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MOUNTAIN LIVING

WINTER DREAM HOMES HOME OF THE YEAR INSIDE THE ULTIMATE SKI RETREAT

Nov/Dec 2013


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WELCOME TO INSPIRED M O U N TA I N L I V I N G

AT A P E X M O U N TA I N H O M E S , W E A R E PA S S I O N AT E A B O U T S E T T I N G T H E S TA N D A R D F O R E X C E L L E N C E I N C U S T O M H O M E B U I L D I N G A N D R E N O VA T I O N .

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c u n n i f f e . c o m

Photo by david o. marlow

9 7 0 . 9 2 5 . 5 5 9 0 Photo by david o. marlow

Photo by david o. marlow


2012 AmericAn institute of Architects colorAdo West PeoPle’s choice AWArd Winner


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IN THIS ISSUE

30

38 travel

shopping

WINTER DREAM HOMES NOV/ DEC 2013

64 home of the year 2013

76

reclaimed refinement

92

IN EVERY ISSUE

glass act

From the Editor 8 Online This Month 22 Featured Homes 63 Gallery 112

84 rooms with a view

ON THE COVER The Home of the Year features a dramatic “ski bridge” that connects the main house to an elevator that descends 31 feet to a slopeside ski room. For more, turn to page 64. Photography by Gibeon Photography. 6

ML | November /December 2013

Vol. XIX, No. 7.© 2013 by Network Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. Permission to reprint or quote excerpts granted by written request only. Mountain Living ® (ISSN 1088-6451) is published 7 times a year: bi-monthly, with an additional special issue in August, by Network Communications Inc. 2 Sun Court, NW, Suite 300, Norcross, GA 30092. Periodical postage paid at Norcross, GA, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Mountain Living® P.O. Box 705, Selmer, TN 38375. For change of address include old address as well as new address with both ZIP codes. Allow four to six weeks for change of address to become effective. Please include current mailing label when writing about your subscription. Subscriptions: $29.95 for one year; $52.95 for two years. Canada and Mexico add $20 per year. Single copy price: $4.95. Subscription questions, call (888) 645-7600. CPM#40065056. Canada post PM40063731. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: Station A, P.O. Box 54, Windsor, ON N9A 6J5.


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FROM THE EDITOR

A WINNING DESIGN

and that was certainly the case for our 2013 Home of the Year (see it on page 64), where the problems posed by a steep site in Big Sky, Montana, resulted in architect Reid Smith’s spectacular “ski bridge” (this issue’s cover image) that connects the main house to a slopeside ski room. But that architectural feat is just one of many winning design elements that make this house the ultimate winter retreat. When homeowner Marsha Hill first met with interior designer Hunter Dominick, she requested a swing suspended from the living room ceiling. “I knew then that we were going to have a lot of fun,” Dominick says. That sense of whimsy shines through in details throughout the home, from Marsha’s rustic wood swing that hangs by the fireplace, to a giant daybed with room for the whole family, to an indoor teepee in a log “forest.” To complement these one-of-a-kind touches, Dominick created a bold color palette, pairing fire-engine-red and deep blue in a bathroom, splashing grass green in a guest room, and selecting a black, white and gold moose mount to preside over the great room. The home offers plenty of spaces just for the Hills’ grandchildren (bunkrooms connected by a secret passage, a hot-chocolate station in the ski room), and thoughtful spots that celebrate favorite memories, like a hallway featuring custom wallpaper created from family photos. But what really draws me to this house is something I can’t quite put my finger on. All I can say is there’s a bit of magic in these rooms, and I hope you feel it too. CHRISTINE DEORIO EDITOR IN CHIEF cdeorio @mountainliving.com

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PHOTOS BY GIBEON PHOTOGRAPHY. PORTRAIT BY DEBORAH COTA

Big challenges often lead to great architecture,


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MOUNTAIN LIVING

Publisher Editor in Chief Art Director Associate Editor Copy Editor Contributing Writers

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ONLINE

/

ONLINE THIS MONTH

FOCUS ON:

WINTER ADVENTURE Dreaming of a winter getaway? This November and December, we’ll share our favorite mountain vacation ideas with you at blog.mountainliving.com, from overthe-top experiences to weekend getaways within reach. Here’s one that’s truly a trip of a lifetime:

, &+226( 1&), +,*+3(5)250$1&( 63) ,168/$7,21 'DQ ) 6DWHU ,, $,%'&*3

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WINTER ADVENTURE NO. 1 THE ULTIMATE SKI EXPERIENCE

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This fantasy getaway sounds like an episode of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Bachelor.â&#x20AC;? From your home base at the Four Seasons Resort & Residences in Whistler, B.C.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get there from the airport via helicopter, of courseâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll head to the slopes for two days with a Whistler Blackcomb instructor, plus a day of heli-skiing in the back country. Demo a pair of Prior skis or a snowboardâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and tour the factoryâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;then create your very own custom-designed high-performance skis or snowboard. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time for pampering, too: The rate includes two 50-minute après-ski massages at the Four Seasons spa. From $2,336 per night, double occupancy; five-night minimum stay. fourseasons.com/whistler

Find more winter adventures at blog.mountainliving.com.

w w w. i n s u l s t a r. c o m

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[

WEB mountainliving.com BLOG blog.mountainliving.com FACEBOOK Mountain Living Magazine TWITTER @MtnLivingMag INSTAGRAM @MountainLivingMag


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SHOPPING

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARTIN CRABB

PRODUCED BY LONETA SHOWELL

HIBERNATE

MARTIN CRABB

SUMPTUOUS BLANKETS, LUSH PILLOWS AND SOFT-AS-A-CLOUD BEDDING MAKE A TEMPTING— AND LUXURIOUS—NEST FOR A LONG WINTER’S NAP

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CABIN COMFORT FROM LEFT: GENUINE COYOTE THROW WITH PENDLETON BLANKET LINING, $2,999; Antèks, antekshome.com. FAUX MOHAIR OMBRE THROW, in Gold, $59; Pottery Barn, potterybarn.com. SIENNA BED BLANKET, queen size, $595; Ralph Lauren Home, ralphlauren.com. ECO WOODGRAIN THROW in Chocolate/Flax, $165; in2green, at revamptgoods.com. SARA RASO GOLD TOP SHEET in Ivory, $1,215; Dea, at brassbedfinelinens.com. SILK VELVET IKAT PILLOW in Red, woven in Uzbekistan, $325; Shaver-Ramsey, shaver-ramsey.com. MONGOLIAN LAMB PILLOW in Platinum, 24” square, $139; West Elm, westelm.com. BORGA PILLOW in Flax/Bronze, 22” square, $285; HW Home, hwhome.com. TIBETAN SHEEPSKIN PILLOW in Ivory, 16” square, $99; Room & Board, roomandboard.com. ○

ML | www.mountainliving.com 31


Dahl Showrooms www.dahldesign.com

Dahl of Avon 910 Nottingham Road, Ste S-11 Avon, CO 81620 970.949.9101

Dahl of Glenwood Springs 2550 Highway 82, Bldg B Glenwood Springs, CO 81601 970.384.2707

Dahl of Montrose 1133 N Townsend Ave Montrose, CO 81401 970.249.5342


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FURNITURE + DESIGN NOW LOC A DENVER D TED IN THE ESIGN DIS TRICT

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18,500 sq. ft. Showroom Filled with Furniture & Accessories Complete Interior Design Services 475 South Broadway Denver, CO 80209 www.DAmoreInteriors.com Â&#x2DC; 303.422.8704

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For more information, visit:

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Let Us Tuck You In.

Wrap yourself – and everyone you love – in fabrics so exquisitely milled you won’t ever want to get out of bed. We’ve traveled the shows from New York to Milan to bring you linens and furniture from the finest designers in the world. As always, our professional design staff is here to help you create a look that is yours alone. We’ll take care of all the details so that you can relax, slip in and enjoy your dreams. Visit us in Denver, Boulder or online at www.brassbedfinelinens.com. Luxurious Sheets | Coverlets & Blankets | Pure Down Products | Accent Pillows Organic Mattresses | Heirloom Beds | Tables, Benches & Lamps | Bath Towels & Robes Bath Accessories | Table Linens | Nursery Items | Hostess Gifts | Free Professional Design Service

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TRAVEL

THE MODERN BUTLER GET TO KNOW THE HEAD BUTLER AT UTAH’S ST. REGIS DEER VALLEY RESORT

Things we knew about Alexander Mattinson Head butler Alexander Mattinson and his team are known for making vacations at the St. Regis Deer Valley memorable—and effortless. Whether you’re craving a cup of cocoa in between ski runs, need a new pair of boots or just some help packing up your gear, your wish is their command.

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before meeting him: Born in England, he worked at Buckingham Palace for more than a decade before moving to his wife’s hometown, Park City, Utah. He’s now the head butler for the St. Regis Deer Valley, as well as the hotel brand’s lead butler for the Americas. Things we didn’t know: This 21st-century butler can not only pack a perfect suitcase and secure last-minute dinner reservations at the hottest tables in town, he can also crack a good joke and charm even the toughest customer, all with one hand tucked neatly behind his back.


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ML: What services do St. Regis butlers offer? ALEXANDER MATTINSON: Our services are based on what a butler would have originally done for a house. He wouldn’t actually do all the work, but he would organize all the tasks. Guests give me their requests and I find the right people to do the job. There are five standard signature services provided for suite guests at all St. Regis properties: packing and unpacking; tea and coffee service; and a pressing of two garments per person. There’s also an e-butler system, so you can just shoot a quick email off saying, “I’m skiing back in now, can I get some hot chocolate in my room?” All guests also have access to the butler service desk. ML: Do you provide personalized services too? AM: We have a system within the hotel that allows us to build a profile on every guest. We can then surprise them more easily with, for example, a special birthday cake on their birthday. It allows us to craft different experiences for each guest.

PHOTOS COURTESY ST. REGIS DEER VALLEY

ML: Is today’s butler still starched and stiff? AM: TV and movies have portrayed butlers in such a specific way, and history has shown that a butler should be withdrawn. So we try to put guests at ease. We greet each guest at the front desk and walk them through the hotel to their suite, so we get to build a conversation and show that we’re not stuffy. I like to crack a joke once in a while, to break the ice and find something in common with them. Before you know it, conversation is flowing and you’ve become a part of the family. ○ Learn more about the St. Regis Deer Valley Resort at stregisdeervalley.com.

WE WERE WONDERING... IS IT BUTLERING OR BUTLING?

MOST UNUSUAL REQUEST

SUITCASE-PACKING SECRET

HIGH-TECH BUTLING

“I am a butler. I butle for a guest. Butling is what I do. And as far as I know, a guest is not a butlee.” And should we really call a butler by his last name? “Times have changed. I go by Alexander, but Alex is just fine.”

“At our sister property in Aspen, a woman [who lived abroad] left her shoes at the hotel and didn’t want them FedExed to her; she wanted them personally delivered. So we put them on a plane with somebody and flew them back to her.”

“There’s a lot of tissue paper involved. I put tissue paper in between clothing like I’m layering a lasagna. It absorbs creases and if anything is damp, it won’t bleed onto other items. It looks nice as well. It gives it that je ne sais quoi.”

“Butling is changing with technology. I find that text messaging guests is a great thing. I’ll give them my phone number and tell them they can text me, so it’s just one point person dealing with all of their requests during their stay.”

ML | www.mountainliving.com 39


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Stēl House & Home

Born from the architectural and interior design talents of Brandt Vanderbosch and Kristin Rieke of Vertical Arts Architecture, the newly opened showroom Stēl House & Home brings together a contemporary mountain style with furniture, art and accessories that reveal a unique blend of reclaimed, modern, custom and raw materials. stelhouse.com


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2601 blake street #110 p: 303.996.6195 denver, co 80205 f: 303.355.5274

WARMING HOMES SINCE 1890

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www.valorfireplaces.com ML | www.mountainliving.com 41


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www.harthowerton.com

Designing Complete Environments™ PLANNING

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ARCHITECTURE

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ML | November /December 2013

INTERIOR DESIGN


High-country

photo by Jeremy Swanson, courtesy aspen chamber resort association

photo by bob winsett

Lodging

photo courtesy Park City Chamber/Bureau

The stunning scenery and unparalleled recreation opportunities of the Mountain West set the stage for an ideal experience when vacation time rolls around. With views that stretch for miles, sparkling water and sunsets that you will remember forever, this region belongs at the top of any trip planning or relocation list. Options abound when staying in this part of the country. Whether you are seeking a laid-back, intimate getaway, a sumptuous retreat or a centrally-located home base for outdoor activities, you can find it here.

Mountain resorts offer a full-service experience with a long list of amenities, placed in an extraordinary setting. These all-in-one resorts offer plush accommodations, ranging from spacious rooms to extended suites, suitable for families. Award-winning restaurants and luxurious spas make for a comfortable, relaxing stay. Often placed adjacent to expansive ski areas, the resorts offer four-season fun. Whether your tastes run to skiing, skating, shopping or dining, you can find it nearby. Concierge services can provide quick access to everything from ski gear to biking and hiking trails, fly-fishing and more. Dude ranches offer a down-to-earth experience, letting guests live the life of the great American cowboy (or cowgirl) for a few days. It’s fair to say that the typical ranch hand never enjoyed the level of comfort that these guests will. After a day in the saddle or working with livestock, guests come home to hearty, delicious meals, soft sheets with thick comforters and entertainment under a night sky thick with stars. If a home away from home is more your style, there are hundreds of exquisite dwellings scattered throughout the mountains, ready for your arrival. These dream homes are turn-key ready for guests, and generally have room for friends, family and more. Beautifully appointed, tastefully decorated, and with all the amenities a group could ask for, a mountain home is a superb choice for a special gathering.

photo by liam doran

For those ready for a quiet retreat, consider a bed and breakfast. A home-cooked breakfast, just a few fellow guests and as much or as little privacy as you desire are the hallmarks of this lodging option. Rooms are comfortable, with highthread count sheets, soft bedding and alluring views. B&B’s can be located in the heart of town or off the beaten path, but they all offer a cozy, boutique vibe. If you’re ready to unplug and enjoy the company of those around you and the natural beauty of the mountains, a rustic, backcountry cabin may be the ultimate getaway. All the recreation and entertainment opportunities may still be close by, but here, you’ve got a little space, and a little room to breathe. That’s not to say you won’t enjoy creature comforts; crackling fireplaces, refined décor and kitchens fit for a foodie all add to the understated serenity of a private cabin. Come to the mountains; breathe the clean air, walk or ski the trails, and feel the relaxation settle in. At the end of the day, lay your head down in one of these outstanding properties, and know that you have arrived. -Kelly Smith

A MOUNTAIN LIVING SPECIAL SECTION


Eat. Drink. Play. Stay.

Your Portal for ALL Things Breckenridge. 800.872.8789

ViSitBrEck.com


The next generation in luxury vacation homes. Pinnacle Lodging is now the largest vacation home management company in Breckenridge, providing worldclass lodging, service, and amenities to our guests. From ultra-luxury slopeside chalets to charming downtown Victorian bungalows â&#x20AC;&#x201C; come create your own memories and experience all that Breckenridge has to offer.

335 North Main Street Breckenridge, CO 970.453.0730 pinnaclelodging.com


Spacious studio suites to four-bedroom condominiums located just 150 yards from the Lionshead Gondola. All condos boast a full kitchen, private balcony and gas fireplace. Enjoy the picturesque pool, free parking and so much more.

CONDOMINIUMS & CONFERENCE CENTER

Your Colorado Mountain Home for just a couple of days...or the rest of your life.

Photos courtesy of Jack Affleck and Drew Winners.

800-258-8619 Ask about our Early Season Good Snow Guarantee!


Highlights •

Ski-in/ski-out-style lodging high in the Rockies of Southwest Colorado

133 rooms, including 10 private cabins and 86 condos, all with kitchens and fireplaces

Heated outdoor pool overlooking scenic surroundings

Immediate access to gondola for transportation to the heart of Telluride and one block from Telluride Golf Club

Located on Telluride Ski Course, with ski-in/ski-out access and a full service ski shop

5,000 square feet of intimate meeting space

457 Mountain Village Blvd, Telluride, CO 81435 mountainlodgetelluride.com | 970.369.5000


RENT THIS! M OUN TAIN LIVING’S LUXU RY LEA S ES SP ECIAL SECTIO N

Luxury Steamboat

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Rated #1 on TripAdvisor in Steamboat Springs April 2013

Across the street from the Steamboat Gondola

FEATURES: Perched high alongside Steamboat’s Mt. Werner and rated one of the top 10 log homes in America, the See Me Lodge is one of Colorado’s premier luxury destinations. Whether you are looking for a private chef or ski instructor, an in-home masseuse or just some advice about what to do in town, our private concierge will ensure your stay is unforgettable.

6 bedrooms, 6.5 baths • Steamboat’s most spectacular views • Private on-call shuttle and concierge service • Gourmet chef’s kitchen • Private hot tub • Full-service catered packages with private gourmet chef •

HighmarkSteamboat.com

CONTACT: The See Me Lodge steamboatplatinumlodging.com don@steamboatluxe.com 877.475.6923 | 970.846.8907

A MOUNTAIN LIVING SPECIAL SECTION


Slopeside Luxury in Breckenridge, Colorado Only steps from the Independence SuperChair, the Grand Lodge on Peak 7 combines incredible convenience with unparalleled amenities to provide your family a luxurious mountain vacation you will never forget.

Save 10% Off Lodging Mention source code: MTNLG

866-337-7639

www.grandlodgeonpeak7.com

1979 SKI HILL ROAD â&#x20AC;˘ BRECKENRIDGE,CO 80424


Re-imagined. Re-made. Remarkable. Return to The Peaks Resort and Spa Renowned as one of the top resort-hotels in North America, The Peaks is like no other. Immerse yourself in serenity with a visit to the Spa at The Peaks, ranked 15th Best Spa in North America by Conde Nast Traveler, or dine in the award winning Palmyra restaurant with the best panoramic sunset views in Telluride. The Peaks Resort and Spa offers ski-in/ski-out access directly on the slopes of the Telluride Ski Resort. Additionally, Colorado’s premier heli-skiing outfitter, Helitrax, is located on property with its own heli-pad in the Peaks’ back yard. Whether you’re visiting Telluride for the first time or consider yourself a local, visit the Peaks Resort and Spa and take advantage of unbeatable Ski and Stay Packages all winter long.

800.789.2220 | ThePeaksResort.com


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A Vintage Winter Wonderland

Antique sleighs, skis, poles, skates, toboggans, snowshoes and sleds.

114 Homestead Rd., Evergreen, CO 303-670-8726 | SKICOUNTRYANTIQUES.COM

ML | www.mountainliving.com 53


www.bhhpartners.com

Let us partner with you to make your dream home a reality.

MARC P. HOGAN, AIA 970.453.6880 | Breckenridge MICHAEL R. HOUX, AIA 970.513.1000 | Silverthorne

call us for your Free Design Consultation


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A Slice of Life

Nature’s most beautiful work is captured in CSWoods personally sourced and unique raw woods. Now open in Denver, our showroom has a large selection of hard to find, live edge wood slabs for custom table tops and solid wood surfaces.

Please visit our new showroom and open warehouse. 4355 Monaco Street, Denver, 80216 303-355-0302

www.cswoods.com Table design by Kerry Stoen

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DREAM HOMES

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2013 HOME OF THE YEAR

Atop a ridge in Big Sky, Montana’s exclusive Yellowstone Club community, this site delivers gorgeous views of Electric and Ramshorn peaks and Sphinx Mountain. But its steep slope posed a challenge. Architect Reid Smith’s solution is this dramatic “ski bridge,” which extends through the mountain air to a 31-foot-tall elevator tower. At the base of the tower is the family’s ski room, where they store their gear for easy ski-in, ski-out fun.

STORY BY HILARY MASELL OSWALD

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home of the year

MAGIC ON THE MOUNTAIN Designed to welcome three generations of family, a Montana retreat offers a few surprises amid its dramatic architecture and whimsical interiors

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“ CHALLENGE IS A GOOD THING. IT CREATES GOOD ARCHITECTURE.” REID SMITH

ABOVE: A log colonnade and stone archway define the home’s front entrance. The dramatic columns extend through the foyer and into the great room, “drawing you into the home,” Smith explains. FACING PAGE: Beneath a red ceiling in the dining room, the hefty fir dining table—custom made in Whitefish, Montana—seats 14 people. On one side, interior designer Hunter Dominick swapped typical dining chairs for settees with seats covered in embossed leather. On the other side, chairs are upholstered with an artsy antler fabric in hues of green and khaki—a fun alternative to the traditional antler chandelier—from Hickory Chair. On the far wall hangs a collection of Bavarian antler mounts.

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2013 HOME OF THE YEAR

ARCHITECTURE BY REID SMITH ARCHITECTS INTERIOR DESIGN BY HUNTER & COMPANY CONSTRUCTION BY LANGLAS & ASSOCIATES

Homeowner Marsha Hill had a clear inspiration for the Montana home she and her husband, Gregg, built on a ridgetop site in Big Sky’s Yellowstone Club: “It’s all about our grandkids,” she says. The Hills have five children and six grandchildren (with more on the way), and they wanted a high-country retreat where the whole family could gather to ski in the winter and play golf and tennis in the summer. But the Hills didn’t want just any mountain lodge; they wanted a home characterized by whimsy and fun, a place infused with a little magic. During her first meeting with Bozeman-based architect Reid Smith, Hill explained the ways she envisioned using the home: Her family would come in from skiing, store their gear, change out of their ski clothes, relax in the steam shower or hot tub, and then get cleaned up and ready for a family dinner. The gathering spaces had to be large enough to accommodate everyone but intimate enough to foster conversation. Hill also wanted rooms where everyone could play: a rec room, a theater room, a kids’ playroom, an exercise room and, near the top of her wish list, a space close to the kitchen where the littlest kids could play while their parents chatted and prepared dinner. Finally, the house needed five bedroom suites—one for each child and his or her family—and a pair of bunkrooms for the grandchildren, each with its own bathroom, that would adjoin the master suite. “We talked a lot about function,” Smith says, “and then Marsha told me to be creative with the architecture.” Smith had to be creative. The site is relatively flat at street level, but slopes dramatically down toward the ski access, requiring a clever solution to the challenge of descending the slope—all while capturing views of Sphinx Mountain and Electric and Ramshorn peaks. Smith delivered: The home’s most prominent architectural feature is a “ski bridge” that extends from the main house to an elevator that descends 31 feet to the ski room. “We got pretty excited about this idea,” Smith says. “We use the bridge as an opportunity to prepare you for the day’s skiing. It’s an experience.” The first half of the bridge has a bank of windows on the left, facing north and northeast, and a picture wall on the right. At the halfway point, there’s a small seating area, and the second half of the bridge reveals views to the southwest with a picture wall along the northeast side. At the end is a daybed that feels suspended in air. “You can’t have a fear of heights up there,” Smith says. >>

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The homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s foyer sets the tone for the spaces to come: Handsome wooden doors open to reveal a pinwheel-tile floor that fans out in a traditional pattern. Steps away hangs a rustic swing from La Lune Collection accented with pillows made of fabric inspired by classic Swiss chalet motifs. The stone fireplace is an enormous three-sided structure that anchors the dining room, kitchen and great room.

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2013 HOME OF THE YEAR

ABOVE: The great room is boldly decorated with a large-scale print on two oversized sofas. “We chose floral because it’s unexpected,” Dominick says. The moose head is from MacKenzieChilds. RIGHT: Owners Gregg and Marsha Hill love color, so for the kitchen, Dominick chose fireengine-red cabinets and a black-and-white backsplash of custom tiles. The table that extends from the island is a casual dining spot—“dinette-style,” Dominick calls it. The banquette and table to the left of the range are designed just for the grandkids. “It’s tiny,” Dominick says. “No adults allowed.” The turquoise skull is a signature piece from Hunter & Company.

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“ MARSHA TOLD ME SHE WANTED A SWING IN THE LIVING ROOM, AND I KNEW THEN THAT WE WERE GOING TO HAVE A LOT OF FUN.” HUNTER DOMINICK

Smith’s design, built by Bozeman- and Billings-based Langlas & Associates, includes a few more grand ideas: He created an observation tower with a wraparound deck that captures views of Lone Mountain to the north—“a bonus view,” he calls it. On the main floor, he designed a massive three-sided stone fireplace that anchors the dining room, kitchen and a great room that juts out to reveal a 180-degree panorama. Downstairs, Smith designed the two bunkrooms to be connected by a secret passage. And to satisfy Hill’s request for a kids’ play area near the kitchen, he dreamed up a teepee in the middle of a log “forest.” To these architectural feats, interior designer Hunter Dominick, principal of Hunter & Company in Whitefish, Montana, added exquisite—and playful—details. The interiors feel both Western and new-fashioned. For one of the guest suites, Dominick designed a contemporary cowhide bed, which she paired with a chunky black chest and a green chair with heather-gray upholstery. “The key to the room—to the whole house, really—is that there are unexpected design elements,” Dominick says. “You give your eye much more to enjoy when you skip the matching suites of furniture.” Another eye-catching choice: The dining room showcases antlers—but not in a chandelier. Instead, the dining chairs and benches are upholstered with a largescale antler-print fabric in hues of green and khaki. >>

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The daybed at the end of the ski bridge is accented with fabrics in ski-inspired patterns. The raw metal elevator doors got an alpine update when Dominick painted skis on them. FACING PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: An indoor teepee is surrounded by a log “forest.” The ski room offers space for every family member’s gear—and a hot-chocolate station; the ottomans are reproductions of antique sleds. A bunkroom (one of two) adjoins the master suite.

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FAMILY-FRIENDLY AND FABULOUS How to Design with the Kids in Mind GIVE ’EM SPACE It sounds simple, but spend time thinking about how your kids will use the house. What will a typical day look like? What kinds of spaces do they need—and how can you make those rooms feel special? In this home, the teepee (left) near the kitchen gives the grandkids a place to play while the adults make dinner. A tiny table and banquette are the perfect eating nook for little ones, and for more formal meals, the design team had a kids’ dining table made. MAKE MUCH OF MATERIALS Ask your designer to use materials known for durability: Twill- and velvet-upholstered pieces are better choices than silk. Sisal rugs add texture and hide dirt. Leather looks even more beautiful after a little wear and tear. And tailored slipcovers in washable materials help parents relax when the sippy-cup spills.

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2013 HOME OF THE YEAR

Such bold color choices are especially brilliant against the textural backdrop of stone and timber. Yet instead of feeling unwieldy, the palette is unified in subtle ways. Fire-engine-red cabinets in the kitchen echo the red ceiling in the dining room and the fabrics that accent the daybed at the end of the ski bridge. The grass-green hue of the great room’s rug is repeated in the floral print on the oversized couches, the painted bed frame in a guest room and a plucky fringed ottoman in a seating area. “The key to using color well is having some common threads throughout the house,” Dominick says. There’s plenty to admire, down to the tiniest details: metal cowboyboot hooks in the bunkrooms’ adjoining bathrooms, the cozy glow of the teepee, the glam gold-and-black pulls on the kitchen cabinets. But the Hills’ favorite part of their home suggests the design team succeeded in achieving their primary goal: “I just love to watch the grandkids play,” Hill says. “I love that they’re happy here.” ○

ABOVE: For this powder room, the design team converted a piece of furniture into the vanity and selected an onyx vessel sink. The walls are covered in a textured paper in a modern animal print. The vaulted ceiling gives the small space a feeling of grandeur. RIGHT: Smith designed the textural log wall— “it’s a natural material used more playfully than we usually do,” he says. Dominick had the door painted green to keep the space from feeling too brown and added a little fun with leopardprint needlepoint on the stools.

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BELOW: Each bedroom suite was given a name inspired by one of the Hills’ five children: Rushing Buffalo, Silly Moose, Dancing Fawn, Hungry Bear and Gray Wolf, pictured here. Dominick paneled the walls in a simple plaid pattern of reclaimed wood and filled the in-between spaces with a herringbone-patterned grasscloth wall covering. She also designed the cowhide bed, which was made by Old Hickory Tannery; the green Spool chair is from Hickory Chair. “The green isn’t a lot of color, but it adds that one found piece, that one surprise,” she says.

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Visit mountainliving.com/homeoftheyear2013 for a guide to this home’s products and pros.

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RECLAIMED REFINEMENT A MONTANA SKI LODGE IS A STUDY IN UNDERSTATED ELEGANCE

STORY BY LAURA BEAUSIRE 76

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Contrasting textures and tones add dynamic tension to the kitchen/dining area. Cool white custom wood cabinets by Highline Partners are heavily textured, while the steelfronted kitchen island is starkly industrial. The liveedge reclaimed-walnut dining table, by Michael McGee of Bozeman’s Integrity Builders, also mixes materials, with steel seams and butterfly joints. “I love the way the steel plays off the warm wood,” interior designer Lisa Kanning says. Custom lacquered benches are upholstered in buffalo hide.

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ARCHITECTURE BY LOCATI ARCHITECTS INTERIOR DESIGN BY LISA KANNING INTERIOR DESIGN CONSTRUCTION BY HIGHLINE PARTNERS

There’s a lot to love about a traditional ski lodge, but the rough-and-rustic, heavy-timbered approach isn’t everyone’s cup of cocoa. This Montana home was semi-finished in just such a traditional style when it was purchased by an East Coast couple who recognized its potential. The ski-in/ski-out Yellowstone Club residence, designed by Bozeman-based Locati Architects, featured reclaimed Douglas fir beams, a towering stone living room hearth—and not much else. The owners had admired the fresh modernity of Mountain Living’s 2011 Home of the Year, so they decided to call on the same team of talented design professionals to take the Westernstyle elements of this home in a different, more restrained and contemporary direction. Interior designer Lisa Kanning, of Lisa Kanning Interior Design, and builder Rob McRae, of Big Sky’s Highline Partners, teamed up for the challenge. Together, they developed a plan emphasizing sleek, clean lines and soft neutral colors grounded by rich textural variations. True to mountain form, wood plays a starring, albeit uncommonly sophisticated, role in the home. The reclaimed timbers McRae chose for the new doors, baseboards and trim were particularly rough, with bolt holes and scratches. “But we sanded them very smooth and treated them in a much more refined manner to create a cleaner look that still references the older reclaimed materials in the house,” he explains. For the dining area, Michael McGee, of Bozeman’s Integrity Builders, created a live-edge reclaimed walnut dining table with boldly contrasting steel inlays and butterfly joints. Admitting that “the original orangey-brown beams were not my favorite,” Kanning tempered them by establishing a subdued color palette. “Grays and taupes really warm the space up in a different direction,” she explains. The raw walls— framed, but not drywalled when the project began—were given a warm gray shade of Venetian plaster, and taupe-and-whitegrained fumed-oak floors continue the muted theme. The tall living room space features a floor-to-ceiling stone fireplace original to the home. The designers removed a preexisting wooden mantelpiece to create a cleaner and more contemporary profile, and placed a lounge chair and sofas around a cocktail table designed by Kanning and cleverly crafted by >>

Kanning warmed up the living room by adding generous seating by Hickory Chair in family-friendly indoor/outdoor Holly Hunt fabrics. Custom side tables by C7 Studio have bleached-ash tops supported by chunky steel legs, while the cocktail table reinterprets the same rich walnut used for the nearby dining table. “Fame & Prejudice,” by A.M. Stockhill, hangs above the fireplace.

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“IN THE END WE DECIDED THE TEXTURES COULD STAND ON THEIR OWN.” LISA KANNING

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The master bedroom features dueling textures: Phillip Jeffries grasscloth on the bed wall and Montana Frontier stone on the fireplace wall. The custom bed and settee are by Brownstone Upholstery, and Theodore Waddell’s “Willowcreek Dr. Angus #5” adds an artful note of local color. FACING PAGE: The pristine master bathroom is anchored by a curvaceous Kohler tub and lit by a custom candelabra by CP Lighting.

DESIGNER CHOICES CHOOSE STYLISH AND PRACTICAL WALL COVERINGS.

CHOOSE TEXTURES TO CREATE INTEREST.

CHOOSE FABRICS FOR RELAXED LIVING.

CHOOSE CEILING TREATMENTS TO ADD POLISH.

For walls in heavy use areas— a ski room, kids’ bath, bunk or laundry room—designer Lisa Kanning recommends applying vinyl wall coverings replicating grasscloth, leather or stone as a cost-effective and wear-resistant way to add an extra layer of interest to an otherwise utilitarian space.

“Initially we thought we would add some bright pops of color to the rooms, but in the end we decided the textures could stand on their own,” Kanning explains. Smooth and pebbled leathers, suedes, hair-on hides, shearlings, Melton wool, embroidered fabrics, silk, chenille, velvet and textured vinyls are just some of the tactile materials she introduced along the way.

“One idea for achieving a sophisticated mountain interior that’s also family-friendly is to use outdoor upholstery fabrics on indoor furniture,” Kanning suggests. There are a wide variety of plush velvets and textured chenilles available that are sumptuous yet durable, and they allow for a stress-free environment.

“Ceilings are often underutilized as design elements,” Kanning says. “In this home’s great room, I applied a textured fabric wall covering with a metallic background, which added not only warmth but also much-needed light from the reflective quality of the material.”

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A small office space fits snugly under upstairs beams. Wood from Montana Reclaimed Lumber was used throughout the home, and builder Rob McRae gave baseboards and trim two coats of stain to bring out grayer tones. The leather chairs are from Restoration Hardware. FACING PAGE: Kanning covered the ceiling with a metallic â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chain Mailâ&#x20AC;? wall covering by Phillip Jeffries to reflect light and give a warm glow to the relaxed loft seating area.

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Michael McGee from small cubes of the same walnut used for the dining table. The tawny hues of the custom brindle-cowhide rug tie all the room’s colors together. Upstairs, Kanning envisioned the loft as a “cool hang-out area,” so she furnished it with a comfy sectional and a playful gym mat-inspired coffee table perfect for upraised feet at the end of a day on the slopes. The opposite wall serves as a study, with a reclaimed live-edge slab of white ash for a desk and curvy leather chairs that swivel. The master bedroom’s rugged accent wall is clad in linear pieces of Frontier stone, native to Montana and often used as flagstones. “It’s in keeping with the palette of the living room fireplace but up-

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dated by the more modern stacked-stone shapes,” Kanning explains. Glass shelves built into steel-framed recesses introduce a “stark, clean element into the stone,” she adds. The incredible master bath is sheer design drama. As Kanning remembers, “the alcove just called out for a tub.” She answered that call with a sculptural matte-white Kohler tub placed atop soft gray porcelain tile floors and surrounded by a pale faux-wood-grain wall covering. Gentle illumination comes from Christopher Pullman’s nature-inspired candelabra, embellished with drops of raw-edged crystals. It’s no surprise that in this quietly elegant home, an unexpected detail turns out to be a jewel. ○

Visit mountainliving.com/reclaimedrefinement for a guide to this home’s products and pros.

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ROOMS WITH A VIEW FRESH, MODERN INTERIORS AND A BOLD ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN PLAY WELL TOGETHER AT A VAIL, COLORADO, RETREAT—BUT THE REAL PRIZE IS THE PANORAMA

STORY BY HILARY MASELL OSWALD

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The inspiration for the living room’s design came from this piece of art, by Christopher Beane of New York, that fills the fireplace wall. “The fireplace, the height and scale of the room—all of it was based on this artwork,” interior designer Eddy Doumas says. FACING PAGE: The home’s architecture is a modern riff on agrarian forms connected by bridges with walls of glass. “The home is very much integrated into the existing topography,” architect Brian Judge says. “That’s part of what makes it so special.”

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In the casual family room adjacent to the kitchen, the wood-clad wall is finished in an aubergine hue that matches the kitchen cabinets, tying the rooms together. The two display “cubbies” flank a space that hides the TV. The Lucite animal heads are playful takes on typical taxidermy. FACING PAGE, FROM LEFT: “The owners didn’t want a big porte-cochere or a massive façade,” Judge says. When guests step into the foyer, they look directly into the back garden. A curved hallway with walls of glass extends from the entry to the gathering spaces.

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ARCHITECTURE BY VAG ARCHITECTS & PLANNERS

INTERIOR DESIGN BY WORTH INTERIORS

CONSTRUCTION BY VIELE CONSTRUCTION

It’s no secret that in the mountains, we design around the views. We’re (rightfully) reluctant to sacrifice even the tiniest glimpse of a majestic peak or glimmering colony of aspens when placing our windows and walls. And our devotion pays off: Many high-country homes celebrate vistas so beautiful, they become the owners’ favorite part of mountain living. But this house might top them all. On a four-acre site in Vail’s secluded Mountain Star community, the 9,000-square-foot home was shaped by its surroundings. “Glass and light and connectivity to nature— those were our driving forces,” says architect Brian Judge,

principal of VAg Architects & Planners in nearby Edwards. Instead of designing one hulking mass of a structure, Judge relied on a more romantic idea: “What if you had a compound of four or five agrarian forms, as if someone had built a homestead here? And what if you connected those structures with more contemporary elements?” he says. “That’s the philosophy behind the architecture.” The home’s layout allows expanses of glass to cover at least three walls in almost every room, ushering in abundant natural light and displaying grand views at every turn. >>

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Designer Eddy Doumas, principal of Worth Interiors in Vail, embraced the combination of clean-lined and rustic architectural elements when he created the home’s luxurious interiors, where traditional and contemporary furnishings, fixtures and details mingle for that “mountain-modern” look. “We used very organic materials— wood, stone and steel as opposed to chrome—and detailed them in a more tailored way,” Doumas says. The combination is captivating and unexpected. In the dining room, for instance, regal, turned-leg head chairs from Quatrine flank a traditional Spanish-style dining table. Hélène Aumont side chairs display sleek silhouettes, and the contemporary, arrow-like chandelier is sleeker still. “This chandelier and dining table were never meant to be together,” Doumas admits. “Pairing them breaks the rules, but that’s why they work.” The room also benefits from the addition of rich textures: Above the stone walls, a Phillip Jeffries grasscloth wall covering adds an earthy sophistication to the ceiling. >>

ABOVE: The cubby-like bookshelves in the office “are meant for collections,” Doumas says. Each column is crowned with an old-fashioned pharmacy light. “At night, the room just glows,” he says. RIGHT: The kitchen cabinets are white oak with an aubergine finish that’s been treated with a taupe wash. The glass mosaic backsplash adds modern energy to the space. FACING PAGE: Contemporary and traditional elements combine in the dining room. The ornate head chairs are from Quatrine, and the side chairs are from Hélène Aumont. A grasscloth wall covering on the ceiling adds textural interest.

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“WE INTRODUCED ORGANIC PIECES THAT HAVE A MODERN EDGE —FOR EXAMPLE, WOOD IN VERY NATURAL FINISHES BUT CLEAN SHAPES.” EDDY DOUMAS

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The design is as clever as it is handsome. In each room, subtle details and design elements guide the eye toward the views. In the master bedroom, the design team skipped the traditional fireplace and instead installed a fire pit just a few feet outside the floor-to-ceiling glass doors. “In the evenings, you still get the cozy feeling of the fire, but the room’s focal point is the view,” Doumas explains. Similarly, in the family room, the fireplace is positioned far to one side of the sleek, wood-clad wall for an asymmetrical effect that defers to the views through the

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glass doors on the adjacent wall. But perhaps the best example of this design philosophy is the “bird’s nest,” an office space accessed via a sculptural winding staircase. This second-story room is a “glass box,” Doumas says. “You really feel like you’re in the clouds.” The room’s design is clean, featuring minimal furnishings and columns of “cubbies” topped with old-fashioned pharmacy lights—yet another example of a small, unexpected detail to discover, if you can tear your eyes away from the mountain views. ○

Visit mountainliving.com/roomswithaview for a guide to this home’s products and pros.


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LEFT: In the master bedroom, a painting by New York artist Robert Kelly stands atop a dresser from Jiun Ho. The bed is from Bright Chair Company, and the custom duvet cover is embroidered silk. A Fortuny handpainted silk chandelier crowns the room. RIGHT: The master bathroom is divided into “his” and “hers” sides. His side pairs cabinetry with a cognac/nutmeg finish and a lacquered vanity. The floors are travertine.

Go Mod in the Mountains Feeling inspired to add a few clean-lined elements to your mountain home? Start by shopping these sources: WORTH (worth-home.myshopify.com): Interior designer Eddy Doumas’s shop in Vail—an extension of his design firm—offers a collection of furniture, lighting and accessories that reflect a sleeker interpretation of mountain living. Find pieces from high-quality design houses including Baker, Taracea, Ralph Lauren, Arteriors, Made Goods and more. ORGANIC MODERNISM (organicmodernism.com): This Brooklyn-based store is one of Doumas’s favorites. It’ll be yours, too: The shop combines

hip lodge-style art and accessories with midcentury charm and a few industrial elements. (Don’t miss the animal-inspired oil paintings that would feel right at home in the West.) NUEVO (nuevoliving.com): Here you’ll find chic, contemporary furnishings with an industrial twist, and fixtures that feel inspired by abstract art. Choose from dining tables with reclaimed hardwood tops and cast-iron bases, quirky chrome clocks, sculptural crystal-and-chrome lamps and more.

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FOR A MIDWESTERN ARCHITECT’S INITIATION INTO THE WORLD OF MOUNTAIN HOME DESIGN, THE FIRST TIME PROVES TO BE A CHARM

GLASS ACT

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STORY BY LEILANI MARIE LABONG

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GIBEON PHOTOGRAPHY

While the home may have been designed without ornate embellishment, that doesn’t mean it’s without its architectural hijinks. The stairs, for instance, are cantilevered off a stone wall and only nearly abut the glass, making the flight a sculpture of air and wood. FACING PAGE: The loftiness of the foyer isn’t an indication of a grandly scaled home, but rather a way to put the human form in perspective when taking in the big view. Custom stonework by Avignon Stone reflects Colorado’s rugged terrain.

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The kitchen occupies one end of the great room. Modestly sized, it suits the family of four well. Industrial gray cabinets emphasize architect Fred Wilsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s modern design, while the dark wood accents help keep the space from feeling too cold. Vintage-inspired bar stools are an homage to the original Uhl Art Steel chairs that were popular in the early 20th century.

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ARCHITECTURE BY MORGANTE-WILSON ARCHITECTS INTERIOR DESIGN BY ERIC COHLER DESIGN CONSTRUCTION BY LABINE BUILDERS

The early blueprints for a contemporary mountain retreat in Avon, Colorado, lingered in architect Fred Wilson’s desk drawer for a few years, waiting for the economy to bounce back. Luckily for the family who had commissioned the home—brownstone-dwelling New Yorkers with a couple of spunky millennials under their roof— the mountains weren’t going anywhere, anytime soon. When it came time for Wilson to dust off the plans in the fall of 2009, those mountain peaks took precedence in the finished design, even more so than they had before—a gesture of gratitude, if you will, for their unwavering strength during a decidedly unsteady time. Such an homage would require vast amounts of glass to wrap the eastern face of the home; enough to emphasize the majestic summits rather than merely frame them. For someone who had never attempted mountain architecture in his life, Wilson’s instincts to diverge from the traditional logcabin designs seen around these parts were brazen—and spot on. “This home is really about materiality,” says Wilson, whose firm, Morgante-Wilson Architects, is based in Evanston, Illinois, where sprawling plains are the defining topographical feature. “It’s not heavy-handed; it’s all very pure and simple.” Compared to the homeowners’ brownstone in Brooklyn Heights, where Wilson worked to preserve and enhance as much of the historical detail as possible, the family’s Colorado getaway is, as the architect proudly says, “devoid of embellishment.” That’s not to say the home is without roots of any kind. Its strong views are emphasized by a simple palette of materials, chosen for their time-honored presence in the region and proven fortitude against the harsh winter elements: beige stucco, cedar (in small amounts, for window- and doortrim purposes only) and Colorado moss rock, deftly arranged by Vail-based Avignon Stone. >>

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Inside, rustic materials ground the modern architecture in the natural environment. Floors of quarter-sawn oak and walls of moss rock add warmth and texture, respectively. New York City interior designer Eric Cohler embraced this dedication to nature, choosing a neutral color palette accented with touches of blue (a cornflower hue for the sofas in the great room; a paler shade on the linen-velvet headboard in the master suite) to reference the sky. Rough-hewn tables, beefy leather club chairs

and sculptural bronze pendant lights resembling planetary orbits all keep the décor, well, down to earth. In some respects, the same could be said for the way the architecture is situated on the site. “We actually slid the house down the hill,” Wilson explains. The back of the house drops eight feet below street level, allowing for a semi-subterranean basement story that opens directly onto a vast open space, a backyard as far as the eye can see. >>

A neighborhood zoning ordinance restricted the street face of the home to an 18foot height—typical for a two-story house. But in order to achieve a bonus “hangout space” (complete with a bunk room for kiddie sleepovers) that wasn’t located in a dank subterranean lair, Wilson nestled the basement level into the side of a hill. The result: a sunny ground-level rec room with easy access to the great outdoors.

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LEFT: Interior designer Eric Cohler used cornflower blue in the great room’s corner seating area to emphasize the blue skies just beyond the glass. BELOW, LEFT: The master bath owes its luxe texture to marble floors and walls. BELOW, RIGHT: While the master suite is modestly sized, the furniture takes full advantage of the dimensions, making the room seem loftier than it really is.

SUN SMART Solar panels are a great option for energy savings, especially in places like Colorado, where the sun shines an average of six hours a day, 300 days a year. Jason Perez, CEO of Colorado-based Conundrum Technologies— the company that installed 18 modules on the roof of this home—gives a few pointers for harnessing the sun’s power. SOUTHERN EXPOSURE If you’ve got south-facing roof space, your house can benefit from solar panels. A 38-degree roof pitch is ideal for catching rays year round. “Panels also add extra life to the roof by protecting it from the sun and elements,” Perez says.

SAVING FOR A RAINY DAY You can bank the energy you produce through a system called “net metering”—a plus for vacation homes that aren’t always occupied. Not ready to take the plunge? Perez suggests installing a conduit just in case. “As technologies advance, having a conduit to pull any type of cable is beneficial.”

SOLAR STYLE Concerned about ruining your home’s good looks? Consider thin-film solar cells, which come in the form of laminate or shingles to minimize the architectural impact, but take heed: Thin-film is expensive and not nearly as effective as standard silicon solar cells (seen on this home).

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Glass railings on the top floor don’t impede the beautiful panorama. Opposite, a wood-paneled wall seamlessly hides the entrance to a guest room. “A hallway of doors would have only detracted from the view,” Wilson says. FACING PAGE: The great room’s fireplace seating evokes lively conversation. Foreseeing the potential for raucous debates, Cohler used performance upholstery on the cushy club chairs to protect against spills.

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“THIS HOME IS REALLY ABOUT MATERIALITY. IT’S NOT HEAVY-HANDED; IT’S ALL VERY PURE AND SIMPLE.” FRED WILSON

The beauty of the architecture is the tension it strikes between the magnificence of its surroundings and its purpose as a cozy family home. “The spaces are very human in scale,” Wilson says. While the rooms have standard ceiling heights—a comfortable nine feet—their perceived grandness comes in part from the full-height windows and the views that accompany them. In the foyer, however,

more

illusion is hardly part of the equation. From the home’s humble street façade, the owners enter a space where the ceilings soar 18 feet to showcase the mountains in their full glory. “Just imagine coming from New York City to this,” Wilson says. “Colorado might as well be on the opposite side of the world. The architecture doesn’t hinder the experience, it only makes it better.” ○

Visit mountainliving.com/glassact for a guide to this home’s products and pros.

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STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP Management and Circulation 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Publication Title: Mountain Living Publication No.: 017-726 Filing Date: 9/01/2013 Issue Frequency: Jan/Feb, Mar/April, May/Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep/Oct, Nov/Dec. No. of Issues Published Annually: 7 Annual Subscription Price: $29.95. Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication (Not Printer): Two Sun Court, Ste. 300, Norcross, GA 30092. Contact Person: Kurt Coey, 303-524-6557. 8. Complete Mailing Address of Headquarters or General Business Office of Publisher (not printer): Two Sun Court, Ste. 300, Norcross, GA 30092. 9. Full Names and Complete Mailing Addresses of Publisher, Editor, and Managing Editor: Publisher: Holly Scott, 1780 S. Bellaire St. Ste. 505, Denver, CO 80222. Editor: Christine DeOrio, 1780 S. Bellaire St. Ste. 505, Denver, CO 80222. Managing Editor: Laura Beausire, 1780 S. Bellaire St. Ste. 505, Denver, CO 80222. 10. Owner (If the publication is owned by a corporation, give the name and address of the corporation immediately followed by the names and addresses of all stockholders owning or holding 1 percent or more of the total amount of stock. If not owned by a corporation, give the names and addresses of the individual owners. If owned by a partnership or other unincorporated firm, give its name and address as well as those of each individual owner. If the publication is published by a nonprofit organization, give its name and address.): Network Communications, Inc. (NCI) Two Sun Court, Ste. 300, Norcross, GA 30092. Beach Point Capital Management LP. (owns 100% of NCI) Two Sun Court, Ste. 300, Norcross, GA 30092. 11. Known Bondholders, Mortgagees, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or Other Securities: Network Communications, Inc. (NCI) Two Sun Court, Ste. 300, Norcross, GA 30092. Beach Point Capital Management LP. (owns 100% of NCI) Two Sun Court, Ste. 300, Norcross, GA 30092. 12. Tax Status: For completion by nonprofit organizations authorized to mail at nonprofit rates. The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes: Has Not Changed During Preceding 12 Months. 13. Publication Title: Mountain Living 14. Issue date for circulation data below: Sep/Oct 2013. 15. Extent and nature of circulation: A. Total no. copies (Net Press Run): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 28,161. No. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 30,102. B. Legitimate Paid and/or requested distribution (By Mail and Outside the Mail): 1. Outside-county Paid/Requested mail subscriptions stated on PS Form 3541. (Include direct written request from recipient, telemarketing and Internet requests from recipient, paid subscriptions including nominal rate subscriptions, employer requests, advertiserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proof copies and exchange copies): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 8,016. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 8,793. 2. In-county Paid/Requested mail subscriptions stated on PS Form 3541. (Include direct written request from recipient, telemarketing and Internet requests from recipient, paid subscriptions including nominal rate subscriptions, employer requests, advertiserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proof copies and exchange copies): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, Not Applicable. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, Not applicable. 3. Sales through dealers and carriers, street vendors, counter sales, and other Paid or Requested Distribution Outside USPS: Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 4,573. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 4,867. 4. Requested Copies Distributed by Other Mail Classes Through the USPS (e.g. FirstClass Mail): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, Not applicable. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, Not applicable. C. Total paid and/or requested circulation (Sum of 15b(1), (2), (3), and (4)): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 12,588. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 13,660. D. Nonrequested Distribution (By Mail and Outside the Mail): 1. Outside-county Nonrequested Copies on PS Form 3541 (Include Sample copies, Requests Over 3 years old, Requests induced by a Premium, Bulk Sales and Requests including Association requests, Names obtained from Business Directories, Lists, and other sources): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 2,536. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 2,742. 2. In-county Nonrequested Copies on PS Form 3541 (Include Sample copies, Requests Over 3 years old, Requests induced by a Premium, Bulk Sales and Requests including Association requests, Names obtained from Business Directories, Lists, and other sources): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, Not applicable. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, Not applicable. 3. Nonrequested Copies Distributed Through the USPS by Other Classes of Mail (e.g. First-Class Mail, Nonrequestor Copies mailed in excess of 10% Limit mailed at Standard Mail or Package Services Rates): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, Not applicable. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, Not applicable. 4. Nonrequested Copies Distributed Outside the Mail (Include Pickup Stands, Trade Shows, Showrooms and Other Sources): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 5,195. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 6,087. E. Total Nonrequested Distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4)): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 7,731. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 8,829. F. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and e): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 20,319. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 22,489. G. Copies not Distributed (See Instructions to Publishers #4, (page #3): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 7,842. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 7,613. H. Total (Sum of 15f and g): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 28,161. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 30,102. I. Percent paid and/or requested circulation (15C divided by F times 100): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 62%. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 61%. 16. Publication of Statement of Ownership for a Requester Publication is required and will be printed in the Nov/Dec 2013 issue of this publication. 17. I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties).

WHERE DESIGN COMES TO LIFE

Myth. Orchids have a reputation for being difficult to grow, however, there are many varieties that make excellent house plants. Orchid care is not difficult, it is just different. Another myth is that working with an interior designer is difficult and complicated. In fact, when you hire an ASID interior designer, you get an experienced practitioner who can solve problems, even save you money by helping you avoid costly mistakes, referring reliable contractors, and selecting products and materials that meet your budget and design requirements. ASID interior designers are different. Let your interior design project come to life. Hire an ASID interior designer, today.

Find a designer at asidcolorado.org

ML | www.mountainliving.com 101


AWARDS GALA SEPTEMBER 20, 2013 | Summit County, Colorado

For the fifth consecutive year, Mountain Living was proud to sponsor the Summit County Builders Association’s Summit County Parade of Homes, an annual showcase of high-country homes located in beautiful Summit County, Colorado. On Friday, September 20, 2013, local residents and design-industry insiders joined Mountain Living at the Lodge & Spa at Breckenridge to celebrate the best design on display on this year’s tour.

2013

MOUNTAIN LIVING PEAK AWARD WINNER

36 Thackwell Lane, Keystone, CO

We were pleased to present our Peak Award for best in show to McCrerey Fine Homes, DHR Architecture, and Designs by Sundown for their work on the spectacular home at 36 Thackwell Lane. Congratulations from all of us at Mountain Living! EVENT PHOTOS BY STUDIO KIVA PHOTOGRAPHY

A MOUNTAIN LIVING SPECIAL SECTION


design finds luxury Products and services for your home

Cedar mountain

We Finish What Mother Nature Started. Cedar Mountain creates one-of-a-kind, heirloom-quality vanities, kitchen islands, fireplace mantels, tables and more for the home. No two pieces are ever alike, and each is customized to meet your specifications and handcrafted in the United States. Sinks start at $1,999. To learn more, call us at 877-423-7686 or visit cedarmountaincollection.com

Stone Wood and Steel Pictured: “Kerry the Caribou” from the Big 5 Trophy Head Series by Yahmis Mild steel mounted on hemlock 32” x 26” x 28” Hand-forged in the foothills of the Canadian Rockies stonewoodandsteel.ca

d’amore interiors

Tired of searching for the perfect pieces that fit your lifestyle? At D’Amore Interiors, we specialize in creating spaces that cater to your entire family’s needs. With the use of our complete interior design services, you can relax, knowing that you will be taken care of by our highly skilled design team, with their access to an abundance of resources. To learn more, call us at 303-422-8704 or visit damoreinteriors.com

Vantia Hardwoods

Vantia Hardwoods of Colorado supplies and installs premier customized hardwoods, ranging from reclaimed to European engineered, wide-plank to custom-stained or distressed. To match your home’s unique style, Vantia does the distressing and staining by hand, right in the heart of the Rockies in Summit County, Colorado. Check out the company’s portfolio of projects and products at vantiahardwoods.com. A MOUNTAIN LIVING SPECIAL SECTION


DESIGN FINDS LUXURY PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR YOUR HOME

SKYHAWK ULTRA HIGH-POWERED BINOCULARS

Make the most of your beautiful mountain, ocean, or lake views with the SkyHawk 9600 binoculars—so high-powered, they seem to bring views that are miles away right into your living room. Enjoy sensational nature watching of game animals, birds, whales, even butterflies as well as long-distance viewing of land, sea, or space with the comfort of using both eyes. See what you’ve been missing! SKYHAWKOPTICS.COM 760-452-6145

BEATRIZ BALL COLLECTION

Sculptural pieces that are as much an ornament as they are practical, Beatriz Ball pieces are non-tarnish and can be used to serve, chill and warm your food. Environmentally friendly, and made entirely by hand, one at a time, using 100% recycled materials, the Dakota bowl from their Soho Collection features a chiseled rim, and a slightly raised base. Designed for the way you live now, Beatriz Ball pieces are also the top choice for today’s bride. 10 3/4 x 10 3/4 x 3 ¾ 6676: MSRP $100 BEATRIZBALL.COM | 888-265-1076

SHOP MOUNTAINLIVING.COM

Looking for more great design finds? Log on to mountainliving.com, click on our “Find a Resource,” and instantly browse hundreds of home-design products and services, plus top high-country destinations and properties for sale—all with a click of your mouse! And, for hot product picks, direct from our editors (like the Chinese Chestnut Study by Owen Mortensen and the Minotaur Club Chair by Blackman Cruz, pictured here), visit the ML blog at MOUNTAINLIVING.COM/BLOG A MOUNTAIN LIVING SPECIAL SECTION

MONTANA LEATHER DESIGNS

From Montana’s Bitterroot Valley, award-winning leather artist Olive Parker carves, stitches and dyes leather home accents and one- of-a-kind personal accessories. Custom orders welcome. See more at MONTANALEATHERDESIGNS.COM, or call 406-381-0284.


PHOTO BY INGRID LUNDAHL

3

A MOUNTAIN LIVING SPECIAL SECTION

PHOTO BY VIVIEN KILLILEA

PHOTO BY PAMELA GENTILE

PHOTO BY PATTY PENTA

PHOTO BY JOHN SCHULTZ

PHOTO BY EMELYN MORRIS

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OUT & ABOUT Mountain Living was proud to sponsor the following fall festivals and events. To learn about upcoming events in the high country, visit mountainliving.com/category/events. 1. CHERRY CREEK ARTS FESTIVAL PHOTO BY LONETA SHOWELL

5

JULY 5-7, 2013

2. ASID CRYSTAL AWARDS JULY 11, 2013

PHOTOS BY KELLY TASKER

3. END-OF-SUMMER NETWORKING EVENT AUGUST 22, 2013

PHOTOS BY KELLY TASKER

4. TELLURIDE FILM FESTIVAL

AUGUST 29–SEPTEMBER 2, 2013

5. JACKSON HOLE FALL ARTS FESTIVAL SEPTEMBER 5-15, 2013 PHOTOS BY KATHY ERICKSEN

6. WESTERN DESIGN CONFERENCE SEPTEMBER 5-8, 2013

PHOTOS BY LANE GRIFFIN

7. CODY HIGH STYLE

SEPTEMBER 18-22, 2013

8. SUMMIT COUNTY PARADE OF HOMES AWARDS GALA SEPTEMBER 20, 2013 PHOTOS BY STUDIO KIVA PHOTOGRAPHY

7

6 8 A MOUNTAIN LIVING SPECIAL SECTION


NOURISH YOUR MIND THIS WINTER WITH THE

VAIL SYMPOSIUM FEATURED SPEAKERS & EVENTS: D ECEM BER 28

David Rubenstein

JAN UARY 9

Chief Randall McCook | The Mountain Ute

F E B RUARY 13

Barney Frank | The Fall-Out of Dodd Frank

F E B RUARY 25

Marketing Colorado | Kelly Brough, Aaron Kennedy, Steve Sander

MARC H 7 MA RC H 20

Stephan Koch | Snowboard Mountaineer Eben Alexander | Proof of Heaven

THE COMPLETE WINTER 2014 SCHEDULE IS COMING NOVEMBER 1, 2013. GO TO WWW.VAILSYMPOSIUM.ORG FOR MORE INFORMATION. The dates & events above are subject to change. Please visit our website for the most up-to-date information.

www.vailsymposium.org


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C A L G A RY, A L B E RTA , C A NA DA

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C A N M OR E , A L B E RTA , C A NA DA

TAY L OR S V I L L E , C A

Leave the noise of the city behind but keep all the comforts less than 60 minutes from Calgary. Nestled atop a ridge on the 147 acre estate, this unique country home is surrounded by gardens, streams, ponds and mature forests and the Rocky Mountains in the distance. $12,000,000 CAD. Dennis Plintz. dennis@plintz.com

Renaissance redefines luxury living in the Canadian Rockies. West of Calgary in the Canmore region where world class skiing, hiking, golf and fresh air abound. 2, 3, 4 bedroom suites available. $800,000-$3,000,000. Michael Zelenski. mzelenski@sothebysrealty.ca

This ranch offers 1,514 acres of private valley with meadows and forests in the Sierra Nevada mountains. The main residence is a stunning 9,000 sf log home with 6 BR, 8 baths and 6 fireplaces. The ranch has 7 homes, a heliport, 10 barns, ponds, and a lake. $13,750,000. scott.conley@sothebysrealty.com

Sotheby’s International Realty Canada +1 403.608.1112 | sothebysrealty.ca

Sotheby’s International Realty Canada +1 403.244.9215 | renaissancecanmore.com

Pacific Sotheby’s International Realty +1 858.764.2040 | pacificsothebysrealty.com

C ON I F E R , C O

E V E RG R E E N , C O

S A N DP OI N T, I D

This newly built home is reminiscent of a historic ranch. The main house enjoys main level living while the guest house offers 2 BR, 2 baths plus a full kitchen and study. The acreage is fully fenced and gentle with mountain and city views. $2,879,000. Emily Henderson.

Ideal horse property - 18.39 close-in gentle acres has 4 stall barn, outdoor arena, stream and pond. Fine craftsmanship is displayed throughout the 8,851 sf completely remodeled home. Terraced patios, waterfall, gazebo and lawns. $2,600,000. Jennifer Davenport.

Kataryna Castle at Schweitzer Resort: an authentically constructed castle with towers, turrets, battlements, portcullis, drawbridge and moat. Perfect for ski-in ski-out winter sport and lazy summer days on Lake Pend Oreille. Price upon request. Louise Boomer. louise@louiseboomer.com

Fuller Sotheby’s International Realty +1 303.717.3418 | fullersothebysrealty.com

Fuller Sotheby’s International Realty +1 720.488.6003 | fullersothebysrealty.com

Tomlinson Sotheby’s International Realty +1 208.627.8384 | katarynacastle.com

© MMXIII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. A Realogy Company. All Rights Reserved. ©2012 LIK USA. Photo by Peter Lik. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a registered trademark licensed to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity . Each office is Independently Owned and Operated except offices Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.

ML | www.mountainliving.com 109


DECEMBER 28, 2013 4:30–7:30 PM

SAVE THE DATE

CALL 970.925.8050 FOR RESERVATIONS

FREESTYLE 2013 A BENEFIT FOR THE ASPEN ART MUSEUM

WELCOMING 2013 SPONSOR

www.aspenartmuseum.org 590 N. Mill Street Aspen, Colorado 81611


Redesigned with our readers in mind,

M o u n ta i n L i v i n g . c o m is now faster, cleaner and easier to navigate.

The “Photo Galleries” tab lets you view your favorite spaces by room and style. It’s now easier than ever to pin images from our website onto Pinterest— and “build” your dream home with just a few clicks!

photo by Audrey hall

Keep up with the editors of ML on their blog as they report on the latest happenings from the high-country design scene. Our exclusive “Find a Resource” service lets you connect with the very best architects, interior designers, builders and more.

bringing the spirit of the high country home


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ML

GALLERY

COMMUNAL CONNECTION

THUNDER CLOUD OVER BUTTE

BEST KNOWN FOR: Bold Southwestern landscapes rendered in lush colors. INSPIRATION: A proud member of the Tewa-Hopi tribe, Namingha has been exploring the spirit of his ancestry and his homeland for more than 40 years. COMMANDING RESPECT: As one of the most prominent Native American artists of our time, Namingha’s voice resonates. His unwavering

112

ML | November /December 2013

Dan Namingha

oil on canvas 40” x 40” Niman Fine Art 125 Lincoln Ave., Suite 116 Santa Fe, NM 505-988-5091 namingha.com

respect for the earth, deep connection to his family roots and belief in “the communal spirit of the universe” add a profound level of meaning to his works. ON VIEW: See Dan Namingha’s work at Niman Fine Art, Altamira Fine Art (Jackson, Wyoming; altamiraart.com) and Ann Korologos Gallery (Basalt, Colorado; korologosgallery.com). His work will also be on exhibition at the Museum of Northern Arizona (Flagstaff, Arizona; musnaz.org), November 16, 2013 - May 4, 2014.

PHOTO BY NICOLE NAMINGHA

THE ARTIST: Dan Namingha


Benchmark Manor

529 Benchmark Drive - Mountain Village, Colorado

Great Room

Kitchen

Guest Cottage Living Room

A magnificent blend of bold, hand-crafted mountain architecture, refined finishes, awe-inspiring living spaces and contemporary comforts, all slope side with enchanted forest-like private ski and walking trails to and from the residence. An exterior of Telluride Gold Stone, antique timbers and barn wood siding surround a motor court that welcomes guests and family. Four outdoor living spaces nestled amongst old growth spruce are located on 2.64 secluded acres with breathtaking views of the San Sophia Range. The main residence encompasses four luxurious master suites, fireplaces with carved wood and glazed stone surrounds, a three-sided mezzanine with sitting room and full laundry, elevator, home theater, billiard/game room with wet bar, dine-in wine cellar, powder room and gallery hall. A “library-breezeway” joins the main residence to a two bedroom/two bath French country guest cottage. $12,450,000 www.TellurideBenchmarkManor.com

George Harvey  970.729.0111  George@TheHarveyTeam.net  www.TheHarveyTeam.net Post Office Box 2283  Telluride, Colorado 81435


Photo courtesy of Chris Marona

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November / December 2013 Winter Dream Homes Home of the Year

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November / December 2013 Winter Dream Homes Home of the Year

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