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News for members of Singing River Electric Power Association

Silhouettes

Periodical postage (ISSN 1052 2433)

Bringing

to light 4

pages 14-15

Life before electricity not ‘the good ole days’

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New book celebrates the Delta hot tamale

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Starting school can be scary


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October 2016

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October 2016

Our new name emphasizes cooperation that works for you ur name is changing and we have a new logo, but our mission remains the same: to provide services that help your local electric power association better serve you. Electric Power Associations of Mississippi is now Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi, or ECM. The new name more accurately reflects our nature as an association of the 26 electric cooperatives in Mississippi, each one owned and controlled by the people (members) who use its services. When rural Mississippians began organizing notfor-profit electric cooperatives in the 1930s, they soon realized that by working together they could operate more efficiently and keep members’ rates as low as possible. So in 1947, officials from the 11 electric cooperatives in operation at the time formed a statewide organization to obtain (and share the costs of) group insurance and to launch the statewide publication you now hold in your hands. As rural electrification spread across Mississippi and electric cooperatives grew in number, the statewide organization expanded to offer them more services. Today, ECM provides job safety training, emergency restoration coordination, an employee credit union, government relations services, communications and more for its member electric cooperatives. But how does all this benefit you, the electric power association member? It’s this simple: Your electric service is safer, more reliable and more affordable because electric power associations work together to achieve common goals. By sharing services through ECM, electric power associations save money, operate more efficiently, have well-trained employees and restore power faster during outages. They have a strong, unified and

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On the cover Shannon Catoire, a Coast Electric member living in Carriere, photographed a seagull making a few last calls before the sun drops below the horizon. Readers were challenged to photograph silhouettes for this month’s “Picture This” feature. See a sampling of their submissions on pages 14-15. Our next photo theme is Country Churches; details are on page 13.

respected voice in the state legislature and in Congress, a big advantage when some 1.8 million Mississippians are counting on you to protect the quality of their electric service. ECM staff members also work with their electric cooperative counterparts in other states to coordinate power restoration efforts during major outages. You may have seen this program My Opinion in action after Hurricane Michael Callahan Katrina, when thousands of Executive Vice President/CEO Electric Cooperatives electric cooperative workers of Mississippi came from other states to help us rebuild thousands of miles of power lines across the state. We meet regularly with emergency coordinators throughout the region to refine our emergency response plan and ensure cooperation that works to everyone’s advantage. With October being National Cooperative Month, I encourage you to take a moment to consider the benefits of your own cooperative membership. Your electric power association is a responsive, efficient provider of service. Everything about it is local: It is an important contributor to the local economy. It provides a wide range of employment opportunities for local residents. Its employees tend to be community volunteers who serve as youth coaches and support charitable drives. ECM’s new logo signifies the cooperation integral to the daily operations of these 26 electric power associations. Collectively, we distribute electricity to some 85 percent of Mississippi’s land mass. We are a powerful, positive force that works for the benefit of all our members.

Today in Mississippi OFFICERS Tim Smith - President Barry Rowland - First Vice President Randy Smith - Second Vice President Keith Hayward - Secretary/Treasurer

EDITORIAL STAFF Michael Callahan - CEO Ron Stewart - Sr. VP, Communications Mark Bridges - Manager, Support Services Debbie H. Stringer - Editor Elissa Fulton - Communications Specialist Trey Piel - Digital Media Manager Rickey McMillan - Graphics Specialist Linda Hutcherson - Administrative Assistant

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ON FACEBOOK Vol. 69 No. 10 EDITORIAL OFFICE & ADVERTISING 601-605-8600 Acceptance of advertising by Today in Mississippi does not imply endorsement of the advertised product or services by the publisher or Mississippi’s electric power associations. Product satisfaction and delivery responsibility lie solely with the advertiser. • National advertising representative: National Country Market, 800-626-1181 Circulation of this issue: 461,476 Non-member subscription price: $9.50 per year

The Official Publication of the Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Today in Mississippi (ISSN 1052-2433) is published 11 times a year (Jan.-Nov.) by Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Inc., P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300, or 665 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, MS 39157. Phone 601-605-8600. Periodical postage paid at Ridgeland, MS, and additional office. The publisher (and/or its agent) reserves the right to refuse or edit all advertising. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300

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Our Homeplace

Creek beds in Mississippi can yield some unexpected finds, like this fossilized seashell. Go fossil hunting in north Mississippi with Walt Grayson on page 8. Photo: Walt Grayson

Mississippi is beautiful sunrises and brisk walks in the countryside. Going fishing, after a rain and a good cool breeze to settle the dust, in a bream bed to catch a nice supper. Making quilts for the winter. — Jocelyn Thornton, West Mississippi is the beautiful state where I was born and have lived my whole life. In the spring I love seeing the pink maples budding, violets growing and the dogwoods blooming. I love watching the butterflies, robins, bluebirds, quail and all God’s other creatures. I find such pleasure digging and planting my garden. Summertime finds me harvesting my vegetables, gathering polk salad leaves and eating fresh asparagus spears. Fall in Mississippi brings more beauty with all the different colors and cooler weather. On cold nights of winter I love sitting in front of my fireplace. We are occasionally treated to a snowfall, and I watch the redbirds searching for food. Mississippi is the place where I raised my five children. It is the wonderful state where I will finally rest in the 121-year-old church cemetery. The good earth of Mississippi already holds my parents, husband, sister, son, baby great-granddaughter and many other relatives and friends. Others may roam but I will never leave this beautiful Magnolia State. It is home sweet home to me. — Mrs. Gene Anderson, State Line Mississippi to me is the love of the people you meet as you travel through the state. If you break down beside the road, someone is willing to stop and help with a smile or kind word to cheer you on your way. The simple way of life as God intended it to be, helpful and always hopeful. — Connie Pitts, Morton

What’s Mississippi to you? What do you treasure most about life in our state? Send your thoughts to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158, or to news@epaofms.com. Please keep your comments brief. Submissions are subject to editing for length and clarity.

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Life before electricity was way tougher than you think By Debbie Stringer Long before the digital age transformed our lives, a movement of similar impact emerged to extend electric service into rural America. Although nearly all towns and cities had electric service by the 1930s, less than 10 percent of rural homes and farms had electricity. In Mississippi, it was less than one percent. People in rural Mississippi subsisted on hard manual labor before they began organizing electric cooperatives in the mid-1930s to obtain badly needed electricity, with help from a new federal agency, the Rural Electrification Administration (REA). Few people living today have washed clothes on a scrub board and boiled them in an iron pot set over a fire, or cooked three meals a day on a wood stove. Through the years, Today in Mississippi has heard from rural readers for whom these chores were a daily reality before electric lines reached their farms. Such a bleak lifestyle is hard for us to imagine today. “I don’t think young people could go through what we did,” wrote Twin County Electric member Mrs. Wayne Hunter, whose daughter was delivered in 1938 by the light of a coal oil lamp. To celebrate National Cooperative Month, we revisit members’ descriptions of home life before rural electrification and the profound changes sparked by its longawaited arrival. Quotes in this story first appeared in Today in Mississippi articles commemorating the 50th anniversary of REA in 1985.

I It was all done by hand

Mrs. Berry Thornhill, a Magnolia Electric member living in Jayess, described living a “dark, work-hard life” without electric lights, refrigeration, washers, water heaters, water pumps, and dairy equipment. Something as simple as enjoying a glass of iced tea took extraordinary effort: Several homemakers wrote of wrapping 50-pound ice blocks in quilts to keep them from melting and storing them in the hearth (in summer), or packing them in sawdust. Ice was chipped off as needed for iced tea after a long, hot day of work at home or in the fields. Mrs. Marianna Tolle Hill, a 4-County Electric member in Noxubee County, recalled her family storing perishable foods inside an apple crate submerged in a creek. “We had about the same luxuries as all the other neighbors: outside toilet, an iron wash pot, an iron stove with a warming closet, the treadle White sewing machine and a wood pile. We were in a depression but did not know its meaning since we were too young,” Mrs. Hill said. Smoke, soot and ashes were constant irritants from the ever-present fires. Wood was burned to warm the

house, cook meals, heat water and boil laundry. Coal oil lamps provided the only light after dark. “Sometimes the smoke would blow back down the flue into the kitchen. The kitchen would be filled with smoke and I would have to leave out for a while coughing

Electric light was a thing of wonder to rural Americans in the 1930s.

and my eyes burning and running water,” said Mrs. Alvin Johnson, a Southern Pine Electric member living in Crystal Springs. “My mother was awfully proud of her gasoline washing machine.... Can you imagine the smells of gasoline and oil and the noise?” said Singing River Electric member Joel Rogers, of Pascagoula. “Mom used a charcoal bucket to heat the old smoothing iron, and no matter how hard she tried to avoid it, smut marks seemed to get on a Sunday shirt,” recalled Mrs. Lera N. Johnson, of Mantee. “The day power was turned on, I came home from school and Mama was ironing. I don’t think I will ever forget her beaming face as she looked up and said, ‘There’s nothing grander than an electric iron.’”

I Electricity is coming!

Mrs. W.E. Carter, of Louisville, joined the many rural Mississippians eager to help organize a local electric cooperative—in her case, East Mississippi Electric. “In the mid-1930s, we heard about the REA and began holding community meetings,” she wrote. “Soon I went to work in the program and visited every house in the community, signing up members and securing rights-ofway. I plotted each house in the county and drew the lines on a map. It took more than two years of awfully hard work, but when we got lights it made life so much easier for us. It was progress—wonderful progress to me!” “I thought it was the happiest moment of my life when I came home and found we had electric lights,” wrote Mrs. Charles R. Marvin of Hazlehurst, a Southwest Mississippi Electric member. When Southern Pine Electric energized the new

power lines serving Mrs. Alvin Johnson’s home, she was dazzled by the change. “The lights were so bright they almost hurt our eyes at first, since we were accustomed to the dim [coal oil] lamp light. But we were so happy and excited! At last our hopes and dreams had come true,” she said. Monroe County Electric member Mrs. Lois Faulkner, of Greenwood Springs, remembered the single light bulb dangling from the ceiling of her childhood home, filling the room with light for the first time. “For a few nights, every room in every house in the neighborhood was lit up, needed or not. We all wanted the world to know we were out of the backwoods—we had electricity!” she recalled. “The first thing my husband bought me was a wringer washing machine. I was so happy I sat down and cried,” wrote Northcentral Electric member Mrs. Brooksie D. Smith, of Byhalia. “When we got our TV, Papa thought the people on the screen could see us watching them,” said Mrs. Mary Boyles Woodard, a Dixie Electric member in Sidon. Although her parents “got lights” in 1947, Mrs. Woodard’s mother retained some of her old ways. “She passed away in 1983 at the age of 90 years and 10 months, and up until the last two years she was still washing her clothes by hand on her old rub board.”

I The next greatest thing

Mrs. Estelle Barlow Smith, a Southern Pine Electric member, recounted a story from radio show host Paul Harvey: “He was telling of an old gentleman in a rural area in 1940 who said that the greatest thing a person could possibly have is the love of God in his heart, and the next greatest thing is to have electricity in his home. I felt like crying when I heard that because I, for one, also believe it’s true.” A national survey revealed that only electric irons nudged out radios as the most popular purchase after rural homes were electrified. Batteries were expensive and tended to die during the most popular radio dramas, or so it seemed. The new, more reliable plug-in models delivered timely news, farm market reports, weather forecasts, live baseball games, entertainment from Jack Benny to the Lone Ranger, and educational homemaking programs. For Mrs. W.A. Bishop, of Louin, radio brought “good preaching” into her rural home. “I do thank God for letting me live up to the time when our work is made much lighter and easier by electricity,” she said. “Only one who has done without this convenience for years can fully appreciate the significance of now possessing it,” wrote Jean Carraway, an East Mississippi Electric member.


October 2016

VOTER ID made easy & FREE!

In 2010, the Mississippi Secretary of State’s office received a petition with more than 90,000 signatures from qualified electors across the state’s congressional districts requesting a Voter Identification initiative be placed on the November 2011 general election ballot. The initiative measure, now known as Initiative 27, would require voters casting a ballot in a “primary or general election, either in person at the polls or in person in the office of the Circuit Clerk, [to] present a government-issued photo identification before being allowed to vote.” Initiative 27 further provided that if an individual did not possess government issued photo identification, such identification could be obtained from the state free of charge. Mississippians overwhelmingly approved Initiative 27 in the Nov. 8, 2011, general election with 538,656 votes, or 62 percent of the votes cast. House Bill 921, passed by the Mississippi Legislature during the 2012 regular session and later signed by the governor, Delbert Hosemann Secretary of State fulfilled the mandates of Initiative 27. The legislation required each person appearing to vote at a polling place on election day or by absentee ballot in a circuit clerk’s office to identify himself or herself with current and valid photo identification before casting a regular ballot or voting absentee. For electors lacking the correct state- and federally-issued photo identification, House Bill 921 created a new form of state-issued photo identification, the Mississippi Voter Identification Card. The card can be obtained at no cost by completing an application at a circuit clerk’s office. The June 3, 2014, congressional primary election was the first election in which the voter identification law was enforced. Ninety-nine percent of Mississippians voting in the primary election presented proper photo identification.

Y’all vote... EDITOR’S NOTE: We encourage electric cooperative employees and their consumer-members to exercise one of their most basic rights—the right to vote. Electric co-ops are a powerful voice on issues that have a local impact. We want to be sure that our voice is always heard. For a wide variety of resources, visit www.vote.coop and follow #CoopsVote.



Today in Mississippi

 Acceptable photo IDs Any one of the following types of photo IDs may be used on election day for voter identification purposes:

• Driver’s license • Photo ID card issued by a branch, department or entity of the State of Mississippi • U.S. passport • Government employee identification card • Firearms license • Student photo ID issued by an accredited Mississippi university, college or community/junior college • U.S. military ID • Tribal photo ID • Any other photo ID issued by any branch, department, agency or entity of the United States government or any state government • Mississippi Voter Identification Card

 Help is available at no cost

All Mississippians voting at the polls are required to show an acceptable photo identification card. If you do not have any of the acceptable forms of photo identification, a Mississippi Voter Identification Card is provided at no cost. Also, free transportation to a circuit clerk’s office to obtain a Mississippi Voter Identification Card is provided to any voter needing travel assistance. Your circuit clerk may even verify your birth record free of charge in order for you to obtain a free Mississippi Voter Identification Card.

1-844-MSVoter (1-844-678-6837) www.MSVoterID.ms.gov Mississippians no longer have to leave the comfort of their home or office to change their existing voter registration information. “Y’all Vote” launched in September in connection with National Voter Registration Month. The website allows citizens to change their voter-roll information by submitting an online application, and acts as an online voter information center aimed at preparing voters to cast a ballot on election day. The 2016 general election, which includes races for U.S. President and House of Representatives, is scheduled for Nov. 8. For more information on “Y’all Vote” and how to register to vote in Mississippi, visit the Secretary of State’s website, www.sos.ms.gov.

Welcome to Mississippi’s OnlineVoter Information Center



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Thursdays and the month of October hursday has long been my favorite day of the week. Determining the reason for this demands protracted explanation, and I am sure my internalizing of such data took a circuitous route through nostalgia. But whatever the cause, if a single one exists, Thursday surfaced as my favorite. It began in early high school. I played in the band. Tuba for the most part. We, as most high schools, had Friday-night ballgames. These were the genesis of weekend activities, and topping the list of these weekend doings was squirrel hunting on Saturday mornings. My daddy had started me out early on in this endeavor, and by high school I was fairly free to continue it with likeminded comrades. Those ballgame Fridays were filled with tight schedules since most of us rode the bus home, completed farm chores and then gathered up in someone’s battered pickup or car to get back to the band hall in ample time to make ready for the games and our half-time marching programs. Thursdays, however, were different. These afforded a bit of extra time to relax and enjoy the bus ride home minus thoughts of the rush to get farm work done before heading back to the school. On that bus were a couple of my squirrel-hunting buddies. We would sit close together and ponder Saturday morning’s meanderings. We would plan where we would go, how we would get there and what clothes the weather required.

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That latter, as I now view it, was moot. We had only one jacket each, one extremely worn pair of boots, and would consider nothing other than the most tattered of blue jeans. The newer and less exhausted ones were reserved for school. Still, we dreamed and planned and laughed and recognized that we were among a most fortunate and elite collection of young men. It was grand, and it was on Thursday that it all unfolded. That is a brief by Tony Kinton revealing of why Thursdays emerged as my favorite. Now with the day established, which month became my favorite? That is more difficult to isolate. September was then and is now a leading contender. It was and is dawn of autumn’s delights. Much good comes in September, and the month allows that good to glide gently on a cool breeze and transition into October. So the two became competing twins; still are. One is hardly less or more skilled than the other. But for a dedicated squirrel hunter such as I, October had to get the slightest of nods, for it was the month that squirrel hunting began. Squirrel hunting is a pedestrian but glorious proposition. Dismissed by many, particularly in the modern society of today, it was never dismissed by my small group from those old days. It was back then the premier hunting experience of fall and early winter. Deer were not a viable option, for too few were around in the woods and fields to which we could retire on Saturday mornings. Hunting this king of the big game simply did not happen in our area. Not so with squirrels. The hardwoods along the Pearl River fewer than three miles from home held bushytails by the droves. Even scattered woodlots on a nearby creek offered squirrels, and get-

Outdoors Today

Autumn’s color spectacle will begin to show up in October. Photo: Tony Kinton

ting to these was easily accomplished by a mile-long hike during those haunting minutes before sunrise. Monstrous decisions on those Thursday-afternoon bus rides were employed to determine which of the two venues would be visited. If it were to be a foot deal, the creek was elected. If one of us could scrounge a worn-out pickup from farm chores, then the river received priority. We liked it better than the creek in the first place. More room to ramble and more squirrel territory to scour. Those magnificent mornings in the squirrel woods sank deeply into my being. So deep they became and so deep they remain that I must now as an old man repeat them with regularity. The sun rising over a chilled and fresh horizon, casting ghostly fingers of misty light in perfectly straight lines through timber and onto the ground. The dripping of moisture from leaves. The cawing of crows over near a distant field. The haunting chatter of a pileated woodpecker. And later that morning, those shaking oak boughs that announced a squirrel’s presence. Life at such times is full and rich, and we experienced it practically every Saturday following those favorite Thursdays.

Life since then has dramatically changed. Satisfying contentment and pure wonderment are perhaps too often sought in whirlwind undertakings, substituting busyness for essence. Desired outcomes for said undertakings are often inextricably linked to a misplaced concept of excessive cash outlay, with more outlay expected to produce more reward. And perhaps most tragic of all, some seem to have come to the erroneous assumption that life can and should be made up primarily of soughtafter pleasure. Truth is, life was never designed for that. I contemplate such matters as this often and have arrived at a variety of conclusions over the years. As I age, those conclusions have morphed and are perhaps more concise. I now realize that Thursdays, while treasured, are fairly economical; they come weekly. But Octobers are priceless and come only once a year. That said, I don’t intend to miss even the slightest speck of either. Tony Kinton has been an active outdoors writer for 30 years. His newest book, “Rambling Through Pleasant Memories,” is now available. Order from Amazon.com or Kinton’s website: www.tonykinton.com.


October 2016

Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi awards engineering scholarships The ECM Foundation recently awarded its 2016 engineering scholarships to Nathan Bowman, Daniel Giles, Dylan Horn and Clark Rounsaville. These young men have served as co-op student interns at local electric cooperatives in Mississippi. Pictured from left are Michael Callahan, ECM CEO; Ronny Rowland, general manager, Prentiss County Electric; Bowman, Poplarville; Mike Smith, CEO, Singing River Electric; Horn, Rienzi; Rounsaville, Leakesville; Giles, Union; and Wayne Henson, CEO, East Mississippi Electric. Each student received a $2,500 scholarship.

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Mississippi streambeds hold clues to prehistory e turned off the main highway onto a county road and then, just after crossing a little bridge, pulled over and parked. Ahead of us was a picturesque hillside with a shed and a barn. It could have been a postcard. But we weren’t going that direction. No, we were walking back to the creek we had just driven across. There were six of us including me. As George Phillips, who is a paleontologist at the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science, was pulling on a pair of boots, he looked up at me and apologized for failing to mention there would be wading involved in our expedition that morning. All this started a few weeks before with the announcement that George had discovered dinosaur remains in the little creek we were about to explore. Turns out it was from a rather rare species. There have been other fossils found here near New Albany. I had understood there were no

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dinosaur fossils in Mississippi because there had been no dinosaurs here; this part of the world was underwater during the age of the dinosaurs. That’s why we have whale skeletons instead. As we were sloshing down the creek toward where the fossil was found, James Starnes from the Mississippi Geological Survey pointed Mississippi out a dark Seen shape sticking by Walt Grayson up from the mud in the creek bottom. He told me it was the vertebrae from a huge sea lizard. (Well, he finally told me it was a sea lizard after he first called its scientific name, which was longer than I am tall.) He said they were monsters. The one bone didn’t look like much to me. Matter

of fact, I’d have walked right past it and not known what it was. But we were after an even more rare find. I wanted to see the place where the dinosaur fossil had been found. It was about a quarter of a mile on up the creek in a gravel bar, just below a small waterfall. When we got to the spot, George pulled out a casting of the original find to show us where it had been lying. It was a tooth. A tooth! That was all! I had seen a sketch of the dinosaur it had come from. I asked George how he came up with a whole animal from just a tooth. That’s like finding a spark plug and sketching a whole car from it. He laughed and said there had been complete skeletons of this particular dinosaur found elsewhere, and they have rather peculiar-looking teeth. So they know which animal it came from. My next question was how it got here, since no land animals lived in Mississippi in that era. Well, turns out this little fellow could have lived as far away as the Appalachians and over time—a lot of

time—just washed here. George explained that streambeds are good places to look for anything, including fossils, because eventually lots of stuff erodes into creeks and rivers as heavy rains tend to collect them in places like where he found the tooth. Looking around, we found more traditional fossils for our area, sharks’ teeth and fossilized oyster shells. My granddaddy on Mama’s side of the family used to find oyster shells in the creeks near Fulton. They were his proof of Noah’s flood. I’m flooded with fascination of the amazing things you can find in streambeds in Mississippi. But on my next fossil hunt, I’m bringing a new pair of boots! Walt Grayson is the host of “Mississippi Roads” on Mississippi Public Broadcasting television, and the author of two “Looking Around Mississippi” books and “Oh! That Reminds Me: More Mississippi Homegrown Stories.” Contact Grayson at walt@waltgrayson.com.


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Raised beds benefit flowers, vegetables any people are interested in having home vegetable and flower gardens, but many homes have small lots. Home gardeners in this situation may not think they have enough room. Others, especially inexperienced gardeners, may be discouraged by the amount of time and work required to build a new garden bed. A good solution to this problem is to grow vegetables and flowers in compact, raised beds. By using an intensively cultivated area, you need less time and space to produce vegetables that taste great and flowers that feed the soul. A raised bed is exactly what the name suggests—a landscape or garden bed that is higher than the surrounding grade. Raised beds offer many advantages for gardening in Mississippi: • Research suggests plant growth is enhanced, primarily due to the much improved drainage of the raised bed compared to in-ground gardening. • They aid gardeners who have sore backs and achy knees by bringing the garden up a little closer, which I particularly appreciate. • Growing in raised beds allows the gardener to reach into the bed from both sides.

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The first planning step is deciding where to put your garden. Most vegetables prefer full sun all day, but they can get by with at least six hours of sun. If all-day sun is not possible, select a site that receives morning rather than afternoon sun. Another very important factor to consider is how close your bed is to the water faucet. Successful gardens must have easy access to irrigation. And don’t forget to call 811 and have any underground utilities located. This really is a must for any garden and landscape project. You can raise the planting bed by simply piling up growing mix and making walkways on either side. But using hardscape materials to build sides will keep your garden looking tidy. Southern The choice of Gardening materials is the gardener’s deciby Dr. Gary Bachman sion. If you don’t want to use treated lumber, then cedar and redwood have natural resistance to decay. These woods are more expensive but will last much

longer than untreated pine. Other options include using blocks, recycled concrete or recycled plastic boards. The construction parameters of raised beds are quite simple. You can make the raised bed as long as you want, but don’t make it over 4 feet wide. This width allows you to reach plants in the middle from either side without walking in the bed. Your new raised bed is really just a large container, so use a growing mix made for containAdding hardscape materials such as treated lumber to build sides keeps ers. And because the raised-bed gardens looking tidy. Photo: MSU Extension/Gary Bachman raised bed is contained fill your bed, but it is the most expenwith side walls, no one walks through it sive. So here’s an alternative mix recipe to compact the growing mix. That that will give the same great results: use means the soil will stay light and fluffy equal volumes of peat moss, compost and ready for any season. and pine bark. To make measuring easiTo calculate the volume of growing er, remember that a 5-gallon bucket mix you need for your raised bed, just hold two-thirds of a cubic foot. multiply the length by width by depth, Growing vegetables and flowers in using feet for all the dimensions. raised beds is one way to help any garBagged, premixed potting soil or soilless mixes are readily available from gar- dener have greater success. den supply stores. This is a quick way to Dr. Gary Bachman is an associate Extension and research professor of horticulture at the Mississippi State University Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi. He is also host of “Southern Gardening” radio and TV programs.

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10  Today in Mississippi  October 2016

Mike Smith, General Manager & CEO Lorri Freeman, APR, Manager of Public Relations Amanda Parker, Public Relations Specialist For more information, call 601-947-4211/228-497-1313 x 2251 or visit our website at www.singingriver.com

Singing River Electric is an equal opportunity employer and provider.

Comfort Advantage

CEO’s message

www.singingriver.com

Seven key principles of cooperative business Mike Smith General Manager and CEO Singing River Electric

As a cooperative, Singing River Electric adheres to seven key principles, which combine to help build trust among the co-op, its members and the community. For example, the first principle is Voluntary and Open Membership, which means Singing River Electric is a voluntary organization open to all who choose to use our service and are willing to accept the responsibility of membership. The second principle, Democratic Member Control, gives Singing River Electric members a voice in the cooperative’s policies and decisions. Through the fifth principle,

Education, Training and Information, we commit to supporting education both on the job for our employees and in the community for our members and youth. We also commit to keeping our members informed of issues relating to costs, service and our industry. The seventh principle is Concern for Community. This principle is lived out daily through the commitment of our employees and their involvement in local churches, youth sports, service clubs and much more. Singing River Electric works toward the sustainable development of our communities through employee involvement and cooperative support and donations. Cooperatives build jobs locally.

MAKE THE SWITCH TO LED BULBS.

Singing River Electric has a long-standing commitment to our communities, economic development and job creation. One way this is done is by securing USDA Rural Development loans and grants for local projects. To date, Singing River Electric has assisted local governments and businesses in receiving nearly $8 million of zero-interest funding to improve local hospitals, schools and industries. We are more than a utility. We are an electric cooperative, which means we are led by members serving on our board, we were created by members to uniquely serve, and we return capital credits to members. Our focus is on serving you, and we thank you for this opportunity.

Josh Havard Member Services Representative joshhavard@singingriver.com

As a Singing River Electric member, our trained and experienced energy professionals are ready to assist you when building your home or business. There are three ways to participate and save: Comfort Advantage Home, Comfort Advantage Plus Home and Comfort Advantage Change Out. With the Comfort Advantage Home, you are eligible for a $300 rebate by following specific efficiency building requirements. Your builder will need to meet with one of our energy specialists to verify that program specifications were met. The Comfort Advantage Plus designation awards a $500 rebate and takes energy efficiency a step further for those who want even greater energy savings. The Comfort Advantage Change Out applies to those who have an existing home and want to upgrade their heating/cooling system. Qualified Singing River Electric homeowners who install a specified heat pump system and meet these requirements are eligible for $400. For more information on Comfort Advantage programs and required features, as well as other energy saving tips, visit the Save Energy and Money page at www.singingriver.com.


You have a voice

October 2016



Today in Mississippi  11

Participate in our Member Survey

In mid-November, a small random sample of Singing River Electric members will receive either an email or phone call from NRECA Market Research Services. This confidential survey will help us explore members’ satisfaction and views on the service provided to you. The survey will take about 10 minutes, and NRECA Market Research Services guarantees complete confidentiality of your individual responses. Results are compiled and reported to Singing River Electric as group totals. So, please

be candid in your response. There are no right or wrong answers. Only a very small random number of residential members will receive the emails or calls. This makes your response critical. If you are contacted by NRECA Market Research Services at an inconvenient time, suggest a better time to call. We look forward to sharing the results of this survey with you. Again, if you are contacted, we ask for your participation and thank you for your time and input.

Your co-op at a glance

WAYNE COUNTY

Statistcal Information GREENE COUNTY PERRY COUNTY

Washington County

Beaumont Leakesville

98

Mobile County

Incorporated Total Miles of Lines Total Meters Served Meters Per Mile of Line Number of Full-Time Employees

1938 7,288 73,269 10.05 183

Serving Jackson, George, Greene, Perry, Stone, Wayne and Harrison counties in MS and Mobile and Washington counties in AL.

Lucedale

STONE COUNTY

Cooperative Profile

GEORGE COUNTY

57 63 JACKSON COUNTY

Mission

HARRISON COUNTY

10

Moss Point

90

Ocean Springs

Singing River Electric is a member-owned, not-for-profit distribution electric cooperative serving power to homes, businesses, schools and industry in seven counties (Jackson, George, Greene, Perry, Stone, Wayne and Harrison counties) in Mississippi and two counties (Mobile and Washington) counties in Alabama.

Pascagoula

To provide safe and reliable electric service at the lowest possible cost while promoting energy efficiency and enhancing the lives of the members and communities we serve.

Helping neighbors in need Please contribute to Neighbors Helping Neighbors Energy Assistance. Your donation will make a difference right here at home.

singingriver.com

www.singingriver.com


12 I Today in Mississippi I October 2016

Hot Tamale-Stuffed Peppers 4 bell peppers, any color, tops removed, cleaned and cored 10 to 12 hot tamales (depending on size), unwrapped

RECIPES FROM:

‘Delta Hot Tamales: History, Stories & Recipes’ Wait—aren’t hot tamales a Mexican tradition? Yes and no. Author Anne Martin explains in her new book about the Mississippi Delta’s own version of hot tamales and why they have remained a staple of Delta cuisine for generations. Their ancestry is unclear, but Delta hot tamales likely evolved from Hispanic, African American, Native American and European influences in the Mississippi Delta. Unlike their Mexican cousins, Delta hot tamales are made with corn meal, not corn masa flour; they are smaller and more tubular in shape, spicier, and simmered rather than steamed. Greenville, the self-proclaimed Hot Tamale Capital of the World, is the epicenter of Delta hot tamales, Martin asserts. More hot tamale makers live in the Greenville area than any other Delta community. Though the fundamentals may be the same—spiced meat encased in a spiced corn meal dough wrapped in a corn husk—each tamale maker takes pride in his or her own secret recipe. Some have experimented with unexpected ingredients—like fruit and vegetables—while others stick to family heirloom recipes. Tamale makers show off their culinary mastery while competing to become Grand Champion at Greenville’s annual Delta Hot Tamale Festival. This year’s event is Oct. 13-15 and features not only hot tamale contests and vendors but Hot Tamale Royalty, a street party, music and more. (Get details at MainStreetGreenville.com.) Martin is a co-founder of the festival, a journalist and a Delta native. Her illustrated book serves as a complete guide to hot tamale lore and culture. She profiles tamale makers with names such as Sho-Nuff, Juke Joint Food and Hot Tamale Heaven. Most of them are family businesses that started in a home kitchen; one couple began by peddling tamales from the trunk of their car. Martin describes in detail the preparation of hot tamales by hand and machine, and offers recipes (including those reprinted here) for using homemade or purchased tamales in dishes. Whether eaten whole, sliced and baked in a casserole, or smothered in chili and cheese, there is no wrong way to eat a hot tamale. Even if you’ve never tasted “the Delta’s favorite food,” Martin’s book will have you running for the nearest hot tamale stand. “Delta Hot Tamales” is available in softcover where books are sold. Price is $21.99. An e-book is also available.

1 can shoe peg corn, drained 1 can fire-roasted diced tomatoes, drained 1 cup shredded colby jack cheese, plus extra for topping

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Steam bell peppers just to soften slightly and remove outer film. Pat dry and place upright in a casserole dish. In a large mixing bowl, mash up hot tamales. Add corn, tomatoes and a generous cup of cheese. Stir together with hot tamales. Put hot tamale mixture into bell peppers. Bake for about 30 minutes, until warm in the center. Remove from oven and sprinkle shredded cheese on each bell pepper. Cook an additional 5 minutes, or until cheese is melted. Serve warm.

Hot Tamale Dip 2 dozen hot tamales 1 bunch green onions, chopped

4 cups chili 3 cups grated sharp cheddar cheese

Preheat oven to 350 F. In a large bowl, mash hot tamales. Mix in onions and 1 ½ cups chili. In a greased 9-by-12-inch casserole dish, layer 3 times the tamale mix, remaining chili and cheese. Bake uncovered for about 30 minutes, or until bubbly. Serve warm with corn chips.

Hot Tamale Surprise 1 can crescent rolls 6 to 8 hot tamales, unwrapped 4 green onions, chopped 1 (4.5-oz.) can sliced black olives, drained

½ cup black beans, drained and rinsed 1 small- to medium-size tomato, diced 1 cup sharp cheddar cheese, plus extra

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Unroll crescent rolls. Place wide ends of crescent rolls in the center of a pizza stone or heavy cooking sheet. Mash wide ends together, closing up any gaps. Coarsely chop the hot tamales. Add onions, olives, black beans and tomato. Mix and then stir in cheese. Place hot tamale mixture by the spoonful into the center of the crescent rolls. Do not pile too high. Lightly mash down the mixture if necessary. (You might not use all of the mixture.) Bring the pointed ends of the rolls up and over the hot tamale mixture. The seams along the sides may be open. Bake at 375 F for about 20 minutes. Remove from oven and lightly cover with foil. Return to oven and continue to bake for 20 minutes. Let cool slightly before serving as an appetizer.

Simple Delta Tamale Pass Around 1 dozen hot tamales Saltine crackers Several bottles good hot sauce

Remove corn shucks from hot tamales. Cut tamales into pieces about 1 ½ inches long. Place 1 tamale piece on each cracker. Put crackers on your favorite tray along with a bottle of hot sauce. Pass among your guests.

Hot Tamale Dog Hot dog buns Butter Hot tamales

Chili Shredded cheese Coleslaw

Spread hot dog buns with butter and lightly toast. Place 1 or 2 hot tamales (depending on the size) that have been warmed in the microwave on the bun. Cover with warm chili. Add a generous amount of shredded cheese. Top with coleslaw.


October 2016

‘Picture This’ focuses on country churches Send us your photos of a country or small town church in Mississippi. Both interior and exterior views are eligible. Submissions must be emailed or postmarked by Dec. 5. Selected photos will appear in our January 2017 issue. Amateur photographers whose photos are selected become eligible for a $200 cash prize drawing held in December 2017. Photos must be in sharp focus and relate to the given theme. Include the photographer’s name, address, phone and electric power association (if applicable). Feel free to include

comments or notes on the subject. Digital photos should be high-resolution JPG files, at least 1 MB in size. If emailing phone photos, choose the “Actual Size” setting or equivalent before sending. Prints are eligible as well. Email photos to news@epaofms.com. Mail prints or a photo CD to Picture This, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Learn more at todayinmississippi.com or send questions to news@epaofms.com.

Commissioner of Agriculture and Commerce Cindy Hyde-Smith welcomes you to the

2016

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Mississippi Industrial Heritage Museum at Historic Soule’ Steam Works

FIRST WEEKEND IN NOVEMBER

FRIDAY & SATURDAY

NOV. 4&5 MERIDIAN, MS 9AM to 4PM // $5 Admission

FEATURING MORE THAN 16 WORKING STEAM ENGINES

October 5-16

FOOD • RIDES • GAMES • ATTRACTIONS

 Oct. 5 • Travis Tritt

 Oct. 6 • Frank Foster

Historic Fr aTctoourrys Open Fo DEMONSTRATIONS • Machine Shop • Blacksmithing • Letterpress Print Shop • Spinning • Weaving • Broom Making

 Oct. 10 • Alter Bridge

Street Organ FALL RALLY

 Oct. 11 • Boyz II Men lable Advance tickets avai through Trustmark. (selected locations) Like Us On Facebook

 Oct. 12 • Old Dominion

 Oct. 13 • American Authors

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14

Silhouettes

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October 2016

Picture This:

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Readers capture the beauty, serenity of silhouettes. 1. A young boy tosses his net into still waters. Charles Lee, Pascagoula; Singing River Electric member. 2. Pelican in repose. Tommy Nichols, Thaxton. 3. Dad and daughter fish together at Henderson Point, on the Bay of St. Louis. Jeff Baldock, Hurley; Singing River Electric member. 4. Setting sun silhouettes trees on a Carroll County ridge. Debbie Suggs, Carrollton; Delta Electric member. 5. A peaceful Mississippi River reflects sunset at the Natchez-Vidalia bridge. Clyde Gousset, Natchez; Southwest Mississippi Electric member. 6. Flying in formation. Mais Ammari, Starkville; 4-County Electric member. 7. Iconic profile of the great blue heron. Cathy Bland, Mt. Olive; Southern Pine Electric member. 8. Watch cat. Elizabeth W. Boyd, Ruth; Magnolia Electric member. 9. Forrest poses against a summer sunset. Sandy Warren, Benton; Yazoo Valley Electric member. 10. Angler Matt Vaughn fishes for bass in the Tombigbee River. Laya Vaughn, Chunky; East Mississippi Electric member. 11. No rod, no bait, no problem. Jeff Johnson, Quitman; East Mississippi Electric member. Our next photo theme: Country Churches Deadline for submissions is Dec. 5. Details on page 13.

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Marketplace

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October 2016

Type or print your ad clearly. Be sure to include your telephone number. Deadline is the 10th of each month for the next month’s issue. Rate is $2.50 per word, 10-word minimum. Mail payment with your ad to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Have any questions? Phone 601-605-8600 or email advertising@epaofms.com.

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PLAY GOSPEL SONGS by Ear! $12.95. “Learn Gospel Music� - chording, runs, fills - $12.95. Both $24. Davidsons, 6727MS Metcalf, Shawnee Mission, Kansas 66204. 913-262-4982. FREE BOOKS/DVDS, Soon the “Mark of the Beast� will be enforced as Church and State unite! Let the Bible reveal. The Bible Says, P.O. Box 99, Lenoir City, TN 37771. 888-211-1715; thebiblesaystruth@yahoo.com. STOP STRUGGLING WITH DEBT! Learn the Truth about Bankruptcy. Call 228-215-3584 Now for FREE information.

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October 2016

Starting school can be scary

D

id you ever get lost and couldn’t find your way home? Frightened or desperate isn’t the word for it. Hold on to your seat; I’ll

explain later. I drive by three schools almost every day and tense my shoulders watching for children to dart in front of me, or waiting for a school bus to turn toward its appointed school. When do I relax my shoulders? Only when I drive into my carport. My point is, never relax when you are driving, especially when our precious children are round and about. This year when school began, again, I focused on the reality of the signs: School Zone and other signs warning that Children are Playing. This brought back memories of when I was teaching in the lower grades and a fly on the wall. Many little hearts were broken as were those of parents who had to pry tiny hands from theirs, turn and walk away. Each time I saw a child’s tears, and Mommy’s tears, I saw my own daughters’ when I had to leave them the first day of school. Looking further back in time I saw a mean old lady yank me away from my mother’s arms as I reached for her, my eyes clouded and wet.

These are situations that we can’t avoid. Yet, there are some young children who are social and are not affected by the trauma of first school days. If you are my age and lived in a small town, you didn’t start school until first grade, at age six. And you possibly attended that same school for all 12 years. Grin ‘n’ A sad situation is when you Bare It have attended by Kay Grafe the same school for years and you are genuinely shy ... then out of the blue your parents move to another town or they get a divorce and you must go with one or the other. There are so many things we don’t know about our friends’ background, unless they aren’t ashamed to talk about them, or their parents are walkie-talkies. Some parents have no clue that what they tell friends will spread like a bad cold. I realize small-town gossip is the worst. In a city, however, your classroom is an example of a small town. My first day in a new third grade class was in Tampa, Fla.—the day after

Christmas holidays. Mother walked me into my assigned classroom and all eyes zeroed in on us. Mother had a word with the teacher while I stood near her desk, embarrassed to the nth degree. The teacher stood up and said, “We have a new student from Mississippi; her name is Kay Fountain. Her mother is Mrs. Griffith.” One kid spoke up and asked, “Why are their last names different?” After that introduction I wasn’t accepted or so it seemed. I’m sure I didn’t make an effort, since I was extremely shy. Mother asked the teacher, Mrs. Clark, to walk me to my bus after school. When the bell rang, Mrs. Clark told me to look for bus No. 2672. I stood at the bus stop, watching all the buses leave. By the time I walked back to the school it was locked. I begin to walk and found Bay Shore Drive, where a sidewalk followed Tampa Bay for miles. I felt frightened and desperate. As the sun began to fade, several people passed me and said, “You better hurry home little girl, it’s almost dark.” A man walked slow and wobbly by me. He said, “Come with me. I’ll take you home.” “No!” And I began to run. A lady stood by the curb with a baby stroller;

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she was about to cross the wide street. “Please help me,” I begged. “I’m lost.” That took all the courage I had. She said, “I live across the street. Come with me and you can call your mother.” “I can’t go in a stranger’s house.” She smiled, “That’s okay. You can sit on my porch and I will call her.” I sat on the wide steps and she went inside to call, but the number was wrong. She was kind and told me not to worry. Within 30 minutes a police car pulled up in front of her house. By then I was crying; the lady tried to comfort me. When the police door opened, Mother jumped out and ran toward me. We had one car and my stepdaddy had not returned home from his first day at work in Tampa. Mother had reported me missing when I didn’t get off the city bus. I learned three things that day: I was rewarded because I didn’t go with the man or into a stranger’s house. I learned that Mother wasn’t shy because the next day she called Mrs. Clark out in the hallway and said, “You are responsible for my daughter’s safety. I should report you to the superintendent for negligence.” And lastly, I realized that I could be as brave as my mother. Kay Grafe is the author of “Oh My Gosh, Virginia.” To order, send name, address, phone number and $16.95, plus $3.50 S&H to Kay Grafe, 2142 Fig Farm Road, Lucedale, MS 39452.

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Events MISSISSIPPI

Want more than 450,000 readers to know about your special event? Submit details at least two months prior to the event date. Submissions must include a phone number with area code for publication. Mail to Mississippi Events, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300; fax to 601-605-8601; or send to news@epaofms.com. Events open to the public will be published free of charge as space allows. Please note that events are subject to change; we recommend calling to confirm details before traveling.

Magnolia State Bluegrass Association Fall Show, Oct. 8, Morton. Featuring Red Hill Strings, The Bluegrass Cartel, Leiper’s Fork. Roosevelt State Park. Details: 601-954-2565, 601-408-5965. Craft Fair and Bake Sale, Oct. 8, Brandon. Handmade gifts, food, door prizes, more; 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Nativity Lutheran Church. Details: 601-825-5125. Historic Griffin Cemetery Tour, Oct. 8, Moss Point. Family members interpret ancestors buried here; guided hour-long walking tours, craft vendors. Free admission. Griffin Cemetery. Details: 228-218-5239. Mid-South Area Job Fair, Oct. 11, Southaven. Resources for job seekers, diverse group of employers; 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Landers Center. Details: bit.ly/2bbMRQC. Plein Air Greenwood, Oct. 13-15, Greenwood area. Artists paint outdoors in various locations. Held in conjunction with Art & Soul, Oct. 14-15. Admission; registration. Details: MainStreetGreenwood@gmail.com. Deep Blues Festival, Oct. 13-16, Clarksdale. Featuring outsider and alternative blues. Admission. Various venues. Details: 662-3136220; DeepBluesFest.com. Catholic Church Exhibitors at Canton Flea Market, Oct. 13, Canton. More than 100 exhibitors. Sacred Heart Catholic Church, Peace Street. Details: 601-859-3223. Fall Flower and Garden Fest, Oct. 14-15, Crystal Springs. Largest home gardening show in Southeast. Trial gardens, plant sale, seminars, live animals, food, more; 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Truck Crops Branch Experiment Station. Details: 601-892-3731; Facebook; extension.msstate.edu/fallfest. Bukka White Blues Festival, Oct. 14-15, Aberdeen. Blues, kayak rentals, inflatables, petting zoo, crafts, barbecue rib contest, exotic animal show, more. Details: 662-369-9440; BukkaWhiteFestival.com. The Dark Zone, Oct. 14-15, 21-22, 28-29, Brandon. Haunted house, scary paint ball; 6:30-10 p.m. Not suitable for ages 5 and under. Admission. Soccer fields, off W.

Government St. Details: 601-825-2094. A Day in the Country, Oct. 15, Meridian. Barbecue, homemade cakes, chitlin plates, crafts, music, more. Causeyville Volunteer Fire Department. Details: 601-616-2198, 601-6443556. City-wide Indoor Yard Sale, Oct. 15, Hattiesburg. Cloverleaf Mall; 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Details: 601-467-5429. Success Frog Fest, Oct. 15, Saucier. Arts, crafts, food, entertainment, children’s activities. Free admission. Success Civic Center. Details: 228-832-8874; SuccessCommunityMS@gmail.com. Bluegrass Gospel Singing on the River, Oct. 15, Chunky. Featuring Sowell Family Pickers, Pilgrim Family/Uncle Pug’s Bluegrass Band, others; 11 a.m. Chunky River Recreation. Details: 601-480-3045. Sounds of Bluegrass, Oct. 15, Philadelphia. Featuring Bill and Temperance, Alan Sibley and the Magnolia Ramblers; 7 p.m. Admission. Ellis Theatre. Details: 601-656-1000. Bluegrass, Country and Gospel Singing, Oct. 15, Black Hawk. Featuring Benny Rigby, Russell Burton & Friends, Curtis Burton & Out of the Blue; 6 p.m. Black Hawk Old School. Details: 662-453-0072; bobbykayalford@gmail.com. Family Day Celebration, Oct. 15, Moss Point. Free admission. Pascagoula River Audubon Center. Details: 228-475-0825 ext. 2. Hope For Hattiesburg Run For Literacy, Oct. 15, Hattiesburg. 5K run/walk with fun run. Benefits Grace Christian Elementary literacy program. Longleaf Trace, USM Gateway. Details: HopeForHattiesburg.org/run. “Running Mates,” Oct. 20-23, Laurel. A Southern political comedy. Laurel Little Theatre. Details: 601-428-0140; LaurelLittleTheatre.com. Barn Sale, Antiques & Collectibles, Oct. 21-22, Purvis. More than 40 vendors; 7 a.m. 5 p.m.; 4799 Old Hwy. 11. Details: 601-8185886, 601-794-7462. Children’s Fairytale Fall Festival, Oct. 2123, Picayune. Seven fairy tales under the spot-

light, hay ride, pumpkin patch, more; 6-8 p.m. Admission. Jack Read Park. Details: 601-7995619, 601-347-6883. Antique Days, Oct. 22, Yazoo City. Cane syrup making, cornmeal grinding, kibbie cookoff, old tractor show/parade, world’s largest Radio Flyer wagon, Kids Zone, Carl Acuff Jr. Show, more. Free admission. Triangle Cultural Center. Details: 662-590-5415; AntiqueDays.com. Great Delta Bear Affair, Oct. 22, Rolling Fork. Vendors, Teddy Bear Color Run, chainsaw woodcarving, Living Reptile Museum, Indian mound driving tours, fireworks, more. Details: 662-873-6258; GreatDeltaBearAffair.org. Greene County Country Music Jamboree, Oct. 22, Leakesville. Featuring Lee Carreon, Bluegrass Martins, Leona/Ron Williams, T. Graham Brown; opens 3 p.m. Rural Event Center. Details: 601-947-9331, 601-508-1681. 41st Annual Crazy Day, Oct. 22, Magee. Crafts, food, woodcarvers, kids’ play area, car show, concert featuring Mustache the Band. Details: 601-849-2517. Fall Fest on the Roost, Oct. 22, Olive Branch. Arts, crafts, music, chili cook-off, kids’ costume parade, more. City Hall. Details: 662-8930888; OliveBranchOldTowne.org. 23rd Annual Port Gibson Heritage Festival, Oct. 22, Port Gibson. Details: 601597-1845, 601-437-9275. Turkey Shoot, Oct. 22, Nov. 12, Vancleave. Sponsored by Daisy Masonic Lodge No. 421; 25700 School House Road, Daisy Vestry community; 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Details: 228-392-5227. Jake Moeller Memorial Shallow Creek Homecoming, Oct. 22, Picayune. Bluegrass gospel singing, antique tractor exhibit; 6 p.m. Shallow Creek Farm. Details: 601-590-3577; aletamoeller@gmail.com. Mid-South Wedding and Bridal Show, Oct. 23, Olive Branch. Fashion show, bridal seminars, games, prizes. Admission. Whispering Woods Hotel/Conference Center. Details: 901368-6782; MidSouthWeddingShow.com. Sixth Annual Old Time Gospel Singing, Oct. 29, Port Gibson. Congregational singing, lunch; 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Love offering. Rocky Springs Church, 10158 Old Port Gibson Road. Details: 228-255-7083. Southaven Gun Show, Oct. 29-30, Southaven. Multi-Purpose Arena. Details: 601922-8138; JacksonGunShow.com. Kemper County Heritage Day, Oct. 31 Nov. 1, DeKalb. Museum, country music, barbecue. Kemper County Historical Museum. Details: 601-934-2649. Soulé Live Steam Festival, Nov. 4-5, Meridian. More than 18 working steam engines, historic engine factory, blacksmithing, more. Mississippi Industrial Heritage Museum. Details: 601-693-9905;

SouleLiveSteam.com. Holiday Missions Marketplace, Nov. 5, Puckett. Arts, crafts, holiday foods, rummage sale, more; 8 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Puckett United Methodist Church. Details: 601-214-7834. Grillin’ & Chillin’ BBQ Festival, Nov. 5, Taylorsville. BBQ contest, arts, crafts, music, car show. Town Park. Details: 601-785-6531; TaylorsvilleChamber.com. 17th Annual Old Time Day, Nov. 5, Leakesville. Grist mill, smokehouse, syrup making, mule pull, more. Batley farm. Details: 601-394-2385; trbatley@hotmail.com. Big Pop Gun Shows, Nov. 5-6, Pascagoula; Nov. 12-13, Jackson; Dec. 3-4, Philadelphia. Details: 601-498-4235; BigPopGunShows.com. Festival at the Music Barn, Nov. 7-12, Polkville. Featuring Southern Grass, Williamson Branch, others. Camper hookups. Details: 601-946-0280, 601-955-9182. Library Book Sales, Nov. 7, Dec. 5, Starkville. Starkville Library. Details: 662-323-2766. Gingerbread Market, Nov. 11-12, Jackson. Admission. Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum. Details: 601-573-0221; GingerbreadMarket.com. 20th Holiday Boutique, Nov. 11-12, Pass Christian. Estate/handmade jewelry, linen clothing, art, photography, food, more. Pass Christian Yacht Club. Details: 228-452-2571. Magnolia State Gem, Mineral and Jewelry Show, Nov. 11-12, Pascagoula. Exhibits, demos, vendors. Admission. Jackson County Fairgrounds Civic Center. Details: 601947-7245; mgcgms.org. Jingle Bell Jubilee Holiday Open House, Nov. 11-12, Louisville. Historic Main Street. Details: 662-773-3921; Facebook: Main Street Louisville, Mississippi. Monster Jam, Nov. 11-13, Jackson. Monster truck show. Mississippi Coliseum. Details: MonsterJam.com. Holiday Gift Bazaar, Nov. 12, Meridian. Thirty-five vendors, gumbo lunches; 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Free admission. Trinity Presbyterian Church. Details: 601-485-4105. 5K Glow Fun Run/Walk, Nov. 12, Gautier. Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College, Jackson County campus. Details: SeanCooleyNursingScholarship.com. 16th Annual Gulf Coast Veterans Parade, Nov. 12, D’Iberville. Parade begins 11 a.m., D’Iberville High School stadium. Details: 228669-4997; MSVeteransParade.com. “The Early Days of the Delta,” Nov. 15, Rolling Fork. Presenter: Willy Bearden; 6:30 p.m. Free. Sharkey-Issaquena County Library. Details: 662-873-6261; LowerDelta.org. Mississippi Food Summit and Agricultural Revival, Nov. 17-19, Jackson. Workshops, forum, farm tours, more. Ag Museum. Details: 662-452-0942; mssagnet.net.


October 2016

FREE 20% OFF 7

We have invested millions of dollars in our own state-of-the-art quality test labs and millions more in our factories, so our tools will go toe-to-toe with the top professional brands. And we can sell them for a fraction of the price because we cut out the middle man and pass the savings on to you. It’s just that simple! Come visit one of our 700+ Stores Nationwide. R PE ON SU UP O C Customer Rating

12" SLIDING COMPOUND DOUBLE-BEVEL MITER SAW WITH LASER GUIDE ITEM 69684 shown 61969/61970

SAVE $259

$

13999 $ 19999 comp at

88999

R PE ON SU UP CO

ITEM 69249/69115/69137 69129/69121/877 shown Customer Rating

2

SAVE $ 99 64% $499

VALUE

LIMIT 1 - Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or prior purchase. Coupon good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Offer good while supplies last. Shipping & Handling charges may apply if not picked up in-store. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/17. Limit one FREE GIFT Coupon per customer per day.

TORQUE WRENCHES Customer Rating

ITEM 2696/61277 807/61276 62431/239

Item 239 shown

• Accuracy within ±4%

1199 $2199

Customer Rating R PE ON SU UP CO 2.5 HP, 21 GALLON

R PE ON SU UP O C

125 PSI VERTICAL AIR COMPRESSOR

SAVE SAVE 60% $337

$

comp at

$29.99

SAVE 40%

ITEM 69091/67847 shown 61454/61693/62803

99 $

comp at

SAVE $215

159

179 $497

$

comp at

15499 199 $

$

comp at

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

1500 WATT DUAL TEMPERATURE HEAT GUN (572°/1112°)

R PE ON SU UP CO

SA $60

Customer Rating

$5999

99

$

$369.99

29 PIECE TITANIUM NITRIDE COATED HIGH SPEED STEEL DRILL BIT SET

ITEM 67514

Customer Rating

1999 $29 2 99

shown ITEM 5889/62281/61637

$1299

comp at

$

$33.66

R 10 PIECE DRAGONFLY PE ON SOLAR LED STRING LIGHTS SU UP O ITEM 62689 C Customer Rating

SAVE 74%

60758 shown

89

99

• Weighs 34 lbs.

comp at

3-POINT QUICK HITCH

R PE ON SU UP CO

ITEM 97214

• 2000 lb. capacity • 27-3/16" clearance

$ $

99

89

99

Customer Rating

SAVE $146

10 FT. x 17 FT. PORTABLE GARAGE ITEM 62860/62859 63055/69039 shown

calling rFreight.com or by or prior n at our stores, Harbo LIMIT 3 - Good t be used with other discount or coupo al receipt. 800-423-2567. Cannodays from original purchase with originn must be coupo 30 al able. Origin purchases after es last. Non-transfer er per day. Offer good while supplih 2/5/17. Limit one coupon per custom presented. Valid throug

R PE ON SU UP CO

10" PNEUMATIC TIRE ITEM 69385/62388 62698/62409/30900 shown

17999 $

comp at

$319.01

SAVE 60% 6" 8"

10" 12"

4 PIECE ADJUSTABLE WRENCH SET

R PE ON SU UP CO

ITEM 903 shown 69427/60690

SAVE $670

$14.99

LIMIT 7 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP CO

Customer Rating

ITEM 61263/9583 shown

ITEM 69387/62744 63271/68784 shown

9 99

$ 99

$

1 11

LIMIT 8 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

99

$

379

• 700+ Stores Nationwide • Lifetime Warranty On All Hand Tools

9999

comp at

$133.89

$1029.99

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

SAVE $53 99 $ $

99

comp at

comp at

79

359

• Weighs 245 lbs.

$24.99

12 VOLT, 15 GALLON SPOT SPRAYER Customer Rating

Customer Rating

$

• 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed • Over 30 Million Satisfied Customers • No Hassle Return Policy

44", 13 DRAWER INDUSTRIAL QUALITY ROLLER CABINET

$

11999 comp at

$163.06

calling rFreight.com or by or prior n at our stores, Harbo LIMIT 4 - Good t be used with other discount or coupo al receipt. 800-423-2567. Cannodays from original purchase with originn must be able. Original coupo per day. purchases after 30 ansfer Non-tr last. es er Offer good while supplih 2/5/17. Limit one coupon per custom presented. Valid throug

R PE ON SU UP CO

SAVE 65%

TILTING FLAT PANEL TV MOUNT ITEM 62289 61807 shown • 176 lb. capacity

$

Customer Rating

1999 $

Fits flat screen TVs from 37" to 70".

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

• HarborFreight.com • 800-423-2567

2999 comp at

comp at

$326.55

R PE ON SU UP CO

$8999

SAVE $73

3

19999

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

ITEM 69381 60338 shown

Customer Rating

Not for highway use.

SAVE $ 99 73% $599

comp at

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

TTS 900 PEAK/700 RUNNING2WA 2 HP (63 CC) CYCLE GAS RECREATIONAL GENERATOR

$59.99

Customer Rating

$

WOW SUPER COUPON

$4799

• 580 lb. capacity

calling rFreight.com or by or prior n at our stores, Harbo LIMIT 5 - Good t be used with other discount or coupo al receipt. 800-423-2567. Cannodays from original purchase with originn must be able. Original coupo per day. purchases after 30 ansfer Non-tr last. es er Offer good while supplih 2/5/17. Limit one coupon per custom presented. Valid throug

comp at

Customer Rating

comp at 99 $199.99

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

14

LIMIT 8 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP CO

ITEM 95659 shown 61634/61952

159

SAVE $110 Customer Rating

SAVE 20%

SAVE 78%

comp at

1999 $59.97

ITEM 38391/62376 62306 shown Customer Rating

99

$31.47

$26.99

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

ER PACK 3-IN-1 PORTABLE POW WITH JUMP STARTER

comp at

10999 6 99 $ 99 $ comp at

8

$ 99 $

$119.99

$ 99 $

8

WOW SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

SAVE 71%

Customer Rating

R PE ON SU UP 26", 4 DRAWER CO TOOL CART

SAVE $209

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

ITEM 62340/62546 63104/96289 shown

calling rFreight.com or by or prior n at our stores, Harbo LIMIT 5 - Good t be used with other discount or coupo al receipt. 800-423-2567. Cannodays from original purchase with originn must be coupo 30 al after Origin ases able. purch es last. Non-transfer er per day. Offer good while supplih 2/5/17. Limit one coupon per custom presented. Valid throug

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$8.48

WOW SUPER COUPON

TWO TIER COLLAPSIBLE EASY-STORE STEP LADDER

• 225 lb. capacity

99

ITEM 69252/60569 shown 68053/62160 • 3-1/2 Pumps Lifts 62496/62516 Most Vehicles

• Pair of arbor plates included

7 FT. 4" x 9 FT. 6" ALL PURPOSE WEATHER RESISTANT TARP

R PE ON SU UP O C

LIMIT 8 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

MINUM ® RAPID PUMP 1.5 TON ALU RACING JACK VE

ITEM 32879/60603 shown

ITEM 61258 shown 61840/61297/68146

$ 97

ANY SINGLE ITEM

WOW SUPER COUPON

20 TON SHOP PRESS

$159.99

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$399

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

comp at

ITEM 61313/62728 62583/47770 62570 shown

YOUR CHOICE

$

5999 SAVE $100

$

6 PIECE SCREWDRIVER SET

R PE ON SU UP O C DRIVE 1/4" 3/8" 1/2"

$

WITH ANY PURCHASE

Limit 1 coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, Extended Service Plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day Parking Lot Sale item, automotive lifts, compressors, floor jacks, saw mills, storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, trenchers, welders, Admiral, Badland, CoverPro, Daytona, Diablo, Earthquake, Franklin, Grant’s, Holt, Jupiter, Lynxx, Maddox, Portland, Predator, Stik-Tek, StormCat, Union, Vanguard, Viking. Not valid on prior purchases. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/17.

I

2500 LB. ELECTRIC WINCH WITH WIRELESS REMOTE CONTROL

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

Today in Mississippi

R PE ON Customer Rating SU UP CO

700+ Stores Nationwide

How Does Harbor Freight Sell GREAT QUALITY Tools at the LOWEST Prices?

I

$57.37

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

WOW SUPER COUPON 42" OFF-ROAD/ FARM JACK

• 3-1/2 ton capacity ITEM 60668/6530 shown

SAVE 23%

Customer Rating

$45 99 $5799

comp at

$59.99

calling rFreight.com or by or prior n at our stores, Harbo LIMIT 5 - Good t be used with other discount or coupo al receipt. 800-423-2567. Cannodays from original purchase with originn must be coupo 30 al after Origin ases able. purch es last. Non-transfer er per day. Offer good while supplih 2/5/17. Limit one coupon per custom presented. Valid throug

At Harbor Freight Tools, the “comp at” price means that the same similar functioning item was advertised for sale at or above the price by another retailer in the U.S. within the past 180 days. Prices by others may vary by location. No other meaning of "comp at" implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store

item or a "comp at" advertised should be associate.

19


Today in Mississippi October 2016 Singing River  

Today in Mississippi October 2016 Singing River

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