, organisms or foods were accurately reported in the popular press, we would still have this problem. The problem is that the companies that own GE seeds refuse to allow any independent scientists to study their products without their express permission. Needless to say, permission is never given for studies the companies think might make them look bad! Only a few, scattered studies by regulators (outside the U.S.) and scientists willing to take serious legal and career-related risks have been truly independent. This means that the body of research that currently exists on GE products is thoroughly biased in a way that’s unlike any other area of science today.  If you’re like me, you don’t put too much stock in this industry-controlled research, and you’d rather make your own decisions and control your own risks. In other words, you support labeling! Colin Fiske, McKinleyville

Round Right Signs Editor: I was going to write about the Joe Bonino signs a couple of weeks ago. Then continued on next page

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What do you think? The Journal wants to learn about readers like you. Please participate in this quick online survey so we can keep bringing you the best newspaper in town. You can take the survey online at:

https://www.research.net/s/01-3491 Or scan the QR Code above with your smart phone.

Thank you!

& ipate N a c i t r I Pa uld W icate o c you t certif if $50 g a LOCAL ! T to RAN U A T RES

I saw your article “Watching Ward 2” (Oct. 11). This is what I was thinking: Something is smelling a little bad in Eureka. Notice the signs from Rex Bohn, all made up and expensive looking, and so many of them! Now it’s happening the same way in Eureka with Joe Bonino and his perfect signs. Is someone trying to get rid of all the liberals and paying to get ultra-conservatives in to run our city???? Charlotte Stuart, Eureka

Schools Need You

Editor: Thanks for covering the Proposition 30 and 38 initiatives (“Propping up Schools,” Oct. 4). I would like to add my thoughts to the discussion. Prop. 38 would also increase the personal income tax rate on all but the lowest bracket through 2024. All new revenues from Prop. 38 would be dedicated to K-12 except during 2016-17, when 30 percent would be allocated for state debt-service costs. And most importantly, within Prop. 38, no funds are dedicated to higher education. In contrast, Prop. 30 provides essential funds for higher education. If Prop. 30 fails, there will be even further cuts to the CSU and UC system, which are both already substantially impacted by budget reductions. Specifically for the UC system, as structured in 2012-13 state budget, there will be an additional $250 million “trigger” cut, plus a shortfall of $125.4 million from a negotiated tuition freeze, for a total deficit of $375.4 million. While not everyone has or will have a child looking to the CSU and UC system for higher education, it is important to remember that UC has also been serving our local community since 1913 through the UC Cooperative Extension system and its programs: 4-H youth development, master gardener, localized education and research on a broad range of agriculture and natural resource topics, among others. If Prop. 30 fails, impacts will be felt everywhere in UC. However, if it passes, most of us will only experience a quarter cent increase in sales tax for the next four years, but together we will help maintain our world-renowned public university system and will be able to provide educational opportunities for the next generation. As a parent I do not support Prop. 38. I ask you to consider the merits of Prop. 30 and join me in a yes vote. Yana Valachovic, Bayside   Editor: Thank you NCJ for your very well done comparison of Props. 30 and 38. I’d like to offer my two cents on two propositions on the ballot. As a teacher, mother and California citizen, I implore voters to use economic sense when making important election decisions. As an economics teacher, I teach students about the link between a country’s “human capital” — the skills, knowledge and experience that a population possesses — and economic growth. Why are some countries rich while others are poor? According to economists Eric Hanushek of Stanford’s Hoover Institution and Dean Jamison of UCSF, there’s “evidence of a clear, strong

8 North Coast Journal • Thursday, OCT. 25, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

relationship between cognitive skills and economic growth.” They say, “A highly skilled work force can raise economic growth by about two-thirds of a percentage point annually.” Please consider this. If Prop. 30 fails, education will be cut $6 billion. Schools in our state rank an abysmal 47th nationally in per pupil spending! We cannot maintain our standard of living if we continue to axe school funding. Vote yes on 30. Proposition 32 will also affect California’s economic future. If Prop. 32 passes, corporate interests will have more influence on policymakers while middle class public employees will be silenced. Prop. 32 is billed as “cutting the money tie between special interests and career politicians,” but is in fact a sham, funded by the very people who it exempts! In the age of Citizens United, billionaires don’t need more influence over our policies. Don’t let pro 32/anti 30 PACS use their “$11 million in secret money,” the largest in California political history (Associated Press reported in the TimesStandard, Oct. 20), prevail! Please vote for economic growth by supporting education and the middle class. Vote yes on 30 and no on 32.    Jennifer Dean-Mervinsky, Arcata   

Vote for Life

Editor: Thank you for the excellent explanation of Propositions 30 and 38. However I wonder if your readership understands the graver issues that Prop. 34 addresses? The Buddhist Peace Fellowship (Humboldt Chapter) strongly endorses Prop. 34 as a way to end the death penalty in California and probably reduce solitary confinement housing. Currently in California there are 709 men and 19 women on Death Row. The maintenance of the death penalty consumes $1 billion every five years due to the cost of solitary confinement and extra access to the legal system, with trials and appeal processes that average 25 years. It costs $90,000 more per prisoner per year to house inmates on Death Row instead of with the rest of the prison population. Even legislation that proposes to speed up the processing of Death Row inmates would cost taxpayers $95 million, according to separate reports by Loyola Law school professor Paula Mitchell and the California Commission of the Fair Administration of Justice. Apart from these overwhelming financial considerations there is the moral dilemma of society justifying revenge murders and “sanctioned torture” by endorsing the death penalty and long-term solitary confinement, respectively. A recent report by Amnesty International said the conditions in the SHU (Secure Housing Units) such as those in Pelican Bay and the similar AC (Adjustment Centers) such as those at San Quentin were “breaching international standards on humane treatment.” Also, ending the death penalty would bring California in line with the vast majority of developed nations who have already ended this horrific practice and would set a precedent for the other 32 states that still allow it. Please support ending the Death Penalty in California and vote yes on Prop. 34 on Tuesday, Nov. 6. Lynda McDevitt, Trinidad


Two Deaths, Many Questions

Top judge, defense attorney won’t say why, or how often, Humboldt releases prison-bound inmates By Carrie Peyton Dahlberg newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

S

corched by the attention that followed a slaying in Hoopa and a fatal hit-and-run crash, Humboldt County prosecutors have begun opposing every single request for release under a legal deal called a Cruz waiver. The temporary stance, which could last a few weeks, is aimed at giving prosecutors time to decide whether to set new standards for acquiescing to such releases, said District Attorney Paul Gallegos. No matter what the prosecutor wants, in most cases it’s up to a judge to decide whether to release a criminal who has already admitted guilt as part of a plea bargain. Presiding Judge Bruce Watson has declined repeated requests from the Journal to answer questions about Cruz waivers, pre-sentencing releases, plea agreements or any other court policies, including how the DA’s temporary stand is affecting the criminal courts. Gallegos’ new policy comes as a man named Jason Anthony Warren sits in San Quentin State Prison, serving time for two crimes after failing to keep his end of a bargain that would have reduced that to just one. Warren, 28, is a “person of interest” in the killing of Dorothy Ulrich in Hoopa, and the Sept. 27 crash that sent a Kia into three joggers, killing Suzanne Seemann, an HSU geography lecturer, and severely injuring two others (“Senseless Tragedy,” Oct. 4). He hasn’t been charged in either crime. But no one disagrees that he was out of custody at the time of both deaths only because he didn’t show up in court, as promised, on Sept. 7. Warren, who had a juvenile record and had already served prison time as an adult

for being a felon in possession of a weapon, was up in Hoopa in March when he had some kind of confrontation, according to court records. From there it’s murky. An alleged victim initially told Hoopa police that Warren robbed him of $20 at knifepoint and tried to stab him when he wouldn’t hand over the keys to his car. On top of that, two other people said Warren pointed a gun at them in Ray’s Food Place. Not so, Warren’s attorney said in court filings. There was no robbery, just an angry confrontation when Warren had words with a man who had texted his wife. And the two people who reportedly saw the gun at Ray’s were friends of the texter. And even so one of them later said he didn’t see any gun; it was just an argument. While all this was coming out, Warren was in Humboldt County jail, awaiting trial on charges of second degree robbery, assault with a deadly weapon and possession of a firearm by a felon, plus a bunch of enhancements that could have increased his prison time. Somewhere along the way, Gallegos said on the phone last week, prosecutors realized that the only charge they’d be likely to make stick at trial was the felon in possession of a firearm. From that perspective, the plea deal saved taxpayers the trouble and expense of a trial, and it avoided any risk of losing. Warren pleaded guilty on Aug. 24 to possession of the weapon, with the understanding that that would include an enhancement that would double his sentence. If both sides had agreed to it, the plea deal could have stopped right there, and

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continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 25, 2012

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Second Hand Sale Sat., Nov. 3 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Eureka Woman’s Club No Checks Please Cash or Credit Cards Only

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10 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 25, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Warren could have stayed in jail until his formal sentencing. The jail wasn’t particularly crowded the day Warren pleaded. The daily census emailed to the courts that morning showed 369 inmates, down from 384 at the beginning of the work week and comfortably below the 391 maximum capacity. But Warren or his attorney, Glenn Brown, apparently didn’t want Warren to stay in custody until sentencing. So the plea bargain got more complicated. Warren also pleaded guilty to assault with a deadly weapon, with the understanding that if he showed up as promised on Sept. 7, that charge would go away. If he didn’t show up, he’d be convicted of both crimes and he’d have a first “strike,” a step down the path toward lifetime incarceration. His sentence would increase from six years to just over nine years. With such serious consequences hanging over Warren’s head, said District Attorney Gallegos, “to us it was ‘Wow, only a fool would not show up’” for sentencing. Gallegos is one of the few people talking freely about the case. The echoing silence of other key players makes it virtually impossible to understand the context for the deal or how such waivers are commonly handled by Humboldt County courts. Have lots of criminals been getting out on Cruz waivers after pleading guilty? Or not so many? Are Cruz waiver releases only commonplace for people facing probation, who wouldn’t be looking at more time behind bars? Was the release of a man facing years in prison a standard practice or an aberration? It turns out, these are not easy questions to answer by looking anywhere else in California, because there are so many regional differences. “Almost anything associated with sentencing varies from county to county,” said Lisa Rodriguez, a San Diego County deputy district attorney who has taught seminars on sentencing. Both Scott Thorpe, chief executive officer for the California District Attorneys Association, and Gabriel Chin, a professor of law at UC Davis, concurred. Because prosecutors, defense lawyers and judges in any given county see each other over and over, they tend to evolve a usual way of doing things, all three said. What’s normal in one county might be atypical in another. Gallegos’ office files around 8,000 cases year, and he estimates that 90 to 95 percent of them end with some kind of plea bargain. Gallegos said he has no idea how many of those include some kind of pre-sentencing release after a guilty plea. Public Defender Kevin Robinson, whose office had a conflict and so didn’t defend Warren, said that his office almost always

requests such releases when the expected sentence is probation or when the client asks for one. But when the client is facing a prison sentence, Robinson said, he doesn’t necessarily expect the court to grant the request. He said he couldn’t recall — even in the roughest terms like more than half the time or less than half — how often prosecutors oppose these releases or judges reject them. The judge who approved Warren’s plea deal and release, Timothy P. Cissna, declined to speak either about this case or about general Humboldt County Superior Court procedures. Glenn Brown, the attorney who Humboldt County pays to defend indigent people when the public defender has a conflict, represented Jason Warren and negotiated his plea bargain. Why did Brown ask for this particular release? Brown has no comment, on this or anything else. He failed to return six phone calls from the Journal over three business days last week, and did not respond to a business card left at his office. When the Journal called again on Monday, the seventh call was finally returned — Brown had staffer phone back to say he won’t give an interview or answer a single question on any subject. Zack Curtis, the deputy district attorney who prosecuted Warren, said he can’t remember what rationale, if any, Brown offered for seeking the release. “It was something that came up on the eve of trial, so it was very much in the heat of battle,” Curtis said in a phone interview. And there’s nothing in writing explaining it. “This isn’t like a transactional practice where you throw down everything in writing. You can’t do that in criminal law. The caseload is too huge. You have to make snap judgments, and you do things as you go along.” For the prosecution, “just looking at it analytically, the decision was within the bounds of reason. It was what I would call a reasonable decision.” Curtis paused. He wanted to stress, again, that Warren hasn’t been charged with anything, and even if he had, he’s still innocent unless proven guilty. But at a minimum he definitely did not show up on Sept. 7 for sentencing. And in that context, Curtis said, “I took a chance on him and it failed.” By the end of September, two women were dead, under circumstances that are still being investigated. Gallegos said his deputy was shaken. “I’ve told him, ‘You did not kill these people,’” Gallegos said. “I can’t find fault with Zack. … I don’t find fault with his decisionmaking process.” Of course, Zack Curtis wasn’t the final decision maker. Judge Timothy Cissna was. And he’s among the many who just aren’t talking. ●


Blog Jammin’ MUSIC / BY ANDREW GOFF / OCT. 23, 1 P.M.

Reason No. 4,172 You Don’t Live in Santa Rosa Ah, Humboldt harmoniousness... If you needed another reminder of the immense talent we’re hoarding here behind the Redwood Curtain, give a click or seven to videographer Chuck Johnson’s recent Humboldt Live Sessions videos. For the last month or so, Johnson has been prolifically producing and uploading beautifully shot performances by local musical standouts. Bonus: the clips are shot in scenic, quirky Humboldt locales — for example, folk/punk group Gunsafe wails in the Ferndale Cemetery, guitar charmer Todd Krider finds Nirvana in the ruins behind Bayshore Mall and singer/ songwriter Caitlin Jemma commits armed robbery at Three Corners Market. Johnson, the man behind the lens, has been a musician and photographer for over 30 years. After purchasing his most recent camera, he started filming music at local festivals but wanted to take it a step further. “Tons of people were already photographing and taking video at these same events,” Johnson said via email. “I wanted something more personal that everyone else wasn’t already uploading to YouTube with their cell phones.” So the Humboldt Live Sessions were born. Johnson imposes a few rules on himself for the clips: One continuous camera shot. No microphones blocking faces. Good music. Unique locations. Hey, why hasn’t your band been Humboldt Live Session-ed yet? Chuck says he’s still looking for subjects. “I want to keep this going as long as there are performers and locations to put in front of my camera.” Enjoy this visual and aural celebration of Humboldt on our blog. ● GEOLOGY / BY ANDREW GOFF / OCT. 21, 1:47 P.M.

Great Blue Lake Quake! … measured a measley 3.5 on Richter’s ol’ scale according to the USGS. The quake was centered about three miles east of Blue Lake. Go on with your Sunday. ● COURTS / BY HEIDI WALTERS / OCT. 19, 5:26 P.M.

Proctor’s Bad Gamble Brandon Jon Proctor, 25, of Klamath, was sentenced Thursday in Humboldt County Superior Court for trying to stab a state fish and game warden on Sept. 25, reports the CaliforREAD FULL POSTS AND SEE PHOTOS AT

MCKINLEY CLIMBING, HALLOWEEN 2011.

PHOTO BY ANDREW GOFF.

nia Department of Fish and Game. According to the news release, Warden Paul Weldon was out in Orick investigating an unrelated elk poaching when “a frantic couple with a flat tire” flagged him down. The motorists pointed to Proctor and shouted that Proctor had slashed their tire with a knife. As Weldon stepped into help, Proctor lunged for him with the hunting knife. Weldon disarmed and arrested him. The motorists told Weldon that Proctor threatened them with the knife. Proctor had a prior felony conviction for assault. He’s been sentenced to two years. ● ELECTIONS / BY CARRIE PEYTON DAHLBERG / OCT. 19, 4:54 P.M.

Sleaze Starts Sizzlin’ Does Humboldt know its sleaze, or what? The ink was barely dry on our Sleazy Campaign Ad contest when the first contender was dropped off at our office, courtesy of Brian Connors of Eureka. “Sacramento is Broken,” it warns, but “We can Fix It.” That would be by voting down the extra money Gov. Brown is pleading for to stop huge “trigger” cuts, and by voting to near-muzzle unions. Brian was at work when we got back in touch, so he couldn’t take time to explain all the sleazy points he saw in this four-page mailer. But he is hardly alone in calling out some of the lies being repeated by something called the Small Business Action Committee. Check out this Sacramento Bee editorial, which begins: “Supporters of Proposition 32 claim that their campaign finance initiative ‘cuts the money tie between special interests and politicians.’ It’s a lie. And an $11 million donation from a shadowy Arizona nonprofit illustrates why. Proposition 32 would ban unions and corporations from using automatic paycheck deductions to raise money for political purposes. While that might sound like a balanced way to blunt big-money politics, this initiative would hit labor unions disproportionately. Corporate interests are increasingly dumping money into independent expenditure campaigns, which Proposition 32 would not touch. Nor would Proposition 32 stop scam nonprofits from influencing elections. Indeed, this initiative is now the beneficiary of one.” And then there’s this little bit of factchecking from the San Jose Mercury News, which tackles a TV ad but debunks the same phony claim this mailer makes about Proposition 30: “Reality Check: Anti-Prop. 30 ad is misleading because it implies it won’t help schools.” ●

www.northcoastjournal.com/blogthing

PREPAREDNESS / BY ANDREW GOFF / OCT. 18, 11:13 A.M.

Cops for Plaza Halloween The art of McKinley climbing is in serious jeopardy. Arcata Plaza frequenters will recall the increased law enforcement presence this past New Year’s Eve when compared with previous years. Expect more of that. A press release issued today by the Arcata Police Department indicates that that approach to curbing the chaos will now extend to Halloween. It said in part: “Due to the damage and criminal misconduct that occurred on the Arcata Plaza last Halloween, the Arcata Police Department has joined with other local law enforcement agencies to significantly increase police presence on the Plaza during Halloween.” And just to make everything clear: “In order to prevent graffiti vandalism, public urination, indecent exposure, and the illegal climbing of the McKinley statue, the center of the Plaza will be cordoned off. Entry into the center area will be strictly prohibited. The consumption of alcohol and the possession of glass containers are prohibited and will result in citation or arrest. The discharging of fireworks in or near a crowd of people is a felony offense and will result in immediate arrest. All laws will be strictly enforced.” The full release is on our website. ● BEER / BY ANDREW GOFF / OCT. 16, 2:02 P.M.

Humboldt Beer “Great” File this away in the tell-us-somethingwe-don’t-know drawer: Humboldt-produced beer is top shelf, kids. And now it’s official (again). At last weekend’s annual Great American Beer Festival — the Academy Awards of brewin’ — Mad River Brewing Co. bested 67 other microbrew entries to take home ze Gold in the “Golden and Blonde Ale” category with its Humboldt-approved Steelhead Extra Pale Ale. BOOM! This is the second time Steelhead has earned the honor, having first done so back in 2008. Cheers, crew! Ah! But MRB was not alone among local award winners. Fortuna’s Eel River Brewing Co. took home the silver in the “Aged Beer” category for its 2004 Triple Exultation. Here’s to aging gracefully. Well done. So drink up, HumCo. You’s gots good brews. ●

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11


‘Don’t Bother Coming In’ Why is the county paying employees hundreds of thousands of dollars to stay home? By Ryan Burns

I

n 2011 and the first half of 2012, Humboldt County spent more than $700,000 on salaries and benefits for people who weren’t coming to work — they were on paid administrative leave. Department heads order these leaves to protect employee rights while an investigation is conducted. That can happen for a variety of reasons: a sheriff’s deputy involved in a shooting, a manager accused of sexual harassment or a victim of alleged misconduct by fellow employees, for example. Sometimes the accusations have merit; other times they’re baseless. And not every employee placed on investigative leave is suspected of wrongdoing. But before any employee can be disciplined, a thorough investigation must be conducted, during which employees get their paychecks and accrue benefits as usual. This is the law for public employees in California, and the system works the same way in every county. But not every county puts as many people on leave — or keeps them there for as long — as Humboldt County has over the past two years. During the 18 months from the start of last year through June 30 of this year, Humboldt placed two dozen workers on paid administrative leave for two weeks or longer — some of them much longer. All but four of those 24 were on leave for more than three months. If you look beyond that 18-month window you’ll find some truly extended leaves. Three women employed in the county’s social services department haven’t gone to work since December 2011, though that hasn’t kept them from earning, cumulatively, nearly $100,000 in salaries and benefits. Another employee, a government aid eligibility worker named Dawn Schultheis Musselman, was paid to stay home for more than two years. Actually, “stay home” isn’t quite accurate. “I was out partying, having a good time,” she told the Journal. Before her leave ended, Musselman had moved with her two sons to San Diego, where she

“It created so much stress and anxiety in my life that I just wanted a resolution.” — Katie Koopman

now lives and collects unemployment. Her last paycheck arrived in March, by which time she’d collected $51.499.84 in salary plus nearly $22,000 worth of benefits without showing up for a single day of work. All this at a time when the county is struggling under major budget constraints — cutting positions, maintaining hiring freezes and denying raises to minimum-wage workers. A Humboldt County official argues that these long leaves are

12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 25, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


the inevitable result of some difficult balancing acts — discipline versus due process; union demands versus shrinking budgets; the cost of thorough investigations versus the cost of sloppy, inconclusive ones. But former employees and their union rep say the county is wasting their time, and our money. Much of the information in this story was the result of a Public Records Act request, which at first was granted only partially. County staff initially refused to release the names of almost everyone who’d been placed on administrative leave. The county’s legal counsel argued that releasing those names “would constitute an unwarranted invasion of privacy.” Only after the Journal hired an attorney to explain state law did the county relent. California’s Supreme Court holds that names and salaries of public employees are public information, part of the state’s “strong public policy supporting transparency in government.” In that spirit of transparency, we take a closer look at the people and departments most affected by these long absences, and the process that’s causing them.

with you,” Koopman recalled in a recent interview. Her coworker and friend, Dawn Shultheis Musselman, an eligibility worker 2, was placed on leave that same morning. Musselman said she was called into her boss’s office, informed that she was being placed on leave and ushered out of the building. “I couldn’t even go back to my desk,” she said. Neither woman knew why they were being placed on leave, and they didn’t hear anything for weeks, they said. Eventually they learned that Koopman was being accused of interfering with the interview of a man who lived with her. He’d come in to apply for social services and, during an intake interview being conducted by Musselman, Koopman had emerged from her office — just to say hi, she said, though the county was accusing her of preferential treatment. Both women denied any wrongdoing. They looked to their union representative to handle negotiations with the county. The county hired an outside investigator named Cindy Manos who took months to contact the women, they said. After an interview with Koopman, it emerged that employManos had a conflict of interest in the case. ees placed on leave, three quarters were, (She knew Koopman’s ex-boyfriend, who or remain, employed in the Health and had a tangential connection to the case.) Human Services department, which acSo the county hired another investigator, counts for just over half of the county’s Diane Davis, who’s based in Redding. More total workforce. Ten of the 24 (42 percent) months went by without contact. came from the social services branch, Musselman didn’t mind the delay. “Oh, which accounts for less than a quarter of I was having a blast,” she said. She loved the county workforce. knowing that she was getting paid not Katie Koopman worked in that branch to work, and even accruing benefits. “I for more than a decade. In early 2010 she accrued sick leave. I accrued everything — was a lead eligibility worker managing a my retirement, my health benefits — evcomplex caseload of clients who were on erything was paid.” But for Koopman, the wait was excruciating. “It created so much stress and anxiety in my life that I just wanted a resolution,” she — Dawn Shultheis Musselman said. That’s a much more or applying for public assistance programs typical response, according to Harriet such as Medi-Cal and food stamps. She Lawlor, the local rep of Koopman and Muswas, by her own account, a star employee. selman’s union, the American Federation Her most recent performance review, of State, County and Municipal Employwhich she showed to the Journal, had ees (AFSCME). “The whole time you’re on nothing but positive things to say. So she administrative leave, you’re thinking that was shocked on the morning of Friday Feb. someone believes you’ve done something 5, 2010, when she was unexpectedly placed [wrong], whether or not you’ve done it,” on administrative leave. Lawlor said. “It’s terrifying. And your in“It really blindsided me, to be honest come relies on it.” continued on page 15

Of the two dozen

“Oh, I was having a blast. I accrued sick leave. I accrued everything — my retirement, my health benefits — everything was paid.”

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continued from page 13 Diane Davis delivered her completed investigation of Koopman to the county on Jan. 4, 2011, 11 months after Koopman had been placed on leave. Davis submitted a three-ring binder containing a 35-page report along with transcripts of interviews with 15 of Koopman’s coworkers. This might seem like an exhaustive amount of information, yet Koopman wasn’t contacted for another four months. On May 3, Health and Human Services Director Phillip Crandall sent her a letter notifying her that he intended to fire her for committing fraud. She vehemently denied the allegations and considered appealing her case to the state but ultimately decided that the fight wasn’t worth the hassle and anxiety, she said. She resigned on May 27, one year, three months and three weeks since she’d last been to work. In that time she made more than $73,000 in salary and benefits. Since resigning she’s been collecting unemployment. Musselman’s case is even more confounding. The county didn’t resolve her investigation until the following October. According to both Musselman and Lawlor, the county told her to come back to work. But by that point, she’d decided that she didn’t really want to work for the county anymore. And the county didn’t really want her back, either, she said. During her five-year employment she’d filed grievances against a couple of coworkers and didn’t get along with all of her superiors. As she put it, “There was a handful of us at work that weren’t butt-kissers, and I’m one of them.” So what did she do? She talked turkey — tried to get the county to keep paying her salary in exchange for not coming back to work. “I told ’em to pay me for a year. They said, ‘You’re crazy.’ They came back with two months, and then we bartered. The final decision was five months.” Musselman forwarded the Journal a copy of the settlement agreement between AFSCME (her union) and the county. The agreement, which was emailed to

Humboldt County Paid Administrative Leave The county has paid these people to stay home while it investigates whether they are victims of workplace wrongdoing or may have done something wrong themselves. (The paid leaves aren’t discipline and do not imply any guilt.) Employee Jeannie Duncan Dawn Shultheis Musselman

Joseph Marsh Gordon Glynn Mari Glynn Jacquelyn Hulsey Colleen Proctor Cynthia Peterson Leslie Stadler Katherine Toler Katie Koopman Robert Shoop Valeria Thompson Shannon Noonan James May Tammy Cowan Michael Pittman [name redacted]** Gladys Panama Judy Wilson Shelly Milford Joy Sabia [name redacted]** William Wren

Position DA’s legal office mgr. Eligibility worker II Sheriff’s deputy Deputy public guardian Mental health case mgr. Airport manager Public health nurse Eligibility worker III Eligibility worker III Psych nurse Eligibility worker III Activity therapist Vocational assistant Office assistant II Vocational assistant Vocational assistant Building maint. custodian Sheriff’s deputy Fiscal assistant II Fiscal assistant II Vocational assistant Psych nurse Social worker IV Building maint. custodian

Start of Leave

End of Leave

5/2/2011 ongoing 2/5/2010 3/21/2012 dates redacted 1/5/2011 10/13/2011 1/5/2011 10/13/2011 10/3/2011 1/28/2012 6/16/2011 11/2/2011 4/29/2011 10/5/2011 4/29/2011 10/17/2011 8/15/2011 10/31/2011 2/5/2010 5/27/2011 4/8/2011 8/8/2011 12/12/2011 ongoing 12/12/2011 ongoing 5/16/2011 10/5/2011 12/12/2011 ongoing 12/10/2010 3/28/2011 dates redacted 5/3/2011 8/1/2011 4/29/2011 8/1/2011 3/1/2012 ongoing 5/31/2012 ongoing 7/1/2011 8/3/2011 4/16/2012 4/30/2012

Still employed with county?

Yes No No No No Yes No No Yes No No No Yes Yes No Yes No redacted Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes TOTAL:

* SALARY AND BENEFIT NUMBERS FOR LEAVES DURING 1/1/11 THROUGH 6/30/12 ONLY. ** THE COUNTY HAS WITHHELD THESE TWO NAMES CITING NUMEROUS GOVERNMENT CODES, INCLUDING ONES WHICH IMPLIED PEACE OFFICERS WERE INVOLVED. THE JOURNAL IS CONTINUING TO INVESTIGATE.

her on Oct. 25, 2011, says that in exchange for an irrevocable letter of resignation submitted on or before Oct. 28, 2011, “Ms. Musselman will remain on full pay status until 5 p.m. March 21, 2012, at which time the employee will be separated from County service.” Musselman still can’t believe the county agreed to it. “They continued to pay me, full pay, for an additional five months,” she marveled. By the end of her two-plus years on leave she’d collected more than $127,000 in salary and benefits. The county’s investigations into Koopman

and Musselman cost an additional $14,684, bringing the total taxpayer-funded expense of the duo’s time off to more than $200,000. “The amount of money that they spent just on the two of us was obscene,” Koopman said.

As Humboldt County’s

director of human resources, Dan Fulks was saddled with the unenviable task of explaining the nuances of administrative leave without addressing any specific cases. Legally he’s not allowed to talk

Salary

During Leave*

$77,744.34 $51,499.84 $45,304.70 $25,252.48 $22,510.72 $24,119.11 $28,792.00 $19,960.32 $21,373.44 $17,032.96 $18,370.56 $14,743.84 $14,219.92 $14,345.76 $11,734.08 $12,999.52 $12,383.80 $11,331.95 $7,659.36 $9,361.44 $6,890.16 $6,087.84 $5,345.20 $1,245.69 $48,0345.03

Benefits

During Leave*

$27,415.25 $21,858.77 $17,139.30 $32,562.35 $21,291.28 $8,651.32 $2,816.00 $11,523.31 $9,739.06 $10,373.04 $4,074.89 $6,424.16 $6,899.75 $5,910.09 $7,454.78 $5,750.48 $3,368.99 $4,077.78 $5,842.77 $3,676.44 $3,001.60 $2,519.07 $1,327.18 $2,423.54 $22,5761.20

Total Salary and Benefits During Leave*

$105,159.59 $73,358.61 $62,480.00 $57,814.83 $43,802.00 $32,770.43 $31,608.00 $31,483.63 $31,112.50 $27,406.00 $22,445.45 $21,168.00 $21,119.67 $20,255.85 $19,188.86 $18,750.00 $15,752.79 $15,409.73 $13,142.13 $13,037.88 $9,891.76 $8,606.91 $6,672.38 $3,699.23 $70,6106.23

about individual employees, and he’s a disciplined adherent to this policy: He’s very practiced at saying, “That’s a personnel matter. I can’t comment.” But it’s easy to draw at least one distinction between private- and public-sector employees in California. In the private sector you can be fired with little fanfare. If you work for the government, on the other hand, you have “Skelly rights.” In 1975, the California Supreme Court ruled in Skelly vs. State Personnel Board that before being disciplined, a public emcontinued on next page

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continued from previous page ployee has a right to know what’s being alleged, confront his or her accusers and respond to the charges. “The only way to protect the legal rights of the county as well as the employee is to place ’em on paid administrative leave, because that’s not disciplinary,” Fulks explained. Next, the county has to investigate, either with its own staff or, increasingly, due to staffing cuts, by hiring an outside investigator. If wrongdoing is discovered then the county has to build a solid case against the employee, which can get complicated, Fulks said. Investigations rarely lead where he expects them to. “It’s very common that you start an investigation into employee A, and then you find you’re not only talking about employee A but you’re talking about employee B, C, D and F. Or other conduct comes out.” Once an employee has been disciplined, he or she has five days to appeal, which works like this: Each side, the employer and the union, selects a representative. Those representatives choose from a list of five possible arbitrators provided by the State Mediation and Conciliation Service. The arbitrator then considers the evidence and makes a binding decision. When Fulks was first hired by the county in June 2010, at least three disciplinary actions were pending, he said. Two of those would have been Musselman’s and Koopman’s. Fulks suggested that the turnover in his position (his predecessor was only there for a few months), could have been partly responsible for their long leaves. But he also feels that it has gotten progressively more difficult for employers to win in the arbitration process. He characterized the county’s position as similar to prosecutors building a court case: A lot of evidence must be gathered. “That’s what takes time,” he said. Every time the county disciplines an employee it must cite what rules were broken, outline the behavior that violated those rules and provide evidence. Arbitrators, he said, are supposed to side with whichever party has a preponderance of evidence in its favor, but in his opinion they treat

the process more like a criminal hearing, where even a reasonable doubt is enough to acquit. “They hold us to a standard that is not reasonable.” Lawlor, the union rep, laughed when she heard that. “It’s always weighted in management’s favor,” she countered. Ultimately, Fulks said that without going into detail on individual investigations, he couldn’t explain why Humboldt County has been placing more people on leave, and leaving them there longer, than other counties with similar populations. Here’s the data we tracked down that revealed that fact. According to the U.S. Census, Humboldt County’s 2010 population was 134,623. Among the 24 administrative leaves of two weeks or more last year and the first half of this year, the average lasted more than seven months. Compare that to the following counties: In Sutter County (population 94,737), just five people were placed on leave during the same timeframe. The average lasted 26 calendar days; the longest, 39 days. When told that Humboldt County had employees out for more than a year, Sutter County Personnel Assistant Christine Luigard was taken aback. “With pay?” she asked. “Oh, no, that’s way too long.” Nevada County (population 98,764) placed almost as many people on leaves of two weeks or longer (20) as Humboldt, but only one was kept off work for more than three months. The average was less than eight weeks. Kings County (population 152,982) placed 15 workers on leave for two weeks or more, with the average lasting less than eight weeks. And Napa County (population 136,484) placed just six employees on leaves of two weeks or more, with the average lasting just over three weeks. Nonetheless, Napa County Human Resources Director Suzanne Mason took Humboldt County’s statistics in stride, saying it’s not possible to determine what’s normal and what’s unreasonable without knowing more about the individual cases. When an employee is charged with a crime, for example, the employer often has to wait for the

Before being disciplined, a public employee has a right to know what’s being alleged, confront his or her accusers and respond to the charges.


criminal justice process. Some investigations are more complex than others, and when staff is conducting the investigation it usually takes longer. “There are so many variables,” Mason said. “I don’t know how you can make a generalization.”

With that in mind, let’s

look at a few other examples here in Humboldt County. Several did involve criminal charges, including the case of Humboldt County Sheriff’s Deputy Joseph Marsh. On the Fourth of July 2010, Marsh enlisted the help of a friend’s 10-year-old daughter to hold an illegal Roman candle firework. It exploded in their hands, injuring Marsh and blowing off the fingers on the girl’s right hand, leaving just the pinkie. After the incident, Marsh was kept on paid administrative leave for more than 6½ months, costing taxpayers $62,480. He pleaded no contest to misdemeanor child endangerment last September and is no longer employed with the county. Last January, the Humboldt County Drug Task Force and California Department of Justice were wrapping up a major marijuana trafficking investigation. They’d been targeting a Eureka couple named Brandon and Christina Savio. On Jan. 2, they pulled Brandon over near Benbow and arrested him. Meanwhile, agents monitoring the Savios’ Eureka house saw a neighbor walk in and out several times, hauling out an armload with each trip. This neighbor proved to be Gordon Glynn, then a deputy public guardian in the county’s Health and Human Services Department. His wife, Mari, was a mental health case manager in the same department. Officers searched their house and discovered that the Glynns, who’d been tipped off to Brandon Savio’s arrest by his wife, were hiding some of their neighbors’ belongings — two pounds of processed marijuana, four firearms and a large sum of money, according to a press release issued

the following day. Officers also found that the Glynns had a growing operation of their own, with more than 500 marijuana plants, processed bud, packing materials, more firearms and more money. The Glynns were placed on administrative leave the following Monday. They remained on paid leave for nine months and a week, earning more than $100,000 in salaries and benefits. Four months after their leaves ended, Gordon Glynn was sentenced to two years’ probation and the charges against Mari Glynn were dismissed. Neither is currently employed by the county. Other cases remain a mystery. Humboldt County Airport Manager Jacquelyn Hulsey, for example, was placed on administrative leave from Oct. 3, 2011, through Jan. 28, 2012, and despite numerous inquiries the Journal couldn’t find out why (“Where’s the Airport Manager,” Dec. 22, 2011). Hulsey’s job performance has been criticized by former employees, business leaders and former members of the county’s Aviation Advisory Committee. Following an investigation, the National Transportation Safety Board blamed a miscommunication between Hulsey and one of her employees for causing a 12-hour delay in search-andrescue efforts after a plane crashed off the coast of Trinidad in March 2009. The bodies of the two men on board that plane were never recovered (“The Plane That Wasn’t There,” Dec. 17, 2009). Hulsey earned $32,770 in salary and benefits while on leave. She remains employed with the county. As mentioned above, not everyone who has been placed on leave is suspected of misconduct. Last year, Jeannie Duncan, a legal business manager in the District Attorney’s Office, filed a claim for damages against the county, alleging that she was the victim of retaliation after complaining of sexual harassment and continued on next page

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Ultimately, Fulks said that without going into detail on individual investigations, he couldn’t explain why Humboldt County has been placing more people on leave, and leaving them there longer, than other counties with similar populations.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 25, 2012

17


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continued from previous page office misconduct, including “unlawful polygraph practices” and improper use of office resources and employee time for DA Paul Gallegos’ re-election campaign. The county has yet to resolve Duncan’s claims. She’s been on leave for almost a year and a half, collecting $134,000 in salary and benefits. No one the Journal spoke with could explain why the social services office has been placing more employees on leave than any other in the county. We sent an email through a county public information officer asking if Katherine Young, the county’s director of social services, could explain why 42 percent of employees placed on leave came from her branch. She sent a reply through the same public information officer, saying only, “Careful adherence to the terms of the MOU,” referring to the memorandum of understanding that dictates contract conditions that the county has to follow. But since the MOU applies to all county departments, this doesn’t really answer the question. We also asked to speak with DHHS Director Phillip Crandall but were referred back to Dan Fulks, the HR director. Fulks said that the appeal process for disciplinary actions is different for employees in social services and child support services, under rules that apply statewide. Rather than being referred to an arbitrator, appeals from these two groups of employees are sent to an administrative law judge from the state’s department of personnel, aka CalHR. Fulks actually prefers dealing with administrative law judges. “I have much more objective decisions come from the ALJs,” he said. He didn’t indicate that this process should take any longer than arbitration. On Dec. 13, 2011, three social services employees — former colleagues of Koopman and Musselman — were placed on administrative leave. One of them was

18 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 25, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

office assistant Shannon Noonan, who, six months later, was arrested at her home by the Eureka Police Department. Officers were responding to reports that she was selling methamphetamine, and a search of the house turned up an ounce of crystal meth hidden in Noonan’s bedroom as well as bags and digital gram scales, according to the EPD. Koopman and Musselman heard through the grapevine about Noonan’s arrest. Neither was exactly friends with Noonan (Musselman said Noonan once made false allegations against her). They knew she’d been on administrative leave, and they were curious to see what happened next, as were their friends. “Everybody was like, ‘Well, it’s a slam dunk. They’ve got to fire her now,’” Koopman recalled. But the county didn’t fire her. Not yet, anyway. She remains on leave, along with the two coworkers who were sent home the same day. “She’s still getting paid,” Koopman remarked. It has been four months since her arrest. Lawlor, the union rep, said she appreciates that social services employees deal with sensitive issues like child protection and welfare, which makes it all the more important to ensure that these workers are trustworthy and competent. The county, she said, has “an obligation to make sure that all of the actions of the workers are above board. But it shouldn’t take ’em a year to do it.” The money that the county spent paying people not to work during the 18-month stretch we examined — $706,106.23 — could have paid the salaries of 10 fulltime sheriff’s deputies over the same time period. Or seven public health nurses. Or 17 child care workers. Last month, the county refused to grant a raise of 75 cents per hour to local in-home support services workers, who currently make minimum wage ($8 per

hour) and receive no benefits, insurance, pension or sick time while caring for the community’s elderly, disabled and poor. County officials, including DHHS Director Crandall, said the county was under too much financial pressure to grant the raise, which, according to the county’s own estimates, would cost $245,025 annually. If the county granted the workers’ request for another raise the following year — to $9.50 per hour — it would cost $490,051 annually. An independent factfinding report looked into the matter and concluded that “the County clearly has the ability to pay the modest increases sought.” But in a closed session, the Board of Supervisors rejected the raise anyway. If you do the math you’ll see that, for less than the county spent paying a few employees not to work, it could have given a raise of at least a dollar per hour to all 1,450 of the county’s in-home support services workers, who currently make sub-poverty wages. But according to Fulks, this is just the way the system works. A report of wrongdoing comes in, and the county has a legal obligation to look into it. That takes time. “When I see a violation of the rules, I’m going to move forward and investigate it,” he said. “And the reason I do that is to protect the taxpayers’ dollars.” But what about Koopman and Musselman, whose case dragged on for years and cost taxpayers $200,000? “Sounds like an important case then, doesn’t it?” he responded. Asked to elaborate, he just repeated himself. “Sounds like an important case then, doesn’t it?” So, are huge expenses inevitable? “I would love to be able to tell you, ‘No, it’s not inevitable,’” Fulks said. “But the answer, I think, [is that] there will be a certain amount of paid administrative leaves that go into the future.” Especially here in Humboldt County. l


GET OUT!

Patricia Cheng Terry paddles with Tim Haywood. Photo by Amy Cirincioni

Stand Up and Paddle By Amy Cirincione

outdoors@northcoastjournal.com

I

t’s raining again. After a glorious September and early October, the fog is rolling in and the days of peeka-boo sunshine are back. For me, this means my running season is over, and my climbing is going mostly indoors. But there are still a few ways to enjoy Humboldt that do not include whining about the weather. Stand-up paddle boarding is my current favorite. I love being close to the water, controlling my speed as I glide quietly across the surface. I also love that the learning curve is gentle. Stand-up paddle boarding emerged in the 1950s as a hobby for Waikiki beach boys, men who made their living teaching surfing and canoeing to tourists. The beach boys stood on long boards and used outrigger paddles to reach distant surf break, and to maneuver through small waves during beginner surf lessons.  Modern day paddle boarding was popularized in the 2000s by Laird Hamilton, Dave Kalama and other pro surfers in Hawaii. They were looking for a way to stay in shape when the surf was low, and the “retro” style of paddle boarding appealed to them. In the last few years, stand-up paddle boarding has made its way behind the redwood curtain, and the sport is perfectly suited for our waters. Stand-up paddle boarding is not a difficult sport to learn, and it’s a fantastic way to explore the bays and lagoons of Humboldt. All you really need is a decent sense of balance in order to stand on the board. If you’re lacking even in that department, you can always paddle from

your knees and gradually work your way up to the “stand up” part. The paddling itself doesn’t require much strength, just a willingness to sink into the hips and pull the long paddle through the water using not just your arms but the strength in your back and abdominal muscles. You can rent the necessary equipment (board, paddle, wet suit, life jacket) from local outfitters and put in from any of the public docks in Humboldt Bay or from the beaches of Trinidad Bay, Big Lagoon or Mad River Beach (to name a few).  Below are brief profiles of my favorite spots. Each has its own unique character and sights, and offers relatively flat water for beginners. Humboldt Bay (Woodley Island Marina) The easiest place to put in on the bay is from the Woodley Island Marina. The first dock (closest to the parking lot and the entrance to the marina) is for public access and offers the most convenient spot for unloading gear and starting your paddle. From the dock, you can paddle west around the tip of Woodley Island (in the direction of the giant fisherman statue) and then through the waters that separate Woodley and Indian islands.  During the fall, these waters are full of seals, my personal favorite marine mammal. In the spring you can often spot baby seals napping on the beaches of both islands, waiting for their mothers to return from fishing. If you spot a seal, be sure to stay at least 100 feet away to keep from startling it. And don’t be surprised if one or more seem to be following you. If you set out from the marina about

an hour before high tide, the current will be with you as you paddle out to Indian island. If you take time to explore, you should be ready to return to the marina just as the tide is turning. It’s possible to circumvent Indian Island or paddle through its sloughs, but save those adventures until you’re familiar with both the tide tables and your paddle board skills. Until then, an out and back will afford you lots of fun wildlife views and a deep appreciation for the bay. For this trip, you can rent gear at Pacific Outfitters or book a lesson and guided trip from Tim Haywood at All Out SUP (www. alloutsup.com). Tim’s trips and lessons include gear rental, except for wetsuits. Big Lagoon Big Lagoon is my favorite water in Humboldt. During the summer, I like to run on the spit and then swim in the lagoon, where the waters are just warm enough to make for a non-frigid swimming experience. During the fall, you’re better off on top of the water. Put in at the county boat ramp. Paddle straight out toward the end of the sand spit. The water is flat and relatively sheltered from wind. You can paddle the entire 3.5 miles to the end of the spit (7 miles round trip), or turn around at any point for a shorter loop. The water is crystal clear during the summer, and then increasingly brackish through the winter.  At some point during the winter, the lagoon waters will breach the spit and drain out. Paddle this route while you can!  If you’re interested in doing more exploring in this area, you can also head up Maple Creek (under the bridge on the right).  Depending on how soon you go, there should be enough water in the main channel to paddle about a half mile up this quiet, scenic creek. If you’re very lucky, you’ll even see some otters, my second favorite marine mammal. This is about a three-mile round trip. For this trip, you can rent gear or book lessons and guided trips from Marna Powell at Kayak Zaks (www.kayakzak.com).  And More If these spots have piqued your interest, there is more exploring to be done. Trinidad Bay’s waters are still relatively flat, but as you paddle out into the more open water from the beach, the stakes get higher. If you trust your balance, have a good wetsuit and are prepared to swim a bit, it’s time to take the bay. If you’re interested in smaller water but more wildlife, the Hookton Slough is your best bet. The boat ramp at the slough is a gentle put-in that sets you up to explore the south bay. But be sure to check your tide tables lest you get thoroughly stuck in the mud. l

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Raising the Dead Crooked Jades, Fishtank, Nitty Gritty, Bigmouth, Lukas and lots of All Hallows events By Bob Doran

bobdoran@northcoastjournal.com

H

umboldt is a place where dayto-day fashion statements, say wearing kitty ears and a tutu when you go to the store, make it seem like it could be Halloween year ’round. But toward the end of October the admonition to dress up for seasonal events ramps up. This year, with All Hallows Eve falling on a Wednesday, it’s extended. Watch for zombies. But first let’s look at some none-Halloween-related music events. The Arcata Playhouse has back-to-back shows this weekend featuring cuttingedge neo-traditional touring bands. Saturday it’s San Francisco’s Crooked Jades, a band on a self-declared mission “to reinvent old-world music for a modern age, pushing boundaries and blurring categories.” Founders Jeff Kazor and Lisa Berman revive the dark and hypnotic sounds of what Kazor calls “pre-radio music,” aka old time, from a 21st century perspective using the expected guitars, ukes and banjos but adding harmonium and other unusual sounds. The Jade’s latest project/ CD, Bright Land, found the band creating a new old time score for a modern dance piece by the Kate Wear Company. Sunday, L.A.-based Fishtank Ensemble returns to the Playhouse with more of its “world class world music,” an amalgam defined by its worldly membership. French fiddler Fabrice Martinez and operatrained vocalist Ursula Knudson met Serbian standup bassist Djordje Stijepovic while traveling in Eastern Europe in a real gypsy caravan. Guitarist Doug Smolens adds a touch of flamenco. The title of the ensemble’s album-in-progress, Edge of the World, pretty much defines the Fishtank style. The SoCal country-folk-rockers The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band were ahead of their time melding old time tunes with rock back in the ’60s. The band convinced country icons including Maybelle Carter, Earl Scruggs, Roy Acuff, Merle Travis and Doc Watson to play on its groundbreaking 1972 album Will the Circle Be Unbroken. NGDB is still at it and will be at Cher-Ae

Heights Saturday to play a sold out show. Redwood Jazz Alliance continues its season of modern jazz with Chris Lightcap’s Bigmouth playing Tuesday in HSU’s Fulkerson Recital Hall. In 2011 Chamber Music America awarded Lightcap a “New Jazz Works” commission grant; Bigmouth premiers the new piece at the Earshot Festival in Seattle this weekend, just before coming here. Bassist Lightcap fronts the jazz quintet with Tony Malaby and Anthony Bishop on tenor saxes, keyboardist Matt Mitchell and drummer Ches Smith. Lukas Nelson will probably always be referred to as Willie’s son, but he’s making a name for himself with his band Promise of The Real, lately playing the late night talk shows (Leno, Letterman, Kimmel) as well as the Bridge School Benefit and Farm Aid. The Trouble opens for Nelson’s Friday night show at Humboldt Brews. (The Trouble also plays a Halloween show at the Eureka Inn on Wednesday, the real All Hallows Eve, with quirky songwriter John Ludington.) Speaking of country icon relations, Lucky Tubb, great nephew of Ernest Tubb, plays with his honky tonk country band The Modern Day Troubadors on Saturday night at the Riverwood Inn. (He’s good.) Six Rivers Brewery has The Pine Box Boys Saturday night playing bloody alt. country murder ballads (seasonally appropriate). Friday you have an Arcata reggae collision: Ex-locals Synrgy (now based in Ashland) are at the Jambalaya joined by the Hawaiian band Guidance and locals Elephant Dub Band. They’re up against a much bigger show at Arcata Theatre Lounge with Bermudan reggae crossover star Collie Buddz and his trio New Kingston. DJ Selecta Prime opens. Keyboard wizard Brian “Swiz” Swislow celebrates his birthday Sunday at the Red Fox Tavern (where he’s one of the owners) doing what he loves best: playing music with his friends. Among them: The Speakeasy Saints, Naive Melodies, Vidagua, Moo-Got-2 with Pete Ciotti on drums, DJ Just One and Swizlo’s own Acid Jazz


Mexican Day of the Dead tableaux photo by Bob Doran

Experiment with members from a bunch of local bands. It’s not a costume party. “You do not need to dress up,” says Swiz, “but ties are required for women and men alike; wear your coolest tie!” With the close ties between Burning Man and EDM, costumes are not unusual at electronica shows like World Famous’ dance concert Thursday at the Arcata Theatre Lounge with Portland soundsmith Eprom (who appropriately records for Frite Nite) plus Slugabed from England, KiloWatts and MikeyDataBlend. On Halloween proper, next Wednesday, World Famous returns to ATL with Salva, owner of Frite Nite, plus Russ Liquid, Clicks and Whistles and Thriftworks. Travis Turner, who says he’d like to divert people from the Arcata Plaza, helped organize an all night afterparty, Dawn of the Bass, at the Arcata Flake Board Plant (4700 West End Road) with a mess of local EDM artists. Wednesday the 31st, the Red Fox features an ad hoc band, Black Alice, that only plays on Halloween and only plays Alice Cooper and Black Sabbath covers. The shifting lineup: Terry Henkel from Triple Junction handles lead vocals on the Cooper portion and bashes drums on the Sabbath tunes. Tyler Lusk of Eyes Anonymous plays Alice drums. Martian Bishop from Eyes switches from guitar on Alice songs to lead vocals on Sabbath. Rico Von Rabenau from Triple Junction and Eyes Anonymous plays guitar and keys throughout. Bassist for both sections is John Murdoch from Speakeasy Saints, Triple Junction, etc. He’s also in Cell, which opens the show. Gruesome theatrics and props: check. Hard rock: double check. Elsewhere on Wednesday, Humboldt Brews has a Halloween party with looping guitarist/soul singer Zach Deputy. The Jambalaya has Bay Area psych band Monophonics plus DJ Rickshaw. Jello wrestling and comedy? Why not? Sherae O’Shaughnessy from BadDum-Chh serves as host for Friday’s Jello

Wrestling Halloween Edition at the Red Fox. Sherae is also part of Savage Henry‘s C-U-Last Tuesday Ladies Night (with one dude) at the Jambalya on Tuesday, Oct. 30. Kate Willet, Stafani Silverman and Matt Lieb are here from S.F. O’Shaughnessy and Sarah Godlin rep Humboldt. Halloween-themed benefits? Take your pick: The annual Northcoast Environmental Center’s All Species Costume Ball usually happens in conjunction with the North Country Fair, but this year it’s moved to Thursday at the Arcata Playhouse. Come dressed as your favorite plant or animal and dance to music by Sour Mash Hug Band, Kindred Spirits and in demand Missing Link DJs Matt ‘n’ Adam. (M&A also host a sold out one-year anniversary Soul Night Fright Saturday at Humboldt Brews.) Friday and Saturday at Blue Lake Casino, local Burners present Sea of Flames: Fire for the Arts, a benefit for Coastal Grove Charter School’s parent teacher organization and the F Street Warehouse featuring assorted fire artists — and music. Friday they have Saint John and the Sinners (7 p.m.) and the new Afrojam-funk combo Motherlode (9 p.m.), Saturday it’s funky hip hop by Acufunkture (9 p.m.) followed by EDM from DJ Touch, OnHell, Treemeista, @udiogasm and Alien Lounge. KMUD’s annual Halloween Boogie at the Mateel has an eclectic array of dance music with three bands up from the Bay Area: the genre-leaping Diego’s Umbrella (mariachi meets African-tinged jamrock), ska veteran Curtis Meacham and his band Monkey, and electro-cumbia combo Candelaria. Companion Animal Foundation is calling its annual fundraiser Saturday at the Arcata Community Center The Fur Ball, “a Howl-aween Extravaganza.” Food, drink, auctions, raffle, photo booth etc. support a spay/neuter program. Saint John and the Sinners supply the rockin’ music. There’s a little bit in this week’s calendar about Eureka’s dueling zombie walks, but it does not mention the Red Cross’ Dawn of the Dead-esque Zombie Invasion Preparation disaster fair Saturday noon-6 p.m. at the Bayshore Mall with first-aid demonstrations (useless for zombies) and instructions for making a zombie apocalypse disaster kit (Swiss Army knife, bowling ball?) plus zombie face-painting and fun for kids. That should get you ready for Nocturnum’s Zombie Apocalypse Dance of the Dead Saturday night, promising “a night of blood and brains with some of your favorite deadly DJs fresh from the grave,” specifically Masta Shredda, Deft and MikeyDataBlend. They’re also collecting (cash) donations for the Red Cross blood drive. Dance, zombies, dance. l

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northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 25, 2012

21


Fishtank Ensemble Sunday Arcata Playhouse

thur 10/25

fri 10/26

sat 10/27

THE ALIBI: ARCATA 822-3731 744 9th St. Arc. thealibi.com

venue

Dirty Thursday DJ Choice Edition Pressure Anya 10:30pm

Find us on Facebook

Rooster McClintock, Dirt Nap Band (alt. country) 10:30pm $5

ANGELINA INN Fernbridge

Blue Lotus (dinner jazz) 6-9pm

Lori ‘O and The Knights (rock) 9:30pm

NEC All Species Ball 7pm $15

The Crooked Jades (old time) 8pm $15

ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 822-1575 ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. Info line: 822-1220 BAR-FLY PUB 443-3770 91 Commercial, Eureka barflypub.com BEAR RIVER CASINO 733-9644 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta

EPROM, Slugabed, KiloWatts, MikeyDataBlend (EDM) 9:30pm $20

Collie Buddz with New Kingston, DJ Selecta Prime 9pm $30

Random Acts of Comedy Doors 7:30pm $5

Happy Hour everyday 4-6pm $1 off wells & pints

www.barflypub.com

Happy Hour everyday 4-6pm $1 off wells & pints

Karaoke w/ Chris Clay 8pm

McBride Brothers (rock) no cover 9pm Halloween Dance w/DJ Will Duka 9pm

McBride Brothers (rock) no cover 9pm

Karaoke with KJ Leonard 8pm

Sea of Flames - all ages 4pm-1am $10 Blue Rhythm Revue (Wave) 9pm

Sea of Flames - all ages 4pm-1am $10 NightHawk (Wave) 9pm

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

Nitty Gritty Dirt Band 8pm SOLD OUT Dr. Squid (rock) no cover 9pm

Dr. Squid (rock) no cover 9pm

BLONDIE’S Arcata 822-3453 BLUE LAKE CASINO 668-9770 777 Casino Way, Blue Lake CHAPALA CAFÉ Eureka 443-9514

NEWN!

UDO BOWL NOODLE

Throwback Thursday DJ Night w/ Accurate Productions 9pm

CLAM BEACH INN McKinleyville

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 9pm

COUPLE CUPS 1603 G. St. Arcata

Beer & Sake on 18th St., between G & H, Northtown Arcata 826-1988

Nightly 6pm-3am

CHER-AE HEIGHTS 677-3611 27 Scenic Dr. Trinidad

2 1 + O N LY

Buddy Reed and The Rip It Ups 9pm

EUREKA INN 497-6093

Wanna 7-9pm

FIELDBROOK MARKET 839-0521 HUMBOLDT BREWS 826-2739 856 10th St. Arcata HUMBOLDT STATE UNIVERSITY

Open daily noon-11pm until 2am most music nights One Continuous Lick (Gist Hall) 7-10

Lukas Nelson & The Promise of the Real, The Trouble 9pm $15

Missing Link’s Soul Fright One Year Anniversary 9:30pm

JAMBALAYA 822-4766 Arcata

The Great White Caps, Birdhouse 9pm

Synrgy, Guidance, Elephant Dub 9pm

Gothic/Industrial Dance Party 9pm

HSU Guitar Group (jazz) 7-9pm

LARRUPIN CAFE Trinidad LIBATION 761 8th St. Arcata LIL’ RED LION 444-1344 1506 5th St Eureka MAD RIVER BREWERY 668-5680 101 Taylor Way Blue Lake

Blue Lotus Jazz 7-10pm

Ali and Baron (guituar/bass jazz) 7-10pm

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It’s a bar.

We got beer.

Food Truck Night: Taqueria La Barca

Brewery Tours: 1-4pm Keg Sales: 1-4:30pm

www.madriverbrewing.com KMUD Halloween Boogie 7pm $23 adv.

THE MATEEL Redway NOCTURNUM 206 W 6th St. Eureka NORTH COAST GROWERS FARMERS’ MARKETS 441-9999

GENTLEMEN’S CLUB

Music by Rick Park @ Henderson Center

Queer Bill’s Club Pulse: Heaven & Hell

Zombie Apocalypse Dance of the Dead

See the NCJ’s 8 Days a Week Calendar for times and Farmers’ Market info

9am-2pm Arcata Plaza Music by The Bayou Swamis

Sci Fi Club Readings: The Works of Ray Bradbury 7-9pm Live DJ (dance music) 10pm

Jan Bramlett & Friends (singers/songwriters) 7-9:30pm

OCEAN GROVE Trinidad OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St. Eureka 445-8600 PEARL LOUNGE 507 2nd St. Eureka 444-2017 PERSIMMONS GARDEN GALLERY 1055 Redway Drive 923-2748

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com www.pearlloungeeureka.com Mark Growden (Americana songwriter) 7pm

RED FOX TAVERN 415 5th St Eureka REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWING 550 South G St., Arcata 826-7222 REDWOOD RAKS 616-6876 824 L Street, Arcata redwoodraks.com

G RVIN E S NOW & WINE BEER

FABULOUSTIPTOP.COM CLUB: 443-5696 BAR: 443-6923 LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

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Chris Amberger, Francis Vanek, Mike Curran (jazz) 7pm

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22 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 25, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

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Jello Wrestling Halloween Edition 9pm Humboldt Republic Halloween 9pm We’re Back! Tasting room open again!. Blues Dance Night Lesson 8pm, Dancing 9pm $5

Open for pints, goblets, growlers, kegs, and merchandise - new space. Creepy Creature’s Ball w/Pressure Anya & Humboldt Rockers 8pm $5

Saturday noon-9pm Halloween Spooktacular Gala w/ bellydancers and fire dancers 8pm $10 Lucky Tubb (country) 9pm $10

RIVERWOOD INN Avenue of the Giants

NEW HUMBOLDT DESIGNS JUST ARRIVED, AND THEY WILL GO FAST SO COME IN TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR SALE:

Live DJ (dance music) 10pm

ROBERT GOODMAN WINES 937 10th St. Arcata 826-WINE

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

Find us on Facebook

The Living Rooms (acoustic eclectic) 9pm

SHAMUS T BONES 407-3550 191 Truesdale St., Eureka

Kenny Ray and the Mighty Rovers (country swing) 8pm

Live music

Come in for a great Dinner!

SICILITO’S PIZZERIA Garberville

Karaoke 7-10pm

SIDELINES Arcata Plaza

DJ music 10pm

DJ music 10pm

DJ music 10pm

SIX RIVERS BREWERY Central Ave. McK. 839-7580

Brews & Blues 9pm

Mojo Brown (blues) 9pm

The Pine Box Boys (alt. country murder ballads) 9pm

THE SPEAKEASY 444-2244 411 Opera Alley, Eureka

Open Sunday-Thursday 4-11pm Friday and Saturday 4pm-2am

ShugaFoot Band (jazz/blues) 8pm Ladies night ($1 off drinks) 8pm

Buddy Reed (blues) 8pm

Boss Levelz (DJs) 10pm

MXMSTR KRSHN2N 10pm

Friday and Saturday lap dance specials

www.fabuloustiptop.com

SILVER LINING 3561 Boeing Ave., McK

TOBY & JACKS Arcata Plaza TIP TOP CLUB 443-5696 6269 Loma Ave., Eureka

Throwback Thursdays


entertainment in bold includes paid listings

clubs • concerts • cafés bands • djs • karaoke • drink & food specials • pool tournaments • and more sun 10/28

mon 10/29

tues 10/30

wed 10/31

www.thealibi.com

Dysrhythmia (NY) Dog Shredder (Wa) Amplified Heat (TX) 10pm $5

2-Fer Tues: Buy any breakfast or lunch item 8am-3pm: 2nd for 1/2 off

Irish Pub Wednesdays: with $2 wells

Blue Lotus (dinner jazz) 6-9pm Fishtank Ensemble 8pm $12 The Nightmare Before Christmas Doors 5:30pm $5

Giant Screen Monday Night Football Doors 5:15pm - free - all ages

On the Web at www.arcatatheater.com

Salva, Russ Liquid, Clicks & Whistles, Thriftworks Doors 9:30pm $20

Closed Sunday www.barflypub.com

Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells Pint Night 6pm-close $2 beer pints

Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells Wing Special 1 lb. for $5 Free pool

Halloween Karaoke w/ DJ Marv costume contst 9pm-1am

A Chance to win $1,000,000

No Limit Texas Holdem Tournament 6:30pm

No Limit Texas Holdem Tournament 6:30pm

A Chance to win $1,000,000

The Small Axe (orchestral rock) 9pm

Mad Trees Digital Bass 9pm

Beer and Babies (wear costumes)

Karaoke with KJ Leonard 8pm

Monday Night Football on the big screen + Flat Screen TV giveaways

Fat Tire Tuesdays $2.00 Fat Tire Pints

Wild Wing Wednesdays: Chicken wings and $8 domestic pitchers 5pm

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm 9-ball tournament 8pm

8-Ball Tournaments at 8pm

Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm

FREE Pool $3 well drinks

Organic Open Mic: Caitlin Jemma 7pm The Trouble, J. Ludington 8:30pm $5 All shows 21+ www.humbrews.com

Open daily noon-11pm until 2am most music nights

Sundaze: Deep Groove Society 9pm

Amplified Heat 9pm

Halloween Party with Zach Deputy Happy Hour 3- 6 pm (loop soul) 10pm $15 every day RJA: Chris Lightcap’s Bigmouth 8pm Hai-Ting Chinn’s Spooky Songs 8pm C-U- Last Tuesday (comedy) 10pm

Monophonics, DJ Rickshaw Aber Miller (piano) 6-9pm

Buddy Reed (blues guitar) 7-9pm Don’t think of it as work Think of it as fun!

Repeat: We got beer.

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif

Purl and Pour craft time 6:30pm

Hot Wings (eclectic folk) 6-8:30pm

Pin Cask: Mad Pumpkin

All markets have fresh fruits and vegetables and much, much more

Online at humfarm.org

Music by Haulypacha @ Old Town Eureka

See the NCJ’s 8 Days a Week Calendar for times and Farmers’ Market info

Now serving beer and wine

Open Sunday-Thursday 7am-9pm Friday/Saturday 7am-10pm.

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

No open mic. Happy Halloween!

Closed www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Closed www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Tequila Tuesdays muchas variedades

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Find us on Facebook

Handcrafted items for children and adults.

Ask us about hosting your event

The Damien Roomets Trio w/ Greg Goad & Mike Curran 7-10pm

Open Sundays Ready for some football?

Whomp Whomp Wednesday (EDM)

Rude Lion Sound (reggae) 8pm

B Swizlo’s Birthday Bash 9pm Sunday noon-9pm

Black Alice, Cell/Basement D 9pm

Breakdance with Reckless Rex Atienza 5-7pm $10

Weekday Hours M-F 3pm to 9pm 6th Annual Halloween Bash w/ Jim Lahman Band 7-10pm $5

Eleanor Murray (folk) 9pm

Spoken Word Night 9pm

Find us on Facebook

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

Have a signature Cocktail in the bar!

Barbecue and Bids: dinner and auction for Jessie & Terri 6-9pm

Check out the Sunset from our bar!

Come have lunch 11:30-4:00

Trivia Night 8pm

Karaoke 9pm w/ sushi

Sunny Brae Jazz 9pm w/ fried chicken

St. John (unplugged) 8pm

Sunday Mimosa and Bloody Mary specials

Live music 7pm

ShugaFoot Band (jazz/blues) 7pm

Wednesday Happy Hour 4-6:30pm

Like us on Facebook

2-for-1 DD lap dances

2 Dollar Tuesdays $2 beer / $2 lap dances

Ladies/Amateur Night Ladies get in free!

www.redwoodcurtainbrewing.com

Find us on Facebook.

West African Drum and Dance 5:30pm Intermediate Tango 7:15pm

West Coast Swing Wednesdays 7:30pm lesson, 8:30 dancing Halloween w/Jimi Jeff $10

Good & Evil Twins Scary-oke 8pm

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 25, 2012

23


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24 North Coast Journal • Thursday, oct. 25, 2012 •

northcoastjournal.com


DELL’ARTE GETS INTO THE SEASONAL SPIRIT WITH THE MACABRE CABARET, WHICH RUNS FRIDAY TO SUNDAY, OCT. 26 TO 28. EXPECT LAUGHS, MUSIC AND “A LITTLE SPLATTER,” AS DELL’ARTE REGULARS TAKE YOU THROUGH AN ULTIMATE ACT OF REVENGE, A TERRIFYING OPERATION AND A HORRIFIC COOKING DEMONSTRATION. BUT DON’T LET THE ACTORS HAVE ALL THE COSPLAY FUN. COME DRESSED IN YOUR HOLIDAY WORST AND BE ENTERED IN A RAFFLE.

BURN IT UP! LOCAL FIRE ARTISTS’ GLORIOUS PYROMANIAC TENDENCIES WILL BE ON FULL DISPLAY AT THIS WEEKEND’S SEA OF FLAMES FIRE ARTS FAIR AND SYMPOSIUM AT BLUE LAKE CASINO ON SATURDAY AND SUNDAY, OCT. 26 AND 27. SEE HEATED PERFORMANCES FROM THE MISCHIEF LAB, DEPARTMENT OF SPONTANEOUS COMBUSTION AND OTHERS IN THIS FUNDRAISER FOR COASTAL GROVE CHARTER SCHOOL’S PARENT TEACHER ORGINIZATION AND THE F STREET WAREHOUSE. FIRE!

25 thursday EVENTS

All Species Ball. 7 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Come dressed as your favorite plant or animal. Costume contest and music by Sour Mash Hug Band, Kindred Spirits and Missing Link DJs Matt and Adam. Proceeds benefit the Northcoast Environmental Center. $15/$10 adv. 822-1575.

THEATER

Dusty and the Big, Bad World. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. A grade school girl, a magic purple dust ball and the secretary of education are at the center of this hilarious and good-hearted send up of the culture wars. $10. redwoodcurtain.com. 443-7688.

MUSIC

EPROM. 9 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. World Famous presents the diverse, funky and energetic soundsmith, blending live remixing and manipulation of hiphop and dubstep with bass-heavy neurcrunk. Event also features Slugabed, KiloWatts and MikeyDataBlend. $20/$15 adv. 822-1220. The Black Pirate. 7 p.m. Arcata High School, 1720 M St. ArMack Orchestra performs the original score and amusing sound effects for the silent pirate adventure film starring Douglas Fairbanks. Cheer for the hero! Boo the villain! $5. armack.org. 445-9063.

ART

One Continuous Lick. 7-10 p.m. Gist Hall Theater, HSU. The Humboldt Circus presents three nights of clowning, juggling, black light and carnival midway action. Adults only. $8. 925-381-1444. Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. In the courtyard. Weekly group. Live model. An Ink People DreamMaker project. 442-0309.

FOOD

Henderson Center Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Vegetables, fruits, seedlings, plants and local food. Music by Rick Park. humfarm.org. 441-9999.

McKinleyville Farmers’ Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza, Central Avenue. Farmfresh produce every Thursday. humfarm.org. 441-9999.

LECTURE

Who Will Feed Us in a Planet in Crisis? 5:30-7 p.m. Humboldt State University, BSS Room 166, Arcata. Sustainable Futures Speaker Series continues with UC Berkeley agroecology professor Dr. Miguel Altieri. E-mail pjs26@ humboldt.edu. 826-3653. Prosperity! For The Aspiring Entrepreneur. 5:30-8 p.m. Siemens Hall, HSU. Economic Fuel workshop covers the basics of economic development strategy. www.economicfuel.org. 476-2780.

ETC.

Salad Luncheon. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Mad River Grange, 110 Hatchery Road, Blue Lake. Blue Lake Museum fundraiser. $6. 668-4188. Maintenance Technician Training. 9 a.m. College of the Redwoods Downtown Site, Sixth and K streets, Eureka. Learn entry-level skills for a career in maintenance. Get your OSHA certification and learn basic electrical and plumbing skills. thejobmarket.org. 441-5627. Parent/Son Discussion Group. 6-8 p.m. Six Rivers Planned Parenthood, 3225 Timber Fall Court, Eureka. Six Rivers Planned Parenthood presents a discussion group for parents and their sixth to eighth grade sons. Topics include puberty, communication, relationships and responsibility. $5. 445-2018.

26 friday HALLOWEENESS

Haunted Kinetic Lab of Horrors. 7 p.m.-midnight. Kinetic Sculpture Lab, Eighth and N streets, Arcata.

Take a guided freakshow tour and support the people who’ve brought you kinetic gags, freaky fun, and laughter for 30 years at their annual fundraiser. $10. kineticsculpturelab.com. 822-4805. Halloween Creepy Creature’s Ball. 8 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Dance till you drop with DJ Anya and Gabe Pressure. Costume and pumpkin art contests. $5. www.megzmadrone.com. 832-8973. Something Wicked Comes Again! 7-9:30 p.m. Old Town Coffee and Chocolates, 211 F St., Eureka. Ghoulish storyteller Carpathian and others pay tribute to Ray Bradbury with spooky readings of classic tales. www.patientcreatures.com. 445-8600.

EVENTS

ALREADY VACUUMING UP TOO MUCH HALLOWEEN CANDY? A TRIP THROUGH THE HAUNTED KINETIC LAB OF HORRORS SHOULD HELP YOU PURGE YOUR DAY’S CALORIES BEFORE THEY TAKE FULL EFFECT. THIS YEAR, THE EYE GRABBING YUCK WILL BE ON DISPLAY AT THE CORNER OF EIGHTH AND N STREETS IN ARCATA FROM 7 P.M. TO MIDNIGHT FROM FRIDAY TO SUNDAY, OCT. 26 TO 28, AND THEN AGAIN ON WEDNESDAY, OCT. 31. RECOMMENDED FOR AGES 13 AND UP (IF ANYONE).

Lukas Nelson and Promise of the Real. 9 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. American rock and roll band performs. Local band The Trouble opens. $15/$12 adv. humbrews.com. 826-2739. Synrgy. 10 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Jambalaya, 915 H St., Arcata. Former Arcata reggae band returns. Night also features Hawaiian reggae band Jah Guidance and locals Elephant Dub Brigade. $10/$5 before 10 p.m. jambalayaarcata.com. 822-4766. Howlin’ Moon Blues Review. 8 p.m. Arcata Veterans Memorial Building, 1425 J St. ArMack Band show features the electric Chicago sounds of John Lee Hooker to the rootsy sounds of Delta blues. Fundraiser for its trip to the Santa Cruz Jazz Festival. $10/$5 students. The Black Pirate. 7 p.m. Arcata High School. See Oct. 25 listing.

Sea of Flames: Fire for the Arts. Noon-midnight. Blue Lake Casino. Celebrate Northern California’s fire art scene with local music, workshops and displays of flaming visual wonder. Brought to you by the Mischief Lab. $15. E-mail markwswitzer@gmail.com. 223-1372. Jello Wrestling. 9 p.m. Red Fox Tavern, Eureka. Big Daddy Promotions presents strippers falling down in jello. Hosted by Sherae O’Shaughnessy. $8. theredfoxtavern. com. 269-0282.

DANCE

The Macabre Cabaret. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Drinks, gore and side-splitting comedy. Features a cooking demonstration that goes very wrong, a headless emcee and tiny finger puppets that have a bloody good time. $15. dellarte.com. 668-5663. Dusty and the Big, Bad World. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre. See Oct. 25 listing.

MOVIES

THEATER

MUSIC

Joyce Yang. 8 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, HSU. 25-yearold pianist and winner of the Avery Fisher Career Grant performs. $45/$22 HSU students. humboldt.edu/centerarts. 826-3928.

World Dance. 8 p.m. St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 1675 Chester Ave., Sunny Brae. Humboldt Folk Dancers event features teaching and request dancing. $3. 839-3665. Club Pulse. 9 p.m. Nocturnum, 206 West Sixth St., Eureka. Where’s Queer Bill Halloween-themed LGBTQ dance party. $5. 832-4785.

ART

One Continuous Lick. 7-10 p.m. Gist Hall Theater. See Oct. 25 listing. Fourth Friday Flicks. 7 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. Screening of 1961 foreign comedy Divorzio all’italiana (Divorce Italian Style). 677-9493.

ETC.

Disability Awareness Event. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Yurok Tribe Headquarters, 190 Klamath Blvd., Klamath. Features presentations from all over California, from organizations at the state, tribal and local levels. Hosted by Hoopa Yurok Vocational Rehab. hoopa-nsn.gov.

continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 25, 2012

25


formed on the pipe organ, piano and a brass quintet. 442-1797. Haunted Kinetic Lab of Horrors. 7 p.m.-midnight. Kinetic Sculpture Lab. See Oct. 26 listing. Halloween Kid’s Day. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Humboldt Botanical Gardens, College of the Redwoods, Eureka. Come in your Halloween costume for apple bobbing, a pumpkin rolling contest, face painting and a candy bug making event. Performance by Humboldt Music Academy’s violin students. hbgf.org. 442-5139.

continued from previous page

EVENTS

Your Guide to Humboldt Zaaambies The new season of The Walking Dead has arrived, so it’s time to love zombies again. And, in fact, there is more undead activity in HumCo than you might suspect. We got a call from zombie Angelique Perrott who was a little worried that there could be impending community confusion. It seems that while she was out making the rounds to promote the zombie walk she’s been arranging for several years, she came across a flyer at Halloween City for a separate event that shared the same name — “Zombie Walk,” appropriately — on a different date. D’oh! So, she changed hers — March of the Undead was unborn. But who’s this other brain connoisseur? The Journal called zombie organizer Joshua Scharfenberg, who said he’s been among the walking dead for three years now. He noted that Perrott had stopped into Halloween City — where he works — and that he’d proposed combining the undead hordes. But both dates were set. No hard feelings. Thus, dual zombie walks.

27 saturday HALLOWEENESS

Annual Boo at the Zoo. Noon-4 p.m. Sequoia Park Zoo, 3414 W St., Eureka. Spooktacular family fun with games, activities, costume parade and contest, animal encounters and your favorite zoo animals enjoying special jack-o-lantern treats. www.sequoiaparkzoo.net. 442-5649. Halloween Costume Parade. 11 a.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza, Central Avenue. Local merchants provide a safe trick-or-treating experience. 834-6460. Eureka Trick-or-Treat. 12:30 p.m.-6 p.m. Downtown and Old Town Eureka. Local businesses fork out the candy. Also,

OS X UPGRADE NEW

Whether you think more zombies wandering the streets is a good thing — or not — will determine how you interpret this turn of events. We at the Journal have always supported diversity, healthy growth and picking people’s brains. So this is a good thing. Here are the places to congregate if you enjoy awkward gaits: The 2012 March of the Undead will take place on Tuesday, Oct. 30. Your lifeless body should be at the foot of C Street in Eureka by 5:45 p.m. so that you can wreak good-natured havoc through the streets of Old Town starting at 6 p.m. Brains! The Zombie Walk to Arts Alive will be held on Saturday, Nov. 3. Drag your corpse to the parking lot of Halloween City (near Jack in the Box) on Broadway around 4 p.m. There will be makeup booths — to make sure your cheeks have that gray glow — music by DJ Touch and a zombie shooting range in some dude’s trailer (you’ve seen it). The march to Old Town begins at 5 p.m. More brains! Consider yourself informed/warned. — Andrew Goff Pumpkin Bowling, a petting zoo and other activities. 442-9054. Mystery Museum. 2-6 p.m. Discovery Museum, 517 Third St., Eureka. Afternoon of Halloween fun features, crafts, storytime and the Haunted Pirate Ship. discovery-museum.org. 443-9694. Halloween Festival: Magical Tours. 5-8 p.m. Humboldt Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 24 Fellowship Way, Bayside. Come meet the King and Queen of Halloween before embarking on a magical tour where fairytales unfold before your very eyes. $5. E-mail jennhaig@hotmail.com. 822-3793. Zombie Invasion Preparation. Noon-6 p.m. Bayshore Mall, 3300 Broadway, Eureka. Disaster preparedness fair, includes instructions for making a disaster kit, first-aid demonstrations, zombie face-painting and activities for children. /www.facebook.com/ZombieInvasionPrepareRedwoodCoast. 443-4521. Monster Music Concert. 4 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church, 15th and H streets, Eureka. Featuring Halloween favorites per-

MOUNTAIN LION

Harvest Festival. 4 p.m. Lutheran Church of Arcata, 151 East 16th St. Authentic German Oktoberfest dinner celebrating 40 years of ministry. $15/$7 kids under 12. 822-5117. Sea of Flames: Fire for the Arts. Noon-midnight. See Oct. 26 listing. Fur Ball 2012. 7 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Companion Animal Foundation hosts a red carpet fundraiser featuring music by St. John and the Sinners, cash bar and desserts, Beast-ro awards, silent auction. $25/$20 adv. www.animal-foundation.org. 826-7387.

THEATER

The Macabre Cabaret. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte. See Oct. 26 listing. Dusty and the Big, Bad World Gala Opening. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre. See Oct. 25 listing.

MUSIC

Missing Link Soul Night. 9:30 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. One year anniversary “Soul Fright” edition! All vinyl. All soul. All booty shaking. $10. humbrews.com. 826-2739. Halloween Boogie. 7 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Featuring bands Diego’s Umbrella, Monkey and Candelaria. Hosted by Mateel Community Center and KMUD Radio. $25/$23 adv. 923-3368. The Crooked Jades. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Reinventing old-world music with driving dance tunes and haunting ballads. Celebrating the release of their new album Bright Land. $15/$13 members. arcataplayhouse.org. 822-1575. Humboldt Symphony. 8 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, HSU. Bach cantatas featuring three student soloists, Bizet’s “Carmen” and Copland’s “Our Town,” plus an original composition, “Prelude and Dance for the Day of the Dead” by student Justino Eustacio Perez. Conducted by Paul Cummings. $7/$3 students and seniors. HSUMusic.blogspot.com. 826-3928. Halloween Dance Fundraiser. 7-11 p.m. Redcrest Grange. Redcrest Volunteer Fire Department presents an evening of live music, dancing, food, no-host bar and prizes for best costumes. $15/$10 adv. 722-1951. Halloween Spooktacular Gala Show. 8 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Evening of Halloweenthemed dance performances by Ya Habibi, Shoshanna, Megz, Nightshade Serenade and Circus of the Elements. “Monster Mash” costume exhibition. $10/$8 in costume. www.megzmadrone.com. 832-8973. The Black Pirate. 2 and 7 p.m. Arcata High School. See Oct. 25 listing.

ART

One Continuous Lick. 7-10 p.m. Gist Hall Theater. See Oct. 25 listing.

OUTDOORS • Combines features from iPhone, iPad and iPod touch to the Mac • Send iMessages • Get your Mac on Game Center • Receive notifications and more • And with iCloud now Mac works even better with your iOS devices

Audubon Society Marsh Field Trip. 8:30 a.m. Meet at the parking lot at the end of South I Street. Led by Pat Bitton. Bring binoculars and have a great morning birding. Trip held rain or shine. 442-9353. Friends of the Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Meet leader Erica Stephens for a 90-minute walk focusing on the plants and ecology of the marsh. 826-2359.

COMEDY

Random Acts of Comedy. 8 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Humboldt’s funniest freaks this side of the asylum, local loons and possible pole dancers perform. $6/$10 adv. 822-1220.

BASIC

UPGRADE

25

STARTS AT $

26 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 25, 2012 •

FOOD On the Plaza • 707-825-7100

northcoastjournal.com

Arcata Farmer’s Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Fresh vegetables, fruits, seedlings, plants and local food. Music by Bayou Swamis. humfarm.org. 822-5951. Vegan Potluck. Noon. Humboldt Area Foundation, 373 Indi-

anola Road, Bayside. Potluck and free screening of the film Genetic Roulette. HumboldtVeg.blogspot.com. 633-6340.

SPORTS

Humboldt State vs. Central Washington. 6 p.m. Redwood Bowl, HSU. Foot. Ball. $10/$8 Non-HSU/kids. hsujacks.com.

ETC.

24-Hour Yard Sale. 7 a.m. Ink Annex, 47B West Third St., Eureka. Proceeds benefit The Placebo. Live music by Telefawn. inkpeople.org. Traditional Tibetan Buddhist Meditation. 9-10 a.m. Arcata Holistic Health Center, 940 Ninth St. Dalai Ani Kunzang Drolma leads meditation sessions. E-mail structuralthomas@gmail.com. 825-1088. Communities in Motion 2012: Rural People Power Forum. 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Work together to create healthy communities, hear about local successes and learn new skills to make our neighborhoods healthy and vibrant. Lunch and childcare will be provided. RSVP. 441-5545. Book Sale. 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Friends of the Redwood Libraries holds their quarterly book sale. 407-5565.

28 sunday HALLOWEENESS

The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993). 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Tim Burton’s ghoulish holiday tale featuring wicked humor and stunning animation. $5. arcatatheater.com. 822-1220. Haunted Kinetic Lab of Horrors. 7 p.m.-midnight. Kinetic Sculpture Lab. See Oct. 26 listing. The Macabre Cabaret. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte. See Oct. 26 listing. Grave Matters. 2-5:30 p.m. Sunrise Cemetery, Fortuna. Theatrical production features spellbinding stories of both the obscure and the infamous buried in Fortuna. Tours begin at various times. $15. 442-2999.

MUSIC

Fishtank Ensemble. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Roma roots music group returns to the Playhouse with eclectic and eccentric stage show. $12/$10 members. arcataplayhouse.org. 822-1575.

ART

Art Talk Sunday. 2 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Features Helsinki-born, Humboldt County artist Claire Iris Schencke discussing her new passion, finger–painting on the iPad. $2. humboldtarts.org. 442-0278.

OUTDOORS

Tarzan Day. 1-4 p.m. Mendocino Adventure Ropes Course, Leggett. Celebrate the 100-year anniversary of Tarzan by Edgar Rice Burroughs by swinging through the lush redwoods. $30/$50 couple. 925-6285.

FOOD

Polenta Feed. 5 p.m. St. Bernard’s Catholic School, 222 Dollison St., Eureka. Hosted by the Eureka Lodge of the Sons of Italy. Benefits North Coast Stand Down, bocce court maintenance at Redwood Ballfields, and the lodge’s scholarship program for local students. $14. E-mail lcanzoneri@suddenlink.net. 443-8669.

ETC.

Same-Sex Marriage Discussion. 7 p.m. Lifetree Cafe, 76 13th St., Arcata. Opportunity to discuss how same-sex marriages are impacting society and how people are responding to the growing presence of same-sex marriages. 672-2919. Buddhist Study Group. 6 p.m. Arcata Yoga Center, 890 G St. Weekly gathering practices the Chenrezig sadhana and Dorje Yang Dron. 822-4756.

29 monday EVENTS

Barbecue and Bids. 6-9 p.m. Shamus T Bones, 1911 Truesdale St., Eureka. Fundraising dinner and auction benefitting the families of Jessie


Hunt, Terri Vroman-Little and Suzie Seemann who were victims of the Bayside hit-and-run incident in September. 444-3918.

DANCE

Friendship Circle Dance. 7-10 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Dancers 50 and older enjoy dancing with live music from the 1930s-50s. $4. 725-5323.

OUTDOORS

Arcata Marsh Jogging Interpretive Tour. 5:30 p.m. Meet at Klopp Lake parking lot at foot of South I Street. Four- to fivemile evening jog around marsh led by Megan McCue. 633-6226.

FOOD

Old Town Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town, Eureka, F Street between First and Third streets. Fresh farm-grown produce. Music by Huayllipacha. humfarm.org. 441-9999.

ETC.

Office Specialist Training. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. College of the Redwoods Downtown Site, Sixth and K streets, Eureka. Learn entry-level skills used in an office setting. thejobmarket. org. 441-5627.

30 tuesday HALLOWEENESS

March of the Undead 2012. 5:45 p.m. Foot of C Street, Old Town, Eureka. Come dressed in your zombie attire and march toward the brains. 444-3268. McKinleyville Girl Scouts Annual Haunted House. 6-9 p.m. Dow’s Prairie Community Grange, 3995 Dow’s Prairie Road, McKinleyville. For children of all ages. Also collecting nonperishable food items for McKinleyville Food Bank. $1. E-mail johnclancy001@gmail.com. 442-4534. Tricks and Treats. 6-8 p.m. Far North Climbing Gym, 10th and K streets, Arcata. Halloween games, aerial show and dance party. $5. AerialDanceCircus.com. 786-375-0879.

MOVIES

Searchlight Serenade. 7 p.m. Founders Hall Rm. 118, HSU. Premiere screening of the hour-long documentary about big bands in the Japanese American incarceration camps. Produced locally by Claire Reynolds and Sam Greene at KEET-TV. keet.org. The Long Goodbye (1973). 6:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Relatively modern neo noir directed by Robert Altman and starring Elliott Gould as Philip Marlowe. Part of the Based on the Book Film Series. Hosted by Bob Doran. 269-1910.

MUSIC

Chris Lightcap’s Bigmouth. 8 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, HSU. Redwood Jazz Alliance presents the acclaimed jazz quintet. $15/$10 students and seniors. redwoodjazzalliance.org.

FOOD

Fortuna Farmers’ Market. 3-6 p.m. 10th and Main streets. Fresh and tasty local produce, plants, breads and jams. 726-9371.

Sweet Parenting Like Valentine’s Day and New Year’s Eve, Halloween is one of those misbehaving holidays that doesn’t fall on a convenient three day weekend-enabling date. Also, reputable employers/schools tend not to give you any time off around it either. You can choose to be bummed by this. Or … This year, Halloween falls on a Wednesday, which means that the weekend before it is filled with adult Halloween events. But the kids! Those little ghouls and goblins are really luckin’ out this year as the sugary events have been split between Saturday and Wednesday. If you want to be a hero parent, you can just let ’em wear their costume from Friday night ’til Thursday morning.

ETC.

North Coast Networkers. Noon-1:30 p.m. Rita’s Mexican Grill, 1111 Fifth St., Eureka. Group of local business people who get together once a week to give and receive referrals. www. bnicalneva.com. 825-4709. Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15-9:30 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Weekly cribbage tournament. $7. cribbage.org. 444-3161. Eureka Fair Wage Act Meeting. 6:15 p.m. Eureka Labor Temple, 840 E St. Volunteer training meeting for those interested in gathering signatures for a proposed ordinance that would require employers with 25 or more workers in Eureka to pay a $12 minimum wage. fairwages.org. Healing Rooms of Redwood Coast. 6:30-9 p.m. Wood Street Chapel, 1649 Wood St., Fortuna. Non-denominational prayer group. E-mail dlbitte@hotmail.com. 834-5800.

31 wednesday HALLOWEENESS

Trick or Treat On and Around the Plaza. 4-6 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Bring ghosts, goblins and ghouls to the Arcata Plaza for a safe and neighborly trick or treat experience. Downtown merchants provide treats. Costume parade at 5 p.m. 822-4500. Annual Halloween Carnival. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. City of Arcata Recreation Division, along with Humboldt State University Recreation Students host an evening of games and goodies for kids ages 10 and younger. www.cityofarcata.org/rec. 822-7091. Community Halloween Fest. 3:30 p.m. Garberville Town Square. SoHum spookyness for kids and adults! Costume judging, scream contest, trick-or-treating, haunted house. garberville.org. 923-2613. Hai-Ting Chinn’s Spooky Songs. 8 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, HSU. International mezzo-soprano and Arcata High grad comes home for a Halloween recital of spooky songs from the classical repertoire, plus duets with Elisabeth Harrington. $8/$3 students and seniors. 826-3928. McKinleyville Girl Scouts Annual Haunted House. 6-9 p.m. Dow’s Prairie Community Grange. See Oct. 30 listing. Haunted Kinetic Lab of Horrors. 7 p.m.-midnight. Kinetic Sculpture Lab. See Oct. 26 listing. Fortuna Trick-or-Treat. 3-5 p.m. Businesses in Downtown Fortuna and at the Redwood Village Shopping Center hand out the candy. 725-9261.

MUSIC

Salva. 9:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. World Famous Productions presents the versatile solo producer, crowd riling DJ, owner of the revered Frite Nite label. Russ Liquid, Clicks and Whistles and Thriftworks open. $20/$15

adv. arcatatheater.com. 822-1220. Halloween Party with Zach Deputy. 9:30 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Celebrate All Hallows’ Eve with the soul singer and guitarist. $15. 826-2739.

NLY!

HT O ONE NIG

ETC.

Kids Carnival. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Campbell Creek Connexion. 76 13 St., Arcata. Jumping castle, carnival games, candy, haunted house. Eel River Valley Founders BNI. 7:30-9 a.m. Victorian Inn, 400 Ocean Ave., Ferndale. Meeting of local business owners. 407-6827. Office Specialist Training. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. College of the Redwoods Downtown Site. See Oct. 29 listing.

1

thursday

THEATER

8. 7:30 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. Local actors perform staged reading of the play based on transcripts of the California Prop 8 trial that established marriage equality as a constitutional right. Benefits the American Foundation for Equal Rights. $5. HSUStage.blogspot.com. 826-3928. Dusty and the Big, Bad World. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre. See Oct. 25 listing.

MUSIC

Humboldt Folklife Society Group Sing Along. 7-9 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Joel Sonenshein leads. 839-7063.

MOVIES

Ocean Night Film Screening. 7 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Features Humboldt State University alumni Michael Kew and the films Triptych and Guacamole. Sponsored by Ocean Conservancy, Humboldt Surfrider and Humboldt Baykeeper. $3. 822-1220.

THURSDAY, NOV. 1ST AT 7:30PM IN JVD THEATRE $5 DONATION LIMITED FREE SEATING FOR HSU STUDENTS WITH ID THIS PRODUCTION IS PARTIALLY FUNDED BY THE INSTRUCTIONALLY RELATED ACTIVITIES FEE AND HSU’S DEPARTMENT OF DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION. Department of Theatre, Film & Dance

ETC.

Maintenance Technician Training. 9 a.m. College of the Redwoods Downtown Site. See Oct. 25 listing.

Heads Up…

Old Jewelry Sought. Humboldt Domestic Violence Services is collecting donations of jewelry for its second Just Jewelry sale, to be held Nov. 3 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Eureka Woman’s Club. Jewelry donations can be dropped off through Friday at Old Town Jewelers in Eureka, Heart Bead in Arcata, Minkler Jewelry, 1981 Central in McKinleyville, Trinidad Trading Co. in Trinidad, Ferndale Clothing Co. in Ferndale and Curves in Fortuna. For more information, call 444-9255. ●

Here’s are your opportunities to score them candy and thrills: Saturday: Are your kids normal? Then they will enjoy the costume/candy/cuddly animal combo offered at the annual Boo at the Zoo event at the Sequoia Park Zoo from noon to 4 p.m. Across town, Eureka has decided to jump the gun on its big downtown/Old Town trickor-treating event. Shop owners will dole out the candy for a good chunk of the day, but be sure to drop in at the Discovery Museum from 2 to 6 p.m. The “Mystery Museum” will feature stories, crafts and a (not too scary) haunted pirate ship. Farther north, McKinleyville features its own downtown candy grab and costume parade. Wednesday: Double your candy haul countywide Wednesday evening! Arcata hosts Trick-or-Treat On

(and Around) the Plaza. The Annual Halloween Carnival at the Arcata Community Center features games facilitated by HSU students. The night also features downtown Trick-or-Treat walks in Garberville and Fortuna. While those are your best bets for early cavities (baby teeth fall out anyway), be sure to refer to the rest of our calendar for even more spookiness for kids of all ages. Uh, be safe out there. Watch out for apple razor blades, if that’s still a thing. Boo. — Andrew Goff northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 25, 2012

27


Corner of 14th & G Streets. Near Wildberries and only two blocks from HSU. Tuesday - Sunday 11:30am to 8:45pm Closed Monday

822-2227

Movie Times Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Broadway Cinema

707-443-3456 * = FRi.-sAt. only 1223 Broadway Street, Eureka Times are for 10/26- 11/1 unless otherwise noted.

Serving Fresh Farmer’s Market Ingredients for Lunch and Dinner 316 E ST. • OLD TOWN, EUREKA • 443-7187 DINNER MON-SAT 5-9 •LUNCH TUE-FRI 11-2

Caffé Italia BreakFaSt•eSpreSSo lunCh•dinner•Catering

444-2421

3220 Broadway, Suite 8 • eureka (Behind Big 5 Sporting goodS)

M-F 9aM-10pM • Sat. 11:30-10pM • CloSed Sun.

Cloud AtlAs 12:40, 4:25, 8:10 silent Hill: RevelAtion 3d 3:55, 8:55 silent Hill: RevelAtion 2d 1:25, 6:25, *10:00 CHAsing MAveRiCks 12:15, 3:00, 5:45, 8:30 Hotel tRAnsylvAniA 3d 12:55, 5:40 Hotel tRAnsylvAniA 2d 3:20, 8:00 FRAnkenweenie 3d 3:40 FRAnkenweenie 2d 1:15, 6:00 PitCH PeRFeCt 8:20 ARgo 12:20, 3:10, 6:05, 9:00 seven PsyCHoPAtHs 3:50, 9:15 looPeR 1:00, 6:30 PARAnoRMAl ACtivity 4 12:05, 2:25, 4:50, 7:15, 9:40 Alex CRoss 1:40, 4:10, 6:40, 9:10 Hotel tRAnsylvAniA 2d 11:55 sinisteR 2:10, 4:35, 7:05, 9:30 tAken 2 1:35, 4:00, 6:20, 8:45 Fun size 12:00, 2:20, 4:40, 7:00, 9:20

Mill Creek Cinema

707-839-3456 * = FRi.-sun. only 1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville Times are for 10/26- 11/1 unless otherwise noted. Fun size *1:10, 3:40, 6:05, 8:30 silent Hill: RevelAtion 3d *1:20, 6:20 silent Hill: RevelAtion 2d 3:50, 8:50 Hotel tRAnsylvAniA 3d 3:15, 8:05 Hotel tRAnsylvAniA 2d *12:50, 5:45 sinisteR *1:50, 4:20, 6:50, 9:30 tAken 2 *12:25, *2:40, 4:55, 7:20, 9:40 ARgo *12:35, 3:25, 6:15, 9:05 PARAnoRMAl ACtivity 4 *1:30, 4:00, 6:30, 9:00 Alex CRoss *1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15

Minor theatre 707-822-3456

* = sAt.-sun. only 1001 H Street, Arcata Times are for 10/26- 11/1 unless otherwise noted.

PARAnoRMAl ACtivity 4 ARgo PitCH PeRFeCt

*2:15, 4:35, 7:00, 9:25 *12:50, 3:30, 6:15, 9:00 *1:40, 4:10, 6:40, 9:10

Fortuna theater

707-725-2121 * = sAt.-sun. only 1241 Main Street, Fortuna ** = FRi.-sun. only Times are for 10/26- 11/1 unless otherwise noted. silent Hill: RevelAtion 3d *1:30, 4:40, 7:10, **9:30 Fun size *1:40, 4:25, 6:40, **9:00 PARAnoRMAl ACtivity 4 *12:50, 3:00, 5:10, 7:20, **9:45 ARgo *1:20, 4:05, 6:50, **9:40 tAken 2 *1:00, 4:30, 7:00, **9:35 Hotel tRAnsylvAniA *1:50, 4:10, 6:30, **8:45

Bayfront Restaurant One F Street, Eureka, CA 443-7489 Open Daily 11-9:30pm | BayfrontRestaurant.net

garberville theater 707-923-3580

766 Redwood Drive, Garberville Hotel tRAnsylvAniA

10/26- 11/1: 7:30 EXCEPT 10/31: 6:30

You Call That Scary?

Hollywood trots out pathetic Halloween offerings. Let’s egg its house. By John J. Bennett filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 4. I don’t really go in for horror movies. I can enjoy one if it’s well made, but those are pretty thin on the ground. Add to that tendency my increasingly fervent dislike of foundfootage movies and you’ll have a pretty clear picture of my bias regarding any sort of Paranormal Activity. To date, circumstances have allowed me to avoid this franchise. I figured the trailer-blitz we’ve weathered for this series had gotten me up to speed. But like all good things, that era has come to an end. PA4 apparently picks up five years after the last installment (don’t quote me on that), with a possibly possessed lady named Brooke making off with a possibly to-be-possessed infant named Hunter. Into the lives of an affluent suburban family move an odd young mom and her even odder 6-year old son Robbie. After Robbie’s mom falls ill and goes to the hospital, our unwitting protagonist family takes Robbie in. And so begins the paranormal activity.            We view the action primarily from the point of view of 15-year-old Alex (Kathryn Newton). Or, rather, through her video camera, webcam and iPhone (foundfootage, remember). She’s party to a lot of unexplainable stuff her parents don’t want to hear about, and she has her technosavvy boyfriend, Ben, set up hidden cameras throughout the house to capture evidence. So we get a lot of shots of the living room and the kitchen with nothing going on. Then a chair moves by itself, then a shadowy form moves through the frame, then Alex’s sleeping form is levitated out of her bed. Pretty elementary scare tactics: The filmmakers spike the mundanity of the goings-on with just enough cheap thrills

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast JourNal • thursday, JaN. 12, 2012 31 28 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 25, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

to keep us mildly unnerved. To be fair, there are some heart-in-your-throat moments, but they are too few and way too far between to carry the movie. The idea seems to be to distract us with 75 minutes of almost-unbroken boredom, then freak us out by loading all the deaths into the last 20 minutes. The first half of that plan works. Sadly, the movie stays boring and unremarkable all the way to the end. R. 88m. ALEX CROSS. The best thing about seeing this immediately after Paranormal Activity 4? The latter makes this one look like a masterpiece by comparison. Tyler Perry takes on the eponymous character, who was created by thriller novelist James Patterson and previously played by Morgan Freeman in Kiss the Girls (1997) and Along Came a Spider (2001). Cross is supposed to be a genius profiler of the criminal mind and a peerless detective. Alex Cross gives no evidence to support either claim. Perry is so affable, so heart-on-his-sleeve that he’s almost impossible to believe as a veteran Detroit cop. He’s got a reputation as the coolest, toughest cop on the street, but he seems more like a big ol’ teddy bear with a Glock. And when he’s called upon to play enraged and out for vengeance, it gets almost laughably bad. To backpedal a bit, I wouldn’t blame Perry for this debacle. He does the best he can, but he’s too recognizable and kindly to disappear into a part like this. He was miscast at the start, then misused by director Rob Cohen (The Fast and the Furious, XXX). Matthew Fox plays Cross’ foil, an expert assassin who’s also no slouch when it comes to charcoal renderings of his victims. He’s listed in the credits as Picasso, so I’ll let the writers involved share some


Field notes of the blame. Here again, weird directing choices derail the performance. Fox seems pretty dedicated to the part, having starved himself to the point of being almost unrecognizable. But his killer plays as an ill-conceived combination of calculating and insane. This ultimately amounts to him yelling and going all googly-eyed, because apparently someone told him that’s what sociopaths do. The plot concerns a French gazillionaire and some barely thought-out industrial espionage, but it hardly matters. Mishandled action, poor plotting, incongruous performances and a complete lack of verisimilitude about sum it up. PG13. 101m. —John J. Bennett

Previews

CLOUD ATLAS. Epic mindbender alert! This film from the creators of The Matrix and Run Lola Run careens through past, present and future, melding romance, sci-fi and action while exploring the connections that bind people through time. Based on the novel by David Mitchell and starring Tom Hanks, Halle Berry and Jim Broadbent in multiple roles (and prosthetics) apiece. R. 163m. SILENT HILL: REVELATION 3D. What you have here is a sequel to a poorly received movie that was based on a series of survival horror video games involving evil specters shrouded in fog. Strap on some glasses and they’ll jump out atcha. R. 94m. FUN SIZE. A sarcastic high school senior (Um, hello? Redundant much?) is like totally bummed cuz her mom is making her take her stupid kid brother trick-or-treating, which sucks cuz she and her sassy best friend like totally wanted to go to this awesome party hosted by this totally hot guy. PG13. 90m. CHASING MAVERICKS. Based on the story of phenom Jay Moriarty, this fictional surf flick recounts the story of a 15-year-old NorCal surfer (newcomer Jonny Weston) who sets out to catch one of the biggest waves on earth with the help of legend Frosty Hesson (Gerard Butler). The promotional materials promise “some of the most mind-blowing real wave footage ever captured on film.” PG. 115m. Ring in Halloween week with The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993), the stop-motion fantasy film about a gangly, skull-faced troubadour named Jack Skellington who opens a portal between Halloween Town and Christmas Town. Sunday at 6 p.m. at the Arcata Theater Lounge. PG. The Humboldt County Library’s “Based on the Book” series wraps up Raymond Chandler month with The Long Goodbye

(1973), directed by the great Robert Altman and starring Elliott Gould as hardboiled detective Phillip Marlowe. R. 112m. 6:30 p.m. Hosted by the Journal’s own Bob Doran.

Continuing

ARGO. Ben Affleck can direct! Here he helms a thrilling and surprisingly funny account of the 1979-80 Iran hostage crisis, starring alongside Alan Arkin, John Goodman and Bryan Cranston. R. 120m. FRANKENWEENIE. Tim Burton directs this black-and-white stop-motion film about a quixotic boy who resurrects his dead dog. PG. 87m. HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA. Dracula (voiced by Adam Sandler) runs a posh, monsters-only hotel, catering to the likes of Frankenstein (Kevin James) and the Mummy (CeeLo Greene). PG. 91m. LOOPER.  Joe (Joseph Gordon Levitt) is a mob hitman in the future who’s supposed to kill an older version of himself (Bruce Willis), sent back from the future’s future. Smart, trippy sci-fi. R. 118m. PITCH PERFECT. Anna Kendrick heads the cast in a music-drenched tale of an all-girl a capella group striving to win a championship. PG13. 112m. SEVEN PSYCHOPATHS. This violent, star-studded dognapping comedy from writer/director Martin McDonagh (In Bruges) may be uneven, but Christopher Walken has rarely been better. R. 110m. SINISTER. Ethan Hawke stars as a truecrime novelist who accidentally unleashes some bad supernatural juju that was minding its own business in a box of old home movies. Oops. R. 109m. TAKEN 2. An ex-CIA agent proficient in the whupping of ass (Liam Neeson) has to protect his family from kidnappers. PG13. 90m. —Ryan Burns

Oct. 27 Oct. 29 Sat Oct 27 - Random Acts of Comedy Doors at 7:30 p.m. $6 All ages Sun Oct 28 - Nightmare Before Christmas (1993) Doors 5:30 p.m. $5 Rated PG Mon Oct 29 - Giant Screen Monday Night Football Doors at 5:15 p.m. Free All ages

arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St.

Victorian Version of King arthur with the wizard Merlin: gustaVe doré’s roMantic 1868 engraVing for tennyson’s Idylls of the KIng. Public doMain

King Arthur, Part 1: The Matter of Britain By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

A

rthur long sustained his sinking country, and roused the broken courage of its citizens for war. Deeds of the Kings of the English, William of Malmesbury, c. 1125. I used to give one-evening community college classes on such eclectic topics as “The Seven Wonders,” “Dinosaurs,” “Mars,” and “King Arthur.” Attendance was unpredictable … except for “Arthur,” which always attracted a full house. What I was seeing wasn’t a new phenomenon. Since the Middle Ages, the Arthurian legends have consistently captured large audiences with their tales of chivalry and romance. In this and the following two columns, I’ll try to explain their timeless popularity. Around the year 1200, medieval French poet Jean Bodel classified the storytelling themes of his age into three “Matters.” The oldest was the “Matter of Rome,” which included legendary Greek tales of the Trojan War and the subsequent founding of Rome by Aeneas, together with exploits of real-life military strongmen such as Alexander and Julius Caesar. The youngest, the “Matter of France,” concerned the French king Charlemagne and his 12 knightly “peers,” including Roland (as in the classic Chanson de Roland). And the third was the “Matter of Britain:” the story of King Arthur. You might think that a figure as well-known in popular culture as Arthur, together with his court at Camelot, the Round Table of knights and the quest for the Holy Grail, must have at least some basis in fact. Yet historians debate whether a real-life Arthur actually existed — or if he did, which of maybe six questionable contenders was the prototype. That’s

because it all happened in post-Roman Britain, during the era often referred to as the “Dark Ages” roughly from 400 to 700 CE, when European historical records are particularly sparse. Arthur — assuming he was a real person — lived in late fifth century Britain, but not until three centuries later is he mentioned by name, and then as a war lord (“dux bellorum”), not as a king. Romanized Britain had enjoyed a roughly three-century era of peace and prosperity in the period before Arthur, from Emperor Claudius’ conquest in 144 to the evacuation of the last Roman troops in 410. They left behind a British populace “entirely ignorant of the whole practice of war,” quoting the only British historian of that time, the monk Gildas. With the Romans gone, outsiders stepped up the raids. Picts and Scots swept in from northern Britain; Saxons, Angles and Jutes came from present-day Denmark and northern Germany. According to Gildas, the land was devastated with fire “until it burnt nearly the whole surface of the island, and licked the Western Ocean with its red and savage tongue.” What the country needed was a leader capable of rallying the Britons to defend the land from the invaders, maybe someone named Arthur? Next week, we’ll look at the evidence for Arthur’s role in the singular event that appears to have stemmed the invasions for a century: the battle of Mount Badon. l Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo.com) is teaching a course at OLLI (826-5880) on King Arthur, dinosaurs and the Seven Wonders in November.

Journal • Thursday, Oct. 25, 2012 northcoastjournal.com • North Coast

29


Dance, Music, Theater, Film List your class – just 50 cents/word per issue! Deadline: Monday, noon. Place online at www.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com. Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/ MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts

BEGINNING & INTERMEDIATE WOODWORKING. Learn how to make small wood projects primarily with hand tools. McKinleyville Middle School Wood Shop, evenings, 1-2 nights/week. All tools supplied. Ages 16+. Maximum 20/class. Approximately $4-$7/ hour. Information, email randhall@suddenlink.net (AC-1101) PHOTOS 1. Bring your camera and learn more about your digital camera and the techniques that will help your artistic expression in making photographs. $85. Tues.s, Nov. 6– Dec.18. 3:30-5:30 p.m. Eureka Downtown site at 333 6th St. Call (707) 269-4000 to register. (AC-1025)

Communication

SAME SEX MARRIAGE, WHEN RIGHTS, MORALS & LOVE COLLIDE. How same-sex marriages are impacting society discussed at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun. Oct. 28, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. 672-2919, www. campbellcreek.org for more info. (CMM-1025) FREE PARENT/SON DISCUSSION GROUP. HEY PARENTS! If you don’t teach your son how to become a healthy & responsible young man, then who will? The Media ? His Peers? Not likely. He needs you! Six River Planned Parenthood Presents this interactive workshop for 6th- 8th grade boys and his parents, focusing on responsibility, peer pressure, and the changes to look forward to during puberty. Thurs., Oct. 25, 6-8 p.m, Six River Planned Parenthood, 3225 Timber Fall Court, Eureka. Call for more information, and to register (707) 442-2961. (CMM-1025) CASCADIA LEADERSHIP PROGRAM. Cascadia Center for Leadership is accepting applications for the 2013 ten-day Leadership Program. A program of the Humboldt Area Foundation, Cascadia is led by Mary Gelinas and Roger James, who also co-direct GelinasJames, Inc., an international consulting and training firm. They offer cutting-edge leadership concepts and tools to emerging and seasoned organizational and community leaders. 2013 session dates are Jan. 1718; Jan. 31 & Feb. 1; Feb. 21-22; April 4-5; April 25-26.The $1,750 participant fee includes meals, materials, and tuition. Limited partial scholarships available. Apply on-line at www.cascadialeadership.org. Questions, email info@cascadialeadership.org or call Heather Equinoss, (707) 442-2993. Space is limited and the application deadline is Fri., Oct. 26. (CMM-1025) MOTIVATION, EXPECTATIONS & CONSTRUCTIVE FEEDBACK. A management workshop. Develop your staff and increase motivation with clear communication of roles, responsibilities and boundaries, while delivering timely feedback. With Janet Ruprecht. Fri., Nov. 9, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $85 (includes materials). Pre-registration required. Call HSU Distance & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www. humboldt.edu/extended (C-1101)

Computers

INTRO TO ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR CS5. Learn the drawing program used to create logos, technical and free-form illustrations, banners, posters, web graphics and more. With Annie Reid. Tues.s/Thurs.s, Oct. 30-Nov. 13, 6:30-9 p.m. $135. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Distance & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (C-1025)

FREE INTRO TO ARGENTINE TANGO. Sat., Oct. 27, 7 p.m., in Arcata. Experience the most interesting and beautiful dance of all for free! You’ll learn the basics, meet new people and have lots of fun! Partner not required but suggested. More info, www.tangodelsol. net or (858) 205-9832. (DMT-1025) SPIRIT DANCE WITH MARC TAKAHA. At Om Shala Yoga. Sat., Nov. 10. 2-5 p.m. Dancing the Ecstatic Wave as Spiritual Practice. $30 if paid by 11/1, $40 after. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga. com (DMT-1025) LEARN 2 HOOP DANCE. Foundational Hoop Dance series starts every few weeks in Arcata. Ongoing int/adv. workshops. Private lessons. Hoops/collapsible hoops for sale. www.chakranation.com (DMT-1227) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, ARCATA. West African, Belly Dance, Tango, Salsa, Swing, Breakdance, Jazz, Tap, Modern, Zumba, Hula, Congolese, more! Kids and Adults, 616-6876. (DMT1227) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502-9469 (DMT-1115) DANCE WITH DEBBIE. Ballroom, Latin and Swing for adults & teens. Group and private lessons at North Coast Dance Annex in Eureka. Contact (707) 464-3638 or debbie@dancewithdebbie.biz. (DMT-1108) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (DMT-1227) WEST AFRICAN DANCE. Tues.s, Thurs.s, 5:30-7 p.m., at Redwood Raks, Arcata. All levels welcome. Live drumming. Dulce, 832-9547, Christina, 498-0146. (DMT-1227) GUITAR/PIANO/VOICE LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (DMT-1227) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginneradvanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (DMT-1227)

Fitness

ADORNI FITNESS CENTER MEMBERSHIP SPECIAL. Exclusive offer available only in Oct.! Start a new fitness membership & pay no initiation fee! Membership includes Unlimited Group Fitness Classes, Free Personal Trainers & more! Hurry in special ends Oct. 31, 2012. Visit the Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive or call 441-4248. (F-1025) BEGINNING TO ADVANCED GROUP PILATES. Increase your potential through a mindful movement practice with Melissa Peraza at Arcata Core Pilates Studio! Beginning-advanced group Pilates mat classes, reformer classes and private training sessions Mon.-Sat. Trained in STOTT Pilates, Melissa has experience with high caliber athletes, injury rehabilitation, and senior populations. Questions? Call (619) 203-4345 or email peraza.mell@ gmail.com to schedule an appointment. (F-1025) PARTY IN PINK ZUMBATHON. Get your move on while supporting breast cancer research. Join the Adorni Center on Fri., Oct. 26, 12:15-1:15 p.m. for a Party in Pink Zumbathon supporting Susan G. Komen for the Cure. Suggested donation $5. Zumbathon free with Adorni Fitness Membership or $6.50 drop-in fee. Call 441-4248 or visit www.eurekarecreation.com. (F-1025) YOGA FOR SELF HEALING. Start your morning with an energetic, upbeat yoga perspective while strengthening your body, mind & spirit on Eureka’s beautiful waterfront. Join Kayleigh on Wed.s, 7-8:15 a.m. at the Adorni Center. Class is free with Adorni Fitness Membership or $6.50 drop-in fee. Call 441-4248 for more info. (F-1025)

30 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 25, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

PANATUKAN, FILIPINO MARIAL ARTS. Taught by Hal Faulkner. Mon., 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Wed., 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m. Learn Filipino boxing. Lau Kune Do: Temple of Martial Arts, 445 I St., Arcata. arcatakungfu.com (F-1025) HARD STYLE LIFTING. With Levi Rivas. Learn the kettlebell basics. Tues.s and Fri.s, 6 p.m., in Fortuna. Sign up for classes online at http://www.kjhanzfitness.com or contact Levi Rivas at LeviLrivas@gmail.com. Personal training sessions available. (F-1101) NORTH COAST SELF DEFENSE ACADEMY. Come learn your choice of Gracie Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Muay Thai Techniques, Filipino Kali, Jun Fan Stand Up Kickboxing, & Muay Thai/MMA Sparring. Group and private sessions available 7 days a week for men, women and children; all experience and fitness levels welcome. Call or visit (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St., Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www.northcoastselfdefense.com (F-1227) HUMBOLDT CAPOEIRA ACADEMY. Fall Session Aug. 1-Dec. 15. Classes for Kids, Adults and Beginners. Martial Arts, Music and Acrobatics. Helps to improve strength, flexibility, coordination and self-control. Rental Space Available. For full class schedule visit www.humboldtcapoeira.com. (707) 498-6155, 865 8th St., Arcata. (F-1129) AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching non-violent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www.northcoastaikido.org, info@northcoastaikido.org, 826-9395. (F-1227)

ZUMBA WITH MIMI. Put the FUN back into your workout! Latin & Pop music, sure to leave you sweaty and smiling! Wed. & Fri. 9:30 a.m. at Redwood Raks in the Old Creamery Building, Arcata. Tues. & Thurs. 9:30 a.m., Fri. 5:30 p.m., Humboldt Capoeira Academy, Arcata. (F-1227)

Holiday

HALLOWEEN CARNIVAL STORYBOOK ADVENTURE. What would your favorite storybook look like if it came to life? Come to a Storybook Adventure at Eureka Recreation’s Annual Halloween Carnival on Wed., Oct. 31, 5:30-7:30 p.m at the Adorni Center. A safe alternative to trick-or-treating for youth 12 & under accompanied by an adult. $2/child, adults are free. Call 441-4244 for more info. (H-1025)

Kids & Teens

LEGO MOTOR CHALLENGE. Kids 5-12 years work together in teams to construct a drivable bridge, battling robots, a construction crane, steerable vehicles and more. Thurs.s, Nov.1-Dec. 6, 4-5:30 p.m. Contact Arcata Recreation Division 822-7091 or visit our website www. cityofarcata.org/rec (K-1025) TEEN FILMMAKING & MUSIC PRODUCTION. Learn the basics of film & music production by working on original projects with professional equipment. GULCH Teen Recreation Program meets Tues. & Thurs., 4-6 p.m. at Cooper Gulch, 1720 10th St. $5 drop-in fee & scholarships available. Call Brian at 441-4240 for more info. (K-1025) LITTLE BUDDHAS YOGA. Children’s Yoga Series. Fri.s, Nov. 2-Dec. 14 (no class Nov 23). Ages: 3-6, 4:15-5 p.m. Ages: 7-10, 5-5:45 p.m. Location: Redwood Raks. $50/6week series. www.littlebuddhasyoga.com/children (K-1101)

KUNG FU & TAI CHI. Taught by Sifu Joshua Cuppett. Adult Kungfu: Tues./Wed./Thurs., 5-6 p.m., Sat., 1-2:30 p.m., Sun., 2-3 p.m. Kids Kungfu: Tues./Wed./Thurs., 4-5 p.m. (uniform included), Adult Tai Chi, Wed.s, 6-7 p.m., Sun. 1-2 p.m. Kungfu Movie night is first Fri. of every month, 4-8 p.m. Lau Kune Do: Temple of Martial Arts, 445 I St., Arcata. arcatakungfu.com (F-1025)

THANKSGIVING BREAK CAMP. Join us in Blue Lake for our Thanksgiving Break Camp for 5-13 year olds. Mon.-Wed., Nov.19-21, 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. at Perigot Park. Full-day or half-day option. Register today as space is limited! Download a registration form at www.bluelake. ca.gov or call Kara Newman, 668-5932, for more information. (K-1115)

AIKIBOJITSU. Get your black belt in stick! New beginning classes in Aikibojitsu, The Art of the Staff, taught by Tom Read Sensei, Chief Instructor of Northcoast Aikido, with over 40 years of experience in martial arts. Classes meet Sat.s 9 a.m- 10 a.m., at Northcoast Aikido, 890 G Street, Arcata (entrance in back, by fire station). $20 per class, Visit www.aikibojitsu.com (F-1206)

WINTER SOCCER ACADEMY. Register Now ! at fcsamoa. com. Take your game to the next level. Seven levels of classes (8-17yrs, Pre-Academy thru Advanced) One day per week. Starts Dec 3. Professional Soccer Coaches USSF NSCA ACE NSCC CCCTC Certified (K-1115)

NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata, contact Justin (707) 601-1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@ gmail.com (F-1227) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall, Noon and every Thurs. at the Eureka Vets Hall, Noon. Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marlajoy.zumba.com (F-0110) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon-Fri 5-6 p.m., 6-7 p.m., Sat 10-11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www. sunyisarcata.com, 825-0182. (F-1227) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class ! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (F-1227)

KIDS CLIMBING AFTERSCHOOL PROGRAM. Learn climbing technique, safety, and build confidence at Far North Climbing Gym. Mon./Thurs., 3:30-5 p.m. Ages 6-12. $70 for 4 days. Corner of 10th and K St., Arcata. (707) 495-2774. (K-1129) ACTIVE KIDS = HAPPY KIDS. Come learn self-confidence, discipline and respect while gaining true life skills through martial arts. North Coast Self Defense Academy is offering two introductory lessons for only $14 with this ad. Call or visit- (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St, Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www.northcoastselfdefense. com (K-1227)

Lectures

ESTATE PLANNING, MAPPING OUT YOUR FAMILY’S FUTURE. Free Seminar! Premier Financial Group is dedicated to helping our community achieve financial peace of mind. Come to our free educational seminar on Thurs., Nov. 29, beginning at 6 p.m. at the Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Dr., Eureka. This is a non-sales seminar. RSVP at (707) 443-2741 or online at www.premieradvisor.com (L-1122) MYSTERIES, RUINS & REMINDERS. Between Humboldt Bay and the ocean there is a concentration of evidence of times past. See it all on a 3-1/2 hour field trip. Sat., Nov. 3, 1:30-4:30 p.m. $49. Call (707) 269-4000 to register or www.redwoods.edu, visit community education link. (L-1025)


FOOD SAFETY. Food Safety. Preparing for any emergency includes food safety. Learn the basics of selecting appropriate nutritious foods, storage and preparation of edible supplies, especially when there is no power. Presented by HSU Regional Training Institute, Community Disaster Preparedness. $25. Wed., Nov. 21, 6-8 p.m., Healy Senior Center, Redway. Pre-registration required: www.humboldt.edu/rti/foodsafety or call HSU Distance & Extended Education at 707-826-3731. (L-1108)

Over 50

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826-5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes. (O-1227) GARDENING FOR WILDLIFE. You can easily attract wild birds and animals to your yard, even without a green thumb. With Louise Bacon-Ogden. Thurs., Nov. 8, 6-8 p.m. $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1101) NORTH COAST WEATHER. Tour the National Weather Service office on Woodley Island with NOAA meteorologist-in-charge Nancy Dean. Sat., Nov. 17, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1108)

Pets/Animals

PUPPY, BASIC & RALLY OBEDIENCE. Puppy class starts Thurs., Nov. 8, 6 p.m. For puppies 6 months or less. Minimum one vaccination required. Basic obedience starts Thurs., Nov. 8, 7 p.m. DHLPP and rabies vaccinations. Rally Obedience starts Wed., Nov. 7, 7 p.m. Do something fun with your dog. Call Mette Bryans 443-1183 for info or sign up at the Adorni or eurekarecreation.com (P-1101) DOG OBEDIENCE. Start your puppy off on the right “paw” or reinforce the basics with your dog. Wed.s, Nov. 7-Dec. 19. Puppy Class 6:30-7:30 p.m. Dogs 6 months and older, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Contact Arcata Recreation Division 822-7091 or visit our website www.cityofarcata.org/rec (P-1025)

Spiritual

TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres, 442-4240, www.tarotofbecoming.com. (S-1227) ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 8261701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@yahoo.com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701. www.arcatazengroup.org. (S-1227)

THE WAY OF WELLNESS. Learn a few time-tested principles of wellness that include portable, low-cost ways to build your fitness, fuel your body, protect yourself against disease, maintain emotional balance and strategies to change long-held habits. With Louisa Rogers. Thurs., Nov. 8 & 15, 1-3 p.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1101)

Sports/Recreation

SHARE A STORY, RECORD A STORY. Oral History That Lasts. Do you or someone you know have a story to tell? Learn the basics of interviewing and recording oral histories with Renee Ross. Sat., Nov. 3-17, 10 a.m.-Noon. $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1025)

Therapy/Support

THREE ANCIENT MYSTERIES. Explore King Arthur, the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World and the demise of the dinosaurs with Barry Evans. Wed., Nov. 7-28, 1-3 p.m. $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1101) CREATIVE JOURNAL WRITING. For both experienced diarists and anyone who has been thinking of writing a journal, this course with Lorraine Miller-Wolf will help you explore new depths of yourself through various journal writing approaches. Tues., Nov. 6 & 13, 1-3 p.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-1025) MANAGING YOUR ESTATE, AN OVERVIEW. Learn about estate management through the use of powers of attorney for health and finances, trusts, conservatorships and wills with Kip Roberti. Mon., Oct. 29 and Nov. 5, 6-8 p.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1025) MUSHROOM WALK. Learn to identify a broad variety of local fungi. Includes field trip transportation and lunch. With Dick Wild. Thurs., Nov. 1, 6-7:30 p.m. and Sat., Nov. 3, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $70/OLLI members, $95/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-1025) SPIRITUALITY VS. PSYCHOSIS. Bringing Psychology’s New Paradigm into the 21st Century. Where can the line be drawn between “madness” and “mystery”? How does “faith” and “superstition” survive a secular and scientific world view? Explore with Bonnie Shand. Tues., Oct. 30-Dec. 11, 1-3 p.m. $65/OLLI members, $80/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1025) TAKE IT SLOW, TAKE THE TRAIN. Learn the ins and outs of train travel with Louise Bacon-Ogden and David Ogden. Tues., Oct. 30, 5:30-8 p.m. $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1025)

ROLLER SKATING. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation Fri./Sat., 6:30-9:30 p.m., Sun. 2-5 p.m. Adult Skate: 2nd Sun. of every month, 6:30-9:30 p.m. To schedule birthday parties, call 668-5932 or find us on facebook at parks-rec@bluelake. ca.gov. (SR-1227) GET WIRED FOR JOY! 8-session young adults group forming. Learn a USF research-based method to manage emotions in an optimal way that reduces stress and increases joy! Emotional Brain Training Provider Nancy Borge-Riis, LMF T. ( 707 ) 839-7920 or nancyborgeriis@gmail.com (T-1115) TYPE 1 DIABETIC SUPPORT GROUP. meeting the 3rd Tues. of each month, 6-7:30 p.m, at the Foundation of Medical Care, 3100 Edgewood Rd. Eureka. Contact 4430124. (TS-0214) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@yahoo.com or 845-8973 (T-1227)

Vocational

NOTARY TRAINING. One-day seminar for new and renewing notaries provides the practical training needed to pass the comprehensive exam required for all California Notaries. Mon., Nov. 19, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. $149 plus additional for live scan, photo and exam. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Distance & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (V-1108)

INTRO TO TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE. Curious about acupuncture? Want to know how Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) works and what conditions it might benefit? This 2-hour class will explore basic TCM theory and tools of the medicine, including acupuncture, herbs, dietary therapy and more. With Lupine Meredith Wread. Thurs., Nov. 1, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $20. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Distance & Extended Education at 826-3731 to register, or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (W-1025) NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (W-1025) KUNDALINI YOGA WITH JOAN RICHARDS. At Om Shala Yoga. Ongoing Tues.s, 10:30 a.m.-Noon & Thurs.s, 6-7 p.m. $14/drop-in, $100/10-class pass. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga. com (W-1025) YOGA FOR ALL WITH ARTEMISIA SHINE. At Om Shala Yoga. On-going Tues.s & Thurs.s & Fri.s, 4-5:25 p.m. Practice with an open heart! $10-$14 sliding scale. 75% of Fri. class proceeds donated to local charity. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga. com (W-1025) 5 ELEMENTS OF TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE. Five Elements (Wu xing) is an ancient Chinese worldview that has relevance today in Traditional Chinese Medicine, as well as in our day-to-day living. Explore what each of the Five Elements embody and how they relate to our health today. With Lupine Meredith Wread. Thurs., Nov. 8, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $20. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Distance & Extended Education at 826-3731 to register, or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (W-1101) START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY! Evening classes begin Jan. 22, 2013 at Arcata School of Massage. 650-Hour Therapeutic Massage Certification will prepare you for Professional Certification in California, and the National Exam. Our comprehensive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident professional massage therapist. Call 822-5223 for information or visit arcatamassage. com (W-1227)●

Christmas Stocking 11/10 & 11/17 Do you love handmade Christmas decorations? Want to learn more sock techniques? Make an heirloom Scandinavian designed Christmas stocking. Choose from five designs: Peace, Love, Joy, Angel, or Cabin. You’ll learn how to do a provisional cast-on, hem top, knitting in the round, a fair isle (color) knitting technique that weaves the yarn rather than having strands in the back, short row heel (wrapping & hiding wraps), & Kitchener stitch grafting. Cost $75.00 (includes materials)

Call 707.442.9276 or www.northcoastknittery.com NorthCoast KNittery 320 2nd St. between D&E, Eureka Space is Limited!

5 TH ANNUAL APPLE TASTING FREE! Saturday, October 27th 10:30 –11:30 a.m. Sample locally grown apples. Come taste what you could grow!

1828 Central Ave. • McKinleyville • 839-1571 x 5 Mon.-Sat. 8:30 to 5:30 • millerfarmsnursery.com

CHILD ABUSE MANDATED REPORTER TRAINING. With Cara Barnes, M.A., and Carolyn Albee, M.A. Fri., Nov. 2, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., $30 fee includes lunch. $25 additional for nursing or education academic credit or MFT/LCSW CEUs. Pre-registration is required. Call HSU Distance & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt. edu/extended (V-1025)

Wellness/Bodywork

DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Classes with Jane Bothwell. Herbal Clinic Class. Jan. 14-April 15, 2013, Refine and expand your herbal counseling skills. 10 Month Herbal Studies Program. Feb.-Nov. 2013. Meets one weekend per month with three camping trips. Learn in-depth material medica, plant identification, flower essences, wild foods, formulations and harvesting. Plant Lovers Journey to Costa Rica with Jane Bothwell & Rosemary Gladstar, Nov. 14-23, 2013. More information to come soon. Get in touch to be on the interested list. Register online at www.dandelionherb. com or call (707) 442-8157. (W-1101) northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 25, 2012

31


PUBLIC SALE

©2011 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC AUCTION

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK!

ACROSS

1. Tiger ____ 4. QB’s scores 7. Blackjack decision 10. Stock ticker symbol for Barnes & Noble 13. “... man ____ mouse?” 14. Vote of approval 15. Suffix with Milan 16. “106 & Park” network 17. Autobiography of a shorttempered person? 19. Bagel topping 20. Boxer’s warning? 21. Coagulate, as blood 22. Some radio stations 23. Vibes 24. English county’s treat for a tabby?

DOWN

1. “You can’t mean little ol’ me?” 2. They may have you in stitches, in brief 3. Northeast China region 4. Thit and thas? 5. Sonar’s measurement 6. Utter 7. Batter’s need 8. ____ triangle 9. ____-Mex 10. Requested gift in “A Christmas Story” 11. 1996 Olympic gymnast Strug

27. Not even cracked 28. Columbian painter Fernando 29. ____ kiss 30. Maker of ShowHouse faucets 32. “I’m not listening ...” 36. Taking shots at St. Louis’ NHL team from afar? 39. Raspy 40. Small bouquet 41. Word after waste or want 42. 1994 movie based on an “SNL” skit 44. “Pay ____ mind” 45. Girls in Manitoba’s capital city? 50. Tweak some text 51. Chemical in drain cleaners 52. Prepare for planting 53. Yellowstone animal

54. He said “Learn from the masses, and then teach them” 55. Public wardrobe malfunction that exposes a certain body part (as in 17-, 24-, 36- and 45-Across) 58. Ruby of “A Raisin in the Sun” 59. Leaf-turning time: Abbr. 60. I love, to Luis 61. Tide rival 62. Fabric amts. 63. Pint-size 64. Farthest-right bowling pin 65. Managed

12. Banjo accessory 18. “How could ____ this happen?” 22. Headline locale 23. Coral Sea sight 24. Slacks material 25. “____ to differ” 26. Short story in James Joyce’s “Dubliners” 27. Obi, e.g. 30. El ____ (Peruvian volcano) 31. It’s to the left of a decimal 33. “Oklahoma!” role 34. Trotsky and Uris 35. Regarding

37. It may be fine 38. Landford Wilson’s “The ____ Baltimore” 43. Narc’s find, maybe 44. Cruise stops: Abbr. 45. Like an untended garden 46. Sat 47. Air Jordans, e.g. 48. Grisham’s “____ to Kill” 49. Nurse 54. Cut 55. D.C. baseballer 56. A Gershwin 57. Put down in writing? MEDIUM #8

www.sudoku.com

Solution, tips and computer program at

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

32 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 25, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on the 7th of November, 2012, at 9:00 AM, on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at Rainbow Self Storage, at 4055 Broadway Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt the following: Christina Dimico, Unit # 5044 Christina Dimico, Unit # 5140 Linda Mahan, Unit # 5208 Roy Watkins, Unit # 5329 Leticia Maxfield, Unit # 5449 Ashley Tuttle, Unit # 5458 Jeremie Hennings, Unit # 5532 The following units are located at 639 W. Clark Street Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Sangvane Khounsinnavong, Unit # 2117 The following units are located at 3618 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Salina Vanderwaal, Unit # 1119 Amie Ely, Unit # 1157 Christopher Kinnamon, Unit # 1310 Aaron Longtin, Unit # 1741 The following units are located at 105 Indianola Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Arthur Bergenn, Unit # 123 Ian Weatherbee, Unit # 141 Elaine Hermann, Unit # 472 Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: Household furniture, office equipment, household appliances, exercise equipment, TVs, VCR, microwave, bikes, books, misc. tools, misc. camping equipment, misc. stereo equip. misc. yard tools, misc. sports equipment, misc. kids toys, misc. fishing gear, misc. computer components, and misc. boxes and bags contents unknown. Purchases must be paid for at the time of the sale in cash only. Anyone interested in attending the auction must sign in at 4055 Broadway Eureka CA. prior to 9:00 A.M. on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchase items sold as is, where is and must be removed at time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated party. Auctioneer: Rainbow Self-Storage, 707-443-1451, Bond # 40083246. Dated this 25th day of October 2012 and 1st day of November 2012 10/25, 11/1/2012 (12-308)

Notice is hereby given that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the Civil Code. The undersigned will sell at a public auction by competitive bidding on the 2nd of November 2012, at noon, on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at South Bay Mini-Storage, 2031 Eich Road, Eureka, County of Humboldt, State of California, as follows. Items to be sold include but are not limited to the following: Unit #118 Mary Oliva - stereo & speakers, floor jack, vacuum, luggage, boxed items Unit #205 Laura Boatsman - furniture, heater, infant seat, boxed items, toys Unit #213 Jack Sarter - TV, cooler, dresser, table, microwave, boxed items Unit #224 Theresa Simmons - gun cabinet, couch, desk, dresser, boxed items Unit #277 Heather Gant - luggage, bike, helmet, dresser, misc boxes Unit #333 John Dickerson - sewing machine, stereo & speakers, coffee table, rugs, boxed items Unit #503 Clarence Wren - TV, bed set, electronics, boxed items Unit #507 Larry Seminoff - fishing rods, dresser, boxed items Unit #722 Peggy Silva - old baby carriage, VCR, boxed and bagged items Unit #874 Michael V Rogers - guitar, misc bagged and boxed items Purchases must be paid for at the time of purchase in cash only. All purchased items are sold “as is” and must be removed from the premises within 24 hours. Sale subject to cancellation in the event of a settlement between owner and obligated party. Bring a flashlight and padlock(s) Dated this 17th and 24th day of October 2012 CA BOND NO. 0336118 10/18, 10/25/2012 (12-298)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00603

The following person is doing business as JAM SCREEN PRINTING AND GRAPHIC DESIGN OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA at 4149 E St., Apt. A, Eureka, CA 95503. Perry Brubaker 4149 E St., Apt. A Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Perry Brubaker. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 5, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/25, 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/2012 (12-304)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00618

The following person is doing business as INSPIRE WELLNESS at 4589 Fieldbrook Rd., McKinleyville, CA 95519. Juliet C. Ferri 4589 Fieldbrook Rd. McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Juliet C. Ferri. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 12, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/25, 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/2012 (12-307)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00624

The following person is doing business as RIGDEN’S RURAL LAND SERVICE at 3633 Patricks Point Dr., #17, Trinidad, CA 95570, P.O. Box 441, Klamath, CA 95548. Peter Rigden 3633 Patricks Point Dr., #17 Trinidad, CA 95570 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Peter Rigden. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 17, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/25, 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/2012 (12-305)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00626

The following person is doing business as NORTH PACIFIC LANDSCAPE DESIGNS BY GAIRD RIGDEN at 3633 Patricks Point Dr., #16, Trinidad, CA 95570, P.O. Box 1091, Trinidad, CA 95570. Gaird Rigden 3633 Patricks Point Dr., #16 Trinidad, CA 95570 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Gaird Rigden. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 17, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/25, 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/2012 (12-306)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00582

The following persons are doing business THE CLOTHING DOCK & K STREET ANNEX at 1109 11th St., Arcata, CA 95521 Susan D. Paul 1403 Chester Ave. Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 9/30/1999 /s/ Susan Paul This statement was filed with the


County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 27, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/18, 10/25, 11/1, 11/8/2012 (12-301)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00586

The following person is doing business as PURE MAKEUP at 609 E Street, Eureka, CA 95501. Maria Darlina Brandon 3199 Mitchell Rd. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Maria Brandon. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 27, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/18, 10/25, 11/1, 11/8/2012 (12-297)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00616

The following persons are doing HUMBOLDT HARDWARE at 531 2nd St., Eureka, CA 95501 Patrick Murphy 1340 Marsh Rd Eureka, CA 95501 Lane Thomsen Po Box 275/1045 Hawk Hill Rd. Loleta, CA. 95551 The business is conducted by A General Partnership. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 10/12/2012 /s/ Patrick Murphy /s/ Lane Thomsen This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 12, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/18, 10/25, 11/1, 11/8/2012 (12-302)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00617

The following persons are doing HUMBOLDT HARDWARE WHOLESALE at 531 2nd St., Eureka, CA 95501, 1340 Marsh Rd., Eureka, CA. 95501 Patrick Murphy 1340 Marsh Rd Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 10/12/2012 /s/ Patrick Murphy This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 12, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/18, 10/25, 11/1, 11/8/2012 (12-303)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00585

The following person is doing business as CURTIS WILSON CA FISHING GUIDES at 1140 Q St., Arcata, CA 95521. Curtis Wilson 1140 Q St. Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An

Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Curtis Wilson. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 27, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/11, 10/18, 10/25, 11/1/2012 (12-290)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00601

The following persons are doing business as CHARLIE ROSS INSTALLATIONS at 2848 Campton Heights Dr., Fortuna, CA 95540. Charles Kingsland Ross, Jr. 2848 Campton Heights Dr. Fortuna, CA 95540 Mary Lu Ross 2848 Campton Heights Dr. Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 9/1/96. /s Charlie Ross. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 4, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/11, 10/18, 10/25, 11/1/2012 (12-291)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00604

The following persons are doing business as STEVE AND DAVE’S BAR at 200 First St., Eureka, CA 95501. Bryan and Kadiver Inc. 200 First St. Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s David Kadiver, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 5, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/11, 10/18, 10/25, 11/1/2012 (12-292)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00574

The following person is doing business as STITCHES-N-BRITCHES at 1225 Central Avenue, McKinleyville, CA 95519, 360 Cedar Hill Lane, Arcata, CA 95521. Kristin Aleen Anderson 360 Cedar Hill Lane Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 10/01/12. /s Kristin A. Anderson. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 25, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/4, 10/11, 10/18, 10/25/2012 (12-280)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00575

The following person is doing

business as MANY HANDS GALLERY at 438 2ND St., Eureka, CA 95501. Astra N. Burke 836 3rd St., #B Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 9/24/2012. /s Astra N. Burke. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 25, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/4, 10/11, 10/18, 10/25/2012 (12-282)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00576

The following persons are doing business as PINE MOUNTAIN LOGGING AND CONSTRUCTION at 25090 Alderpoint Rd., Blocksburg, CA 95514, P.O. Box 170, Blocksburg, CA 95514. Randy Hoisington 25090 Alderpoint Rd. Blocksburg, CA 95514 Dawnita Rose Hoisington 25090 Alderpoint Rd. Blocksburg, CA 95514 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Dawnita Hoisington. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 25, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/4, 10/11, 10/18, 10/25/2012 (12-283)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00587

The following persons are doing business MOM & ME KRAFTY KREATIONS at 2446 18th St., Eureka, CA 95503, P.O Box 91, Willow Creek, CA. 95573. Zena Bushnell 2285 Friday Ridge Rd. Willow Creek, CA. 95573 Stormie Freeman-Dare 2446 18th St. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by A General Partnership. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s/ Zena Bushnell This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 28, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/4, 10/11, 10/18, 10/25 (12-286)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00590

The following person is doing business as NATURE’S SERVING at 3750 Harris St., Eureka, CA 95501, 138 B Rocky Creek Rd., Bayside, CA 95524. Leira V. Satlof 138 B Rocky Creek Rd. Bayside, CA 95524 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a.

/s Leira V. Satlof. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 28, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/4, 10/11, 10/18, 10/25/2012 (12-288)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF MARY H. RANDALL CASE NO. PR120247

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: MARY H. RANDALL A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by SUSAN RANDALL in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that SUSAN RANDALL be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on November 15, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: DONALD W. BICKNELL S.B.# 83266 ATTORNEY AT LAW 732 5TH STREET, SUITE H

EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 443-0878 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 10/18, 10/25, 11/1/2012 (12-299)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF MATTHEW ARTHUR PESENTI CASE NO. PR120244

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: MATTHEW A. PESENTI A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by RAYMOND R. PESENTI, JR. in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that RAYMOND R. PESENTI, JR. be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on November 15, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: DONALD W. BICKNELL S.B.# 83266 ATTORNEY AT LAW 732 5TH STREET, SUITE H EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 443-0878 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 10/18, 10/25, 11/1/2012 (12-296)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF RICHARD G. KUNES CASE NO. PR120246

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: RICHARD G. KUNES A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by MADELINE KUNES in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that MADELINE KUNES be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on November 1, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JOHN R. STOKES SBN# 67715 STOKES, HAMER, KAUFMAN & KIRK, LLP 381 BAYSIDE ROAD ARCATA, CA 95521 (707) 822-1771 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 10/11, 10/18, 10/25/2012 (12-295)

Curious about legal advertising?

442-1400

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 25, 2012

33


the Employment

Chief TreaTmenT PlanT OPeraTOr CIty oF FortunA $

55,556 - $67,501

Administrative, operational and maintenance functions. Valid CDL, Grade III Wastewater, Grade II Water required, Grade IV Wastewater preferred or must be obtained within 12 months of hire and Grade 3 Water Certification within 18 months. Complete job description and application available at friendlyfortuna.com or City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, (707) 725-7600. Applications must be received by 5:00 pm, 11/9/2012

engineering technician ii

Commercial Lines Agent Loan Servicing Agent • Medical Assistant Construction Remodel Technician Construction Labor • Part Time Outside Sales Refrigeration Technician • Casino IT Director Technology Sales B2B • PT Reception Coming soon - Graphic Design Artist

707.445.9641 www.sequoiapersonnel.com 2930 E Street Eureka, CA 95501

CIty oF FortunA $

(Plus excellent benefits)

CITY OF ARCATA

POLICE OFFICER

(LATERALS, GRADUATES, CURRENT ACADEMY STUDENTS)

$47,523.84 - $57,765.52 / yr. Final Filing Date: Open until filled. Application materials are available at City of Arcata, City Manager’s Office, 736 F Street, Arcata, CA 95521; by calling (707) 822-5953; or at www.cityofarcata.org. EOE. County of Humboldt

EnvironmEntal HEaltH tEcHnician i

$2,278 - $2,923 Monthly plus benefits Processes permits for installing new or repairing or abandoning existing underground storage tanks; explains and applies a variety of regulations and policies regarding environmentally sensitive actions; makes routine field inspections; performs related work as assigned. Two years of office support experience desirable. Must possess a valid California driver’s license. Filing deadline: November 06, 2012. Apply at online at www.co.humboldt.ca.us/jobs or pick up an application at Human Resources, Humboldt County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. AA/EOE

Positions REFERRAL SUPPORT, 1 F/T Eureka SENIOR FINANCE ACCOUNTANT, 1 F/T Arcata SITE ADMINISTRATOR, 1 F/T Humboldt MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST, 1 F/T McKinleyville, 1 F/T Willow Creek, 1 F/T Eureka, 1 P/T Crescent City MEDICAL BILLER, 2 F/T Arcata

40,573 – $49,296

Perform a variety of technical office and field engineering work; to perform public works inspections, surveying, prepare engineering drawings using CADD, GIS mapping; and to do related work as required. Complete job description and required application available at friendlyfortuna.com or City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, 725-7600. Applications and resume for must be received by 5:00 pm on Friday, 11/9/2012

Come join our dedicated team of professionals who are committed to compassionate care.

Become a Mentor! Seeking committed, positive people willing to share their home & help an adult with developmental disabilities lead an integrated life in the community. Become part of a professional team and receive a competitive monthly reimbursement, training & continuous support. Contact Jamie (707) 442-4500 ext. 14 317 Third St. Eureka, CA 95501

ACCOUNT MANAGER FULL-TIME. Mad River Radio Group consisting of 991 KISS FM, MIX 951 and 1067 The EDGE is currently accepting applications for a full time Account Manager position. Preferred applicants should be motivated, ambitious, organized and personable individuals with existing retail or outside sales experience. Competitive pay and commission structure. Income varies per own ability. You must have your own vehicle and provide proof of insurance. Please provide a resume by mail to 728 7th St., Ste. 2-A, Eureka Ca. 95501 or email randy@kjny.net. Mad River Radio is an Equal Opportunity Employer. (E-1025) HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Nonmedical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly fees. 442-8001. (E-1227)

County of Humboldt

MENTAL HEALTH MAINTENANCE CUSTODIAN $2,278 - $2,923 Monthly plus benefits

Performs a full range of custodial and basic building maintenance and repair duties for the Mental Health Branch; cleans and disinfects patient rooms and the inpatient facility; cleans and maintains offices, clinics and other facilities in multiple buildings. Must know proper cleaning methods and the use of cleaning materials, tools and equipment, be skilled general maintenance and repair work. Must be available to work weekends and evenings and pass a fingerprint background check. CDL required; experience performing custodial, housekeeping, or building maintenance duties in an institutional or health-related setting is desirable. Filing deadline: November 7, 2012. Apply at www.co.humboldt.ca.us or pick up application at Humboldt County Personnel 825 5th St. Rm. 100, Eureka. AA/EOE

34 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 25, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

RN CLINIC COORDINATOR, 1 F/T Crescent City MEDICAL ASSISTANT, 1 F/T Willow Creek, 1 P/T Arcata Go to www.opendoorhealth.com for online application Call 707-826-8633 ext. 5140 for information

AIRLINE CAREERS Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-2423214. (E-1025) BILINGUAL CLIENT ADVOCATE. North Coast Rape Crisis Team has opening for a 40+ hr/wk Bilingual (Spanish/English) Client Advocate w/excellent benefits for a team oriented, self-motivated person who wants to provide in-person and phone support to survivors of sexual assault. Applications due on 10/26/12 at 4 p.m. Call 443-2737 for info. EOE (E-1025) DRIVERS NEEDED!! Delivering phone books. Must have license, insurance & own transportation. Call Now! 1-888-718-8485, www. deliveryofphonebooks.com (E1101) HUMBOLDT AREA FOUNDATION SEEKING. two motivated people dedicated to connecting, engaging and inspiring community members of multiple cultures to work together to find solutions to community problems. The Humboldt Community Leadership Organizer will work with a larger team of organizers in Humboldt and Del Norte Counties supporting grassroots leaders. The Regional Community Leadership Development Manager will develop a bi-county organizing organization and funding system. Position open until filled; interviews will occur in November. For more information and to apply, go to www.hafoundation.org or call (707) 442-2993. (E-1025)

AIRLINE CAREERS. Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified, Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059. (AAN CAN) (E-1025) FOSTER PARENTS NEEDED!!! Enriching Lives is seeking committed individuals interested in opening their home and caring for children with developmental disabilities. Initial & continuing education, 24-hour professional support and a monthly stipend of $1000-4000 provided. Call 268-8891 today! (E-1025) ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS. Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300/day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks. 1-800-560-8672 A-109. For casting times/locations. (AAN CAN) (E-1115) BECOME A MENTOR! California Mentor is seeking committed, positive people willing to share their home & help an adult with developmental disabilities lead and integrated life in the community. Become part of a professional team and reive a competitive monthly reimbursement, training & continuous support. Contact Jamie, (707) 442-4500 ext. 14, 317 Third St., Eureka. www.mentorswanted.com (E-1227) your ideal employee may be a Journal reader. If you’re looking for help, advertise in the Marketplace. 442-1400. VISA/MC. Place your ad onlinle at www.northcoastjournal.com Find “Help Wanted” ads online


Employment

14 W. Wabash Ave. Eureka, CA 268-1866 eurekaca.expresspros.com

Real Estate

Rentals Now Hiring:

CPA Experienced Office Mgr Mortgage Loan Officer Commercial Lines Ins. Agent Smog Tech Laborers for Heavy Lifting

Rental Helpers

Offers the largest listing of homes, apartments, condos and rooms for rent in Humboldt County! 4 Seventh Street, Suite A

(707) 443-HELP TheRentalHelpers.com

Humboldt County’s only DRE Licensed Listing Service!

Corner 7 th & A of St.

PRA02054

Rentals

CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO PART-TIME POSITIONS

Crown Club Rep Janitorial Busser/Host (Sunset) Bingo Inventory Clerk Deli Worker Server (Sunset) Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria Employments Applications available in Human Resources/ Seascape/ Cher-Ae Heights Casino or our website at www.cheraeheightscasino.com Cher-Ae Heights is an alcohol and drug free workplace with required testing.

HELP WANTED!!! Extra income! Mailing Brochures from home! Free supplies! Genuine opportunity! No experience required. Start immediately! www.themailingprogram.com (AAN CAN) (E-0228) $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easywork-greatpay. com (AAN CAN) (E-1220) MOVIE EXTRAS, ACTORS, MODELS. Make up to $300/day. No Experience required. All looks and ages. Call 866-339-0331 (AAN CAN) (E-1025)

Hiring?

Post your job opportunities in www.northcoastjournal.com • 442-1400

ARCATA 1 BEDROOM APT. Onsite laundry, parking, near bus, some utilities. $600, (707) 443-4357, www. TheRentalHelpers.com. (R-1025) ARCATA 2 BEDROOM TOWNHOME. Parking, dishwasher, some utilities. $800, (707) 443-4357, www. TheRentalHelpers.com. (R-1025) ARCATA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Deck, garage, yard, laundry hookups. $1400. (707) 443-4357, www. TheRentalHelpers.com (R-1025) EUREKA 1 BEDROOM APT. Appliances, all utilities paid. $595. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com (R-1025) EUREKA 1BD/1BA APARTMENT. 309 E St., Apt. #12. W/S/G Pd. Rent $495. Section 8 OK. W/C Pet. Vac 11/11. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1025) EUREKA 2 BEDROOM APT. Storage, carport, onsite laundry. $695. (707) 443-8227, www.TheRentalHelpers.com. (R-1025) EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. 1335 6th St., #9. W/S/G Pd. MtM Rent $650. Vac 11/01. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1025) EUREKA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. 2 car garage, fireplace, pets considered, yard. $1300. (707) 4434357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com (R-1025) MCKINLEYVILLE 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Yard, garage, laundry hook-ups. $1375. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com. (R1025)

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

Openings soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,300; 2 pers. $23,200; 3 pers. $26,100; 4 pers. $28,950; 5 pers. $31,300; 6 pers. $33,600; 7 pers. $35,900; 8 pers. $38,250.

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

CONTINUED ON next page

EUREKA 3BD/1BA HOUSE. 3395 Trinity. Refridgerator, Lg Yard, Hookups. MtM W/C Pet. Rent $1200. Vac 11/4. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1025) FORTUNA 2 BEDROOM APT. Laundry hookups, upstairs unit. $850. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com (R-1025) FORTUNA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Garage, washer/dryer hookups, yard. $1390. (707) 443-4357, www. TheRentalHelpers.com (R-1025) LO L E TA 2 B D/2 BA TOW N HOUSE. 335 Lincoln Ave., #2. Range, Refridgerator, DW, Carport. W/C Cat. MtM Rent $800. Vac 11/02. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1025) MCKINLEYVILLE 2 BEDROOM APT. Parking, some utilities. $795. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com (R-1025) MOBILE HOME SPACE FOR RENT. Double or Single Wide. Located Space #35 Glendale Mobile Estates. Call info (707) 442-4292 or (707) 407-8909. Near Bluelake. (R-1115) EUREKA 2BD/1.5BA TOWNHOUSE. 3946 Harrison, #6. W/S Paid. Double Car Garage, Fenced Patio. W/C Cat. Rent $850, Vac 11/08. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1025) EUREKA UPSTAIRS 2BD. Most utilities paid. $750/month, $1500 deposit. Coin laundry, No smoking/pets/water beds. (707) 4432540. (R-1025) FORTUNA 3BD/2BA HOUSE. 1206 P St. City Views, Yard with Deck. Double car garage. Hookups. Rent $1500, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1025) EUREKA 1300 SF 3BD HOME. No pets. Call for Details. 443-2246. (R-1101) EUREKA 1BD/1BA APARTMENT. 2214 Fairfield St., Apt., #6. All Utilities Pd. Rent $615. Cat OK, Vac 10/27. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1025)

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS. Plaza Point Apartments, 977 8th St., Arcata. 1 & 2 bedroom apartments and also apartments with special design features for individuals with a disability. Inquire as to the availability of rental subsidy. Must be 62 years of age or older; or disabled, regardless of age. Call (707) 822-2770, Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-1 p.m. TDD #1-800-735-2929. We are an equal opportunity provider and employer. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY ACCESS. (R-1108) ELK RIVER 2900 SF 5BD HOME. No pets. Call for Details. 443-2246. (R-1101) EUREKA 1BD/1BA APARTMENT. 1140 E St., # 2. W/S/G Pd., Rent $595. Cat OK, Vac 10/26. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1025) EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. 225 Hillsdale St., Apt. #2. W/S/G Pd. Rent $750. Section 8 OK. Cat OK, Vac 11/27. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1025) EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. 3222 17th St., Unit C. W/S/G Pd., MtM, Cat OK, Spacious, Garage, Rent $775, Vac Soon. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1025) EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENTS. 230 Wabash Ave., Apt. #6, #11, #19. W/S/G Pd. Rent $645. Section 8 OK. Cat OK, Vac 10/29. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1025) EUREKA 2BD/1BA HOUSE. 17 W 14th St. 6 Mo. Lease, W/C Pets, Den & DR, New Paint, Garage, Rent $975, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1025) EUREKA STUDIO APARTMENTS. 1507 5th St., Apt. #7 & #9. W/S/G Pd. $460. Section 8 OK. Cat OK, Vac Soon. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1025) MCKINLEYVILLE 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. 1138 Gassoway, #15. W/S/G Pd., 6 Month Lease, Sm. Pets OK, Rent $765, Vacant Now. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1025)

real estate

this week

ARCATA CLEAN 1BD. No growing, no illegal drugs, no smoking, no pets. References Required. $840/ month plus deposit. (707) 8227471. (R-1025) ALL AREAS-ROOMMATES.COM. ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) (R-1213)

Business Rentals DOWNTOWN EUREKA OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE. Close to Courthouse. Call 443-2246 for sizes and pricing. (BR-1101) RETAIL & OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE. In historic Jacoby’s Storehouse. Call 826-2426. (BR-1108) DANCE STUDIO RENTAL. Humboldt Capoeira Academy offers rental space for the performing arts, beautiful 2800 sq. f.t dance space offers hardwood floors, wall-to wall windows, full length mirrors, and dressing rooms. Convenient location is visible from the plaza, and will help you to promote your classes. Check with us for rates and availability. Contact Sarara at (707) 498-6155, or sararacdo@hotmail. com. (BR-1227)

WILLOW CREEK PROPERTY. 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R-2 soils report and perk tested. Approved septic system design by Trinity Engineering. Property is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $99,900 will consider offers. (530) 629-2031 (RE-1227)

Lodging/Travel VACATION RENTAL. King Range, Great for family gatherings, workshops, small events, solar powered, easy access, handicap friendly. min. 3 nights www.chemisemountainretreat.com, 986-7794. (L-1025)

Auto CASH FOR CARS. Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) (A-0404) YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMERGENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442-GLAS, Humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (A-1227)

Real Estate

Check out the listings on page 39

real estate

this week

or online @ www.northcoastjournal.com

real estate

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 25, 2012

35


the

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 35

Buy/Sell/Trade

Autos

PLACE YOUR AUTO AD!

ESTATE

Buy/Sell/Trade HALLOWEEN COSTUMES & DECORATIONS 1/2 PRICE ! Blue Tagged Clothes only 25¢ each! Oct. 23-27. Dream Quest Thrift Store-Providing Opportunities for Local Youth in Willow Creek.(530) 629-3564 (BST-1025) MONEY 4 ALL. 11,011 days! Automated. Easy. 831-238-6448 (AAN CAN) (BST-1108)

Yard Sale 996 1 1th s t.

le garage sa › this way

Rummage

SALE KITS • $7

310 F Street., Eureka, CA 95501 Phone 442-1400 • Fax 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com carmen@northcoastjournal.com

Featuring a truckload of NEW furniture (factory overstocks), household misc. + additions incl. Lane cedar chest, blanket chest, raise/lower recliner, leather recliner + others, vintage collectibles, art. Rotary lawn mowers, Stihl chainsaw, Homelite weeder + others (almost new) & MUCH MORE!

Gentle Professional Grooming Since 1989

Join us Saturday Oct. 27 for our “clearing out the shop” sale & WS Fundraiser! 10am to 4pm 550 South G. St, Suite 3, Arcata

Great prices & Great stuff for a Great Cause! (And we could use a few extra hands. so don’t be shy — Let us know if you’d like to volunteer!)

(707) 822-6600 www.worldshelters.org info@worldshelters.org

1701 Giuntoli Lane Arcata • groomingbyLinn.com • 826-0903

Custom Pet Portraits by Sophia Dennler •

ADVANCE NOTICE: NEXT AUCTION THURS. NOV. 8TH 5:45 PM

For more information and to order

Info & Pictures at WWW.CARLJOHNSONCO.COM PREVIEW: Weds. 11-5, Thurs. 11 am on

www.sophiadennler.com/pets 3950 Jacobs Ave. Eureka • 443-4851

REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL ! Get a 4-Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting at $19.99/ mo. FREE HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, CALL NOW. 1-800925-7945. (BST-1025) TOO MANY TUBAS, OVERWHELMED WITH STUFF? Are your crowded shelves an earthquake hazard? List it all here. 442-1400. VISA/MC

FLASHBACK 443-3259 116 W. Wabash Approx. 1-6 Closed Tues & Sun

SELECT SALE: As is & Zombies

THE BEAD LADY. For all your needs in beads! Glass beads, leather, shells, findings, jewelry. Kathy Chase Owner, 76 Country Club Dr Ste 5, Willow Creek. 530629-3540. krchase@yahoo.com. (BST-1227) IT’S FIREWOOD TIME! Alder, Douglas Fir, Juniper, Madrone (sometimes), Oak, Pepperwood, & Kindling. Call for current availability. We can deliver. Almquist Lumber Company, Boyd Road, Arcata. Open 7 days a week. Stop by or call; (707) 825-8880 (BST-0328)

Vintage Clothing Furniture, Housewares & more!

&

K STREET ANNEX

822-8288

n Tow Old

LOOK FOR KITTENS AT PETCO. Sat.s, 11-3 p.m. Our kittens are always fixed, vaccinated, and deparasited $66. Non-Profit. Bless the Beasts. or call (707) 444-0408 (P-1227) PAWS OFF MY HERBS. 8% OFF SALE! Bulk herbs aren’t taxed and Buster still gets a break. It’s a dog’s life. Dot’s Vitality, Dot’s Veggie Vitality and Dot’s Arthritis. Find Dot’s at: Moonrise Herbs, Arcata, Humboldt Herbals, Eureka, or order online at www.humboldtherbals.com (P-1227) LOOKING FOR A PET? Place your ad here! 442-1400. VISA/MC. Place your ad onlinle at www. northcoastjournal.com

PLACE YOUR PET AD!

THE

CLOTHING DOCK 11th & K Streets, Arcata

in ON AT I OC L NEW

Services

• Grooming & Boarding by Linn •

AUCTION

THURS. OCT. 25TH 5:45 PM 20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

Pets

616 Second St. Old Town Eureka 707.443.7017 artcenterframeshop@gmail.com

36 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 25, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

Services

RIGDEN’S RURAL LAND SERVICE. Logging, Excavating, Grading, Water Systems, etc. Peter Rigden (707) 498-1588. (S-1213) BOUDOIR PHOTOGRAPHY. By Venus & Aphrodite, Classy to sassy, comfort and privacy guaranteed. $40 fall special. 223-4172. (S-0110) GROCERIES DELIVERED. Order today. Delivered tomorrow. Get paid to help advertise. 831-2386448 (AAN CAN) (S-1108) AIR-SOURCE HEAT PUMPS. Use solar energy to heat your home. rockydrill@gmail.com. A proven technology, reasonably priced, Sunlight Heating, CA lic. #972834 (707) 502-1289. (S-1025) CREATIVE WRITING COACH/ EDITOR Nurturing, collaborative editing and creative coaching will make your work shine. All styles welcome. C.Baku, MFA. www. carlabaku.com. (S-0207) 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Contact (707) 8453087. (S-1101)

Harvey’s Harvey’s Ha H aarvey’s arvey y at

ALL UNDER ER HEAVEN HE H EA AV VE EN N

Old Town, Eureka 212 F St., 444-2936

&

Arcata Plaza 825-7760


Services

CONTINUED ON PAGE 38

Community

Music

FD1963

(707) 443-1104 humboldtcremation.com No membership required. Only funeral provider in Humboldt County to be certified by the Green Burial Council.

SEABREEZE CLEANING CO. Office & Rentals, Licensed & Bonded(707) 834-2898 (S-0131) HELICOPTER FLIGHT LESSONS/ SCENIC TOURS. Redwood Coast Helicopters, based in Humboldt County. Whatever your helicopter needs, we will accommodate you! $160/hour. redwoodcoasthelicopters@gmail.com (S-1115) LIFE CYCLE LANDSCAPING. Garden Maintenance, Restoration and Design. Serving All of Humboldt County, (707) 672-4398 (S-1206) A’O’KAY JUGGLING CLOWN & WIZARD OF PLAY. Amazing performances and games for all ages. Events, Birthdays, Festivals, Kidszones. I’ll Juggle, Unicycle, & bring Toys. aokayClown.com, (707) 499-5628. (S-1227) ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard maintenance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn and garden needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834-9155, (707) 825-1082. (S-1122) SEWING SERVICE. Stitch in Time repairs & alterations. Fri. and Sat. 11 a.m.- 5 p.m. 1038 11th street, Arcata. 707-496-3447 (S-1227)

ARCATA CLEANING COMPANY. The non-toxic cleaning solution for your home or office. 707-8227819. (S-1227) CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 8391518. (S-1227) TAI CHI GARDENER. Maintaining balance in your yard. Well equipt. Maintenance + Projects 18 yrs experience. Call Orion 825-8074, taichigardener.com. (S-1025) ERIC’S SERVICES. Home Repair, Maintenance, Affordable Prices (707) 499-4828. (S-0808) MCKEEVER ENERGY AND ELECTRIC. McKeever Energy & Electric, Inc. Electrical Contracting, Renewable Energy, Planning & Design. Contact Nate McKeever at 707.822.0100, info@mckeeverenergy.com, or www.mckeeverenergy. com. Lic # 965286. (S-1227) WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. 443-8373. www.ZevLev.com. (S-1227)

Legal Services

PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (M-1227) ROAD TRIX ENTERTAINMENT. Live Music. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all Kinds. Bookings, Bradley Dean, 832-7419. (M-1108) MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multitrack recording. (707) 476-9239. (M-1122) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginner-advanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (M-1227) GUITAR/PIANO/VOICE LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (M-1227) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502-9469 (M-1115)

Greg Rael Law Offices

Practice devoted exclusively to Criminal Defense since 1976 1026 Third Street Eureka

(707) 445-9666

Looking for a romantic getaway?

Community HALLOWEEN CARNIVAL STORYBOOK ADVENTURE. What would your favorite storybook look like if it came to life? Come to a Storybook Adventure at Eureka Recreation’s Annual Halloween Carnival on Wed., Oct. 31, 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the Adorni Center. A safe alternative to trick-or-treating for youth 12 & under accompanied by an adult. $2/ child, adults are free. Call 441-4244 for more info. (C-1025) OUT OF THIS WORLD HALLOWEEN CARNIVAL. Arcata Recreation Division invites youth 10 and under to the Arcata Community Center, Oct. 31, 5:30-7:30 p.m., for games, prizes and more. $2 donation. Proceeds benefit the Youth Development Scholarship Fund. Call 822-7091 or visit our website www.cityofarcata.org/ rec. (C-1025)

The Wedding Guide is available at newsstands and wedding retailers throughout Humboldt & online at

northcoastjournal.com

What do you think? The Journal wants to learn about readers like you. Please participate in this quick online survey so we can keep bringing you the best newspaper in town. You can take the survey online at:

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Thank you!

& ipate N a c i t r I Pa uld W icate o c you t certif if $50 g a LOCAL ! to NT URA A T S RE northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 25, 2012

37


e

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 37

body, mind

&Spirit

the Community NOW CASTING. Had an affair? Want to come clean? A new television series may be able to SAVE YOUR MARRIAGE! Contact 323-860-6745 or marriage.crisis. help482@gmail.com (C-1025) SAME SEX MARRIAGE, WHEN RIGHTS, MORALS & LOVE COLLIDE. How same-sex marriages are impacting society discussed at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun. Oct. 28, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. 672-2919, www.campbellcreek. org for more info. (C-1025) HEY PARENTS! If you don’t teach your son how to become a healthy & responsible young man, then who will? The Media ? His Peers? Not likely. He needs you! Six River Planned Parenthood Presents a Parent/Son Discussion Group, Free, interactive workshop for 6th- 8th grade boys and his parents, focusing on responsibility, peer pressure, and the changes to look forward to during puberty. Thurs., Oct. 25, 6-8 p.m, Six River Planned Parenthood, 3225 Timber Fall Court, Eureka. Call for more information, and to register (707) 442-2961. (C-1025) ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE. from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice,*Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-481-9472 www.CenturaOnline.com (AAN CAN) (C-1025) SE X/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@yahoo.com or 845-8973 (C-1227) BECOME A FOSTER PARENT. Provide a safe and stable environment for youth 13-18 for them to learn and grow in their own community. Contact the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services Foster Care Hotline at 441-5013 and ask for Peggy. (C-0124) NORTHCOASTJOURNAL.COM You’ll find searchable back issues, articles, workshops & classes, the calendar, the Menu of Menus, the Wedding Guide...

Energy Life Center Open house oct. 27th 10am-2pm Open Mon- Sat

Call 442-5433 for an appt. 616 Wood St. ~ Eureka energylifecenter@gmail.com

GIT YER VALSSAGE! Swedish, Deep Tissue & Therapeutic Massage.

Valerie Schramm

Certified Massage Therapist

New Lower Prices (707) 826-1165

www.northcoast-medical.com

GOD GIFTED PSYCHIC. Nicole Goodman Love Specialist, will provide happiness and peace of mind with your lover. Can solve all impossible problems. Never fails. 1-866-524-6689 (MB-1025) KICK BUTTS! Become nicotine free with Dave Berman, Clinical Hypnotist. (707) 845-3749. www. ManifestPositivity.com. Helping the YOUniverse conspire on your behalf. (MB-1025) FIND YOUR CENTER @ OM SHALA YOGA! Come practice in a supportive and conscious community. We offer a wide-range of classes for all levels and ages, taught by skilled and dedicated teachers in a warm, light-filled studio in the heart of Arcata! Enjoy a free sauna, showers and lounge with each class. Our gorgeous retail boutique offers yoga apparel, props, books, music and gifts. Yoga styles include: Anusara, Vinyasa, Forrest, Kundalini, Restorative, Prenatal, Kids and more. Discounts for seniors, students and beginners. Take a breath. Enjoy the world. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (MB-1129)

do TERRA ESSENTIAL OILS. Amazing results with no side effects. Maureen Brundage, (707) 498-7749, www.thinkdoterra. com/19719 (MB-1115) CERTIFIED MASSAGE THERAPIST. Samantha Dudman-Miller, (707) 616-6031. (MB-0124) NEEDING SOME SUPPORT RIGHT NOW? Experienced counselor & therapist Linda Nesbitt, MSW, LCSW (Lic#18830) is expanding her practice and welcoming new clients. Focusing on stress/anxiety, depression, grief/loss, trauma recovery, relationship challenges and postpartum support. EMDR Advanced Trained. (707) 268-0929. (MB-1025) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres, 442-4240, www. tarotofbecoming.com. (MB-1227)

Ongoing Classes Workshops Private Sessions Diana Nunes Mizer Parent Educator

707.445.4642 www.consciousparentingsolutions.com

38 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 25, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Marriage & Family Therapist, MFC 47122

Gambling Treatment • Trauma Recovery Addiction Treatment • Stress Management DOT/SAP (707) 496-2856 • shawnabmft@gmail.com 381 Bayside Road, Suite C • Arcata, CA 95521

norcalrecoveryservices.com

Gift Certificates Available (707) 599-5639

BREATHE LOVE, CLAIRVOYANT ENERGY HEALING INTEGRATED WITH AXIS MUNDI ASTROLOGY. Gain clarity for self-empowerment. Rev. Elisabeth Zenker, MSW; (707) 8451450. www.sacredenergyspace. com (MB-1122) NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (MB-1025)

SHAWNA BELL

THE SPINE IS YOUR CONDUIT FOR LIFE-FORCE ENERGY. Open to the Alignment of Your Whole Self: Chiropractic by Dr. Scott Winkler, D.C. and Energy Work by Rebecca Owen. 822-1676. (MB-0919) COACHING FOR PERSONAL EVOLUTION WITH REBECCA OWEN. Access your wholeness by cultivating your Presence in the Now and learning to clear old patterns. 822-5253. (MB-0919) HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing professionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822-2111 (MB-1227) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall, Noon and every Thurs. at the Eureka Vets Hall, Noon. Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marlajoy.zumba.com (MB-0110) AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching non-violent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www.northcoastaikido. org, info@northcoastaikido.org, 826-9395. (MB-1227)

Loving Hands,

Institute of Healing Arts

Est. 1979

MASSAGE THERAPY Weekend Massage Clinic Special ½ hour $30 1 hour $45

Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sat. 9 to 5; Sun. 12 to 4

725-9627

739 12th St., Fortuna www.lovinghandsinstitute.com

ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@yahoo. com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701, www.arcatazengroup. org. (MB-1227) ASTROLOGY & TAROT. With Salina Rain: Readings, Counseling and Classes. Mon., 1:25 p.m. KHSU 90.5 FM. (707) 668-5408. astro@ salinarain.com, www.salinarain. com. (MB-1227) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (MB-1227)


2850 E St., Eureka (Henderson Center),

CommUnITy CrISIS SUpporT:

707

269-2400

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville

Humboldt Co. mental HealtH Crisis line

real estate

445-7715 1-888-849-5728

707

839-9093

www.communityrealty.net

this week

Humboldt domestiC ViolenCe serViCes

443-6042 1-866-668-6543 rape Crisis team Crisis line

home & garden

$450,000

service directory

2 bed, 1 bath, 871 sq ft cottage and large shop on 10 acres in a rural area of McKinleyville, close to the conveniences of town with ocean views and variety of pine, spruce, and redwood trees

national Crisis Hotline

DOW’S PRAIRIE: Have a garden and raise some chickens! on this half-acre in Dow’s Prairie. The older 3 bd/1 ba home needs some TLC and remodelling, but has a good floor plan and a separate laundry room. Includes a garden shed and greenhouse. Great location! mls#235831 $165,000

national suiCide preVention lifeline

1-800-273-TALK YoutH serViCe bureau YoutH & familY Crisis Hotline

home & garden 444-2273

Need some help home & garden around the house?

garden

sdireectrviocrey service directory see page 14

$369,000

4 bed, 3 bath, 2,400 sq ft Lundbar hills spacious home on oversized lot, hardwood floors, custom tile shower in master, south facing decks with bay views on upper deck, RV pad, fenced yard

real estate $267,900

4 bed, 1.5 bath, updated Arcata home, remodeled kitchen, with maple cabinets, hardwood flooring, double pane windows, complete insulation, skylights, family room addition, patio with hot tub

this week

service directory Sylvia Garlick #00814886 Broker GRI/ Owner 1629 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

Charlie Tripodi Land Agent #01332697

7 0 7. 8 3 4 . 3 2 41

service directory

home &

this w

■ MCKINLEYVILLE

445-2881

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433)

real est

Talk to us.

The Journal wants to learn about readers like you. Please participate in this quick online survey so we can keep bringing you the best newspaper in town.

You can take the survey online at: https://www.research.net/s/01-3491 Or scan the QR Code below with your smart phone.

Thank you! te & a icipa Part ld WIN u te o a c c i you t certif f i $50 g a LOCAL ! to ANT AUR REST

707.445.8811 ext.124

NEW DIRECT LINE - 24/7 - 707.476.0435

iCe!

ed pR

Snow Camp Mountain this panoramic +/-160 acre ReduC

parcel features a year round creek, developed water system, rolling meadows with scattered second growth and pockets of old growth trees. Call now!

$325,000

Willow Creek Land/Property

+/-250 acres near Waterman Ridge, only a half an hour from Willow Creek. property boats Southern exposure, timber, two large year round springs, great access and multiple developed building sites.

$450,000

Ferndale ReduCed pRiCe! Land/Property

+/-160 acres off of Centerville Road. property boasts beautiful ocean views, open meadows, standing timber, a pond, year round springs, fruit trees, gardening sites, small rustic cabin and more.

$599,000

2120 Campton Rd. Ste #C – euReka, Ca 95503

w w w. h u m b o l d t l a n d m a n . c o m

COAST JOURNAL northcoastjournal.com • NORTH northcoastjournal.com COAST JOURNAL• •THURSDAY, THURSDAY, OCT. OCT. 25, 2012 • NORTH

39


Fall. Food. Family. TOP OF THE HILL, G STREET, ARCATA

VISIT US AT www.wildberries.com ATM, VISA, MC, AMEX, DISCOVER

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North Coast Journal 10-25-12 Edition  

The North Coast Journal of Politics, People & Art is a guide to what’s really happening on the far North Coast of California.