Page 1

Periodical postage (ISSN 1052 2433)

News for members of Singing River Electric Power Association

Going native 4

Crosby Arboretum preserves state’s botanical heritage

9

It’s time to grab a cane pole and crickets

15

Camp Shelby is home to a rich history


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May 2016


May 2016

Don’t put your life on the line; respect the power of electricity he power lines bringing electricity to your home may appear harmless but nothing could be further from the truth. Power lines are suspended high overhead or buried deep below and heavily insulated for a reason: Contact with them can cause serious injury and even death. To deliver electricity efficiently from the power plant to your electric meter, lines carry very high voltages. Voltage acts like water pressure; think of high-voltage lines as a firefighter’s high-pressure hose. A transformer mounted on the utility pole at your place reduces the voltage to a usable level—like the flow from a garden hose—before the electricity enters your electric meter. My analogy greatly simplifies a huge, complex system but the thing to remember is this: Like lightning, manmade electricity seeks to enter the ground by the path of least resistance—your ladder, construction materials, farm equipment, kite string and other objects. If you are touching the grounded object or standing nearby when this happens, you could be seriously or fatally injured. Birds perch on a power line without harm because they are not grounded. Trees, however, are grounded by their trunk and should never touch power lines. Trees also contain moisture and sap, which makes them excellent conductors of electricity under most conditions. Trees’ ability to conduct electricity makes them not only a safety hazard but also a primary cause of power outages. A properly maintained right-of-way greatly reduces the occurrence of storm-related power outages by preventing limbs from contacting the lines. Your electric power association follows a diligent right-of-way clearing schedule to prevent outages caused by tree limbs and other plants reaching into power lines. As the growing season kicks into high gear, so do our vegetation-management activities.

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On the cover Pat Drackett, a former landscape designer, serves as director of the Crosby Arboretum, a public garden of regional native plants in Picayune. The garden’s award-winning Pinecote Pavilion overlooks a pond, where visitors can feed the fish and turtles. Learn more about this special place, a member of Coast Electric Power Association, on pages 4-5.

Underground power lines, typically found in subdivisions, must be avoided as carefully as overhead lines. Any digging activity, whether trenching, landscaping or construction, presents opportunities to come in contact with an underground line. Do not begin any digging before calling 811 to have all underground utilities marked in the area. This is a free service, though disregarding it could cost dearly. As member-owned electric power associations, we do all we can to build and maintain reliable electric distribution systems to serve our members. Above all else, this infrastructure must be safe. Our employees literally risk their lives building and repairing power lines. Their intensive safety training, specialized gear and extreme attentiveness keep them safe on the My Opinion job. Michael Callahan We should all be so Executive Vice President/CEO respectful of the power of Electric Power Associations of Mississippi electricity. For many people, however, utility poles and power lines are such a part of the landscape, they have become invisible. May is National Electrical Safety Month, a good time to consider how you can protect your family from electrical accidents. Children, especially, need to learn to avoid all electrical equipment, including substations and downed power lines, as well as trees that touch lines. If you have questions or concerns about electrical safety, or want to report an electrical safety hazard such as a downed power line, please contact your electric power association.

Today in Mississippi OFFICERS Keith Hurt - President Tim Smith - First Vice President Barry Rowland - Second Vice President Randy Smith - Secretary/Treasurer

EDITORIAL STAFF Michael Callahan - CEO Ron Stewart - Sr. VP, Communications Mark Bridges - Manager, Support Services Debbie H. Stringer - Editor Elissa Fulton - Communications Specialist Trey Piel - Digital Media Manager Rickey McMillan - Graphics Specialist Linda Hutcherson - Administrative Assistant

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ON FACEBOOK Vol. 69 No. 5 EDITORIAL OFFICE & ADVERTISING 601-605-8600 Acceptance of advertising by Today in Mississippi does not imply endorsement of the advertised product or services by the publisher or Mississippi’s Electric Power Associations. Product satisfaction and delivery responsibility lie solely with the advertiser. • National advertising representative: National Country Market, 800-626-1181 Circulation of this issue: 437,185 Non-member subscription price: $9.50 per year

The Official Publication of the Electric Power Associations of Mississippi Today in Mississippi (ISSN 1052-2433) is published eleven times a year (Jan.-Nov.) by Electric Power Associations of Mississippi, Inc., P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300, or 665 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, MS 39157. Phone 601-605-8600. Periodical postage paid at Ridgeland, MS, and additional office. The publisher (and/or its agent) reserves the right to refuse or edit all advertising. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Today, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300

Visit us online at www.todayinmississippi.com

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Today in Mississippi

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Our Homeplace

The Jaketown Museum, in Belzoni, tells the story of the prehistoric Jaketown site, which was inhabited from 1750 BC to 1500 AD. Exhibits include artifacts found in the area of the site. Located in Humphreys County north of Belzoni on Highway 7, the Jaketown site is one of the longest and earliest inhabited sites discovered in North America. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1990. The museum is located at 116 West Jackson St. Admission is free. For details, call 662-247-2151.

Mississippi is to me like a good cup of coffee; it wakes up the spirit in me and makes me want to go out and see it all. I love Mississippi for its beauty. I think there is a tree of just about every species, from the tall pines and cedars to the beautiful blooming magnolias. Mississippi has it all, the rolling hills to the Delta’s flat lands to the beautiful Gulf Coast—and so many lakes and rivers you can’t count them all. I will never leave my beautiful Mississippi. —Carolyn Parker, Mathiston Mississippi is my happy place. [I was] born and raised in Miami, Fla., but got here as quick as I could. This was my mother’s home. Smithville is a well-kept secret, a place to exhale. From day one, I knew I was home. The kindest, most welcoming people. Mississippi is my home. —Patty Lovern, Smithville Mississippi is memories of childhood glee on the dusty ride home on that school bus on the last day before summer vacation. Making a pallet in the yard with an old handmade quilt, waiting for June bugs to land.... Being afraid of those ugly, green, horned catawba worms on our neighbor’s tree, then realizing they made fantastic bait for bream fishing in our farm pond. Overwhelming noise filling the air from seven-year locusts for weeks.... I still live on the same farm, but all these insects have almost vanished. Is this progress? —Martha Gadd, Byhalia

What’s Mississippi to you? What do you treasure most about life in our state? Send your thoughts to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158, or to news@epaofms.com. Please keep your comments brief. Submissions are subject to editing for length and clarity.

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natives

Come meet the

May 2016

By Debbie Stringer Far more than just a walk in the woods, the Crosby Arboretum immerses visitors in a celebration of nature. For 30 years, the arboretum has been demonstrating that nature is not the backdrop to our world—it is our world. Located in Picayune and operated by the Mississippi State University Extension Service, the awardwinning arboretum encompasses more than 700 acres dedicated to research, education and preservation of the Pearl River basin habitats of Mississippi and Louisiana. Its bogs, fields, forests and ponds support more than 300 species of native plants and untold numbers of birds, reptiles and other wildlife. The site’s public garden consists of the 104-acre Pinecote Native Plant Center. Included are exhibits of the basic habitats found in the local ecosystem: savanna, woods and waters. A network of wide, flat pathways leads visitors through a rich tapestry of plant life. In springtime, native azaleas, irises, mountain laurel, pitcher plants and red buckeye splash color in every direction. This month, several species of native orchids will emerge along with the more prominent blossoms of water lilies, southern magnolias and tulip poplars. Each bend of the trail reveals photo-worthy views (a camera is a must here). Signs along the way help visitors learn more about the plants they see. Wooden benches offer shady places to enjoy the free concerts staged by frogs, songbirds and insects. The trails converge at a visitors center, which houses a gift shop, restrooms, a library and a Pat Drackett, a former landshady boardwalk. scape designer, is director of the Crosby Arboretum. Overlooking a nearby pond is the 4,000-squarefoot Pinecote Pavilion, the venue for arboretumsponsored programs and special events as well as private events. Pinecote’s architect, Fay Jones, described his iconic design as “abstract forest,” with tall wooden supports echoing the trees surrounding it. Jones’ numerous awards for Pinecote included the American Institute of Architects’ highest honor, the Gold Medal. More recent accolades for the arboretum include the Garden Excellence Award from the American Public Gardens Association, for commitment to best horticultural practices. It is these practices that have transformed the remnants of old pine plantation into a lush, botanically diverse garden. Visitors might assume the A wide boardwalk leads to a bridge that spans one of the ponds at the arboretum. All the trails are flat, well maintained and suitable for wheelchair use. Benches provide places to rest and observe.


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Native azaleas, left, are among the springtime bloomers at the arboretum. A new deck with ramp, below, leads into the forest from the visitors center.

arboretum sprang to life on its own. The real story involves far more human intervention: 40 acres was planted with some 12,000 trees and plants according to a carefully designed master plan. “All of our aquatic exhibit is manmade, though you would think that this is just a place where there is a pretty pond and streams,” said Pat Drackett, arboretum director and a self-described “nature nut.” The Crosby Arboretum, a member of Coast Electric Power Association, was established as a family memorial to L.O. Crosby Jr., whose father conducted timber and agricultural operations in the area. Crosby Jr. operated the 640-acre Strawberry Farm, as the arboretum was then known, as a longleaf pine plantation from the 1940s until Hurricane Camille leveled most of the trees in 1969. After Crosby Jr.’s death in 1978, his family decided to build a memorial to the successful timberman by establishing a native arboretum on the site of the old farm. The Crosby Arboretum opened to the public in 1986. The site was operated as a private, nonprofit entity by the Crosby Arboretum Foundation until 1997 when it became a part of the Coastal Research and Extension Center of Mississippi State University. The merger with MSU Extension ensured the sustainability of the arboretum and expanded its educational mission. A master plan developed in the 1980s by landscape architect Ed Blake defined the exhibits and served as a blueprint for future development. Blake was the arboretum’s first

director, having served from 1984 to 1994. His plan and landscape design for the arboretum won an American Society of Landscape Architects Honor Award. Continued on page 8 One of the trails takes visitors through a savanna exhibit, right. Carnivorous pitcher plants, below, appear to talk to one another in the arboretum’s pitcher plant bog. The pitchers are filled with a fluid that drowns and digests the insects that fall in.

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May 2016

You may hear more than bird calls at Strawberry Plains ne of the big activities at the Strawberry Plains Audubon Center near Holly Springs comes up May 20-21. It’s their annual native plant sale. The other big attraction is the first weekend of September when people come out to watch migrating hummingbirds. Holly Springs isn’t exactly just down the road from my house. So when I am in the area I try to stop by the Audubon Center and take a little quiet walk on the nature trails to hear myself think again. Mitch Robinson is the education manager there. Mitch and I were visiting when he mentioned the plant sale. Mitch says “native plants” are plants that are indigenous to the region and have been here since before European colonization. Insects and birds and deer and such have been feeding off these plants for millennia. So if you want to support the bird population like the Audubon Society does, there needs to be a healthy crop of insects for the birds to eat. And the insects prefer to feed on these native plants that have been around for so long, and not so much on the exotic varieties that have been transplanted here from other parts of the world. I told Mitch my definition of a native plant from a gardener’s point of view would be a plant that’s hard to kill. He agreed. Since these plants have grown here for so long they have adapted to our wet springs, dry summers and sharp cold snaps in the winter. They manage to survive when others don’t. But secretly I also like to drop by Strawberry Plains to poke my head inside the old Davis House on the property. That may seem odd to go to a nature preserve to see an old house. But it was the center of life for the plantation that became the Audubon Center. The Davis House was the only house in the Holly Springs area that was burned by the Union army during the Civil War. The house stayed in that charred condition for a century before it

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The Davis House at Strawberry Plains Audubon Center was burned during the Union occupation of Holly Springs in the Civil War and wasn't restored for a hundred years. Make sure you see it while you are in the area and maybe you will bump into a ghost! Photo: Walt Grayson

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was restored in the 1960s. Its 2-footthick brick walls managed to withstand time and weather and made a very nice skeleton on which to rebuild a beautiful old home. Speaking of skeletons, one of the things that attracts me to the house is that it is supposed to be haunted. I asked Mitch about that and he told me that several people have reported hearing and seeing things in the old home from time to time. He added, however, that he has spent the night there on several occasions and has never had any unusual experiences. I think you have to be susceptible to the idea of ghosts to see them. I’ve tagged Mississippi along on a Seen bunch of ghost hunts with by Walt Grayson ghost hunters and I have never seen a thing. But the ghost hunters never fail to find all sorts of spirits on those same hunts. Maybe I don’t know what to look for. No doubt the Davis house will be open the weekend of the native plant sale at Strawberry Plains. Let me know if you see anything. But if you want to get in touch with your own spirit, hike the quiet walking trails while you are there and listen to yourself think again. And then take home a few of the native plants from the sale. Those plants should be hardy enough not to die on you and become plant ghosts. Walt Grayson is the host of “Mississippi Roads” on Mississippi Public Broadcasting television, and the author of two “Looking Around Mississippi” books and “Oh! That Reminds Me: More Mississippi Homegrown Stories.” Contact Grayson at walt@waltgrayson.com.


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8 I Today in Mississippi I May 2016

natives Come meet the

Continued from page 5

Unlike many other public gardens, the Crosby Arboretum was planned to showcase native rather than exotic plant species. The landscape would be allowed to change in time as its forests matured and weathered storms, fires and pests.

Three cypress trees, for example, remain bowed from Katrina’s winds of 10 years ago. “These are plants being themselves and growing as they do in nature,” Drackett said. “That’s what’s fun to watch.”

Crosby Arboretum employee Terry Johnson, top, builds the bridges and boardwalks and maintains the grounds to keep the site welcoming and safe for visitors. A shady woodland trail, above, follows a small stream before terminating at the pitcher plant bog. Learn more about the arboretum in former director Robert F. Brzuszek’s book “The Crosby Arboretum: A Sustainable Regional Landscape,” left.

The Crosby Arboretum is a popular destination for school field trips and teacher training workshops. In this outdoor classroom, students can witness the evolution of a forest, see pitcher plants trap insects, count turtles and feed the fish. Teachers often tell Drackett their students can’t stop talking about their arboretum visit. “I’ll never forget that

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kid who said, ‘I’m having the best field trip ever,’ and he had just gotten off the bus,” she said. The arboretum offers plenty of ways for individuals to get involved too, including the new Adopt-a-Trail program and a range of memberships. Its busy slate of programs and events—from nature discovery presentations to plant sales to yoga classes—allows visitors of all ages to enjoy learning about nature in nature. The Crosby Arboretum is located at 370 Ridge Road in Picayune. For information, call 601-799-2311 Wednesday through Sunday. Visit the website at crosbyarboretum.msstate.edu for complete details, including upcoming events and a webcam. Admission to the site is $5, with discounts available for seniors, children and members of the military.


May 2016

Bream fishing and the joys of May he time has come. Yes, a Vicksburg were our preferred destinagreat many anglers have tions, specifically Albermarle Lake, but already begun collecting crap- we never missed an opportunity to visit pie and catfish. In fact, less exotic environs, such as the sloughs reports of exceptional crappie catches and eddies and dead rivers along the from those spots where high waters have Pearl. Even the Pearl itself. All afforded pushed out of stream banks and flooded good bream fishing. timber along the edges have been quite Those far-off excursions were all-day common. doings. We loaded cane poles into racks So are notes from those who have attached to the rain gutters on some stretched trot lines and bank hooks in aging Plymouth or Rambler and headed search of catfish. These folks have been west at 2 a.m. Arrival at Albermarle usugathering impressive numbers of blues, ally coincided with sunrise. We hit the channels and even the occasional flatwater in rented cypress boats propelled head. by wooden paddles and bream fished Fishing has been good. But the time with abandon. mentioned in that first sentence deals Somewhere around 9 that same with a diminutive creature that defines morning, we cooked breakfast on a driftfor many, and did so for me from early wood fire: homemade sausage and childhood until now, what spring fishing bacon, eggs fresh from a chicken coop in is all about. That entity is the bream, the backyard, buttered toast made in a whether in bluegill or red ear or long ear skillet. It was purely grand. persuasion. They all fall under the desigBack at home in mid-afternoon, the nation of bream for most anglers. And work began. We pulled big bream the time has definitely come. from the ice chest and set about scalCountry wisdom says that bream ing and cleaning. These were our make their most concentrated effort at favorite fish for the table. They bedding on the first full moon of May. remain the same for me today. That is a rather loose underThe closer-to-home standing of the biology, for fishing was far less water temperature is the ornate. Daddy and I overriding factor. Still, May would go to the river is a logical schedule for such or some slough either activity, and the full moon just before daylight seems to spur this instinct or late in the day. It into a frenzied regimen. was understood that I recall with fondness the these would be short anticipation of this time and sojourns and that we can still feel the pure exhilawould likely catch ration present when we fewer bream than on made our first spring effort those Delta trips. But at catching bream. And yes, we caught bream just by Tony Kinton it was usually in May. the same. And they Bluegills were the target, but were carefully reserved we never turned down a chinquapin (red and prepared for the table as well. ear) or red belly (long ear). And there But regardless of where we went, would also be the odd goggle eye (rock we followed a prescription that lay bass) or the spunky channel cat. All were hard against tradition and simplicity. welcome. Fishing tackle was cane poles equipped This was a family affair for the most with tiny Eagle Claw hooks and goosepart. There were times when Daddy and quill “corks” on a monofilament line. I were the only two along, but more Bait was hand-caught crickets and often a bream trip included Mama and grasshoppers extracted from a wooden my sister. The oxbows north of box with screen sides and overlapping

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Outdoors Today

top flaps of rubber made from a worn inner tube salvaged from a truck or tractor tire. There was also a coffee can filled with rich dirt and the worms that inhabited it. Pedestrian to be sure, but such rigs were pure magic. I admit to an affinity for the flyrod or ultralight nowadays, but the cane pole baited with crickets is near impossible to beat for certain success when bream fishing is on the agenda. So now that May is here, what must you do should you opt to go bream fishing? Do what we did as per outlined above. Find a stream or oxbow or slough or pond. Bream will be in each. Regardless of the technique or equipment employed, bream fishing remains a delightful experience. Photo: Tony Kinton

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Fish from the bank or get a boat. Either will work. Employ a flyrod and popping bug or ultralight and spinnerbait. You can catch bream. Or, should you desire to keep things truly simple, this is especially important if youngsters and/or novice anglers are involved: use a cane pole and crickets. Let these base elements cast their spell and transport you from the mundane into the surreal. It can happen in May where bream are encountered. Tony Kinton has been an active outdoors writer for 30 years. His newest book, “Rambling Through Pleasant Memories,” is now available. Order from Amazon.com or Kinton’s website: www.tonykinton.com.


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Mike Smith, General Manager & CEO Lorri Freeman, APR, Manager of Public Relations Amanda Parker, Public Relations Specialist For more information, call 601-947-4211/228-497-1313 x 2251 or visit our website at www.singingriver.com

Singing River Electric is an equal opportunity employer and provider.

Spring Energy Fairs scheduled in May, June

Mike Smith General Manager and CEO Singing River Electric

Electric cooperatives have a culture of safety. Our employees know when someone tells you “be safe,” it is not just an expression but a call to action. A call to choose to work in the moment and to think safety first. We stress daily and in monthly employee safety meetings how important it is to take the time and extra effort needed to ensure safe work practices. May is electrical safety month, and we encourage our membership to be safe around electricity. One of the safety programs our crews participate

in is Federated Insurance’s Near Miss program, where employees report near miss safety incidents that thankfully did not result in injury or loss. The goal is to learn from the near miss incident and prevent an accident in the future. We also have near misses at home, and these incidents can become teachable moments with our families. Singing River Electric also has a new safety communication campaign beginning this month called: Be aware. Everywhere. Advertising and the website www.beawareeverywhere.com

communicate the importance of considering electrical safety at home with tips to stay safe when working or playing near electricity. There are also tips for how to enjoy the four seasons of safety including severe weather and generator safety tips. So remember to be safe around electricity this month and every month. For more electrical safety information, visit www.singingriver.com and www.beawareeverywhere.com.

www.singingriver.com

“Be Safe” is a call to action

Nick DeAngelo, CEM Manager of Member Services & Facilities deangelo@singingriver.com

Make plans to visit Singing River Electric’s Energy Fairs slated for Tues., May 3 at our Sand Hill office and on Thurs., June 23 in Lucedale. Energy Fair participants will receive one-on-one advice from our trained professionals about many efficiency issues including lighting, home additions, infiltration, insulation, and more. Tips shared at the Gautier Energy Fair held in April included: • Flip the switch on your ceiling fan(s) so blades blow air down to make you feel cooler. • Turn off ceiling fans when you leave the room. • Choose LED light bulbs, which use about 70-90 percent less energy than traditional incandescent bulbs. • Wrap water heaters in a blanket to conserve heat and save on your electric bill. • Caulk and use foam sealant around penetrations to stop infiltration. For more energy efficiency tips, visit singingriver.com and join the conversation on social media including Facebook (Singing River Electric), Twitter (SREPA) and Instagram (Singing River Electric).


May 2016



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Annual Meeting set for June 23 Singing River Electric’s annual membership meeting will be held Thursday, June 23, at the Singing River Electric office located at 11187 Old 63 South in Lucedale. The Energy Fair will begin at 1 p.m., and continue through 6 p.m., with annual meeting registration beginning at 4:30 p.m. The business portion of the annual meeting will begin at 6 p.m. In addition to the pre-meeting Energy Fair, the business session will include the cooperative’s financial, management and board reports, as well as the annual board of directors elections. Singing River Electric has a nine-person board of directors elected from the membership in the three geographic districts. Each district is represented by three directors. Each year, one director from each district is up for election. Nominations for election to the board of directors are made by petition. Interested members must acquire signatures of 25 Singing River Electric members on a form provided by the association. Applicants must complete and return a director candidate packet to the Lucedale office and be certified by the credentials and election committee before being placed on the ballot. The deadline for nomination by petition to be placed on the annual meeting notice was March 31, 2016. This deadline was posted in the February and March issues of Singing River Electric’s 2016 Today in Mississippi publication. This year’s candidates include: District 1 - Ralph Hicks, District 2 - G.A. “Don” Parnell and District 3 - O. Howard Davis. The slate of nominees were approved by members of Singing River Electric serving on the credentials and election committee. According to association bylaws, the candidates’ names were placed in nomination for election to a three-year term, beginning June 23 at the cooperative’s annual meeting. To conduct business at the annual meeting, a quorum of at least 10 percent of the membership is necessary. The quo-

rum is derived by adding the number of members present at the meeting, the valid online votes and the number of valid proxies received. Annual meeting notices and proxies will be mailed on May 17 to all Singing River Electric members. Members will also have the opportunity to vote in director elections online beginning May 17. The deadline for returning proxies and voting online ends on June 17 at close of business. Any member may vote in person at the June 23 meeting, online or by proxy. Each member is entitled to one vote regardless of the number of accounts in the member’s name. A proxy may be assigned to either a member of the current Singing River Electric board of directors or to another association member.

A member can vote up to 200 assigned proxies at any membership meeting. The presence of a member at the meeting, or in the case of a joint membership, the presence of a spouse, shall revoke a proxy. All proxies must be received by Singing River Electric’s Lucedale office by close of business on June 17. Members returning their proxy, voting online, as well as those who attend the meeting, may qualify to win valuable prizes. Those returning their proxy or voting online may qualify to win up to $500 in cash. Those attending the annual meeting will receive an attendance prize and may be eligible for door prizes. For more information, visit www.singingriver.com. Singing River Electric bylaws are available online.

Attendees of this year’s annual membership meeting can take a “selfie” photo with their phones or cameras using gloves and safety equipment in a replica of the buckets that are typically used on a Singing River Electric bucket truck.

Held in conjunction with the annual meeting, the Lucedale Energy Fair will provide members the opportunity to visit five do-it-yourself demonstration stations including: insulation, air filters, weatherstripping, caulking and ceiling fan seasonal use. There will also be a lighting display to see firsthand the difference in the amount of energy used by LED, CFL and traditional or incandescent lighting. Trained professional will be available to give expert efficiency advice and to distribute efficiency brochures and free LED bulbs.

Annual Meeting will be held on Thurs., June 23, 6 p.m.

Return proxy or vote online by June 17 to qualify to win up to $500 in cash! Energy Fair • Thursday, June 23 • 1-6 p.m.


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Annual Meeting Singing River Electric Thursday, June 23 – 6 p.m. 11187 Old 63 South Lucedale

Vote for board members online

Voting begins at 8 am on May 17 and ends at close of business on June 17. You are a member, not just a customer. Your electric cooperative is run by a board of directors made up of members just like you. Nine Singing River Electric members from three geographic areas help run the business, make decisions and work with the CEO and management team to ensure the

cooperative provides the best electric service at the lowest price possible. Three reasons why your co-op membership matters: 1. You have a vote in SRE board elections, 2. You are represented on the board by your neighbors who are SRE members just like you, and 3. You have capital credits

assigned and retired to you. Any member may vote in person at the June 23 meeting, online or by proxy. All SRE members who vote online or return their proxy by end of business on June 17 will be entered into a drawing for one of six $250 cash prizes and one $500 cash prize.

Vote online with a touch of your screen

STEP ONE:

STEP TWO:

STEP THREE:

STEP FOUR:

Have your SRE member ID number and zip code ready. Visit www.singingriver.com or use the SmartHub app on any mobile device.

Read instructions and click “Go To Ballot.”

Read ballot, view candidate biographies, vote for one candidate per district and click “Go To Ballot Confirmation.”

Hit “Submit Ballot” to ensure your vote is cast.

Download the SmartHub app from the iPhone App Store or the Android Marketplace to vote online, report a power outage, check your usage or pay your electric bill easily with the touch of a screen. Search for “SmartHub.” If duplicate apps appear with the same name, National Information Solutions Cooperative

...And you are done!

provides the correct app. Find Singing River Electric by location or name and confirm. Enter the email and password you currently use to pay your Singing River Electric bill online, or select “New User” if you have not already established a password to pay your bill online.


May 2016 I Today in Mississippi I 10c

Spring Energy Fairs More than 135 Jackson County residents participated in Singing River Electric’s spring Energy Fair held at the Gautier location on Fri., April 1. Two additional Energy Fairs are scheduled for Singing River Electric’s Sand Hill office on Tues., May 3, and the Lucedale headquarters office on Thurs., June 23.

What you can learn at our Energy Fairs:

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Five do-it-yourself (DIY) demonstration stations covering efficiency projects including insulation, air filters, weatherstripping, caulking and seasonal ceiling fan use.

2

Interactive lighting display to show firsthand the difference in the amount of energy used by LED, CFL and traditional or incandescent bulbs.

3

Expert advice from trained professionals on how to conserve energy and save money in your home or business. Information will be shared on heat pump rebates and how to build according to our Comfort Advantage or premium Comfort Advantage Plus efficient building programs.

4

Efficiency tips and brochures and access to FREE online and in-person energy audits of your home or business.

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LED bulb, air filter whistle and other efficiency home product giveaways. Also, enter for your chance to win a $50 Lowe’s gift card to get a jump start on your home efficiency projects!

Don’t forget our upcoming Energy Fairs at our Sand Hill and Lucedale offices! Come visit our energy efficiency experts to see how you can save on energy costs in your home.

Remaining SRE 2016 Energy Fair Dates and Locations • Tues., May 3 • Thurs., June 23

SRE Sand Hill Office – 39276 Hwy. 63 N SRE Lucedale Office – 11187 Old 63 S

9 a.m. – 1 p.m. 1 p.m. – 6 p.m.


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Make the most of ceiling fans

Improved rate calculators

By turning on the fan, you can turn up the savings!

Singingriver.com has a great tool that allows you to look at the costs that make up your monthly bill. Participants can change values on the online tool to see how increased kilowatt hours used will increase the total bill. Members can also see how regulatory and power cost adjustments affect their bills. This tool is now functional on all mobile devices.

Like most homeowners or renters in the coastal South, you probably have at least one ceiling fan in your home. Ceiling fans move air across your skin and help you feel cooler and more comfortable in the room. They are a decorative addition to any room, and if used correctly, can help lower energy costs. TIPS FOR MAKING THE MOST OF YOUR CEILING FANS: TURN OFF FAN WHEN YOU LEAVE – Fans make you feel cooler and allow you to feel comfortable in the room. They do use electricity, however, and should be turned off when you are not in the room.

A fan that is 52 inches or more should be used to cool a larger space.

ADJUST YOUR THERMOSTAT – In the summer, when using the ceiling fan along with the air conditioner or heat pump, turn the thermostat up a few degrees. The fan will ensure you still feel comfortable and the higher temperature setting will help lower energy costs.

FLIP THE SWITCH – Most ceiling fans have an energy saver or seasonal switch near the blades. It may be a toggle switch with no label. In the summer, flip the switch so the blades operate and you feel a gentle breeze. In the winter, switch can be changed and the blades will force air up towards the ceiling to help force warmer air down.

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2

CHOOSE THE RIGHT SIZE – Make sure your ceiling fan is the right size for the room. A fan that is 3644 inches in diameter will cool a room up to 225 square feet.

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4

To view rate calculators, simply visit www.singingriver.com and select rate schedules under my bill for either my home or my business. Singing River Electric rates and bills can be explained with just the touch of a screen.

HOW TO CLEAN REFRIGERATOR COILS … and why it matters! Your refrigerator is one of the largest, most-used appliances in your home. It requires only minimal maintenance – just simple cleaning of the condenser coils, which disperse heat. If the coils are covered with dust, gunk or pet hair, they cannot diffuse the heat properly and will not run efficiently. A bigger problem can result if the compressor burns out from having to run constantly because of the grimy coating. This can be an expensive problem. The bottom line? A minor investment in time once a year can save you cold cash down the line. 1. Locate the refrigerator’s coil, a gridlike structure, or fan that will likely have a covering or grate protecting it. The coil is usually concealed behind the front toe kick or in the back. Some newer models have internal coils, so if you don’t find them in the front or back, this may be

the case with your fridge. 2. If the coil is in the back, slide the refrigerator away from the wall, removing the plug from the electrical outlet. You may also need to disconnect the line to the water dispenser or icemaker to allow enough room to work. 3. Gently vacuum and clean the coil. Using the brush or crevice attachment, carefully vacuum the dust and dirt wherever you see it. If you have pulled the fridge out, vacuum and wipe down the sides and back of the fridge and the floor. 4. Once the floor is dry, plug in the refrigerator and rearrange the power cord and supply lines so they don’t get a kink or stuck under the weight of the refrigerator. Slide the refrigerator back into place. Be sure to replace the toe kick panel if this was removed.


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Singing River Electric cares for community

Singing River Electric Serviceman Phillip Moseley and Journeyman Meter Technician Jason Hataway (in left photo) lifted a U.S. flag between bucket trucks to greet cyclists participating in the Ride 2 Recovery event at the American Legion in Gautier, Miss.

Manager of Public Relations Lorri Freeman, Gautier District Manager Brian Hughey, Customer Service Representative III Nikki Stork and General Manager and CEO Mike Smith volunteered at the Household Hazardous Waste Collection in Gautier.

May is Electric Safety Month According to Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI), extension cord misuse and overburdened electrical systems are two of the main causes of home electrical fires. It is important to be aware of these common and preventable hazards, as well as other safety measures you can take to ensure that your home is electrically safe. Take time to consider these and other electrical safety tips from ESFI.org: • Do not plug extension cords into one another. • Do not use appliances or electronics with frayed or damaged cords. • Do not staple cords or extension cords into baseboards or walls. • Keep all extension cords (including outdoor cords) clear of standing water.

SRE Journeyman Linemen Nick Greer and Michael Ethridge discuss how to be safe around power lines with Trent Lott Academy students in Pascagoula.

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What’s the weather going to do? y only husband and I were drinking morning coffee on the enclosed back porch and watching Fox News. I said, “I’m so tired listening to what one candidate says about the other and continues repeating their marvelous qualifications, I could scream!” He was playing with his iPhone. I looked out the windows. “Wow, it’s cloudy. Honey, why don’t you get the chair cushions off the patio.” He responded, “It’s too dangerous. I’ll wait until the lightning quits.” “Lightning? I haven’t heard thunder or noticed any flashes.” He then handed me his iPhone. “Look, it says right here in my latest bulletin that lightning struck a quarter of a mile from our house at 7:40 and that I should stay indoors. Do you want me to get struck?” He then settled back and took another swallow of coffee. He continually checks his phone for the latest weather forecasts and gets all the weather alerts for our area. The weather app on his phone tells him the exact minute the rain will start at our house, lightning warnings, tornado watches and warnings, and of course the exact temperature. He knows more about

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the local weather than TV weathermen knew back in the 1970s and 80s. I don’t have that app; the only alert I want is what day my package will arrive from Amazon. The alert I really dislike is my credit card purchase that pops up on his iPhone. These phones are getting too personal. When I was a teenager I’d check the weather forecast from yesterday’s paper before I got dressed for school. Which was a waste of time. The so-called weathermen back then didn’t have a clue; they checked the weather in Houston, Texas, the day before they predicted our forecast. In researching weather forecasting in the 1940s and 50s, I found that the term “tornado” was never used before the 1950s. Actually, the word was banned from use in a weather forecast since the forecasters couldn’t say with accuracy that conditions were favorable for tornado development. They didn’t want to frighten people unnecessarily. The ban was lifted with the breakthrough in knowledge of the conditions and radar. The slowly moving hurricanes could be tracked, but their exact landfall was still

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back then. Have you ever noticed that when you don’t have anything to say to someone you can always talk about “the weather?” That is, if they aren’t on their cell phone texting, talking or playing a game. I went to my iPhone to check the available app categories. There are 25, and each category has at least the same number of sub-categories. I’m lost in technology, never to be found again. I mentioned earlier that these phones are getting too personal. Mr. Roy has an app that can find me when I’m in Mobile at the doctor’s office, or any place. But it’s none of his business if I change my mind and go shopping while I’m in Mobile! Even if I said I was coming straight home. If I’m a tad late he pulls up his app “Find my car,” or “Find my iPhone.” It’s aggravating when I get home and he asks, “What did you buy at Hobby Lobby?” He can check his “weather” all he wants to, but wives need a little privacy to shop or stop for ice cream without husbands knowing about it. Don’t you agree, ladies?

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May 2016

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Basil varieties produce garden, food options f there is an herb that my wife and I love to grow, it has to be basil. There is nothing better for the hot months because it is gorgeous in any landscape and really delicious for fresh summer meals. Many gardeners only think of this herb as being the sweet Italian basil. For the beginning gardener, that variety is most likely the basil of choice. It is versatile in the kitchen and pretty nonthreatening for the novice. But for experienced gardeners, the world of basil is seemingly endless. There is a wide range of basils to explore for the more adventurous. There are Southern many leaf sizes, Gardening textures and, believe it or not, by Dr. Gary Bachman flowers. Cinnamon, licorice, lemon and lime— you can’t imagine all the different aromas. I start to miss the fresh garden lettuce hamburgers and sandwiches when we get into the summer months. One of my absolute favorite basils has to be the lettuce-leaf variety with its ruffled leaves that are as big as my hand. A single leaf

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adds a new twist to the standard sandwich. Compared to other garden herbs, basil is a tough landscape plant. As a testament, Purple Ruffles was named a Mississippi Medallion winner. The deeppurple leaves are very fragrant. Uses include fresh garnish or color in salads. A variety I like is Dark Opal. This is a beautiful selection that has variable, mottled, dark-purple appearance; no two plants are the same. Dark Opal was an All-America Selection in 1962 and is still a winner. Thai basil varieties like Queenette and the heirloom Cardinal—with their beautiful, bright-green foliage that contrasts with dark-purple stems—have delicious and exotic cinnamon and licorice flavors and aromas. Siam Queen is a Thai basil with beautiful flowers that begin as tight, purple bunches. These make good cuttings when collected as the white flowers start to emerge. The flowers will continue to open in the vase and will stay fresh for at least a week. Basil thrives when grown in raised beds planted in well-drained soil, but the roots need consistent moisture. Water deeply each week and use a good-quality mulch to help conserve soil moisture and keep the soil cooler. We like to grow our basil in subirrigated Earthboxes. Growing in containers is a superb option when you have limited space. Placing

Siam Queen is a Thai basil with purple flowers and a licorice aroma and flavor. Basil is delicious for summer meals and easy to grow. Its variety of shapes and sizes makes the plant an excellent addition to the perennial garden, shrub border or container garden. Photos: Gary Bachman/MSU Extension Service

containers on the porch or patio keeps them near your outdoor living area and makes them handy for fresh summer recipes. Regardless of the variety of basil you want to grow, the plant can be as pretty as a coleus in the flowerbed. Basil is incredibly easy to grow, and the variety of shapes and sizes makes it an excellent addition to the perennial garden, shrub border or container garden. Basil can be tucked into unused garden corners, displayed among vegetables, edged along a flower garden or grown in mixed containers where its handsome foliage contrasts with bouquets of colorful flowers. My wife and I like to enjoy our fresh basil all summer long and miss it once the temperatures start falling in autumn. Here’s a tip for saving the summer har-

vest to use in the winter months: Using a food processor, take your extra basil and combine with olive oil. Place about half a cup in a freezer bag, press the bag out flat, and store it in the freezer. It doesn’t take up much room and can make any recipe extra special. A word of caution is needed here. The garden centers will have the basic basils. To become a basil explorer, you will need to become a basil grower. The catalogs are full of amazing varieties to try. Dr. Gary Bachman is an associate Extension and research professor of horticulture at the Mississippi State University Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi. He is also host of “Southern Gardening” radio and TV programs.


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Fruit Dip mississippi

1 (7-oz.) jar marshmallow creme 1 (8-oz.) pkg. cream cheese, softened 1 tsp. grated orange rind

1 Tbsp. orange juice (or 2 tsp. orange flavoring)

Combine all ingredients and chill at least 4 hours. Use as a dip for various fresh fruits.

RECIPES FROM:

‘Mississippi Church Suppers’ Church cookbooks tend to dominate our “Mississippi Cooks” page because that’s where you’ll find the dishes Mississippians have enjoyed for generations. This tradition of home cooking is showcased in a new cookbook from Great American Publishers, based in Lena. “Mississippi Church Suppers” presents more than 300 recipes collected from 70 Mississippi Baptist churches and profiles of each church with a color photograph and information. The cookbook features the staples of the southern church supper: meat loaf, chicken and dumplings, macaroni and cheese, vegetable casseroles, cobblers, pies and cakes— and variations thereof. Additional recipes reflect more modern culinary trends, some with international inspirations. Color photographs illustrate many of the recipes. “Mississippi Church Suppers” is available in softcover at participating churches and gift shops. Price is $21.95. For more information, call Great American Publishers at 888-854-5954.

Honey and Spiced Glazed Chicken ¼ cup honey 2 garlic cloves, minced 2 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice 2 tsp. Dijon mustard 1 tsp. sweet paprika

¼ tsp. cayenne pepper 4 (10-oz.) bone-in chicken breast halves with skin Salt and freshly ground pepper

Preheat oven to 425 F. In a small bowl, mix honey, garlic, lemon juice, mustard, paprika and cayenne. Put chicken breasts on a rimmed baking sheet. Using a sharp knife, make 2 deep slashes in each chicken breast; season with salt and pepper. Brush most of the honey glaze over chicken. Bake 15 minutes. Brush with remaining honey glaze and bake about 10 minutes longer, or until cooked through. Remove chicken breasts from oven. Preheat to broil. Using a clean brush, brush juices from baking sheet onto chicken and broil about 1 minute, or until skin is crisp. Serve immediately.

Jalapeño Bites 1 (8-oz.) pkg. cream cheese, softened 8 oz. Parmesan cheese, grated 1 large egg, beaten 4 Tbsp. seeded, chopped jalapeño peppers (about 2)

2 to 3 cups plain or seasoned breadcrumbs (or panko)

Preheat oven to 350 F. Combine cream cheese, Parmesan, egg and jalapeños to form a paste. Shape into ¾-inch balls, using about ½ tablespoon for each. Roll balls in breadcrumbs. Place on ungreased baking sheets and bake 10 to 15 minutes, until golden brown. Serve warm. Makes 36 Jalapeño Bites.

Roasted New Potatoes with Herbs ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil 4 to 5 large garlic cloves, crushed 20 new potatoes, halved

1 Tbsp. chopped fresh rosemary 1 ½ Tbsp. chopped fresh thyme Salt and pepper to taste

Combine oil and garlic; set aside for at least 1 hour to allow flavors to blend. Preheat oven to 400 F. Place potatoes in baking dish and sprinkle with rosemary, thyme, salt and pepper. Pour oil and garlic mixture over potatoes and toss well. Roast, stirring occasionally, about 45 minutes or until tender and crusty. Serves 4 to 6.

Blackberry Upside Down Cake 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour 1 ½ tsp. baking powder ¼ tsp. salt 3 ½ Tbsp. unsalted butter, softened and divided ¾ cup sugar

2 large eggs, room temperature 2 tsp. vanilla extract ½ cup milk 1⁄3 cup dark-brown sugar 3 cups blackberries

Preheat oven to 350 F. Whisk together flour, baking powder and salt. In a large bowl, using a mixer, beat 2 tablespoons butter with sugar on high until light and fluffy, about 6 minutes. Beat in eggs and vanilla. With mixer on low, add flour mixture in 2 additions, alternating with milk; beat until combined. In a 10-inch cast-iron skillet, melt remaining butter over medium heat. Add brown sugar and cook, stirring, for 30 seconds. Remove from heat and arrange blackberries evenly in skillet. Pour batter over berries and smooth top. Bake until golden brown and a toothpick inserted in center comes out clean, approximately 35 to 40 minutes, rotating halfway through. Cool in skillet on a wire rack for 5 minutes. Run knife around edge and carefully invert cake onto a serving plate. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Rice Pudding with Cherries 1 cup uncooked long-grain white rice 1 ½ cups milk 1 ½ cups water ½ tsp. salt 1 (14-oz.) can sweetened condensed

milk 2⁄3 cup dried cherries 2 Tbsp. heavy cream 2 Tbsp. vanilla extract Ground nutmeg, for garnish (optional)

Using a double-boiler over lightly simmering water, combine rice, milk, water and salt. Cover and cook until rice is tender. Stir in condensed milk, cherries and heavy cream. Continue to cook, stirring frequently, about 20 minutes or until pudding thickens slightly. Remove from heat and stir in vanilla. Sprinkle with nutmeg when serving, if desired.


CAMP SHELBY

May 2016

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Today in Mississippi

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IS HOME TO A RICH HISTORY

By Nancy Jo Maples Ninety-nine years ago the federal government selected a tract of wooded land south of Hattiesburg as a World War I cantonment that became known as Camp Shelby. “Most people associate Camp Shelby with WWII, but the fact is that Camp Shelby dates back much further in time,” Rita Dianne McCarty, Cultural Resources Program manager at the Camp Shelby Joint Forces Training Center, said. McCarty works under the Environmental Division of the Mississippi National Guard as Scenes from Camp Shelby’s early days show tents that housed soldiers an archeologist to preserve artifacts and details and a few of more than 1,200 buildings constructed for the 136,000-acre camp, located south of Hattiesburg. Photos courtesy of Camp Shelby of Camp Shelby’s history. Shelby is a national training center for guardsmen from all across the U.S. as well as for soldiers from other countries. The “Camp Shelby also had a bakery with 14 ovens. cantonment was established on July 18, 1917, when Four thousand loaves of bread were baked here each Hattiesburg won the bid for a day,” McCarty said. U.S. Army camp. The property Soldiers lived in tents in segwas donated by the J.J. Newman ments of the camp and were Lumber Co. in an agreement that divided by units, including sepathe government purchase lumber rate sites for Japanese soldiers from the Newman company. and another separate site for Construction occurred quickly African-American soldiers. The with the first troops sleeping in tents were so numerous that train cars while structures were Camp Shelby was sometimes built and wells were dug. called “tent city.” Family memElectricity was provided by the bers of officers and medical staff Rita Dianne McCarty works at Camp Shelby to preserve lived at three sites called Squaw Hattiesburg Traction Co. The camp’s location offered easy access artifacts and history. Shown are maps of historic camp Camps. Houses in the Squaw to the Mississippi Central and the sites on the Camp Shelby grounds. Camps were built by the owners; Gulf and Ship Island railroads. the camps had churches and a “For the day and time it was a modern place with fully functional school. electricity and other amenities,” McCarty said. “They were like a mini-town within a town,” More than 4,500 civilian contractors were hired to McCarty said. build the post. An ice-making plant, laundry faciliSoldiers were trained in artillery, cavalry, bayonet ties, hospital, two theaters, four YMCA buildings warfare and other battle techniques. Three professors and a telegraph station were among the 1,206 buildfrom Canada were relocated to Camp Shelby to teach ings constructed. The camp also had a library with soldiers the French language before the soldiers were 10,000 books donated by citizens from Kentucky, deployed to Europe. Indiana and West Virginia—home states of the first “The professors were arrested one night when they troops stationed there. These first troops totaled went into Hattiesburg to see a movie. Police arrested 6,000 National Guardsmen and formed the 38th them as spies and didn’t initially believe their story that Infantry Division. they were working for the military,” McCarty said.

At its height during WWI, Camp Shelby housed 35,000 troops. When WWI ended in November 1918 the camp was converted to serve as convalescing quarters for soldiers returning from battle. The history of Camp Shelby and the artifacts found here are important to McCarty. She is directly involved in any building or excavation project on the property because federal regulations require such projects be cleared regarding historical value. If a site has historical significance or artifacts, McCarty makes sure the historical value is not damaged and that the artifacts are permanently preserved. Trenches are among the significant remnants of the WWI training grounds. Soldiers were taught tactics in building trenches that zigzagged. “The soldiers were drilled in techniques to build trenches so that the enemy could not shoot in a straight line to kill them,” McCarty said. “The trenches are very important and are eligible for listing on the National Register (of Historic Places).” Some of the artifacts discovered at Camp Shelby include dog tags, pottery, helmets and various military gear. All are coded, catalogued and permanently preserved though an arrangement with the Department of Anthropology and Sociology at the University of Southern Mississippi. Some pieces are exhibited at Camp Shelby’s Armed Forces Museum, which is currently under renovation and expected to reopen this summer. McCarty also works with history prior to WWI, including a current antebellum project that includes archeological digs and research about early owners of the Camp Shelby property. Mississippi has two National Guard training sites. The Hattiesburg site is the largest with 136,000 acres. The other, a 29,000-acre site at Grenada, is called Camp McCain. Writer Nancy Jo Maples can be reached at 188 Ernest Pipkins Road, Lucedale, MS 39452 or nancyjomaples@aol.com.


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Marketplace

Today in Mississippi

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May 2016

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Mississippi

Type or print your ad clearly. Be sure to include your telephone number. Deadline is the 10th of each month for the next month’s issue. Rate is $2.50 per word, 10-word minimum. Mail payment with your ad to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Have any questions? Phone 601605-8600 or email advertising@epaofms.com.

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May 2016



Today in Mississippi



17

‘Picture This’ eyes bird life Birds can be a challenge to photograph but patience and skill can produce some stunning images. We invite you to submit your best bird photographs to “Picture This,” our reader photo feature. Submissions must be emailed or postmarked by June 10. Selected photos will appear in the July issue of Today in Mississippi. “Picture This” appears in the January, April, July and October issues of Today in Mississippi. We publish a few of the photos that best illustrate the given theme from among those submitted. Photographers whose photos are selected become eligible for a $200 cash prize, to be awarded in a random drawing in December.

 What you need to know

• Photos must be in sharp focus and relate to the given theme.

• Photos must be accompanied by identifying information: photographer’s name, address, phone and electric power association (if applicable). Include the name(s) of any recognizable people or places in the picture. Feel free to include comments. • Photos must be the original work of an amateur photographer (of any age). • Photos may be either color or black and white, print or digital. • Digital photos should be high-resolution JPG files, at least 1 MB in size. If emailing phone photos, choose the “Actual Size” setting or equivalent before sending. • Please do not use photo-editing software to adjust colors or tones.

• Photos with a date appearing on the image cannot be used. • Prints will be returned if accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. We cannot, however, guarantee their safe return through the mail.

 How to submit photos

Mobile Home Owners: ROOF KING

Prints and digital photos are acceptable. Mail prints or a photo CD to Picture This, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 391583300. Email photos to news@epaofms.com. If submitting more than one photo, please attach all photos to only one email message, if possible. Question? Call Debbie Stringer, editor, at 601-6058610, or email your request to news@epaofms.com.

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Today in Mississippi

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May 2016

Events MISSISSIPPI

Want more than 400,000 readers to know about your special event? Submit it at least two months prior to the event date. Submissions must include a phone number with area code for publication. Mail to Mississippi Events, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300; fax to 601-605-8601; or send to news@epaofms.com. Events open to the public will be published free of charge as space allows. Please note that events are subject to change; we recommend calling to confirm details before traveling.

“The Power of Children: Making a Difference,” through May 25, Greenwood. Stories of Anne Frank, Ruby Bridges, Ryan White. Museum of the Mississippi Delta. Details: 662-453-0925; museumofthemississippidelta.com. Craftsmen’s Guild of Mississippi Spring Showcase, May 7, Ridgeland. Indoor/outdoor show and sale. Free admission. Mississippi Craft Center. Details: 601-8567546; craftsmensguildofms.com. Rummage and Bake Sale, May 7, Brandon. Indoors; 8 a.m.- 2 p.m. Lutheran Nativity Church. Details: 601-825-5125. McComb Train Day, May 14, McComb. Model trains, railroad car/museum tours, entertainment, food; 10 a.m.- 2 p.m. Free admission. McComb Depot and Railroad Museum. Details: trainmaster@mcrrmuseum.com. MayFest, May 14, Olive Branch. 5K run/walk 8 a.m.; festival 9 a.m. Arts, crafts, music, more. Old Towne. Details: 662-893-0888; olivebrancholdtowne.org. Snakes, Snakes, Snakes!, May 14, Picayune. Learn about snakes from “Snake Man” Terry Vandeventer; 10-11 a.m. Admission. Crosby Arboretum. Details: 601-799-2311. 43rd Annual Gospel Singing Jubilee, May 14, Pearl. Featuring Freemans, Tim Frith and Gospel Echoes, Southern Plainsmen, Revelations; 6:30 p.m. Admission. Pearl Community Center. Details: 601-906-0677. Wildlife Photography: Birds, Bugs and Other Wildlife, May 14, Holly Springs. Curt Hart and Allen Sparks to lead workshop; 9 a.m. Registration fee. Strawberry Plains Audubon Center. Details: strawberryplains.audubon.org. Live Oak Arts Festival, May 14, Pascagoula. Music, arts/crafts, local food, kids’ activities, more. Downtown. Details: 228-219-1114. Lakefest, May 14, Lake. Christian music of Finding Favour, 5K run/walk, car/bike show, crafts, more. Free admission. Lake Depot. Details: 601-479-4223. Lower Delta Talks: Building Delta Plantations: Connecting Washington County and Chicot County, Ark., May 17,

Rolling Fork. Blake Wintory to present; 6:30 p.m. Free. Sharkey-Issaquena County Library. Details: 662-873-6261; lowerdelta.org. Olive Branch Genealogy Club, May 18, Olive Branch. Meets every third Wednesday; 12-2 p.m. Free; public welcome. Olive Branch Public Library. Details: 662-895-4365. Magnolia Fest, May 18-21, Horn Lake. Carnival, midway, music, food, more. Free admission. Latimer Lakes Park. Details: 662393-9897; hornlakechamber.com. Alfalfa Hay Production and Equipment Demo, May 19, Newton. Topics include establishment, fertility/harvest management, pests/diseases, more; 9 a.m.- 3:30 p.m. Free. Coastal Plain Branch Experiment Station. Details: 601-683-2084; jlt205@msstate.edu. Native Plant Sale, May 20-21, Holly Springs. Experts to answer questions; 9 a.m.- 4 p.m. Strawberry Plains Audubon Center. Details: 662-252-1155; strawberryplains.audubon.org. Pascagoula Gun Show, May 20-21, Pascagoula. Buy, sell, trade, appraisals. Jackson County Fairgrounds. Details: bigpopgunshows.com. Bluegrass and Gospel Singing by the River, May 21, Chunky. Bluegrass Cartel Band, Tyler Carroll and Pineridge Bluegrass, Rowzees, Southern Grace, Jason Archie Family; begins 11 a.m. Chunky River Recreation and Trading Post. Details: 601-480-3045. Mendenhall in May, May 21, Mendenhall. Arts, crafts, car show, 5K run/walk, BBQ cookoff, kids zone, food, free concert featuring 55 South. Downtown. Details: 601-847-1725, 601-847-2525. Square Affair, May 21, Carthage. Music, garden tractor pulls, kids fishing rodeo, kids zone, art/crafts, car show, 5K run, blues by James SuperChikan Johnson, more. Free admission. McMillan Park. Details: 917-547-8579; carthagemainstre@bellsouth.net. Dixon Day, May 21, Philadelphia. Begins 10 a.m. Lunch served picnic style. Neshoba County Fairgrounds. Details: 601-656-3795. 42nd Annual A’Fair, May 21, Hernando. Arts, crafts, 5K run/walk, food, kids’ activities, music. Hernando Courthouse Square. Details: 662-280-8875; hernandooptimist.org.

Arboretum Habitat Walk: Exploring Native Plants and Their Pollinators, May 21, Picayune. MDWFP botanist Heather Sullivan to lead walk; 10-11 a.m. Admission; register by May 20. Crosby Arboretum. Details: 601-799-2311. Butterfly and Moth Gardening, May 21, Picayune. Dr. Charles Allen to discuss attracting and feeding butterflies and moths; 1-2:30 p.m. Admission; register by May 20. Crosby Arboretum. Details: 601-799-2311. Mini Maker Faire, May 21-22, Meridian. Makers from various fields, from technology to arts, share skills, knowledge; 10 a.m.- 5 p.m. Free admission. Miss. Industrial Heritage Museum. Details: makerfairemeridian.com; Facebook. Downton Abbey English Tea, May 22, Hattiesburg. Benefits Pink Ribbon Fund; 2-4 p.m. Admission. Downtown train depot. Details: 601-450-7465. World Championship Old-Time PianoPlaying Contest and Festival, May 26-30, Oxford. Early 20th century music with competitors from four countries, workshops, concerts by guest artists, sing-along show, more. Admission. University of Mississippi. Details: oldtimepianocontest.org. St. Clare Seafood Festival, May 27-29, Waveland. Music, carnival rides, fireworks show, 5K race, classic car show, more. St. Clare Catholic Church. Details: 228-467-9275; Facebook. Red Hills Festival, May 28, Louisville. Crafts, food, car show, carnival, antiques; 8 a.m.- 4 p.m. Details: 662-773-3921. Living History Event, May 28, Sandy Hook. Civil War reenactors, artillery, antebellum duel, War of 1812 reenactors, more. Historic John Ford House. Details: 601-731-3999. Hill View Arts and Crafts Jubilee, May 28, Greenwood. Vendors; 8 a.m.- 4 p.m. Hillview Baptist Church. Details: hillviewbaptist.net/artsandcraftsjubilee. The Hoppers in Concert, May 28, Moss Point. Gospel music; 6 p.m. Admission. Escatawpa Baptist Church. Details: 228-4752938; thehoppers.com. Hog Wild Barbecue Cook Off and Family Festival, May 28, Brookhaven. 5K walk, vendors, entertainment, food. Railroad Park. Details: 601-757-2826; hogwildfestival.org. Lake Fest, May 28, Eagle Lake. Bands, food, flea market, kids fest, silent auction, door prizes. Free admission. Details: easysite.com/eaglelakematters. Crawfish Music Festival, May 28-29, Olive Branch. Gumbo cookoff, kids’ area, crafts, live music; 4 p.m. - 12 a.m. Admission. Old Towne. Details: southbranchlionsclub@gmail.com. 37th Annual Gem, Mineral, Fossil and Jewelry Show, May 28-29, Biloxi. Exhibits, demonstrations, vendors, educational activi-

ties. Admission. Joppa Shrine Temple. Details: 251-937-3529; gulfportgems.org. Festival South, May 30 - June 18, Hattiesburg. Special events, performances, kids’ activities, more. Headliners include Sandi Patty. Details: 601-329-1104; festivalsouth.org. Creative Craft Camp, throughout June, Ridgeland. For ages 5-18. Admission. Craftsmen’s Guild of Mississippi, Mississippi Craft Center. Details: 601-856-7546; craftsmensguildofms.com. “Peter Pan Jr.,” June 2-5, Laurel. Laurel Little Theatre Kids’ Camp production featuring more than 100 students. Historic Arabian Theatre. Details: 601-428-0140; laurellittletheatre.com. Magnolia State Fiber Festival, June 3-4, Vicksburg. Fiber-art-related vendors, educational demos and workshops. Free admission. Vicksburg Convention Center. Details: msff.net; Facebook: Magnolia State Fiber Festival. Open Car/Truck/Bike Show, June 4, Bay St. Louis. Silent auction, music, raffles, food; 8 a.m.- 3 p.m. Our Lady of the Gulf Catholic Church. Details: 228-344-0358. Give Diabetes the Finger, June 11, Pass Christian. 5K run/walk, 8 a.m.; 1-mile fun run, 8:30 a.m. Gulf Coast Health Educators event. War Memorial Park. Details: 504-344-3331. Juneteenth Family Fun Festival, June 11, Horn Lake. Music, crafts, kids’ zone, teenage talent show, Corvette car show, step show, health fair. Free admission. Latimer Lakes Park. Details: 901-481-3968. Fourth Annual My First String Camp at Carey, June 13-17, Hattiesburg. String instruments camp for grades 1-6; 9 a.m.- 12 p.m. Instrument rental available. Admission; register by June 6. William Carey University. Details: 601-318-6175.

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Today in Mississippi

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Today in Mississippi May 2016 Singing River  

Today in Mississippi May 2016 Singing River

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